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TM M A GAZINE 2014 | ISSUE 1 Powering the future Also featured in this
TM M A GAZINE 2014 | ISSUE 1 Powering the future Also featured in this
TM M A GAZINE 2014 | ISSUE 1 Powering the future Also featured in this
TM M A GAZINE 2014 | ISSUE 1 Powering the future Also featured in this
TM M A GAZINE 2014 | ISSUE 1 Powering the future Also featured in this
TM
TM

M A GAZINE

2014 | ISSUE 1

Powering the future

Also featured in this issue:

Korea’s innovative power plant designs

z

AMEC gains the AVEVA advantage in the North Sea

z z z Enabling the Lean Construction revolution Arctech builds the world’s first oblique icebreaker
z z z Enabling the Lean Construction revolution Arctech builds the world’s first oblique icebreaker
z z z Enabling the Lean Construction revolution Arctech builds the world’s first oblique icebreaker
z z z Enabling the Lean Construction revolution Arctech builds the world’s first oblique icebreaker
z z z Enabling the Lean Construction revolution Arctech builds the world’s first oblique icebreaker
z z z Enabling the Lean Construction revolution Arctech builds the world’s first oblique icebreaker

z

z

z

Enabling the Lean Construction revolution

Arctech builds the world’s first oblique icebreaker

Reducing reactor outage time at OKG

z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training
z Video game technology transforms operator training

z

Video game technology transforms operator training

INSIDE

THIS EDITION

Page 12

Corporate News

Unleashing Creativity

3

AVEVA Wins UK tech award for Tech Innovation of the Year

7

Authoritative Insights on Shift Handover

15

AVEVA World Summit 2013 Hits a Home Run in Boston!

33

New Customers in 2013

46

Page 30

Product News

Enabling the Lean Construction Revolution

8

Playing it Safe: AVEVA AVP

18

Lean Construction: Effective Control of Iterative Change

26

Unlocking the Full Potential of Your Operations

37

Customer News

Page 33
Page 33
Page 18
Page 18

Cover story: KOSPO’s Use of AVEVA NET for Power Projects

4

Offshore Asset Management at AMEC

12

An Ice-breaking Innovation: Arctech Builds Baltika

22

Creative Engineering Reduces Reactor Outage Time at OKG

30

DSME and AVEVA Celebrate Decades of Collaboration

36

Burgasnefteproekt Reduces Design Time by 80%

39

Oil Field Development Engineering Drives Down Rework Time

40

Support for ICE in Complex and Demanding Projects

42

Cover photograph:

The Samcheok Thermal Power Project, South Korea. Image courtesy of KOSPO - rendered using 3D MAX.

Copyright © 2014 AVEVA Solutions Limited and its subsidiaries. All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written consent of the copyright holders. Licences issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency Limited or any other reproduction rights organisation do not apply to AVEVA World Magazine.

The views expressed in AVEVA World Magazine by any contributor are not necessarily those of AVEVA. Continued product development means that information relating to AVEVA’s products is subject to change. No responsibility can be accepted by AVEVA for action taken as a result of information contained in this publication.

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Editors – Magnus Feldt, Senior Marketing Specialist, AVEVA Camille Nedelec-Lucas, Editor and PR Specialist, AVEVA

Camille Nedelec-Lucas , Editor and PR Specialist, AVEVA twitter.com/avevagroup youtube.com/avevagroup 0 2 AVEVA

twitter.com/avevagroup

youtube.com/avevagroup

02 AVEVA World Magazine 2014| Issue 1

Page 36

Unleashing Creativity

Unleashing Creativity Watching an advertisement for a latest-generation video game recently, I reflected on how far

Watching an advertisement for a latest-generation video game recently, I reflected on how far – and how fast – these technologies have advanced to become mainstream culture. But whereas a game is an end in itself, AVEVA products in contrast are enablers; they unleash creativity right across the engineering industries, often in ways that were never envisaged when we first created the software.

The video game caught my attention because I had just witnessed a colleague demonstrating our new AVEVA Activity Visualisation Platform™ (AVEVA AVP™) product, which uses industrial gaming technology to enable simulation-based training. This is an enabling technology that not only meets an immediate and very real need to improve operational efficiency and safety by fostering excellence in training, but will also undoubtedly lead to many unforeseen innovations as its user community grows. While the benefits of a video game are short-lived, AVEVA’s technology and the projects it enables deliver value for decades.

‘To me, the fact that we can create pioneering new software technologies that then go on to enable others to pioneer completely new, practical solutions to economically important challenges ’

is truly exhilarating

Another way in which AVEVA is exploiting consumer-oriented technology for engineering applications is through the launch of the AVEVA E3D Insight™ tablet app, aimed at eliminating bottlenecks in the design approval process by providing direct access to the live AVEVA E3D™ design model, anywhere, any time. At the AVEVA World Summit in Boston we introduced AVEVA E3D Insight to a spellbound audience of delegates and leading industry analysts. These analysts are deeply knowledgeable and not known for giving praise lightly, so their universally warm welcome to this ground-breaking product was especially pleasing. The icing on the cake was to see the value of this new product also recognised by its receiving the UK tech awards ‘Tech Innovation of the Year’.

Almost every issue of AVEVA World Magazine illustrates our status as innovation enablers. The development of an oblique icebreaker – a vessel that moves sideways for more efficient ice-breaking – is just one example of the ways, described in this issue, that customers are using AVEVA products to innovate and achieve world firsts. The vessel is scheduled to be in service later this year. To me, the fact that we can create pioneering new software technologies that then go on to enable others to pioneer completely new, practical solutions to economically important challenges is truly exhilarating.

Now that AVEVA Everything3D™ has been in service with early adopters for a year, we are beginning to see how successful it is proving on real projects. No surprise to us, as it’s built on the same proven foundations as AVEVA PDMS™, but the engineering industry is entitled to be cautious when deploying any new technology, especially on such safety-critical applications as nuclear power. AVEVA E3D’s use by OKG on their nuclear projects is therefore particularly convincing proof of the confidence that this next-generation design technology engenders.

2014 brings new opportunities for AVEVA and its customers to achieve extraordinary things together.

and its customers to achieve extraordinary things together. Richard Longdon Chief Executive AVEVA Group plc AVEVA

Richard Longdon Chief Executive AVEVA Group plc

Integrated Information Management for Power Projects

How AVEVA NET is enabling efficient data management for the construction, operation and maintenance of one of Korea’s most advanced thermal power plants

of one of Korea’s most advanced thermal power plants Korea’s energy demands, post-industrialisation, have

Korea’s energy demands, post-industrialisation, have rocketed since the 1980s and the country remains a major energy importer; as a result, energy supply continues to be high on the political agenda. Accordingly, its power sector is almost entirely controlled by the state. The South Korean government owns a 51% share in the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) which is responsible for 93% of the country’s electricity generation. Korea Southern Power Co. Ltd. (KOSPO), a subsidiary of KEPCO, is one of the country’s biggest domestic power providers.

KOSPO is today responsible for ten facilities in the country which, with a total generating capacity of 9,240 MW, provide about 11.2% of South Korea’s energy. At the 2013 AVEVA World Summit, Mr HeeJong Kim, a senior manager in charge of the deployment of KOSPO’s Integrated Construction Management System (ICMS) for power plant construction projects gave a presentation on KOSPO’s use of AVEVA NET™. We spoke to him afterwards to learn more about the system and the future projects it will facilitate.

About the project KOSPO has plans for six diverse new power facilities, including wind, combined-cycle and coal power. Of the six projects, the USD $3bn, 57-month Samcheok Thermal Power Project is the first, and by far the largest. The overarching strategy is the provision of Korea’s grid with a constant, stable supply of electricity by increasing capacity and developing a diversified energy basket. Samcheok, for example, will be able to burn coal of different grades, thereby effectively avoiding potential supply-chain issues in the future. The innovative coal-fired plant will be located in the north-east of South Korea, and will occupy 2.5 million square metres of reclaimed coastal land.

Janis Choi Senior Marketing Specialist, AVEVA Korea Aerial view of the Samcheok Thermal Power Project,
Janis Choi
Senior Marketing Specialist, AVEVA Korea
Aerial view of the Samcheok Thermal Power Project, South Korea. Image courtesy of KOSPO.
Mr HeeJong Kim, presenting at the AVEVA World Summit 2013 in Boston.
Mr HeeJong Kim, presenting at the AVEVA World Summit 2013 in Boston.

In the facility’s first phase, it will generate up to 2,000 MW using the plant’s four 500 MW Circulating Fluidised Bed (CFB) boilers. The CFB boilers will feed two 1,000 MW turbines and will fire sub-bituminous coal of 4,000 Kcal per ton imported from Indonesia, with the potential to burn 20% biomass (representing 400 MW).

The plant is an interesting paradox; although it will burn high-water, low-ash coal typically known for its low energy content, the facility has at the heart of its design the reduction of the environmental impact of producing energy. This is achieved in a number of ways.

Firstly, the CFB boilers have improved efficiency due to superior heat transfer and more efficient combustion. Secondly, the facility’s auxiliary power needs will be met from renewable sources, which include fuel cells, hydropower, solar panels and wind turbines. Samcheok’s coastal location will also enable it to embrace wave-power generation. Any excess power generated will go into the grid.

Mr KeeSoo Kang (standing), president of POMIT. Photo courtesy of POMIT.
Mr KeeSoo Kang (standing), president of POMIT. Photo courtesy of POMIT.

‘As an integrated Information Management system, AVEVA NET Portal was appealing to KOSPO for its cost-effectiveness, simple installation and easy-to-use interface

Choosing AVEVA software On a project of this size, a large number of EPCs are involved, generating a huge quantity of data that it is vital for KOSPO to manage effectively. The company required a centralised Information Management solution that could handle large volumes of data from any source, and could also provide the ability to clearly visualise this information. Throughout a power plant’s life cycle, about 80% of its technical information comes from EPCs; seamless data management will enable KOSPO to use this information effectively to operate and maintain the plant to maximise its life span.

POMIT (www.pomit.co.kr), a system developer and provider of plant IT solutions, is a trusted business partner of KOSPO and they were asked to suggest a solution. Already a successful customer of AVEVA, having used both AVEVA PDMS™ and AVEVA NET since 2009, POMIT recommended AVEVA NET Portal™ and subsequently played a key role in installing it.

and subsequently played a key role in installing it. Cut-away model of the Samcheok Thermal Power
and subsequently played a key role in installing it. Cut-away model of the Samcheok Thermal Power
Cut-away model of the Samcheok Thermal Power Project. Image courtesy of KOSPO.
Cut-away model of the Samcheok Thermal Power Project. Image courtesy of KOSPO.
Plan view of the Samcheok Thermal Power Project. Image courtesy of KOSPO. KOSPO’s Cyber ATP-1000

Plan view of the Samcheok Thermal Power Project. Image courtesy of KOSPO.

the Samcheok Thermal Power Project. Image courtesy of KOSPO. KOSPO’s Cyber ATP-1000 system uses AVEVA NET

KOSPO’s Cyber ATP-1000 system uses AVEVA NET to integrate and provide access to all types of asset information. Graphic courtesy of KOSPO.

all types of asset information. Graphic courtesy of KOSPO. Navigating between different information sources using AVEVA

Navigating between different information sources using AVEVA NET. Graphic courtesy of KOSPO.

Mr Kim explained, ‘Using IT and 3D technology for sharing information and optimising decision-making processes was important for us to manage this mega-sized project. As an integrated Information Management system, AVEVA NET Portal was appealing to KOSPO for its cost-effectiveness, simple installation and easy-to-use interface. AVEVA NET Portal’s strong reputation in the global market and positive reference cases from other companies were also key in our final decision.’

AVEVA NET is now supporting the phased handover of information from the many EPCs involved in the Samcheok project, reducing time to operation and to the achievement of nameplate capacity. KOSPO’s ability to verify the accuracy of the information handed over, against its own information standards, will reduce errors and the need for rework.

About the system KOSPO’s AVEVA NET Portal implementation

is composed of AVEVA NET Workhub™, AVEVA

NET Gateways™ and 20 licences of AVEVA NET Dashboard™.

Mr KeeSoo Kang, president of POMIT, told us, ‘AVEVA NET Portal’s flexible and configurable qualities strongly influenced KOSPO’s final decision, as it enabled user training to take place at AVEVA Korea’s premises in Seoul using actual data and a replica of the customer’s environment. Such capabilities are extremely valuable as they enable a customer to access their own data and class libraries from an early stage.’

POMIT and KOSPO named the implementation the ‘Cyber ATP-1000’ (Advanced Thermal Power Plant) system. This AVEVA NET-based Information Management system enables the integration of a wide variety of information

types, from multiple vendors and sources, in a variety of file formats. The Cyber ATP- 1000 system connects to the LDM server, ERP system and RtDB, and enables users to view, interrogate and navigate between plant 3D models, mechanical equipment 3D models,

a wide variety of drawings, images and pdf documents, and a VR panorama view.

The extensive cross-referencing of information of different types and sources enables KOSPO’s engineers to quickly navigate and drill down through the information asset. For example, the image on the left illustrates the ways in which a user might start with a P&ID and quickly find detailed information about a selected item of equipment or the pipeline with which it is associated.

Samcheok’s future When KOSPO began the project, it decided to implement AVEVA NET to manage the huge quantity of data that such enormous energy complexes involve. AVEVA NET Portal technology is now the mandatory Information Management system for this important project.

Scheduled to be fully operational by December 2015, the facility is a step towards meeting South Korea’s target of a 30% reduction in carbon emissions by 2020. The long-term vision for the facility is exciting:

Samcheok aims to deliver 5,000 MW by 2020 from a wide range of sources.

About KOSPO Established in 2001, KOSPO, a state-owned company, continues to increase capacity and is currently committed to the construction of six future projects, including coal-fired, combined-cycle and wind plants. Its current generation capacity is divided across a number of energy sources, including 48.1% LNG (4,448 MW), 43.3% coal (4,000 MW), 8.06% oil (745 MW), and 0.51% renewable (47 MW).

Headquartered in Seoul, KOSPO is stepping into the global market as a top-class energy company with up-to-date power generation technology, and is actively seeking projects in Chile, India, Vietnam and Turkey. KOSPO expects that Samcheok will set an example for future coal-fired power plants around the world. The company is also focusing on developing green energy projects and exploring alternative fuel resources.

For further information, visit www.kospo.co.kr/ENGLISH.

‘AVEVA NET Portal’s flexible and configurable qualities strongly influenced KOSPO’s final decision, as it enabled user training to take place at AVEVA Korea’s premises in Seoul using actual data and a replica of the customer’s environment. Such capabilities are extremely valuable as they enable a customer to access their own data and class libraries from an early stage

AVEVA Wins UK tech award for Tech Innovation of the Year

New AVEVA E3D Insight™ app recognised for successful innovation and commercialisation

AVEVA has won the coveted UK tech award for tech innovation of the year for 2013 from an impressive field of technology companies in the software, manufacturing and engineering sectors.

