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Haener Block

16-Inch Open Faced


Two Block System

August 19, 2003

Contents

Title

Page Number

Haener Block 16-Inch 2-Block System

Calculation of Grout Costs

Calculation of Block Material Costs

The Haener Advantage

Columns

10

Pilasters

12

Brick Ledge using 12 & 8 Blocks

16

Retaining Wall using 12 & 8 Blocks

17

Description of Split Block

18

Base or Footing Blocks

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Haener Block 8x8x16-Inch Open Faced 2-Block System


The U.S. 2-Block system consists of a main block with a
length of 16 inches and a half block with a length of 8
inches.

Figure 1

The combination block may also be made in dimensions of


12x8x16, 8x6x16, 6x8x16, and 6x6x12 inches, with half
blocks of 12x8x8, 8x6x8, 6x8x8, and 6x6x6 inches.
(Note; the 12 inch block requires an insert block near all corners)

For purposes of generating useful data the 2-Block system


will be related to 16 square feet of wall.

Figure 2

Per 16 square feet (ft2) of wall there are 6 x 3 = 18 main


blocks, which are each 16 inches in length.
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The Main Block has three cavities.

Figure 3

It can also be designed with only one cavity to allow for an


insulation insert.

Figure 4

The cavity volume of the main block is 8.59 liters. Every


16 ft2 of wall has a total cavity volume of 154.62 liters.
For retaining walls and most housing configurations the
walls have to be grouted solid. The cost of grout varies
slightly from country to country.

Calculation of Grout Costs


September 2002
The best grout consists of 3 parts sand, 2 parts gravel and
one part cement by volume.
Cost of Sand = $20.00 per m3 x 3 = $60.00
Cost of Gravel = $26.00 per m3 x 2 = $52.00
Cost of Cement = $82.00 per m3 x 1 = $82.00
Total = $194.00/6m3
Total grout cost = $32.33 per m3 or $0.0323 per liter
Therefore, to fully grout 16 ft2 of wall will cost:
154.62 liters x $0.0323 = $4.99 per 16 ft2

Calculation of Block Material Costs

fl 8 inches
16 inches

8 inches

16.68 dm3 = 16.68 total liters for block and cavities


16.68 liters (total)
- 8.59 liters (cavities)
8.09 liters of block material per block
8.09 liters x 18 blocks = 145.62 liters per 16 ft2
8.09 liters x 2.2kg per liter = 17.80 kg per block.
The best block material mixture consists of 8 parts
aggregate and one part cement by volume.
Cost of Aggregate = $23.00 per m3 x 8

= $184.00

Cost of Cement = $82.00 per m3 x 1

= $82.00

Total = $266.00/9m3
Total Block Material Cost = $29.5600 per m3
= $ 0.0295 per liter
Therefore, the Block Materials for 16 ft2 of wall will cost:
145.62 liters x $0.0295 = $4.29 per 16 ft2

The Haener Advantage


The following section will address issues relating to the
current product, its differences from past versions, patent
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protection, the systems flexibility and strengths. The


current version of the Haener 2-Block System has been
optimized for speed, price and versatility.
Haener Blocks can accept insulation, reinforcement, gravel,
or whatever specific needs the region or builders require,
with only limited customization.
The first versions of the Haener Block had four
components: 2 corner blocks, 1 stretcher block and 1 half
block. It was difficult for the customer to determine how
many different blocks were needed for a project. It was also
difficult for the block makers to determine how many of the
various blocks to keep in inventory. There was often
confusion in the delivery of blocks to the building site and
time was wasted waiting for the correct blocks to be
delivered.
The next version had three blocks but this too proved to be
confusing and time consuming. With the current 2-Block
System it is very easy to calculate the number of each block
needed onsite and for the block maker to keep more
appropriate inventories since there are only two different
blocks: a half block and a combination stretcher-corner-end
block.
The next major development in the system was the
inclusion of dovetailed vertical interlocks. The dovetailed
vertical interlocks allow the blocks to self-align. The
exact shape of the interlock was fine tuned through real-

