Sei sulla pagina 1di 728

STUDIUMBIBLICUMFRANCISCANUM

LIBERANNUUS
LXI

Jerusalem

2012, Fondazione Terra Santa - Milano


Edizioni Terra Santa - Milano
Editor
L. Daniel Chrupcaa
Co-editors
Massimo Pazzini, Gregor Geiger
Editorial Board
Eugenio Alliata, Giovanni Bissoli, G. Claudio Bottini,
A. Marcello Buscemi, Pietro Kaswalder, Giovanni Loche,
Massimo Luca, Frdric Manns, Alviero Niccacci,
Carmelo Pappalardo, Rosario Pierri, Tomislav Vuk

Publications of the
STUDIUM BIBLICUM FRANCISCANUM
sponsored by the Franciscan Custody
of the Holy Land:
Liber Annuus (LA) 1951-2011
Collectio Maior 51 volumes
Collectio Minor 44 volumes
Analecta 79 volumes
Museum 16 volumes
All correspondence, papers for publication in LA,
books for review, and any request for exchanges
should be addressed:
Editor of Liber Annuus
Studium Biblicum Franciscanum
P.O.Box 19424 91193 Jerusalem (Israel)
Tel +972-2-6270485 / 6270444
Fax +972-2-6264519
E-mail: edit@studiumbiblicum.org

Distribuzione esclusiva
BREPOLS PUBLISHERS
Begijnhof 67, B-2300 Turnhout (Belgium)
Tel. +32 14 44 80 20 - Fax +32 14 42 89 19
E-mail: info@brepols.net - www.brepols.net

Finito di stampare nel marzo 2012 da Corpo 16 s.n.c. - Bari


ISBN 978-88-6240-143-2 ISSN 0081-8933

LIBER ANNUUS
Annual of the
Studium Biblicum Franciscanum
Jerusalem

Indice generale

Articoli

Alviero Niccacci
The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

Alberto Mello
Abitare nella casa del Signore. Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

37

Vittorio Ricci
La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

53

Gregor Geiger
Akzentuierung zur semantischen Differenzierung: nifal wayyiqtol in
masoretischer Vokalisierung

77

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa


Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

89

Frdric Manns
The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

127

Giorgio Giurisato
Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

211

Alfio Marcello Buscemi


Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

229

Rosario Pierri
Limperativo nel Nuovo Testamento: in dialogo con J.D. Fantin

257

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa


Il avverbiale in Lc-At

285

Erwin Reidinger
The Temple in Jerusalem: Using the Sun to Date its Origins

319

Darko Tepert
Fragments of Targum Onkelos of Exodus Recently Found in Rijeka, Croatia 347

Indice generale

Jobjorn Boman
Inpulsore Cherestro? Suetonius Divus Claudius 25.4 in Sources and
Manuscripts

355

Massimo Pazzini
Trattato di San Gregorio Taumaturgo circa la non passibilit o passibilit di
Dio. Testo siriaco e traduzione italiana

377

Michele Voltaggio
Lo sviluppo urbanistico di Gerusalemme tra IV e VII secolo

413

Yana Tchekhanovets
Early Georgian Pilgrimage to the Holy Land

453

Ilaria Sabbatini
The Representation of the Orient in the Pilgrimage Diaries of the Florentine
corpus (XIV and XV centuries). Men, Women, Costumes, Cultures between
Religion and Observation

473

Silvio Barbaglia
Har Karkom interroga lesegesi e la teologia. Un primo bilancio della ricezione
dellipotesi di E. Anati nei dibattiti sulle origini di Israele

499

Varda Sussman
Artistic representation of the Judean Shefelah jurisdiction: The Beit Nattif oil
lamps

519

Asher Ovadiah - Sonia Mucznik


The Roman Sarcophagi at Kedesh, Upper Galilee: Iconography, Typology and
Significance

531

Gyz Vrs
Machaerus Revealed: Anastilosis and Architectural Reconstruction after the
Surveys and Excavations of the Archaeological Monument

555

Hamed Salem
Khirbet Siya: A Byzantine Settlement in Ramallah Region - Palestine

575

Massimo Pazzini
Grammatiche e dizionari di ebraico-aramaico in italiano. Catalogo ragionato
Aggiornamento (dicembre 2011)

621

Sintesi degli articoli (Abstracts)


Ricerca storico-archeologica in Giordania. XXX - 2011
Recensioni e Libri ricevuti
SBF: Anno accademico 2010 - 2011
Indici Liber Annuus 1981 - 2010

627
639
659
711
719

Articoli

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 7-625

Alviero Niccacci
The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms,
Isaiah and Ezekiel

Outside the book of Exodus we speak of an exodus tradition, that is something


that is referred to, rather than narrated, being presupposed as already known and
significant for the faith of the audience. This observation is both evident and important for a correct interpretation.1
1. Criteria
To evaluate the exodus tradition outside the book of Exodus is not an easy task.
Overt occurrences and indirect allusions are relatively numerous but they are dispersed in the prophetic corpus and in the Psalms. We need, first, to establish definite
criteria to identify the exodus tradition; second, to investigate how the exodus
tradition is actually used in each text; and, third, to exert due caution in historical
and theological interpretation of the data.
Studies on prophetic material have identified an exodus pattern composed of
three phases: the coming out of Egypt, mostly with ayIxwh; the walking in the desert,
J yIlwh; and the entering into the promised land, with ayIbhE . This pattern, derived
with K
of course from the tradition of the exodus from Egypt, in the prophetic tradition is
also used for a different setting, e.g. for a return of the exiles from other countries.
In the Psalms and the Prophets the exodus motif is evoked for a certain purpo-

1 This is a revision and updating of a conference I gave in April 15, 1996, during the colloquium Reality versus Poetry in the Narration of the Exodus in the Biblical and Egyptian Sources
organized by the Hebrew University together with the cole Biblique in memory of Professor B.
Couroyer. Unfortunately, I could not prepare my paper in time for the publication in I. ShirunGrumach (ed.), Jerusalem Studies in Egyptology (gypten und Altes Testament 40), Wiesbaden
1998. I took it back and tried to revise my conference after having published Esodo 15. Esame
letterario, composizione, interpretazione, LA 59 (2009) 9-26. Again, due to health problems, I was
unable to revise my paper in time to be published in LA 60 (2010) issued in honor of Fr. Giovanni
Bissoli at the age of 70 years. It is a pleasure to finally be able to dedicate this paper to him, my
colleague and coetaneous, with all my compliments and best wishes.

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 9-35

10

Alviero Niccacci

se rather than for its own sake. We need to investigate how the exodus pattern is
used according to the syntactical texture of each text.2
The exodus motif in the Prophets and the Psalms is used for hymnic or paraenetic-didactic purposes. Thus, not all the exodus events are necessarily mentioned but rather a choice is made according to necessity. This means that we
need to be cautious not to over or misinterpret the evidence both historically and
theologically.
The three-phase exodus pattern helps analyze most of the prophetic texts of
Deutero-Isaiah, Hosea, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Micah and Amos.3 However, in order to
analyze the Psalms we need to look for other criteria. The best thing to do is to
make a critical inventory of the motifs connected to the exodus tradition in the
biblical sources. Compiling this inventory poses, of course, serious problems. I
base my inventory on one of the few comprehensive inquiry on the exodus tradition, that by Loewenstamm.4
The main motifs involved are the plagues, the parting of the sea, and the defeat
of the Egyptians. According to Loewenstamm, Pss 78 and 105 show a series of
seven plagues and are older than that of the final redaction of the book of Exodus,
which has ten plagues. Seven is, of course, a climatic number, well known in both
biblical and Ancient Near Eastern literary tradition, while the ten plagues are arranged in a 3x3+1 pattern in the book of Exodus. The ten plagues are the result of
a combination of the two series of seven.5 However, I would object to this conclusion for some reasons. First, Ps 78:43-51 and 105:28-36 (see 2.4. Psalm 105
below) do not show the same list of plagues; second, both texts are poetry and
poetry does not narrate facts like prose but rather refers to them as something already known in order to celebrate one or another in connection with the main purpose of the psalm.6 This means that, according to my view, a psalm does not necessarily reproduces facts exactly as they happened, nor necessarily all of them nor in
the same order as in reality.
The parting of the sea is, according to Loewenstamm, the original nucleus of
the exodus tradition because it is a constant element of it, while the defeat of the
2 For instance, A. Spreafico, Esodo: memoria e promessa (Supplementi alla Rivista Biblica 14),
Bologna 1985, studies the exodus pattern carefully but without paying any attention to the actual
texture of the texts. On the one hand, the exodus pattern contributes to the analysis of prophetic texts,
as Spreafico shows; on the other hand, however, the exodus pattern cannot be extrapolated from its
context. Otherwise one may miss the specific purpose of its use in the different texts.
3 See lists by Spreafico, Esodo: memoria e promessa, chap. VI, sec. II, pp. 138-147.
4 S.E. Loewenstamm, The Evolution of the Exodus Tradition (Publications of the Perry Foundation for Biblical Research in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Jerusalem 1992.
5 Loewenstamm, The Evolution of the Exodus Tradition, 71-86.
6 In my paper Analysing Biblical Hebrew Poetry, JSOT 74 (1997) 77-93, pp. 77-80, I analyze
the killing of Sisera at the hands of Jael first narrated in prose (Judg 4:19,21), then celebrated in
poetry (5:25-27).

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

11

Egyptians is not always mentioned in the texts.7 The parting of the sea, which is
sometimes paralleled by that of the Jordan, echoes the old Canaanite motif of the
battle of Baal against Yam (the Sea).8 With it goes the motif of the tempest with
thunder; lightning and rain, connected with the Lord waging war against his enemies a theophanic element related with god Hadad.9 Another motif, the quaking
of nature, originally independent from the war motif, is found connected with it in
some texts.
The three-phase pattern and the three main motifs connected with the exodus
tradition appear variously in the texts in general or more specific terms, and differently combined according to the purpose of the authors. Other motifs also interact with these, as we shall see; but these cannot be said to be characteristic of the
exodus tradition.
2. Psalms
Let us begin our inquiry with the Psalms because the exodus tradition found in
some of them is very old, possibly, according to a number of scholars to which I
do not agree, older that the one found in the final redaction of the book of Exodus.10
In the Psalms the exodus exemplifies the mighty deeds of the Lord in a special way.
It is not the only one with this function, however; the creation of the world also
plays a role.11
The main Psalms employing the exodus motif are thought to be the following:
78, 80, 81, 105, 106, 114, and 136. However, I will only examine the first four.12
7 Differently, R. de Vaux thought that only the defeat of the Egyptians belongs to the exodus
tradition, not the crossing of the sea (Histoire ancienne dIsral, Paris 1971, 358-364; see H. Simian-Yofre, Exodo in Deuteroisaas, Bib 61 [1980] 530-553, p. 550). On my part, as just said above,
the distinction between narration of a fact, on one side, and proclamation of it for the good of the
believers, on the other, may not represent a sound basis for such definite conclusions.
8 J. Day, Gods Conflict with the Dragon and the Sea (University of Cambridge Oriental Publications 35), Cambridge e.a. 1988, 7-9, 13-16.
9 Day, Gods Conflict with the Dragon and the Sea, 59, 130, 163.
10 In my recent publication, Esodo 15. Esame letterario, composizione, interpretazione, I tried
to show that the composition of the poetic part, vv. 1-18, of Ex 15 is demonstrably old, about the
XIth c., and that this part is strictly connected with the prose related section (see 4).
11 E.g., see my paper, La teologia della creazione nei Salmi e nei Sapienziali, in M.V. Fabbri
- M. Tbet (eds.), Creazione e salvezza nella Bibbia, Roma 2009, 77-117. Also see footn. 12 here
below.
12 The text of Ps 106 is enclosed in an invitation to thank and glorify the Lord for his mighty
deeds to save his people in the past (vv. 1-5 // 43-48); there follows a reflection on Gods mercy
towards the peoples, unsteady of faith in Him, despite His many mighty deeds (vv. 6-7). The mention of Egypt and God's mighty deeds is followed by a positive reaction (vv. 8-12), but soon after
by a negative one, especially during the march in the desert toward the Promised Land (vv. 13-44).
On its part, Ps 114 begins with a very short reference to the exodus, just mentioning the exit from
Egypt (v. 1); then the fact follows that Judah/Israel became Gods sanctuary, and the river Jordan

12

Alviero Niccacci

2.1. Psalm 78
Ps 78 is a didactic composition drawing on the sacred history of Israel. After an
elaborate invitation to the people to listen in order to learn not to sin like the fathers
(vv. 1-11; the Ephraimites are named in v. 9), the marvels done before the fathers
in Egypt, in the fields of Tanis, are recalled (v. 12) and the parting of the sea is
mentioned (v. 13). The poet goes on rapidly to recall Gods guidance of the people
in the desert and his care in providing water (vv. 14-16). But the people continues
to sin and puts God to test by asking bread and flesh, which God provides but immediately punishes their unfaithfulness (vv. 17-31). They still continue to sin while
returning to God, although falsely, when punished. However, the merciful God
pardoned them (vv. 32-39). This continuous rebellion proves that the people did
not recall the deliverance and the signs done by God in Egypt, in the fields of Tanis
(vv. 40-43). This reflection brings the poet back to the exodus motif. A list of seven
plagues follows: blood; swarms and frogs; locusts; hail; cattle pestilence; pestilence on man; slaying of the firstborn (vv. 44-51). The safe guidance in the desert
is briefly mentioned again, in opposition to the disappearance of their enemies, but
only in order to proceed to the next phase the entrance into Gods holy domain,
this mountain which his right hand has won (vv. 52-54). After this swift indication
of the final goal of the exodus, the conquest and the settlement of the tribes are
indicated (v. 55). The series of rebellions is continued by the generation in the land
(like their fathers, v. 57), this time in the form of illegal cult on high places and
idolatry (vv. 56-58). Gods reaction results in the destruction of Shiloh, exile and
ruin of the society and of the religious establishment by the hand of the enemies
(vv. 59-64). After this, the Lord wakes up and smites his enemies. He rejects Joseph/Ephraim and chooses Judah and Mt. Zion. He builds his sanctuary high and
stable. He also chooses David and takes him from shepherding the flock to shepherding Jacob/Israel with integrity and skill (vv. 65-72).
Therefore, after the introductory unit (vv. 1-11), the Psalm comprises two parts,
each one starting with Gods marvelous deeds, peoples response and Gods reaction, as shown in the following diagram.
opened itself, while the mountains were full of fear (vv. 3-8). On this psalm, I add only a small
notice on the term zEol
MAo (v. 1), referring to the Egyptian people. This term should be translated as
a people of a foreign language, or, as generally translated, a people of a strange language. Unfortunately the Italian translation of the Conferenza Episcopale Italiana, even in the new edition
of 2007, is: un popolo barbaro, something that sounds unbelievable for anyone who knows just a
little bit the old Egyptian culture. As for Ps 136, the invitation to give thanks to the Lord encompasses the whole song at the beginning and at the end (vv. 1-3 // 26). The deeds that are recorded are
first the creation, both at the beginning and at the end (vv. 5-9 // 25), then the deeds in Egypt, the
guidance in the desert and the gift of the Promised Land (vv. 10-24). In conclusion, in all these
Psalms the Exodus is mentioned, but without following the characteristics mentioned at the beginning ( 1. Criteria).

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

Gods deeds

12-16 Marvels in Egypt

42-51 Signs in Egypt


52-53 Desert
54-55 Entrance and conquest

Peoples response

17-20 Sin (and request)


32-39 Sin and false repentance,
still pardon
40-41 How many rebellions

56-58 Still rebellion, idolatry

13

Gods reaction

21-31 (Granting of the request


and) punishment:
killing in the desert

59-64 Rejection of Joseph/


Ephraim
65-67 Smiting of the enemies
70-72 Choice of Judah and
David

In other similar didactic compositions the peoples rebellion throughout the


sacred history is denounced, starting from the generation of the exodus down to
that of the desert and to the contemporary one. The two previous generations are
called the fathers. In Ps 78 two peculiarities stand out. First, the unfaithful generations are from the northern tribes, Joseph/Ephraim; second, the unfaithfulness
is not affirmed of the contemporary generation; instead a shift is announced from
the tribes of Joseph/Ephraim to the tribe of Judah, and from Shiloh to the sanctuary built on Mt. Zion, with David chosen as the shepherd/king of Israel.
These two peculiarities are important for the general outlook of Ps 78. Its purpose is certainly paraenetic (see vv. 1-8), but it also aims at legitimating the Davidic dynasty, on the one side, and the Jerusalem temple, on the other. The connection established here between the exodus and the Davidic dynasty and the temple
is noteworthy. In Loewenstamms words, Ps 78 opens its description of Israels
history with the Exodus from Egypt and concludes it with the election of the Davidic dynasty and the building of the Zion temple.13 This outlook is also found in
Ex 15:8-17, whose horizon extends from the parting of the sea to the conquest and
settlement, and to the building of the temple.14 As Loewenstamm convincingly
shows, both Ps 78 and the Song of the sea are dateable in the Solomonic era, before
the splitting of the monarchy.15
Another important feature of Ps 78 is connecting, maybe even identifying, the
exodus and desert generations, or the fathers, with the northern tribes. This feature is also found in Pss 80 and 81 (see below, 2.2-2.3).
13

Loewenstamm, The Evolution of the Exodus Tradition, 42.


See my paper Esodo 15. Esame letterario, composizione, interpretazione, 23-26.
15 See footn. 10 above for Ex 15. Differently, according to R.P. Carroll, Psalm LXXVIII:
Vestiges of a Tribal Polemic, VT 21 (1971) 133-150, the date and setting of the Psalm cannot be
defined with any certainty. In the authors word, Ps. lxxviii may be regarded as the charter myth
explaining how Judah was the rightful heir of the exodus movement and therefore could claim the
leadership of the people of Israel (p. 150).
14

14

Alviero Niccacci

2.1.a. A Text-linguistic Note on Ps 78


From the point of view of literary connections, the first section on the marvels
in Egypt (vv. 12-16) is introduced by an x-qatal construction that in poetry, as here,
may mark an initial unit. A similar construction, i.e. a negative qatal, also marking
an initial unit, is found in the second section on the signs in Egypt (vv. 42-51). This
literary signal confirms the double division of the vv. 12-51, as indicated above.
A characteristic of the unit signs in Egypt (vv. 42-51) is that in a part of it (vv.
44-51) Egypt is the only entity referred to by Gods action, while Israel, which is
usually strictly connected, appears before and after this unit.
The text of Ps 78, all referring to the past except at the beginning (vv. 1-8, see
below), is strictly connected with the coordinated verb form wayyiqtol, which
attests a literary and semantic continuation of an initial (x-)qatal marking the
beginning of a new unit. A strange think is that in some cases the sequence of
wayyiqtol forms, which is normal, alternates with a (waw-x-)yiqtol (vv. 6-8a,
36b, 38a.c, 40, 44b, 45a, 47, 64b, 72b), and in a few cases with weqatal, both in
its positive and also in its negative correspondent alw + yiqtol (vv. 34, 38), which
are not coordinated verb forms after wayyiqtol.
Normally, when the time reference is the past, the sequencewayyiqtol (wawx-)yiqtol or weqatal indicates a transition from an independent, first-level information, to a dependent, second-level information, i.e. the first verb form gives a new
notice while the second verb constructions present it in a way descriptive or repetitive.16 An example to illustrate this may be from vv. 34-38:17
34When

He slew them, they were inquiring after Him,

they were turning back and were seeking God diligently,


35

Then they remembered that God was their rock

36

They appeased Him with their mouth,

while with their tongue they were lying unto Him;


37because

their heart was not steadfast with Him,

and they did not prove faithful in His covenant.


38Nevertheless

He compassionate was forgiving iniquity

whwvrd w MDgr hS _MIa34


:lEa_wrSjvI w w bDvw
...Mrw x MyIhl aT _yIk; w rVk; z y wA 35
MRhyIpb;V w hwt; pA y w 36
:wl_wbz kA y MnwvlV bI w
wm; oI Nwkn _al MDb; lI w 37
:wtyrbV b;I w nVmaR n alw
NOwoD rEp kA y Mwjr awhw38

16 This is valid for prose (see my volume The Syntax of the Verb in Classical Hebrew Prose
[JSOT SS 86], Sheffield 1990, 46, pp. 67-69) as well as for poetry (see my papers, The Biblical
Hebrew Verbal System in Poetry, in S.E. Fassberg - A. Hurvitz (eds.), Biblical Hebrew in Its Northwest Semitic Setting. Typological and Historical Perspectives, Jerusalem - Winona Lake IN 2006,
249-268, pp. 255-261, and An Integrated Verb System for Biblical Hebrew Prose and Poetry, in
A. Lemaire [ed.], Congress Volume Ljubljana 2007, Leiden - Boston 2010, 99-127, p. 115).
17 In my translation of the Biblical texts, I make use of the Revised Standard Version taken from
the Accordance Bible, revised according to my studies on Biblical Hebrew syntax (see footn. 16).

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel


and was not destroying;
on the contrary, He was increasing in order to restrain His anger,
and was not stirring up all His fury.