The UK tech awards celebrate the success, reward the achievement and raise the profile of the UK tech community. The event has evolved from the very successful techMARK Awards, sponsored by PwC. The UK tech awards are positioned to broaden the tech universe and includes not only publicly quoted ‘techMARK’ companies but also AIM tech companies and fast-growing and innovative private tech companies.

The tech innovation of the year award was given to AVEVA for the release of its new AVEVA E3D Insight app and was chosen by a voting panel consisting of experts in technology and finance. According to the winning criteria, the tech innovation of the year award is granted in recognition of outstanding success in the commercialisation of new technologies.

success in the commercialisation of new technologies. Picture shows, left to right: Jass Sarai, UK Leader
success in the commercialisation of new technologies. Picture shows, left to right: Jass Sarai, UK Leader

Picture shows, left to right: Jass Sarai, UK Leader – Technology Industry Group, PwC; Sean Duffy, Head of Technology, Media and Telecoms, Barclays; Richard Longdon, CEO, AVEVA Group plc; and Lara Lewington (awards presenter). Photo courtesy of UK tech awards.

Enabling the Lean Construction Revolution

How mobile devices and new AVEVA technology support zero tolerance to wastage of time and effort

The development of Lean business processes first began in the Japanese automotive industries. It contributed to the industry’s dominance on the global stage in the 1990s, and went on to transform efficiency and product quality in the volume manufacturing industries.

The capital engineering industries, such as the oil & gas, power and process sectors, have long recognised the potential benefits of a corresponding approach to design and construction. However, certain key enablers of Lean Construction methodologies have, until now, been absent. AVEVA’s Future of Plant Design initiative is now creating these enablers.

One key tenet of the Lean philosophy is a zero-tolerance approach to any form of inefficiency or wastage. This embraces not only materials wastage but all facets of a project, including the wastage of time and effort, which can be the greater source of budget and delivery overruns.

5–15% of a design leader’s time is wasted due to their being unavailable to make timely decisions; the equivalent of up to three lost working days every month. This is generally because such individuals are highly mobile; if one could make the design approval process also mobile these decision makers would no longer be ‘out of the loop’ when out of the office. Approval delays could be avoided or minimised, maintaining the project workflow and eliminating many causes of wasted time and effort.

Currently, telephone and email are heavily used in keeping the design process moving forward, but these have significant limitations. Not only is the quantity and quality of information communicated very limited, but there is also no permanent, unambiguous record of any decisions made. For example, a telephone conversation agreeing to avoid a clash by moving an access ladder to another location would not be recorded as part of the project model’s dataset. The ladder would suddenly reappear in a different place. For partners in the supply chain or other design disciplines this change would have happened without explanation, and with no record of who made the decision, and why.

In the fast-moving, change-intensive processes of plant design, even minor delays created by such seemingly simple changes can add up to significant overall inefficiency. Where formal change approval by multiple discipline managers is involved, the potential for delays becomes even greater. There is clearly a need for a more effective process. This process is now made possible by the development of new software that exploits the capabilities provided by powerful tablet devices.

The solution AVEVA E3D Insight™ is a Windows 8.1 app that meets these requirements, enabling

The solution AVEVA E3D Insight™ is a Windows 8.1 app that meets these requirements, enabling project decision makers to view and approve AVEVA Everything3D™ (AVEVA E3D™) designs, using a touch-enabled device, from anywhere in the world.

Developed in collaboration with Microsoft, AVEVA E3D Insight streamlines the design review and approvals process to support Lean business practices. It maximises project efficiency by providing authorised users with direct access to the live AVEVA E3D design model, regardless of their location, 24 hours a day.

AVEVA E3D Insight enables users on the move to:

Visualise – The user can see the current project model and its associated information quickly and clearly.Visualise

Inspect – The user can inspect, manipulate and measure the model to check for potentially critical issues such as clashes, poor accessibility or non-compliance with design standards.Inspect

Comment – The user can liaise directly with the project’s design team and leave a permanent – The user can liaise directly with the project’s design team and leave a permanent record of feedback in the AVEVA E3D database. No more collating of comments is required and key decisions are permanently recorded.

Approve – Authorised users can set model status to customer-defined approval levels. – Authorised users can set model status to customer-defined approval levels.

With the potential this technology offers for reducing that 15% of time wastage, and the even greater benefits to project progress, it is not surprising that leading EPCs and OOs are taking a keen interest in it. However, for AVEVA E3D Insight to be considered as a viable business tool, a number of essential practical features had to be included.

a number of essential practical features had to be included. AVEVA E3D Insight was formally launched
a number of essential practical features had to be included. AVEVA E3D Insight was formally launched

AVEVA E3D Insight was formally launched to an enthusiastic reception from delegates at the 2013 AVEVA World Summit in Boston, USA.

Dave Wheeldon, Chief Technology Officer and Head of Engineering Design & Systems, AVEVA, explained, ‘We are thrilled to be partnering with Microsoft to support their “devices and services strategy“. The new wave of touch- enabled Windows 8.1 devices is enabling us to provide exciting new capabilities for our EPC and our Owner Operator customers.

‘AVEVA E3D Insight provides global, real-time, direct access to project models, enabling our customers to improve their business processes by eliminating the delays and decision bottlenecks caused by critical stakeholders being out of the office.’

Analyst insights into AVEVA E3D Insight

Brad Holtz, Cyon Research

‘AVEVA has done an excellent job extending and maintaining PDMS for more than 40 years, but the computing and business worlds have changed drastically during that period. AVEVA has invested a great deal of R&D in creating AVEVA E3D - a ground-up effort to deliver a product that will serve the engineering industry well for the next 40+ years, but which does not require its customers to change the way they think. From their point of view, AVEVA E3D is “PDMS on steroids”, but with no hiccups in making the transition. AVEVA’s customers work on products/projects with very long lifespans – some span multiple careers – so it’s no wonder that they are risk-averse when it comes to technology change. Understandably, their transitions from PDMS to E3D will be cautiously planned, but E3D Insight is likely to be the game changer that provides very visible and tangible business reasons for accelerating the shift to E3D.’

Tony Christian, Cambashi

‘For years, full exploitation of the 3D plant model has been hindered by limitations in IT infrastructures, so that AVEVA had to develop its leading-edge 3D plant design technology to overcome those limitations. Now, the combination of its leadership in efficient 3D model manipulation and today’s near-commoditised high- performance tablet technology has enabled AVEVA to deliver a breakthrough in the form of the AVEVA E3D Insight technology. The result is a huge step forward in the reach, accessibility and usability of 3D plant information – and therefore of its value to the wider project.’

Monica Schnitger, Schnitger Corporation

‘AVEVA E3D Insight has real benefits for design collaboration, construction and operations, which rarely happen in proximity to the office desktop. Users can manipulate the model, measure and inspect as needed and access status, as well as other non-graphical information. Managers and designers can also take part in a conversation and store its content directly with the model. This means that, throughout the design and fabrication process, the channels of communication between the EPC and the OO can stay open at all times.’

Clear visualisation of your live design model.

Making the vision a reality Perhaps the most obvious prerequisite is security; AVEVA E3D Insight provides direct access to the native project model. Security is therefore ensured by the provision of authenticated accounts using either existing security infrastructure or that provided by AVEVA E3D. This is further supported by the ability for the design data to be disclosed discretely to partners and clients, enabling better protection of intellectual property and preventing unauthorised access.

Clearly, to be an effective tool it must be able to access real-time information; in the example above, the design manager on the move must be aware of the access ladder’s true current location, just as he would be if working at his desk. To be able to make an informed decision, an AVEVA E3D Insight user can see the work of all disciplines, so that the impact of a proposed design change on, say, the piping or structural design can be quickly assessed.

Measure and inspect the live design model.
Measure and inspect the live design model.

AVEVA E3D Insight in action.

Further, information is contextualised so that the user viewing the 3D plant design model can readily drill down to review any tagged object’s associated information, such as its specification or design maturity status.

As with any network-dependent business tool, it should be resilient to network loss. AVEVA E3D Insight achieves this by retaining usable data when connection is disrupted, and being able to reconnect automatically. Finally, to deliver the potential benefits of mobile devices, AVEVA E3D Insight is highly intuitive to use.

devices, AVEVA E3D Insight is highly intuitive to use. To find out more about AVEVA E3D

To find out more about AVEVA E3D Insight, visit:

www.aveva.com/aveva_e3d_insight

Add comments to objects within the live design model.
Add comments to objects within the live design model.
Use the AVEVA PowerWheel™ to acccess object attributes live from the design model.
Use the AVEVA PowerWheel™ to acccess object attributes live from the design model.
With AVEVA E3D Insight, you can add markups to the model to help explain issues.
With AVEVA E3D Insight, you can add markups to the model to help explain issues.

Offshore Asset Management

How AMEC gains the AVEVA advantage in the North Sea

Rosey Cox Marketing Specialist, AVEVA

The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC.

AVEVA The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC. Lying in one of the most challenging
AVEVA The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC. Lying in one of the most challenging

Lying in one of the most challenging operating environments, harvesting the North Sea oil & gas fields has driven engineering development in both the construction and operation of production facilities. Managing the huge quantities of disparate information required to safely and efficiently operate these complex facilities is a considerable challenge that can only be met using powerful Information Management technology, in the form of an Enterprise Asset Management system (EAM, also sometimes referred to as a Computerised Maintenance Management or CMM system).

In 2008, AMEC, one of the world’s leading engineering, project management and consultancy companies, with more than 40 years of experience working in the North Sea, was awarded the role of duty holder for Fairfield Energy’s Dunlin A platform. At the same time, they selected AVEVA WorkMate™ as an EAM solution to support their operations. AVEVA WorkMate is unique, having been specifically created for managing the maintenance, operational, and HSE data associated with offshore facilities. To learn more about AMEC’s practical experiences in using the technology, we visited their Aberdeen headquarters and spoke with several of their senior operations professionals.

Material benefits Just as battles are won more by logistics than by tactics, so too does asset operation depend primarily on sustaining the efficient supply of a wide range of materials. Integrated materials management capabilities are therefore essential for operating the Dunlin platform. AVEVA WorkMate enables AMEC to order materials from anywhere in the world and to track their delivery from source, through AMEC’s Aberdeen depot to their final disposition on the platform itself. This powerful supply management system provides AMEC with complete visibility of where goods are at any time, and when they are due at any location. Potential delays can be identified early and corrected before they become a problem. Where delays cannot be recovered, this clear visibility of the entire supply chain enables AMEC to take informed action to reduce any impact on operations.

Maintenance Continual maintenance and repair is a necessary element of operations but shutdowns are costly. Planning and preparing for an optimised planned shutdown is a highly complex process; as many tasks as possible must be carefully coordinated to minimise its duration and the resulting loss of revenue. AVEVA WorkMate is designed to ease this process, integrating with other systems to ensure sufficient and reliable information is used to plan and prepare for each shutdown. It also enables the advanced planning and preparation of tasks that can take advantage of any unplanned downtime.

‘WorkMate is absolutely critical for a well-planned and prepared shutdown. In years gone by we used spreadsheets, which worked, but WorkMate is so much more effective. Planning and preparation has ’

moved into a new era

AMEC’s Shutdown Coordinator, Jim Barber, explained: ‘WorkMate is absolutely critical for a well-planned and prepared shutdown. In years gone by we used spreadsheets, which worked, but WorkMate is so much more effective. Planning and preparation has moved into a new era. The benefits from using WorkMate are quite important as we have everything in one place. We have the task details and the resources and the maths behind that, that actually tells us the duration of the shutdown in terms of planning. We can export these Task and Work Order details straight from WorkMate across to P6 for planning; that’s absolutely perfect in terms of scheduling.’

Planning maintenance effectively and executing it on schedule is vital also because of the requirement for materials. Not only is materials provisioning to remote offshore locations time consuming and costly, there is also very limited storage space on site. Efficient task coordination must be accompanied by equally efficient scheduling of materials deliveries.

by equally efficient scheduling of materials deliveries. The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC. AVEVA
by equally efficient scheduling of materials deliveries. The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC. AVEVA
The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC.
The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC.

About AVEVA WorkMate

AVEVA WorkMate is a modular, integrated EAM solution that supports every type of maintenance strategy, whether planned, condition- or reliability-based. Its integrated Work Management and Safe Job Analysis functions help operators to take full advantage of both planned and unplanned downtime through the automatic allocation and efficient coordination of planned and pending work.

AVEVA WorkMate is a feature-rich solution that supports effective control of work through integrated management of Work Permits, preparing isolation plans and tag-out and lock-out procedures. Plotting of scheduled activities on a plan of the asset enables rapid identification of task clashes and rescheduling requirements. WorkMate increases productivity and quality on a wide range of routine asset management tasks through such features as the use of templates, information sharing and electronic processing of Safe Job Analyses and Work Orders.

As AMEC’s experience demonstrates, AVEVA WorkMate is an effective Enterprise Asset Management solution, proven on some of the world’s most challenging facilities. For more information, visit www.aveva.com/AVEVA_WorkMate.

The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC.
The Dunlin A platform. Photo courtesy of AMEC.

Shaune Burdon, Maintenance Team Lead at AMEC, explained: ‘WorkMate is very important to maintenance planning on Dunlin. When we are planning maintenance, we need to know that we are executing work at the right time, when we have equipment outages, to avoid impacting production. We need to make sure we have the right people in place at the right time and that the work is ready to execute. WorkMate’s very good at that. I’ve got all the information I need at my fingertips to be sure that the jobs work together, and that the right materials are in place ready for people with the right qualifications and skills for each particular job. Without an integrated CMM system such as WorkMate the work would be a lot slower.’

Safety and compliance Risk management is a fact of life in the oil & gas industry and made all the more essential for the increased risks inherent in maintenance work. AVEVA WorkMate is designed to help manage such risks effectively and maximise operational safety by enabling team managers to monitor the status of all pending and in-progress work and to maximise their teams’ productivity.

In 2010 AMEC commissioned an independent review of their maintenance strategy for electrical equipment in potentially explosive atmospheres – their EX strategy. EX strategy is a critical safety issue that is subject to regulatory control, so a robust and well-executed EX strategy is essential. The review recommended that AMEC adopt a risk-based assessment methodology, which could also be supported by WorkMate.

Grace Baxter, Maintenance Manager at AMEC, explained: ‘We would no longer need to use spreadsheets; we could use WorkMate to produce reports and we could manage the data within WorkMate. That reduces the potential for errors outside of WorkMate and means that we have more accurate reporting and better coverage. By using WorkMate to manage the data more efficiently we have been able to make a considerable reduction in our offshore man-hours commitment to the EX strategy, along with reducing the clerical effort onshore.’

Conclusion AMEC has long been a leading user of AVEVA technology, gaining valuable business benefits from it and providing equally valuable real-world feedback to AVEVA on practical issues concerning its use. We are particularly grateful to the operations team at their Aberdeen headquarters for sharing their experiences of different aspects of their use of AVEVA WorkMate, and their continuing support in its future development.

and their continuing support in its future development. ‘As Maintenance Team Leader on Dunlin I have

‘As Maintenance Team Leader on Dunlin I have to monitor all on-going work,’ Shaune explained. ‘Using WorkMate I can find out which tasks are over-running and are a threat to the work not being completed on time. I can make sure that all safety-critical work is closed out on time, that we fulfil our HSE responsibilities, and that the integrity of the platform is maintained.’

