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THE

NEWSPAPER

FOR

SOUTHERN

SPAIN

THE NEWSPAPER FOR SOUTHERN SPAIN FREE COPY OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 Nº1263 inEnglish www.surinenglish.com Antonio

FREE COPY OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 Nº1263

inEnglish

www.surinenglish.com

17TH TO 23RD 2008 Nº1263 inEnglish www.surinenglish.com Antonio Banderas gets Fine Arts gold merit award King
17TH TO 23RD 2008 Nº1263 inEnglish www.surinenglish.com Antonio Banderas gets Fine Arts gold merit award King
17TH TO 23RD 2008 Nº1263 inEnglish www.surinenglish.com Antonio Banderas gets Fine Arts gold merit award King
17TH TO 23RD 2008 Nº1263 inEnglish www.surinenglish.com Antonio Banderas gets Fine Arts gold merit award King

Antonio Banderas gets Fine Arts gold merit award

Antonio Banderas gets Fine Arts gold merit award King Juan Carlos also presented Alicia Alonso with
Antonio Banderas gets Fine Arts gold merit award King Juan Carlos also presented Alicia Alonso with

King Juan Carlos also presented Alicia Alonso with a medal

The Spanish actor Antonio Ban- deras and Cuban dancer and chore- ographer Alicia Alonso were two of 18 people who received Spain’s Fine Arts Gold Medal of Merit this week from King Juan Carlos. One of the most moving moments in the ceremony came when the king went up to Alonso, who has difficulty moving, and placed the medal around her neck. As spokesman, Banderas said the winners accepted their medals with “open hearts, clear minds and souls full of gratitude,” and that they would continue to “help build a place of freedom called Spain.” He told the audience, which included his wife, actress Melanie Griffith, that artists must banish vanity and self-indulgence. The medals, said the king, were given “in recogni- tion of their valuable work and careers, which earn our admira- tion, encourage our sensibilities and stimulate our intelligence.”

GOLD MEDAL. Banderas is applauded by the king and queen. / EFE
GOLD MEDAL. Banderas is applauded by the king and queen. / EFE
MEDAL. Banderas is applauded by the king and queen. / EFE Progress on motorway By 2010
MEDAL. Banderas is applauded by the king and queen. / EFE Progress on motorway By 2010
MEDAL. Banderas is applauded by the king and queen. / EFE Progress on motorway By 2010
MEDAL. Banderas is applauded by the king and queen. / EFE Progress on motorway By 2010
MEDAL. Banderas is applauded by the king and queen. / EFE Progress on motorway By 2010

Progress on motorway

By 2010 the Las Pedrizasroadwill be open

PAGE 2

on motorway By 2010 the Las Pedrizasroadwill be open PAGE 2 SUR in English Cudeca appeal

SUR in English Cudeca appeal

Readersmakinga donation to theappeal canwinafantastic prize

PAGE 22

inside

GENERAL NEWS 2

HERE & THERE

34

LEARN SPANISH 4

37

LEGAL

6

SPORT

38

OPINION

20

CLASSIFIED

41

COSTA

22

CONTACTS

61

HEALTH

26

ASSOCIATIONS 62

WHAT’S ON

30

63

20 CLASSIFIED 41 COSTA 22 CONTACTS 61 HEALTH 26 ASSOCIATIONS 62 WHAT’S ON 30 63
20 CLASSIFIED 41 COSTA 22 CONTACTS 61 HEALTH 26 ASSOCIATIONS 62 WHAT’S ON 30 63
20 CLASSIFIED 41 COSTA 22 CONTACTS 61 HEALTH 26 ASSOCIATIONS 62 WHAT’S ON 30 63
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2

General news

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

surinenglish.su@diariosur.es

I N E N G L I S H surinenglish.su@diariosur.es VIADUCT. The bridge in the picture

VIADUCT. The bridge in the picture is ready for the road segments to be created using a cast-in-situ method with the help of moveable scaffolding system. / YOLANDA MONTIEL

The fast road that will eventually link Las Pedrizas with the city of Malaga is already well on its way, aiming for the 2010 deadline. The journey will be more like flying than driving

The toll motorway takes off

IGNACIO LILLO

As you turn off along a dirt track from the MA-3101 near Casaber- meja the presence of heavy machinery warns that something big is going on, but nothing quite prepares you for what is around the corner. The huge viaduct, 75 metres high and 300 metres long, looms high above us, ready to carry vehi- cles practically through the air towards Malaga from December 31st 2009. Work started on the Las Pedrizas toll motorway (the future AP-46) on February 18th this year, and despite is complexity, the pro- ject is already 40 per cent complete, after just eight months. At the beginning of next year the level- ling of land will have finished and the project will have reached its halfway point. The terrain is so mountainous that the new road, which stretch- es for just 24.5 kilometres, has 17 viaducts and three tunnels, the longest being 1,350 metres. Driving along the route will almost be like flying in a straight line over a suc- cession of bridges and through tun- nels, from the point known as Alto de Las Pedrizas to Puerto de la Torre where it will join the city’s outer ring road. The ambitious project involves a workforce of a thousand and more than 200 heavy vehicles, all working against the clock.

The scene before us is known by the engineers as viaduct 13. The technicians are currently busy preparing the moveable scaffold- ing system (MSS) that will be used to create the road itself that will rest on the giant pillars. This is the first of seven viaducts to be built using this “cast-in-situ” system:

the metallic scaffolding structure is clamped between two pillars and an empty cage placed on top. This is filled with concrete and, once this has set, the system moves on to the next pillar. This viaduct should be complete between December and January. The other ten bridges will be built with prefabricated road sec- tions. The processing plant for these sections has been set up near Puerto de la Torre and this will also be used for the stretch of the outer ring road that the AP-46 joins. Funnily enough the first vehicles to use the new road will be the lorries carrying the bridge sections that will complete the stretch. However viaduct 13 is not the only bridge that has already start- ed to rise out of the ground, the largest of the others being 600 metres long and 90 high. The mag- nitude of the operation is present on all sides. Here 700 tonne cranes are being used while the ones we see on normal building sites are just 40 tonne machines. From another spot the idea that drivers will be flying along the

another spot the idea that drivers will be flying along the TUNNEL. Seven kilometres a day

TUNNEL. Seven kilometres a day are blasted away. / Y. MONTIEL

road is even clearer: one bridge reaches a small flat hill top where the road continues for no more than 50 metres on land before another bridge stretches out. The levelling of land is being done with the help of blasting work, like the tunnels. On a stretch of just 300 metres a million tonnes of soil have been moved. Along the entire road some 12 million cubic metres of soil will be moved but this will all be used to fill in where more height is necessary. Drainage and fauna passage work is already complete. At another spot we find our- selves face to face with two great black tunnel mouths. So far at the tunnel at kilometre 11, the longest of the three, some 300 metres have been dug out. The excavation advances at a rate of around sev-

en metres a day although this will soon double when machines start working at both ends at the same time. This tunnel is expected to be finished by April next year. Once the path of the road has been cut out the embankments are being replanted with native species of vegetation. Around 1,200 trees that were growing in the path of the new road, such as olives, holm oaks and carob trees, have been transplanted in other locations. At the start of 2010 between 16,000 and 23,000 vehicles will be using this new road every day. They will play 1.80 euros for the privilege, or 2.50 in the summer and during Holy Week: a small price to pay to fly from Las Pedrizas to Malaga, leaving the tailbacks and dangerous bends on the A-45 way behind.

AP- XXX 46 STATISTICS

F

Structure: The new road covers 24.5 kilometres, although the major- ity of this involves complex struc- tures including 17 bridges and three tunnels. All the stretches are under construction.

F

Viaducts: Their height ranges between 50 and 90 metres and length from 300 to 750 metres. Some have three lanes when there is a steep incline.

F

Tunnels: Located at kilometre 7, 11 and 21. The longest is at km 11, stretching for 1,300 metres.

F

Progress: Work started on Febru- ary 18th and the road is already 40 per cent complete. The halfway point should be reached in February next year.

F

Builders: The road is being built by Sacyr and will be managed by the firm’s subsidiary Itínere.

F

Resources: One thousand workers and more than 200 heavy vehicles.

F

Cost of project: 322 million euros.

F

Eventual journey time: 15 minutes.

F

Toll fee: For cars 1.8 euros and 2.5 euros during peak holiday periods. There will be no toll for cars between midnight and 6 a.m. or for heavy goods vehicles between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.

F

Speed: The speed limit along 90 per cent of the road will be 120 km per hour.

F

Services: There will be two petrol stations, one on each side of the road near the point where the new road breaks away from the A-45.

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

GENERAL NEWS 14

Investigating judge brings charges in the Spanair crash case

judge brings charges in the Spanair crash case Fuel reaches Tarifa beaches after two vessels run

Fuel reaches Tarifa beaches after two vessels run around in storms in Strait

The “Fedra” crashed into cliffs at Europa Point and the “Tawe” ran aground at Punta de San García

SUR / AGENCIES ALGECIRAS

Stormy weather, rough seas, ships in difficulty, fuel leaks and political squabbles. It happened with the “New Flame” and now it’s happened again with the “Fedra”, the Liberian registered cargo ship that ran aground at Europa Point, Gibraltar, last Fri- day night. First came the rescue operation, when Spanish and Gibratarian maritime services collaborated to lift the 31 crew members to safety. The option of towing the 35,000 tonne vessel

from the area became an impos- sibility when the Fedra split in two on Saturday morning. Meanwhile another vessel, also registered in Liberia, the “Tawe”, ran aground in the early hours of Saturday morning near Punta San García in Algeciras. It didn’t take long for the authorities and environmental- ists to express their fears that fuel leaking from the two distressed vessels could pollute the area. The “Tawe”, whose crew chose to remain on board, reported a crack in one of its fuel tanks and the

CREDIT CRUNCH 17

Clients offered incentives as takings drop in the adult nightclubs

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CULTURE 63

Local author is top in a new anthology of short stories

63 Local author is top in a new anthology of short stories FEDRA. The vessel split

FEDRA. The vessel split in two near Europa Point on Saturday morning. / EFE

consequent spill was reported to have stretched over 400 metres. This was light diesel fuel and would evaporate before it reached the shore, said the experts, while the extraction of the rest of the fuel from the “Tawe” was sched- uled to start next week. The “Fedra” had also lost some of its fuel, an estimated 150 tonnes, and by Monday small globules of oil had started to appear on beaches in the Tarifa area. By Tuesday workers had

removed some ten cubic metres of waste from the sand. On Monday fishing vessesl from Algeciras and Tarifa were forced to return to port by the fuel contamination in the water. They staged a peaceful protest at Alge- ciras harbour mouth, but did not block the way of other vessels. On Sunday the Gibraltar Police arrested the captain and two offi- cers from the “Fedra” under sus- picion of having violated port reg- ulations. They were released on

bail. Environmentalists have accused Gibraltar and Algeciras port of negligence while the Jun- ta de Andalucía has promised to take the owners of the “Fedra” to court for the damages caused. The regional government also regret- ted that there wasn’t a greater lev- el of collaboration between the Spanish and Gibraltarian author- ities. Meanwhile the Partido Pop- ular criticised the actions of all the Socialist authorities.

and Gibraltarian author- ities. Meanwhile the Partido Pop- ular criticised the actions of all the Socialist
and Gibraltarian author- ities. Meanwhile the Partido Pop- ular criticised the actions of all the Socialist
and Gibraltarian author- ities. Meanwhile the Partido Pop- ular criticised the actions of all the Socialist
and Gibraltarian author- ities. Meanwhile the Partido Pop- ular criticised the actions of all the Socialist
and Gibraltarian author- ities. Meanwhile the Partido Pop- ular criticised the actions of all the Socialist
and Gibraltarian author- ities. Meanwhile the Partido Pop- ular criticised the actions of all the Socialist
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GENERAL NEWS

4 G E N E R A L N E W S OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CUSTOMS BY LIZ PARRY
SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CUSTOMS
BY LIZ PARRY

Spain beats all the records

T he Guinness Book of

Records was, apparently,

aimed originally at

British pubs so that drinkers could settle their disputes over

who held whatever record they were arguing about, but the Spanish certainly took it to heart and you can often hear them talk about who holds “el Guinness” for various feats,

ranging from making the biggest paella to living longer than anyone else on the planet. Now, Spain itself holds “el Guinness” for being the state which holds the most of the cov- eted “Guinness”. (They never say “Guinnesses” but they do use the word as a noun to signi- fy records recorded in the Guinness Book of Records )

signi- fy records recorded in the Guinness Book of Records ) Svetlana es rusa pero vive

Svetlana es rusa pero vive en España = Svetlana is Russian but lives in Spain

Not all of the record holders set out to achieve fame through the pages of the Book - presumably Svetlana’s legs just happen to be the longest ever recorded, and Rafael Nadal would have won 60 consecutive matches on clay courts even without the incen- tive of getting his name in it. Gisela Pulido, aged 10, took part in the World Kitesurfing Championships and got into the Book as the youngest ever win- ner, and Jorge Elich, aged 8, fig- ures as the youngest lion tamer on the planet. Then there is Jesús Gil Gibernau, who has the biggest collection (3,000) of those Spanish drinking vessels with spouts, known as “boti- jos”, and Sandra Guerrero who can tapdance faster than any- one (898 taps per minute). The biggest “mus” tournament (512 pairs of players) took place in Móstoles, and of course, the record for the largest quantity of gazpacho ever made for one sitting, at 4,520 litres, is held in Spain - by the people of Campohermoso, in the province of Almeria.

USEFUL VOCABULARY F Tiene el récord F He/she/it holds the record F Tenemos el Guinness
USEFUL VOCABULARY
F
Tiene el récord
F
He/she/it holds the record
F
Tenemos el Guinness de la paella más grande
F
We hold the Guinness record for the biggest paella
F
No tiene el Guinness, pero es la mujer más vieja del
mundo
F
She doesn’t hold the record, but she is the oldest woman
in the world
F
El hombre más pequeño del mundo
F
The smallest man in the world
F
La mujer con las piernas más largas
F
The woman with the longest legs
F
El domador de leones más joven del planeta
F
The youngest lion tamer on the planet
F
La colección más grande de sellos
F
The biggest collection of stamps
F
El mayor torneo de ajedrez
F
The biggest chess tournament
F
Ayuda a resolver discusiones
F
It helps settle arguments
F
Nadal ganó 60 (sesenta) partidos consecutivos
F
Nadal won 60 matches running
F
El libro recoge miles de hazañas
F
The book is a collection of thousands of feats
F
España tiene el mayor telescopio del mundo comple-
tamente robotizado
F
Spain has the biggest completely robotic telescope in
the world
F
Una española es capaz de taconear 898 (ochocientas
noventa y ocho) veces por minuto
F
A Spanish woman is capable of stamping her heels 898
times a minute
More Spanish language and customs on hhttp://services.surinenglish.com/spanish-language/
LANGUAGE CROSSWORD
LANGUAGE CROSSWORD

Fill in the Spanish words

LANGUAGE CROSSWORD Fill in the Spanish words Across Down Answers at the bottom of this page

Across

LANGUAGE CROSSWORD Fill in the Spanish words Across Down Answers at the bottom of this page

Down

LANGUAGE CROSSWORD Fill in the Spanish words Across Down Answers at the bottom of this page

Answers at the bottom of this page

ENVIRONMENTAL TIP N.º 2
ENVIRONMENTAL TIP N.º 2
Answers at the bottom of this page ENVIRONMENTAL TIP N.º 2 Buy products with the least

Buy products with the least amount of packaging

Santander to complete purchase of Sovereign for 1.4 billion euros

The Spanish giant already holds more than 24 per cent of the U.S. bank

EFE

Banco Santander S.A. has said it will complete, in the first quarter of 2009, its purchase of U.S. thrift Sovereign Bancorp Inc., paying $1.9 billion (1.4 billion euros) in shares for 76.65 per cent of the Philadelphia-based institution. Santander, Spain's biggest bank and one of the ten largest in the world, already holds more than 24 per cent of the U.S. bank. The Spanish giant plans to con- vene an extraordinary share- holders’ meeting to secure approval for the issuance of 147 million new shares, equal to 2 per

for the issuance of 147 million new shares, equal to 2 per CASH POINT. In Philadelphia

CASH POINT. In Philadelphia

cent of the firm's existing capital. Santander said in a statement that the deal “meets the criteria for

acquisitions, both strategically, significantly improving the Group's geographical diversifi- cation, and economically,” as the Spanish bank expects Sovereign to earn a net profit of $750 million by 2011. The purchase is subject to approval from bank regulators in the United States and Spain, as well as to endorsement by the shareholders of both companies. Sovereign's shares fell 3.41 per- cent Monday on the New York Stock Exchange, ending the trad- ing day at $3.68, while Santander soared 12.35 per cent on the Madrid stock market.

Buy in bulk and transfer into your own reusable containers. Avoid buying single use items e.g. drinks, cat/dog food, school lunches, etc. Use an aluminum container for water/juice for your child's lunch box. Forum have a very good selection. Plastic bottles when they become hot, for example in the car, release chemicals that may be harmful to your child. Use filtered tap water for all your drinking and cooking. Charcoal jug filters are widely available and mean you do not have to lug all those heavy plas-

tic bottles home from the super- market. Just accept one straw or sachet of tomato sauce when eating out. Buy your ice cream in a cone not a cup. Try to buy your fruit and veg- etables loose, although this is getting more and more difficult. If we only buy loose fruit and vegetables then this is how the supermarkets will stock them. Don't forget - consumer power is a very strong force.