15

tyIjvV y _alwV
wp aA byIvhD lV hDb; r hI w
:wtmD jS _lDk; ryIoy _alw

The transition from a simple information expressed with wayyiqtol (vv. 35a,
36a), or with qatal (negated in v. 37b), to a repetitive or descriptive information, a
transition indicated with should be respected. The simple information in English
is translated as simple past, while the repetitive or descriptive information is translated as imperfect. Transitions of this genre are typical of poetry. And this transition
tied to the past temporal axis is particularly present in the Psalms, like Ps 78, in
which the past Gods actions are remembered and celebrated. The only verses in
which the other two temporal axes, present and future, are attested are at the beginning of Ps 78 (vv. 1-8).
A major difficulty is that yiqtol in the first position of a sentence is not indicative
but volitive, and its coordinated continuation verb form is weyiqtol, not alw + yiqtol
nor weqatal, which are indicative.18 A transition from volitive () to indicative verb
form (*) is present at the beginning of the Ps 78:
6()

in order that the generation to come might know it,

the children that will be born,


in order that they might arise and tell it to their children,
7and

they might place in God their confidence,

and thus they will not forget the deeds of God,


and His commandments they will keep.
8And

thus they will not be as their fathers

NwrjS aA rwd; w ody NAomA lV ()6


w dElw y MyInb;D
:MRhynbV lI w rVp sA yIw w mqy ()
MDlsV k;I MyIhl aEb w myIcy w 7()
lEa_yEllV oA mA w jVk; vV y alw (*)
:wrxn y wyDtwO xV mI w ()
MDtwbaS k;A w yVhy alw 8 (*)

There is however a serious problem with a first-position yiqtol in the axis of the
past, which is not volitive but simply repetitive or descriptive. In order to explain
this, one needs to notice that in poetry the phenomenon of double-duty modifier
is essential.19 This means that a term that appears in a colon may have the function
of modifying also another connected colon, and therefore an initial yiqtol may
become syntactically a <x->yiqtol. In order to explain this phenomenon, let us
examine special cases of initial yiqtol in Ps 78:
18 I first proposed this analysis in A Neglected Point of Hebrew Syntax: Yiqtol and Position in
the Sentence, LA 37 (1987) 7-19.
19 See my papers The Biblical Hebrew Verbal System in Poetry, 258-261, and An Integrated Verb System for Biblical Hebrew Prose and Poetry, 116.

16

Alviero Niccacci

40How

oft they were provoking Him in the desert,


they were grieving Him in the wilderness!

rDb; d m;I bA w hwrVmy hDm; k;A 40


:NwmyIvyIb; w hwbyIxoS y <hDm; k;A >

More problematic are cases in which no explicit item appears that could function as <x-> element before yiqtol. Three cases in Ps 78 are as follows: vv. 14-15,
25-26, and 44-50. All these cases are rather amazing for an alternation of wayyiqtol
or x-qatal (v. 25) followed ( ) by a first-place yiqtol:
14And

He led them in the cloud by day


He> was cleaving rocks in the desert.
Then He made them drink as floods of the sea abundantly.

MDmwy NDnoD b;R MEjn y w 14


rDb; d m;I b;A MyrxU oq; bA y 15
:hDb; r twmhO tV k;I qV vV y w

25Bread

of angels did man eat,


meat He sent them in superabundance
26<while He> was causing the east wind to blow in heaven,
and by His power He brought on the south wind.

vyIa lAkaD MyryIb; aA MRjlR 25


:oAbcO lD MRhlD jAlvD hdyEx
MymD vD b;A Mydq oAs; y 26
:NDmyEt wz oU b;V gEhn y w

44 And

MRhyra
O y

15<while

He turned their rivers into blood


He> was sending among them warms,
thus they devoured them,
and frogs, thus they destroyed them
47 <while He> was destroying with hail their vines
48Then He gave over their cattle to the hail
49<while He> was casting on them his fierce anger
50<while He> was making a path for his anger,
He did not spare their souls from death,
while He gave their lives over to the plague.
45 <while

MdlV KJ pO hS y w 44
MElkV ay w bOroD MRhb;D jAl; vA y 45
MElkV ay w
:MEtyIjv
V t;A w oA d; r pA xV w
MDnp
V g drb;D b;A gOrhS y 47
MryIob
;V drb;D lA rEg sV y w 48
wp
aA NwrjS MDb; _jAl; vA y 49
wp aA lV byItn sEl; pA y 50
MDvpV n twm;D mI KJ cA jD _al
:ryIg sV hI rRbd; lA MDty jA w

How to explain these cases? In fact it seems impossible to find a grammatical double-duty modifier in the context. In cases such as those above, other
possible explanations can be as follows. Because the subject of all the verb
forms is always the same, i.e. God, it might be possible to take the 3rd person
pronoun as the double-duty modifier, i.e. <awh>-yiqtol, rendered as <while
He> - imperfect in the translation above. Another possibility may be simply to
produce a variation among the verb forms, from first level to secondary level,
like from qatal and wayyiqtol to x-yiqtol, in order to produce variations that are
typical of the BH poetry. In such cases the variation would be a means to hasten
the rhythm of the text, simply from wayyiqtol x-yiqtol to wayyiqtol yiqtol,
although the meaning remains the same.20
20 I have discussed this problem already in The Biblical Hebrew Verbal System in Poetry,
255-261, but sometimes a definite solution is not easily available.

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

17

2.2. Psalm 80
Ps 80 is a national lament belonging to the last days of the northern kingdom.
It is a repeated request to the Lord who sits enthroned upon the cherubim to shine
forth before Ephraim, Benjamin and Manasseh (vv. 2-3).
The reference to the exodus comes in v. 9 until v. 14 as the basis for a heartfelt
request repeated as a refrain: Restore us, O God of hosts; / let your face shine, that
we may be saved! (vv. 4, 8, 20). In v. 9, the exodus is indicated under the symbol
of a vine (NRpg ) that the Lord has brought from Egypt. This unusual symbol in connection with the exodus21 is combined with the pastoral terminology in v. 2 (O
Shepherd of Israel, listen, / who led Joseph like a flock!) and with the warlike
terminology related to the ark in the vv. 2-3.22
2.3. Psalm 81
Ps 81 is a liturgical composition belonging to a period before the destruction of
Samaria (721). At a given (uncertain) festival,23 the assembly of the northern kingdom is invited to acclaim the Lord with music and instruments. The reason given
reads as follows:
5For it is a statute for (l) Israel,
an ordinance of (again l) the God of Jacob;
6He made it as a decree in Joseph,
when He went out over (lAo)24 the land of Egypt.

The rest of the Psalm seems to be spoken by God. It spells out what is established as a statute/ordinance/decree:

21 Hos 9:10 may be usefully compared with this text: As grapes in the wilderness, I found
Israel. / Like the first fruit on the fig tree, in its first season, / I saw your ancestors. / But they came
to Baal-peor On this text see, e.g., M. Schulz-Rauch, Hosea und Jeremia (Calwer theologische
Monographien. Reihe A: Bibelwissenschaft 16), Stuttgart 1996, 101-106.
22 See, e.g., B.C. Ollenburger, Zion the City of the Great King (JSOT SS 41), Sheffield 1987,
37-38, 71-72, and A. Basson, Divine Metaphors in Selected Hebrew Psalms of Lamentation (FAT
II/15), Tbingen 2006, 199-201.
23 See Loewenstamm, The Evolution of the Exodus Tradition, Excursus I, pp. 44-52.
24 Sometimes translated: went out from with subject Jacob/Israel, as in the LXX; see M. Dahood, Psalms II, 51-100 (Anchor Bible 17), Garden City - New York 1968, 262.264. Redak also
mentions this possibility preferred by other Jewish interpreters (the same phrase is found in Gen
41:45 referred to Joseph), but notes as follows: However, it is right for me that wtaxb is said of God
blessed be He ; that is, when he went forth over Egypt to redeem us (Mikraoth Gedoloth: Psalms,
Vol. 2, New York 1991, 318).

18

Alviero Niccacci
6cThe

voice of One I did not know25 I was hearing.26


relieved his shoulder of the burden;
so that his hands may be freed from the basket.27
8In distress you called, and I delivered you:
I was answering you in the concealment of thunder;
I was testing you at the waters of Meribah.

7I

It is a proclamation of a word spoken by God in Egypt. It affirms Gods personal commitment to save the enslaved people and, at the same time, his demands.
;D xR l;V jA aS w tD arq ) to two
The abrupt shift in v. 8 from x-qatal and coordinate wayyiqtol (K
n oR aR and K n jD bV aR ) may mean that the Lord did answer the cry of the
yiqtol forms (K
people, while He acted and concealed Himself in the thunder and his intention was
to put them to test.28 In other words, God did hear the appeal of the Israelites, but
he soon expected them to hear him, what they failed to do:
9Hear,

O my people, in order that I may testify unto you!


O Israel, would you listen to me!
10No strange god shall be among you;
you shall not bow down to a foreign god.
25 The phrase yI;tVody_altApVc represents a construct state involving a negated finite verb as
the nomen rectum, and for some interpreters am people or er the one which is implied
(thus already Ibn Ezra, Mikraoth Gedoloth: Psalms, Vol. 2, 318). This would mean that God
did not yet know the people in Egypt; he knew it afterwards among all the families of the
earth (Am 3:2; see Dahood, Psalms II, 51-100, 264-265). However, F. Delitzsch translates: A
language of One not known did I hear; see Psalms (Commentary on the Old Testament 5),
Grand Rapids 1980, 390, 396-397. As a result, the sentence is said of God by the psalmist, who
speaks for the people of Israel who would know his God only after their exit from Egypt. Further, the sentence introduces the following speech of God (vv. 7-11), and therefore I think that
Delitzschs interpretation is preferable.
26 Given the contextual linkage with qatal verb forms (vv. 6-8) and the reference to past events,
also the yiqtol oDmv
V aR is tied to the past axis and therefore indicates a repeated action and is to be
rendered with an imperfect (see my volume The Syntax of the Verb in Classical Hebrew Prose, 46,
pp. 67-69). Passing from qatal indicating punctual information to yiqtol indicating habitual/repeated
information can be called aspectual merismus (see my paper An Integrated Verb System for
Biblical Hebrew Prose and Poetry, 118-119).
27 Remember the famous scene of Semites making bricks in the tomb of Rekhmire; see
photo and drawing 115 in J.B. Pritchard, The Ancient Near East in Pictures Relating to the Old
Testament, Princeton NJ 1954, 35, and description in K.A. Kitchen, From the Brickfields of
Egypt, TynBul 27 (1976) 137-147, pp. 139-140; cf. Loewenstamm, The Evolution of the Exodus Tradition, footn. 19.
28 The interpretation of lines b-c of v. 8 are admittedly difficult. First, the two yiqtol K
n oR aR and
K n jD bV aR may be linked with the axis of the past expressed by x-qatal and a coordinated wayyiqtol in
line a, and thus indicate habitual/repeated information (like oDmv
V aR in v. 6c, see footn. 26), or they
may be linked with their own temporal axis and thus convey future information. The first possibility seems preferable. Further, lines b-c seem to express a special, maybe northern, version of the
Meribah affair; see Loewenstamm, The Evolution of the Exodus Tradition, 50-52.

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

19

11I

am the Lord your God,29


who brought you up out of the land of Egypt.
Open your mouth wide, that I may fill it.
12But my people did not listen to my voice,
and Israel did not obey me.
13So I gave them over to their stubborn hearts,
that they will follow their own counsels.
14If my people would listen to me,
<if> Israel would walk in my ways,
15I would soon subdue their enemies,
and against their foes I would turn my hand.
16Those who hate the Lord should submit themselves to Him,
in order that their time should endure for ever.
17And He fed them with the fat of wheat,
while with honey from the rock I was satisfying you.30

2.4. Psalm 105


Ps 105 is a hymn of praise to the Lord for his marvelous deeds in Israels history. It is qualified by some scholars as an historical psalm; however, history is
presented as motivation for the praise. Qatal forms are used to convey the divine
deeds in history, and wayyiqtol serves as continuation form (indicated by a in
the following diagram). Thus, the central part of the Psalm (vv. 8-41) consists of
a series of syntactic units beginning with qatal. The resulting textual structure can
be represented as follows:
Praise the Lord!
O seed of Abraham his servant
(For) it is He the Lord
He has remembered His covenant

1-5
6
7
8-41

(invitation)
(address)
(motivation without yIk
; )
(specification of the motivation)

29 A special stress may fall on the independent personal pronoun yIkOnDa at the beginning of
the sentence, which therefore would be a cleft sentence, with the personal pronoun as the
predicate: It is I (not any other god!) that brought you up out of the land of Egypt. In this case
the sentence is not presentative (self-presentation) but predicative, with the function of spelling out the unique claim of the Savior God. On the two types of sentence, see my papers
Marked Syntactic Structures in Biblical Greek in Comparison with Biblical Hebrew, LA 43
(1993) 9-69, and Finite Verb in the Second Position of the Sentence. Coherence of the Hebrew
Verbal System, ZAW 108 (1996) 434-440.
30 Both them and you (with singular pronouns in Hebrew, w h- and K
- respectively) refer to
the people of Israel. This shift from the third to the second person referred to the people goes together with a similar shift from He to I referred to God himself. Shift of person is not infrequent
in poetry, particularly in emotional addresses as here.

20


-

-

-

-


-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-


-




-

-

-

-

Alviero Niccacci

which He made with Abraham


He sent Joseph (imprisoned)
The king sent (Joseph released)
He made him lord of his house
Then Israel came to Egypt
He turned their hearts to hate His people
He sent Moses, Aharon
They put his signs among them
He sent darkness
He turned their waters into blood
He made their land swarm with frogs
He spoke, and there came swarms
He put their rain as hail
And he smote their vines and fig trees
He spoke, and the locusts came
And they devoured all the vegetation
And he smote all the firstborn
Then he brought them out
Egypt was glad when they departed
He spread a cloud for a covering
He asked, and he brought quails
He opened the rock, and water gushed

For (yIk
; ) he remembered His holy word, Abraham
So he led his people out with joy
And he gave them the lands of the nations;

in order that they would keep his statutes.
Praise Yah!

9-16
17-19
20
21-24
23
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32-33
33
34-37
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

(first plague)
(second plague)
(third plague)
(fourth plague)
(fifth plague)
(sixth plague)
(seventh plague)

42-45 (resumption of vv. 8-9)


43
44
45

Several points are worth notice in this psalm. First, the exodus story begins
with Joseph; second, all the Gods deeds are presented as the result of Gods
faithfulness to the covenant with the fathers (mentioned in vv. 8-9 and 42 as an
inclusive idea); third, the fathers are Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, not the exodus
and desert generations as in the other Psalms examined above; fourth, the covenant is indicated as tyrV;b, rDb;d, and hDowbVv (vv. 8-9); fifth, in connection with the
covenant, the Israelites as designed as wyryIjV;b His chosen ones (vv. 6, 43);
sixth, the final goal of Gods deeds is that the Israelites may observe the law
(v.44). The association of exodus, covenant and law is particularly remarkable.
The date of Ps 105 is hard to determine. The citation of part of it in 1Chron

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

21

16:18ff. may suggest a pre-exilic composition.31 This may be confirmed by the


fact that the historical section ends with the conquest, without any allusion to
future calamities.
3. Prophets
The previous analysis confirms the common opinion that the exodus is prevalently a northern tenet. The following brief outline of the subject by Carroll
seems to represent the opinion of many scholars:32
When David became king his most strategic move was the removal of the
ark from the cold storage and its installation in a new sanctuary in the Jebusite city of Jerusalem. This gave Judah and the tribes a common sanctuary containing the definite symbol of Yahwism. Thus Judah became involved with the exodus tradition. The covenant between David and Yahweh
gave Judah a distinctive election tradition. With the collapse of the Davidic
empire the two kingdoms maintained their separate election traditions virtually in isolation from each other.
Subsequently in Judah the emphasis was placed on the David-Zion tradition to the virtual exclusion of the exodus tradition.

Isolated cases to the contrary (Is 4:2-6; 10:24,26; 11:16; Mic 6:4) are mostly
regarded as inauthentic, while two passages in Amos (2:10; 5:25) are not considered because they are addressed to the north.
Now, in my opinion, while the scarcity of references to the exodus tradition in
the eighth century prophets, except the northern Hosea, is a fact, the possibility of
their authenticity cannot be dismissed out of hand on the basis of an exegetical
aut-aut. On the one hand, it is understandable that the David-Zion ideology became
very popular during the united monarchy, and again under Hezekiah, especially
after 701 (see below, 3.1. Isaiah); on the other hand, this ideology may not have
been conceived as rival of the exodus tradition. As mentioned earlier (see 2.1.
above), Ps 78 and Ex 15 are good examples of how the David-Zion ideology was
integrated into the salvation history by making it the climax of the exodus. As a
matter of fact, the conquest was not really completed until the monarchic period.
Indeed, despite the fact that it was foreign to Israelitic tradition, the royal ideology
was incorporated remarkably well in biblical theology.

31

See, e.g., M. Dahood, Psalms III. 101-150 (Anchor Bible 17A), Garden City NY 1970, 51.
R.P. Carroll, Psalm LXXVIII: Vestiges of a Tribal Polemic, VT 21 (1971) 133-150,
pp. 141-142.
32

22

Alviero Niccacci

3.1. Isaiah
In this connection, Loewenstamm refers to Is 11:15-16, where the return of the
exiles is described after the pattern of the exodus from Egypt. He notes that Ch. 11
begins with a reference to the Davidic dynasty: A shoot shall grow out of the
stump of Jesse (v. 1). In his opinion, these two passages show a connection between the David-Zion ideology and the exodus in the form of a new exodus. Loewenstamm also mentions a similar connection found in Jer 23:5, I will raise up for
David a righteous branch, and 23:7-8:33
7Therefore

(NEkl
D ), behold, days are coming, oracle of the Lord,
when men shall no longer say,
The Lord lives
who brought up the people of Israel out of the land of Egypt,
8but The Lord lives
who brought up and who led the descendants of the House of Israel out of
the north country
and out of all the countries where I had driven them.34
Then they shall dwell in their own land.

I would say that the connection shown in Jer 23 between the David-Zion ideology and the exodus is clearer than that of Is 11 from the point of view of the syntactic structure. In fact, while Jer 23:7-8 and 23:5 are found in the same pericope
and are connected with NEklD therefore, the two Isaian passages are juxtaposed and
semantically part of different pericopes although they are connected syntactically;
in fact, Is 11:1-9 is tied to the preceding context, and 11:15-16 to the pericope beginning in v. 11.35
33

See also its parallel 16:14-15.


The Masoretic text MyIt
; jV d; hI , a first person qatal, is acceptable, despite the fact that an almost
identical expression in 16:15 has MDjyd
; hI , a third person qatal. For a similar person shift in a poetic
text, see footn. 30 above.
35 This analysis is based on a definite understanding of the functions of the different verb forms
(as expounded in my book The Syntax of the Verb in Classical Hebrew Prose, and more recently in
The Biblical Hebrew Verbal System in Poetry, 247-268, and in An Integrated Verb System for
Biblical Hebrew Prose and Poetry, 99-127) and on other literary considerations. The weqatal verb
form in my opinion is a continuation form; when it is found at the beginning of a new pericope, this
pericope is syntactically connected to the preceding context, normally as a consequence, although
semantically it starts a new unit. This means that, e.g., the weqatal in Is 11:1 begins a pericope which
is presented as related to the preceding context. Looking back, we find in 10:27, awhAhMwy b
;A hDyhD w and
it will happen on that day, a weqatal with a formulaic expression, which repeats frequently (see
10:20 and also 11:11). Another weqatal is found in 10:12, also starting a pericope related to the
preceding context. Syntactically, the beginning of the section is found in 10:1 with a nominal sentence introduced by ywh woe to. Another similar sentence is found in 10:5. To these two woe-oracles are connected the following pericopes introduced with weqatal. In my opinion, this syntactic
analysis provides a reliable basis to the interpretation.
34

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

23

The motif of the new exodus and that of the gathering of the dispersed show
both similarities and dissimilarities. Spreafico, who studied the three-phase exodus
pattern in detail, treats the two motifs together.36 However, while the exodus pattern
regularly shows three phases (coming out Egypt, walking in the desert, entering
the promised land), the motif of gathering shows two phases (gathering the dispersed, bringing them to the land).
Most scholars think differently with regard to the motif of gathering the dispersed. Since multiple places of dispersion are mentioned, these texts can not refer
to the Babylonian exile. Thus some scholars relate these passages to the later Jewish Diaspora, others to the exile of the northern kingdom, depending on whether or
not they think the texts are genuine. J. Lust,37 for instance, studying Is 11:12 together with texts on the gathering of the dispersed from Jeremiah and Ezekiel,
concludes that they belong to late layers of both books although the style is not
deuteronomistic.38 I would note that Lusts analysis fails to take into account other,
possibly older, texts from Hosea (9:3; 11:5; 12:21) and Micah (7:12) that mention
Egypt and Assyria as countries of exile for Israel. In my opinion, these texts envisage situations of exile other than the northern exile after the fall of Samaria and the
later Babylonian exile. Following S. Stohlmann, a Judean exile after 701 is probably attested in these and other prophetic sources, among which Is 11:12-16. As I
have tried to show elsewhere,39 Mic 2:12-13 can be interpreted as a promise to these
exiles and not necessarily to those in Babylon. Probably some texts on the gathering of the dispersed can also be interpreted along similar lines.
In this connection we can also consider Is 52:4 where Egypt and Assyria appear
in parallelism as places of exile:
For thus said the Lord God:
Into Egypt My people went down at the first to sojourn there,
and the Assyrians oppressed them for nothing.

If we add Babylon, we get three main places of exile and dispersion, or rather
places from where Gods people was liberated. One might suggest, then, that three
exodus should be recognized, not two, with relation to the three places: the exo36

See Spreafico, Esodo: memoria e promessa, 39-40, and chap. VI.