‘I’ve got all the information I need at my fingertips to be sure that the jobs work together, and that the right materials are in place ready for people with ’

the right qualifications and skills for each particular job

Authoritative Insights on

Shift

Handover

Camille Nedelec-Lucas Editor and PR Specialist, AVEVA

An interview with Dr Sam Mannan, Director, The Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center (MKOPSC)

The Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center (MKOPSC) Here, Dr Mannan is speaking to AVEVA about

Here, Dr Mannan is speaking to AVEVA about MKOPSC’s latest research, sponsored by AVEVA, ‘Development of an Effective Framework for Shift Handover’.

Q: Based on your research, which key aspects of shift handover stand out as potentially benefitting from technology? A: The key factors include ambiguity of language, the time available for shift handover, the nature and complexity of tasks, the behaviour of the engineers and the quality of the information. Of these, the most important is the quality of information – its detail, context and accuracy – and how it is communicated. That is where, in our opinion, technology can make the biggest improvement.

Q: ISO 55000 recommends the use of technology to support safety standards. To what extent do you think this is currently achieved? A: Our survey showed that handover information is communicated face to face about 95% of the time. Written notes, recordings and electronic logging systems are also used. However, we feel that current communication methods result in information gaps. If computerised systems, including logging systems, were more widely adopted, there would be significant improvement in the safety standards of shift handover. However, such systems cannot function as disconnected ‘silos’ of information; there needs to be a much wider, integrated infrastructure that manages asset information. This information should be readily accessible at all times, not just during shift handover.

Q: Do you think that shift handover is likely to become subject to specific regulations? A: It will be hard to make an impact on safety culture if shift handover procedures are not addressed within a regulatory framework. But the industry has an opportunity now to get ahead of the curve; increasingly, companies are already automating procedures. This indicates heightened awareness of the need for a standardised way of integrating Information Management technologies into operations. I think that, at the least, database logbooks will become the norm in the future.

think that, at the least, database logbooks will become the norm in the future. AVEVA World
think that, at the least, database logbooks will become the norm in the future. AVEVA World

Dr Sam Mannan, Director, The Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center (MKOPSC). Photograph courtesy of MKOPSC.

‘A commitment to best-practice safety culture must begin with leadership and a clear, consistent safety message that is implemented from the top down. The manager on site cannot preach about safety matters one minute and then urge engineers to cut corners for speed the next; this simply undermines the message. For safety to be fostered as a core value, safety tasks must not be seen as separate from operational tasks; ’

they are interrelated

separate from operational tasks; ’ they are interrelated Q: Do you think there are sufficient incentives

Q: Do you think there are sufficient incentives for adopting Information Management systems, or are there still business or cultural barriers? A: Often, when you investigate an accident, it emerges that the shift handover was not properly handled; problems with shift handover are increasingly being recognised as a leading indicator of underlying issues with a facility’s safety culture. The development of a best-practice safety culture in an organisation can require a paradigm shift in a company’s operations and outlook; such fundamental change is always met with a certain level of apprehension.

An additional barrier is the perception that Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) systems increase complexity in a time-pressured environment in which downtime is costly and engineers must get the job done. As

a result, operational discipline needs to be well designed, without

shortcuts, embellishments or deviations. Contractor payment structure

must not be linked to production without also being linked to safety performance. Absence of a safety culture can be self-perpetuating; without an effective EAM infrastructure, establishing and sustaining safety-oriented procedures can be very difficult.

The cost of EAM implementation also remains a major consideration. It

is difficult to compile a business case in a situation where the benefits

in risk avoidance are unquantifiable; you have to look at the potential

economic benefits across all aspects of the business.

Q: If additional cost is an issue, what about the financial benefit offered by EAM, for example with process optimisation?

A: Yes; such systems will pay for themselves through a reduction in Lost Time Incidents and more efficient operation, but more awareness is needed and the potential savings must be demonstrated in literature and publications. But if you consider an incident’s potential impact on

a business – and it can be more than just on profitability – the industry must recognise that a lack of Information Management systems is going to cost them a lot more money in the long run.

Q: You have said that there is still no clear definition of what a safety culture is or of its exact elements. What does safety culture mean to you and how can those ideas be best applied to the process industries? A: A commitment to best-practice safety culture must begin with leadership and a clear, consistent safety message that is implemented from the top down. The manager on site cannot preach about safety matters one minute and then urge engineers to cut corners for speed the next; this simply undermines the message. For safety to be fostered as

a core value, safety tasks must not be seen as separate from operational tasks; they are interrelated.

AVEVA’s point of view

MKOPSC’s research has amply confirmed AVEVA’s view, backed by considerable anecdotal evidence, that the biggest single improvement in shift handover can be achieved by the use of a formal communications framework such as Crew Resource Management, supported by effective Information Management technology. While much of the information required at shift handover can be provided by existing systems such as DCS, the disparate nature of the vast and complex information asset embodied by a physical plant often makes it difficult to access important supporting materials.

Photograph courtesy of MKOPSC.

Appropriate feedback loops must also be put in place, enabling workers to support organisational goals and policies in a culture that actively encourages accurate safety reporting. Reporters of hazards or incidents must neither be punished (resulting in a drop of reported incidents) nor rewarded (resulting in ‘false positives’). Incentives for sustaining a certain level of safety compliance have a tendency to work better and offer a more accurate view of the facility’s safety levels. Continual workforce training also plays a key role, and should include simulation and attention to both lagging and leading indicators.

Q: Lastly, what is your vision for a future perfect shift handover scenario? A: I think a perfect shift handover scenario would transmit 100% of the information from one shift to the next. Any environment that can achieve that will rely heavily on a software- based system, because it is impossible to achieve with face-to-face communication only. You need a system where communication uses software tools, and that also provides enough overlap between the two shifts. The facility must be well informed about what is going on at any given time.

About MKOPSC Part of Texas A&M University, MKOPSC was established in 1995 in memory of Mary Kay O’Connor, an operations superintendent killed in 1989 in an explosion at a petrochemical facility in Pasadena, Texas. MKOPSC carries out world-leading research on safety in the power, plant and process industries. Its director, Dr Mannan, speaks widely on safety issues and has given congressional testimony several times including testimony to the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearings on the explosions in Texas and Louisiana.

Committee hearings on the explosions in Texas and Louisiana. Information Management technology is now available to

Information Management technology is now available to support every aspect of enterprise-wide asset management, validating, integrating, collating and presenting different types of information drawn from many different sources. It offers considerable potential for developing and supporting best practice in shift handover and across the entire lifecycle of the asset.

In addition to identifying opportunities for using Information Technology to develop more effective shift handover practice, the research also found encouragingly widespread recognition of its potential. Development of effective solutions is both desirable and feasible, and can be expected to gain rapid acceptance by plant operators.

About AVEVA’s Information Management approach AVEVA has developed a broad Information Management strategy for asset operation that can support important business processes such as shift handover. Based on application- agnostic technology, the AVEVA Digital Information Hub integrates information from existing systems to form an overarching Information Management layer presented through intuitive, web-browser-style ‘dashboards’. This enables solutions that add value to existing data assets by making trustworthy information easily accessible to support a wide variety of business processes.

What makes the Digital Information Hub so powerful is its ability to acquire, contextualise, validate, store and provide easy access to vital asset information. It supports a digital asset that is in a constant state of change, creating a living environment that directly reflects the evolution of the physical asset. This trustworthy information can be used by any critical application, including those that specialise in shift handover, improving the quality of the process and reducing many of the common risks identified by the MKOPSC research.

The role of trusted information In a typical operations scenario, the criticality of an unfamiliar alert can be quickly assessed for its importance, for example by calling up a P&ID schematic in a dashboard view. The operations team can then locate the tagged item concerned and navigate to its maintenance history and relevant procedures. Any necessary corrective actions can be initiated, based on a clear understanding of the alert’s significance, and all relevant information can be communicated effectively to the incoming shift.

The MKOPSC research identified a number of areas where the efficiency and safety of the shift handover process could be improved; the effective use of trusted information is a key enabler in optimising this process. We have seen among our own customers how AVEVA’s asset Information Management solutions can play a role in supporting operational best practice in combination with other critical information systems. AVEVA believes strongly that the creation of a living digital asset is fundamental to safer, more efficient operations for increasingly complex plant assets.

To read MKOPSC’s full research report and AVEVA’s response in more depth, visit: www.aveva.com/shift-handover-survey

Playing It Safe How video game technology is transforming operator training in the plant industries

Playing It Safe

How video game technology is transforming operator training in the plant industries

Dave Coppin Executive Vice President, AVEVA

Driven by insatiable demand for ever more realistic and engaging ‘virtual world’ gaming experiences, and

Driven by insatiable demand for ever more realistic and engaging ‘virtual world’ gaming experiences, and supported by continuous increases in the power of computing hardware, hyper-realistic video games are now commonplace. Meanwhile, in the plant industries, increasing regulatory and economic pressures are putting a premium on more effective operator training. The time is ripe to harness gaming technology for ‘real-world’ asset operations.

Where immersive applications such as flight simulation once required costly, high-power processors, now even entry-level hardware enables video game players to move around in convincingly immersive 3D environments and interact in complex ways with them. Powerful graphics and physics engines accurately replicate the real-world appearance and behaviour of virtual objects and materials. The technology has already been used for practical simulation tasks; now it can be applied to the needs of plant operations – industrial gaming.

So why would an Owner Operator be interested in industrial gaming? The question answers itself as soon as one sees a demonstration of AVEVA Activity Visualisation Platform™ (AVEVA AVP™). Instead of the fictitious environment of a spaceship or battlefield, AVEVA AVP puts the player inside an interactive 3D model of a real plant. Objects can be animated to behave just like their physical counterparts: valves turn and switches switch; bolts can be removed and equipment replaced. And just as in multi-player games, the individual can work with the avatars of colleagues to perform team activities. Most importantly, of course, users can practise potentially hazardous procedures in perfect safety, without risk to themselves or to the physical plant.

A new approach to training Such capability has benefits comparable to those of flight simulation. Whether in video gaming for pleasure, flying an airliner or operating a complex plant, practice makes perfect. And immersive, hands-on training is by far the most effective. 1 Traditional classroom training led, at best, to a 50% retention rate, while simulator-based training, where trainees performed actions themselves, lifted that to 75%. 2

Clearly, industrial gaming can make better use of training budgets,

but the ability to make training more flexible and more effective brings benefits in day-to-day operations. For example, when planning

a shutdown for maintenance, it is essential to perform the maximum

amount of work in the minimum amount of time. Some tasks may be performed so infrequently that they take longer than necessary; by being able to practise them beforehand in the virtual plant, a maintenance team can refresh and refine its skills ready for the real task.

But perhaps the biggest potential impact is on operational safety in high-

risk environments where a mistake really could mean ‘game over’. Human error is widely recognised as a major cause of incidents; Dr Michael Platt,

a Human Performance Engineer at Lockheed Martin, has said that we

shouldn’t train people until they get it right, we need to train them until they don’t get it wrong.

Across all the engineering industries there is a shortage of experienced engineers. The combination of less-experienced personnel and more complex, highly automated assets introduces new risks into safe and effective operations. This is where the use of 3D industrial gaming technology provides vital new capabilities. Costly on-the-job training, with its inherent practical and safety limitations, can be reinforced and extended by far less costly, risk-free training that can cover an almost unlimited range of routine and emergency scenarios.

almost unlimited range of routine and emergency scenarios. ‘AVEVA AVP puts the player inside an interactive
almost unlimited range of routine and emergency scenarios. ‘AVEVA AVP puts the player inside an interactive

‘AVEVA AVP puts the player inside an interactive 3D model of a real plant. Objects can be animated to behave just like their physical counterparts: valves turn and switches switch; bolts can be ’

removed and equipment replaced

1 G. Hofstede, J. de Caluwe, V. Peters. Why Simulation Games Work – In Search of the Active Substance: A Synthesis. Simulation & Gaming, Vol. 41, Number 6, 2010. 2 New South Wales Mines Rescue Services: Application of Virtual Reality Training for the Mining Industry – Training for Tomorrow. Bruce Dowsett, Manager VR Services, Regulation & Compliance, Coal Services Pty Limited. Mechanical Engineering Seminar, 5th August, 2009.

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Structured training exercises can be created in which, just as in video games, trainees are
Structured training exercises can be created in which, just as in video games, trainees are

Structured training exercises can be created in which, just as in video games, trainees are only allowed to progress when they have achieved a specified level of competence and no longer make errors. Unstructured training can also be provided, for example enabling a new recruit to walk around a virtual plant to become familiar with it before being assigned to the physical plant, or for a maintenance engineer to quickly remind himself of the locations of the isolation switches for a particular Work Order.

Creating the virtual plant The virtual plant is only useful if it accurately mirrors the environment and characteristics of the real plant in which the employee will be working. One reason for the slow adoption of industrial gaming has been the cost and limitations of creating sufficiently realistic virtual plants. In AVEVA AVP, simulations are created directly from the plant’s 3D model and information in the Digital Information Hub, even before the physical plant has been built. Not only does this dramatically reduce the cost and time required to build the model, it also builds in the information that makes the model a convincing and usable simulation.

An AVEVA AVP model is quite different from the conventional 3D review model commonly used for performing design reviews. Although both offer walk-through navigation and the ability to measure and interrogate the model, this is where the similarity ends.

An important feature is the use of a sophisticated physics engine to simulate the behaviour of objects. For example, objects have a solidity and a mass that makes them react as they would in the real world:

dislodged barrels bounce and roll, dropped tools fall from gantries, and heavy objects can block access points.

from gantries, and heavy objects can block access points. The AVP virtual plant has a much

The AVP virtual plant has a much more realistic ‘look and feel’ than an idealised review model. Lighting can be accurately simulated through the 24-hour cycle of daylight and artificial lighting. Objects can be realistically hidden by shadows – either from the sun or from luminaires – to show potential practical hazards that might otherwise go unrecognised. Non-designed objects such as ladders, tools or moving vehicles can be used in the simulation.

‘The need for more effective training is widely understood throughout the ’

industry

The AVP model offers many other features required of an effective training simulator. An in-game web browser can be opened, linked to available information sources, to simulate the use of mobile devices to call up procedures, documents or other information when working on site. Of even greater potential benefit is the ability to provide streaming data, such as real-time or pre-recorded SCADA information from the physical plant itself, enabling the most realistic training or the analysis of real incidents.