, Brought to you by Marion Howland. www.aura-roboclean.co.uk

SOLUTION LANGUAGE CROSSWORD
SOLUTION LANGUAGE CROSSWORD
power is a very strong force. , Brought to you by Marion Howland. www.aura-roboclean.co.uk SOLUTION LANGUAGE

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 G

GENERAL NEWS

5
5

UPDATE

Vélez motion

VELEZ-MÁLAGA. Councillors handed in their vote of no confidence on Tuesday. / EVA GUZMÁN

VELEZ-MÁLAGA. Councillors handed in their vote of no confidence on Tuesday. / EVA GUZMÁN

Fall in numbers

After Monday night’s negotia- tions, Tuesday morning saw the PSOE, IU and GIPMTM (Torre del Mar independence party) present their vote of no confi- dence in the Mayor of Vélez- Málaga, Francisco Delgado (PP). The motion has been signed by 13 of the 25 local councillors. nine from the PSOE, two from Izquierda Unida and two from GIPMTM. The third Torre del Mar independence party coun- cillor, José Luis Sánchez Toré, has been left out of the agree- ment and will not form part of the proposed new local govern- ment in compliance with a con- dition laid down by the IU. Once the mayor has been ousted the groups have agreed that Torre del Mar will have its own bud- get and more independence. It is expected that the no confi- dence vote will take place on October 25th. Meanwhile, on tuesday Delgado had not given up hope. He still had ten days to convince the GIPMTM to rethink their agreement with the groups and to join forces with his government.

For the first time in eight years Malaga airport has seen a fall in the number of flights and pas- sengers. Figures released by Aena, the national airport authority, the first nine months of this year show a drop of 3.6% in passengers and 5.4% in flights. September itself, although still showing high fig- ures, was 10% down on previ- ous years. Even so, some 10.3 million passengers travelled through the airport on 95,533 flights. Aena pointed out that some domestic flights had been affected by the introduction of the AVE high speed train ser- vice, with airlines reorganising some of their domestic routes. Similar fluctuations have occurred before and are usual- ly of short duration as the mar-

 

ket steadies and levels out again.

New Bishop

to the shooting of a British man in Puerto Banús on September 24th for which four other Britons have been arrested. It appears that the group, who were involved in drug related activities, had become con- cerned about the activities of the victim, who was known to be violent and had been speak- ing out of turn. A plot was hatched in the bar belonging to one of the detained men to deal with the problem, which result- ed in the victim being shot five times. He survived after twice undergoing major surgery. This means that two of the three recent shootings in the Mar- bella area have been resolved.

Toll road usage

of toll roads in the country. This, and the changed dates of Ramadan, saw a 14% reduction in traffic on the Autopistas dur- ing September. The most affect- ed was the toll road from Mala- ga to Estepona.

Partial freedom

The Pope has confirmed the appointment of Jesús Esteban Catalá Ibáñez who is currently bishop of Alcalá de Henares, as the new Bishop of Malaga and Melilla. He will replace the 75 year old Antonio Dorado Soto, who is retiring after holding the post since 1993. The new Bish- op, who was born in Valencia, said that he was very pleased to be coming to Malaga and looked forward to getting to know the people and the churches. Dora- do Soto has been appointed as church administrator during the period of around two months until the new Bishop arrives.

Wrong sort of rain

This time it worked! The very heavy rainfall at the start of the week has finally led to a signif- icant increase in the levels in the reservoirs of the area, par- ticularly those that serve Mala- ga. At the height of the storms some 72 litres per square metre fell in the Guadalhorce valley and Antequera areas. The increase in just those few days is the equivalent of three weeks supply for Malaga. However, some experts believe that, although the recent rains are a good sign, this sort of localised, heavy rainfall is not the best for filling the reservoirs. Mean- while beaches in Malaga, Tor- rox and Fuengirola took the worst battering during the storms.

Fight to save jobs

The 51 workers whose jobs are threatened by the closure of the Clínica Salus in Benalmádena met with representatives of the management on Monday. The workers say that the closure is the “easy option” and that, with proper management, the clinic is viable and the proposed clo- sure would not be necessary. Staff cuts could still be made through natural wastage and voluntary redundancies, there- by reducing the costs and num- bers affected.

The status of Julián Muñoz, the ex mayor of Marbella current- ly serving his sentence in Alhaurín prison, has been down graded to category three. This gives a number of options which will afford him greater freedom, such as spending nights at home, not being in prison everyday or, the most likely, an open prison with weekend privileges. There are still a a large number of cases open against the former may- or, including charges of falsi- fying documents and fraud.

Clarification

The Policía National have clar- ified some of the facts relating

It would seem that the current economic problems are leading motorists to reduce their usage

economic problems are leading motorists to reduce their usage in English WE MAKE YOUR BUSINESS WORK
economic problems are leading motorists to reduce their usage in English WE MAKE YOUR BUSINESS WORK
economic problems are leading motorists to reduce their usage in English WE MAKE YOUR BUSINESS WORK
economic problems are leading motorists to reduce their usage in English WE MAKE YOUR BUSINESS WORK

in EnglishWE MAKE YOUR BUSINESS WORK Tel. 95 264 96 69

WE MAKE YOUR BUSINESS WORK

Tel. 95 264 96 69

economic problems are leading motorists to reduce their usage in English WE MAKE YOUR BUSINESS WORK
economic problems are leading motorists to reduce their usage in English WE MAKE YOUR BUSINESS WORK
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GENERAL NEWS

6 G E N E R A L N E W S OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

 

LEGAL AFFAIRS

TANÍA MORÓN

 

Licences applicable to shopping centres in Andalucía

additional administrative requirements relating to the intended commercial activity. The approval or refusal of an application for this type of licence will depend princi- pally on the existence or oth-

in line with the current sit- uation and expected trend of development and modern- ization of retail outlets. In any event the regional Administration will also take into consideration the find- ings contained in the report issued by the Tribunal for the Defence of Unfair Com- petition which is a compul- sory requirement although not legally binding. This report will assess the effect that the new commercial cen- tre could have on the existing commercial structure in the area in question and will also examine the benefits to be gained in terms of free com- petition by the creation of a shopping centre in that local- ity. The report would also reflect any negative effects which the new centre could pose for the small traders and local businesses in the area. Each autonomous communi- ty is responsible for granting specific business licences in that region and therefore the procedure involved for open- ing a new shopping centre may vary from one autonomous community to another.

, MORE INFORMATION. Landwell

F

QUESTION

erwise of appropriate instal-

I

should like to know what

lations and facilities in the area in which the new shop- ping centre will be located and the impact which such a centre could have on the existing commercial struc- ture in that area. The law considers that the appropri- ate installations and facili-

type of licence is applicable

to large shopping centres in Andalucía and also which authority is responsible for dealing with applications and issuing the corresponding opening licence.

F

ANSWER

ties exist in an area when there is a guaranteed avail- ability to the current popu-

In order to open a shopping mall it is necessary to obtain

a

specific business licence

lation and the population growth envisaged in the medium-term of a range of products offering quality, variety, services, prices and commercial hours which are

also known as a “second licence”, the regulation and

issue of which corresponds to the regional Administra- tion who may also specify

SHOPPING CENTRE. A ‘second licence’ must be obtained.

SHOPPING CENTRE. A ‘second licence’ must be obtained.

Tax and Legal Advisers. PricewaterhouseCoopers Edificio Teatinos Plaza, Calle Pirandello 16, 29010 Malaga

WILD FLOWERS OF SOUTHERN SPAIN BLADDER-LIKE fruits. / AUSTEN COLWELL / MAURICE W. MATTHEWS Bristly-fruited
WILD FLOWERS OF SOUTHERN SPAIN
BLADDER-LIKE fruits. / AUSTEN COLWELL / MAURICE W. MATTHEWS
Bristly-fruited silkweed
Gomphocarpus fruticosus
Bristly-fruited silkweed is a low, thin perennial shrub whose
leaves are long and narrow pointed. Its flowers are white and
held in small clusters. The plant is, however, more remarkable
for its conspicuous large bright green bristly bladder-like fruits.
The plant prefers damp soils. The above photograph was taken
on the Cártama to Malaga road in September.
fruits. The plant prefers damp soils. The above photograph was taken on the Cártama to Malaga

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

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S U R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD
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GENERAL NEWS

8 G E N E R A L N E W S OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD
8 G E N E R A L N E W S OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

The week in pictures

S U R I N E N G L I S H The week in pictures

European leaders hold crisis summit

European leaders and Eurogroup representatives met at the Elysee palace in Paris on Sunday for a crisis summit, and agreed a plan to inject millions of euros into troubled banks in an attempt to restore confidence in the financial system.

in an attempt to restore confidence in the financial system. King calls for unity to ride

King calls for unity to ride out the crisis

The Spanish royal family presided over the military parade on National Day on Sunday, and at a reception held afterwards King Juan Carlos told guests that he hoped Europe would work together to find a solution to the crisis.

Europe would work together to find a solution to the crisis. Severe weather puts dampener on

Severe weather puts dampener on weekend

The province of Malaga was hit by strong winds and rainstorms over the long week- end. Winds reached up to 90 kilometres per hour in some areas on Friday while heavy rain affected traffic on roads in Antequera and the Guadalhorce area on Monday.

on roads in Antequera and the Guadalhorce area on Monday. Half of an Osborne bull blown

Half of an Osborne bull blown down in Fuengirola

The strong winds which hit the province of Malaga at the end of last week blew over half of the emblematic black Osborne bull which stands on the hill in Torreblanca. The metal supporting frame has been badly damaged, and local residents are hoping that the icon, which was erected in the town some fifty years ago, will be repaired as soon as possible.

some fifty years ago, will be repaired as soon as possible. Remembering victims of ETA The

Remembering victims of ETA

The Guardia Civil celebrated their patron day in Malaga on Sun- day by remembering officers killed by ETA. Plaques for out- standing achievement were also awarded to some Civil Guards.

standing achievement were also awarded to some Civil Guards. Work begins on terminal roof Little by

Work begins on terminal roof

Little by little the new terminal at Malaga Airport is taking shape, and the avant-gard style roof is now being installed. Work should be finished by the beginning of 2009.

is taking shape, and the avant-gard style roof is now being installed. Work should be finished

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

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S U R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD
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GENERAL NEWS

10 GENERAL NEWS OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N E N G

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

Amid restlessness and resignation, the newly unemployed seek an opportunity to help them move forward. Re-training or reducing their aspirations are some of the strategies they employ

The faces of unemployment

M. CARMEN ESPAÑA MALAGA

The worst unemployment figures for August in twelve years. Mala- ga ended its busiest month in terms of tourism with 111,316 peo- ple registered as unemployed, 4,213 of them newly so. The economic crisis is having a worrying effect on the queues at the unemploy- ment offices, and behind every blank statistic is a human story. Professional hopes and dreams cut short, leaving people with nothing but the hope of finding another opportunity which will enable them to pay their bills or find the job of a lifetime. The newest unemployed tend to be young people, who are accus- tomed to the precariousness of the job market which means that they have to change jobs frequently. With the current economic situa- tion, they now realise that it is not as easy to find new employment as it used to be, and they will have to learn to be patient. This is demon- strated by the fact that in August only 38,122 employment contracts were signed in Malaga, some 33 per cent fewer than July. Not everyone who ends up join- ing the ranks of the unemployed reacts to the situation in the same way. Some fret about their pro- fessional future from the first day. Others face the problem with more resignation and take comfort from the fact that they are not the only ones in that situation. Indeed, 27,011 people in Malaga have reg- istered as unemployed in the last twelve months. The most optimistic take this enforced break in their working life as a form of holiday, or an opportunity to complete their aca- demic training. They are, howev- er, aware that the relaxed attitude of the early days will change and they will become more restless as time goes on without them finding another job. “At the moment I don’t mind being on the dole but I’m sure I won’t feel the same way in six months’ time”, says Jorge Quesada, who has just lost his job as a draughtsman. The same mis- fortune has also struck his girl- friend and colleague, Trinidad Sempere. The construction industry was particularly badly hit by job loss- es in August: 1,867 jobs went, which is 44.3% more than in the previous month. “As there are no new building projects, they weren’t able to renew our contracts”, explains. Sempere. “At least we have some money saved up so we can pay the mortgage”, adds her partner, looking worried. As well as newly unemployed people reacting in different ways to their situation, their require- ments when looking for work also change in accordance with the amount of time they have been unemployed. Other factors also come into play, such as their over- all financial situation.

come into play, such as their over- all financial situation. MALAGA. Dozens of people wait their

MALAGA. Dozens of people wait their turn in the Andalusian Employment Service office / C. MORET

Looking for work, if only for just a few months

avoid having to give a worker a permanent contract. This hap- pened to Vanessa Guerrero, who, after working for just over a year in an electronics company, now has to wait three months before

 

cult economic situation means

M. CARMEN ESPANA MALAGA

that they have to either sign on as unemployed in the meantime or look for another job, even if it is only for a few months. Carolina Morales used to work in an ice-cream parlour, and she intended to return there after maternity leave. However, this coincided with a downturn in business “So I will have to wait until the Christmas period”, she says, resignedly. As well as the temporary nature of some professions, in other cases temporary contracts are terminated so employers can

being able to return to her job. “I hope I will be able to go back, because it is difficult to find oth- er work”,she says. The same thing happened to Jesús González. He is on the wait- ing list for a job, and can do noth- ing but wait patiently. He is con- fident that he will eventually obtain a job as a bus driver, but in the meantime he has to do something to pay his bills. “I have a mortgage to pay, and you really notice the lack of one income in the household”, he explains.

Sectors such as tourism, which are dependent on seasons, are among those hardest hit by the current economic situation in Malaga. In the month of August, 1,803 people from the services sector registered as newly unemployed. Some of those who have recently lost their jobs have been told by their employers that there will be more work for them when times are busier, for exam- ple at Christmas, but the diffi-

Generally, the majority of unem- ployed people say they intend to look for work which is commen- surate with their level of educa- tion or their experience. “I’m hop- ing to find something related to my qualifications in Chemistry, either in teaching or in a factory”, says

Patricia Martínez, although she admits that, through necessity, she will have to accept whatever is available when her money runs low.

Opening doors

Among those who hope to be more

eligible in the job market are those who study for a second university degree and an alternative career. They believe this will assist them in finding work in different sec- tors. “I’m a physiotherapist, but now I’m going to train as a music teacher”, says Belén Navarro.

Public service jobs such as teaching are among the most pop- ular alternatives for unemployed people who are looking for job

security. “I might take this oppor- tunity to train as a teacher” says Rocío Oneto. This isn’t to say that

it is easier to train for a new pro-

fession than to find a new job, but many people believe that re-train-

ing is a good way of dealing with

a period of unemployment.

There are also plenty of people with basic education who take advantage of being unemployed to go on courses. The scarcity of jobs means that they have to con- sider work which is very different to anything they have done before. “My last job was as a waitress, but now I’m going to take a course to be a clinic auxiliary worker”, says Isabel Jiménez.

Wide experience

The queues at the INEM and Andalusian Employment Service (SAE) offices are full of people from Malaga who are prepared to do a wide variety of jobs. David Morales has done courses in electricity, metal working and gardening. Aged 30, he has had the opportu- nity to put all his skills into prac- tice, and he has also worked as a gas bottle delivery man. David’s last job was as a driver, taking passengers from hotels to the airport. His contract ended on August 31st and, although it looked as if it would be renewed, he end- ed up unemployed with a mort- gage, car payments and bank loans to pay. It is in his favour that he never rejects a job offer, because the labour market and economic cri- sis leave him no alternative. He is now considering training to work in his wife’s hairdressing salon if he doesn’t find another job soon. “There is no choice but to be open to new types of work”, he stresses. The professional experience of José Manuel Llanos is another example of versatility in the pre- sent job market. He is 35 and although he trained in adminis- tration he has worked in a variety of different jobs. “I have been an administrator, caretaker, securi- ty guard, and I have even erected stages”, he relates. The list of the newly unem- ployed does not, however, consist

only of those with a wide range of professional experience. It also con- tains numerous young people who are studying a profession but who need to go out to work as well in order to be independent and lead

a new life.

This is the case of Álvaro Urdiales. A 22 year old Tourism student, he has worked as a wait- er in hotels and water parks for several summers. He insists that combining his studies with any work he can find is the only way he can live his own life. “I‘m get- ting married soon and that costs a lot of money, what with the wed-

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008
 
SUR IN ENGLISH OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008   GENERAL NEWS 11

GENERAL NEWS

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NEWLY UNEMPLOYED

       
 

DAVID MORALES

TERESA JIMÉNEZ

 

TRINIDAD SEMPERE AND JORGE QUESADA

   

ÁLVARO URDIALES

 
 

GARDENER

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

 

DRAUGHTSMAN AND DRAUGHTSWOMAN

 

TOURISM STUDENT

 
 
 
 
 

F

Experience: Gas delivery, garden- er, electrician, mechanic and driver

F Experience: Administrative assis- tant and shop assistant

F

Experience: Waiter.