world testing to provide the best shape for both its function
and for production.
The latest development of the system was to move the
vertical interlocking columns to one side, leaving room for
insulation, a drying cavity, or other various options.
The patent for the Haener 2-Block System is very strong. It
so thoroughly describes the blocks and their specific
features that it is virtually impossible for a similar product
to exist without infringing on the Haener Patent.
There are very few structures where the Haener Two Block
System cannot be used in place of standard concrete block.
One such structure, however, is a round configuration with
a small radius bend, such as a flowerbed. In this situation a
standard concrete block can simply be cut to fit the desired
radius, but the Haener Block if cut might fail to interlock.
In general, construction plans are drawn up in the local
dimension, whether in Imperial or Metric Units. The widths
of the openings in the walls need to be measured in terms
of half blocks (8 inches) and the heights of the openings
need to be measured in terms of the block height (8 inches).
However, the blocks were designed to allow for small
alignment movements of up to 1/2 inch. For instance, if a
retaining wall spans a 30-foot space and it comes out 1-inch
too short, the last eight blocks can be pulled out 1/8th-inch
each to make up the error. It will always be a case of
expanding the wall since the blocks were designed to be
1/16th-inch undersized. If even more exact tolerances are
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needed, a simple measuring device can be used. This


measuring device consists of a 1 x 2 x 6 piece of lathing
that has a nail driven in every 16-inches. See Figure 5.

Figure 5

This device provides the starting points for each block and
only needs to be used on the first layer. Each subsequent
layer receives its orientation from the preceding one. In
mass production, the alignment, without much attention,
comes out relatively exact. The frames, either made on the
building site or prefabricated, generally allow some room
for further alignment in the space that is left to seal the
interface. Most frames are similar to the ones shown in
Figures 6 and 7.

Figure 6

Figure 7
Sealer Space

The Haener Blocks have also been designed so that they will
interlock when packed for storage or transportation. This
feature is true for both the half block and the combination
block. The blocks interlock for packing in a denser
orientation than when in the wall. See Figures 8 and 9.

Figure 8

Side View

Figure 9

Top View

Once interlocked the blocks will not slip and therefore the
breakage during transportation and storage is reduced to
nearly zero. The blocks can be packed on a pallet, have
shrink nylon applied and then stored in the factory without
the risk of becoming dirty or old looking. The pallets
generally hold between 80 and 100 blocks.

16-Inch Column
The following figures demonstrate how a 16-inch square
column can be formed by simply rotating four Half Blocks
90 from layer to layer. This feature is yet another
advantage of the proposed two-block system.
Figure 10

Figure 11

Rotation of four
half blocks 90

Figure 12

Top view of the interlocking blocks

Extremely strong and sturdy


16-inch square column

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24-Inch Column
The following figures demonstrate how a 24-inch square
column can be formed by alternating four Combination
Blocks from layer to layer. The ability to generate
extremely rigid columns is another feature of the proposed
two-block system.
Figure 13

Figure 14

Alternating geometries
of four combination blocks

Figure 15

Top view of the


Interlocking blocks
Extremely strong and sturdy
24-inch square column
11

Fortified Wall with 24-inch Pilasters


and Footer Block
Interconnection
with Wall
8-inch Wall

Figure 16

24-inch Square Pilaster


Footer Block

A wall made with the Haener Block Two Block system


can be fortified with interlocking pilasters of various sizes.
These pilasters fortify the wall locally and increase its
bending strength and rigidity several times for protection
from earthquakes and hurricanes.
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The 24-inch Pilaster interlocks between each layer and with


the wall. This extra degree of interlocking allows for faster,
more secure construction of the structure. Four differently
oriented layers allow
the 24-inch Pilaster to
fully interconnect with
the wall. The
arrangement of the four
repeating layers, along
with the footing layer,
can be seen in the
following figure.