J. Lust, Gathering and Return in Jeremiah and Ezekiel, in P.-M. Bogaert (ed.), Le livre
de Jrmie. Le Prophte et son milieu, les oracles et leur transmission (BETL 54), Leuven 1981,
119-142, pp. 123-127.
38 It is well known this theme belongs to the royal Assyrian ideology: see, e.g., Lust, Gathering and Return in Jeremiah and Ezekiel, 126.
39 See Un profeta tra oppressori e oppressi. Analisi esegetica del capitolo 2 di Michea nel
piano generale del libro (SBF. Analecta 27), Jerusalem 1989, 125-130. Also see my paper Il libro
del profeta Michea. Testo traduzione composizione senso, LA 57 (2007) 83-161, 1.4.1, pp. 104107, and p. 161, footn. 164.
37

24

Alviero Niccacci

dus from Egypt in the fourteenth century, the gathering of the dispersed from 721
onwards, and the return from Babylon in the last decades of the sixth century. From
the brief survey on the DtIs that I am going to present in a moment, the return from
Babylon is announced sometimes as a new exodus from Egypt, with the threephase pattern, sometimes as a new gathering of the dispersed, with two phases.
Many scholars agree that the new exodus is a major theme in DtIs. After C.
Stuhlmller, Spreafico has produced a list of thirteen passages, from Is 40 to 55,
with the names of the scholars who interpret them as exodus texts.40 Later, two
scholars have challenged this interpretation.41 Both have in common the opinion
that DtIs is a person or a group operating in Jerusalem, not in exile.
I will now present some comment on Simian-Yofres position.42 His criticism
is welcome to counter the tendency of many interpreters to see a new exodus theology whenever there is an allusion to water, desert or fertility. His insistence on the
precise perspective of the so-called exodus texts is also welcome. They celebrate,
more than announce, an event; and this event is not a new exodus but a kind of
theophany, or Gods intervention in history. The purpose of DtIs is to convince the
people that the Lord is still powerful. According to Simian-Yofre, the imagery used
in such texts is subservient to representing Gods power and dominion. He notes
that, for instance in 51:9-10, three motifs are evoked to this purpose: the fight
against Rahab, the primordial monster, a motif connected to the ideology of the
divine warrior;43 the exodus from Egypt; and the crossing of the Jordan, a motif
tied to Gilgal.
I would say, however, that his criticism goes too far. First of all, there are a few
texts that explicitly mention Babylon, as 48:20:
Go forth from Babylon,
flee from the Chaldeans,
with a shout of joy declare, proclaim this,
send it forth to the end of the earth;
say, The Lord has redeemed his servant Jacob!

For Simian-Yofre this is a proclamation of liberation destined to the liturgical


community, as is Ps 78, not an actual order of departure.
My second comment is that Simian-Yofres analysis concentrates on the single
40

See Spreafico, Esodo: memoria e promessa, 13-16.


J.M. Vincent, Studien zur literarischen Eigenart and zur geistigen Heimat von Jesaja, Kap.
40-55, Frankfurt a.M. 1977; Simian-Yofre, Exodo in Deuteroisaas, and La teodicea del Deuteroisaas, Bib 62 (1981) 55-72.
42 See footn. 41.
43 See M. Fishbane, Biblical Interpretation in Ancient Israel, Oxford 1986, 354-356. See also
1. Criteria and footn. 8 above.
41

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

25

passages disregarding the larger context. This is visible in that he treats 43:1-7 and
43:16-21 separately; however they most probably form a single text. In between,
we read the following powerful self-vindication of the Lord (43:9-15):
9All

the nations gathered together,


in order that the peoples assemble.
Who among them will announce this,
and make us hear the former things?
Let them bring their witnesses to justify them,
and let them hear and say, It is true.
10You are my witnesses, oracle of the Lord,
and my servant whom I have chosen,
in order that you may know and believe me
and understand that I am He.
Before me no god was formed,
nor after me shall be any.
11 I, I am the Lord,
and besides me there is no savior.
12I have announced and I will save,
I will proclaim, when there is no strange god among you;
and you are my witnesses, oracle of the Lord,
and I am God.
13And also henceforth I am He;
there is none who can deliver from my hand;
I will act and who will hinder it?
14Thus said the Lord,
your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel:
For your sake I have sent to Babylon44
and I will bring down all them as fugitives,
and also the Chaldeans, in the ships of their rejoicing.
15I am the Lord, your Holy One,
the Creator of Israel, your King.

One cannot fail to recall two passages of the book of Exodus:


And I will harden Pharaohs heart, so that he will pursue them in order that
I may get glory over Pharaoh and all his host; and so the Egyptians will
know that I am the Lord (Ex 14:4);
And I, I am about to harden the hearts of the Egyptians in order that they
44 Normally understood: I will send to Babylon. However the verb yIt
; jV l;A vI is a qatal; with it
God is predicting the destruction of the city. Further, the Piel jAl
; vI can have positive (set free; let go
freely) or negative meaning (to let go, dismiss; cf. L. Koehler - W. Baumgartner, The Hebrew
and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament, Leiden 1994, ad vocem).

26

Alviero Niccacci

may go in after them (i.e. the Israelites), and I may get glory over Pharaoh
and all his host, his chariots, and his horsemen (Ex 14:17).

One can also compare another formula connected to the exodus event in the
book of Exodus (6:7; 10:2; 16:6,12), also a favorite one in Ezekiel (6:7,13; etc.):
Thus you shall know that I am the Lord.
The Lords claim that He, and He alone, can announce something that is going
to happen in the future and do it, as well as the distinction between the former
things and the new, are found in other passages of DtIs (41:22; 43:9,18; 44:7-8;
45:11).
The fact that in Ch. 43 the exodus motif frames this long self-vindication of the
Lord is significant for the interpretation. One can further note that Ch. 43 is intro; oA w and therefore, as is Ch. 44. This means that, syntactically as well
duced by hDt
as semantically, the two chapters are presented as the consequence of the previous
context.45
Moreover, despite Simian-Yofres opposition, the motif of the crossing of the
waters in 43:2 may be seen as connected to, or reminiscent of, the exodus because
a few verses later the gathering of the Israelites from the four corners of the earth
is made explicit (43:5-6; compare 49:13).
Attention to intertextual connections may help evaluate two passages: 40:1-11
and 52:1-12. They have a similar terminology and structure as we see from the
following table:
1 Comfort,

your God.

2Speak

Is 40
comfort my people, / will say

unto the heart of Jerusalem, / and


cry to her / that her warfare is ended, / that
her iniquity is pardoned, / that she has received from the Lords hand / double for
all her sins.

Is 52
awake, / put on your strength, o
Zion; / put on your beautiful garments, / o
Jerusalem, the holy city; for there shall no
more come into you / the uncircumcised
and the unclean.
2 Shake yourself from the dust, / arise, o
captive Jerusalem; / loose the bonds from
your neck, / o captive daughter of Zion.
1Awake,

3For thus said the Lord: / For nothing you

were sold, / and without money you shall


be redeemed.

45

The beginning of the text comprising the two chapters seems to be 42:1.

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel


3A voice of one who cries: / In the wilder-

ness prepare the way of the Lord, / make


straight in the desert / a highway for our
God.
4Every valley shall be lifted up, / and every
mountain and hill they shall make low; /
the uneven ground shall become level, /
and the rough places a plain.
5 And

the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, / and all flesh shall see it together,
/ for the mouth of the Lord has spoken.
6A voice of one saying, Cry! / And one
will say, What shall I cry? / All flesh is
grass, / and all its beauty is like the flower
of the field.
7 The grass has withered, the flower has
faded, / because the breath of the Lord has
blown upon it; / surely the people is grass.
8The grass withers, the flower fades; / but
the word of our God will stand for ever.

9Up to a high mountain, go up you, / herald

of good tidings for Zion; / lift up your


voice with strength, / herald of good tidings for Jerusalem. / Lift it up, fear not; /
say to the cities of Judah, / Behold your
God!

10 Behold, the Lord God will come with


might, / and his arm rules for Him; / behold, his reward is with him, / and his recompense before Him.

27

4For thus said the Lord God: / Into Egypt


my people went down at the first to sojourn
there, / and the Assyrian oppressed them
for nothing.
5And therefore what have I here, oracle of
the Lord, / seeing that my people are taken
away for nothing? / Their rulers will wail,
oracle of the Lord, / and continually all the
day my name is despised.

Therefore, let my people know My


Name; / therefore exactly in that day, / because you shall know that it is I who speak:
Here I am.
7 How beautiful upon the mountains / are
the feet of him who brings good tidings, /
who publishes peace, who brings good tidings of good, / who publishes salvation, /
who says to Zion, Your God began reigning.
8The voice of your watchmen, / they lifted
up their voice, / together they will sing for
joy, / because eye to eye they shall see, /
when the Lord of Zion will come back.
6

9Break forth into joy, sing together, / you


waste places of Jerusalem; / for the Lord
has comforted his people, / he has redeemed Jerusalem.
10The Lord has bared his holy arm / before
the eyes of all the nations; / and all the ends
of the earth shall see / the salvation of our
God.

28

Alviero Niccacci
11Depart, depart, go out from there, / touch

11He

will feed his flock like a shepherd, /


He will gather the lambs in his arms, / and
will carry them in his bosom, / He will gently lead those that suckle.

no unclean thing; / go out from the midst


of her, / purify yourselves, you who bear
the vessels of the Lord.
12 For you shall not go out in haste, / and
you shall not go in flight, / for the Lord will
go before you, / and the God of Israel will
be your rear guard.

The similarity of the two passages suggests, on the one side, that 40:1-11 is
also an exodus text despite the reservations voiced by Simian-Yofre on the basis
of the fact that it shows no explicit exodus terminology; on the other side, the
pastoral imagery (40:11) is connected to the exodus also in DtIs (besides Ps
77:21; 78:52; 80:2).46 From these texts we gather that Gods presence in the new
exodus will be glorious, not unpretentious as in the first exodus, and the march
of Israelites will not be hastily and fearful, as in the first exodus, but quiet and
joyful under the guidance of the Lord who will tenderly shepherd his people.
A third comment on Simian-Yofres analysis regards his criterion for deciding what is and what is not exodus tradition in DtIs. His term of comparison is
the book of Exodus; that is, only what DtIs has in common with this book belongs to the exodus tradition. This is because, as mentioned above, his main
concern is to demonstrate that what we read in DtIs is liturgical proclamation
rather than actual order of departure from Babylon, and therefore no real exodus
is envisaged. There is some truth in this contention. Actually, the departure is
announced as future, and this makes a difference with the Psalms, which celebrate the exodus as a past event. Still one may ask whether one is justified in
dismissing as symbolic the terminology of those passages of DtIs and in denying
any import of the exodus in this prophetic corpus.
If, on the contrary, one allows also the hymnic tradition of the Psalter to bear on
the exodus tradition in general, then one is in a better position to appreciate the
announcements of DtIs. In them, the motif of the desert is particularly prominent.
One aspect of this motif is preparing the way to the Lord, which we find in 40:3-4:
3In

the wilderness prepare you the way of the Lord,


make straight in the desert
a highway for our God.
4Every valley shall be lifted up,
and every mountain and hill they shall make low;
the uneven ground shall become level,
and the rough places a plain.
46

See E. Bosetti, Il pastore (Supplementi alla Rivista Biblica 21), Bologna 1990, 235-240.

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

29

A symbolic, moral interpretation of the phrase, In the wilderness prepare you


the way to the Lord, / make you straight in the desert / a highway for our God, is
attested in Christian tradition (Mark 1:2-3 par.) and in Qumran (1QS 8:14; 9:19),47
but the desert remains a reality in both cases. However, such an interpretation is
hardly conceivable in DtIs. Note that sometimes the way is also prepared for the
people (Is 11:16; 49; 62:10).
Another aspect of the same motif is changing the desert into springs of water
(see 41:18 and 43:19, in parallelism with preparing the way),48 and compare Ex
17:6. In 49:11 a similar idea is connected with the pasturing of the people under
Gods guidance (49:9-10).49
In sum, the exodus motif is really important in DtIs. Maybe some texts, as Is
41:17-20, do not speak specifically of a departure from the exile but simply
make use of exodus terminology to describe an aspect of the future salvation.
In any case, this use only confirms the importance of the exodus terminology in
DtIs. One can add that this terminology is drawn not only from the book of
Exodus but also from the Psalms. Finally, some texts in DtIs reflect the tradition
of the gathering of the dispersed rather than the exodus tradition as is the case
with 42:14-17.
3.2. Ezekiel
The way Ezekiel reworks the exodus tradition is rightly regarded as the most
independent in the OT.50 A major characteristic is that, according to the prophet,
the Israelites sinned against the Lord already in Egypt. This is made clear in Ch.
23 with the allegory of the two sisters Oholah/Samaria, and Oholibah/Jerusalem, who played the harlot in Egypt and continued to do so even after they became Gods property.
The most important text is Ez 20, but before coming to it let us review the
other texts. The two-phase pattern of the gathering of the dispersed is found in
11:17:
47 See my essay Sfondo antico-testamentario di Mc 1,1-8, in M. Adinolfi - P. Kaswalder
(eds.), Entrarono a Cafarnao. Lettura interdisciplinare di Mc 1. Studi in onore di P. Virginio Ravanelli (SBF. Analecta 44), Jerusalem 1997, 91-103, pp. 100-101.
48 I will make a way in the wilderness / and rivers in the desert (Is 43:19). The Qa text has
twbytn paths instead of twrhD n ; but the LXX confirms the MT: potamou/ rivers.
49 This passage may be instructive with regard to the problem of whether DtIs worked in Jerusalem or in the exile. In 49:8-10 Gods servant is appointed to establish (MyIqh
D lV ) the land, to make
inherit (lyIjn h
A lV ) the desolate heritages, that is, the land of Israel. Therefore, the prisoners of v. 9
are meant to be in the country, while the people of v. 12 come from distant countries. This may mean
that both perspectives, of Jerusalem and of the exile, are at work in DtIs.
50 See S. Herrmann, Exodusmotiv, I. Altes Testament, in TRE 10 (1982) 732-737 (on Ezekiel,
p. 735); and H. Ringgren, Myr xV m
I mirajim, TWAT IV (1984) 1099-1111, pp. 1109-1110.

30

Alviero Niccacci

Therefore say,
Thus said the Lord God:
And I will gather51 you from the peoples,
and assemble you out of the countries
where you have been scattered,
and I will give you the land of Israel.

Similarly in 28:25-26. In 34:12-13 the gathering pattern combines with the exodus pattern in the framework of the pastoral imagery. After the phase of the bringing out, we find the gathering; then the phase of the bringing in is expanded with
the motif of the shepherding on the mountains of Israel:
12As a shepherd seeks out his flock
the day when he is in the midst of his scattered sheep,
so will I seek out my sheep;
and I will rescue them from all places
where they have been scattered
on a day of clouds and thick darkness.
13And I will bring them out from the peoples,
and gather them from the countries,
and will bring them into their own land;
and I will feed them on (lRa MyItyIor w )52 the mountains of Israel,
by the fountains, and in all the inhabited places of the country.

The same three-phase pattern, with the a verb of gathering in the second phase,
is found in 36:24:
And I will take you from the nations,
and gather you from all the countries,
and bring you into your own land.

This passage is noteworthy because it adds new motifs to the traditional ones
just listed; they are the sprinkling of clean water for purification (36:25), and the
51 yIt
; xV b;A qI w is a weqatal, which is a continuation verb form. The fact that it is found at the beginning of a new speech of God introduced by the initial formula hwhyyDnd
O aS rAmaD _hOk; Thus said the Lord
God means that it ideally continues the Gods speech of the previous verse, although it also starts
with the same initial formula. Thus, yIt
; xV b;A qI w expresses a consequence of what God did in the past (v.
16), a consequence that is further specified by a series of coordinate weqatal in vv. 17-19 and further.
The double introduction hwhyyDnd
O aS rAmaD _hOk; may have the function of strengthening Gods promises
to His people.
52 The verb hDor
to shepherd is used with the preposition lRa towards, as it was a verb of
movement.

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

31

giving of a new heart of flesh instead of the heart of stone (36:26). The latter
element is rooted in the tradition of the book of Exodus, and ultimately on an
Egyptian belief, as is well known.53 It is also found in 11:19; and Jer 31:33. In
parallelism with the giving of a new heart God promises to give his own spirit54
in order to enable the Israelites to observe his laws (36:27). Still more motifs are
present in the text: settling in the land once promised to the fathers; coming in a
covenant with God (you shall be my people, / and I will be your God, 36:28);
delivering from all uncleanness and giving every abundance (36:29-30); being
ashamed, on the part of the people, of the bad conduct of the past (36:32b); and
final declaration that God is not going to act for the sake of the people (36:32a).
Similar, very developed passages are 11:17-21; 20:34ff.; 37:12-14,21-28; and
39:25-29.55
New elements in these texts are as follows: in 37:12 a two-phase pattern is
T hR he brought up and ayIbhE he brought infound with the traditional verbs hDlo
to, but the point of departure are the graves instead of a land of exile (I will
S hA w , from your graves, o my people), in
open your graves, and raise you, yItyElo
correspondence with the vision of the dry bones found at the beginning of the
same chapter; in 37:22,24,26 we read the promise of making one people with one
;V )
king and shepherd over them, namely David; and of an eternal covenant (tyrb
between God and his people (compare 34:23-25); finally in 39:27 the root bwv,
in the bEbwv form to bring back, is used, the only time in Ezekiel.
This quick overview of the relevant passages is enough to show the vitality of
the exodus tradition in Ezekiel. Ancient motifs are picked up again, transformed
and expanded in a very colorful way. Yet, what is most characteristic of the
prophets presentation of the exodus tradition is his contention that Israel was
unfaithful to the Lord already in Egypt. To this singularity, Johan Lust would add
the claim that Ezekiel did not preach a return to the promised land but rather a
coming to it for the first time after the exile. Lust states his position in the following way:56
Strictly speaking, the Book of Ezekiel does not preach a return. It announces that God will gather his people and bring (aw;b, hifil) them into
their own land. This corresponds with one of the basic themes of the
53 See, among many other essays, my Yahveh e il Faraone. Teologia biblica ed egiziana a
confronto, BN 38/39 (1987) 85-102, 2, pp. 89-91.
54 This parallelism is expressed syntactically with a tense shift from weqatal
D bEl MRklD yIt; tA n w ) to waw-x-yiqtol (MRkb;V r qI b;V NEt; aR yIjw r_tRaw ) accompanied by a chiastic order:
(vdj
verb - object; object - verb.
55 Strangely enough, according to Herrmann the exodus tradition spielt in den Kapiteln ber
den Wiederaufbau Israels Ez 34-48 keine Rolle, lediglich 34,13 anspielend auf Israels Herausfhrung aus den Vlkern (Exodusmotiv I. Altes Testament, TRE 10 [1982] 732-737, p. 735).
56 Lust, Gathering and Return in Jeremiah and Ezekiel, 136-137.

32

Alviero Niccacci

Book: Israel was sent into Exile before it reached the Promised Land.
This does not mean that Ezekiel or his prophetic school refused to believe that the Chosen People lived in Israel before the Exile. It means that
according to them, geographic Israel was not yet the Promised Land Israel. In line with this thinking God does not make his people return (byIvEh)
to the land, He brings (ayIbEh) them there. An examination of Ez 20 will
illustrate this.

Now, besides the fact Ezekiel does use once the verb to return (bEbwv) for
Israel (39:27), a careful reading of Ch. 20 does not, in my opinion, confirm this
contention. The problem is here, as with many other passages, that the final text
is not thought to be original. Based on one of his earlier studies,57 Lust maintains, along with other scholars, that Ez 20 is composed of two parts. In his
words,
vv. 1-31 give a survey of Israels history up to the Exile and 32-44 offer
perspectives on salvation for the period after the Exile.

The two parts appear to Lust irreconcilable; he claims that the second part
takes the form of a dispute which begins in v. 32 with a complaint being made
by the people.58
I would observe, first, that the character of the first part as a survey of Israels history, as well as the irreconcilability of the two parts, need to be checked
on the basis of a plain analysis of the syntactic and literary structure of the whole
chapter. Otherwise, one runs the risk of mishandling the text instead of interpreting it. In light of this, it is rather surprising to discover that Lust did recognize
some clues for the interpretation, specifically what he calls the theme of prophetic consultation (vr;d) of God in vv. 1-3 and 30-31, but he did not make any
effort in this direction apparently on the basis of his presuppositions.
It seems clear that the logic and the genre of Ez 20 is correctly understood
when one grasps the overall architecture of the final form. This is shown in the
following diagram:

57

J. Lust, Ez., XX, 4-26. Une parodie de lhistoire religieuse dIsral, ETL 43 (1967) 488-

58

Lust, Gathering and Return in Jeremiah and Ezekiel, 138.

531.

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

33

1-2
Setting: date; coming of some elders of Israel to inquire of the Lord (vOrd
lI ).

Gods address to the prophet
3
A Son of man, speak to the elders of Israel.

You shall say to them, Thus said the Lord God,

Is it to inquire of me that you are coming?

As I live, I will not be inquired of (vrd
; aI ) by you, oracle of the Lord God.
4-5
B Will you judge them, will you judge, son of man?

Let them know the abominations of their fathers.

You shall say to them,

Thus said the Lord God:
5-26

27-29 B


30-32 A








Argument from past history, abominations of their fathers. (Four strophes)


Therefore (NEklD ), speak to the House of Israel, o son of man.
You shall say to them, Thus said the Lord God,
In this again your fathers blasphemed me
Therefore (NEklD ) say to the House of Israel,
Thus said the Lord God,
Will you perhaps defile yourselves after the manner of your fathers?
And should I be inquired of (vrd
; aI ) by you, O House of Israel?
As I live, oracle of the Lord God, certainly I will not be inquired of (vrd
; aI )
by you.
And what comes to your mind shall never happen,
because you say,
Let us be like the nations, like the tribes of the countries
to serve wood and stone.

33-44
Aa (33-34) anger and promise: bringing forth from the nations and gathering

Ab (35-40) judgment in exile: different destiny for rebels and the House of Israel

Aa (41-44) promise realized: bringing forth; gathering;

bringing into the promised land; for Gods name sake,

not according to the peoples evil deeds.

Section BA correspond to section AB and develop the judgment on the House


of Israel. Section C is the basis for the prophetic accusation, introduced with two
NEkDl in B and A. Therefore, C is not an historical survey because it is subservient
to the argument. Saying with Lust that in v. 23 (at the end of the fourth strophe)
God sends Israel in exile is going beyond what the text says and contradicts its
logic. The logic of the chapter is that, despite everything, God brought the fathers
into the promised land. This interpretation is in line with the first three strophes
and also with the end of the chapter (v. 44):

34

Alviero Niccacci

Thus you shall know that I am the Lord,


when I deal with you for My Names sake,
not according to your evil ways,
nor according to your corrupt doings,
o House of Israel, oracle of the Lord God.