 
 

“As a lot of building projects have come to a halt, they weren’t able to renew our contracts”

F

Education: Currently studying Tourism.

F

Education: Secondary school and various training courses.

F Education: Course in Auxiliary Administration.

F

Experience:

Draughtsman/draughtswoman. Jorge has also been a sales rep and teacher.

F

Type of job: Something related to his studies, such as receptionist, or food and beverage manager.

F

Type of job: Prefers gardening but doesn’t rule out other options.

F Type of job: No preference for any particular job.

 

F

Education: Both are qualified in tech- nical construction. Jorge has also trained as a teacher, and Trinidad is going to study Fine Arts.

   
     
 

“You must be open- minded; I’ve even considered training as a hairdresser”

 

“Apart from the crisis, it seems you’re no use as a worker if you’re over forty”

 

“At least we have some money saved to

 

“I’m getting married soon and that involves a lot of expense”

F

Type of job: Something related to their training.

pay the mortgage”

ding reception, the rent and fur- niture for the apartment “, he says, anxiously. Miguel Ángel González already knows what it is like to live far away from home. He spent three years in England and has tried several times to move back home but the difficulty in finding work here has always led him back to Britain. “It’s easier to find work there and the conditions are

much better”, he explains. It seems that the crisis does- n’t distinguish between differ- ent ages, but the same cannot be said for the labour market. If it was a marvel to find a job dur- ing the boom period if you were over thirty, the current situa- tion is much more complicated for people who haven’t yet found a job or those who have lost the job they have done all

their working life. “It seems as if you’re no use as a worker once you reach 40”, complains Teresa Jiménez. She has worked as an administration assistant for several companies, but has never managed to be employed for more than four con- secutive years. Now, the com- bination of her age and the diffi- cult employment situation makes her believe that she is even less

likely to find a good job. Rosa Guerrero is 45 and since the age of 12 she has been work- ing as a cook for different com- panies. Now, the crisis has led her most recent employers to tighten their belts and they want her to go and work away from the city, something she has not been able to do for personal reasons. “At my age it will be difficult, but I have hands and feet to enable

me to work”, she states. Apart from their attitude towards unemployment, their academic training or the experi- ence detailed in their CVs, all the newly unemployed have in com- mon their desire to work and their hope that the black cloud which has descended on the labour market will soon clear away away and the economic sit- uation will revive.

black cloud which has descended on the labour market will soon clear away away and the
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GENERAL NEWS

12 G E N E R A L N E W S OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

Walking past the supermarket shelves is not the pleasure it used to be. With constantly rising prices, lemons are being substituted for vinegar and olive oil for vegetable oil

The rising cost of eating in

M. CARMEN ESPAÑA

Carmen Postigo was shocked as she walked out of her local supermarket last week. “I’ve spent 50 euros on food over the past two days, and there are only three of us in the house,” she said. She has reason to be shocked. A recent comparative study by the Ministry for Industry, Tourism and Commerce shows that prices of basic food products in this country have risen by between five and 48 per cent over the year gone by. The items whose prices have risen highest in that time include lemons, sunflower oil and flour, with an average increase of 40 per cent. Lemons are now 47.96 per cent more expensive than they were a year ago, which means that, while two of them cost 57 cents in September 2007, they now sell for 80 cents. Oranges, on the other hand, have increased in price by slightly less than ten per cent. As far as the president of the Interprofessional Association of Lemon and Grapefruit Growers, José Andrés López, is concerned, over-production last year is to blame. “Prices fell to such limits that, in some cases, it was not worthwhile growing these products. Fruit growers were simply losing money on them,” he said.

Searching for answers

As a glance at shoppers in supermarkets will show, many housewives are substituting lemons for cheaper products like vinegar. “I now use vinegar instead of lemon juice on salads, because it’s cheaper,” said Julia López. Another option is to do one’s shopping at the fruit market, where a kilo of lemons works out at a single euro. “I go there whenever I have time these days, and buy three or four kilos at a time,” said Lucía Benítez. One may be able to obtain cheap lemons, but milk is quite a different story. “I bring lemons from the trees in the countryside, but I’m not going to bring a cow

trees in the countryside, but I’m not going to bring a cow COSTLY OIL. The price

COSTLY OIL. The price of sunflower oil has increased by 40.83 per cent in the past year. / ARCHIVES

back to the city to get my milk cheap,” said Antonia Escobar. A litre of milk now costs 13.8 per cent more than it did a year ago, which works out at 14 cents more. Other milk-based products such as yogurts have also increased in cost. The price of a tub of yogurt has risen by 12 per cent in the past twelve months.

Sunflower oil is also one of the food products whose prices has risen sharply over the past year. Since September 2007, it has increased in cost to the consumer by 40.83 per cent. According to sources in the sector, the cause lies in the cut in production last April, when it was discovered that contaminated sunflower oil from

the Ukraine had been imported into Spain and overall demand dropped suddenly. “Prices of sunflower oil will be lower next year, and will then stabilise,” says the president of the National Association of Edible Oils and Industrial Packagers, Pedro Rubio. And as Mari Carmen Alcázar commented, she will not

PRODUCTS WHOSE PRICES HAVE RISEN HIGHEST

LEMONS (2)

 
LEMONS ( 2 )  

2007

2008

%

0.57

e

0.85 e

+47.96%

SUNFLOWER OIL (1 litre)

SUNFLOWER OIL ( 1 l i t r e )

2007

2008

%

0.84

e

1.19 e

+40.83%

FLOUR

(1 kilo)

FLOUR (1 kilo)

2007

2008

%

0.55

e

0.70 e

+28.29%

RICE (1 kilo) 2007 2008 % 0.90 e 1.03 e +14.77% MILK (1 litre) 2007
RICE
(1 kilo)
2007
2008
%
0.90
e
1.03 e
+14.77%
MILK
(1 litre)
2007
2008
%
0.99
e
1.13 e
+13.81%
YOGURT (4)
2007
2008
%
0.76
e
0.85 e
+12.00%
WHAT THEY SAID ANTONIA ESCOBAR 51 YEARS OLD “I get lemons from the trees in
WHAT THEY SAID
ANTONIA
ESCOBAR
51 YEARS OLD
“I get lemons
from the trees
in the
countryside, but I’m
not going to bring a
cow with me for milk”
LUCIA BENÍTEZ
60 YEARS OLD
“If I have time,
I go to the
fruit market
because it’s cheaper”
CARMEN
POSTIGO
57 YEARS OLD
“I spent 50
euros in the
past two days
on food”
MERCEDES
FANCUBERTA
48 YEARS OLD
“Since basic
food products
cost so much,
I spend less now
on expensive items
like meat and fish”

then have to search for special offers as much as now, because when the price drops, she intends to buy in bulk. The price of flour rose over the past year by 28.29 per cent, while rice, sardines, packaged bread, butter, chard and tomatoes have all increased in price over the same period by between ten and 14.77 per cent. But not all food products have been increasing in price over the past twelve months. Anchovies, beans, green peppers, Canary Island bananas, olive oil, chickens and sugar have all dropped in price by between 0.2 and 5.67 per cent, according to figures recently released by the Ministry for Industry, Tourism and Commerce. These, however, are the exceptions. Most basic food products will now cost us more than they did a year ago. The result is that ordinary people are eating less meat and fish than before, and cutting down on the amount they would normally spend on leisure

people are eating less meat and fish than before, and cutting down on the amount they

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 G

GENERAL NEWS

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17TH TO 23RD 2008 G E N E R A L N E W S 13

CHANGE. Now there’s no obligation to carry insurance papers. / SUR

Drivers will no longer be asked to produce insurance papers

Police officers can see for themselves whether a vehicle is correctly insured by consulting a computer database

ALMUDENA NOGUÉS MALAGA

As from this week drivers will no longer have to search in their glove compartments for their insurance papers if stopped by an officer of the law. The new Obligatory Car Insurance Regulation, approved recently by government ministers, states that from now on it will be up to the Guardia Civil or Police officers themselves to check that

a vehicle has valid insurance by

consulting the Insured Vehicle Computer Database (FIVA). The main aim of the new regu- lations is to improve financial pro- tection for the victims of traffic accidents by making the cover pro- vided by obligatory insurance practically unlimited. It also aims to simplify the administrative process of dealing with an accident and aspects concerning the pay- ment of damages awarded. The President of Associated European Motorists, Mario Arnal-

do, has praised the changes. “It did- n’t make sense for traffic officers to waste their time and inconve- nience drivers asking for insurance receipts when all insurance firms have been obliged to put their clients’ details on the database on a daily basis since 1995”, he said. Arnaldo added that drivers have faced fines of 60 euros for not being able to show their insurance papers, a fine that the expert

describes as “unfair”, “as you can’t penalise a driver for failing to show information that the authorities already have”, he continued, encouraging drivers with fines for failing to produce these papers to appeal against them. Meanwhile the Government is being asked to modify the law so that it is no longer obligatory to carry a set of spare headlamp, brake light and indicator bulbs plus the tools required to change them. The reason for this is that new cars are fitted with xenon

lights which have to be changed by a mechanic, making the regu- lation “obsolete”, as the head of the Traffic Department, Pere Navarro, explained.

PETCARE
PETCARE

A STRANGE FASCINATION

PETER HARRISON

T here is a degree of necrophilia in many people that I find hard to

understand. Why can anyone want to see a dead animal in pref-

erence to a live one? I can understand it where food is concerned

but not when it comes to hunting or shooting just for fun or for treasure collecting. When I spoke to a rather peaceful looking chap in our local village about the wild boars that I had seen on our land his immediate reaction was that he would love to come and “shoot them”. When I asked whether he wanted them for food his reply was “Oh no… I just enjoy shooting”.

I suggested he went for an inanimate target on a range. We had a trespasser on our land shooting at wild birds. He was accom- panied by four children: what an example to the youngsters! I told him he was on clearly marked private land and he must go. He became aggres- sive. The Guardia Civil came. He went! We have so many lovely birds on our land. Why should anyone get pleasure in killing them? There are many instances of adults setting a very bad example to chil- dren where animals are concerned. Even though fox and stag hunting has virtually stopped in the UK, despite the hubristic claims of the mis- named “Countryside Alliance”, it was only a few years ago that children were blooded after a fox was killed. It begs belief! I was in Fuengirola and visited an office with a small garden in front. As I left I spotted a beautiful beetle scuttling. It was jade green with black and yellow spots and I knelt to observe it closely in order to identify it

later from our collection of reference books. Another client of that office stopped to see what I was doing and I pointed the beetle out to him. With

a laugh he stamped on it. I did not share his sense of humour. I would

cheerfully have liked to stamp on him as he discovered. My father bought a snooker table and when it was delivered from the house sale it came complete with two stag heads which were part of the lot. Presumably they were intended to decorate the snooker room. Cer- tainly we would never play with unseeing eyes facing us. They were giv- en a decent burial. Who could have perpetrated such a crime? Live stags are a joy to watch. In my late teens I was invited to have coffee at the home of a girlfriend. To my horror the four coffee tables were elephant feet with marble tops, which the family had brought from East Africa. I left; that romance did not blossom! So much of our attitude in adult life is conditioned by our experience and observation when we were young. That is why I like to see many ani- mal rescue centres teaching children how to care for animals, how to respect them. To quote the eighteenth century Irish philosopher Edmund Burke: “The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good people to do nothing”. I would never claim to be good but I try to set an exam- ple to kids. Join me! Animals stand to benefit greatly.

I would never claim to be good but I try to set an exam- ple to
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GENERAL NEWS

14 G E N E R A L N E W S OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

PROFILE

ANTONIO SILVA CAÑIZARES POET

“The nights are often my most inspired time”

E. GUZMÁN

They say it is never to late to follow your dreams, particu- larly in the worlds of art and lit- erature. This certainly applies to Antonio Silva Cañizares, a pensioner who attends the day centre in La Capuchinos , Vélez-Málaga, and has just pub- lished his third volume of poems.

What is the title of this latest book?

It is my third book and is enti- tled ‘Añoranzas y Recuerdos’

(Longings and memories).

How long have you been writing?

From when I was young I always enjoyed writing, but then I didn’t have the time as I was always working in the countryside or on building sites. Now I am retired I have all the time in the world. The Director of the centre encouraged me to publish my work.

How many poems are in the lat- est book?

There are a total of 155 poems and now I have written more for a fourth volume, I am very pro- ductive. I am often inspired in

INSPIRED. Silva has published three books. / E.G
INSPIRED. Silva has published three books. / E.G

the early hours of the morning.

When an idea comes to me I have to write it down quickly so that I don’t forget it

What sort of things inspire you?

The truth is that they are very varied. I dedicate poems to my children, my wife, to celebri- ties like Rocío Jurado or Anto- nio de Canillas. Also to every- day things like food and a suit- case, all sorts of things can inspire a poem. Mostly they are based on real life.

How many copies do you have printed?

Of this one and the second titled ‘Amor a la Vida’, I printed 500. The first edition was ‘Calle de

mi pueblo’ which came out in

2005.

Where can we buy this one?

The book costs eight euros, but

You

for pensioners it is seven

can buy it at the Capuchinos day centre, where I come every day.

Who wrote the introduction to this book?

For me it was a great honour that Juan Fernández Olmo responded to my letter and

agreed to write the introduction

for me.

Judge charges Spanair manager and mechanics with negligent manslaughter

AGENCIES

Judge Javier Pérez, who is leading the investigation into the Spanair accident in which 154 people lost their lives on August 20th in Madrid's Bara- jas airport, has charged the two mechanics who checked the plane before it took off, and the maintenance manager from the company, with negligent manslaughter and injury. Yesterday, the judge, who started to hear the first round of witness statements (from the National Police officers who worked at the crash scene), also ordered that an investigation commission be set up to run in parallel with that of the Devel- opment Ministry. The second investigation team will be made up of two pilots, two engineers and two mechanics. The investigation commis- sion's preliminary report said that the wing flaps and slats were not set properly for take off and the judge considers that the maintenance staff did not notice that the wing flap alarm system was not working. The alarm system did not activate when the plane was in "flight mode". The magistrate said that: "It's

The three men were involved in the aborted take-off earlier in the day

possible that this fault was a result of a MD 82 multifunction failure", because the flaps and slats had previously failed to work on August 9th and 18th. Today, Friday, Javier Pérez will hear statements from indi- rect witnesses, including an Iberia cabin crew member who saw the accident from another plane and a maintenance tech- nician and other employees from the company Newco, who are responsible for the ground assistance service. On October 27th it will be the turn of anoth- er five witnesses who include those who filled the plane with fuel and on October 31st those who work on the maintenance of the runways at Barajas will give their version of events.

Home

Two survivors of the crash were finally able to be dis- charged from hospital in Madrid this week.

version of events. Home Two survivors of the crash were finally able to be dis- charged

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 G

GENERAL NEWS

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Telefónica fined 60,000 euros for having signed up a client without his knowledge or consent

The Malaga man, who works in computers, reported Telefónica for having signed him up to an ADSL line without his consent

The Data Protection Agency believes the telephone company has committed a grave infraction of the law

ALMUDENA NOGUÉS

Indignation, impotence, frustration and anger. This is what José Pérez Lozano remembers when he looks back over the past two years of his battle against Telefónica, the Span- ish telephone multinational. His nightmare began in February 2006, when he arrived home one day to be presented with an ADSL kit left for him in his neighbour’s house by Telefónica. That was the first he knew of it. Then his own operator, Terra, cut him off, again without his consent. He now found himself unable to access the Internet, and began to look more closely at what exactly had happened. He was, he discovered, a victim of an illegal practice known as ‘slamming’; by which users are signed up with new companies without their knowledge or consent. In many cases, users accept the new companies and sim- ply carry on more or less as before, but José Pérez Lozano was not about to go down without a fight. He reported what had happened to the Data Protection Agency, and two years later, his case led to a fine of 60,000 euros for Telefónica for hav- ing broken the law. They have the right to appeal, of course. Pérez Lozano refers to what hap- pened to him as “the hijacking of his telephone line,” reminding us that his biggest problem was being without an Internet connection for two months. He tells us exactly what happened. “One day I arrived home to find the new ADSL kit awaiting me, and shortly afterwards I got a call from home telling me that my Terra line was not working. I imme- diately called Terra, where I was informed that I was no longer a client of the company, but they would not say why. I was given no explanation by either Terra or Tele- fónica. According to to them, I was responsible for it all, and I alone, because I had, they claimed, con- tracted the ADSL line by phone and given them my identity card num- ber. I could not find out any more about it.”

Report

Fed up of trying to speak to anybody in either company, José decided to report the matter to the Ombuds- man, but with no success. Then he tried to bring his problem before the Secretariat for Telecommunications and the Society for Information, but

SLAMMING
SLAMMING

F

Surprise bill: Slamming is the prac- tise by telephone companies of sign- ing up new clients without their con- sent. The victim discovers the exis- tence of his new contract when he gets his first bill.

F

Frequency: According to estimates by various consumer associations, one in seven clients has been a vic- tim of the practise.

F

Advice: Do not show bank docu- ments or receipts to anybody. Do not sign documents that could turn out to be contracts. Do not answer in the affirmative to questions asked in telephone surveys.

