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Laguna State Polytechnic University

Sta. Cruz, Laguna


College of Computer Studies

7 Fundamentals of Human Behavior

These are the principles of human behavior that have been validated over the forty
years of my work profiling thousands of people in the fields of motivation, persuasion,
and productivity.

1. ALL PEOPLE ARE MOTIVATED.


It may not seem that way to teachers, parents, or managers because of what they
experience on a daily basis, but it's true. Students may not be motivated to be in a
particular class kids may not be motivated to do what their parents say they should
be doing employees may be just one step behind their managers but they are all
motivated to be doing something. I have yet to meet anyone who isn't or hasn't been
excited about something.

2. YOU CAN'T, I CAN'T, WE CAN'T MOTIVATE ANOTHER


PERSON. WHAT WE CAN DO IS CREATE AN
ENVIRONMENT WHERE THEY CAN BE SELFMOTIVATED.
This means we can find out what excites them really interests them and allow them
to do it. Motivation is nothing more than having a motive for an action (motive/action)
a reason for doing what we want to do. All we have to do is find it for that other
person, and encourage it to happen. Once motivation builds to the level of enthusiasm,
it is contagious.

3.PEOPLE DO THINGS FOR THEIR REASONS NOT

YOURS.
This may seem obvious, but most people ignore this concept when they deal with
people of all ages. It is possible to get people to do what you want them to do, even if
their reasons for doing it are different than yours providing they have reasons to do
it. So the question is why would they do what you want them to do because THEY
want to do it. If it is their why, the potential for getting it done increases
dramatically. This is the reason why know why is essential to moving people and
their minds.

4. IN DEALING WITH OTHER PEOPLE, OR A TASK, USE


YOUR YOUR STRENGTHS BUT REMEMBER, AN OVEREXTENSION OF A STRENGTH MAY BECOME A
WEAKNESS.
For example, you may be decisive, but an overuse of this behavior may cause you to be
impulsive. This can effect the quality of your decisions. The strength of people with
high dominance is that they MAKE DECISIONS QUICKLY, but people of action often
move without thinking of the consequences.
The other extreme are people who are driven by high compliance, are concerned about
details and correctness, and may dwell on these issues to the point of NO ACTION.
The fundamental here is to use your strengths for motivation, but control them for
effectiveness.

5. YOU CAN NOT NOT COMMUNICATE OR MAKE


AN IMPRESSION ON ANOTHER PERSON IN CONTACT
WITH YOU.
From walking through a crowd, to talking to a group, or being involved with one-onone discussions, every thing about you is communicating or making an impression on
others. This includes verbal (telephone or voice-mail), and even written

communication.
These impressions can be be negative, neutral or passive, or positive and favorable.
These impressions can be controlled if you are aware of them. It has been said that the
most favorable impression you can make on another person is to be a good listener.
Listening is communicating the importance of the other person in your eyes. An
extension of this concept of favorable impressions, is to be genuinely interested in
what the other person is saying.

6. IF I KNOW MORE ABOUT YOU THAN YOU KNOW


ABOUT ME, I CAN IF I CHOOSE CONTROL OUR
COMMUNICATION.
In the age of influence and persuasion, the concept of controlling the communication
or dialog with other people has reached the level of obsession. If I have the natural or
learned ability to read people what activates and drives their behavior I can shape
our communication in a favorable way.
Today there are tools and techniques available to the masses to help understand
yourself and others. To facilitate open and two-way communication, understanding
the differences that drive behavior is necessary and achievable.

7. IF I UNDERSTAND YOU BETTER THAN YOU


UNDERSTAND YOURSELF I CAN IF I CHOOSE
CONTROL YOU.
This principle is responsible for stretching the psychology of persuasion and influence
into the realm of manipulation and control. If I truly know what drives your behavior
your wants, your needs, and your fears, I can, as proven for generations, control your
behavior.
At the least, I can attempt to control what you buy in our consumption- based society
to actually controlling destructive versus constructive behavior.

The imperative today is to really understand what drives your behavior. Fortunately,
the tools and techniques for self assessment and validation are accessible to every
individual. The language of behavior is common to all cultures.

Keys on Behavioral Science,


Assumption, Concept and Principles.
First, there are several conceptual schemes that have developed to such a degree that they might
qualify under the rubric of "theories" indeed, they are so labeled by many of those from whose
disciplines they emerge. Perhaps most promising is that set of notions that are called general
systems theory. Proceeding from the assumption that there are structural similarities in
different fields, and correspondences in the principles that govern the behavior of entities that
are intrinsically widely different, this approach seeks to identify those similarities and
correspondences (as well as dissimilarities) that might be found in the universes of all the
scientific disciplines. In its search for an integrated theory of behavior, the general systems
approach
1.Postulates the existence of a system, its environment, and its subsystems. Some of the key
concepts employed are feedback,
2. Homeostasis, network, entropy, and information, reflecting a considerable intellectual debt to
cybernetics. By thinking of the states as subsystems within the international system, which in
turn has a particular environment of physical and social dimensions, we are provided with a
rather fruitful
3.Taxonomy that suggests, in turn, a fascinating array of hypotheses. Within the same context,
the idea of homeostasis is particularly suggestive to those concerned with balance, stability,
and equilibrium in the international system.

Another set of concepts that seems to offer real promise


is that employed in the theory of games.

The clearest model postulates two or more players (individuals, groups, states, coalitions)
pursuing a set of goals according to a variety of strategies. If the goals are perceived by the
players as incompatible, that is, only one player may win, we have a so-called "zero-sum" or winlose game, with the players tending to utilize a "minimax" strategy. If, however, they perceive a
possible winwin outcome, their strategies tend to deviate sharply from the conservative minimax
pattern, in which they place prime emphasis on minimizing their maximum losses. The
appropriateness of such a model for an enduring rivalry seems rather evident.
We now turn from these very general conceptual schemes to some of the more limited concepts
found in the specific behavioral disciplines. Looking first at psychology, from learning theory,
stimulus-response theory, and the concepts associated with reinforcement, a wide range of
models can be adapted and modified and could ultimately shed useful light on diplomatic
influence, a central aspect of international relations. For example, is a major power more likely
to shape the policies of a weaker neighbor by punishment, reward, denial, threat, promise, or
calculated detachment? Or, in seeking to explain the way in which public opinion in a given state
ultimately influenced a certain policy decision, we might find some valuable suggestions in
reference-group theory, the concepts of access and role-conflict, or some of the models of
communication nets. To take another problem area, if one were concerned with the emerging
attitudinal characteristics of the international environment, such notions as acculturation,
internalization, relative deprivation, self-image, or consensus might prove to be highly
productive.