In other words, undeserved grace makes known that God is the Lord much
better than punishment. Although problems of detail remain, the overall logic and
development of Ez 20 is coherent and consistent. It carries a powerful force of
persuasion.
4. Conclusion
Certainly, it is not an easy task to put together and to arrange one with the other
the different conclusions of this research. In order to identify the exodus tradition
outside the book of Exodus, we need an exodus pattern in three phases: coming
out of Egypt, walking in the desert, and entering into the promised land. As we
saw in the previous analysis, the exodus motif in the Psalms and the Prophets is
used for hymnic or paraenetic-didactic purposes, i.e., to glorify the Lord and/or to
invite the people to learn His mighty deeds of the past and to live according to His
laws.
From this hymnic and didactic purpose of recalling the mighty deeds of the
Lord, it follows that the total number of Gods mighty deeds from the historical
point of view is not necessarily evoked in a complete way. In fact, outside the historical point of view of the book of Exodus, the purpose of prophetic and psalm
material is not to evoke history completely, but rather to evoke those deeds which
serve the didactic-paraenetic purpose of the prophetic and Psalms compositions.
Therefore, we need to be careful not to misinterpret the texts.
For instance, the Loewenstamms position is that because, as said above ( 1.
Criteria), Pss 78 and 105 show a series of seven plagues, this number is older than
the ten plagues, which are the result of the final redaction of the book of Exodus.
In my view, this opinion does not consider accurately the fact that in Exodus the
plagues apart from Ex 15:1-18 are narrated as a historical event. Therefore the
fact that Pss 78 and 105 show a series of seven plagues do not necessarily mean
that for them this is the authentic historical number because, as I suggested more
than once, a hymnic or paraenetic-didactic evocation of the plagues does not evoke
the events historically but rather celebrate the single plagues evoked.
As already mentioned, a three-phase exodus pattern helps analyze most of the
prophetic texts of Deutero-Isaiah, Hosea, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Micah and Amos,
while in order to analyze the Psalms we need other criteria, i.e., the mention of the

The Exodus Tradition in the Psalms, Isaiah and Ezekiel

35

plagues, the parting of the sea and the defeat of the Egyptians. This means that
there is a difference in the criteria followed by the Psalms and the Prophets.
Psalm 78 is the most special example of a didactic composition drawing on the
sacred history. After an invitation to listen, with mostly direct speech verb forms,
in order to learn not to sin like did the fathers (vv. 1-8), references to the past are
marked by narrative verb forms: (waw-)x-qatal followed mostly by coordinated
wayyiqtol. However, there are unexpected (waw-)x-yiqtol and even simple yiqtol.
In a small text-linguistic note ( 2.1.a. A Text-linguistic Note on Ps 78) I tried to
explain all such cases, particularly those most difficult.
In Ps 80, a national lament with a repeated request to the Lord to restore the
situation of the northern tribes, the exodus is indicated by Israel as a vine and the
Lord as the Shepherd of His people.
Ps 81 is a liturgical composition made up as a Gods personal commitment to
save His enslaved people. At the same time, He expected them to hear Him, but
they failed to do it.
Ps 105 is a hymn of praise to the Lord, for His marvelous deeds in Israels history. Sometimes it is qualified as a historical Psalm, but here history is a motivation for the praise, not the main purpose. Besides, the association that appears in
this Psalm of exodus, covenant and law is particularly remarkable.
As a consequence, Pss 80, 81 and 105, rather than historical units, are, respectively, the first a national lament and a direct reference to the Lord who can restore
any bad situation, the second a Gods personal commitment to save his people in
order that they may listen to Him, and the third a praise to the Lord who made
marvelous deeds for Israel.
In Isaiah the exodus pattern is tied to the gathering of the dispersed from multiple places Egypt, Assyria and Babylon. In DtIs the return form Babylon is announced sometimes as a new exodus from Egypt and this is done with a pattern of
two phases gathering of the dispersed and bringing them to the land.
Ezekiel is the prophet who most independently reworks the exodus tradition;
e.g., for him the Israelites sinned against the Lord already in Egypt. Further, he
envisages the gathering and the exodus pattern in the framework of the pastoral
imagery. He also adds new motifs, such as giving water for purification and a new
heart, settling in the promised land, and other gifts from God. For the prophet, the
graves are the point of departure instead of a land of exile and Gods promise is
making one people with one shepherd over them, i.e., the king David, and in an
eternal covenant.
Alviero Niccacci, ofm
Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem

Alberto Mello
Abitare nella casa del Signore.
Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

Il Sal 27 presenta una regolarit strofica che non ha bisogno di essere dimostrata, tanto condivisa dalle principali versioni (TOB, RSV) e dallanalisi di Fokkelman1: in tutto, sono dieci strofe, basate sulla legge del parallelismo poetico2. Il
salmo ha un titolo davidico, quindi si pu dire che regale3. Per i Lxx ci riservano una sorpresa, perch al nome di David aggiungono: pr tou christhnai, ovvero:
prima di essere unto (re). Teniamo presente questo fatto: la versione greca si
sentita in obbligo di precisare che David non era ancora re. Salvo poche eccezioni,
il David dei Salmi un uomo randagio, che si nasconde nel deserto: perci aspira
ad abitare nella casa del Signore, che si immagina gi costruita, poich non c n
prima n dopo nella Scrittura. Ma quello che importa notare, per ora, il fatto che
David non ancora re. Detto altrimenti: non lui il Re! Oppure un re non secondo i criteri ufficiali, il riconoscimento pubblico, di questo mondo. un re destinato-a-diventarlo, e che lo sar proprio quando abiter nella casa del Signore. Esaminiamo ora il salmo strofa per strofa, per poterne vedere anche il punto di approdo, lesplosione spirituale, che mi sembra essere una profezia della risurrezione.
I
Il Signore mia luce e mia salvezza:
di chi avr timore?
Il Signore la forza della mia vita:
di chi avr paura?
(tetracolon: v. 1)
1

J.P. Fokkelman, The Psalms in Form, Leiden 2002, 38.


Sul parallelismo in poesia il manuale di riferimento quello di W.G.E. Watson, Classical
Hebrew Poetry. A Guide to its Techniques, Sheffield 1984 e successive ristampe. Ma le elaborazioni letterarie pi interessanti sono: R. Alter, The Art of Biblical Poetry, New York 1985 (trad. francese: LArt de la posie biblique, Bruxelles 2003), A. Berlin, The Dynamics of Biblical Parallelism,
Cambridge 2008; J.-P. Sonnet, Alef-Bet della Poesia Biblica, per ora reperibile soltanto in dispense.
3 Do per scontata questa equivalenza, difesa con particolare enfasi da E. Cortese, La preghiera
del Re. Formazione, redazioni e teologia dei Salmi di Davide (Suppl. RivBibl 43), Bologna 2004.
2

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 37-51

38

Alberto Mello

Il Signore il vero Re, e perci la luce e la salvezza anche di David, non ancora re: al v. 9 si incontra lespressione teologica Dio della mia salvezza, che
una maniera semitica per dire Dio mio salvatore. Luce e salvezza si pu
dire che sono quasi sinonimi, perch se uno ci vede non inciampa, salvo. Ma i
commentatori medievali hanno registrato una lieve differenza tra i due termini che
li rende complementari. Annota Ibn Ezra: C chi dice mia luce di notte, quando
non c luce e lanima ha paura; e mia salvezza di giorno. C invece chi dice mia
luce per quanto riguarda lanima e mia salvezza per quanto riguarda il corpo4. La
prima spiegazione la pi ovvia; lultima quella pi ricercata e, in quanto tale,
da preferire. Si potrebbe gi prolungare ulteriormente: Luce in questo mondo,
salvezza - salvezza integrale - nella risurrezione.
Altrove si dice che il Signore, come lampada, rischiara la tenebra (Sal 18,29):
la tenebra, quella che si chiama anche ombra di morte (Sal 23,4) il contrario
della salvezza. La luce dissipa le tenebre: salvezza non temere i pericoli della
notte. Non temere, poi, in tutta la Scrittura, particolarmente in Isaia, sinonimo
di avere fede e troveremo questa esplicitazione del verbo credere alla fine del
salmo, come un passaggio obbligato per conseguire la salvezza. Il sostantivo tradotto con forza indica, letteralmente, un luogo fortificato, una fortezza o un
bastione; ma si pu intendere iperbolicamente come difesa (della mia vita). I
Lxx ne fanno addirittura un attributo divino: Kyrios hyperaspistes (Vg: Dominus
protector). Come la luce genera la fede e scaccia la paura, cos la salvezza produce una forza interiore che sostiene la vita, le d spessore e protezione. Questa
forza Dio stesso, come la luce, come la salvezza5.
II
Quando si sono avvicinati a me dei malvagi
per divorare la mia carne,
i miei avversari e nemici:
essi sono inciampati e caduti
(tetracolon: v. 2)
Quando: vuol dire che una cosa che pu succedere, anzi che si ripete frequentemente. Si tratta di un caso reale, sperimentabile. La presenza di forze ostili, nemiche, attraversa il nostro salmo: nemici (v. 6); oppositori (v. 11); avver4 Una silloge dei commenti ebraici al Salterio, dal Midrash Tehillim a Rashi, stata edita da
me con il titolo: Leggere e pregare i Salmi, Magnano (BI) 2008. Il commento al Sal 27 alle pp.
123-126.
5 Una esplorazione del nostro salmo sotto il profilo della fiducia stata operata di recente da
G. Vivaldelli, Il Signore mia luce e mia salvezza. Il Salmo 27 e il suo contributo per una teologia biblica della fiducia in Dio, Cinisello Balsamo (MI) 2004.

Abitare nella casa del Signore. Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

39

sari (v. 12). Tutto il primo libro del Salterio (Sal 3-41) invaso da questa presenza, a un punto tale da stupire lo stesso salmista: Signore, quanti sono i miei avversari!, incredibile quanti ce ne sono! (Sal 3,2). Al lettore odierno del Salterio, questa enfasi sullinimicizia pu sembrare perfino eccessiva, ingombrante.
Per il salmista, un caso realissimo, perfettamente corrispondente alla situazione
da lui vissuta. Qui si parla di avversari politici, di nemici militari: si pu pensare
che il salmista sia un re, la persona pi soggetta a pressioni politiche esterne. Ma,
non ostante che questa inimicizia sia oltremodo enfatizzata, vi pur sempre una
ricaduta anche sul pi comune dei fedeli. La nostra vita sazia di mali, di contraddizioni, di contrariet. La vita di David esemplare proprio in questo, perchla finzione narrativa che sia un uomo ordinario, prima di essere unto re.
Va segnalato, per, un possibile trabocchetto di questa insistenza del Salterio sui
nemici. Sta nella fin troppo facile identificazione dei nemici personali con gli
empi. Filologicamente, questa equiparazione del tutto inesatta6. Ma il problema non tanto il fatto che consideriamo empi i nostri nemici; il problema, pi
sottile, che noi consideriamo giusti noi stessi. Vale a dire che ci facciamo
unimmagine ideale di noi stessi, che non corrisponde al nostro Io reale, peccatore. Finch abitiamo questo Io ideale (che perseguita in noi il nostro Io peccatore),
non abitiamo ancora nella casa del Signore7.
Tuttavia questo versetto insegna unaltra cosa importante: che gli stessi avversari, per il semplice fatto di essere avversari, finiscono per inciampare nella loro
avversit. Detto altrimenti, il male si ritorce contro chi lha progettato, come nel
Sal 7, che forse la riflessione biblica pi acuta su questo tema. L David arriva
a dire che, se ha fatto del male a qualcuno, il nemico ha il diritto di inseguirlo, di
raggiungerlo e di calpestare a terra la sua gloria regale. Non solo, ma stabilisce la
norma, che si ritrova anche altrove nei libri sapienziali, che chi scava una fossa
(per qualcun altro) vi cade dentro lui stesso (cf. Sal 7,16)8. Questo, che possiamo
chiamare effetto boomerang del male, importante perch non prevedibile,
non sotto il nostro controllo. Non siamo consapevoli del male che facciamo, e
neppure di quello che progettiamo contro altri, se non quando sperimentiamo su
noi stessi le sue imprevedibili conseguenze.

Cf. A. Mello, Lessico del Salterio, LA 54 (2004) 28.


Debbo questa riflessione, che trovo molto pertinente, a P. Beauchamp, Salmi notte e giorno,
Assisi 20022.
8 Il principio sapienziale che uno cade nella fossa che ha scavato si ritrova anche in Sal 9,16;
35,8; Pr 26,27; Qoh 10,8; Sir 27,26-27.
7

40

Alberto Mello

III
Se si accamper contro di me un esercito
non temer il mio cuore;
se scoppier contro di me una guerra
proprio in questo ho fiducia.
(tetracolon: v. 3)
La strofa precedente era introdotta da una preposizione temporale (b + infinito:
quando); quella attuale da un condizionale (im: se). La strofa precedente aveva i verbi al perfetto, cio al passato: descrivevano un caso non solo possibile ma
realmente accaduto. I verbi di questa strofa, invece, sono allimperfetto, cio al
futuro: descrivono un caso ipotetico. Qui si ipotizza un caso di guerra (un assedio,
un accampamento) anche se si tratta, probabilmente, di una pura immaginazione:
Se anche si accampasse contro di me un esercito, non temerebbe il mio cuore.
Fa lipotesi di un pericolo estremo, ma non dice se questa ipotesi reale o immaginaria, se il caso impellente o fantasioso. Dal punto di vista storico, sarebbe
forse interessante appurarlo, ma dal punto di vista semantico non cambia molto la
nostra intelligenza del salmo.
In questo si presta a interpretazione. Zot un pronome dimostrativo di genere femminile che pu avere un significato avverbiale: con tutto ci o non
ostante questo (non ostante lo scoppio della guerra). Ma le versioni non hanno
inteso cos. Hanno fatto di questo il complemento del verbo avere fiducia,
ovvero hanno esplicitato in che cosa si deve riporre la fiducia: en taute eg elpizo
(Lxx); in hoc ego sperabo (Vg). Detto altrimenti, io spero in questo fatto: che il
Signore mia luce e mia salvezza. Cos la terza strofa si ricongiunge con la prima
a formare una specie di inclusione. Dopo aver enumerato una serie di casi, possibili o reali, si fa ritorno al principio, al tema di fondo.
IV
Una sola cosa ho chiesto al Signore,
questa sola voglio:
abitare nella casa del Signore
per tutti i giorni della mia vita;
contemplare la dolcezza del Signore
e visitare il suo tempio.
(hesacolon: v. 4)
Una sola cosa: questo ci rimanda alla preghiera del re, alla sua concentrazione e riduzione allessenziale. Quante cose possibile chiedere a Dio? Nei
Salmi, noi assistiamo a un progressivo affinamento della domanda. Chiedi a me,

Abitare nella casa del Signore. Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

41

e ti dar in eredit le genti, esordisce il Sal 2,8. In questo salmo regale, che
inaugura la raccolta, si considera ancora possibile domandare la vittoria sui nemici (bench i due termini utilizzati per questo, eredit e propriet, non si
riferiscano mai a una conquista armata, leredit consistendo in un lascito familiare e la propriet in un acquisto tramite denaro). Vita ti ha chiesto e tu glielhai
data (Sal 21,5): qui la domanda esclude ancora pi chiaramente una vittoria
militare e si limita alla vita, cio una vita piena, lunga, felice, certo liberata
dalle forze avverse, ma non necessariamente prevalente su di esse. Ma adesso si
precisa ancora meglio il contenuto di questa richiesta vitale: abitare nella casa
del Signore per tutti i giorni della mia vita. Vi certamente un nesso, allinterno
del salmo, tra questa abitazione e la vita, la luce e la salvezza. Abitare un
sinonimo di vivere, ma vivere confortevolmente. Normalmente, per dire vivere, in ebraico si usa abitare, risiedere (shevet): Ecco come bello e gioioso
labitare insieme di fratelli (Sal 133,1)9. Vivere abitare in un luogo salubre,
luminoso, pieno di vita, e non c dubbio che il luogo architettonicamente pi
splendido, religiosamente pi significativo, a Gerusalemme fosse il tempio (ed
tuttora la spianata delle moschee).
Una sola cosa ho chiesto al Signore. Un commentatore moderno osserva
che il salmista fa qui una delle pi risolute affermazioni dintenti di tutto lAntico Testamento10. Per esempio, non si trova nulla di simile nei cosiddetti proverbi numerici, l dove si elencano in scala di importanza le cose maggiormente preferibili: niente che derivi da un desiderio cos intenso ed esclusivo. Ma,
soprattutto, abitare nella casa del Signore non da intendere soltanto alla lettera, come il desiderio del levita o sacerdote di essere un inserviente nel tempio.
Pu essere il desiderio di un re di abitare allombra dellAltissimo (Sal91,1) o
il desiderio di un comune israelita di salire a Gerusalemme. Ho gi detto: non
importa che sia anacronistico parlare di una casa al tempo di David, tant
vero che subito dopo si corregge e dice la tenda di Adonj (v. 5). Ma vedremo
che il v. 13 ci permetter forse di andare oltre nella comprensione di questa casa, di questa dimora eterna, di questa residenza felice. Per ora, basti registrare
un proposito, una intenzione molto forti, molto risoluti: un voto con cui David
si impegnato, un giuramento, come quello che viene descritto nel Sal 132,
sempre a proposito della casa che egli voleva costruire per il Signore.

9 Anche poco prima, nel Sal 23,6, ritorner nella casa del Signore facilmente correggibile,
con i Lxx, in abiter nella casa del Signore per la lunghezza dei giorni (we-shavt, anzich jashavti).
10 P.C. Craigie, Psalms 1-50 (WBC 19), Waco TX 1983, 232.

42

Alberto Mello

V
Perch mi nasconder nella sua capanna
nel giorno del male;
mi celer nel segreto della sua tenda,
su una rupe mi esalter.
(tetracolon: v. 5)
Questa casa pu anche non essere ancora una casa, ma una tenda mobile,
una capanna provvisoria. David non ha costruito nessuna casa, bench ne avesse
avuto il desiderio. Che cosa ha costruito? Ha costruito ci a cui quella casa sarebbe servita: la preghiera dIsraele (Daniel Epstein direbbe che ne ha costruito la
psiche)11. Nascondersi nella capanna, celarsi nella tenda, sono entrambi sinonimi di pregare. Si tratta, certo, di una preghiera nascosta, personale, a tu per tu.
istruttivo che un discendente di David, Ezechia, nella sua malattia si rivolga per
pregare contro un muro, affinch nessun altro possa sentirlo. Ancora pi istruttiva
la lezione di Ges, che invita a ritirarsi nella camera pi interna, affinch la
preghiera sia fatta nel segreto, come si dice anche qui. Pertanto, questa strofa
precisa il desiderio di David, il suo voto: tutto si gioca su questa intimit con Dio.
Non importante la casa di per se stessa: pu trattarsi anche solo di una capanna.
Tutto dipende da questa segretezza, da questa possibilit di nascondimento. Notiamo che questo versetto 5 del nostro salmo molto simile al Sal 31,21: Li nasconderai nel segreto del tuo volto, lontano dai lacci delluomo. Li celerai nella
(tua) capanna, lontano dalle contese delle lingue (il Sal 31 si pu considerare, per
pi motivi, parallelo al Sal 27)12.
VI
Anche adesso si esalter il mio capo
sui nemici che mi assediano.
Offrir nella sua tenda
sacrifici di esultanza:
canter e salmegger al Signore.
(pentacolon: v. 6)
11 Ho recepito questo pensiero di Daniel Epstein, che non ha mai scritto nulla ma ha molto
insegnato, nel mio libretto: I Salmi, un libro per pregare, Magnano (BI) 2007.
12 Entrambi appartengono alla terza unit del primo libro dei Salmi, che presenta questa struttura concentrica: A Sal 25: alfabetico; B Sal 26: protesta di innocenza; C Sal 27: speranza (in fine);
D Sal 28: supplica (di non scendere nella fossa); E Sal 29: lode nel tempio; D Sal 30: ringraziamento (per risalire dalla fossa); C Sal 31: speranza (in fine); B Sal 32-33: confessione della colpa; A Sal
34: alfabetico. Il tema centrale quindi il tempio, di cui si hanno riscontri quasi ad ogni salmo: Sal
26,8; 27,4-5; 28,2; 29,9; 30,1; 31,21; 33,14.

Abitare nella casa del Signore. Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

43

Anche adesso o gi adesso, weattah: questa la situazione da cui prende


le mosse la preghiera, il suo Sitz im Leben, per esprimerci cos. Si tratta di un sacrificio di ringraziamento (il testo dice teru: di ovazione o di esultanza, ma
lequivalente di azione di grazie). Tutta la prima parte del salmo, fino a questa
strofa (che ne rappresenta la prima stanza) un inno di grazie, che accompagna il
sacrificio. Intorno a questa eucaristia, tutto si riassume: la lode di Dio, il superamento delle difficolt causate dai nemici, il proposito, soprattutto, di abitare
nella casa del Signore, di nascondersi sotto le sue ali. Tutto si raccoglie e tutto si
scioglie in ringraziamento. Ma qui cominciamo a capire che questo desiderio,
almeno in parte, si gi realizzato, proprio adesso.
VII
Ascolta, Signore, la voce con cui grido:
abbi piet di me e rispondimi.
Di te ha detto il mio cuore:
Cercate il mio volto.
Il tuo volto io cerco, Signore:
non nascondermi il tuo volto.
(hesacolon: vv. 7-9a)
Ascolta: dal ringraziamento si passa alla supplica, con le espressioni pi
intense di questa (piet di me, rispondimi). Questo passaggio, questo cambiamento di stile, non inusuale nei Salmi. Il cerchio della lode individuato da
Goldingay13 dato dalla successione, nellordine, di lamento - supplica - ringraziamento - lode. Pu cominciare o interrompersi non importa quando o, eventualmente, riprendere da capo. Non si tratta di ingabbiare un salmo in un dato schema
ma, al contrario, di apprezzarne la libert, la capacit di adattarsi a diversi stili o
situazioni. In ogni caso, non esiste la minima ragione formale che consenta di
dividere il salmo in due o di attentare alla sua unit poetica14.
Pertanto, qui comincia la seconda stanza del nostro poema. Linsistenza, ora,
data dal tema del volto, ripetuto tre volte: quello che in ebraico si chiama
13 J. Goldingay, The Dynamic Cycle of Praise and Prayer in the Psalms, JSOT 20 (1981)
85-90.
14 Anche A.H. van Zyl, The Unity of Psalm 27, in I.H. Eibers (ed.), De fructu oris sui. Essays
in Honour of Adrianus van Selms, Leiden 1971, 233-251, mantiene lunit del salmo, contro le
deviazioni di una esegesi atomizzante, sulla base delle parallele lamentazioni mesopotamiche. Dal
canto suo, H. Simian-Yofre, Syntaxis y proceso espiritual en el salmo 27, in J.L. DAmico (ed.),
Donde est el Espiritu, est la libertad, San Benito 2003, 221-232, ha mostrato lucidamente tutta
una serie di inclusioni concentriche che tengono le due parti agganciate e ne determinano lunit
strutturale. Indichiamo soltanto le pi evidenti: 1 vita; 2 nemici; 3 alzarsi contro; 4 cercare; 5 nascondere; 6 tenda; 7 tenda; 8 cercare; 9 nascondere; 11 avversari; 12 alzarsi contro; 13 viventi.