F

What to do: If one becomes a vic- tim of this kind of fraud, order the bank to send back the bill, sign up with one’s old operator and report the attempted fraud to a consumers’ association.

WHAT

HE SAID

“They changed my ADSL line without my knowledge and insisted I had agreed to a new contract by telephone. This was a lie”

“I was two months without an Internet connection. You feel very bad about something like this when it happens”

here too he was not satisfied with the answers they gave. He finally complained to the Data Protection Agency. “I realised one day that if the company had processed my per- sonal data without checking where it came from, and ensuring the authenticity of the contract, they should be held responsible,” he says. Now, two years later, the Data Protection Agency has decided in his favour. Telefónica attempted to elude responsibility for what hap- pened by claiming they did not con- tract the line, but simply effected the transfer to a distributor named Locutel, sub-contracted by the com- pany. “They acted on their own behalf and risk, aside from any instructions from the operator,”

and risk, aside from any instructions from the operator,” INCONVENIENCE. José Pérez was without an Internet

INCONVENIENCE. José Pérez was without an Internet connection for two months as a result. / SUR

says the Data Protection Agency decision. Telefónica still insists that it

acted with diligence, as it says, and that since their client requested an immediate end to his contract, they provided it in

three days. José, on the other hand, assures us he was two months without a connection. Telefónica say that had no rea- son to resort to slamming, given that Terra became part of the

same group in July 2006. Locutel insists that José made a contract by telephone and gave his iden- tity card number when request- ed to do so. But they can show no documentation to support this claim. The Data Protection Agency believes Telefónica has commit- ted a grave infraction of the law in this matter, “having violated the principle of consent as stated by the law (pertaining to) the

transfer of personal data aimed at activating an ADSL line.” José now expects the company to pay all costs incurred by the two-year process. “I had to use my mobile phone as an Internet con- nection during those two months, and was forced to do a lot of paper- work relating to the case, and it all added up to some 800 euros. I hope they pay this cost,” he says, encouraging more dissatisfied users to follow his example.

up to some 800 euros. I hope they pay this cost,” he says, encouraging more dissatisfied
16
16

GENERAL NEWS

16 G E N E R A L N E W S OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N E N G L I S H

MALAGA VALLEY. Members with the rector of Malaga University Rector and the city’s mayor. / S. S.

of Malaga University Rector and the city’s mayor. / S. S. Malaga Valley Club claims technology

Malaga Valley Club claims technology is the key to the crisis

Chairmen and CEO’s from technology multinationals met up in Malaga

REGINA SOTORRÍO MALAGA

On Tuesday Malaga City Hall was the venue for the 5th Presidents’ Meeting of the Club Malaga Val- ley. The project, launched in 2006, is described as Europe’s most rel- evant technological think-tank and is formed by chairmen and CEO’s of technology-related multinationals. Their aim is to design policies to promote the idea of the Sillicon Valley of Europe growing up in the Mala- ga area. Inevitably this week’s meeting concentrated on the current state of the economy, the word “crisis” coming up time and time again. However the key to the problem, according to this gathering of top executives, was to invest in new technology and innovation. This fifth Presidents’ Meeting managed to unite more top direc- tors from national and interna- tional firms than ever Among them were names such as Anto- nio Brufau, chairman of Repsol YPF; Amparo Moraleda, chair- man of IBM España; Paolo Vasile, CEO of Telecinco; Alejandro Echevarría, chairman of Telecin- co and Uteca (Union of Associat- ed Commercial Television chan- nels); José María Bergareche,

deputy chairman of Vocento; Javier Rodríguez, director of Google España; Jaime Gorbeña, chairman of the Bergué Group, among many others. What became clear at the event is that the microchip looks set to replace bricks and mortar as the key to future prosperity. The Secretary of State for Telecommunications, Francisco Ros, pointed out that the “tech- nology industry is not in a crisis situation, but is growing and gaining more and more weight within the economy”. “Investment in technology is really valuable in times such as this”, added the chairman of IBM España, Amparo Moraleda, who claimed that the current eco- nomic situation would “sharply accelerate the transformation process of society”. On the subject of the private audiovisual industry, the repre- sentatives called for the “com- plete renewal of the sector in Spain”. The current system, they claim, is unviable for the future as the industry is moving towards a completely different model “with the digital changes around the corner”. The next Malaga Valley Club meeting has been set for April.

DEBATE. Alloza (second left) and the Mayor (right). / S. SALAS Alloza stresses internet as
DEBATE. Alloza (second left) and the Mayor (right). / S. SALAS
Alloza stresses internet as a
development opportunity
The director general of Prensa Malagueña, Jesús Alloza, stressed
the importance of internet as a development opportunity during
the debate held to close Malaga Digital Week. Alloza pointed out
that the web is not just a vehicle for publicity but also an oppor-
tunity to gain an audience that is complementary to, rather than
a substitute for, the readers of printed press.
oppor- tunity to gain an audience that is complementary to, rather than a substitute for, the

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 GENERAL NEWS 17 Takings have dropped between 30

GENERAL NEWS

17
17

Takings have dropped between 30 and 40 per cent in ‘nightclubs’ because of the economic situation. Many business owners are offering incentives to clients as a way of getting through the crisis

Red light in the adult clubs

ANTONIO ROCHE

The economic crisis is also having an effect on the sex industry. There has been a definite downturn in business recently. Income in the so-called ‘nightclubs’ has dropped by between 30 and 40 per cent, or so José Roca, the spokesman for the National Association of Adult Relax Clubs, which is known as ‘Anela’, assured the SUR newspa- per recently. This is, of course, completely logical: when people have less money to spend, they are less likely to go out. In any period of economic crisis, the first cut- backs in spending are noticed in businesses related to the leisure sector. The beginning of the crisis can be traced back to just after the gen- eral elections last March. “Things have gradually been getting worse and August was a bad month, although that isn’t unusual in our

industry, but September really hit us hard”, commented Roca. There are no reliable statistics about the financial effects of the crisis in this sector, but the asso- ciation held a survey among its members to obtain first hand infor- mation about the situation and it claims that income has dropped by about 40 per cent. It has now ordered a proper survey to be car- ried out and at the end of this year it will be in a position to issue more precise figures.

Clientele

Despite the considerable drop in income of these adult clubs, the number of clients is only about 10 to 15 per cent lower. “What hap- pens is that if a person used to have three drinks, now he only has one”, explains Anela’s press sec- retary. The clients make their drinks last longer and are now more reluc-

tant to buy a drink for the girls who work in the club. One work- er says that some clients will order a rum and Coke, and then make it last so long that the ice has melt- ed by the time they empty the glass. The red traffic lights which force drivers to come to a halt on the roads are now shining over the cash-boxes of these clubs and their owners are seeking ways of getting through the difficult economic sit- uation. Some are offering incen- tives to maintain their clientele, such as a complimentary liqueur at certain times of the night, or giv- ing them their second drink free. The situation has obliged some owners to reduce staffing levels, particularly bar and waiting staff. Others have decided to lease their businesses. The representative of Anela says that the figures can be extrapolated to apply to any Span- ish town or city.

can be extrapolated to apply to any Span- ish town or city. ADULT CLUB. A dancer

ADULT CLUB. A dancer is given a tip by a client in a night club.

Less Money

The owner of one of these clubs in the centre of Malaga says that he has had a “fixed clientele” for quite a long time, but he is noticing the effects of the crisis on his takings:

the amount of money taken every night is “considerably less” than two years ago, for example. And if the clubs are experienc- ing bad times, street prostitution is suffering from the recession as well. “When I started doing this I used to charge about 50 euros but now I only ask 30 for everything”, says a young Rumanian woman. “Recently all the girls have been complaining about the lack of clients. Especially since the lorry drivers’ strike in June”, points out the spokeswoman for the Hetaira group for the defence of prostitutes, Cristina Garaizabal. “Things have been very bad since the beginning of summer. This type of work suf- fers badly when there is an eco-

nomic crisis, because the prices aren’t fixed”, explains another business owner in the sector. Before the crisis, the sex indus- try was on the rise and was con- tinually generating more money - a reported 18,000 million euros - between street prostitutes, adult clubs, brothels, films, internet con- tacts and premium rate telephone lines. According to a report published by Anela, Spanish people spend 50 million euros each day on prosti- tution, above all in Andalucía, the Community of Valencia and Madrid. These are the autonomous communities with the largest pop- ulations and, as a result, the high- est number of prostitutes. Andalucía is the region with the highest number of women working as prostitutes, whether in clubs or in the street: 18,200, followed by the Community of Valencia with 14,200 and Madrid with almost 13,800.

in clubs or in the street: 18,200, followed by the Community of Valencia with 14,200 and
18
18

GENERAL NEWS

18 G E N E R A L N E W S OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

DIRECT ANSWERS

FROM WAYNE AND TAMARA

 

Second thoughts

ment. Still I am left with guilt and question whether I need

feelings and ended up feeling snubbed. That snub led to embarrassment at work, physical intimacy, and now,

lack of belief in yourself

a

A

young man I worked with

to explain myself to this man. He still contacts me and says he loves me, and I still can- not respond. He’s told mutu- al friends he has stayed in this town for me. He is a good man, but I don’t know

asked me out. We had spent quite a bit of time together, and I may even have flirted. But deep down I didn’t believe this could develop

and your own judgment.

A

snub is like a scab we can’t

resist picking, but picking at

into a long-term relationship.

a

scab turns it into some-

I

stated we were friends and

if

I could be happy with him.

thing worse. That is why pet owners put an Elizabethan collar on their dog or cat, so they can’t bite or scratch the area which needs to heal. You have an area which needs to heal, and that is why you must stay away from this former coworker. This whole chain of events started with an innocent deci- sion to overrule your best instincts. But your instincts were correct. Deep down you know your desire for a rela- tionship can never turn the wrong man into the right man. We get many letters from people who end up mar- ried to someone they didn’t even want to date. It starts with one small step in the wrong direction. Don’t question yourself. Don’t let second thoughts make you a poster child for unhappy marriages.

colleagues, and I just wanted

I’m wondering if I’m the

to

remain friends.

problem and if this would happen regardless of which man approached me.

Casey

The next day I reconsidered and thought I’d go on one date to be “nice,” since he had the courage to ask. Thing is, the date never hap- pened. This bothered me, or my ego, and I asked him about it months later. He said he didn’t follow through because he wasn’t sure he asked the right person. I was hurt. Months passed and I kept my distance because I was embarrassed. But since we

work together, I decided to start communicating again. After a bit of time, he said he wanted a second chance. He gave me gifts and kept call- ing and asking even when I turned down his physical advances.

Casey, a few years ago there was a popular antismoking poster featuring the face of a cadaverous woman with a cigarette in her mouth. Over her head were the words “Smoking is very glam- orous.” Do you think the tobacco companies were worried about that poster? Not at all. They know that extreme examples of health risks don’t make people reform their behavior. Just the reverse. Because people can’t identify with extreme exam- ples, posters like that make

I

was in a state of tension as

smokers even more confident

had to work with him every day. Following more months of avoidance I convinced myself to give it a go. This

time intimacy did occur, and

I

“it could never happen to me.” In the same way, if we paint-

ed a picture of a bickering couple whose marriage ends

 
 

Wayne and Tamara

 

it

left me unhappy. He kept

in divorce, you would not rec- ognize yourself. But your picture could be on that poster, not because you are

 

CAN

WE HELP?

saying he loved me, and I could not respond as I could- n’t say those words truthfully. I’ve since left that job, and the distance has helped. I know now I need to keep physical intimacy to the con- fines of a proper commit-

Authors and columnists Wayne and Tama- ra Mitchell can be reached at

a

cantankerous person, but

www.WayneAndTamara.com

because of a small error in your thinking.

From the beginning this man felt wrong to you. To be “nice” you overrode those

Send letters to

 

Direct Answers, PO Box 964, Springfield, MO 65801, USA

e–mail

DirectAnswers@WayneAndTamara.com

65801, USA e–mail DirectAnswers@WayneAndTamara.com SIGNS. The leaves of infected trees tend to droop. /

SIGNS. The leaves of infected trees tend to droop. / EDUARDO NIETO

Red palm weevil detected in Malaga Park

ANTONIO ROCHE

Malaga City Hall has detected the dreaded red palm weevil pest in two trees in Malaga Park. One of the affected trees stands in front of the Casa del Jardinero, the oth- er near the open-air Eduardo Ocón auditorium. Councillor Teresa Porras told SUR that preventative measures such as the fumigation of trees with a product called Imidacloprod applied to the roots, have not had the desired effect, and she added that the products were “unlikely to destroy the pest”. When the female gets inside the bark, it lays between 200 and 400 eggs, and cutting down the tree becomes the only option. The council fears that the pest could spread to trees around the city centre, as the weevil can fly up to five kilometres.

MALAGA Solar energy fraudsters called to declare The three owners of the solar energy company
MALAGA
Solar energy fraudsters called to declare
The three owners of the solar energy company Sifa Fotovoltaica
are to appear in court on November 10th to answer charges of
fraud. Two weeks ago SUR reported how the company alleged-
ly offered customers a chance to invest in a project in which
five solar energy parks were to be built in the provinces of Mala-
ga, Granada and Murcia. Twenty-two customers invested 560,000
euros in the scheme, but more than a year later were yet to see
any progress. The judge in charge of the case has frozen the sus-
pects’ bank accounts and has ordered a review of the company’s
assets.
Couple attacked as they watched a film in
their car
A couple aged between 20 and 30 were assaulted as they watched
a film on a laptop in their car in the early hours of Saturday
morning in Puerto de la Torre, Malaga. Police officers say that
two men with their faces covered got into the victims’ car and
dragged them to a secluded area where one of them began to
assault the male victim while the other sexually assaulted the
female. The suspects then switched roles before letting the man
and woman go free. The victims made it back to their car, how-
ever, the suspects lay in wait and started to attack them again.
This time the couple managed to escape and told a passer-by
about the attack. The case remains open.
MARBELLA
Municipal consumer inspector arrested for
accepting bribes from business owners
Once again the town of Marbella and the word corruption have
been linked. National Police officers have arrested a consumer
inspector from the Town Hall for allegedly asking business-
people for money in exchange for favourable reports. The sus-
pect, whose duties included revising price lists and consumer
complaints presented at the municipal office, is believed to have
demanded money from business owners and in return he turned
a blind eye to infractions and irregularities. Two alleged accom-
plices of the suspect have also been arrested, and the three are
expected to appear before a judge within the next few days.
BIRTH. Javier Mariscal, his wife Soledad and baby Javier.
SEVILLE
First genetically selected baby born to save
his brother
His name is Javier and he weighs 3.4 kilos. He looks just like
any other newborn on the maternity ward at Seville’s Hospital
Virgen de Sevilla, but he is in fact the first genetically selected
baby to be born in Spain, and it is hoped that Javier can save
the life of his brother who suffers from a serious hereditary con-
dition known as Beta Thalassemia, a severe form of anaemia,
which Javier does not have. Stem cells from the umbilical cord
of Javier will be used to carry out a bone marrow transplant on
six-year-old Andrés. The condition is rare, and more prevalent
in
Mediterranean and Asian countries, and sufferers are unlike-
ly
to live beyond 35. Javier’s is just the second case of genetic
selection in the world.
Tour guide imprisoned for illegal trafficking of
people seeks justice
On March 17th this year a tour guide on an excursion to Keni-
tra, Morocco, was arrested and charged with the illegal traf-
ficking of people after police in Tarifa found a Moroccan would-
be immigrant hiding in the man’s trailer at the Spanish border.
David Sobredo, who works for San Pedro company Discovery
Moto Tours, claimed that the immigrant had hidden in his trail-
er without his knowledge while he was having coffee at a road-
side café. Nevertheless, the authorities did not believe him and
he was sent to Botafuegos high security prison in Algeciras. He
was released 25 days later after paying 4,000 euros bail. The pros-
ecution in the case called for a six-year sentence, but Sobredo
was later absolved. However, he is now considering suing for
damages and says that he wants justice.

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 Culture

Culture Department values Roca’s art collection at three million euros

The 415 works confiscated from the Malaya ringleader range from “irrelevant” value to 250,000 euros

range from “irrelevant” value to 250,000 euros G E N E R A L N E
range from “irrelevant” value to 250,000 euros G E N E R A L N E

GENERAL NEWS

19
19
value to 250,000 euros G E N E R A L N E W S 19

MOST VALUABLE. Works by Millares (250,000 euros), Dubuffet (200,000) and Mohedano (60,000).

(250,000 euros), Dubuffet (200,000) and Mohedano (60,000). CHEAPEST. Works by Llusmeld, Emilio Serna and Otmar Alt,
(250,000 euros), Dubuffet (200,000) and Mohedano (60,000). CHEAPEST. Works by Llusmeld, Emilio Serna and Otmar Alt,
(250,000 euros), Dubuffet (200,000) and Mohedano (60,000). CHEAPEST. Works by Llusmeld, Emilio Serna and Otmar Alt,

CHEAPEST. Works by Llusmeld, Emilio Serna and Otmar Alt, all described as of “irrelevant” value.

