Sei sulla pagina 1di 3

CE 2021:

Civil Engineering Materials

Feb. May, 2016

ME 2010:

Mechanics of Solids I

Tutorial #5

(To be discussed during week #5: Feb. 29 March 4)

1. Fig. 1(a)-(d) shows some common plane areas. C denotes the centroid and Using integration where necessaryfind the following in each case:

(a)

(b) The second moment of area about the

The values of

x

c

and/or y

c

in cases where they are indicated.

axis.

x

x a centroidal axis.

Then use the parallel axis theorem to find the following in each case:

(c) The second moment of area about the x axis.

h/2 C h/2 b
h/2
C
h/2
b

(a)

x

x

x R C x (b)
x
R
C
x
(b)
x x c h C y c b
x
x c
h
C
y c
b

Fig. Q1

(c)

x h C y c x x b
x
h
C
y c
x
x
b

(d)

I 2. Calculate x for each of the areas shown in Fig. Q2(a)-(c). (x is
I
2. Calculate
x for each of the areas shown in Fig. Q2(a)-(c). (x is a centroidal axis).
120
200
100
25
20
x
20
x
x
150
300
200
25
25R
20
25

( dimensions are in mm)

Fig. Q2(a)

( dimensions are in mm )

Fig. Q2(b)

( dimensions are in mm )

Fig. Q2(c)

3. During construction of a highway bridge, the main girders are cantilevered outward from one pier towards the next (see Fig. Q3). Each girder has a cantilever length of 48 m and an I-shaped cross-section with dimensions shown in the figure. The load on each girder (during construction) is assumed to be 9.5 kN/m, which includes the weight of the girder. Determine the maximum tensile bending stress and the maximum compressive bending stress in a girder due to this load. (From Gere & Goodno).

Fig. Q3
Fig. Q3

4. Fig. Q4 shows the cross section of a long uniform concrete wall of a water tank. Assuming that the wall behaves like a cantilever, calculate the maximum tensile bending stress and the maximum compressive bending stress in the concrete. ( density of water = 10 3 kg/m 3 ; gravitational acceleration g = 9.81 m/s 2 ).

Hint: Consider a unit length of the wall.

5. Fig. Q5(a) shows a beam ABCD, simply supported at B and C and subjected to a point load of 10 kN at A and a udl of intensity 12 kN/m over a part of it. The doubly symmetric uniform cross section of the beam is shown in Fig. Q5(b).

2.5 m 2.0 m 200 mm
2.5 m
2.0 m
200 mm

Fig. Q4

(a)

Determine the support reactions at B and C.

(b)

Indicating all critical values sketch the shear force diagram (SFD) and the bending moment diagram (BMD) for this beam.

(c)

Calculate the largest tensile bending stress and the largest compressive bending stress in the beam.

10 kN 12 kN/m B C A 1 m 1 m 3 m 1 m
10 kN
12 kN/m
B
C
A
1 m
1 m
3 m
1 m

Fig. Q5(a)

D

120
120

20

20
20

20

20

kN 12 kN/m B C A 1 m 1 m 3 m 1 m Fig. Q5(a)

150

( dimensions are in mm) Fig. Q5(b)

6. Beam ABCD shown in Fig.Q6(a) is simply supported at B and C. It is subjected to two concentrated loads of magnitudes 10 kN and 4 kN at A and D respectively, and a udl of intensity 12 kN/m over BC.

(a)

Giving all critical values, sketch the shear force diagram (SFD) and the bending moment diagram (BMD) for this beam.

(b)

The cross section of this beam is shown in Fig.Q6(b). Determine the magnitudes of the largest tensile and compressive bending stresses in the beam.

7.

A

10 kN 4 kN 12 kN/m D B 1 m 3 m C 1 m
10 kN
4 kN
12 kN/m
D
B
1
m
3
m
C 1
m
200 25 25 300
200
25
25
300

Fig. Q6(a)

( dimensions are in mm )

Fig. Q6(b)

A railroad sleeper is subjected to two rail loads, each of magnitude P = 175 kN, acting as shown in Fig. Q7. The reaction q of the ballast is assumed to be uniformly distributed over the length of the sleeper, which has cross-sectional dimensions b = 300 mm and h = 250 mm. Calculate the maximum bending stress in the sleeper due to the loads P, assuming the distance L = 1500 mm and the overhang length a = 500 mm. (From Gere & Goodno)

L = 1500 mm and the overhang length a = 500 mm. (From Gere & Goodno)

Fig. Q7

NS Feb. 26, 2016