44

Alberto Mello

lhaster panim (nascondimento del volto)15. Questo nascondimento, sempre


provvisorio, visto, per, come un invito alla ricerca: Cercate il mio volto. Chi
che dice questo? Dovrebbe essere Dio, ma in realt il mio cuore. Perci ci
si aspetterebbe il pronome di terza persona: Cercate il suo volto (come, in effetti, leggono i Lxx). A dire il vero, anche incerto il senso del dativo ebraico lekha:
a te, di te, per te, al posto tuo?16 Comunque lantica esegesi rabbinica, in
particolare Menachem Meiri, ha dato un senso pi profondo a questa apparente
incongruenza: effettivamente, il cuore di David che invita a cercare il proprio
volto, perch sul volto del Messia si riflette il volto stesso di Dio (cf. 2Cor 4,6).
Altre versioni, in particolare quella siriaca, risolvono diversamente: A te parla il
mio cuore, Signore, e il mio volto cerca il tuo volto.
VIII
Non piegare, nellira, il tuo servo
sii il mio aiuto.
Non lasciarmi e non abbandonarmi
Dio della mia salvezza:
mio padre e mia madre mi hanno abbandonato
ma il Signore mi accoglier.
(hesacolon: vv. 9b-10)
Questa volta, il problema quello dellabbandono, che parallelo al nascondimento del volto. Come questultimo, che solo una momentanea distrazione dello sguardo, un guardare altrove, anche labbandono non mai definitivo
(il grido di derelizione del Sal 22,2 finisce come sappiamo bene in un inno di
lode). In altri termini, ci che in causa lira di Dio, quella giusta collera che
non soltanto provvisoria, ma persino foriera di pace. Lira divina un braciere
di misericordia. Ci non toglie che se ne temano gli effetti (Non piegarmi, non
abbattermi, non prostrarmi o, come pi comunemente si traduce, non scacciarmi dalla tua presenza) e si chieda di esserne risparmiati. Sii il mio aiuto un
perfetto precativo, o pu essere vocalizzato allimperativo, come hanno inteso le
versioni antiche (ghenou: Lxx; esto: Vulgata). Ma potrebbe anche intendersi alla
lettera, come un passato di circostanza: Tu sei sempre stato il mio aiuto. Lo sei
sempre stato e sempre lo sarai, a differenza di un padre o di una madre che prima
15 Questo tema ha risonanze bibliche, e specialmente salmiche, molto diverse da quelle che si
potrebbero comunemente pensare o immaginare: cf. A. Mello, Quando Dio si nasconde. Una metafora della rivelazione biblica, LA 52 (2002) 9-28.
16 Lincertezza di questo lamed pi o meno equivalente a quella del titolo le-Dawid. Craigie,
Psalms 1-50, 33, enumera queste quattro possibilit: to, by, for, about (ovvero: dedicato a; da parte
di; destinato a; circa David).

Abitare nella casa del Signore. Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

45

o poi ci abbandonano, in questo mondo. Presso Dio, invece, non si mai orfani.
Presso di lui si attua una familiarit che non viene mai meno. Abitare nella casa
del Signore vuol dire anche questo: godere di una familiarit cos grande che
nessun lutto potr mai pi scalfire. Notiamo che si dice: Mio padre e mia madre
mi hanno abbandonato. un dato di fatto, non una possibilit. Quando vengono
meno i propri genitori, si determina un vuoto affettivo. Ma Dio supplisce a
quellaffetto, anche in ci che esso pu essere stato carente, da parte loro o anche
da parte dei figli.
IX
Indicami, Signore, la tua strada
conducimi su un sentiero piano
di fronte agli avversari.
Non pormi in balia dei miei nemici
perch sono sorti contro di me falsi testimoni
che soffiano violenza.
(hesacolon: vv. 11-12)
Adesso il salmo ritorna al suo principio, al suo motivo iniziale: la paura dei
nemici. In realt, questo motivo non mai stato tralasciato, perch anche quando
lorante afferma la sua fiducia di essere nascosto nella capanna o celato nel
segreto della tenda del Signore, non esprime solamente un sentimento di intimit, ma specialmente un bisogno di protezione, di riparo dallinimicizia. Soltanto,
questi nemici adesso riaffiorano in primo piano e soffiano violenza, come qualcuno che soffi sulla brace per attizzare il fuoco17. Sono falsi testimoni: testimoni, dunque, provvisti di una certa familiarit con il re-salmista, capaci forse anche
di una qualche solidariet, ma ingannevole, inaffidabile. Perci si tratta, fondamentalmente, di trovare un sentiero piano, semplice in mezzo a tanta falsit. Il
termine usato per piano, mishor, lo stesso che appare anche in Is 40,4: E il
tortuoso diventer diritto, che contiene una allusione obliqua (aqov) al nome di
Giacobbe (Jaaqov), lingannatore, il non trasparente. Si tratta di trovare una via,
e il verbo per indicare (jarah) lo stesso da cui deriva anche tor: indicazione,
insegnamento. Si potrebbe pensare, come per Giacobbe, a una correzione etica, a
una dirittura morale. Ma non questo il caso. Si tratta, piuttosto, di trovare una
strada in mezzo alle inimicizie, un sentiero che aggiri le false testimonianze. In
breve: unuscita di sicurezza.

17

Il verbo soffiare, in senso aggressivo, non nuovo nel Salterio: cf. Sal 10,5; 12,6.

46

Alberto Mello

X
Se non credessi di vedere
la bont del Signore nella terra dei viventi
Spera nel Signore:
sii forte, si rinsaldi il tuo cuore
e spera nel Signore
(pentacolon: vv. 13-14)
Questo periodo ipotetico sospeso uno dei passi pi enigmatici di tutto il
Salterio. Osserviamo, prima dellanomalia grammaticale e della difficolt anche
metrica, che nei Lxx (e nella Vulgata) la condizione negativa lule, se non, del
tutto assente. Quindi la versione greca traduce semplicemente: Credo di vedere
la bont del Signore nella terra dei viventi. Punto e basta, e questa soluzione
viene adottata anche dalla maggior parte delle versioni moderne. Ma la difficolt
del testo ebraico richiede pur sempre un tentativo di spiegazione. Diciamo, per
prima cosa, che lanomalia grammaticale di una protasi priva di apodosi stata
avvertita dagli stessi masoreti, i quali hanno posto quattro punti diacritici sopra e
sotto lespressione lule. Questo per indicare che il nostro testo pone un problema
di lettura, ed ecco come gli antichi maestri ebrei hanno cercato di risolverlo:
stato insegnato, in nome di Rabbi Jos: Come mai la parola se non punteggiata
sia sopra che sotto? Perch David disse al Santo sia benedetto : Signore del
mondo, io so che tu darai ai giusti una buona ricompensa, nel mondo avvenire,
ma non so se anchio sar uno di loro oppure no18. La fede di David intatta per
quanto riguarda la bont del mondo futuro, ma incerta per quanto riguarda la
propria partecipazione a questa bont finale, in considerazione dei suoi molti
peccati. Perci il condizionale se non manifesterebbe questa incertezza, sarebbe
un atto di umilt da parte del salmista. Potremmo tradurlo come unesclamazione:
Magari avessi sempre creduto di vedere la bont del Signore nella terra dei viventi!. Oppure, ancora pi semplicemente: Oh, se io non avessi creduto di vedere la bont del Signore nella terra dei viventi! (sottintendendo: Sarei uno
sventurato; Sarei il pi infelice degli uomini, come afferma Paolo se avesse
creduto alla risurrezione soltanto in questa vita: cf. 1Cor 15,19). Vi , poi, chi
restituisce lapodosi mancante connettendo questa frase con il versetto precedente: Sorgerebbero contro di me falsi testimoni, se io non credessi (o non avessi
creduto) alla bont del Signore19. Ma questo tentativo, oltre a non essere molto
perspicuo quanto al nesso logico che stabilisce tra le due frasi, difficilmente
accettabile dal punto di vista del parallelismo poetico.
Invece, io osservo che la frase poetica rimanda molto strettamente a un verset18
19

Midrash Tehillim (ed. Buber), Vilna 1891, 228; Mello, Leggere e pregare i Salmi, 125.
Cos J. Niehaus, The use of lle, JBL 98 (1979) 88-89.

Abitare nella casa del Signore. Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

47

to precedente, ossia proprio al voto o al proposito davidico di abitare nella casa


del Signore. In questi due versetti si registrano due espressioni parallele, che
consentono di avvicinarli nella loro interezza, come nel procedimento rabbinico
della ghezer shaww, o analogia verbale: Contemplare la dolcezza del Signore, al v. 4; Vedere la bont del Signore al v. 1320.
Di conseguenza, penso che anche questultimo versetto sia interpretabile come
un voto o un giuramento di David. In questo caso, lapodosi mancante, e che va
restituita, appunto quella del giuramento: Dio mi faccia tanto, e aggiunga tanto21, se non credessi di vedere la bont del Signore nella terra dei viventi!. In
questo caso, la fede di David salva: non soltanto quella che riguarda la bont del
mondo futuro, ma anche la sua dignit e la sua determinazione nel perseguirla.
David ha giurato di vedere questa bont durante la sua vita, anzi per tutti i giorni
della sua vita (v. 4): sia nel mondo presente che in quello futuro.
Risurrezione
Resta da chiedersi: qual la terra dei viventi? Lespressione non isolata:
ritorna una quindicina di volte nella Bibbia ebraica. In generale, possibile che il
salmista avesse, di questa terra e di questi viventi, unimmagine concreta, delimitata: non il mondo in generale, ma proprio questa terra, cio la terra santa. Per
limitarci ai Salmi, si possono ricordare il Sal 142,6 (Ho detto: Sei tu il mio rifugio, la mia porzione nella terra dei viventi) e il Sal 116,9 (Camminer alla
presenza del Signore nelle terre al plurale dei viventi). Che la terra dei viventi sia la terra dIsraele risulta inequivocabile dalle sue molteplici frequenze (6 in
tutto!) nel capitolo 32 di Ezechiele. Nelle altre ricorrenze invece (si pensi a Is
38,11; 53,8; Ger 11,19; Sal 52,7; Gb 28,13), il significato base dellespressione
sembra essere pi generale: in questa vita, nel mondo presente.
Il nostro caso, dunque, si presta a interpretazione. Per i Rabbini, lo abbiamo
visto, la terra dei viventi il mondo futuro, laldil. Comunque, certo che il
verbo vivere (chajah), in ebraico biblico, ha anche il significato di rivivere o
rivivificare. Uno studioso filologicamente molto qualificato, Mitchel Dahood22,
20 Il parallelismo delle due espressioni molto stretto, sia dal punto di vista semantico che da
quello grammaticale: non solo, infatti, chazah sinonimo di raah e noam sta per tov, ma anche la
costruzione sintattica identica: verbo + preposizione b + complemento. Quello che si pu dire
che il v. 4 presenta una forma semanticamente pi ricercata.
21 La formula: koh jaaseh li elohim we-koh josif definita da Joon (165a) come un giuramento di maledizione o una imprecazione. Essa ricorre 12 volte nella Bibbia e quasi sempre nei
libri di Samuele e dei Re. Va notato che si trova per ben sette volte nella storia di David: 1Sam 14,44;
20,13; 25,22; 2Sam 3,9.35; 19,14; 2Re 2,23. Qui il salmista attirerebbe su di s la maledizione se
soltanto avesse mancato di fede nella promessa divina di abitare nella casa del Signore.
22 M. Dahood, Psalms I, 1-50 (Anchor Bible 16), New York 1966, 170.

48

Alberto Mello

ritiene che sia questo il senso dell'espressione salmica: unallusione allaldil e


alla risurrezione. In poche parole: la terra dei viventi la terra dei risorti. Peter
Craigie, che lo cita, squalifica questa idea come anacronistica, in quanto prematura nel periodo monarchico cui si attribuisce il Sal 27. Ma egli non considera
abbastanza un paio di cose: prima di tutto, che il salmo non databile con sicurezza; e, soprattutto, che lidea di una risurrezione possa essere antica in Israele,
o comunque anteriore a quel periodo maccabaico cui di solito si fa risalire. Qui,
ovviamente, si aprirebbe un discorso molto pi lungo, che mi limito a registrare
per sommi capi:
a) Israele ha sempre avuto la credenza in un al di l dalla morte, in una certa
sopravvivenza post mortem. Anche se questa sopravvivenza, lo Sheol, era una
forma di vita depotenziata, ombratile, come lAde dei Greci, e quindi non desiderabile o priva di speranza, tuttavia la credenza in una vita post mortem c sempre
stata. Lo Sheol, in particolare, il luogo, il momento, lo spazio-tempo, del non
ricordo, come detto nel tragico Sal 88:
Farai forse un miracolo per i morti?
Si leveranno le ombre a ringraziarti?
Si narrer il tuo amore nel sepolcro,
la tua fedelt nella perdizione?
Si conosceranno i tuoi prodigi nelle tenebre,
la tua giustizia nella terra delloblio? (Sal 88,11-13).

Oblio, non ricordo, di Dio, del suo amore e della sua fedelt, ma anche oblio
di s, della propria storia, di quella continuit spazio-temporale di senso che
lamore e la fedelt rendono possibile e che si rinnova ogni mattina (miracolo
di una risurrezione anticipata). La prospettiva iniziale , dunque, negativa: ma
attraverso il negativo si intravvede gi il positivo. Risurrezione un miracolo
dellamore e della fedelt di Dio, che costituiscono la nostra identit personale, la
nostra memoria23, e anche della sua giustizia, nella misura che opera un giudizio, abbassando i superbi ed elevando gli umili.
23 Sulla memoria, specialmente nelluso che ne fanno i Salmi, quasi come memoria Dei, ha
detto cose suggestive Brevard Childs: Luso della memoria si configura spesso come separazione
da Dio, risentita da un individuo o dalla comunit. A Israele sono stati negati gli strumenti abituali
di accesso a Dio (Sal 42; 137), per cui si sforza di trovarlo. Non che la centralit del tempio venga
cancellata (Sal 43,3), ma appare qualche cosa di nuovo. Nello sforzo intenso di non perdere il contatto con la tradizione, Israele riscopre nuovamente, attraverso la memoria, il Dio del passato. La
sua attenzione non si fissa pi su eventi storici precisi, ma sulla stessa realt divina che ha formato
la sua storia. Il vocabolario usato per descrivere questo combattuto processo indica la forte interiorizzazione che ne traspira. Ricordare, allora, diventa afferrare, meditare; in una parola, pregare Dio:
Memory and Tradition in Israel (SBT 37), London 1962, 64-65.

Abitare nella casa del Signore. Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

49

b) vero che una fede esplicitamente professata nella resurrezione dei giusti e
degli ingiusti, gli uni per la vita (paradiso) e gli altri per la morte (inferno) documentata soltanto nel periodo maccabaico (2Mac 7) e in ambito apocalittico (Dn
12): quindi in epoca relativamente recente, ed fatta propria anche dal Nuovo
Testamento (con adattamenti molto significativi). Ma non bisognerebbe insistere
troppo su questa risurrezione duplice, per la gloria o per linfamia, in quanto la
seconda non una vera risurrezione: effetto di giustizia, ma non di quellamore
e di quella fedelt che ricostruiscono una vita, che ristrutturano una memoria.
c) Invece, tra luna e laltra prospettiva (diciamo: tra lo Sheol e il paradiso) si
fa gradualmente strada una speranza di vita oltre la morte. Soprattutto negli
scritti sapienziali, nei passi che riflettono sulla fortuna degli empi e la sfortuna
terrena dei giusti, questa speranza cresce24. celebre il grido di Giobbe, in 19,2526, ma sono proprio i Salmi ad esprimerla al meglio. Cos, per esempio, si pu
leggere il Sal 73,25-26:
Chi altri avr in cielo per me?
Fuori di te non ho pi desideri sulla terra.
La mia carne e il mio cuore si dissolvono
ma la roccia del mio cuore la mia parte
Dio per leternit (vedi tutto il contesto, precedente e successivo).

Ancor pi determinante, in quanto ripreso dal Nuovo Testamento, il Sal


16,9-11:
Per questo ha gioito il mio cuore
e ha esultato la mia gloria (il mio intimo, ma cf. Sal 73,2425)
anche la mia carne riposer in sicurezza
perch non abbandonerai la mia vita nello Sheol
non lascerai che il tuo Santo veda la fossa:
mi insegnerai il sentiero della vita (o: dei viventi)
saziet di gioia presso il tuo volto,
dolcezza alla tua destra per leternit.
24 Non nego che lesperienza del martirio maccabaico abbia costituito un banco di prova per
la fede nella resurrezione, ma dire che lidea della resurrezione per lAntico Testamento una
novit, che si affaccia qui (in 2Mac 7) per la prima volta (B. Maggioni, voce Risurrezione nei
Temi Teologici della Bibbia, Cinisello Balsamo 2010, 1170) mi sembra non tenere in sufficiente
conto questa crescita della speranza ebraica, per la quale rimando a M. Greenberg, Hope and
Death, Ariel 39 (1975) 21-39.
25 Nei Salmi, frequente luso di kevodi, in parallelo con nafshi (Sal 7,6) o con libbi (Sal 16,9),
a significare la parte pi nobile delluomo (BDB 459), cio il suo intimo. Ma questo non il caso
del Sal 73,24: mi assumerai nella gloria (kavod), che sembra riferirsi ancora alla risurrezione.

50

Alberto Mello

Queste parole davidiche sono, per Pietro, una prova certa della risurrezione
(cf. At 2,25-28) e anche nell'interpretazione ebraica non vedere la fossa (shachat) non vuol dire essere risparmiati dalla morte, ma non andare soggetti alla
corruzione del corpo. In che senso va inteso: Anche la mia carne riposer in
sicurezza? Quello che David vuole dire : io so che la mia carne non sar rosa
dai vermi26 Crediamo che anche il giuramento del Sal 27, con il suo forte accento sulla terra dei viventi, si muova nella stessa linea di pensiero, operando
la profezia di una vita che continua anche dopo la morte. Perci labitazione
nella casa del Signore, al v. 4, pu essere letta nella stessa luce, cio alla luce
della risurrezione: Credere di vedere la bont del Signore nella terra dei viventi equiparabile, spiritualmente, a desiderare di abitare nella casa del Signore
per tutti i giorni della vita (vedi anche il Sal 23,6 nei Lxx: Abiter nella casa
del Signore per la distesa dei giorni, ossia infinitamente).
Ci si potrebbe ancora chiedere: la prospettiva cos delineata quella di una
immortalit dellanima o di una risurrezione del corpo? Niente obbliga a
scegliere, suggerisce Maurice Gilbert27, il quale registra negli scritti deuterocanonici, redatti in greco come il libro della Sapienza o tradotti in greco come
il Siracide, una certa fluttuazione culturale dalluna allaltra concezione, fluttuazione che si riconosce anche nei manoscritti esseni di Qumran28. Certo,
porre unalternativa troppo rigida tra le due cose finisce per nuocere ad entrambe. A questo proposito, Josef Moingt ha trovato parole che mi sembrano
molto illuminanti:
La risurrezione del corpo la totalit ricapitolata del nostro divenire temporale. , al tempo stesso, questo insieme vivente di relazioni e di dipendenze
aperte sulluniverso che il nostro corpo ha contrassegnato con la sua particolarit. Non per questo diventa superfluo il principio di una distinzione dellanima dal corpo: esso riposa sulla ineguaglianza, interiore a noi stessi, tra ci che
siamo per generazione naturale e ci che dobbiamo diventare in virt della
vocazione divina. Limmortalit dellanima pu quindi designare laspirazione della vita a oltrepassare i limiti del corpo. Non si pu capire la resurrezione dei morti se non si riconosce lesistenza di un principio permanente di
identit a se stessi, atto a sopportare leternit dellamore divino29.
Semplificando proprio al massimo, si pu dire che questo principio di iden26

Cf. Mello, Leggere e pregare i Salmi, 507, sul Sal 119,9 (Midrash Tehillim, [ed. Buber], 492).
M. Gilbert, Immortalit? Rsurrection? Faut-il choisir?, in ACFEB, Le judasme laube
de lre chrtienne (LD 186), Paris 2001, 271-297. Vedi anche C. Marcheselli-Casale, Risorgeremo,
ma come? Risurrezione dei corpi, degli spiriti o delluomo? (Suppl. RivBibl 18), Bologna 1988.
28 E. Puech, La croyance des essniens en la vie future: immortalit, rsurrection, vie eternelle?
Histoire dune croyance dans le judasme ancien (EB n.s. 21-22), Paris1993.
29 J. Moingt, Immortalit de lme et/ou rsurrection, Lumire et Vie 107 (1972) 65-78, qui 65.
27

Abitare nella casa del Signore. Il Sal 27 e la risurrezione

51

tit personale, che risorge oltre la morte, nel mondo greco lanima, in quello ebraico il corpo (ma un corpo pneumatico, come afferma san Paolo
nella prima ai Corinti). La fede nella risurrezione alimenta gi la speranza del
nostro salmo. Una speranza insistente, ripetuta due volte: Spera nel Signore e spera nel Signore. Vale a dire: non cessare mai di sperare. Rashi, con
il suo solito stile conciso, parafrasa: Anche se egli non gradisse la tua preghiera, tu spera ancora. Non scoraggiarti se la tua speranza non trovasse
ancora compimento. Continua a sperare. In vena di midrash, potremmo dire:
Spera nel Signore in questa vita; e spera nel Signore nel mondo che viene.
La risurrezione, in realt, in atto gi oggi. Non rifletteremo mai abbastanza
sul fatto che Ges, per dimostrarne la potenza, non si rifatto n a Daniele n
ai martiri maccabei, ma alla pericope del roveto. Per dire che il Signore, il Dio
di Abramo, di Isacco e di Giacobbe, non il Dio dei morti, ma dei viventi!30
Alberto Mello
Professore invitato Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem

30 il caso di precisare che la disputa tra sadducei e farisei (coi quali Ges si allinea) pi che
teologica era esegetica. Quello che i primi rifiutavano, era la possibilit di dimostrare la risurrezione sulla base della Tor, e quindi di conferirle unautorit mosaica, la sola per essi vincolante. Al
contrario, secondo i maestri farisei, non c pericope della Tor che non affermi la risurrezione dei
morti (Sifr su Dt 32,7). Rabbi Simai dice: Da dove sappiamo che la risurrezione dei morti insegnata dalla Tor? Poich sta scritto: Anche con loro [ossia con Abramo, Isacco e Giacobbe] io ho
stabilito il mio patto, per dare ad essi la terra di Canaan (Es 6,4). Qui non si dice per dare a voi,
ma per dare ad essi. Da qui risulta che la risurrezione dei morti insegnata anche dalla Tor (bSanhedrin 90b). Ges, appellandosi ai Patriarchi tuttora viventi, non fa altro che mettere in atto lo
stesso procedimento esegetico.