Block Layer 4

Block Layer 3

Block Layer 2

Block Layer 1

Footer Block Layer


Figure17

13

Fortified Wall with 32-inch Pilasters


and Footer Block.
Interconnection
with Wall
8-inch Wall

Figure 18

32-inch x 24-inch Pilaster


Footer Block

A wall made with the Haener Block Two Block system


can be fortified with interlocking pilasters of various sizes.
These pilasters fortify the wall locally and increase its
bending strength and rigidity several times for protection
from earthquakes and hurricanes.
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The unique design of the Haener Block allows for the 32inch Pilaster to not only interlock with the wall but also
between each layer. This extra degree of interlocking
allows for faster, more secure construction of the wall.
Three differently
oriented layers allow the
32-inch Pilaster to be
fully interconnected.
The arrangement of the
three repeating layers,
along with the footing
layer, can be seen in the
following figure.

Same as Layer 2

Block Layer 3

Block Layer 2

Block Layer 1

Footer Block Layer

Figure 19
15

12-inch Wide Base Blocks Used


to Provide a Brick Ledge

8-inch Wide Blocks

12-inch Wide Blocks

Figure 20

4-inch Step allows for the easy


addition of decorative brickwork

Figure 21

All layers fully interlock

Figure 22

16

12-inch Wide Base Blocks Used


in a Retaining Wall

8-inch Wide Blocks


12-inch Wide Blocks

Figure 23

4-inch Step Facing


Material Being Retained
Figure 24

Figure 25

All layers fully interlock

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Description of the Ornamental Split Block and its


use as a Base or Footing Block before Splitting
The Haener Block Two-Block System is able to
incorporate split blocks into its design. This allows houses,
retaining walls and free standing walls to have a beautiful
and artistic relief. The split block has a directional
characteristic that differentiates it somewhat from the
standard flat plate blocks: one face is split and the other is
flat. Walls can be built entirely out of split blocks or can be
combined artistically with the flat plate blocks.
In order to produce an inexpensive block that not only has a
beautiful relief but is also able to interlock, a mold
producing a double block is required. This mold, when
split, as in Figure 26, generates two directionally different
blocks.

Split
Figure 26

These two blocks will be referred to as Blocks A and B


from this point on and are illustrated in Figure 27 on the
following page.

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Note that Block A has its split face to the left of its open
face, where as Block B has its split face to the right of its
open face.

Block A
Split

Block B
Figure 27

Figure 28 illustrates that the unsplit double block can


form an interlocking base block for a house.
Note: Dark face symbolizes Split face.

Inside of House

B Blocks

Outside of House
Double Blocks

Figure 28

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Figure 29 shows how floorboards can be set atop the base


blocks when building houses.
Outside of House

Inside of House
fl B Blocks

Floor Boards
Double Blocks

Figure 29

Figure 30 is a wall cross-section showing that the step is


always opposite to the split face of the wall.

fl A Blocks

Split Face

Step

fl Double Blocks

Figure 30

20

Figure 31 illustrates a retaining wall where the interlocking


footing block is the unsplit double block. Again, the split
face of the wall is always facing outward, with the step of
the wall facing the material being retained.
Note: Dark face symbolizes Split face.

A Blocks

This side faces the

retained material
This side faces
outward
fl Double Blocks
Figure 31

Figure 32 shows the design of a retaining wall or fence


where the split face can be on either face of the wall. A
house wall can use non-split or smooth walls on both faces
as well.

Figure 32

21

There is no special knowledge needed by the workers


building the wall. They need only to follow directions.
It is not necessary to know in advance how many blocks
are needed in any certain part of a house. The production of
double blocks can be higher than needed, and the excess
can be kept in inventory. When single blocks are needed
they can be generated using the splitter machine only.
These single blocks can be produced without starting the
block machine and the complete plant, mixer, curing
chambers, etc. Starting the block plant is always the most
expensive phase because almost every plant worker has to
be there. Only one has to be present to operate the splitter
machine. Therefore, if some blocks are numerically under
calculated, others can be immediately split on short call.
Additionally we have the mold available that makes flat
face blocks with no relief surface.

22

Housing Blocks
Half Blocks and Rebar are not shown.

Inside of House

Outside of House

Figure 33
Note: Dark face symbolizes Split face.

23

Retaining Wall Blocks


Half Blocks and Rebar are not shown.

This side faces


the Mountain

This side faces outward

Figure 34
Note: Dark face symbolizes Split face.

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