J. CANO / A. J. LÓPEZ MALAGA

Experts from the Junta de Andalucía have concluded that the art collection confiscated from properties belonging to Juan Anto- nio Roca, the alleged man behind the corruption at Marbella Town Hall, is worth just over three mil- lion euros. The collection contains 415 works, from paintings to prints, sculptures an ceramics, which were seized by police during searches of the offices of the firm

Maras Asesores and Roca’s resi- dences in Marbella, Madrid and Murcia. The most expensive piece in the collection is a Millares paintings worth 250,000 euros, which is fol- lowed in value by a Jean Dubuffet sculpture worth 200,000 euros. At the other end of the scale though are numerous works whose value has been described “irrelevant”. Roca appears to be more interest- ed in quantity than quality. Of the total amount quoted some

482,000 euros corresponds to works whose authenticity is still in ques- tion. The most famous of the sus- pected fakes is the Miró found hanging in a bathroom. The experts have not wanted to deliv- er a final verdict regarding the work before they have consulted a Joan Miró specialist. If it is gen- uine the print could be the most valuable piece in the collection, worth 350,000 euros, but the experts have their doubts, espe- cially as it was hanging in a bath-

room and has suffered inevitable humidity damage. Other possible fakes are the four paintings allegedly by Román Casas y Car- bó which could be worth 108,000.

The collection was found in Roca’s residences and offices

The collection was found in Roca’s residences and offices UNUSUAL. Japanese armour . The collection includes

UNUSUAL. Japanese armour.

The collection includes some more unusual pieces such as a suit of Japanese armour

The 4,000 euro red oil drum

J. C. / A. J. L. MALAGA

T he works of art accumulat-

ed by Juan Antonio Roca

include everything from

Japanese armour to the most

transgressive of pieces. The most surprising is a sculpture entitled “Bidón” (oil drum) by Jean-Pierre Raynaud, which was found in the Maras Asesores offices and has been valued at 4,000 euros. The collection included anoth- er work by the same artist, this time titled “Arrow”, consisting of a no entry sign crossed out in the centre with a white blade. Then there is the sculpture “Compression” by César, made entirely out of Coke cans and val- ued at 12,000 euros. Finally our attention is drawn particularly by the “Family of Carlos IV”, a

is drawn particularly by the “Family of Carlos IV”, a DRUM. Worth 4,000 euros. / SUR

DRUM. Worth 4,000 euros. / SUR

sculpture by Equipo Crónica, a group of artists from the mid 20th century, which has been valued at 30,000 euros.

/ SUR sculpture by Equipo Crónica, a group of artists from the mid 20th century, which
/ SUR sculpture by Equipo Crónica, a group of artists from the mid 20th century, which
20
20

OPINION

20 O P I N I O N OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N E N G L I S H

PUBLISHED BY: PRENSA MALAGUEÑA, S.A.

DIRECTOR GENERAL: Jesús Alloza Moya

Editor in Chief:

José Antonio Frías Ruiz

Editor: Liz Parry Advertising Manager: Eve Browne Newsroom:

Rachel Haynes and Grace Taylor Distribution: Francisco M. Sánchez

Malaga Edition: Avda. Dr. Marañón, 48. 29009 Malaga. Telephone: 95 264 97 41. Advertising Fax: 95 261 12 56. Editorial Fax: 95 202 02 93 Code from UK: 0034

Internet Address: http://www.surinenglish.com E-Mail: surinenglish.su@diariosur.es

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NATIONAL CELEBRATIONS RACHEL HAYNES
NATIONAL CELEBRATIONS
RACHEL HAYNES

A real pain in the

D on’t we all love it when a politician is caught saying something totally out of order when they think they are out of reach of the microphones? It brightens up everyone’s day; gives us all a brief

fly-on-the-wall feeling. The latest slip up of this kind happened this last weekend when the opposition leader Mariano Rajoy was heard telling Javier Arenas that on Sunday he had to go to the “coñazo” of a military parade. Of course as with all juicy snippets like this it loses everything in translation but what he said implied that he sees the traditional October 12th parade as a bit of a drag - one of those political obligations he could quite well do without. This kind of off the record comment does no real harm to the politician in question, once the initial embarrassment has been dealt with and the correct apologies made. In fact slips like this just go to show the more human side to our leaders. How many of the officials standing in Madrid on Sunday watching nearly five thousand soldiers march past in the rain didn’t think at some point that it was all a bit of a “coñazo”, interrupting a nice long holiday weekend? You can even imagine the King thinking the same thing. And I’m sure the Minister of Defence, who had more rea- son to be there than anyone, was secretly longing to get back to her baby. After all what is the point of such an event in this day and age? Spain is hardly showing off its powerful army to scare its enemies. But I sup- pose we do get to see how bright and shiny the soldiers’ buttons are, and the wide range of colourful uniforms our money is being spent on. Then there’s the famous mascot of the fast-marching Legionnaires, the ram that appears just at the right time for those trying to stifle a yawn brought on by boredom rather than fatigue. Going back to the “coñazo” - we all have work and even family oblig- ations that this word comes in very handy to describe. But we are care- ful to avoid expressing this opinion in front of the boss, the tedious client or the relatives in question. In the case of the politicians, for every unfortunate comment that does get caught on a reporter’s tape recorder there must be thousands that don’t. Official openings, meetings, dinners, speeches… must all be described as a “coñazo” in town halls and government buildings all over the country. Later on, Prime Minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero met with Mar- iano Rajoy to discuss the state of the country’s economy. Now we can

imagine the first sentence once the press had left the room: “Now I know it’s a coñazo but I suppose we’d better talk about the credit crunch”.

LIVING IN SPAIN
LIVING IN SPAIN

loo talk

VIVION O’KELLY I was sitting there the other day, giving little thought to the task
VIVION O’KELLY
I was sitting there the other
day, giving little thought
to the task in hand, as one
“We each spend
about three
months of our lives
sitting on the loo”
“The time could be
put to good use, as
I am discovering”

does not after all these years of practice, listening to the chatter downstairs, enjoying those few minutes of enforced solitude, my mind free to wan- der without distraction, think- ing inconsequential thoughts and gazing at the wall tiles opposite as if in a museum of minimalist art. With no anchor to fix the thoughts waltzing through my mind, no pencil and paper to jot them down, nobody to share them with, no keyboard to tap them out on, I began to realise that

I’ve wasted a lot of potentially valuable thinking time sitting on the loo.

I worked out that if we spend

an average of five minutes every day sitting on that large

plastic hole, it amounts to about three months in the average lifetime.

I tried to think of any single

original thought I’ve ever had on the loo, and could think of none. One wonders what Ein- stein, for example, thought about while sitting. Would he have allowed his mind to wan- der aimlessly during these con- templative moments, or could that have been where he first

begin to formulate his theories of movement and mass? Was that where Joyce’s conscious- ness first begin to stream (or was he standing at the time)? Or where Newton heard the plop of falling matter before writing his Principia? Was it where Picasso began to visu- alise the contorted images of his

Women of Avignon, or is any resemblance between the fig- ures in the painting and the action of squatting over a hole in a turn-of-the-century Parisian bathroom purely coin-

cidental? It is very likely that many of the great ideas that have changed our lives were dreamed up during these three months on the lavatory bowl. Years ago, Bewley’s Café in Dublin used to mount pages from the Irish Times on the wall over the urinals, which was an entertaining distraction for

younger men who did not have to stand well back to read the print. Older men with an inter- est in current affairs tended to look like urinating school- children competing for distance behind the sports pavilion. Books often find their way into my bathroom, but the only ones that are not taken away again immediately are those without a storyline, such as dic- tionaries and the like, or Book- er prize winners, which most of us find easy to put down after the second page. My all-time favourite is ‘The Gentle Art of Making Enemies’, a series of pamphlets and letters to the press (of ‘flinging a pot of paint in the public’s face’ fame) pub- lished as a book by James McNeill Whistler in 1890. It is not so gripping as to turn con- stipation into a literary delight, but easily digested in short blocks of text. The most practical addition to any bathroom would be a television set on the wall oppo- site, pre-tuned to whatever pro- gramme is being watched in the sitting room below. Or a pencil and pad of paper, allowing those of a more intellectually bent to write down brilliant thoughts and flashes of inspiration on the loo. But if you’re still reading this, I suggest the former option.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

There is a PRIZE for the best contribution to this page, so please include your address. We accept letters by email, post or fax, but they must include identification and a telephone number, and be exclu- sive to SUR in English. We do not publish anonymous letters. Opinions expressed by contributors to this and other pages of SUR in English do not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publishers.

Not the end of the line

Many of your readers who live in the Guadalhorce Valley will be amazed to read that the railway line which they use every day has been disused since the AVE high speed line came into operation (SUR in English, October 17th to 23rd, P33). Far from being redun- dant, the old wide gauge line from Cordoba to Malaga should be busier than ever in the future because of the opening of the AVE line. There is an obvious need for more frequent and better local ser- vices, including in due course the extension of the Álora service to Antequera town.

Peter J. Owen

THIS WEEK´S WINNER
THIS
WEEK´S
WINNER

Landsbanki clients

We understand that there are about 400 clients of Landsbanki Bank on the coast, and I am sure

interest. Any one who has not con- tacted Marcel in Luxembourg can contact snowdust@terra.es

Gordon Dustan

Deepest sympathy

I would like to send my deepest sympathy to the family of Cecilia who was killed by her ex-boyfriend in Nerja. We were the family whom she was serving at the time of the stab-

bing and can only attempt to feel what they must be going through. My father-in-law and husband tried to fight off the attacker and have been left with nightmares and anxiety since. My father-in-law did a very brave thing and though we point- ed out the danger he was in, we are proud of what he tried to do. We would like to let the family know we hope she gets to go home and rest in peace in her homeland.

Debbie Cattle

that they would like to know that we are getting a group together for our repre-

sentation in Luxem- bourg. The attorney

we will be contacting is also a bank client and we are sure that he will be the best person on the spot to defend our

We’re in the wrong business, dear, we should have set up a bank MARIA’S CHESTNUTS
We’re in the wrong
business, dear, we
should have set up
a bank
MARIA’S
CHESTNUTS
50,000
MILLION
EUROS
FOR
BANKS

Drainage problems

RE the long letter last week about drainage problems in Car- vajal. May I suggest anyone affected contact the town hall and bring it to their attention? Unfor- tunately SUR in English readers, whilst often sympathetic, are not the ones to tell , as they cannot resolve the problem!

John Carington

Beyond the Palin?

We hear that the Republican Vice-Presidential candidate Sarah Palin has just been immor- talised in the form of an action doll, sold in three guises: black trouser suit, uniform with gun holster and sexy schoolgirl. I wonder how a British girl would react if given a Jacqui Smith crime-fighting doll with option- al police body armour; or a Mar- garet Beckett figurine (supplied with toy caravan)? No doubt a Hazel Blears look-alike in leather catsuit (supplied with communi- ty bike) would fly off the shelves in no time!

Ursula Undine

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

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Costa del Sol

22 Costa del Sol IN PRISON. Roca is the best-known defendant in the trial. / J-L

IN PRISON. Roca is the best-known defendant in the trial. / J-L

Roca is the best-known defendant in the trial. / J-L OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S
Roca is the best-known defendant in the trial. / J-L OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

Saqueo trial finally began last week in the Central Criminal Court

Juan Antonio Roca and five others face 10 years in jail for the embezzlement of 36 million euros from Marbella Town Hall

M. J. CRUZADO

We have been bombarded in the media over recent years with court cases involving corruption in the Marbella Town Hall, and now we have the latest of them. This is the Caso Saqueo (Looting Case), which began last week in the Casa de Campo in Madrid, and in which a group of six peo- ple stand accused of having embezzled 36 million euros from the Marbella Town Hall between 1991 and 1995. Former urban plan- ning consultant and suspect Juan Antonio Roca had tried, unsuc- cessfully, to have the case post- poned by claiming that before it could be heard at the Central Criminal Court, it had to go through the National Auditors. It took nine years to bring for- mer Marbella urban planning officer Juan Antonio Roca and five others to trial in the Central Criminal Court in Madrid, in what is, to date, the biggest cor- ruption case ever in this coun- try. All those standing trial face sentences of ten years in prison if condemned, as well as the

paying of 36 million euros in civil damages. The former chief planning offi- cer in the Town Hall, Juan Anto- nio Roca, will be attending the tri- al from his prison cell in Naval- carnero, and will probably be defended by a court-appointed lawyer, given that he has failed to pay the fees of his own lawyer. This, in fact, led to the most recent postponement of the trial. Roca continues on remand for not hav- ing been in a position to pay the three million-euro bail previous- ly set by a judge. The other five defendants are likely to share his fate. They are Javier Herrera and Eduardo Gonzálvez, employees of the municipal companies Planeamientos 2000 and Contratas 2000; Purificación N., widow of the manager of the latter company; José Luis Sierra, former lawyer of the late Jesús Gil while mayor of Marbella, and Manuel Jorge Castel, believed to have been the accountant of the accused. A total of 23 witnesses will give testimo- ny at the trial, expected to last eleven days. The Marbella Town

THE TRIAL F Dates: 10th, 23rd and 24th Octo- ber and 7th, 13th, 14th, 17th,
THE TRIAL
F
Dates: 10th, 23rd and 24th Octo-
ber and 7th, 13th, 14th, 17th, 18th,
19th, 20th and 21st November.
F
Place: Casa de Campo, Madrid.
F
Case: Presumed embezzlement of
36 million euros from the Marbella
Town Hall between 1991 and 1995.
F
Private prosecution: The Partido
Popular.
F
Accused: Juan Antonio Roca, for-
mer urban planning officer; Javier
Herrera and Eduardo Gonzálvez,
employees of Planeamientos 2000
and Contratas 2000; Purificación
N., widow of the manager of the lat-
ter company; José Luis Sierra, for-
mer lawyer of Jesús Gil, and Manuel
Jorge Castel, considered to have
been the group’s accountant.

Hall hopes that one consequence of the trial will be the partial recu- peration of the money embezzled. Pre-trial questions were dealt with on the first day, and the defendants will have the chance to testify on 23 and 24 of this month. The witnesses will take the stand on 7th and 18th November.

will have the chance to testify on 23 and 24 of this month. The witnesses will

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

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COSTA DEL SOL

24 C O S T A D E L S O L OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

FACTS AND FACES Send your social news and photos to surinenglish.su@diariosur.es was for a worthwhile
FACTS AND FACES
Send your social news and photos to
surinenglish.su@diariosur.es
was for a worthwhile cause.
The winners of the treasure
hunt were Russ and Karen who
had only called into the Alba-
tross Restaurant (the starting
and finishing point) for a cof-
fee. Jeff Shaw presented the
winners with their prize - a
voucher for a meal at the
restaurant.
Amy Day
ANNIVERSARY. Russell and Sylvia Quenet-Chute renewed their
vows at St. Andrew’s church last week.
POSH PETS. Fancy dress winners watch the action at the dog
show and pet race held recently in Alhaurín el Grande.
Pearl wedding
Last Sunday Russell and Sylvia
Quenet-Chute celebrated their
30th wedding anniversary by
renewing their vows at a morn-
ing service led by the Venera-
ble David Sutch at St. Andrew’s
church in Los Boliches. The
couple entertained friends at a
celebratory lunch held
afterwards.
Aguilas (Valley of the Eagles)
in Benalmádena from a wildlife
centre in Germany. The centre
is located at the top of the
Calamorro mountain, and it is
here where the eagles will be
trained in falconry. Visitors to
the cable car can watch the
birds in training.
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and on
Wednesday 29th from 3 p.m. to
6 p.m. All nationalities are wel-
come to sign up, and a small
donation is requested for each
class. For more information
about the course call Tony on
952 375 482.
Sixteen year old Amy Fitz-
patrick has been missing from
her home in Mijas Costa since
January 1st. A special fundrais-
ing event featuring live enter-
tainment by Monkey Tennis,
Shamrock and The Merce-
naires, has been organised for
this Sunday (October 19th at 2
p.m.) at Pogs Irish bar in Fuen-
girola. Two 15 year old girls liv-
ing in Spain have written a
moving song for Amy, ‘Some-
body’s Lost Princess,’ which
they will perform on the day.
For more information about
the event call Audrey Fitz-
patrick on 617 561 319.
Posh Pets Spain
Book club
Gaelic classes
Two golden eagles, a male and
a female aged five months,
have moved to the Valle de las
The Irish Association of Spain
has organised a course of Irish
Gaelic classes to be held at
Hotel Alay in Benalmádena
Costa on Sunday October 26th,
Monday 27th, and Tuesday 28th
novel The Catcher in the Rye.
Anyone who would like to par-
ticipate is welcome to do so.
Discussion meetings are free,
and participants are expected
to acquire the books on the
reading list through their own
means. November’s book is
Sons and Lovers by D. H.
Lawrence and the meeting will
be held on Tuesday November
11th at 7 p.m. at the Arroyo de
la Miel library. For more infor-
mation call Amy Young on 639
653 833.
Golden eagles
The International English Book
Club, based at the Arroyo de la
Miel library, has just set its
reading list for the next six
months, which includes clas-
sics such as James Joyce’s
Dubliners, and J. D. Salinger’s
Car treasure hunt
Jeff Shaw, the chairman of the
Alhaurín de la Torre branch of
the British Legion, his nieces
Beverley, Julie and their hus-
bands Charlie and Dave, organ-
ised a car treasure hunt to raise
money for the Poppy Appeal.
Jeff’s brother unexpectedly
died and the only time his
funeral could be held was the
day when the Poppy Appeal
Car Treasure Hunt had been
arranged. The family bravely
insisted that the treasure hunt
go ahead as they were well
aware that the money raised
Posh Pets held their third Char-
ity Dog Show and Pet Race on
October 5th in Alhaurín el
Grande, which was a tremen-
dous success. Some 380 adults
and children went along to
watch and take part in the fun,
and a panel of four judges, who
have all been involved with res-
cue animals, judged 167 dogs.
The largest class was “The
Most Stunning ex-Rescue Dog”,
of which there were 30
entrants. The day was sup-
ported by local businesses
which sponsored the classes so
that winners not only had
rosettes from Posh Pets but also
prize money and gifts too. The
nice weather on the day meant
that the bar and homemade
food almost sold out. A grand
total of 2,000 euros were raised
on the day, which will go to the
A. I. D. animal charity in
Alhaurín el Grande and Coín.
Gordon
Berryman
GRAHAM V. LEWIS
On Saturday I lost a friend, a
good friend. Not a well known
man outside his own circle, but
a gentle and kind man. Gordon
Berryman was 83 years of age
and for more than sixty of those
years he lived in continuous
pain.
In 1943 he joined the RAF and
trained as an air gunner/bomb
aimer. Like his father he was a
keen athlete with professional
ambitions. During training his
plane crashed into a moun-
tainside in Scotland. He was the
only survivor and came out of
hospital three years later. He
endured fifty operations on his
legs over the next sixty years.
Despite the pain he perse-
vered and made a successful
career in industry that took
him all over the UK and South
Africa where he met his wife
Margaret. He loved two things
in life: his wife and teaching.
He was not a teacher but taught
many youngsters their trade in
his industry and helped many
friends with their golf. He start-
ed what became the Monday
Club at Santa María G&CC
where he was an early member.
He finally gave up golf five
years ago when he could no
longer stand and swing a club,
but he still helped others
improve their golf with
patience and good spirit.
His last years were mainly
spent at home in Calahonda
where he was constantly looked
after by Margaret and from
where he played bridge through-
out the world on the computer.
Nor was he ever short of friends
who visited regularly.
Margaret said he died peace-
fully, I hope so. Now, at least the
pain will have gone.