Vittorio Ricci
La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole
sogno nel Cantico

Trama e non trama damore. La sua drammatizzazione poetica


Dai diversi commenti e monografie esegetiche sul Cantico pseudo-salomonico non sono rintracciabili evidenziazioni di alcuni tratti davvero atti a configurare
un quadro di riferimenti tali da illuminare pi adeguatamente un testo cos unico,
anche se non si pu non essere dellidea di doversi rassegnare alla prospettiva che
ogni pretesa di svelare o infrangere la sua inviolabile enigmaticit non possa non
risultare alla fine inevitabilmente fallimentare. Tuttavia, forse non si dovrebbe
dubitare che persino in mezzo a tanta misteriosit espressiva valga qui menzionare solo dal punto di vista meramente lessicale i 43 hapax per 117 versetti, quasi uno per tre versetti si manifesti in una epifanicit assoluta e in una forza comunicativa incomparabile la tematica o meglio il messaggio di fondo. Esso si illumina quasi per incanto nella descrizione dellattrazione profonda e innanzitutto
imprescindibilmente erotica nella sua immediatezza rappresentativa che non
pu non implicare una pienezza relazionale (forse ulteriore e meno immediata)
nella sua dimensione umana che apre necessariamente ad altro, al divino che vi
umanamente sotteso o evocato e un divino non generico e anonimo, ma
quello rivelato biblicamente, giacch non pu non essere pacifico che il Cantico
sia sorto o almeno redatto nella forma testuale in cui giunto a noi, in un contesto
di fede e cultura ebraiche1. Dalla letteratura critica, volutamente, si sorvoleranno
sia le questioni diacroniche, che si richiameremo cammin facendo solo se stretta-

1 Sulla biblicit innegabile del Cantico non si pu comunque esagerare come ad es. circa la
dimensione di patto che ispirerebbe lautore del poema ora secondo quello monarchico-davidico
(I.D. Cambell, The Song of Davids Son in the Light of Davidic Covenant, WTJ 62 [2000] 17-32)
ora secondo quello di Abramo (M.M. Morfino, Il Cantico dei Cantici e il patto elettivo: possibili
connessioni, Theologica et Historica 5 [1996] 7-42); nemmeno in Pr 31,3-5 si pu scorgere una
critica al Cantico per la condotta riprovevole del re che, al posto di occuparsi di problemi sociali,
si dedica completamente ai piaceri dellamore (P. Hoffen, Das Hohelied und Salomon Literature,
in A. Grauner - A.B. Ernst [ed.], Verbindugslinien. Festschrift fr Werner H. Schmidt zum 65 Geburstag, Neukirchener - Vluyn 2000, 17-32).

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 53-75

54

Vittorio Ricci

mente necessarie, sia le questioni strutturali, cui si accenner previamente per un


orientamento complessivo2.
Il Cantico, bench ormai comunemente ritenuto composito, stratificato e variegato stilisticamente, poeticamente, tematicamente e persino redazionalmente, non
pu non essere assunto come ununit armoniosa nel testo a noi giunto, pena
larbitraria induzione a fraintendere il senso definitivo ultimo, che continuamente
sfugge e viene ripresentato nella sua quasi totale misteriosit ineffabile3. La con2 Ci si limiter a una mera registrazione di una delle pi recenti proposte che presenta una
certa acutezza e risulta in qualche modo paradigmatica: la divisione in 9 unit macro-strutturali in
forma chiastica al cui centro si colloca la quinta delimitata in 3,65,1, in cui si descriverebbero il
matrimonio e la notte nuziale (H. Andrew, The New Structure of the Song of Songs and the Implication for Interpretation, WTS 65 [2003] 97-111) non pare completamente accettabile soprattutto
perch non si ravvisano in questa quinta unit elementi che si riferiscano a una celebrazione nuziale (se di matrimonio si tratta va identificato piuttosto verso la fine in 8,6, in cui la salita di Salomone dal deserto e la salita di lei dal deserto nel verso precedente 8,5, espressione interrogativa ricorrente solo in questi due punti, escludendo la locuzione interrogativa in 6,10 le cui sostanziali variazioni di contesto teso allenfatizzazione della lode che le fanciulle e le regine rivolgono a
lei, spingerebbero comunque a pensare a ci). In favore dellunit complessiva del poema si avanzata lanalisi della pericope del palanchino di Salomone, in cui si notano lomogeneit delle fattezze distintive poetico-letterarie e tematiche in E.J. Cherly, Seeing Salomons Palnquin (SSs 3:611), BibInt 11 (2003) 301-316, bench le determinazioni di tali fattezze, che fungerebbero da
giustificazione della uniformit della pericope al resto del componimento pseudo-salomonico, quali il congiurare dellamata, loscuramento della distinzione del passato e del presente e lindirizzarsi al pubblico incluso il lettore, non siano plausibili, soprattutto perch lamata non congiura nulla
che non sia voluto e con-saputo anche dallamato e, in ultima analisi, dallamore in s stesso
(lamore come complotto e stregamento un topos della letteratura pagana in cui Venere, dea
dellamore, viene raffigurata come colei che complotta fatalmente perch due si innamorino inesorabilmente si pensi al celeberrimo libro IV dellEneide, o quando si tratta di amore non corrisposto
si pensi allaltrettanto celeberrima preghiera ad Afrodite di Saffo); ma nel Cantico, bench si rievochino tratti e atmosfere simili, non si nega ma si premette e si conserva sempre un sottofondo di
libert e di volont conscia, per cui le iniziative delle relazioni amorose tra i due sono pienamente e
liberamente accolte e intraprese, il che indispensabile per un vero rapporto amoroso che implica
in qualche modo la sponsalit della creatura umana in genere, che non pu coincidere con la mera
coniugalit tout court, bench questultima ne costituisca una dinamica originario-fondativa e ne
implichi una istituzionalizzazione irrinunciabile. Il confronto tra il poema pseudosalomonico e la
letteratura extrabiblica non classica si ricercato anche nei preziosi canti erotici egiziani, come si
pu particolarmente attingere in A. Niccacci, Cantico dei Cantici e Canti damore egiziani, LA 41
(1991) 61-85, bench non si possano condividere alcune conclusioni, che tendono a rendere il Cantico come una mera registrazione di una esperienza amorosa adolescenziale, per quanto raffinata e
toccante le corde pi profonde dellanimo umano, seppure in un quadro rivelativo-biblico. Non che
una simile prospettiva non sia vera, ma rimane sostanzialmente riduttiva e in qualche modo costretta in una lettura eseguita per lo pi in superficie. Basti qui a mo prolettico rilevare che la Rivelazione veterotestamentaria non meramente sottesa con unallusione in qualche modo vaga ed
estrinseca, solo di rinvio tematico e contestuale (il Cantico un testo tradizionalmente vincolato
alla raccolta dei libri biblici), ma ne la ragione assoluta e di fondo, la motivazione imprescindibile, la fonte ispiratrice e misterica, quella dimensione intima che veramente rende unico e unitario
lintero componimento pseudosalomonico tutto sommato imparagonabile.
3 Non si pu non citare il monumentale ed enciclopedico commento di G. Ravasi (Il Cantico
dei Cantici. Commento e attualizzazione, Bologna 1992) e soprattutto si rinvia alla bibliografia
contenutavi a pp. 135-142 almeno ovviamente fino al termine cronologico della sua pubblicazio-

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

55

gettura di una formazione letteraria del poema di tipo antologico risultante da una
congerie di fonti e influssi biblici ed extrabiblici4, non comporta una seria minaccia
esegetica per lattendibilit di una incontrovertibile valutazione del poema vertente su una estrema unit persino di ispirazione artistica, di cui va detto anche la sua
assoluta unicit compositiva, che non trova veri possibili confronti con opere consimili. La nota dominante e illuminante la profonda oniricit e la forza del desiderio erotico-amoroso per certi aspetti utopica (si rinvia pi allamore desiderato,
desiderabile e da desiderare sempre nella sua immagine pi autentica universale
che alla narrazione di una particolare storia damore o di una esperienza di tal
fatta autenticamente vissuta)5 , in cui tutto il poema immerso, oserei dire, prodigiosamente e meravigliosamente, che lo dota di una unit strutturale tanto recondita e segreta quanto sensibilmente vistosa per chi si lascia ispirare e non si sovrappone con preconcette congetture estranee o del tutto parziali. Insomma, vi pi
realt o la sola vera realt amorosa nel desiderio della immaginaria coppia
perfetta del Cantico che in una qualsiasi situazione realistica di coppia in carne e
ossa, anche in quella pi prossima a quella descritta nel poema, non perch in linea
di principio si disdegnino la carne e le ossa genesiacamente significanti e imprescindibili6, bens perch si sappia cosa quelle ossa e quella carne sempre genesiane, anche se si integrer nel richiamare eventuali interventi di qualche rilievo e soprattutto significativi in vista della tesi che si tenter di dimostrare .
4 Lipotesi della molteplicit testuale e compositiva del poema pseudosalomonico risale addirittura allepoca patristica con Teodoro di Mopsuestia (IV-V sec.; cf. PG 87,27-214) un immediato parallelismo con la raccolta dei Salmi o dei Proverbi con il Cantico (v. nel dettaglio per questo
secondo libro V. Cottini, Linguaggio erotico nel Cantico dei Cantici e in Proverbi, LA 40 [1990]
24-45) danno lidea e la certezza di una natura radicalmente diversa tra le due prime composizioni
veterotestamentarie (anche diversi tra di essi) e la terza, non solo quantitativamente, ma innanzitutto qualitativamente (la continuit dei due amanti nel Cantico, nonostante la figura di [un] Salomone
al cap. 3 e della Sulammita al cap. 7, priva di qualsiasi fondatezza esitazioni ermeneutiche a riguardo). Tuttavia, lunit non deve essere ricercata nellorganicit stilistica e compositiva secondo il
gusto e lesempio dei testi classici poetici o meno con accenti romantici (H. Lusseau, Introduction
critique lAT, in H. Cazelles [ed.], Introduction la Bible, II, Paris 1973, 610); lunit va ricercata piuttosto nel tentativo di concentrare emotivamente e simbolicamente ci che pu essere vissuto e immaginato solo nella sua inalterabile unit, che persiste ancor pi enfaticamente e incisivamente anche nelle sue tensioni e rotture profonde di vario tipo, nelle sue discontinuit che sembrano
minare continuamente e frammentare di tanto in tanto lunit stessa e quindi di riflesso quella compositiva basti pensare alle diverse circostanze psichiche della sposa se vigile o dormiente (realmente e/o simbolicamente) con tutte le implicazioni del caso particolare.
5 Poco importa se il desiderio vada trattato retoricamente per una costruzione artistica e letteraria addirittura ostensivamente perversa ravvisata come una euristica per esporre limmaginario
corporeo e la sua attrattiva erotica (C.B. Fiona, Beauty or the Beast? The Grotesque Body in the
Song of Songs, BibInt 8 [2000] 302-23) o secondo la teoria lacaniana che scorge nella dinamica
desiderativa non la finalit alla consumazione, ma la perversit della indefinita reiterativit e insaziabilit (J.I. Canion, ROLAND BOER, Ripetition and Insaziable Desire in the Song of Songs,
BibInt 8 [2000] 276-301).
6 Sul rapporto tra il Cantico e il racconto genesiaco delle origini (Gn 13) per la sua complessit di tipo non solo testuale, ma anche intertestuale, oltrech semantico e teologico, si dovrebbe

56

Vittorio Ricci

camente alluse debbono significare e realizzare, bench ne vengano continuamente trascese e superate infinitamente dallAmore, per lAmore e nellAmore, perch
quelle ossa e carne sempre genesiacamente alluse sono per definizione caduche e
finite e per questo e solo per questo naturalmente desideranti linfinitezza dellamore che comunque si vive, si fa tangibile e attingibile nel loro insito desiderio umano
ad amare. Il desiderio damore, se non puramente istintivit sensuale e sessuale,
non perch tale dimensione non debba contare e contare anche con un certo rilievo
anzi ne rappresenta la motivazione ineludibile umana, non paragonabile a nessun
altro desiderio umano, perch esso , per cos dire, immediatezza infinita per
natura, trasparenza di una trascendenza afferrata e al contempo non afferrata, che
si lascia afferrare in pienezza e in tale pienezza rimane inafferrata, cio si tratta di
una perfezione assoluta che si dona tutta nel suo desiderante e si lascia possedere
tutta ma sempre nella condizione del desiderato dal suo desiderante, altrimenti
lamore sarebbe solo un assurdo oggetto consumabile e forse anche riciclabile
come una qualsiasi merce utile a soddisfare un bisogno materiale o spirituale. Nel
desiderio damore risiede una forza presentificante, non consumabile, non utilizzabile come un oggetto per un uso qualsiasi o per una qualche fruizione momentanea, perch totalizzante e radicalmente integro e confacente in tutto e per
tutto al desiderato. Il desiderio amoroso gi in s consumazione integrale e infinita di ci che desidera, e per tanto mortalmente inadeguabile ma anche sua inconsumabilit perch nessun desiderante pu consumarlo, finirlo in s, fruirlo ogni
volta che occorre, perch occorre sempre e sempre nella sua assolutezza desiderativa. Daltro canto, il desiderio erotico implica una mediazione non strumentale,
approntare uno studio a parte. Ci pare comunque non rilevato a livello statistico-terminologico un
dato davvero curioso che dovrebbe suggerire un qualche spunto orientativo a riguardo: a) lassenza
assoluta del termine md'a' nel Cantico (come quella meno notevole di rk'z' e di hb'qne ). ; b) la triplice
presenza di Vya) con il senso secondario di pronome indefinito in 3,8 ciascuno riferito agli armati di Salomone nel grande affresco del suo incedere sulla lettiga e in 8,7.11 in senso impersonale nel contesto di uno scenario di tipo mercantile ; c) la triplice presenza di hV'ai solo al plurale
in una espressione formulare per esaltare la bellezza della sposa rispetto alle altre donne in 1,8, 5,9
e 6,1, anche qui con unaccezione piuttosto generica. Una simile costatazione lessicale non certamente sufficiente a dar ragione di una indipendenza tra i due testi biblici in questione, tuttavia
suggerisce una diversificazione tra ci che si pu considerare eziologico-rizomatico, il racconto
del principio e intorno al principio dellantropologia biblica nei primi tre capitoli della Genesi e ci
che si pu definire drammatico-rappresentativo e sicuramente sapienziale nel poema in esame;
inoltre nel primo libro biblico non si fa alcun riferimento alla fenomenologia o a una qualche sua
allusione espressiva della sessualit o della sensualit, se non a livello protologico, cio quanto
fondativo e originariamente costitutivo in essa (prima del peccato non si accenna ad alcuna relazione sessuale della prima coppia umana, anche se lordine divino rivolto alladam creato maschio e
femmina di essere fecondi e di moltiplicarsi nel racconto sacerdotale o comunque finale in Gn 1,28
dovrebbe comunque includerla o almeno presupporla in certo qual modo; probabilmente lordine
non dovrebbe ridursi solo a un tal senso procreativo). Sicuramente non si pu stimare plausibile la
proposta di una lettura del Cantico come una sorta di parabola non allegorica in senso tradizionale
del racconto genesiaco (J.I. Canion, An Analogy of Song of Songs and Genesis Chaptre Two and
Three, SJOT 14 [2000] 219-259).

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

57

ma completa e intrinsecamente propositiva, perch esso un qualcosa di originario da vivere sempre fino in fondo, cio un desiderio che per la sua struttura
vitale e dinamicit complessa da imparare per una adeguazione al desiderato
che rimane al contempo mai e sempre adeguabile perch altrimenti il desiderante
diventerebbe il desiderato in tutto e per tutto (si assimilerebbe confondendosi e
annullandosi reciprocamente); pertanto tale speciale desiderio non solo da percepire sensibilmente o spiritualmente, come il desiderio di sapere o di alimentarsi
fisicamente ecc., ma esercizio di prova e riprova di una conquista che nel momento in cui si consegue, spinge ed esige ininterrottamente di riconquistare il conquistato da cui simultaneamente si viene conquistati, anzi si viene conquistati nel
conquistare e al contempo si vive come una sconfitta in questa lotta assoluta che
non pu paragonarsi a nulla nella sua ermetica misteriosit e al contempo nella sua
pi splendida epifanicit completa.
Una tale osservazione induce immediatamente a trascegliere un elemento strut] ; (amore), che
turale intrinseco alquanto sicuro di tipo lessicale: il termine hb"ha
comunque pare una scelta obbligata, poich il poema non pu che essere un canto
erotico-amoroso7. Esso come sostantivo compare nel poema 7 volte, di cui la prima
in 2,4 e lultima in 8,78; un simile rilievo con estrema semplicit permette di deli7 Sulle diverse declinazioni e significazioni del linguaggio amoroso del Cantico si pu proficuamente attingere da Cottini, Linguaggio erotico, 26ss.
8 Le altre occorrenze sono 2,5; 3,5.10; 5,8 e 7,7. Anche la forma verbale ricorre 7 volte, 3 nel
primo capitolo (1,3.4.7) e 4 nel terzo (3,1.2.3.4); inoltre da osservare che, se si escludono le prime
due occorrenze, tutte le altre volte si ripete un costrutto che ha un carattere alquanto formulare, e
cio yv.pn. : hb"ha
] V" < (colui che lanima mia ama sempre ovviamente espresso da lei), che probabilmente ricopre anche qualche funzione stilistico-metrica. Sicuramente la densit semantica del
verbo nelle prime due occorrenze (la prima riferita alle giovani, fanciulle in et non coniugate,
solo qui e in Ct 6,8 al plurale allinterno di tutto il VT cf. Gn 24,16.28.43; Es 2,8; Pr 30,19; la
famosa profezia di Is 7,14, se si escludono le tre occorrenze, che completano il loro novero totale,
Sal 46,1 concernente il titolo, Sal 68,26 nel contesto del corteo processionale, e il problematico 1Cr
15,20 in relazione a uno scenario simile di corteo) in cui si allude a una attrattiva fisico-sensuale ed
emotiva, per cos dire, provvisoria (senza una o la vera storia damore), dimensione che, bench
condivisa naturalmente dallamata, si differenzia dalla natura dellamore di lei, che implica una
corrispondenza e unappartenenza assolute e definitive nei confronti di chi amato, e non pu non
essere amato (da tutte) a ragione (Ct 1,4c). Non mi risulta che si sia notata la quasi totale assenza
di una qualche attribuzione espressiva diretta o meno del lessico in questione a lui. Se si eccettua
lapostrofazione di lui a lei in 7,7 in un contesto particolare, un tale silenzio quasi totale di lui che
non pronuncia mai esplicitamente la parola amore o parole della sua gamma semantica (anche se
non chiaro ma 2,7 e 3,5 vanno dal contesto attribuite a lei) dovrebbe significare che lazione rappresentata focalizzata decisivamente su di lei e fatta interpretare in primo piano da lei non per un
femminismo ante litteram, poco conciliante con la cultura del tempo e in caso poco rilevante per
esaltare e far risaltare la potenza dellamore proprio in chi ne pare comunemente debole rispetto
allaltro o semplicemente e convenzionalmente, quindi obbligatamente, al seguito dellaltro, ma
anche e soprattutto perch chi veramente pu in un tale contesto (quello infinito e assolutamente
decisivo dellamore) la donna la quale sa declinare in tutte le dimensioni e far vibrare in tutte le
sue corde pi recondite lamore in s stesso, non solo in momenti gioiosi e deliziosi ma anche e
forse soprattutto in quelli penosi e sofferti. In altre parole chi sa ricercare, conoscere e servire lAmo-