Using the virtual plant The highly accurate nature of an AVEVA AVP simulation provides almost unlimited opportunities for optimising asset management from the earliest stages of its creation. In the design stage, conventional 3D walk- through design reviews can be followed, as the design matures, by more detailed reviews that look for emergent hazards such as those caused by poor light positioning, or restricted visibility between operators. Operating and emergency procedures can be drafted early and tested in a realistic manner while there is still time to make design improvements,

for example by repositioning emergency alarms, eye baths and showers. Approaching handover, the commissioning team

for example by repositioning emergency alarms, eye baths and showers. Approaching handover, the commissioning team can begin training and

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All these can be trained for, rehearsed and evaluated effectively within a safe and lifelike environment, using the capabilities of AVEVA AVP.

rehearsal of the sequence of events required, while operations staff can begin familiarisation and training ready to take over the plant. Once in service, a wide variety of training needs can be efficiently met, for the induction of new staff, refresher training and competency monitoring of existing staff, rehearsal of routine maintenance or major repair tasks, incident analysis and so on. Trainees can be provided with

Widening the use cases Like any enabling technology, AVEVA AVP fosters creativity in finding further ways to exploit it. For example, we can expect to see it also being used in:

structured levels of on-screen prompts, beginning with full instructions, progressively reducing to hints, then to ‘no-help’ modes for formal competency testing.

Control of Work activities – visualising and analysing hazards as part of Safe Job Analysis, visualising work permit locations and equipment associated with permits.

The need for more effective training is widely understood throughout the industry. Incident investigations have identified many common human-

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Construction simulation and management – testing proposed new working methods.

factor-based causes, such as:

Remote problem solving – enabling teams to review and rehearse scenarios before arrival at a remote site.

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Limited awareness of operating procedures

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Enabling certification authorities to undertake virtual plant walk-

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Improper identification of safety hazards and hazardous processes

throughs, view punch-lists and compare against the design intent well

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Inadequate inspection

before going to site.

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Inadequately trained workers

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Complex ‘storytelling’ – create a sequence of individually-driven,

The need is clear and real. Ever more stringent regulatory requirements

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The development of informal working practices.

The forthcoming ISO 55000 regulations will make safety training a central pillar of operational readiness and Process Safety Management (PSM), while the OSHA 1910.119(g)(1) regulation lists the following training topics as a minimum:

interactive, animated environments or videos to demonstrate particular activities associated with field operations or maintenance, such as for safety incident review or executive project concept review.

and the need to continually improve operational efficiency and safety will make industrial gaming an essential tool for the plant and offshore

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Lock-out/tag-out

industries. The technology now exists; it is not only practical and

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Hot work

affordable to use, but also offers considerable potential for the long-term

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Line and equipment opening

development of more efficient working methods.

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Confined space entry

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Emergency response

To find out more about AVEVA AVP, visit www.aveva.com/aveva_avp.

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Operating procedures.

An Ice-breaking Innovation:

Arctech builds Baltika

Camille Nedelec-Lucas Editor and PR Specialist, AVEVA

How AVEVA Marine has helped to create the world’s first oblique icebreaker

Helsinki shipbuilders have built 60% of the world’s icebreakers currently in operation. Three years ago Arctech, one of the most innovative of this community of specialists, took the far-sighted decision to focus purely on icebreaking technology at a time when other shipyards were diversifying. It was a strategic decision, recognising that growth in Arctic oil & gas production would create increased demand for high-tech, multi-purpose vessels to open up these remote locations.

AVEVA met Tapani Skarp, Vice President of Arctech, in charge of design and project design, in his Helsinki office to learn more about this shipyard’s big vision, how AVEVA technology is helping to make it a reality, and Arctech’s latest innovation – the oblique ice-breaker.

Arctech’s latest innovation – the oblique ice-breaker. The oblique icebreaker The concept of the oblique

The oblique icebreaker The concept of the oblique icebreaker addresses the problem of opening wide channels in shallow passages. For a large tanker, the 25m channel created by a conventional icebreaker is too narrow, so the tanker must

be accompanied by two icebreakers, increasing cost. The vessel features

a patented oblique design with asymmetric hull and three azimuthing

propellers, which allow the vessel to operate efficiently ahead, astern

and obliquely. Crucially, as the oblique icebreaker can break ice sideways,

it clears a channel almost as wide as its length. Baltika, the world’s first

oblique icebreaker, has a length of over 76m and will be delivered by Arctech in 2014.

‘The history of the oblique icebreaker is actually very long,’ explained Skarp. ‘Its design went through many stages of evolution until the innovative idea was ordered by a client. The original design was more triangular in shape. Gradually, the design shifted towards a more conventional shape because it was found that a more limited asymmetry was not only best for overall performance, but would also be more readily accepted by the market.’

Skarp went on to describe how first model tests on the highly asymmetric design had revealed excessive pitching in high seas, resulting in slamming and air leaks in the forward propeller. The design evolution that led to Baltika has solved this problem while retaining the original

benefits of an asymmetric hull. As a result of this extensive development, Baltika can be operated either bow first, able to continuously break up to one metre of ice, or obliquely, cutting a wide channel through ice up to 0.6m thick at a minimum speed of two knots.

More with less Baltika will essentially do more with less. In her final form, she will halve the number of icebreakers required and her small size will also save fuel. With a beam of only 20.5m, she will cut a 50m channel through the ice, while her draught of just 6.3m makes her extremely versatile. Her small size also requires only 7MW of propulsion power, compared to the 17–20MW required by a conventional icebreaker.

Baltika’s versatility makes her an all-season, multi-functional ship, ideally suited to the diverse needs of Arctic oil production. In addition to icebreaking, she will be able respond to emergencies and provide prompt oil recovery capabilities in the event of spillages.

e e v e n t o f s p i l l a g e
e e v e n t o f s p i l l a g e

The icebreaking rescue and emergency vessel NB 508. Photo courtesy of Arctech.

This block clearly shows the asymetrical profile of the hull. Photo courtesy of Arctech.
This block clearly shows the asymetrical profile of the hull. Photo courtesy of Arctech.

Construction of the icebreaking rescue and emergency vessel NB 508. Photo courtesy of Arctech.

Tapani Skarp, Vice President of Arctech.
Tapani Skarp, Vice President of Arctech.

‘Baltika’s sideways operating mode enables her to act like a broom,’ said Skarp. ‘She has a collection capacity of 750m 3 and in the event of a spill she can be deployed quickly because she will already be present assisting the tankers.’

How to develop a world first: migration to AVEVA Marine Not surprisingly, developing such an innovative vessel brought many challenges, not least its asymmetry, which took Arctech’s designers into quite unfamiliar territory. She is also a very crowded vessel, making 3D design the only practical solution.

Class design was carried out creating a 3D model of the ship – using Tribon at that time – then the model was further refined by the subcontractors, for whom a 3D product model is far more effective than drawings, for detail design of the hull.

Arctech migrated to AVEVA Marine in June 2012 and the rest of the vessel was designed in AVEVA Marine. ‘We found that the hull design was very easy to migrate into AVEVA Marine,’ said Skarp. ‘We chose AVEVA Marine because of the design network in Finland and Russia. AVEVA Marine is very widely used and for liaising on projects it is easier to adopt the same software that contractors and partners are using.

‘What I like about AVEVA Marine is that all the design disciplines are on the same level, so you can manage HVAC, cabling and machinery all within one database. This is of huge benefit because you don’t have to translate data; in the past we had to create a lot of interface modules to achieve this. For example, with materials handling, the new ERM system, AVEVA Mars™, is compatible with AVEVA Marine. Arctech is not currently a user of AVEVA ERM, but we are investigating the option. It would give the possibility to achieve complete material handling, from design through to procurement and production, in the same database. When I joined the industry in the 1970s this was only a dream; now it is reality,’ he concluded.

While the adoption of AVEVA Marine went smoothly, the biggest challenge for Arctech has been introducing the software to people who have only ever used either AutoCAD or 3D mechanical CAD systems, without risking delays to other, more urgent, projects. The design capabilities of the organisation had to be redeveloped after a period of design outsourcing, during a lull in activity at the shipyard.

Skarp explained that Arctech regards training as a continuing, long-term commitment towards achieving its vision.

Towards Lean Construction Skarp has a very clear vision of the way in which he wants the shipyard to be managed. As in many industries, design and production are more and more made of interconnected and parallel tasks. The yard must adapt its operations accordingly.

‘The time between design and delivery is becoming ever tighter and our internal processes must reflect this,’ said Skarp. ‘The production team want to start production as soon as possible to meet the delivery date, but clients want to delay their order until the last minute. So the concept must be ready and waiting in AVEVA Marine well before the contract for the ship is signed, and we must achieve more overlap in the project schedule.’

Lifting the main engines. Photo courtesy of Arctech.

‘3D design enables the overall process to become a lot more streamlined, particularly in its ability to support late changes in specification,’ Skarp continued. ‘But we find the biggest benefit of AVEVA Marine is in time saving. Because we buy hull blocks from Russia, we need the structural information as early as possible. By designing in a 3D environment in advance of contract signing, the first material list can be issued to the procurement department within a few weeks, enabling us to place early orders with the steel mills and ensure timely and sufficient steel supply.

A promising future Arctech has had a lot of interest from Russia in the oblique icebreaker; once the success of Baltika has been proven, it will be interesting to see how the maritime sector reacts to this innovation. In the meantime, AVEVA and Arctech continue to be at the forefront of their respective industries by developing – and delivering – world firsts.

About Arctech The Helsinki shipyard has been in operation since 1865, and has been operating under its current name, Arctech, since 2011. It is a joint venture between STX Finland and Russia’s United Shipbuilding Corporation. With a great deal of untapped Arctic oil & gas within Russian waters, Arctech is set to be a leading supplier to a growing industry. To find out more, please visit www.arctech.fi.

industry. To find out more, please visit www.arctech.fi . ‘Compressing timescales is challenging,’ he explained,

‘Compressing timescales is challenging,’ he explained, ‘but AVEVA Marine enables hull and outfitting design to be carried out in parallel, as well as more concurrent construction work. It has also taken pressure off the procurement process. By getting equipment data earlier we can avoid a lot of costly design updates. Without AVEVA software, we wouldn’t be able to meet these challenges.’

‘Compressing timescales is challenging, but AVEVA Marine enables hull and outfitting design to be carried out in parallel, as well as more concurrent construction work. It has also taken pressure off the procurement process

Embracing

Change

How effective control of iterative change is the key to engineering and design for Lean Construction

When letting a contract for a new plant, an Owner Operator has a clear financial objective, comprising its nameplate output, project cost and delivery time. But the way in which we create any kind of complex entity necessarily creates considerable business risk in executing the project. In this article we discuss the iterative nature of engineering design and explain how, by bringing the ‘design spiral’ under control, AVEVA technology enables the plant industries to develop Lean Construction methodologies that reduce business risk both for EPCs and their clients.

Capital projects are notorious for cost and delivery overruns. Engineers, designers and project managers spend a disproportionate amount of time on what often feels like crisis management in continually making or accommodating changes. It is only natural to exclaim in frustration: ‘Why can’t it just be right the first time?’

There are three fundamental reasons why plant projects are so change-intensive:

Natural design evolution – There are many inherent uncertainties in creating anything new. The creative process starts with outline ideas and rough approximations that are progressively refined. In the case of highly complex, multi-discipline plant projects, this refinement process is also complex, with many interdependencies between process engineering, instrumentation & control, piping, structural design, electrical engineering and so on.

Unforeseen problems – Even the best-managed project can be disrupted by external factors, such as supplier defaults or a client being acquired by an organisation that retrospectively imposes a different set of engineering standards and policies.

Changes of scope – The customer is always right! Contract variations are a fact of life, but are invariably imposed late in the programme and require significant rework in design, if not also in fabrication and construction.

In addition, the very complexity of a project can create avoidable change requirements:

Decisions based on deficient information – If information is not up to date, complete and readily accessible, poor decisions can be made, the results of which may not become apparent until late in the programme.

Poorly controlled design information – Because design information is used by different disciplines and functional groups, as well as by fabricators and site teams, poor control and issuing of deliverables can lead to work being carried out using out-of-date information. The later such errors are discovered, the more severe is their impact on the project.

Expediency – Often, it may be necessary to commit to a course of action, such as preparing the site or ordering particularly long-lead equipment or materials, before sufficiently reliable information is available. Even such calculated risks can have a downside.

‘Engineers, designers and project managers spend a disproportionate amount of time on what often feels like crisis management in continually making ’

or accommodating changes

Compounded problems – the highly interdependent nature of plant design creates vulnerability to a small error propagating like a chain reaction across many other areas and disciplines, making its recovery a disproportionately laborious task. Compound this further with poor quality information and the overall impact can be considerable.

Poor communication – Lack of clarity and/or poor communication of requirements to suppliers or subcontractors can lead to lengthy and costly programme delays, redesign or re-procurement. Such issues are an everyday reality in project execution, yet we still yearn after right-first-time design! Our true objective should be engineering and design for lean construction; efficient design and engineering processes that eliminate the avoidable problems and can effectively handle the unavoidable ones.

The design spiral The iterative, multi-discipline process of plant design is most usefully illustrated as a spiral. The design evolves from the outside of the spiral, where information is necessarily provisional and incomplete, repeatedly passing between the various disciplines which each contribute successively smaller refinements to the whole.

The design spiral more truly reflects the reality of iterative, highly concurrent design. However, achieving a well-managed iterative process in practice relies on a critical prerequisite: controlled information sharing. This is what holds the spiral in shape, rather as the radial lines of a spider’s web do. It also reduces the number of design iterations – loops around the spiral – by highlighting errors and inconsistencies to enable them to be eliminated, in a well-controlled manner, long before the creation of production deliverables is required.

manner, long before the creation of production deliverables is required. AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue
manner, long before the creation of production deliverables is required. AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue
manner, long before the creation of production deliverables is required. AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue
Compare and Update between the 3D model and the P&ID. Checking design in this way

Compare and Update between the 3D model and the P&ID. Checking design in this way reduces the number of change/revision iterations, ensures consistency before issuing fabrication deliverables and increases the consistency of information at handover.

Managing change Projects involve a hierarchy of change, from major contract-level changes right down to the huge numbers of incremental adjustments negotiated continually between engineers and designers. Controlling all these changes and enabling every project participant to work with information of known quality and status requires tight integration between all the various engineering and design applications used. It is precisely such integration underpinning AVEVA Plant that achieves this and, in turn, enables the design spiral to be realised as a robust and efficient business model.

AVEVA’s Integrated Engineering & Design solution is built on the solid foundation of a coherent dataset that integrates all engineering and design data, from the moment of its creation, into a definitive and change-managed description of the project that is shared by all participants. The practical effect of this is that a process engineer, piping layout designer and structural designer can collaborate in real time to efficiently create a clash-free overall design.

This information integration also underpins AVEVA’s powerful Compare & Update capability, enabling the various disciplines to work efficiently at their own pace while frequently reconciling their work with each other’s to implement well-controlled design updates and keep the different sectors of the design spiral in step. This is in marked contrast to trying to achieve right-first-time design at a single pass.

To understand why, consider a typical scenario. A process engineer working on the FEED of a new plant provisionally estimates flow rates through the system. A mechanical engineer uses this information to identify suitable pumps and makes a provisional selection. A piping layout designer and a structural engineer collaborate to create a provisional layout. First steps around the design spiral have been taken.