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 COSTA DEL SOL FUENGIROLA 25 The Armada arrives

COSTA DEL SOL FUENGIROLA

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The Armada arrives in port with a dramatic hostage rescue display

The minesweeper “Tajo” receives its battle ensign in Fuengirola on Saturday

MARI CARMEN JAIME FUENGIROLA

It was a fitting end to Fuengirola’s feria week and a spectacular way to announce the beginning of Armada Week with visits from ships and crews of the Spanish navy. Some 6,000 or more people packed the Castillo beach last Sun- day to watch the aircraft carrier “Príncipe de Asturias” take the lead role in a stimulated hostage rescue. The aircraft carrier, a frigate and three helicopters demonstrated the skill and pro- fessionalism needed to ensure the security of personnel in conflict zones. The audience on the seashore enjoyed a unique experience, com- plete with a commentary on the history of the ships, never before seen on the Costa del Sol and cer- tainly one very much removed from their daily lives. For many

of those present the intensity of the very real demonstration made a lasting impression. Pedro Asen- sio came with his family from Malaga to see at first hand the work of the Armada and was very impressed by the display. The action took place in “Tauroland” an imaginary land were a group of terrorists were holding various hostages. Two rescue teams arrived by helicopters and attacked the terrorist positions using smoke bombs for cover. They quickly located the hostages and led them to safety. There then followed a demon- stration of aerobatics by a Harri- er jet, which left the crowd breath- less with admiration. “It is like being in a war film and very close to the action” said Íñigo Mon- tesinos, who had decided to end his week of partying on a high note with a visit to this unique event. However this was just the begin-

visit to this unique event. However this was just the begin- DEMONSTRATION. A hostage rescue scenario

DEMONSTRATION. A hostage rescue scenario was enacted last Sunday on the beach. / M.J

ning of a week of events that is proving irresistible to lovers of ships and aircraft. Along with her sister ships, the minesweeper, “Tajo”, whose presence is one of the main reasons for the event, is moored in Fuengirola port. The vessel is open for the public to vis- it in the afternoons until Friday, with special times set aside in the mornings for school parties. Local youngsters have had the opportunity to hear talks on the role of the forces in Spain in the Palacio de la Paz and an exhibi- tion about the ships has been open in the Club Náutico. Today, Fri- day, a naval band takes part in a parade accompanied by a squadron from the “Tajo”. All of these events lead up to the high-

the “Tajo”. All of these events lead up to the high- TAJO. Today is the last

TAJO. Today is the last chance to visit the minesweeper. / F. J.

light of the week when, on Satur- day at 12 noon in the marina, the Mayor, Esperanza Oña presides over the presentation to the “Tajo” of its battle ensign. She described the events of the

week as “a unique and patriotic honour for the town”. It has cer- tainly provided the people of Fuengirola with the opportunity to witness a historic event at first hand.

It has cer- tainly provided the people of Fuengirola with the opportunity to witness a historic
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HEALTH AND BEAUTY

26 HEALTH AND BEAUTY Body care OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N

Body care

26 HEALTH AND BEAUTY Body care OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N E N G L I S H
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YOUR HEALTH

GABRIELLE FAGAN

Stand by your beds - man flu approaching

B RACE yourselves girls, man flu is on the horizon!

As the nights draw in and the temperature drops, blokes will start dropping like flies as they succumb to a virus which women shrug off as the common cold, but they see as potentially life-threatening. Cue that chilling statement “I think I’m going down with something”, followed by a repertoire of symptoms. These can range from nose blowing that sounds as though they’re tuning up a trumpet, low moaning and groaning noises (especially if requested to do any routine chore), and the purchase of dozens of pills and potions. But worse, a sufferer’s demands on the carer are tax- ing and heavy - constant sym- pathy, saintly nursing - basi- cally a ‘wait on them hand- and-foot’ service. So be afraid, be very afraid if your man is called Barry, Dave or Brian and is a comput- er geek working in IT, or an engineer, builder, taxi or lorry driver, or shop assistant. These men are most at risk of inflicting full-blown man flu symptoms on their partners, according to a new, light-heart- ed survey of 3,000 women by menthol lozenges manufactur- er, Fisherman’s Friend Blackcurrant. Fisherman’s Friend spokesman Rob Metcalfe has no time for these feeble creatures. “Man flu’s a fairly recent phenomenon that has emerged alongside the ‘metrosexual male’,” he points out. “Men were real men when Fisherman’s Friend lozenges were first created in 1865 to help relieve extreme condi- tions on voyages. Those sailors wouldn’t have got their wives to call their captains to excuse them from their voyages just because of a runny nose.” Yet despite suspecting that men exaggerate their illness, one in three women devotedly nurse their man through the ‘worst’ (with one in 10 taking

their man through the ‘worst’ (with one in 10 taking notoriously bad at going for check

notoriously bad at going for check ups or heeding serious warning signs about their health. So sometimes even the biggest hypochondriacs are actually suffering from some- thing that needs expert med- ical attention. If he is extreme- ly anxious about his symptoms or has been complaining about ill health for a period of time, make a doctor’s appointment and offer to go with him for morale support.

MAN FLU. November is peak month for man flu cases.

Flu busting menu

time off work to do so), while one in five will even telephone their man’s boss to say he’s too sick to work. Be smug if your man is called Alan, Andrew and James. The survey found these blokes are made of sterner stuff and are least likely to complain.

What is it?

The patient may also pore over an A-Z guide to health problems or trawl medical sites on the internet, with a resulting rise in the number and severity of symptoms.

Feed a man healthy meals that will boost his energy levels so recovery is faster - you know it makes sense! Nutritionist Nigel Denby, has some sound advice. “The immune system needs essential nutrients to give the body the best chance of recov- ering from the lethargy left behind after a bout of flu, and for reducing the risk of further infection,” he says. Make sure your man’s meals contain the following essential nutrients:

Iron, found in red meats, pulses and leafy green vegeta- bles, is essential for energy and to avoid anaemia. Vitamin A, found in yellow and orange vegetables like sweet potatoes, peppers and carrots, helps the body ward off infection. Berries are one of the best sources of antioxidants, which help protect cells from attack. B vitamins - found in whole- grains, folate from liver and leafy green vegetables, and selenium found in nuts, fish and eggs, help boost mood which can be low after illness.

Celebrities and man flu

Celebrities most likely to play the sympathy card at the sign of the first sniffle, according to the survey: musician Peter Doherty and footballer Cristiano Ronaldo. Women would most like to nurse: Brad Pitt, David Beckham and actor Colin Firth.

What can you do?

Mothering and sympathy should be given in frequent, large doses. The carer must frequently tell the sufferer that “you’re being really brave” and “it must be miserable for you”. Ensure patient receives a constant flow of snacks, drinks, magazines and news- papers. Position large litter bin by bed/sofa so can he while away idle hours aiming (and usually failing) to score balled-up tissue ‘tries’. Ensure volume levels of children and animals are reduced. Make sure all look suitably concerned whenever they’re within sight of the patient.

Self-help for carers

Man Flu is defined as a psy- chological condition in which men claim to suffer more from colds than women. November is apparently the peak month for man flu cases, with one in six men complain- ing about it striking then.

What are the symptoms?

Watch for these signs that your man may be suffering:

He cannot give you a con- cise breakdown of his symp- toms and relies on ‘it hurts everywhere’. This is a competitive ail- ment, so if you point out you suffered from the same thing but struggled through and recovered he responds: “Oh, but this is much worse.” He retreats to bed or the sofa and appears nervous at the thought of moving, especially when the word ‘work’ is used or if the phrase “get it your- self” is used in anger. Men suffering from man flu are often unable to carry out their normal chores. If chal- lenged they may sigh heavily, look martyred and state: “I am ill you know!”

Anything less than devoted, unconditional caring, may only prolong symptoms as the patient will regard it as a chal- lenge to prove the severity of

his illness. Avoid statements such as:

“You’ve probably got what I had, it doesn’t last long” or “get over it, I’ve got to work/look after the kids and can’t run around after you

24/7”.

Warning: While many men make a huge fuss about minor symptoms they are also are

run around after you 24/7”. Warning: While many men make a huge fuss about minor symptoms
run around after you 24/7”. Warning: While many men make a huge fuss about minor symptoms
run around after you 24/7”. Warning: While many men make a huge fuss about minor symptoms

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 Health

Health service to open two new day centres and take on 46 professionals for the mentally ill in the province

The day centres will be located in El Cónsul in Malaga and in Antequera and will open at the end of this year; another centre is planned for Carlos Haya

ÁNGEL ESCALERA MALAGA

At the end of last week, to mark World Mental Health Day, the regional health department announced improvements to the

service provided for the mental-

ly handicapped in the province of

Malaga. Before the end of this year the department will open two

new day centres, one in El Cónsul in the city and the other in Ante- quera, each with a capacity to care for 25 patients. The centres will be open between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.

A third new day centre is planned

for the Carlos Haya hospital in two years’ time. Also announced last week were plans to reinforce the health ser- vice’s staff currently working with mentally ill patients with an extra 46 professionals. These include ten psychiatrists, four psycholo- gists, 15 nurses, five administra- tive assistants, nine nursing aux- iliaries, an occupational thera- pists and two occupational therapy assistants. These will be

pists and two occupational therapy assistants. These will be STALL. Work by mentally ill patients was

STALL. Work by mentally ill patients was on display at the Clínico hospital last week. / SALVADOR SALAS

posted from November in the Car- los Haya, Clínico Universitario, Antequera and Ronda hospitals. Meanwhile the Hospital Clíni- co’s second unit for severe psy- chiatric patients is due to open in eight months’ time on the Marí-

timo hospital site in Torremoli- nos. A similar unit is also planned to open at the Costa del Sol Hos- pital in Marbella in two and a half years’ time. The regional Mental Health Coordinator, Rafael del Pino,

explained that at present in the province of Malaga some 4,000 patients had been diagnosed with severe mental disorders and added that one in four people suf- fers a mental problem at some point in their life.

HEALTH AND BEAUTY

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Movement for Global Mental Health launched

SUR IN ENGLISH

World Mental Health Day last Friday saw the launch of the Movement for Global Mental Health, which aims to improve services for people with men- tal disorders worldwide. The Movement is a global network of individuals and institutions who are committed to further- ing the goal of scaling up evi- dence-based services for peo- ple living with mental disor- ders and protecting their human rights. The Movement emerged from the recent Lancet series of articles on Global Mental Health. Its goal is to implement the final Call for Action article of the series which demands the scaling up of treatments for mental disorders, for the human rights of those affected to be protected, and for more research in low and middle income countries. The founders of the move- ment believe that it will facil- itate a vigorous and sustained response to the Call for Action. They add that the Lancet will designate mental health as one of its ‘campaign focal points’ in the coming years.

,

I

http://www.globalmentalhealth.org/

MORE

INFORMATION

as one of its ‘campaign focal points’ in the coming years. , I http://www.globalmentalhealth.org/ MORE INFORMATION
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AND BEAUTY

28 H E A L T H A N D B E A U T Y
28 H E A L T H A N D B E A U T Y

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N E N G L I S H

TREATMENT. The number of foreigners receiving treatment in Malaga’s hospitals increases each year. / SUR

Public hospitals claim 16 million each year from countries whose citizens have received treatment

More patients of other nationalities are treated in Marbella’s Costa del Sol Hospital than any other in the province of Malaga

Foreign patients fall into two categories:

those who fall ill on holiday and those who live in the province all year

Most foreigners receiving treatment are citizens of the European Union and Morocco

treatment are citizens of the European Union and Morocco ÁNGEL ESCALERA Illness knows no national bound-

ÁNGEL ESCALERA

Illness knows no national bound- aries. One never chooses where

to fall ill, and illness can strike

while travelling, while on holi- days or while residing in a coun-

try that is not one’s own. Spain,

of course, and the province of

Malaga in particular, has a high-

er number of both visiting and

resident foreigners than most other parts of the world, and with

a highly developed regional

health service, it comes as no sur- prise to learn that the number of

foreigners receiving treatment

in Malaga’s public hospitals is

increasing every year. Last year,

Malaga’s hospital administrators claimed 16.7 million euros in

unpaid fees from countries whose citizens received treatment in the public hospitals of the province,

or from health insurance com-

panies providing coverage for these people. Most foreigners receiving treatment are from the European Union - especially Britain - followed by Moroccans and South Americans, mostly Argentinians. But sending a hospital bill is one thing and getting paid is quite another. “We make out the bills correctly and send them off, but never get back enough to cover all the costs incurred,”

says a spokesperson for one hos- pital. Foreigners who go to hospital in the province of Malaga fall into

two distinct categories: those on holidays who become ill and need immediate medical attention and those who live in the province all or part of the year and choose to use the health services available.

Health Delegation data

The hospital that earned most

money (12 million euros) attend- ing to foreigners in 2007 was the Costa del Sol Hospital in Mar- bella. It was finished some dis- tance behind by the Carlos Haya Regional Hospital, which took in 2.8 million euros, the University Clinic, with 1.2 million euros and the The Axarquía Regional Hos- pital with 700,000 euros, accord- ing to figures supplied by the Provincial Health Delegation. The reason so many foreign- ers use the province’s health ser- vices is obviously linked to the increasing number of foreigners living in the province, especial- ly along the Costa del Sol and in Malaga city. Some have private insurance covering the cost of a stay in a private hospital, but most choose to avail of the pub- lic health service when ill, in need of surgery or giving birth. The different nationalities using

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

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HEALTH AND BEAUTY

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the health service are most notable in the casualty depart- ments of our hospitals, followed by the wards, the out-patients departments and finally, in the doctors’ consulting rooms. Not surprisingly, given the large number of foreigners liv- ing in the area from Estepona to Fuengirola and Mijas, the hospi- tal with the highest number of foreign patients is the Costa del Sol Hospital in Marbella. Although there are many excel- lent private clinics in this area too, most foreign patients in urgent need of attention choose this hospital over the smaller pri- vate clinics. In the Costa del Sol Hospital, 25.8 per cent of those receiving urgent treatment are foreign, 26.4 per cent of hospital stays are by foreigners and 38.7 per cent of births are by foreign- ers. These figures, supplied by the Health Delegation, also show the high number of foreigners undergoing hip replacement operations in this hospital:

approximately 30 per cent of hip replacement surgery in the Cos- ta del Sol Hospital is carried out on non-Spanish patients.

The spirit of solidarity

“The Andalusian public health system has a vocation to attend to all in need, regardless of place of origin,” says a spokesperson for the Health Service. And since the Costa del Sol is the preferred destination of many thousands of foreigners in Spain, it is also where most of them become ill. There are two types of foreign patients: those who happen to fall ill on holidays and have European health insurance cards and those who live in the province of Malaga. In the case of the former group, hospital costs are met through the Health Cohesion Fund, a system based on the relative number of for- eigners seeking health care in Spain and Spaniards seeking health care abroad. Andalucía receives from 25 to 27 million euros each year through this system, the total bill for the first five months of 2008 amounting to ten million euros. The most obvious example of permanent foreign residents seeking health care in the province of Malaga can be seen on the Costa del Sol. Andalucía received sixty-five million euros from central gov- ernment funds for health services provided to this group last year, but it must be kept in mind that a quarter of all foreigners resi- dent in Spain live in the region of Andalucía.