58

Vittorio Ricci

mitare con una certa precisione il corpus letterario e confinare come proemio i vv.
1,12,3 e come epilogo 8,8-14. Il termine svolge una specie di inclusione demarcante linizio e la fine del poema per afferrare la valenza originaria, pura ed eterna
dellAmore (senza inizio e senza fine), che passa anche e primariamente attraverso
lattrazione fisico-emotiva ed estetico-immaginativa, ma non per questo necessariamente sessuale. Il proemio e lesordio come in un dramma, ma anche come in
una drammatizzazione elegiaca dagli aspetti epici, lirici, epitalamici e idilliaci,
contengono la descrizione realistica, storica, anche se con accenti simbolico-allegorici, della sorella socialmente relazionata, in cui trova espressione anche il
contorno della valenza economico-istituzionale e finanziario-familiare, che allusa con limmagine aulica (letterariamente stilizzata e simbolicamente raffinata)
della vigna e della sua custodia (1,6; 8,12) in forma quasi perfettamente corrispondente, tale da costituire con lucida chiarezza, sebbene ornata dei fregi metaforici
propri della poesia, lunit del tema del desiderio amoroso. Le rispondenze sono
diverse, di cui enumeriamo rapidamente solo: a) il contrasto tra lautocoscienza di
lei e letichettatura sociale e domestica, rispettivamente simbolizzate in 1,6 dallabbronzatura e in 8,8 dalla piccolezza di et9; b) la proclamazione di lei, di non cure lei che, bench proprio lei ami, il caso di dirlo, pu farsi vera discepola dellamato (Ct 8,2)
nellamore stesso e per amore semplicemente. Tuttavia, la presenza dellamato anche nella sua
corporeit rappresenta e sostiene il canto e lincanto di amore di lei dandogli effettivamente corpo.
9 Sarebbe miopia interpretativa non notare e strabismo esegetico travisare la portata incisiva
degli impedimenti o condizionamenti sociali e culturali contrassegnati da un maschilismo e potenziale misoginismo dellepoca, inclusa listituzione della poligamia, per questo il Cantico nasconde
o mirabilmente sublima una vena eversiva e sovversiva, ma non di contrapposizione o di denuncia secondo dettami da una coscienza che militi in senso sociale alla maniera contemporanea, o che
lotti per affermare principi come critica positiva e quasi giuridico-teologica della poligamia in favore della monogamia quale simbolo dellamore di Dio per il suo popolo (F. Crsemann, fr
Salomo? Salomo und die Interpretation des Hohenliedes, in F.L. Hossfeld - L. SchwienhorstSchnberger [ed.], Das Manna fllt auch heute noch. Beitrge zur Geschichte und Theologie des
Alten, Ersten Testaments. Festschrift fr Erich Zenger [HBS 44], Freiburg - Basel - Wien 2004,
141-157) o della uguaglianza dei sessi per una rivendicazione di tipo femminista in favore della
dignit della donna; il tono anche burlesco e grottesco che velatamente e garbatamente, di gusto
certamente, accenna a tali limitazioni e costrizioni convenzionali e istituzionali, e la sottile ironia
spingono a pensare che lamore resiste invincibilmente e non si pu costringere a nullaltro che a
s, e nemmeno pu essere contaminato da nulla; lamore capace di rimanere intatto nonostante
tutto e tutti e nonostante soprattutto le limitatezze anche sensitive, sensuali, passionali e psicologiche
dei due che (si) esprimono lamore e vi vengono espressi nella loro autenticit antropologico-creaturale che non pu risultare da una elaborazione culturale, ma universalmente permanente in ogni
tempo e in ogni cultura. Lironico, che si colora anche di drammatico e quasi di tragico, tende pi a
evidenziare il travaglio interiore e laffanno intimo dei due che sono continuamente sollecitati non
ad attrarsi semplicemente e a vivere una passione per quanto travolgente e irresistibile possa presentarsi loro, ma a celebrare la loro stessa essenza e la loro stessa valenza esistenziale in cui si riconoscono e non possono non riconoscersi, e di conseguenza conoscersi in quella esclusivit che
non disprezzo delle altre dimensioni esistenziali e culturali, ma rappresenta la loro illuminazione
e integrazione o pu essere, a seconda dei generi delle realt cui si riferisce, una loro purificazione,
anche se a un altro livello. Non si tratta affatto di crearsi un mondo dellamore in contrapposizione
o in alternativa a quello sociale e quotidiano (la descrizione dellessere vestiti dovrebbe rappresen-

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

59

stodire la propria vigna (1,6; 8,12), esclusivamente sua e non cedibile (custodibile)
come caparra di un bene da investire economicamente o materialmente anche se
ci si presenterebbe come avvenuto secondo lenunciazione in 8,12bc, bench
sorvegliata da custodi esternamente imposti, senza scalfire affatto linestimabile
preziosit della vigna, che rimane descritta come intatta ; c) la rispondenza
(immaginaria) tra linvito di lei perch il re la introduca nel suo proprio interno
in 1,4 e il sentirsi introdotta effettivamente nella misteriosa casa del vino in 2,4,
toponimi che dovrebbero svelarsi in qualche modo con il luogo del concepimento e della nascita di lui in 8,5b in contrasto con quello della madre di lei in 3,4b e
rievocato in 8,2a10; d) il contrasto tra la domanda di lei per ricercare lui (1,7) e la
richiesta di lui a lei di fargli sentire la sua voce (8,13), in un contesto in cui si allude alla presenza di enigmatici compagni, nel primo caso implicitamente con la riposta e nel secondo esplicitamente con una locuzione incidentale per unintenziotare il mondo reale dei ruoli sociali, mentre quella dellessere svestiti il mondo utopico alternativo
con un ruolo e una situazione relazionale in cui si applicano le regole damore fuori delle altre
regole come giustapposte o magari contrapposte (H. Viviers, Clothed and Unclothed in the Song
of Songs, OTE 12 [1999] 609-622), ma di trasformare questo in quello con una continua trasfigurazione, perch il mondo e soprattutto il proprio mondo diventino il mondo dellamore, che regola a s stesso, bench una simile attitudine risulti sempre utopica nella sua realizzazione ultima e
completa, ma soprattutto per la naturale condizione dei due che sperimentano nella tensione somatico-fisico-psicologica un ritardo, una incompletezza dinamica che vale come una pienezza,
bench in pari tempo sempre dilazionata e differita e differibile, ma anche e soprattutto ci che li
precede e li sovrasta, e che si pu chiamare il loro amore che con il suo desiderio li sollecita a raggiungersi e a trovarsi per perdersi di nuovo ineluttabilmente, perch lamore li eccede sempre e li
tocca con la sua pienezza da diventare per loro e in loro ancora desiderabilit inesauribile e al contempo completamente esaustiva in s stessa, amore desiderato e desiderante che si fruisce tutto
eppure non si fruisce mai inesauribilmente.
10 Sul movimento della introduzione (con o senza simbolismo sessuale), presente nei quattro contesti richiamati sopra, si pu evidenziare che alquanto movimentato e slittante, come
se le immagini si sovrapponessero, si spostassero continuamente, si mostrassero evanescenti
creando volutamente una loro rappresentazione onirica, in riferimento sia al soggetto introducente sia al luogo. Si pu genericamente evincere che lintuizione sottesa a questo elemento alquanto plastico, la necessit di tratteggiare unazione (dramma) reciproca, che deve essere assolutamente tale non si pu introdurre chi non lo vuole, poich non varrebbe, si falsificherebbe,
per cui lintroducente e lintrodotto non sono in effetti distinguibili in quanto a volont e libert
nel desiderio di entrare nella stanza dellunione che al contempo rimane evocativit desiderante
di un entrarvi sempre, di un esservi entrati da sempre per la magia della forza desiderativa
dellamore vero. Ci che conta veramente in tutto questo introdursi e al contempo effettivo non
introdursi, il destare(-destarsi) nellidentit autentica e originaria delle proprie persone, in ci
che si in s stessi per laltro senza pi veli o schermi di sorta, come lei afferma in 8,5b, poich
non ci sono stanze ma si esistenzialmente e simbolicamente sotto il melo come toponimo in
cui lui viene concepito e partorito dalla madre; lidentit in cui ci si trova e ci si conosce senza
sovrastrutture o sovrapposizioni, lamore, che, simboleggiato botanicamente con il melo (cf.
la comparazione dellamato al melo in Ct 2,3 e il desiderio di lei di sedere alla sua ombra che
richiama la preposizione sotto riferita a melo in 8,5b), si coglie nella reciprocit di una cooriginariet e in un con-generarsi, senza cui la nascita fisiologica di entrambi rimarrebbe irrisolta, mero sonno umbratile e irrealizzabile, mera identit anagrafica e mera convenzione sociale, per quanto necessario e significativo si voglia intendere tutto ci.

60

Vittorio Ricci

ne chiara di richiamo in questo secondo contesto si conclude cos alla fine in


modo da svelare il luogo mitico-immaginario del loro incontro, enfatizzato con una
variazione toponomastica surreale e ingegnosa, nonch raffinatissima quasi artata
e barocca, tale da rendere diafano e insieme sfuggente un nitido cenno di atmosfera evasiva e magica (eccedente una qualsiasi toponomastica realistica lunico
topos dellamore lintimit inaccessibile dei due animi, non riducibile a un mero
intimismo emotivo , ma non per questo toponomastica meno vera e trasparente di
realt, anzi capace di narrare lunica autentica realt, a dispetto di quanto superficialmente e ordinariamente trapeli o si propini).
Contenutisticamente si predispone una triade espressiva sul desiderio damore: a) linvocazione del bacio; b) la sua irrealizzabilit o mera desiderabilit (in
nessun testo si accenna a un tale gesto effettivamente compiuto); c) labbandono nellaltro e lesigenza allusa di ricercare ancora il bacio pi per la sua valenza simbolica che per leffetto emotivo e psico-erotico, sebbene non escluso,
anzi in qualche modo supposto e convalidato nella sua significazione effettiva
dalla pregnanza figurata, culturale e ideale o idealizzata, di cui viene caricato il
gesto in genere. La natura desiderativa dellamore, espressa e svelata con la
sollecitazione del bacio, che funge da plastico sigillo di appartenenza assoluta,
si raffigura come immagine del sempre e mai raggiunto, del gi da sempre e
del non ancora per sempre11. La storicit degli amanti in s stessa non pu che
11 Il verbo qV;n" (baciare) abbastanza frequente nellAT ma in un predominio quasi assoluto
di gesto da realizzarsi in una relazione familiare (Gn 27,24, Isacco invita Giacobbe, travestito da
Esa, di baciarlo; 1Re 20,41, Eliseo dice a Elia di andare a baciare i genitori prima di seguirlo) o di
parentela (29,11, Giacobbe bacia Rachele perch sua parente; 29,13, Labano bacia Giacobbe, suo
nipote) o di amicizia (1Sm 20,41, il bacio reciproco di Gionata e Davide); vi sono diversi esempi in
cui il baciare viene sarcasticamente stigmatizzato perch rivolto agli idoli come segno di adorazione di false divinit (1Re 19,18, baciare con la bocca Baal in senso di adorazione e in concomitanza dellinginocchiarvisi dinanzi; Os 12,2); famosa lespressione della verit e della giustizia che
si baceranno in Sal 85,11. In Pr 2,13 si paragona il baciare sulle labbra a una risposta retta, ma la
seconda e ultima occorrenza in 7,13 in un suo contesto 7,8-37, decisamente negativo, si descrive
lirretire del giovane ingenuo da parte della donna adultera in abiti di prostituta e di straniera con
lusinghe amorose che per alcuni elementi richiamano il Cantico, quali la notte, il luogo urbano
delle strade e delle piazze, i profumi tuttavia, sono abissali le differenze che qui non possiamo
esaustivamente enumerare e analizzare, ma che sostanzialmente nel poema pseudosalomico sono
inserite, modificate e trattate letterariamente per scoraggiare una sua lettura triviale di tal genere o
di distogliere da una possibile impressione siffatta che potrebbe suscitare in un lettore sprovveduto,
tanto vero che la donna del Cantico, a differenza di quella dei Proverbi, non sposata, e se si
dovesse confondere superficialmente o apparentemente con una prostituta, si dimostra che non lo ,
perch il suo dedicarsi allamore e a un unico amato soltanto non deriva da una intenzione edonistica o da una necessit mercenaria, come si chiarisce energicamente in 8,7, e non lo pu essere perch
non si attira o adesca maliziosamente o ingannevolmente un giovane qualsiasi per una momentanea
e fugace avventura erotico-sessuale. Si deve ancora necessariamente integrare che il sostantivo
plurale tAQyVIG. si trova solo in Pr 27,6 concernenti la fallacia dei baci dei nemici (cf. 2Sm 20,9 in
cui si narra lepisodio di Ioab che uccide Amasa dopo averlo baciato). Tuttavia il costrutto con cui
si unisce il sostantivo (rarissimo, quasi hapax) e il verbo (nel senso specifico altrettanto rarissimo,
se non addirittura hapax anche rispetto alla sua seconda e ultima occorrenza in 8,1 in cui si sfuma

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

61

veicolare limmagine perfetta dellamore desiderato e farla pre-sentire nel sogno o nella intimit pi profonda dellanimo e quindi come se fosse ottenuto ci
che continuamente si cerca e non si pu non cercare ancora e per sempre, cio
la propria integrit completa che non pu essere che amorosa non per una
supina coazione a ripetere psicologica secondo lanalisi lacaniana del linguaggio assente del desiderio, ma per il dramma, lazione effettiva e prevalentemente inappellabile dellamore stesso che si attinge nella sua desiderabilit
permanente, anche e non solo nelle strutture inconsce dellesistenza umana si
ricerca continuamente lazione assoluta dellamore stesso che consiste, cio,
nella propria perfezione, non pi soggetta eroticamente al desiderio il che
storicamente, umanamente, terrenamente impossibile, e in qualche modo, anzi
nellunico vero modo possibile compiuto dal prodigio divino dellAmore stesso.
Implicitamente si deve intendere anche la conoscenza intellettiva circa lAmore,
che essenziale, giacch nulla amabile se non si conosce cosa esso nella
verit e cosa va amato in esso e per esso.
Nel corpus del poema si vuole drammatizzare una simile condizione anche
paradossale di illimitatezza dellamore nella sua assolutezza e la sua compiuta
declinazione nella finitezza e nella fragilit degli amanti che comunque non la
alterano n la compromettono, ma la custodiscono abilitati da ci che custodiscono nel viverlo in tutto e per tutto. Lamore in cui essi due stessi sono nascosti e custoditi, assume il volto di ciascuno dei due e parimenti il vero
volto del loro fondersi in ununit sponsale, bench non si possa ridurre a un
tale suo volto umano. La situazione che pi di un dramma damore, una
drammatizzazione dellamore in s stesso e per s stesso, nel corpus del testo
si pu dividere in due parti (quasi quantitativamente uguali, 47 versetti la prima, 42 la seconda) se al vocabolo hb"h]a; (amore) scelto per una prima demarcazione testuale si assume insieme al participio tl;Ax (languida, malata, debole
o ferita) nelle uniche due occorrenze 2,5 e 5,8. Tale osservazione da sola potrebbe risultare insufficiente per una delimitazione strutturale. Tuttavia, va notato immediatamente che una simile affezione da stimarsi come permanente
e irrimediabile, cio congenita e qualificativa dellamore stesso (la ferita ci
che al contempo in s stessa la guarigione definitiva ed efficace, non si
guariti se non al contempo feriti), quanto viene provato e vissuto dallamata
( ci che essenzialmente la rende tale). Si tratta di una dichiarazione esclusila semantica in un rinvio pi comune di bacio fraterno ha' fratello come appellativo con cui
lei apostrofa lui, si trova solo qui ) con morfologia ottativa del verbo e in qualche modo imperativa del primo verso pseudosalomonico anche allinterno dello stesso testo in esame e il suo stagliarsi con imparagonabile vigoria plastica come simbolo e sigla o sigillo di quanto si vuole narrare,
indicano il vero ritmo e il vero clima di tutto il poema, e cio il desiderio damore e il suo ineluttabile imperativo che coinvolgono la totalit e linterezza della creatura umana. Lamore rappresenta
il vero e unico imprescindibile imperativo categorico in cui si gioca il valore assoluto dellessere
umano in tutta la sua realt mondana e ultramondana.

62

Vittorio Ricci

vamente cosciente e autoconoscitiva, che definisce s lamata in s stessa, ma


che non pu non avere riflessi decisivi e determinativi sullidentit dellamato12, per cui lamore in cui lamato/amata si riconoscono uguali e diversi, assolutamente uniti eppure distanti, e rimane inappagato e in questa inappagabilit si placa beandosi e inebriandosi di questa sua insaziabilit in cui, comunque, si realizza la sua vera pace.
Una tale proposta si fonda per su un elemento testuale che pare del tutto
obiettivo e sicuro, e cio sulla prima di due espressioni emblematiche posta
subito dopo la prima dichiarazione della malattia damore in 2,6-7 e indicante
plasticamente il gesto di lui che abbraccia lei; la seconda espressione quella
dellinvito alle figlie di Gerusalemme di non destare lamore, si trova in forma
identica in una seconda volta in 3,5, e con una leggera modificazione (lassenza
12 La debolezza, che non dipende solo dallassenza-presenza dellamato (cf. Cottini, Il linguaggio erotico, 29) e viene attribuita a lei e rimane inespressa per lui, va ravvisata in qualche
modo in quella dichiarazione messa in bocca a lei in 7,11, in cui si asserisce che il termine singolare
hQ"WVT> (istinto, inclinazione, desiderio) che si ritrova nelle altre due sole volte in Gn 3,16, riferito
alla prima donna nel contesto del suo peccato, e 4,7, riferito a Caino in un contesto in cui si nomina
esplicitamente il peccato. In entrambi le occorrenze si aggiunge il verbo lV:m" (dominare, governare,
regolare) che non ha univocamente senso positivo nellAT (non in genere attribuito a Dio se non
in contesti liturgico-eucologici cf. Sal 22,29; 59,14; 66,7; 89,10; 103,16, confermato da 1Cr 29,12
e 2Cr 20,6, le due uniche occorrenze di Is 40,10 e 63,19 sono in qualche modo originali a differenza
delle altre tre uniche occorrenze protoisaiane, in cui lattribuzione non a Dio, cf. Is 3,12; 19,4,
28,14, e se si esclude anche lunico caso eccezionale di attribuzione a Dio in Gdc 8,22 per esprimere il rifiuto di un regnante che non sia Dio; le altre due uniche occorrenze nei Salmi si trovano in
106,41 e nel celeberrimo Salmo 8 al v. 7). Si deve osservare innanzitutto che questo lessema non
ricorre mai nel Cantico (forse alluso con il titolo regale o salomonico attribuito allamato) e tanto
meno nel verso in cui presente laltro termine in esame. Listinto-desiderio di lui verso di lei non
da dominare o da governare, perch nel dominio incontaminato della loro fusione ed effusione
damore, riguarda ci che conviene a lui, e se proprio si deve richiamare una qualche vulnerabilit
o fragilit faticosa, questa congenita e originaria, costitutiva dellessere appartenenza totale e assoluta di lei perch non si tratta di mera istintualit o di automatismo fisiologico, ma di ricerca di una
identit, quella fondativa e determinativa che non pu prescindere (non da sempre prescissa) da
quella di lei, identit che non data meccanicamente, ma richiede una corrispondenza esistenziale
senza riserve e compromessi. Tuttavia questa ricerca essenziale di identit necessariamente vissuta nella drammaticit di una condizione mai completamente adeguata anche da chi dovrebbe essere
il dominante o il dominatore in questo contesto di unione sponsale, anzi nel quale il dominare e
lessere dominati, lessere feriti o lessere guariti sono simultanei e in ultima analisi coincidenti,
poich occorre riprendersi sempre insieme, e riprendersi (in) quellamore (assoluto) che traspare e
si vela, si compie ed esige di essere re-iniziato per la sua potenza (magari anche stra-potenza con
ricadute seducenti e vulneranti) che tutto pervade incessantemente. Lassenza del verbo dominare
stato gi notato cf. Cottini, Il linguaggio erotico, 27 nota 7 e spiegato con il mero intercambio damore tra i due partners, come se si trattasse di una esclusione voluta; invece da vedervi una
inclusione implicita, perch implica la regalit (riflessa da quella divina) e insieme lesercizio sempre rischioso e sdrucciolevole della ricerca di amore che richiede per limmediatezza istintiva un
investimento psico-fisico e totale a tutti i livelli, quindi una capacit di dominarsi reciproco che
continua tensione di elevazione a ci che si davvero e si rischia di perdere o offuscare per forze e
dinamiche inconsce e travolgenti, basilari ma non immediatamente assecondabili se si vuole cercare
lamore nella sua verit completa e nella sua integra sapienzialit.