Other disciplines make their contributions, any of which may require others to revise their initial work. For example, a reliability engineer carries out an initial Failure Mode Analysis and requires one particular pump to be replaced by two in a dual-redundant configuration. Evidently, this has an impact on the P&ID, the piping layout, the structural design and the Electrical & Instrumentation system. A second iteration around the spiral begins.

system. A second iteration around the spiral begins. Creating new design in context within a laser

Creating new design in context within a laser scan of an existing plant.

Clearly, in the early stages of design evolution, no designer wants to carry out any more detail design than is necessary. But if the provisional status of the pump definition were not apparent or, worse, if the software rigidly enforced compliance with design rules at every step, other disciplines could waste effort detailing pipe runs, foundations, access platforms, electrical systems and so on that would later have to be reworked when the pump definition changed. Compound this one example by all the many other elements in the design and the inefficiencies become considerable.

AVEVA technology supports the reality of plant design. Engineers and designers can create objects knowing that they do not at first comply with all applicable rules, but having their maturity status made visible to all other disciplines and any non-compliances highlighted until finally corrected. This is exactly what is necessary to make the design spiral work in practice; because all participants can see and understand each other’s work, they can collaborate efficiently to develop the complete design definition and eliminate deficiencies in a progressive, orderly manner.

Reducing the iterations Because Integrated Engineering & Design makes successive iterations around the spiral more efficient it also reduces the number of iterations – the number of attempts to get something right, in effect. This is a huge benefit to every stage of the project. If a design development that previously took six changes now takes only four, say, significant savings in design cost are achieved. But fewer changes do not only enable earlier release to fabrication; they reflect more efficient creation of compliant design so that fabrication and construction can be right first time. This enables much larger savings by speeding up construction and reducing costly materials wastage and on-site rework.

Onward to Lean Construction Integrated Engineering & Design certainly enables the more efficient and rapid arrival at a finished design but, to a large extent, the design office still ‘pushes’ the design out to the construction teams in the expectation that it will be accurately complied with. This was never a realistic expectation in practice and non-compliances can often go undetected until late in the programme. The potential benefits of increasingly concurrent project phases are eroded by poor integration between them, which increases the scope for costly errors and delays.

Change highlighting and ease of comparison and updating keep disciplines in step while permitting freedom
Change highlighting and ease of comparison and updating keep disciplines in step while permitting freedom

Change highlighting and ease of comparison and updating keep disciplines in step while permitting freedom of each to work in an efficient manner.

AVEVA Everything3D™ (AVEVA E3D™) now addresses this problem by the integration of 3D laser scan data into the design environment. The ability to quickly return accurate as-fabricated and as-constructed scans into AVEVA E3D to compare the physical objects with the design intent extends Lean methodologies throughout the entire project. Any errors or inconsistencies in fabrication or construction can be quickly identified and assessed, enabling effective corrective actions to be taken at the earliest possible stage. A closed loop is thus created that integrates design, fabrication and construction to unlock the full benefits of highly concurrent project phases.

The Lean Manufacturing revolution was a challenge because it required a radically new approach and most of the tools and techniques had to be developed from scratch. Lean Construction has the advantage of wide awareness of the Lean philosophy but has until now lacked the catalyst to trigger its development. AVEVA E3D provides that catalyst. The engineering industry can now begin developing its own particular implementations of the three key elements of the Lean philosophy:

Respect for people – This translates into ‘empowerment of people’; providing them with the tools and feedback to enable them to contribute effectively to the overall object. The ability for engineers and designers to see the overall design and to collaborate efficiently on its development provides this empowerment.

Eliminate waste – This embraces waste in every form. The scenario outlined above illustrates how design man-hours can be wasted by inefficient working methods, but the greater costs of waste in plant projects arise from fabrication rework and, worst of all, in on-site construction. Integrated Engineering & Design processes eliminate many of the causes of such waste.

Make value-adding more efficient – If, at every stage of a project, every individual contribution genuinely moves the project forward, the overall project becomes more efficient. This is not to imply that every individual task must be fully completed in one go; as described above, efficient working will most often involve successive refinements of a particular contribution in a controlled, stepwise manner. Fewer, better-controlled steps save time and effort.

It is easy to see that, properly enabled by technology, the design spiral can be an inherently Lean process. But with the advent of AVEVA E3D, this spiral can now also embrace the fabrication and construction stages. By using laser scanning to feed back the as-built to design and engineering, more – and shorter – lines of communication tie the spiral together even more securely. As-built information, either generated in the fabrication and construction of a new build, or scanned from the existing plant in a revamp project, can be almost immediately integrated into the 3D design environment, making it accessible to all the business processes that the model supports, and to all project participants.

The big picture Just as Lean Manufacturing started with purely technical innovations and expanded to become an enterprise-wide philosophy, so too will Lean Construction. AVEVA now provides the key technologies to enable this. Its Integrated Engineering & Design solution supports the technical aspects of a Lean project, while its Information Management technologies support an Integrated Project Execution strategy that embraces all the information-intensive aspects, such as materials management, Workface Planning and 4D Construction Management.

First movers into Lean Manufacturing came to dominate their industries; we can expect to see a similar transformation in the capital projects sectors.

This topic is discussed further in Engineering & Design for Lean Construction, an AVEVA Business Paper that may be downloaded from www.aveva.com/publications

‘First movers into Lean Manufacturing came to dominate their industries; we can expect to see a similar transformation in the capital ’

projects sectors

Creative Engineering Dramatically Reduces Reactor Outage Time at OKG

AVEVA Everything3D, combined with laser scanning and innovative prefabrication methods, increases plant availability and profitability

methods, increases plant availability and profitability Oskarshamns Nuclear Power Plant, OKG, a company in the E.ON

Oskarshamns Nuclear Power Plant, OKG, a company in the E.ON group, owns and operates three boiling water reactors, Oskarshamn 1, 2 and 3, often referred to as O1, O2 and O3. The nuclear power plant is located on the Swedish east coast, 30km north of Oskarshamn. The three reactors, with a net capacity of 2,511 MW, produce 10% of Sweden’s electricity and went into commercial operation between 1972 and 1985. OKG needs to invest constantly in safety and modernisation in order to ensure that the plants can continue to operate for their planned 60-year lifetime.

Magnus Feldt Editor, AVEVA World Magazine

Jan Backlund Account Manager, AVEVA

A day-long outage of a reactor would cost an estimated 1 million EUR in

production losses; it is therefore of utmost importance to the profitability

of the facility to keep outage time as short as possible. By using 3D

modelling combined with laser scanning, and further developing prefabrication methods, OKG is expecting to dramatically reduce the outage time for the next modernisation project for O3, scheduled for June 2014. To find out more about the role AVEVA Everything3D™ (AVEVA E3D™) plays in this project, AVEVA visited OKG in November 2013, meeting Claes-Göran Wörmke, Project Manager, and Project Leader for the O3 modernisation project, and Peter Karlsson, Part-project Leader for electrical design, ONE Nordic.

Safety first OKG’s aim is that the reactors should operate at the highest possible safety level for at least 60 years, and each reactor is shut down every year for three to six weeks for maintenance, safety system control and replacement of 20% of the fuel elements. These planned outages normally occur between May and September.

Oskarshamns Nuclear Power Plant. OKG, a company in the E.ON group, owns and operates three boiling water reactors, Oskarshamn 1, 2 and 3. The nuclear power plant is located on the Swedish east coast, 30km north of Oskarshamn. Photograph courtesy of OKG.

‘When AVEVA E3D was launched, OKG realised that they could use it to further improve the efficiency of the design work and to cause the photorealistic installation images and printouts used by the installation teams to be of an even higher quality ’

and more intuitive

From left, Peter Karlsson, Part-project Leader for electrical design, ONE Nordic, and Claes-Göran Wörmke, Project
From left, Peter Karlsson, Part-project Leader for electrical design, ONE Nordic, and Claes-Göran
Wörmke, Project Manager at OKG, and project leader for the O3 modernisation project.
Photograph courtesy of OKG.

When AVEVA visited OKG, the O2 plant had been shut down for a huge, complex modernisation project to upgrade the turbine plant, installing many heavy items of equipment and involving demanding installation activities for vital safety systems.

O3 modernisation project The O3 plant is due to be modernised in June 2014. One of the key aspects of this modernisation will be the replacement of the electrical cabling that passes through the concrete containment walls and connects to equipment inside the containment area. The modernisation includes, not only the cables themselves, but also the penetration assemblies that fit into the wall. These penetration assemblies are important to the overall safety of the reactor as they must prevent radiation and radioactive materials from passing through the penetrations in the wall in any emergency situation.

Conventional design and installation of cables and electrical components would take between 120 and 150 days, causing a long outage and significant loss in production. When similar modernisation programmes were performed for the O1 and O2 plants a few years ago, OKG succeeded in reducing the outage to 80 days by partially prefabricating the electric cables and connectors.

Based on their experiences from the O1 and O2 projects, E.ON IT and OKG have found areas which could enable the installation to be achieved even more efficiently. OKG’s goal for the O3 project is now to further reduce the outage to 58 days.

Planning for the O3 project started in 2012, and OKG expects nearly 300 electrical fitters to be working in parallel in the containment areas at peak times.

The extent of prefabrication will be even greater than for the equivalent O1 and O2 projects. All electrical cables and connectors will be prefabricated externally, similar to the way in which they are made in modern automobile manufacturing processes. This offers an opportunity to cut on-site work, which will considerably reduce outage time. The cables will be prefabricated at both ends, with their connectors, and pretested in a radiation-free area, so that it will be possible to install the whole cabling system in a single step.

The quality and accuracy required is very high, with the tolerance in cable lengths to within a few centimetres. In total there are 36 penetrations for the electrical cables and 1,800 cables with a total length of 30,000 metres. These cables connect to almost 2,000 items including electrical cabinets, contact and magnetic breakers, limit switches, temperature and pressure switches.

OKG decided to model the new cables, penetration assemblies and electric components in a 3D system, and to laser scan the inside of the reactor containment. The laser data will then be integrated with the 3D model to enable highly accurate design work and to allow views to be prepared showing exactly how the fitting task should be performed.

After a thorough evaluation, AVEVA PDMS™ combined with AVEVA Laser Model Interface™ was chosen in 2012 as the system that best met OKG’s requirements. A highly-photorealistic resolution 3D laser scan of the inside of the reactor containment was carried out from about 150 measurement locations, during the normal outage in 2012.

When AVEVA E3D was launched, OKG realised that they could use it to further improve the efficiency of the design work and to cause the photorealistic installation images and printouts used by the installation teams to be of an even higher quality and more intuitive. Having implemented AVEVA E3D, and after a short training course, they were able to continue with the modelling tasks. The 3D model in AVEVA PDMS was easily reusable with AVEVA E3D, as the two applications are fully interoperable.

A significant feature of AVEVA E3D is the seamless integration of design and ‘real-world’ conditions, through the fusion of laser scan data into the design environment. This is enabled by allowing engineers to work within the laser data BubbleView™. BubbleView technology is unique to LFM Software Ltd, an AVEVA Group company. It produces a high-resolution, photorealistic 3D image in a lightweight usable format whilst connecting back to the massively rich dataset.

When the BubbleView data was integrated in the AVEVA E3D model the results proved to be excellent, with high-quality photorealistic installation printouts. In total, OKG plans to generate at least 4,000 installation printouts.

In total, OKG plans to generate at least 4,000 installation printouts. AVEVA World Magazine 2014 |
In total, OKG plans to generate at least 4,000 installation printouts. AVEVA World Magazine 2014 |
Top and above: high-quality photorealistic printouts. Images courtesy of OKG. The use of laser scanning
Top and above: high-quality photorealistic printouts. Images courtesy of OKG. The use of laser scanning

Top and above: high-quality photorealistic printouts. Images courtesy of OKG.

The use of laser scanning technology to automatically build an accurate laser model of the reactor building, combined with AVEVA E3D, enables 3D design work to take place within the laser model, allowing a high degree of accuracy to be achieved for the design of the cables and connectors. Generating the fabrication drawings directly from the 3D model created using AVEVA E3D ensures that the accuracy of the design is conveyed to the fabricators.

This innovative approach also extends to the installation process. OKG estimates that a traditional, paper-based workflow would require the handling of about 20,000 design documents within the containment building. Replacing the paper documents with tablet computers will transform the efficiency of the installation.

25 tablet computers, connected to a wireless network inside the containment areas, will give the fitters access to the photorealistic installation images and assembly information prepared using AVEVA E3D, showing both the new design and the photorealistic laser scan data.

OKG’s creative engineering process produces photorealistic installation images for viewing on tablets and as printouts. This will mean a more efficient installation, with the outage time reduced to only about half that of similar projects at other nuclear plants. Innovative solutions, including the further development of prefabrication methods, and the introduction of 3D modelling combined with laser scanning, lead OKG to view this creative engineering as the model for future modernisation projects.

About OKG OKG was founded in 1965 and has approximately 850 employees and an annual turnover of around SEK 3 billion. OKG is owned by E.ON, one of the world’s most geographically diversified power producers, with major asset positions in Germany, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Russia, the US, Italy, Spain, France and the Benelux countries. Visit www.okg.se for more information.

Benelux countries. Visit www.okg.se for more information. ‘OKG’s creative engineering process produces

‘OKG’s creative engineering process produces photorealistic installation images for viewing on tablets and as printouts. This will mean a more efficient installation, with the outage time reduced to only about half that of similar ’

projects at other nuclear plants

AVEVA World Summit 2013 Hits a Home Run in Boston!

When we scheduled 2013’s AVEVA World Summit in Boston, we had no idea that the Boston Red Sox baseball team would win the final game of the World Series while we were in the city. The exuberant victory celebrations in the streets certainly gave Boston an exciting atmosphere. While our Summit could not compete with that, all agreed that the event did hit a home run for delegates, sponsors and speakers alike.

hit a home run for delegates, sponsors and speakers alike. Highlights of the Summit included the
hit a home run for delegates, sponsors and speakers alike. Highlights of the Summit included the
hit a home run for delegates, sponsors and speakers alike. Highlights of the Summit included the

Highlights of the Summit included the launch of several exciting new AVEVA products, three dedicated agendas for different audiences, and 20 customer speakers sharing their experiences and insights. This packed and engaging programme was accompanied by an interesting sponsor exhibition area, networking sessions, special demonstrations, and a gala dinner at Boston’s world-famous Museum of Science. However, the true success of such an event is measured by the business benefit that it delivers to those who attend. The post-event response from the Summit delegates was outstandingly positive; 96% said that they would recommend the Summit to a colleague.

Steve Tongish VP of Marketing, AVEVA

This was the second year that AVEVA has held a single global Summit, attracting project managers, senior management and decision makers from around the world and across a range of industries.

and decision makers from around the world and across a range of industries. AVEVA World Magazine
and decision makers from around the world and across a range of industries. AVEVA World Magazine
and decision makers from around the world and across a range of industries. AVEVA World Magazine

The Summit provides a dedicated forum, both for the exchange of ideas and for sharing AVEVA’s latest product and solution strategies. Its programme remains focused on a mid-level management audience, providing them with strategies and insights that help to optimise their companies’ projects and improve the efficiency of asset operations.