Profile of

a patient

A. E. MALAGA

The profile of a patient under- going medical attention in a public hospital in the province of Malaga is of a per- son of high or medium eco- nomic level, retired in his own country and living per- manently or for long periods of time in Malaga city or on the Costa del Sol. Being older people, they are usually more prone to illness, and subse- quently tend to require more medical attention. In many cases, they suffer chronic ill- nesses that necessitate fre- quent or continuous medical attention. To fully appreciate the number of foreigners receiv- ing treatment in hospitals and health centres on the Costa de Sol, one needs do no more than visit them. Many of the patients there do not even speak Spanish, or speak it very poorly, making communication between medical staff and patients sometimes quite difficult. Many doctors and nurses speak some English, never- theless, and language is sel- dom a serious problem. In cases where interpreters are needed, however, there are volunteers on hand in the hospitals on the Costa del Sol to lend a helping hand.

Many doctors and nurses speak some English and language is seldom a serious problem

Andalucía receives 65 million euros from the state to treat foreigners

Foreign women giving birth account for 38.7 per cent of the total

Numerous foreigners prefer to receive treatment in Malaga hospitals because the services are excellent and they have to wait less time for operations

Better here than at home

ÁNGEL ESCALERA

Most foreign visitors and per- manent foreign residents in Andalucía and the Costa del Sol confide fully in the efficiency of the Andalusian public health sys- tem. The result is that almost all of them, rather than return to their countries of origin when they fall ill, do not hesitate to attend their local health centres for treatment or choose to receive treatment in the public hospitals of the region.

Confidence

“It has been proven that many foreigners who own houses on the Costa del Sol choose to receive medical treatment here rather than in their own coun- tries,” says the manager of the Carlos Haya Regional Hospital,

Antonio Pérez Rielo. In his view, the reason for this is that they have full confidence in the quality and efficiency of the Andalusian public health sys- tem, the health centres and the hospitals in the region. “We offer a wide range of health ser-

The SAS provides services that may not be available elsewhere

Foreigners have full confidence in the quality of the health system

vices here, and have magnifi- cent medical professionals and the most up-to-date facilities,” he adds. It must also be remembered that the Andalusian Health Ser- vice (SAS) provides, in many cas- es, services that are not available in the countries of origin of the foreigners it treats, and that wait- ing lists in Andalusian hospitals are generally much shorter than in other European countries.

Serious illness

Foreign residents in Andalucía have such confidence in our health system that many cancer patients choose to undergo treat- ment in our hospitals. “And the situation is the same with respect to many other serious illnesses,” says the manager of Malaga’s Car- los Haya Regional Hospital.

the manager of Malaga’s Car- los Haya Regional Hospital. LONG STAYS. Many foreigners are long-term patients

LONG STAYS. Many foreigners are long-term patients in Malaga’s hospitals. / SUR

Car- los Haya Regional Hospital. LONG STAYS. Many foreigners are long-term patients in Malaga’s hospitals. /
Car- los Haya Regional Hospital. LONG STAYS. Many foreigners are long-term patients in Malaga’s hospitals. /
Car- los Haya Regional Hospital. LONG STAYS. Many foreigners are long-term patients in Malaga’s hospitals. /
Car- los Haya Regional Hospital. LONG STAYS. Many foreigners are long-term patients in Malaga’s hospitals. /
Car- los Haya Regional Hospital. LONG STAYS. Many foreigners are long-term patients in Malaga’s hospitals. /
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Entertainment

30 Entertainment OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N E N G L

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

What to do

SUGGESTIONS FOR THE COMING WEEK

Visits & shows

Jardín Botánico Histórico La Concepción (botanic gardens)

Ctra. de las Pedrizas (CN-331), km. 166. Malaga Tel: 952 252 148. 10 a.m. - 7.30 p.m. Closed on Monday.

Boasts more than 5,000 tropical, subtropical and indigenous species. Adults, 3.10 ; children 6 to 16: 1.60. Special discounts for groups.

Alcazaba and Roman theatre

C/ Alcazabilla, s/n Malaga. Tel: 952225106. 9.30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday closed.

11th century fort built at the foot of the Gibralfaro castle. 1.80 euros.

Andalucía Horse Show

El Ranchito, Camino del Pilar, Torremolinos. Every Wednesday 5.45 p.m. Bookings 952383140 / www.spanishhorseshow.com / info@spanishhorseshow.com

‘Rhythm on Horseback’, a one and a half hour show with five different acts, has been running nonstop since 1993. Plus option to stay for ‘Spanish Night’ dinner and flamenco show afterwards.

Museums

Picasso Museum Malaga

Palacio de Buenavista. C/ San Agustín, 8. Open 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays, until 9 pm. Closes Mondays. Tel 952127600. www.museopicassomalaga.org

The museum holds 155 pieces of art by Picasso. Permanent entry, 6 ; tempo- rary, 4,5 ; combination of both, 8 .

Casa Natal de Picasso, Malaga.

Plaza de la Merced, 15. Malaga. Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sunday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Tel.: 952 060 215. Closes on Sunday afternoonandbankholidays.

Exhibition and study centre. Entry: 1 . Freefor accompaniedchildrenunder 17, students and 65+ citizens.

Centro de Arte Contemporáneo, Malaga.

C/ Alemania, s/n. Tel: 952 120 055. From Tues to Sun, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Free entry. www.cacmalaga.org.

Centre dedicated to art of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Popular Art and Traditions Museum, Malaga.

Pasillo de Santa Isabel, 10. Tel: 952 217 137. 10 a.m. - 1.30 p.m. and 7 p.m. - 8 p.m Closes

Exhibition
Exhibition
Exhibition The artist mainly paints couples embracing, women, and colourful still-life pieces. ))) Malaga artist Paco

The artist mainly paints couples embracing, women, and colourful still-life pieces.

))) Malaga artist Paco Meléndez is holding an exhibition in Mijas Costa

See Meléndez’s Picassoesque works

The Casa Cultura in Las Lagunas, Mijas, will be inaugurating an exhibition of work by Malaga artist Paco Meléndez this evening (Friday October 17th at 8 p.m.) Meléndez’s subjects vary from por- traits of women, or couples embracing, to captivating still-life paintings but it is the vibrant colours he uses on canvas which make his work unique, and his Picassoesque style sets him apart from other contemporary artists. Strong colours are used in his paintings to por-

tray perspective and emotions, and some critics have commented that his lifelike characters “observe the viewer at the same time as they are viewed them- selves”. With each and every painting, the talented artist strives to reflect the viewer and hopes that the viewer can identify him or herself with the object of the painting.

F Where: Casa de la Cultura, Mijas Costa. F When: The exhibition is inaugurated this evening and ends on November 17th.

Saturday afternoon,

holidays.

life of the province

through costumes, wine, art, ceramic,

etc. Entry 2 Groups, students and pensioners: 1 Under 14s free.

Urban and rural

Sunday and bank

Municipal Museum of Antequera.

Palacio de Nájera. Plaza del Coso Viejo. Tel.: 952 704 51. Closes Monday. Tuesday to Friday:10 a.m. - 2 p.m. From Wednesday to Friday: 8.30 p.m. - 10.30 p.m. Saturday:

10 a.m.-1.30 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m. - 1.30 p.m.

Contains Roman remains and sculptures, as well as religious art. Entry: 3 .

Ethnographic Museum

Plaza de toros de Estepona. Tel.: 952 805 709. Monday to Friday: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Exhibition

customs of the area. Free Entry.

which

portrays

the

Museo del Bandolero (Bandit Museum)

C/ Armiñán, 65. Ronda. Tel.: 952 877 785. 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Exhibits costumes, weapons and documents. Adults: 3 ; pensioners and students: 2.50 . Group discounts (for more than 10 people): 2 .

Museo Ralli, Marbella

Urb. Coral Beach (between Puerto Banús and Marbella, Ctr. Nac. 340, km 176, Marbella. Tel. 952857923. Tuesday to Saturday 10 a.m. to

2p.m.

Ten galleries exhibiting Latin American art as well as sculpture by European artists such as Dali, Eduardo Soriano and Arman. Free entry.

Theme park

Tivoli World SShowandAmusement Park, Avda. de Tivoli s/n. Arroyo de la Miel,

Benalmádena. Tel: 952577016. Open Saturdays and Sundays from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sundaymornings bric-a-bracmarket.

Special entrance 1 euro from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.www.tivoli.es

The Costa del Sol’s largest entertainment park, surrounded by attractive gardens, bars and themed restaurants, has more than 40 thrilling rides and a wide range of shows. Entrance 6 euros. Supertivolino wristband 12 euros. Free entry for children under one metre tall.

Nature parks

Crocodile Park

C/ Cuba, 14. Torremolinos. Every day 10 a.m to 7 p.m. Tel: 952051782.

Crocodiles and more than 350 animals (water birds and amphibians) live in this park. Adults: 10 ; children (4-12): 7.50 Children under 4 free. Under 12s must be accompanied by an adult.

Selwo Marina

Parque de la Paloma, Benalmádena. Tel:

902190482. Open every day from 10 a.m.

Aquarium with performances by dolphins and sea lions. Adults: 16 Children and seniors: 11.90

Selwo Aventura

Km 162.5, Ctra N-340 (A7), between San Pedro and Estepona. Tel: 902190482. Open every day from 10 a.m.

Safari park with tours to see the wild animals and accommodation. Adults:

22.50 Children and seniors: 15.50 Group Discounts plus educational visits

Teleférico Cable Car

Explanada Tivoli, Arroyo de la Miel, Benalmádena. Tel: 902190482. Open every day from 11 a.m.

Cable car ride up the Calamorro mountain. Adults: return 12.50 single 7 Children and seniors: return 9 single 5 Discounts for groups plus educational visits

Lobo Park

Antequera to Álora road, Km 16. Tel:

952031107. Every day 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Wolves in a semi-natural environment. Guided tours, petting zoo, horse riding and cafeteria. Adult: 7.50 . Children: 5.50 May to October special Howl Nights, guided tours and BBQ. Call for reservation.

Markets

Monday: Marbella, Torrox, SanEnrique andTaraguilla.Tuesday: Nerja, Antequera,FuengirolaandPuertoBanús. Wednesday: Alhaurín de la Torre, Malaga(Avda.JuanXXII),Mijas(LaCala), Rincón de la Victoria and Estepona. Thursday: San Pedro de Alcántara , Malaga (Cruz de Humilladero), Torre del Mar, Torremolinos, Vélez Malaga, Nerja, Alhaurín el Grande,Calahonda,Torreguadiaro(LaLaguna promenade),SanRoque(Estación)and PuenteMayorga.Friday: Benalmádena, Almuñécar, Manilva, and Rincon de la V (La Cala).Saturday: Coín,Malaga(ElPalo), NuevaAndalucía,PuertoBanús,Mijas(LaCala II and Las Lagunas), Ojén, Vélez Malaga, Fuengirola(fairground),Ronda(organic market. Plz San Rafael - 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 2nd and 4th Sat of the month), Coín (organic market - Plz Villa de Coín - every third Saturday of the month) and Torreguadiaro (crafts market on La Laguna promenade in the evening during the summer). Car boot at Las Cañas petrol station close to Caratracca on the 357 Malaga-Campillos road. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Telephone 952 458 413. Mobile

696068598.Sunday:Cártama,Malaga

(Martiricos), Rincón de la Victoria (Benagalbón),Fuengirola(MéndezNúñez), Ronda,Coín(LaTrocha),Pizarra(carboot oppositeDíasupermarket),Nerja(between Urbs. Almijara II and Flamenco) San Roque (El Ejidofairground)andSotograndePort (antique market by El Octógono). El Pescador, Villafranco(betweenCoínandCártama)from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. This market is in aid of SOS Animal Charity.

El Pescador, Villafranco(betweenCoínandCártama)from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. This market is in aid of SOS Animal

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 E

ENTERTAINMENT

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Exhibitions

Ilan Wolff

Plaza del Museo, 9, Seville. Tuesday from

2.30 p.m. to 8.30 p.m., Wednesday to

Saturday from 9 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. Sundays and holidays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Until November 5th.

The Israeli photographer exhibits 60 snaps taken around the world from his van between 1985 and the present day using the camera obscura (dark chamber) device.

Manuel Madrid

Centro Cultural Pablo Ruiz Picasso, Torremolinos. Monday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 8.30 p.m.

The artist’s work can be seen until October 29th.

A Joaquín Nebro photo.
A Joaquín Nebro photo.

Joaquín Nebro

Unicaja building, Calle Las Tiendas, 49, Vélez-Málaga. Friday October 17th to November 7th. Open Monday to Friday

6.30 p.m. to 8.30 p.m.

An exhibition of photographs entitled ‘Paso perdidos’ which features impres- sive black and white snaps.

Nights with Picasso

Malaga Picasso Museum, Palacio de Buenavista, Calle San Agustín, 8, Malaga. Telephone 952 127 600. Saturday October 18th at 8 p.m.

The last ‘Noche con Picasso’ of the year features live music and a guided tour around the facilities for a special price of two euros.

Music, dance & shows

CoraXalia concert

San Isidro church, Periana. Sunday October 26th at 7.30 p.m. Free

admission. Call 630 520 581 for more details.

CoraXalia, the international choir based

San Pedro fair

))) Competitions, concerts, and much more will be taking place

A whole weekend of fun at the fair

The San Pedro fair kicked off on Tuesday with an opening speech by the Marquess of Revilla, Francisco de Borja Otero Zuleta de Reales, and a firework display on La Salida beach. A whole weekend of fun activities will be taking place on the streets and at the fairground. The day fair will be begin at 1 p.m. every day at the Plaza de la Iglesia, Plaza del Pueblo de Istán and Plaza de los Enamorados, while tonight (Friday) at 8.30 p.m. there will be a dance perfor- mance by the municipal dance school in the Caseta Municipal. Traditional fair games and competi- tions will be taking place from midday on Saturday at the Plaza de la Iglesia, and a dance will be held at 10 p.m. at the Caseta Municipal, with music provided by the Velada Orchestra. Medina Azahara will be getting guests up on their feet to dance at a free concert in the same venue at 12.30 a.m. A procession in honour of the area’s patron will set off from the Plaza de la

of the area’s patron will set off from the Plaza de la Huelva star Sergio Contreras

Huelva star Sergio Contreras will be performing on Sunday night.

Iglesia at 12.30 p.m. on Sunday and will be followed by a dance with music by the Velada Orchestra at 10 p.m at the Caseta Municipal. The highlight of the night will be a per- formance by Huelva singer Sergio Contreras at the Caseta Municipal at 12.30 a.m.

F

Where: San Pedro de Alcántara

F

When: Until Monday

F

More information: www.marbella.es

in the La Viñuela area, will perform a selection of songs from well-known opera to quirky rock, in a variety of languages. Donations are welcome.

Music on the patio

Casa Museo, Plaza de la Libertad, Mijas. Friday October 17th at 8 p.m.

El ciguero y la bandá was formed in 2004 by José Miguel Guzmán, Antonio Medina, José Manuel García and Alberto ‘Peli’. They define their music as “agroromantic” - music composed in the solitude and tranquillity of the countryside, under the moonlight or under an olive tree.

La Insostenible Big Band

Teatro Las Lagunas, C/ Cno. El Albero, Mijas-Costa. Friday October 17th at 9 p.m. Price 5 euros.

La Insostenible Big Band was formed by students and teachers at the Malaga music conservatory. The band will be performing a concert of jazz music.

Oriental dance classes

Teatro Las Lagunas C/ Cno. El Albero,

Mijas-Costa. October 17th and 24th.

Cristina Gómez holds two different dance classes (group one from 5 p.m. to 6.30 p.m., group two from 6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m.)

Charity

Charity walk

Calahonda Lions have organised a 12 km walk in the pine forests of Ojén on Sunday October 19th to raise money for CRECE, a Marbella association that stimulates development in children with learning difficulties. Call John Taylor for a sponsor form or for more details on 696 766 576 / www.calahondalions.org

ADANA

18th

annual

dog

show

ADANA site, El Parque de los Pedregales on the Camino to Casares. Sunday October 19th at 10.15 a.m. For more information call Majorie on 952 797 405, or go to www.adana.es

The event boasts several agility

classes and is open to everybody, not just Adana dogs. Registration is on the day itself. A great family day out with bar, café and commercial stalls.

Caribbean Night

La Naranja Club, Calahonda. Saturday October 18th at 7.30 p.m. for 8 p.m.

Cost 20 euros, for tickets call 952 493

490.

Mijas La Cala Lions are holding a Caribbean Night in aid of the Diabetic Support Group. A hot and cold buffet will be available.

Fairs &

festivals

Arts Credo 2008

The Cathedral

Cathedral Square, Gibraltar. October 24th to November 2nd.

the Holy Trinity,

of

The

ten

day

cultural

festival

features

an

exhibition

of

art,

sculpture,

liturgical

vestments,

communion vessels and banners. It also features a number of concerts,

a comprehensive children’s

programme and regular and special Liturgies. Artists and sculptors are invited to exhibit their works. For more information go to anglicangib@gibtelecom.net, or call (350) 200 41799.