New product launches Readers who attended the 2012 Summit in Paris will recall the exciting world debut of AVEVA Everything3D™ (AVEVA E3D™). That is a hard act to follow, but the Summit’s high standard was definitely maintained with the launch of the visually stunning AVEVA Activity Visualisation Platform™ (AVEVA AVP™) and AVEVA E3D Insight™ products, along with the equally important AVEVA Information Standards Manager™.

AVEVA Information Standards Manager is a web-based tool that enables the management of a set of information standards that consistently describe the information needed to execute any project. Importantly, it also enables those information standards to be shared with third parties so that everyone involved in a project operates to a common set of standards. It meets a widely expressed need to increase project efficiency through the more rigorous management and efficient sharing of information.

The second launch was of AVEVA AVP, which enables the creation and use of a fully interactive, multi-user virtual plant environment in which workers can practise tasks – either alone or as a team – in perfect safety. The plant industry’s equivalent of a flight simulator, AVEVA AVP applies video gaming technology to create visually and functionally realistic virtual environments in which every type of routine or unusual maintenance task, from the simplest to the most complex, can be communicated and rehearsed. ‘Industrial gaming’ using AVEVA AVP improves understanding, enables operators to quickly reach and maintain high levels of competence, and provides a tool for evaluating and practising activities that would be prohibitively costly or hazardous to perform on a real plant. AVEVA AVP is such a visual and engaging application that when delegates were invited to play an AVEVA AVP game against each other during breaks in the programme, it was hard to drag some of them away!

But the new product that really stole the show in Boston was AVEVA E3D Insight. This is AVEVA’s first Windows 8.1 app and is designed to help decision makers in the power, process plant and mining industries to view and approve AVEVA E3D designs from a mobile tablet device. For the first time ever, it is possible for someone on a construction site to contribute directly to an evolving 3D plant design. AVEVA E3D Insight anticipates changing customer needs by offering the ability to inspect, comment upon, and approve designs at any time, from anywhere around the world. The launch was followed by a series of demonstrations that gave everyone a hands-on experience of this impressive new app. (Read more about AVEVA E3D Insight on page 8.)

Delegates from

27 countries

3
3

20 Customer speakers

Agenda

3
3

Product

streams

launches

NEW!
NEW!

96%Agenda 3 Product streams launches NEW! of delegates would recommend the Summit 98% agreed it was

of delegates would recommend the Summit

98%

agreed it was valuable to their business priorities

34 34

AVEVA World Magazine 2014| Issue 1

AVEVA World Magazine 2014| Issue 1

to their business priorities 3 4 34 AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue 1 AVEVA World
to their business priorities 3 4 34 AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue 1 AVEVA World
Customer presentations One of the most important and popular aspects of the Summit is the
Customer presentations
One of the most important and popular aspects of the Summit is the
customer presentations: this year, 20 companies generously gave their
time to prepare presentations and share their experiences with the wider
AVEVA World Community. The sheer diversity of these excellent presentations
makes them difficult to summarise, coming from the process plant, power, mining,
oil & gas, marine, and offshore industries, and covering topics ranging from adoption
strategies for new technologies to managing megaprojects and improving operation
efficiency. The speakers made an impressive contribution to making the AVEVA World Summit
such a unique and high-value event.
Dedicated agendas
The Summit programme continues to evolve to meet the changing needs and interests of delegates. To
offer the most appropriate content for each individual, the Boston programme was divided into three separate
agendas for the respective needs of Owner Operators, EPCs and shipbuilders. Each agenda covered a range of
topics, comprising presentations both from senior AVEVA specialists and from customers, who provided relevant
real-world experiences. Although the agendas were designed for particular audiences, it was pleasing to see how
many delegates moved between them to learn from these different industry sectors. Enabling such cross-fertilisation
between industries was a key objective of the single Summit format; judging by observation and the positive
comments from delegates, this clearly works well. We plan to make the multi-track agenda a key feature of future
AVEVA World Summits.
Summary
If you had to summarise the theme of the Summit in a single word, it would be ‘visualisation’. It began with the
keynote speaker, Dan Roam, who provided inspiration on how to communicate complex concepts through simple
drawings. Visualisation is at the heart of AVEVA AVP’s and AVEVA E3D Insight’s technology. It was also the primary
theme both for CEO Richard Longdon’s business overview and CTO Dave Wheeldon’s view into the future.
As our world becomes increasingly complex, we need new strategies to manage the information around us; AVEVA
believes that visualisation technology will play a strategic role in achieving this. The 2013 Summit in Boston
opened a window into this exciting new world which will continue to evolve over the years ahead. This is
what AVEVA World Summits are all about: a fusion of vision, strategy, technology and meeting real-world
challenges.
Just like the Boston Red Sox at the beginning of last season, we all have a challenging year
ahead. But we are sure that, with the vision and experience that was shared at the Summit,
we will all be knocking balls out of the park in 2014! We look forward to seeing you at this
year’s AVEVA World Summit.
www.avevaworld.com

Customer Speakers at the 2013 AVEVA World Summit

Abu Dhabi Marine Operating Company

Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering

EDC Consulting Pty Ltd

Korea Southern Power

Engineering EDC Consulting Pty Ltd Korea Southern Power Lengiproneftechim MAN Diesel & Turbo MILPO Mitsui
Engineering EDC Consulting Pty Ltd Korea Southern Power Lengiproneftechim MAN Diesel & Turbo MILPO Mitsui

Lengiproneftechim

MAN Diesel & Turbo

MILPO

Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding

Pacific Rubiales

Promon

Sembawang Shipyard

Siemens

SINOPEC

SPK ERA Sdn BhD

Sredne-Nevsky

Statoil

Suncor

Technip

Wood Group PSN

WorleyParsons

Statoil Suncor Technip Wood Group PSN WorleyParsons AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue 1 AVEVA World
Statoil Suncor Technip Wood Group PSN WorleyParsons AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue 1 AVEVA World

AVEVA World Magazine 2014|Issue 1

AVEVA World Magazine 2014|Issue 1

35 35

HeungWon Suh, Director, DSME, receives the Award of Recognition from Richard Longdon, CEO, AVEVA.

The Korean shipbuilder, incorporated in 1973, has used AVEVA software since the 1980s. Tribon, the predecessor of today’s AVEVA Marine, had been used in the construction of over 1,000 vessels at the DSME shipyard before DSME upgraded to AVEVA Marine.

‘The history of our relationship with DSME runs in parallel to DSME’s long history of highly innovative projects that have created the shipyard as it is known today,’ said Richard Longdon, CEO of AVEVA. ‘AVEVA is proud to have provided the design tools and Information Management systems that made those kinds of projects possible.’

DSME’s ground-breaking projects include a number of world firsts. In 2005, DSME constructed and delivered the world’s first LNG-RV and became the first shipbuilder to have an annual production capacity of 14 LNGCs.

DSME and AVEVA Celebrate Decades of Collaboration

At this year’s AVEVA World Summit in Boston, AVEVA was pleased to present Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Ltd with an Award of Recognition to commemorate a long-standing, fruitful synergy between the two companies.

a long-standing, fruitful synergy between the two companies. In the same year, DSME delivered the world’s

In the same year, DSME delivered the world’s biggest offshore plant, BP Thunder Horse. Its most recent claim to fame has been the delivery of the world’s largest ship, the Maersk Triple E fleet of vessels.

To continue this legacy of success, DSME migrated to AVEVA Marine™, the latest generation in world-class 3D design software. Carrying forward its illustrious history of record-breaking projects, this year has also seen DSME reach the total of USD 10 billion in offshore plant orders for the first time in the world shipbuilding industry. Meanwhile, work has begun on an order for an 8,000 unit RORO, the biggest car carrier in the world.

After celebrating 25 years of innovation and success facilitated by the partnership with the Recognition award, AVEVA and DSME look forward to the next 25 years’ worth of ground-breaking projects.

to the next 25 years’ worth of ground-breaking projects. From left to right: SangWook Ham, Vice
From left to right: SangWook Ham, Vice President, AVEVA; EunJoo Park, Senior Vice President, AVEVA;
From left to right: SangWook Ham, Vice President, AVEVA; EunJoo Park, Senior Vice President, AVEVA; HeungWon Suh, Director, DSME; Richard Longdon, CEO, AVEVA; Paul Eveleigh,
Executive Vice President, AVEVA; Dave Wheeldon, CTO, AVEVA.

Unlocking the Full Potential

of Your Operations

Gary Farrow VP, 3D Data Capture Business Management, AVEVA

Why 3D data capture should become the keystone of your asset operations strategy
Why 3D data capture
should become the keystone of
your asset operations strategy

When asked ‘Do you think that laser scanning should form the keystone of a digital asset strategy?’ 92% of EPC and Owner Operator delegates who expressed an opinion at the 2013 AVEVA World Summit in Boston agreed. In this article we explain why laser scanning is so potentially valuable, and how 3D data capture should become the keystone element of your asset operations strategy.

AVEVA’s belief, clearly now shared by many Owner Operators, is that for every physical asset there should exist a digital asset. Furthermore this ‘digital plant’ information model should be kept evergreen throughout the entire asset life cycle. Seamlessly integrated, information should flow from as-designed, to as-built, to as-operated. This information model concept forms the basis of AVEVA’s Integrated Project Execution

and Operations Integrity Management strategies. These enable Owner Operators to improve efficiency and reduce risk in both the project execution and asset performance aspects of their operations and, by controlling information, design and engineering resources, also enable EPCs and OOs to improve quality, cut costs and shorten project schedules.

The digital plant can be used throughout the physical plant’s life cycle, from the earliest stages of FEED, through design, construction and commissioning, and throughout the asset’s working life. Because its integrity and value are maintained through the asset’s entire lifec ycle, the digital plant not only supports efficient operations but also facilitates efficient upgrades and revamps.

efficient operations but also facilitates efficient upgrades and revamps. AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue 1
efficient operations but also facilitates efficient upgrades and revamps. AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue 1
efficient operations but also facilitates efficient upgrades and revamps. AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue 1

Turning strategy into reality

AVEVA had already created market-leading products for exploiting the

For many Owner Operators, however, the biggest challenge in developing

value in laser scans when, in 2011, it extended its offering with the LFM

a

digital asset strategy is that digital information for existing plants

range of technologies. These embody two key principles:

is

either completely absent or of uncertain quality. Many plants still

in operation were designed and built before computers even existed, so existing engineering and design information is very often in paper format. Newer plants may have some digital information, perhaps even a 3D model, but in either situation changes are continually made to the plant, for maintenance, upgrades and expansion, to meet new legislation, for changes in the process and so on.

In practice therefore, there is an information gap between the physical

and digital assets. Unless bridged, this gap will continue to widen. This

is where laser scanning fits into an asset operations strategy, and where

AVEVA technology bridges the gap by enabling the digital plant to exist as

a coherent, trustworthy and accessible dataset.

3D laser scanning has become both affordable and powerful, and is now proven to be the most efficient method for capturing the existing conditions. Portable, easy-to-use hardware and powerful software technology enable the true ‘as-is’ condition of a plant to be delivered to the desktop of an engineer or operator quickly, cost-effectively and with minimum exposure to site hazards. The technology has evolved such that Owner Operators are now in a position to take ownership of the as-is data and benefit from the fusion of data from terrestrial, handheld and mobile scanning devices.

First, a uniquely ‘open and intelligent’ ability to work with laser scan data from all of the leading scanner vendors, in addition to industry-standard neutral formats. LFM’s InfiniteCore™ technology enables multiple scans to be processed into a single point cloud dataset of unlimited size, with no need to shed valuable data when doing so.

Second, LFM uses an integrated high-resolution BubbleView™ in which each individual image intelligently knows the 3D data from which it is derived and vice-versa. This creates the flexibility to work with either the point cloud or the BubbleView, while the dataset is still lightweight enough to be used efficiently via the Internet.

Having captured such a rich data set, the next important step is to enable it to be fully exploited by integrating laser scans and 3D design.

Intelligent engineering AVEVA Everything3D™ (AVEVA E3D™) achieves seamless integration of the laser scan data into the design environment. Enabling the ‘real world’ to be referenced in this way AVEVA is eliminating rework, increasing safety by ensuring less time is spent on site, and reducing project timescales during design and construction. Seamless automatic clash detection and the ability to extract critical tie-ins contribute significantly to this.

AVEVA E3D achieves seamless integration of the laser scan data into the design environment.
AVEVA E3D achieves seamless integration of the
laser scan data into the design environment.

Similarly by allowing for modelling within the BubbleView environment, as is possible in AVEVA E3D and AVEVA Laser Modeller™, we are delivering the ability to create an intelligent as-built model. Once created, this intelligent and accurate model becomes a valuable information asset that supports an effective overall asset management strategy.

Information sharing The lightweight technology behind the LFM BubbleViews also enables them to link directly with AVEVA NET™, providing an intuitive way for operators to visualise and ‘walk through’ their asset. Using AVEVA NET IntelliLaser™, objects in 3D BubbleViews can be hot-spotted, linking them to various associated data sources such as operations and maintenance information. In addition, simply by keying in an object’s tag reference, a user can view, measure and annotate the object in a realistic virtual model of the real plant. This capability is unique to AVEVA technology.

Imagine perfect as-built 3D data During project execution, AVEVA E3D provides the possibility to continually verify the as-fabricated and as-constructed against the as-designed model and to update the design model to reflect the true state of the delivered plant. In addition to the many benefits this provides to the EPC in eliminating or mitigating non-compliances with the design intent, a significant benefit for an Owner Operator is the high quality of as-built 3D information at handover. Now asset management can begin with an accurate, complete and intelligent model of the physical asset; a sound basis for safe, efficient and compliant life cycle management.

The use of 3D laser scan data is a key element in AVEVA’s vision of Plant Design for Lean Construction which, by using continual feedback of laser data to close the loop between design, fabrication and construction, enables a transformation in capital project execution. But this also stands to transform asset ownership, by enabling the earlier delivery of higher quality physical assets accompanied by accurate ‘digital plant’ information assets. AVEVA continues to lead the way in providing solutions that maximise capabilities through every stage of the asset life cycle.

capabilities through every stage of the asset life cycle. Burgasnefteproekt Reduces Design Time by 80% Using

Burgasnefteproekt Reduces Design Time by 80% Using AVEVA Technologies

Russia’s buoyant oil & gas industry is the world’s largest oil producer. With both domestic and global energy demand continuing to increase, Russia’s EPCs are in high demand, both for new-build projects and for revamping many elderly facilities. One of these EPCs, Burgasnefteproekt, specialises in petrochemicals projects and has achieved significant cost savings using AVEVA Laser Modeller™ on revamp projects.

Working with Italian company, Technip, Burgasnefteproekt recently undertook a project to upgrade the flaring system on a heavy residues (H-Oil) processing facility for Lukoil Neftochim Burgas. The work entailed checking the capacity of the existing flaring system taking into account new loads, and providing up-to-date, accurate project documentation to facilitate future refurbishments. Now more than 30 years old, the asset had accumulated many divergences between the as-designed and as-built states. Faced with this challenge, Burgasnefteproekt turned to AVEVA Laser Modeller to capture the as-built asset and create a 3D model of the flaring system.

3D laser scan data captured from the facility was imported into AVEVA Laser Modeller, which uses a high resolution, photo-realistic BubbleView™ rendering of the scan and extensively automates the 3D modelling process. On completion, the new model was transferred to AVEVA PDMS™. The result was an accurate 3D as-built model which Burgasnefteproekt could use for the revamp project, and which also provided a valuable digital asset for future design and maintenance activities. Any future plant modifications can be easily compared with the as-built 3D model by using the LFM Server™ technology to reference the laser scan data directly inside AVEVA PDMS. Using these technologies, Burgasnefteproekt achieved an impressive 80% saving in design man-hours.

‘The use of laser scanning technology on this project had a significant impact on the overall labour costs by making the process faster and more efficient,’ explained Rosen Spasov Kutiev, Head of Technical Department, Burgasnefteproekt. ‘Using AVEVA technologies we were able to complete the documentation in only 136 man-hours. Using traditional ways of working, the same task would have taken us between 700 and 900 man-hours. As a result, we rapidly gained an accurate as-built 3D model which we can use for redesign.’

accurate as-built 3D model which we can use for redesign.’ Above: 3D laser scan data from

Above: 3D laser scan data from the flaring system on a heavy residues (H-Oil) processing facility for Lukoil Neftochim Burgas. Image courtesy of Burgasnefteproekt.

About Burgasnefteproekt LUKOIL-Nizhegorodniinefteproekt was established in 1951. It owns several design branches, including Burgasnefteproekt, which was established in 2010. The company focuses on engineering and design in the oil & gas and petrochemical industries and is involved in many projects across Bulgaria and Russia. For more information visit www.nneft.lukoil.ru.

How Oil Field Development Engineering is Driving Down Rework Time

Tracey Nabe

Regional

Marketing Lead, North America, AVEVA

Founded in 2002, Houston-based Oil Field Development Engineering, LLC (OFD) is an enterprising provider of high-quality engineering services. Its expertise includes:

z

Concept Development and Selection

z

Front End Engineering Design

z

Detailed Engineering Design

z

Construction and Installation Support

z

Operation Support

z

Brownfield Modification

z Operation Support z Brownfield Modification The Castor Gas Storage Facility, an offshore gas storage

The Castor Gas Storage Facility, an offshore gas storage facility off the coast of Spain. Photograph courtesy of OFD.

These skills, together with a strong team culture, have enabled the business to grow steadily. Today, its 80-strong team can handle every project task and responsibility, including project management, engineering, project controls, design, drafting and procurement. AVEVA software has been a key enabler of this success.

Choosing AVEVA PDMS Recognising the need for powerful, industry-standard engineering design tools, OFD implemented AVEVA PDMS™ almost from the outset. From experience at previous companies, OFD’s founder and President, Mr Jay Chen and the OFD team knew that PDMS would save time and energy in training staff, as the tool is used by all disciplines for design and drawing generation.

Since the purchase of its first seat of PDMS, OFD has had an outstanding relationship with AVEVA. AVEVA has provided training and support to OFD on several projects, has assisted with customised programming to help OFD meet specific client requirements and continues to assist OFD whenever the need arises.

‘OFD has found that the most significant savings from the use of PDMS are made during fabrication and construction, where the highest proportion of a project’s cost is typically incurred. Rework during the fabrication and construction phase of a project is generally ’

estimated to cost ten times more than during the initial design phase

Early success In 2003, OFD delivered its first PDMS project: a check model for a Launcher/Receiver Skid. PDMS enabled the design team to work out space issues in 3D to create a clash-free design that required no rework in fabrication and which was delivered on schedule for a problem-free installation.

Since then, the OFD team have used AVEVA PDMS on a wide variety of projects, including the preliminary concept for the Texas Offshore Port System (TOPS), a Tank Farm and Distribution system for TEPPCO, Helix Producer I FPU, the Castor Gas Storage Facility, and a number of multi-leg platform jackets for water depths ranging from 200 feet to over 1,150 feet.

Meeting the challenge The Castor Gas Storage Facility, an offshore gas storage facility off the coast of Spain, was a particularly noteworthy project, for which OFD was the Engineering & Procurement (E&P) contractor. It comprised a 7,000- ton main platform and associated wellhead platform. The facility is used to store natural gas purchased during low-demand periods, for sale and delivery during high-demand periods.

As E&P contractor, OFD partnered with fabrication contractor Kiewit Offshore Services to execute the project. The platform is very large; its engineering design included over 3,200 isometrics and around the same number of individual pipe supports. OFD was in continuous direct communication with Kiewit Offshore Services, sending over review models, isometrics and pipe support drawings to Kiewit Offshore Services for fabrication.

AVEVA played a key role in establishing this efficient process, working with OFD to develop a database interrogation system which fed the required design drawings and information direct to Kiewit Offshore Services. This ensured that the fabricator had a complete materials database and could review the 3D model in real time to verify that drawings were clash-free. This proved of considerable value, enabling them to adhere closely to the construction schedule.

Successful collaboration on this project led to OFD and Kiewit Offshore Services partnering on the Helix Producer 1 project, which was of significant importance during the clean-up of the Macondo oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Also designed in PDMS, the main production unit of this facility was used to process some of the oil and flare off gas during the clean-up.

Today, OFD has several service contracts with Owner Operators to modify, update and maintain the PDMS models of their various assets. These 3D models and associated databases are contract deliverables that are handed over to the client at the end of each project.

Benefits from AVEVA PDMS As an agile E&P service contractor with a philosophy of running ‘Lean and Mean’ OFD has gained considerable value from integrating AVEVA PDMS into its operations.

PDMS is OFD’s preferred 3D design environment as it enables rapid project start-up and the implementation is very straightforward. It enables OFD to quickly assess alternative design options to ensure that they provide clients with an optimum design, accurate and fully detailed to meet their requirements. The ability for all design disciplines to work interactively on a common project model not only supports OFD’s strong teamwork culture, but also enables it to deliver consistent, high-quality end results.

The use of review models provides many further practical benefits. They enable OFD’s clients to be engaged early in the project design process and to have their comments easily and quickly incorporated into the evolving design. The engineering team use review models to answer questions that may arise about the design and construction, or in discussion with vendors. The project management, engineering and design teams can also see the true current status of the design, instead of having to rely on drawings that could be out of date. This leads to efficient communication within the entire project team.

The construction phases also benefit. Most fabrication and construction drawings are produced direct from the PDMS model, ensuring their accuracy. Materials information from the PDMS databases enables the fabricators to track material requirements and helps them to schedule project construction. OFD exports review models from PDMS and provides them on a continual basis to the fabrication and construction contractors, who use them to clarify details that could be misinterpreted on a drawing, avoiding the risk of errors and costly rework.

OFD has found that the most significant savings from the use of PDMS are made during fabrication and construction, where the highest proportion of a project’s cost is typically incurred. Rework during the fabrication and construction phase of a project is generally estimated to cost ten times more than during the initial design phase. This is because inaccurate or incomplete detailed information can result in re-fabrication, delays to the project schedule and increased materials costs through scrap and wastage. The accuracy of the information produced from the PDMS design model enables fabrication and construction to proceed confidently, with little or no rework due to design errors or clashes, leading to a truly lean construction project.

About OFD As a service organisation, OFD must be flexible and responsive to its clients’ diverse needs. AVEVA PDMS has enabled it to continually meet and exceed those needs and expectations, delivering engineering design of world-class quality, on time and in a cost-effective way. OFD’s business model of partnering with high-quality fabrication contractors has proved particularly successful for all parties. Of significant importance is this agile team’s ability to deliver projects that are both innovative and practical, with high quality and safety as a priority. By continuing to employ the best resources and tools, OFD aims to achieve its goal of being the first-choice E&P services provider for both onshore and offshore oil & gas projects, upstream as well as midstream.

both onshore and offshore oil & gas projects, upstream as well as midstream. AVEVA World Magazine

AVEVA Marine Supports ICE in Complex and Demanding Projects

International Contract Engineering, ICE, is one of Europe’s largest independent naval architecture and marine engineering consultants, offering a complete range of engineering, project management and consulting services to the marine, offshore and energy-related industries worldwide. The AVEVA Marine™ solution, combining hull and outfitting design modules with AVEVA Global™, has enabled ICE to handle much more complex and advanced projects, often executed globally with many parties involved.

often executed globally with many parties involved. Magnus Feldt Editor, AVEVA World Magazine ‘ICE is an

Magnus Feldt Editor, AVEVA World Magazine

‘ICE is an amalgamation of the former UK-based Sutton Engineering Limited and Icepronav Engineering SRL, based in Romania. Both companies are highly respected within the marine and offshore industries, each benefitting from a track record of nearly 50 years,’ explained Nicu Crapcenco, ICE Group Business Development Director.

ICE has substantially refocused its business towards international clients, particularly in the offshore energy market, which now represents about 80% of its revenue. Since mid-2012, ICE has been able to increase the level of contracts and its workload, enabling it to expand again.

the level of contracts and its workload, enabling it to expand again. 4 2 AVEVA World

At the beginning of 2014, ICE’s total employment level stood at approximately 400 people, including more than 300 professional engineers and naval architects.

Nicu Crapcenco told us, ‘Due to the tough price competition between the commercial shipyards and offshore yards worldwide, many yards, especially in Europe, have outsourced much of their engineering work and associated services to subcontractors. As a result, the shipyards are now much more flexible, with slimmer organisations, but much of the know-how has been transferred from these yards to external design and engineering companies.

‘This means that ICE’s role has changed from primarily providing basic design and detailed engineering to also performing feasibility studies, project studies, procurement, project management, yard planning and supervision work. Many of the offshore projects are complex and often executed globally with many parties involved. Following the first requirement from a client that a vessel should be designed with AVEVA Marine, ICE re-examined its working methods and the supporting software tools for its engineering work.’

Evaluation of engineering tools The evaluation process in the search for new software focused on issues such as client needs, and support for concurrent engineering to allow engineers and designers in all design and production disciplines and on multiple sites to work concurrently on the same ship model database.

It was also important that the new system should be in wide use and supported worldwide. Other key issues were that the hull and outfitting disciplines should be fully integrated, and that engineers should be easily able to adapt to the new software package.

Nicu Crapcenco continued, ‘The AVEVA Marine solution, combining hull and outfitting design modules with AVEVA Global, was selected after a thorough evaluation. Not only does this solution incorporate many of the valuable former Tribon features, especially for the hull design disciplines, it also supports efficient multi-site engineering and design processes. With this solution we can support early and basic design, through detailed hull and outfitting design, to the creation of manufacturing data and drawing documents.’

Migrating to AVEVA Marine ‘AVEVA Marine was implemented at ICE in the spring of 2012,’ Nicu Crapcenco told us. ‘The migration training started in the second week of March in the ICE offices, with a five-day project set-up and a basic administration course. Over the following month, a three-day AVEVA Hull™ upgrade course and a three-week course in AVEVA Outfitting™ were held. All the training courses were carried out by AVEVA consultants.

‘It was particularly helpful that local AVEVA support consultants were located close to us. We had regular meetings with them to exchange information on the status of the project.’

to exchange information on the status of the project.’ ICE is currently using AVEVA Marine for
to exchange information on the status of the project.’ ICE is currently using AVEVA Marine for

ICE is currently using AVEVA Marine for the detailed design of a drilling vessel based on a Gusto MSC basic design. Image courtesy of Gusto MSC.

on a Gusto MSC basic design. Image courtesy of Gusto MSC. ‘The AVEVA Marine solution, combining

‘The AVEVA Marine solution, combining hull and outfitting design modules with AVEVA Global, has enabled ICE to handle much more complex and advanced projects, often executed globally with many parties ’

involved

AVEVA Marine model from the drilling vessel project. Image courtesy of ICE.

AVEVA Marine models from the drilling vessel project. Images courtesy of ICE.
AVEVA Marine models from the drilling
vessel project. Images courtesy of ICE.
from the drilling vessel project. Images courtesy of ICE. More than 250 ICE engineers have been

More than 250 ICE engineers have been trained in AVEVA Marine, and an additional 25 in AVEVA PDMS™, which is used for stationary power generation, chemical plants and related industries.

First project with AVEVA Marine – delivered on time ICE’s first project using AVEVA Marine was for the design of a self- propelled jack-up vessel (NG 2500X). The engineering contract was signed in August 2012 and finalised on June 19, 2013. The vessel (Seajacks Hydra) is currently under construction in one of offshore fabrication specialist, Lamprell Energy’s yards in the United Arab Emirates, and will be delivered to its owner, Seajacks UK Ltd, in Q3 of 2014. Seajacks is a leading Owner Operator of purpose-built, self-propelled jack-up vessels.

The Seajacks vessels are designed specifically for year-round operation in harsh environments and in full compliance with UK, Dutch and Danish operating regulations. Seajacks Hydra is a wind turbine installation vessel, capable of transporting offshore wind turbines and pylons to the wind-farm site from shore under its own power, then quickly jacking itself out of the water to provide a stable platform for installing the turbine structure with a huge on-board crane. These operations will be carried out without assistance from other vessels.

‘More than 250 ICE engineers have been trained in AVEVA Marine, and ’

an additional 25 in AVEVA PDMS

The basic design was developed by Gusto MSC in the Netherlands and ICE has updated the package with information received from other vendors. AVEVA Marine was used for the complete detailed design, in line with the yard’s construction philosophy, to a level of detail that allowed ICE to automatically extract production information for all disciplines down to NC cutting and pipe bending. It is interesting to note that Lamprell built another NG 2500 vessel a couple of years earlier, using less developed drawings and, based on that experience, Lamprell found it worthwhile to rework the 3D model for the entire vessel, using AVEVA Marine to save time in production and overall project costs.

‘It was a challenge to shift from one software environment to the other and to be able to deliver the design on time,’ said Nicu Crapcenco, ‘but all deliveries were made on schedule.’

Current projects There are currently two projects in progress in ICE’s Romanian office where AVEVA Marine is used. Both projects are for the offshore market; the first is a large Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) project and the second is a drilling vessel for a Brazilian owner. Based on the engineering package developed by ICE, six of these sister vessels will be built by Estaleiro Enseada do Paraguaçu S.A. (EEP), which is going to be one of the largest shipyards in Brazil.

These vessels are designed for worldwide operations and are able to perform drilling operations in water depths of up to 3,000 metres.

Nicu Crapcenco, ICE Group Business Development Director. Photograph courtesy of ICE. ICE office building in
Nicu Crapcenco, ICE Group Business Development Director. Photograph courtesy of ICE.
Nicu Crapcenco, ICE Group Business Development
Director. Photograph courtesy of ICE.
ICE office building in Galati, Romania. Photograph courtesy of ICE.
ICE office building in Galati, Romania. Photograph courtesy of ICE.