O.V. film

Cinesur, Parque Miramar

Avenida de la Encarnación, Fuengirola. Tel. 952198600.

BBurn After Reading: 12.15 p.m., 4.10

p.m., 6.10 p.m., 8.10 p.m., 10.10 p.m., 12.10 a.m. Righteous Kill: 12.10 p.m., 4 p.m., 6 p.m. The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas:

12.30 p.m., 4.30 p.m., 6.30 p.m.,

8.30 p.m.

Gran Marbella

Tel.

952810077.

Max Payne: 4.15 p.m. (Mon to Fri)

Paseo

Riviera,

Puerto

Banús.

4.15 p.m., 6.15 p.m., 8.15 p.m. (Tues

to Thurs)

Plaza Mayor

Yelmo Cineplex, Plaza Mayor, Malaga. Tel. 902902103.

Burn After Reading: 6.40 p.m., 8.40 p.m., 10.40 p.m., 12.40 a.m. The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas:

12.40 p.m., 4.40 p.m. Mirrors: 12.15 p.m Vicky Cristina Barcelona: 12.05 p.m. Mammaa Mia!: 12.50 p.m., 3.30 p.m.

El Ingenio

Av. Juan Carlos I Vélez-Málaga. Tel. 952 221 622.

Tropic Thunder: 12.10 p.m., 4.15

p.m., 6.20 p.m., 8.25 p.m.

Nerja Film Club

Cultural Centre Villa de Nerja, Calle Granada 45, Nerja. Telephone

952523863.

The Other Boleyn Girl: Sunday October 19th at 5 p.m. (USA 2008). A tale of two sisters competing for the same king (Henry VIII). The Other Boleyn Girl uses historical facts as window dressing for this work of fiction that is entertaining if not wholly believable. The film, which was produced by the BBC, stars Vicky Cristina Barcelona actress Scarlett Johansson, Natalie Portman (Closer) and Eric Bana (Troy). OV English with Spanish subtitles.

Barcelona actress Scarlett Johansson, Natalie Portman (Closer) and Eric Bana (Troy). OV English with Spanish subtitles.
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Andalucía

32 Andalucía OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N E N G L

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 A
R I N E N G L I S H OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 A

ANDALUCÍA

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AROUND ANDALUCÍA A town with a future El Ejido El Ejido
AROUND ANDALUCÍA
A town with a future
El Ejido
El Ejido
AROUND ANDALUCÍA A town with a future El Ejido El Ejido PORT. The esplanade and the

PORT. The esplanade and the Tower of Balerma, in one of the most populated areas of El Ejido.

of Balerma, in one of the most populated areas of El Ejido. DIVERSITY. The pleasure port
of Balerma, in one of the most populated areas of El Ejido. DIVERSITY. The pleasure port
of Balerma, in one of the most populated areas of El Ejido. DIVERSITY. The pleasure port

DIVERSITY. The pleasure port of Almerimar. Right: Daimuz, and below, the Castle of De Guardias Viejas.

El Ejido is a town with a sharp eye on the future, which has no intention of losing the essence of its past. It is an idyllic place both to live in and to visit. With 27 kilometres of coastline and spectacular views over the Sierra de Gádor, this municipality offers a wide range of activities, and the chance to do nothing at all except rest and enjoy being there.

TEXT: MIRIAM ALCARAZ PHOTOS: SUR

A RT, culture, history and a buoyant economy makes the town of El Ejido the capital of the Poniente

region. It is also a region that has been attracting more and more tourists in recent years, especial- ly since the magnificent Bahía de San Miguel project was built. El Ejido is the most important municipality in the province of Almería, competing economical- ly with the regional capital, and this is in spite of the fact that it is still a very young municipality, created as such in 1982 and com- prising the population centres of Santa María del Águila, Las Norias de Daza, Balerma, Almer- imar, San Agustín, Matagorda, Pampanico, Tarambana and Los Baños de Guardias Viejas. Agriculture is its principal

industry, although the munici- pality has been capable of diver- sifying its economic wealth. Its fruits and vegetables, neverthe- less, have been supplying Europe for the past few decades.

Attractions

The sun shines for three thousand hours every year in El Ejido, and while this accounts for its huge success in intensive food produc- tion, it also accounts for the attrac- tion of the area for tourists, both foreign and Spanish. The waters of the coastline are crystal clear, and the municipality’s eight beaches, stretching from the fish- ing village of Balerma to the Pun- ta Entinas-Sabinar Nature Park, are famous for their cleanliness. The town’s rich historical and architectural heritage is also wor-

thy of a visit. Among the many ancient sites in the region are the burial site of Daymún, dating from Roman times, the Castle of Guardias Viejas, which dates from the middle of the 18th century and which is situated close to the beach; the Tower of Balerma and the Mosaics of Ciavieja, all testi- mony to the origins of this place and its links with the past. The region has always had a farming and fishing industry, and its his- tory can be traced back to a time when people lived in what is now known as the archaeological site of Ciavieja. The present landscape of El Eji- do is largely a sea of plastic, cov- ering many hectares of fruits and vegetables, and it was the only man-made landmark visible to Spanish astronaut Pedro Duque

ROUTE MAP F How to get there: Take the A-7 in the Almería direction. F
ROUTE MAP
F How to get there: Take
the A-7 in the Almería
direction.
F What to see: The fish-
ing locality of Balerma,
the Castle of Guardias
Viejas and Daymún, a
burial site of Roman
origin.
F Where to stay: In
Almerimar, in the Meliá
Hotel. In El Ejido pueblo, in the Ejidohotel (Avda. Oasis, s/n, ✆ 950 486
414. Gran Hotel Victoria (Bulevar, 400, ✆ 950 573 281) Hotel Husa Don
Manuel (Avda. Oasis, 252, ✆ 950 489 430).
F Where to eat: Restaurante La Costa (Ctra. Malaga, 48); Club Náutico
(Pleasure port of Almerimar); Mesón El Toboso (C/ Constantino, 28).
F Nature: The nature reserve of Punta Entinas is an area where migrating
birds can be spotted and where more than 200 species live. In La Caña-
da de Las Norias de Daza one can observe many different species, includ-
ing storks, coots, herons, malmseys and egrets.

on his first space flight in the Voy- ager. More than 14,000 hectares of

land are under plastic, using effi- cient watering and draining sys- tems that allow for intensive pro-

duction. Ownership of this land is diverse, with 8,000 farmers working it. The layout of the plas- tic landscape changes as produc- tion methods improve, and efforts are constantly being made to offer the best and freshest agricultur- al products in the world. The real beauty of nature in El Ejido is outside the town. The marshlands of the Punta Entinas nature reserve provide a natural habitat for more than 200 species of birds, and this is temporary home to species migrating between Europe and Africa. With its sand dunes and lakes filled with flamin- gos, the flora and fauna here is

unequalled.

Sun and sport

But there is a lot more to the area than birds and wildlife. This is a magnificent area for the practice of nautical sports. With temper- atures at an average 27 degrees in summer and 15 in winter, any activity related to the land and the sea can be practised here. The sports available include golf, sail- ing, underwater diving, canoeing, rambling and cycling. The golf

More than 200 bird species live in the marshlands of Punta Entinas

club has been fully renovated, the pleasure port of Almerimar has become a port of call for the yacht- ing confraternity from all over the world, the sea is clean and warm for swimming in, and there are many kilometres of bicycle trails in the area. And for those whose concept of fun is to relax and practice no sport, this is an ideal location, where one can saunter along at one’s own pace through the beautiful landscape or sit with a cool drink and watch the world go by. And finally, El Ejido is a place to go to in search of culture. For the past 30 years, its Theatre Fes- tival has offered the best of nation- al and international theatre, and was declared some years ago by the Junta de Andalucía to be of National Tourist Interest.

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ANDALUCÍA

34 A N D A L U C Í A OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

HERE AND THERE

2008 S U R I N E N G L I S H HERE AND THERE

NERJA. Six new children’s play areas have been installed on Burriana and

and the paving of the market area, among other projects. The chestnut harvest is down 75 per cent this year in the Genal Valley area, where 4,000 hectares are given over to this crop. The lack of rain is responsible for the sudden drop in production.

Gaucín

The former PSOE spokesper- son in the Town Hall, Felisa Carrasco, faces being thrown out of the party if they confirm that she gave up her seat on the council to become secretary to the new mayor, Fran- cisco Ruiz, of the Partido Popular. Ruiz took over as mayor in Septem- ber after he joined forces with four PA

councillors, all of whom face charges for planning offences, to bring a vote of no confidence against the former mayor Teodoro de Molina. Carrasco’s seat will be taken by Maribel Casas.

Estepona

The Town Hall is to set up an inspection service to ensure that the correct construction tax (ICIO) for licences grant- ed over the last four years has been paid. It is hoped that the local authority will gain an extra 18 million euros as a

At the end of last week the Junta de ANdalucía announced a new rural development plan aimed at creating 1,500 new jobs in the province of Malaga. Some 60 million euros will be spent between now and 2013 in an attempt to improve the conditions of people working in rural areas and prevent the depopulation of small villages.

Mijas

The Town Hall’s energy saving package includes a proposal to install solar panels on the roofs of municipal buildings where hot water is used. The energy saving plan aims to reduce con- sumption by 22 per cent and save 2,080,000 euros over the next eight years. Rather than buying the solar panels itself the Town Hall is considering a similar scheme as the one to be introduced in Fuengirola. This involves the local authority renting out the space for the panels on the roofs of munici- pal buildings to specialised firms for an annual fee.

Nerja

The local Beaches Department has now completed the instal- lation of six children’s play areas on the town’s beaches, five in Burriana and one in La Torrecilla. The climbing frames and slides have been purchased thanks to a 194,000 euro grant from the Junta de Andalucía. Other improve- ments to the local beaches include the creation of a motor- cycle parking area on the west side of Burriana as well as the planting of gardens.

Malaga

and is also the second cheap- est in Andalucía after Cordoba. The City Hall has now awarded the 11 million euro contract for work to convert the Villalón palace into the future Thyssen Museum. The museum will include gal- leries, a shop and other ser- vices and the offices of the recently formed Carmen Thyssen Collection Foundation. “Sea Shopping” is the name given to the project for quay number one of Malaga Port, between the lighthouse and Paseo de los Curas. This will be the commercial side to the port with 70 business premises for clothes and water sports shops and bars and restaurants, plus a spa and a convention centre. The corner of the Paseo de la Farola and the Paseo de los Curas will house an under- ground car park with more than 900 spaces above which there will be a cultural cen- tre. Another car park with 155 spaces will be built under- neath the lighthouse itself. Due to restrictions imposed during the drought period consumers that nor- mally use the most water, and therefore pay higher tariffs, have reduced their consump- tion. Before the drought peri- od 75 per cent of Emasa

tomers paid the lower rates charged in the first and sec- ond consumption brackets. Now 83 per cent of customers are in the low price brackets. This has led to a reduction in income for the city’s water company Emasa and to com- pensate the City Hall is to modify its pricing system. Now anyone consuming more than 12 cubic metres a month (instead of 14) will be charged the higher rates in the third price bracket. On top of this Emasa will put all its prices up by around five per cent next year.

Ronda

The Town Hall has officially signed over the land for the new hospital to the Junta de Andalucía which means that construction work can now get under way. The firm with the contract to build the hospital, FCC Construcciones, has already been preparing the land and the first stone is due to be laid today, Friday 17th. The new Ronda hospital is expected to take 42 months to build. Malaga Provincial Govern- ment has promised more than nine million euros in 2009 for towns and villages in the Ser- ranía de Ronda area, 24 per cent more than this year. In Ronda itself money will be spent on road resurfacing

cus- A-4 A-92 A-49 A-92 result of the inspections. The ICIO in Estepona is set
cus-
A-4
A-92
A-49
A-92
result of the inspections. The
ICIO in Estepona is set at 3.5
per cent of the cost of the con-
struction project.
Residents in the Islas
Canarias area have reiterated
their demands for the mobile
telephone aerials to be
removed from their
Huelva
neighbour-
Cordoba
Seville
Jaén
A-92
Jerez
Antequera
Cadiz
A-4
Ronda
Jimena de
Chiclana
Alh. el Grande
Malaga
la Frontera
Coín
Granada
Vélez Málaga
Conil
San Roque
Torremolinos
Marbella
Estepona
Benalmádena
Algeciras
Nerja
Manilva
Mijas
Almuñécar
Tarifa
Salobreña
Gibraltar
Sotogrande
Fuengirola
Motril
Mojácar
Adra
A-7
Almeria
La Línea
Ceuta
Roquetas del Mar
Mediterranean Sea
Melilla
A-4
To Madrid

The Socialist PSOE party has suspended its representatives responsible for its branch in Puerto de la Torre after discovering that they had been signing up dozens of new party members without permis- sion. The irregu- larities came to light when a local resident com- plained that he had received a party member- ship card without having applied to join. Other suspi- cious new “members” signed up by the branch included a man who died months before his name was added to the list and a member of the Guardia Civil who are prohibited by law from belonging to a political party. A City Hall committee will run the branch until new local representatives have been named. On average home owners in Malaga pay 20 per cent more IBI (property tax) than those in Madrid. In Malaga the average IBI bill is for 73.39 euros while in the country’s capital it is 57.94 euros. However when compared with other cities Malaga’s IBI is cheaper than Valencia’s (86.06) and Barcelona’s (75.83)

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 La Torrecilla beaches. / SUR hood. According to
SUR IN ENGLISH OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 La Torrecilla beaches. / SUR hood. According to

La Torrecilla beaches. / SUR

hood. According to the “anti- antenas” lobby group the res- idents will take their com- plaints to the ombudsman if they have to. They point out that there are three aerials of this kind within a radius of just 200 metres.

Benalmádena

Thanks to an agreement with the Town Hall, the Marymar old people’s home, run by the Unicaja social project, will act as a day care centre for 40 elderly people in the munici- pality. The aim is to provide day care for elderly people who live with their families but have no one to care for them during the mornings. Applica- tion forms for this free service are available at the centre itself or from the Social Welfare Department.

Algarrobo

At the end of this month the Junta de Andalucía is to start work on the construction of an artificial reef to prevent unau- thorised trawler fishing. The aim is to protect the young of popular fish species before they are big enough to reproduce in order to encourage the sus- tainability of the Andalusian fishing grounds.

Pizarra

The new version of the PGOU development plan has reduced the number of homes to be built in the municipality over the next decade from 7,000 to 1,300. The Mayor, Francisco Vargas, pointed out that the new figure respected the growth limits laid down by the Junta de Andalucía. The local

authority hopes that the new plan will come into force dur- ing 2009. The new Town Hall building is likely to open up to two years later than planned. The work is already 15 months behind schedule and is not likely to fin- ish before the end of this year. Changes to the plans have increased the cost of the new building by 600,000 euros to more than three million.

Álora

The alarm was raised last weekend when the authorities became aware that young peo- ple from all over the province were receiving text messages announcing a massive outdoor drinking party or “botellón” on the La Molina industrial estate last Sunday. A similar event last year resulted in dam- age to urban furniture, motor- cycle races and confrontations between revellers and local business owners. This year however the authorities man- aged to prevent the concentra- tion. The Local Police set up controls at the entrances to the industrial estate while Guardia Civil cars patrolled the streets throughout the day.

Antequera

During the first nine months of this year some 18,561 work- ers have signed new job con- tracts in the municipality. This

have signed new job con- tracts in the municipality. This ANDALUCÍA HERE AND THERE 35 ESTEPONA.

ANDALUCÍA HERE AND THERE

35
35
in the municipality. This ANDALUCÍA HERE AND THERE 35 ESTEPONA. Residents call for the removal of

ESTEPONA. Residents call for the removal of mobile aerials. / SUR

makes Antequera the sixth town in the province to gener- ate the most employment in this period. However the fig- ures are misleading as only one thousand of the all the con- tracts were for permanent posi- tions or new jobs. Of the total number of contracts signed, 10,039 were for men and 8,522 for women workers. Unem- ployment in the town had risen to 2,460 people in September, approximately 6.6 per cent of the local population over the age of 16.

Marbella

The Town Hall hopes to increase its income by four mil- lion euros in 2009 with its local

tax reform. A total of eleven tax-related bylaws dating back to the 1980s are to be adapted to the current legislation and the town’s socioeconomic sit- uation. The reforms were approved at a special council meeting on Wednesday. The new revised version of the PGOU, town development plan, was handed over to the Town Hall at the end of last week after taking into account the 8,500 objections or sugges- tions handed in by the general public. Sources confirmed that the new document maintains the figure of 27,000 as the num- ber of new homes to be built in the municipality over the next eight years, despite the Junta’s calls for the number to be reduced to by 4,200.

built in the municipality over the next eight years, despite the Junta’s calls for the number
36
36

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH

36 OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 S U R I N E N G L I

SUR IN ENGLISH

OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008

SUR IN ENGLISH OCTOBER 17TH TO 23RD 2008 ROUND-UP OF NEWS Algeciras on to the company,

ROUND-UP OF NEWS

Algeciras

on to the company, to avoid