‘In the end it’s all about using AVEVA Marine in every step: planning, modelling and delivery; it’s all a matter of experience and finding out new things about the software ’

package and its capabilities

ICE started the development of the engineering package in May 2012, based on a Gusto MSC basic design in Tribon. The basic design data was smoothly converted to AVEVA Marine. The whole package, which involves updating the basic design with vendor-furnished information (VFI), the detailed design work and the creation of all production information, is being developed in parallel with production activities and is expected to be completed in Q4, 2014 for the first ship.

ICE has also provided technical support for the procurement activity in the selection of packages, equipment and materials suppliers, and is the engineering office responsible for the integration of all these and for developing the AVEVA Marine 3D model as detailed above.

The design of the drilling ships is being coordinated with AVEVA Global to link project databases at EEP’s Rio project office in Brazil, Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Japan, drill package designer, KCA Deutag (RDS) in the USA and ICE in Romania. AVEVA Global is AVEVA’s solution for multi-site concurrent working, enabling ICE and its partners to work concurrently towards the same ship model. Global provides concurrent, distributed 3D plant design with central project administration; it allows for flexibility with control, and offers high-speed performance whilst being fault tolerant.

Conclusion Nicu Crapcenco concluded, ‘We found the hull application in AVEVA Marine easy to start working with, as many features were similar to the Tribon hull application. The outfitting application in AVEVA Marine was a new application for us but, thanks to effective training, the outfitting design work could begin only a couple of weeks after the hull design started.’

‘The benefits gained from using the AVEVA Global application include ensuring data integrity and efficiency when working with partners in large complex projects, particularly with engineering teams located in different parts of the world and different time zones.

‘One of the big gains we’ve found in moving to AVEVA Marine is its comprehensive and powerful capability for customisation through the PML scripting language. This facility is accessible even to those who do not have a professional programming background. This means that we were able to add specifically-built applications (plug-ins) to meet our needs. Additionally, AVEVA Marine’s well-organised project structure offers a very flexible way to set up a project.

‘In the end it’s all about using AVEVA Marine in every step: planning, modelling and delivery; it’s all a matter of experience and finding out new things about the software package and its capabilities,’ Nicu Crapcenco concluded.

About ICE With its head office on the Isle of Man, ICE has subsidiaries in Romania, Cyprus, the UK and Norway. ICE’s modern office complex in Galati, by the river Danube, is today the company’s main design and engineering facility. Icepronav, a unique design, research and hydrodynamic test facility, founded in 1966, played a key role in Romania’s success in entering the world business market in shipbuilding in the 1990s, after the end of the communist era. They began to use the Tribon shipbuilding system in 1993, while the Sutton Group independently implemented Tribon in 1996 at their Newcastle office.

To find out more, please visit www.icedesign.info.

at their Newcastle office. To find out more, please visit www.icedesign.info . AVEVA World Magazine 2014
AVEVA Welcomes Our New Customers in 2013 AVEVA enables our customers to engineer, design and

AVEVA Welcomes Our New Customers in 2013

AVEVA enables our customers to engineer, design and manage increasing complex projects and assets for
AVEVA enables our customers
to engineer, design and
manage increasing complex
projects and assets for the
process plant, power, mining
and marine industries.
3Deling Sp. z o.o., Poland

Al Khaleej Sugar, UAE Alion Science and Technology Corporation, USA Alpetros Engineering Solutions, Australia Andritz Technologies Ltd., China ARIANE RESEAU, France Ariosh Ltd, USA Astilleros Armón Gijón, Spain Astrolabe Engineering Pto, Greece Atkins Ltd, UK Ausenco, Australia Ausenco, USA Auxitec le havre, France Ayesa MDE, Spain

We aspire to build long- term relationships with the companies we serve and are proud to add the following new customers to the AVEVA community in 2013.

the following new customers to the AVEVA community in 2013. Bilfinger Industrial Services UK Limited, UK
Bilfinger Industrial Services UK Limited, UK BMT Defence Services, UK Bouygues Congo, Congo Braskem SA,
Bilfinger Industrial Services UK Limited, UK
BMT Defence Services, UK
Bouygues Congo, Congo
Braskem SA, Brazil
Brion Energy, Canada
CDE Process (Pty) Ltd, South Africa
CGC Converse Technologies Pvt. Ltd., India
Chantiers Davie Canada Inc., Canada
Chemgineering Technology AG, Switzerland
Chemtech, Brazil
Cimati, Mexico
Citec Engineering (I) Pvt. Ltd., India
CNOOC & Shell Petrochemicals Company
Limited., China
Cofely Fabricom S.A., Belgium
Complete Fire Design, Australia
ConocoPhillips, UK
ConPackSys b.v., Netherlands
Consorcio SPS, Brazil
Construtora Andrade Gutierrez, Brazil
Control Point Design, USA
COWI A/S, Denmark
Brazil Control Point Design, USA COWI A/S, Denmark D.K.L. Drafting, Australia Damodar Valley Corporation,

D.K.L. Drafting, Australia Damodar Valley Corporation, India Degremont Water Treatment Systems (Beijing) Co., Ltd, China Demuth Maquinas Industriais Ltda, Brazil Det Norske Oljeselskap ASA, Norway Development Consultants Pvt Ltd, India Dex Engenharia e Consultoria Ltda, Brazil Dieffenbacher Panelboard Oy, Finland DKT Co., Ltd., Korea DM Ingenieros S.A. de C.V., Mexico DMAR Engineering, USA Doosan Skoda Power s.r.o, Czech Republic Doris USA Inc., USA Dörr Dach + Wand GmbH, Germany DP Clean Tech Poland Sp. z o.o., Poland DPS Process System Integrator Pte Ltd, Singapore Dragon Oil, UAE

Eci ingenierie, France EDOXX Engineering S.A.S., Colombia Elecnor, Spain Eni Norge AS, Norway Estaleiro do Brasil Ltda, Brazil EUROPOLIS S.A., Romania Euxin Marine Design, Romania EXTIA, France

Fabtech Projects and Engineers Limited, India Fichtner GmbH & Co. KG, Germany Forus Energy Services, Norway Fox Solutions, India Furmanite, USA

GAS Entec Co., Ltd. (TAEWON Engineering Co., Ltd.), Korea GDK S.A., Brazil GE Engineering Design Center Oil & Gas, Poland GEOSEL MANOSQUE, France GL Noble Denton AS, Norway GMI S.A. Ingenieros Consultores, Peru Gold Coast Drafting, Australia Grandee Automacao de Engenharia Ltda, Brazil GS Caltex Corporation, Korea

Hanil Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Korea Hensel Phelps Construction Co., USA Hess, USA Holcim Technology Ltd, Switzerland Hwee Metal Works Pte Ltd, Singapore

NEM Energy BV, Netherlands NGLTech Sdn Bhd, Malaysia NIAEP, Russia Nova Chemicals Corporatation, Canada

Silesian University of Technology, Poland Smart Design 2006 Ltd., Bulgaria SNC Lavalin Engineering India Pvt. Ltd., India SNF SAS, France Solaris Energy, Canada South West University of Science & Technology, Canada Stahl & Metallbau Bergmann GmbH & Co. KG, Germany Stahlhallenbau P. Marwinski GmbH, Germany Studi Tecnologie Progetti S.p.A, Italy Sumitomo Chemical Engineering Singapore Pte Ltd, Singapore Summit Engineering & Design, LLC, USA Surveying Systems S.r.l., Italy

Tecdata Engenharia e Servicos Ltda, Brazil Technical Services & Maintenance Inc, USA Technisches Zeichenbüro Fatuly, Germany Technodyne, UK The CQ Group, LLC, USA The Hakodate Dock Co., Ltd., Japan The Korea Offshore & Shipbuilding Association, Korea Tome Engenharia SA, Brazil

TOTAL E&P Nigeria, Nigeria Transfield Worley, Australia TriGeo Technologies Private Limited, India Trinity Consultants, USA Truth Design, LLC, USA Tully Welding Works, Australia Turner & Townsend, Netherlands Tucson Electric Power, USA

& Townsend, Netherlands Tucson Electric Power, USA Ultra Ingenieria SA DE CV, Mexico Universal Pegasus
& Townsend, Netherlands Tucson Electric Power, USA Ultra Ingenieria SA DE CV, Mexico Universal Pegasus
& Townsend, Netherlands Tucson Electric Power, USA Ultra Ingenieria SA DE CV, Mexico Universal Pegasus
& Townsend, Netherlands Tucson Electric Power, USA Ultra Ingenieria SA DE CV, Mexico Universal Pegasus
& Townsend, Netherlands Tucson Electric Power, USA Ultra Ingenieria SA DE CV, Mexico Universal Pegasus
& Townsend, Netherlands Tucson Electric Power, USA Ultra Ingenieria SA DE CV, Mexico Universal Pegasus
& Townsend, Netherlands Tucson Electric Power, USA Ultra Ingenieria SA DE CV, Mexico Universal Pegasus

Ultra Ingenieria SA DE CV, Mexico Universal Pegasus International, USA UOP LLC, USA

Mexico Universal Pegasus International, USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil

Urbica Ingenierie, France

USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos
USA UOP LLC, USA Urbica Ingenierie, France Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos

Vard Promar S.A., Brazil Venezolana de Proyectos Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia

Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,
Integrados Vepica, CA, Venezuela VolgaNIPITEK, Russia W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH,

W. u. W. Staab GmbH, Germany WEGRA Anlagenbau GmbH, Germany Western Refining, USA Westlake Petrochemicals LLC, USA Williamson Technical Services Ltd, UK WLT Liquid & Gas Loading Technology BV, Netherlands WW-IMT SARL, France WYG, UK

Young, Stuart & Associates Inc., South Africa

Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany

Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &
Inc., South Africa Zeppelin Reimelt GmbH, Germany O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process &

O’Brien & Cardinal UHP - AMETEK Process & Analytical Instruments, USA Odfjell Drilling (UK) Ltd., UK Odfjell Drilling Philippines Corp., Philippines Oil & Gas Solutions Pte Ltd, Singapore Optimus (Aberdeen) Ltd, UK Orion Engineering, Inc, USA Overflow Industrial, Australia Ozone Plant Design Services Pvt. Ltd, India

Australia Ozone Plant Design Services Pvt. Ltd, India Paul Wurth IHI Co., Ltd., Japan Pegasus TSI,
Australia Ozone Plant Design Services Pvt. Ltd, India Paul Wurth IHI Co., Ltd., Japan Pegasus TSI,
Australia Ozone Plant Design Services Pvt. Ltd, India Paul Wurth IHI Co., Ltd., Japan Pegasus TSI,
Australia Ozone Plant Design Services Pvt. Ltd, India Paul Wurth IHI Co., Ltd., Japan Pegasus TSI,
Australia Ozone Plant Design Services Pvt. Ltd, India Paul Wurth IHI Co., Ltd., Japan Pegasus TSI,

Paul Wurth IHI Co., Ltd., Japan

Pegasus TSI, Inc, USA Penglai Zhongbai Jinglu Shipping Industry Co.,Ltd., China Perenco Oil & Gas Gabon, Gabon PFEIL & PFEIL Stahlbau GmbH, Germany Pields Engineering Co., Ltd., Korea Pieters Engineering, France Planerkon GmbH, Germany

plantIng GmbH, Germany POSCO E&C Co., Ltd., Korea Power Engineering Consulting JSC 1, Vietnam Powers Engineers, USA Poznan University of Technology, Poland PPG Industrial do Brasil-Tintas e Vernizes, Brazil PRC Engineering AB, Sweden Projeflex Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland

Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH
Engenharia Ltda, Brazil PSE Kinsale Energy, Ireland Quanta Point, Nigeria R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH

Quanta Point, Nigeria

R.K.M Powergen, India R.O.T. GmbH & Co. KG, Germany RAB Hydraulics Ltd, UK Rally Engineering
R.K.M Powergen, India
R.O.T. GmbH & Co. KG, Germany
RAB Hydraulics Ltd, UK
Rally Engineering Inc., Canada
Rapp Infra AG, Switzerland
Richard Industrial Group, USA
Rico GmbH & Co. KG, Germany
RIG Engineering Co. Ltd, UK
Ritaj Engineers and Consultants, Oman
Röhrs AG, Germany
Ritaj Engineers and Consultants, Oman Röhrs AG, Germany I.A Naman & Associates, USA IES Engineering, USA

I.A Naman & Associates, USA IES Engineering, USA IHI E&C International Corporation, USA I-Max Pte Ltd, Singapore Indorama Holdings Rotterdam B.V, Netherlands Ingenieria Strycon S.A.S., Colombia Intermetric GmbH, Germany International Paper, USA Inter RAO Engineering, Russia Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand

Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,
Italian-Thai Development Public Company Limited, Thailand JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering,

JD, Irving Limited, St-John, Canada JEONGWON Engineering, Korea Jingding Engineering Co., China Jobson Italiana s.r.l, Italy Jord Oil & Gas Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea

Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,
Systems B.V., Netherlands Junglim Tech Co., Ltd., Korea K + S Potash Canada, Canada Keystone Engineering,

K + S Potash Canada, Canada

Keystone Engineering, Inc, USA KFS Pfitzer, Germany KH Engineering B.V., Netherlands KH Engineering N.V., Belgium KKMSoft (P) Ltd, India Korea South-East Power Co., Ltd., Korea Korea Zinc Co., Ltd., Korea KSP HUTH e.K., Germany Kuhnhausen Dubbert Semler, Germany

Kwanglim Engineering & Construction Co., Ltd., Korea

Kwanglim Engineering & Construction Co., Ltd., Korea L & T Limited, Construction, India Lai Yew Seng

L & T Limited, Construction, India

Lai Yew Seng Pte Ltd, Singapore Land Air Survey, USA L-Con Engineers & Constructors Inc, USA

Lead Engineering, Korea Levingston Group LLC, USA LKS Ingeniería, Spain Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA

Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico
Lonadek Nigeria Ltd, Nigeria LyondellBasell - USA HQ, USA Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico

Sacmag de Mexico S.A. de C.V., Mexico Samsung Thai Engineering Co. Ltd, Thailand Samsung Total Petrochemicals Co., Ltd., Korea Sance Sandelin Consulting and Engineering Oy, Finland SAV Oy, Finland Schaefer Systems International Pte Ltd, Singapore Schahin Engenharia SA, Brazil, Brazil SEJIN Plant Engineering Co., Ltd., Korea SEWHA E&T Co., Ltd., Korea Shanghai Electric-SPX Engineering & Technologies Co., Ltd., China Shanghai Morimatsu Pharmaceutical Equipment Engineering Co., Ltd., China

MAN Diesel & Turbo India Ltd., India March Consulting, USA Massia Ingenieria S.A.S., Peru MCL, France MECACONCEPT, France Mendes Junior Trading e Engenharia, Brazil Micro CADD Services W.L.L., Bahrain MIM GmbH, Germany Mirante Topografia, Brazil Moco Steel, South Africa Montcalm Montagens Industriais SA, Brazil MSFPA, SA, Spain MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH, Germany

Industriais SA, Brazil MSFPA, SA, Spain MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH, Germany AVEVA World Magazine 2014 | Issue

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