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

63

del sintagma per le gazzelle e le cerve della campagna) la terza e ultima volta
in 8,4 preceduta questultima volta dalla suddetta espressione dellabbraccio.
quasi indubitabile che ci sia una certa pi o meno programmatica intenzionalit
nella collocazione di queste tre espressioni: a) la prima volta insieme (2,5-7) in
modo da formare una pericope quasi a s e di conseguenza in modo da esporre
quanto si vuole descrivere e rappresentare lungo il poema, cio la ricerca affannata e affannosa (dalla valenza essenziale e olistica nella sua realt psico-spirituale), ma ineludibile e appagante ad ogni livello dei due per lamore che provano reciprocamente; b) la seconda occorrenza esclusiva (senza le altre) della
terza espressione relativa al non destare lamore in 3,5 che conclude la prima
descrizione di lei che smarrisce lamato, e in cui lei afferma la volont di non
lasciarlo finch non lo avr condotto nella casa della sua propria madre per richiamare la dimensione erotico-onirica che coinvolge ancora i due; c) la seconda e ultima esclusiva occorrenza della prima espressione per richiamare lo stato
di languore, ma anche la speciale patologicit (la dimensione umana, mortale in
cui si anima e si contrae lamore infinito e divino, che rende questa sua stessa
debolezza in lei ma vale anche per lui la forza invincibile e immortale
dellamarsi autentico e genuino) perch la ricerca, specialmente dellamata, non
terminata, non trova ancora la sua naturale conclusione, che avviene proprio
nei versetti che seguono la seconda e ultima occorrenza della prima espressione
e la terza e ultima occorrenza della seconda espressione in 8,3-4; d) la ripetizione esclusiva (senza la prima espressione) della seconda e terza espressione in
8,3-4 (la seconda locuzione nella sua seconda e ultima occorrenza per richiamare la prima sua occorrenza, la terza espressione nella sua terza e ultima occorrenza per richiamare anche quel primo smarrimento la suggestione che la
terza occorrenza della terza espressione in 8,4 vuole richiamare la sua seconda
occorrenza, confermata, a quanto pare inequivocabilmente, dalla proposizione
interrogativa successiva che in entrambi i passi presente in forma identica, le
uniche due volte, al di l delle differenze dei contesti e dei riferimenti immediati, e con il trascurato richiamo al deserto, che il vero simbolo del luogo in cui
idealmente e drammaticamente si ambienta la narrazione poetico-drammatica
dei due, rispettivamente in 3,7 e 8,6).
Che tali richiami formali e tematici non si possano non definire intenzionali
e strutturanti, in qualche modo formulari e punti di riferimento nellorditura di
una trama cos dispersiva e articolata, centripeta a pi riprese, non davvero
dubitabile, anche perch si indirizzano sempre alle sintomatiche e apostrofate
figlie di Gerusalemme, che in qualche modo rappresentano la coscienza sociale di lei ma anche ci che si vorrebbe magari persino utopisticamente per
tale . Linvito della sposa alle figlie di Gerusalemme a non destare lamore
finch non lo desideri, in qualunque modo lo si voglia interpretare, si contrappone alla dichiarazione in 8,5 in cui la sposa annuncia di avere destato lamato

64

Vittorio Ricci

in modo che quellinvito trova la sua soluzione, per cui si pu evincere che lo
spazio psico-onirico, confermato da altre informazioni tutte concordi e concentrate sulla allusione alla dimensione notturna del tempo (2,17, in cui si allude
alla notte con parafrasi altamente poetiche e deliziose; 3,1, in cui si nomina
esplicitamente la notte; 3,8, in cui si accenna al terrore notturno; 4,6, con
delle variazioni di vario tipo si ripete la stessa immagine allusiva della notte di
2,7; 5,2, in cui lamata dichiara che stava dormendo mentre il suo cuore era
desto, bench lespressione sia poco chiara per indicare il tratto notturno del
giorno, per il pi immediatamente associabile; 7,12, linvito a pernottare in
mezzo agli alberi di cipro inequivocabilmente chiarito per significare il tempo
notturno dallinvito ad attendere lalba per andare nelle vigne). Allora non si pu
non evincere che la descrizione della ricerca e dellincontro amorosi trovano
una unit temporale nella notte con una pregnanza pi simbolica che materiale,
pi esistenziale che attinente alla scansione temporale della giornata, mentre
lintroduzione (1,2-4) coincidente con linizio della ricerca stessa e tratteggiata
come un passato prossimo che comunque continua ad agire nel presente, il
meriggio (1,7) in cui lei non sa ancora dove trovare lui, indicazione che non
sar pi ripetuta, anzi la situazione capovolta in 6,1 poich le figlie di Gerusalemme, probabili (richiamate nel verso immediatamente precedente), chiedono a lei dove se ne andato il suo amato, la quale risponde dichiarando di
saperlo in 6,2 e la conclusione dellincontro si rinvierebbe temporalmente
allalba (7,13, il momento in cui lamata desta lamato in 8,5). Lunit spaziale
quindi non un luogo fisico, localizzabile geograficamente, ma la vita stessa e
la sua misteriosit, a volte o intrinsecamente tenebrosa e dai mille pericoli interni ed esterni; lo spazio di azione rappresentato dalle persone che i due realmente raffigurano e simbolizzano, bench si rievochino paesaggi e luoghi reali
pi o meno intensamente trasfigurati e rarefatti, che comunque contribuiscono
a delineare la fisionomia realistica di un esistere unico e specifico, come quello tratteggiato per i due amanti.
Quanto evidenziato, sembra sufficiente a scoraggiare una interpretazione
esclusivamente e pedissequamente realistica dei riferimenti spazio-temporali o
dei fatti descritti come eventi effettivamente accaduti, e a denunciare forse a
ragione come abuso questo tentativo esegetico di scorgere o ritrovare momenti
fattuali; ci che accade veramente il desiderio damore, desiderio che implica
intrinsecamente e strutturalmente la rivelazione intima e divina, mistica ed estatica, indescrivibile e adombrata nella sua verit irraggiungibile, sempre colta
eppure sempre differita attraverso licona dellaltro, dellalterit, segno tangibile dellintangibile infinit amorosa. Si decanta la storia delle storie, lessenza
psico-spirituale della creatura umana, immersa completamente, lietamente,
amenamente, ma anche mortalmente, angosciosamente, sovente travolta
dallindomabile potenza di ci che rende vera ogni creaturalit capace di com-

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

65

prendere lAmore che la anima e la pervade. Si inneggia a ci che trascende e


trasfigura lesistere tutto nelle sue ambientazioni quotidiane, naturali, bio-fisiologiche, innestate in quel contorno meramente convenzionale o culturale, finanche religioso-rituale o politico, per giungere anche tramite lintuizione di un
solo istante alla purezza infinita del teologico circa lAmore stesso, per non
lasciarlo sfuggire per sempre o rendersi per lo pi irricevibile nella sua intatta
verit. tutto ci quanto si viene ad asserire solennemente nei due distici con
note opposte (positivo-negativo) e con una allure di anticlimax, ma concettualmente identiche circa la valenza assoluta, insostituibile, indelebile e indomabile dellamore in s stesso, introdotta dalla promessa di eterno amore (8,6b-7).
Attrazione e fuga/compagnia e solitudine
Lesordio (1,2-4) esprime con una concitazione emotiva assoluta, ma anche
limpida, la richiesta insopprimibile della presenza fisica dellaltro e lattrazione
quasi fatale della sua assenza. Lessenza dellinnamoramento come inizio originario e innato del desiderio amoroso si consuma nella memoria trasognata
dallaltro e trasognante laltro, nella percezione che, come in un ricordo remoto
e al limite della esprimibilit, sogna e rende reale laltro, anzi effettivamente
presente, pi di quanto sia capace di rappresentare e suscitare la sua presenza
fisica accanto. la solitudine in cui lei si ritrova inesorabilmente, anche coattivamente per motivi sociali e culturali, a renderla pi percettibilmente vera compagna, vera corrispondente inscindibile, a creare in modo inconfondibile la
compagnia indelebile e ininterrotta, vitalmente e unicamente propria.
Tale orizzonte descrittivo permette di comprendere la straordinaria grazia e
preziosit dellinizio del Cantico, che in sintesi anticipa tutta la drammatizzazione e vi si svela come la sua vera fine, rievoca inizialmente e continuamente
ci che alla fine gi compiuto e compiuto da sempre, in una tensione prolettica e incoativa che irrompe sorgiva e indomabile solo nella fase terminale, ma
retrospettivamente, quanto espresso con unapertura totale in 8,14: linvito
esortativo alla fuga e allallontanarsi13 per ripetere, ri-esprimere, ri-significare
13 La chiusa con xr;B' (hapax nel Cantico), che per quanto si possano ricercare valenze semantiche
ulteriori, non pu non assumersi in quella principale e quasi esclusiva del fuggire per scampare da un
pericolo in modo generalmente furtivo e per nascondersi da qualcuno che insegue (basti qui citare le tre
uniche occorrenze nei Salmi, in 3,1 in cui si menziona la fuga di Davide da Assalonne, in 57,1 in cui si
menziona la fuga sempre di Davide per questa volta da Saul, in 138,7 in cui in forma interrogativa si
professa limpossibilit di fuggire da Dio). Comunque non si pu non comprendere in un significato
univoco e sostanziale di allontanamento e in qualche modo di rifugio. Lesortazione di allontanarsi rapidamente e furtivamente non pu non implicare anche un allontanarsi da lei per i paralleli che illuminano se si contrappongono (e non meramente giustappongono) al verso finale in questione. La notte sta
terminando o appena terminata e con essa anche il tempo dellincontro (effettivo o puramente imma-

66

Vittorio Ricci

quelloriginariet desiderante, che implacabilmente si placa di non placarsi eppure sosta come appagata, poich lAmore insieme vita e morte, possesso
dellaltro e sua perdita nella persistenza anamnestica dellattrazione verso laltro, non concretizzabile, non compibile n una volta per tutte n mai, ma solo
nel suo apparente placarsi illusorio, che comunque prende come se fosse compiuto, a motivo proprio delle concrete situazioni creaturali sempre mancanti e
inadatte tali da realizzarsi sempre solo nellaspetto mortale e in un apice conginario e ideale, che comunque non pu non implicare una qualche condizione di conoscenza reale,
poco importa e poco influente sulla composizione), inizia di nuovo il tempo della veglia e della presenza incombente e coercitiva dei figli della madre di lei, ma soprattutto linesauribilit del desiderio
amoroso stato momentaneamente esaurita o interrotta quasi appagata tutta o assaporata, listante del
desiderio della separazione ricollega e recupera con la stessa istantaneit impellente il desiderio del
bacio in tutta la sua indescrivibile intensit dellinizio. Gli aspetti analogici in cui le apparenti, comunque rilevanti, somiglianze rinviano alle decisive differenze, tra 8,14 e 2,17 richiederebbero unanalisi
dettagliata e appassionante. In breve, lunico elemento significativo in comune il paragone tra lui
(esplicitamente apostrofato in 2,17) e la gazzella o cucciolo di cervo per la connotazione della velocit
(la velocit dellamore e quindi dellamato non pu essere di una immediatezza irrefrenabile e incoercibile) che non pu non contenere laltro richiamo toponomastico-simbolico delle montagne (differenziato dai due diversi nomi, elemento che pare solo stilistico-formale e finemente allusivo a una identificazione con sfumature dettate dalla diversa situazione psicologica dei due momenti montagne che
comunque simboleggiano un luogo di elevatezza e di altezza persino vertiginosa). Anche questo elemento fortemente identico riserva una differenza sintattica, mentre in 2,17 lespressione posta come
appellativo e apposizione del vocativo amato mio, in 8,14 si pone come esortazione che in qualche
modo integra il senso del fuggi il costrutto coordinato dei due imperativi non va inteso come una
formulazione paratattica da potersi tradurre ad es. fuggi ad essere simile poich il secondo imperativo
non esprime la finalit del primo, ma casomai la sua condizione remota e imprescindibile, e perch il
secondo imperativo indica piuttosto lesortazione a una continuazione ad essere ci che lamato stato
finora e deve continuare ad essere. Emergerebbe un problema che non mi risulta presente nellesegesi:
sui monti va coordinato con i rispettivi verbi volgersi in 2,17 e fuggire in 8,14 oppure allimmagine della gazzella o del cucciolo di cervo che si trovano, vivono sui monti in genere in modo da
indirizzare linterpretazione sintattica pi per un senso qualitativo che locativo. Questa immagine comunque trova la sua anticipazione in 2,8b-9a in cui si descrive il primo arrivo dellamato, che salta sui
monti (e sulle colline) perch da paragonarsi alle figure teromorfiche espresse subito dopo in 9a. Le
locuzioni di 2,17 e 8,14 del paragone teromorfico e del luogo montuoso, che esse tendono a comporre
in ununica descrizione (invertendole ed escludendo il richiamo alle colline per maggior concisione e
introducendo simbolici nomi ai monti per unenfatizzazione allegorica), spingono a riferire lindicazione toponomastica allimmagine teromorfica e non ai verbi delle proposizioni. In 2,17 lesortazione
preceduta da una connotazione temporale (non ripresa in 8,14) nel contesto quando prima in modo
particolare e unico si accenna al destare lamato (ma come ora non ci sono veri monti, non cerano
nemmeno vere ombre notturne prima). Che comunque linvito a fuggire o allontanarsi velocemente per
o prima della scomparsa delle ombre della notte, da intendersi come separazione da lei, confermato
da quanto premesso da lui come sua intenzione in 4,6. Sembra paradossale che un epitalamio si concluda con il separarsi degli sposi, ma nel canto pseudo salomonico non si tratta di carme nuziale e di
celebrazione matrimoniale tout court, esso invece la drammatizzazione, anche con motivi epitalamici, della sponsalit universale, di quelle dinamiche antropologiche e creaturali che fondano una o le
unioni matrimoniali, o piuttosto semplicemente il dramma (anche con accenti ironici) dellamore umano nella sua riverberazione divina a prescindere, almeno in modo diretto, dalle sue articolazioni istituzionali o sociali o di vissuto matrimoniale, per cos dire, non perch si vogliano stigmatizzare, ma
semplicemente perch non sono il tema del poema pseudosalomonico, come invece sono lo sfondo e il
motivo del racconto della creazione della donna in Gn 2,22-24.

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

67

templativo dellamarsi. Laltrettanto apparente antitesi bipolarizzante tra lurgenza dellessere attratti reciprocamente in un accompagnarsi esistenziale, ineluttabile e cosmico, oserei dire, persino fatale, e di rincorrersi quasi disperatamente e linevitabilit, anzi la necessit simultanea del rifuggirsi nel luogo immaginifico ed estatico, comunque elevato, dellAmore vero e della sua verit
esperita, vissuta e conosciuta senza riduttivismi o forme pi o meno limitative
di alcun genere.
Lo scenario drammatico listante estatico pi o meno cronologicamente
lungo o diluito in una durata temporale (ordinaria), che rievoca e illumina momenti, peripezie, imprese, fatiche pi psicologiche e interiori che fatti storici o
narrazioni di attitudini cerimoniali, sociali, individuali e di sensibilit dellepoca, bench non vengano disdegnati, anzi inseriti per una maggior enfatizzazione
del tema stesso nella sua pi alta puntualit espressiva, nel suo vertice di creativit assoluta, in ci che non affatto tematizzabile. Ne consegue che il corpus
del poema non altro che il pendant tra i due poli estremi, il travaglio eroticopatologico, levoluzione di unesperienza passionale immediata che da singolare viene trasfusa in una luce creativo-simbolica di universalit nelloriginalit e
nella radicale originalit della poesia, che tocca le fibre pi profonde e vitali
dellumanit. Si canta lamore umano, ci si incanta del suo mistero divino non
per una fruizione meramente estetica, ma per una comprensione pi penetrante
di esso, anzi di ci che esso dovrebbe rappresentarsi per chi si lascia rapire
dalla sua soavit impareggiabile e dalla sua prodigiosit che solo la poesia,
questa sola poesia pi precisamente, pu esprimere e proclamare con acuzie
sapienziale nel modo pi adeguato. LAmore nellinnamorarsi reciproco dei
due, ma soprattutto di lei, la pi vulnerabile e la pi debole, ma anche per questo
la pi forte ed eroica, la dominatrice e la soggiogatrice impareggiabile e indiscussa, cui, forte dellAmore appunto, anzi forte della sua totale debolezza
damore, che lascia trapelare anche la mortalit creaturale, nulla e nessuno possono opporre qualcosa di contrario, lunit del soggetto del dramma, che
nellistante del desiderio, che attrae e respinge in un movimento circolare di
perfezione sferica (perfezione esistenziale e ontologica, oserei dire), trova la sua
unit, altrettanto notevole artisticamente, di luogo e di tempo, poich tutto ci
che si narra dallinizio alla fine e di nuovo dalla fine allinizio anche letteralmente non altro che il rammemorare il passato e il suo commemorativo-celebrativo (liturgico?) ri-percorrere il desiderio erotico sempre creativo e dinamico, ma anche sempre affannoso e faticoso, e tuttavia stagliato e fissato nelle
parole auree del canto. Si contempla, in altri termini, linesauribile desiderio
amoroso insieme semplice e complesso, naturale e soprannaturale, fisico e metafisico, teorico e fenomenico, teso continuamente, con maggior o minor intensit emotivo-immaginativa e con differenti tensioni di gravit, con maggior o
minor misura di consapevolezza e resipiscenza, allinfinita e incontenibile im-

68

Vittorio Ricci

mensit dellAmore in persona, immune da ogni condizione di luogo e di tempo


e finanche, oserei dire, di storia.
Latmosfera di continua persistenza onirico-ottativa implicitamente indicata dal gi esaminato ritornello allinizio della sezione che abbiamo chiamato
corpus (v. 2,7), in cui si invita a non destare o ridestare lAmore finch non se
ne compiaccia e quasi alla fine (v. 8,4), sottolineato previamente o introdotto
dallaltro ritornello ripetuto ugualmente in questi due soli contesti, che disegna
le braccia di lui avvinghiate al corpo di lei crediamo che si tratti solo di proiezione immaginaria , e seguito solo in 8,5 dal ridestare lui da parte di lei sotto
il melo in cui lei desiderava sedere allombra di lui in 2,3, versetto in cui abbiamo posto il termine del proemio. Il ridestare laddove ci si era voluti addormentare, allegoresi di uno stato psichico particolare di ripercorso e di tragitto di
un vissuto esemplare e (ri)scoperto nei suoi risvolti pi reconditi e profondi, che
conduce a svelare lessenza dellAmore e linestimabile preziosit esistenziale
e creaturale, il vero fine letterario ed espositivo di tutto il poema, ci che si
potrebbe chiamare la morale o linsegnamento sapienziale, espresso in moduli linguistici parabolici e iperbolici in 8,6-7 (il termine ravvisato da noi del
corpus coincidente con quello dello stato onirico-immaginifico), in cui si sancisce metaforicamente la co-appartenenza assoluta, irrevocabile e irreversibile
dei due con una lucidit diafana da parte di lei, ma anche come ci che va continuamente rivivificato con il desiderio e la ricerca amorosa.
Il clima onirico-simbolico consente una struttura insieme anamnestica e
obliosa, conscia e inconscia, sciente e insciente, per cui il tempo un passato
sempre riproteso a un futuro senza vero futuro e senza vero passato in una sorta
di istante eterno grazie anche alle duttilit morfosintattiche e alle fluide
peformances semantiche del verbo ebraico e il luogo o i luoghi, che
continuamente si trasfigurano in simboli emblematici dellanimo e viventi segni
evocatori di ci che per la sua assoluta natura prima e ultima non pu avere
nessun vero luogo, indirizza decisamente a collocare il poema amoroso
nellinteriorit pi segreta e viva, pi ricca qualitativamente e vivificante di
indelebile arcana memoria della protagonista, nella quale si riflette quella di lui
cio lo stesso in-dividuo (unicit indivisibile) in una diversit di identit
costitutiva e costituente unica con una trasfigurazione completa e abbracciante
ogni cosa e ogni essere in unampiezza cosmica e universale. La memoria
intellettiva e ispirata di lei struttura i canti e articola una materia poetica e
simmetrica che d voce a ununit movimentata, vivace, persino istintiva e
variopinta, ununit autentica e drammatica di soggetto, tempo e luogo. Pare che
i canoni estetici della tragedia, come delineati da Aristotele, con finalit catartiche
pi o meno plausibili, siano per un verso allincirca rispettate o contemplate, ma
anche in qualche modo sconvolte per laltro verso, almeno per loro fissit di
canonicit stilistico-letteraria. Non si tratta di imitare la vita in alcuni suoi fatti

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

69

o situazioni pi funesti, raccapriccianti e destanti sentimenti di piet e terrore


con un respiro pi o meno universale, ma il fatto della vita con tutte le sue
implicazioni pi o meno imitabili e riproducibili secondo la naturale tecnica
della mimesi, di rappresentare ci che non affatto imitabile e rappresentabile
(intrattenibile o irriproducibile entro stratagemmi artistico-espressivo)14. La
causa di fondo va cercata nel fatto che non nellorizzonte del verosimile, ma
del vero e del vero assoluto in un contesto sapienziale, lunico contesto
possibile in cui il tema dellAmore rivelabile senza particolarismi, riduzionismi,
deformazioni, semplificazioni e prosaicizzazioni altrimenti inevitabili, con una
sapienzialit, quella sua propria e specifica, divinamente dettata o genialmente
ispirata.
Il v. 1,7 rappresenta il preludio assoluto dellopera pseudosalomonica: rivelare cosa sia il desiderio amoroso e indirettamente cosa sia lAmore stesso,
come e dove ricercarlo o riconoscerlo umanamente, anzi cosa vuol dire ricercare lAmore nellamato, una ricerca improntata essenzialmente sulla malattia
che mai pu guarire se non in s stessa e tramite s stessa (2,5; 5,8) e sulla guarigione che coincide con la malattia stessa (8,10cd) con una tensione irripetibile e sempre attiva come la vita stessa, che continuamente esposta al pericolo
di morte e continuamente al contempo rinsaldata, anzi malattia che gi sempre
guarigione, morte che gi sempre vita, naturalezza mortale e mondana che
gi vita immortale e ultramondana.
Il v. 5,8, che per la seconda e ultima volta contiene il verbo dgn, il verbo
dellannunciare, del rivelare, del dar notizia o far sapere, rivolto alle figlie di
Gerusalemme, le interlocutrici simboliche dellamata, la prima volta in 1,7,
rivolto direttamente allamato da ricercare e pur presente vividamente e realmente nel desiderio dellamata scioglie in due dittici o due sezioni di movimenti il corpus dellopera, poich la dichiarazione della malattia damore, con
cui si d inizio in 2,5, in qualche modo riceve la sua prima soluzione in un crescendo di desiderio per lamato assente o resosi tale, in 5,6-7 (lapice della
concitazione emotivo-intellettiva del pathos), gi trovato per certi versi, ma
come in un sogno o nel sogno durante il sonno vigile (5,2). Da 5,8 riparte il
secondo movimento o la seconda serie di movimenti, di descrizioni, di gesti e
situazioni per riprendere il tema dellintroduzione richiesto dallamata nella
casa allegorica dellamato, con cui si struttura louverture avviata con il desiderio del bacio, si realizza in 2,4, nonostante la metaforica variazione di appellativi e qualificazioni descrittive, ma in un modo improprio, immaturo, incom14 Non si trovano vere realizzazioni iconografiche del Cantico se non di qualche tratto assunto
piuttosto come spunto per dipinti di scene nuziali o di rappresentazioni spirituali mariane o cristiane
(cf. Ravasi, Il Cantico, 839-859); ma risulta alquanto impossibile una sua trasposizione cinematografica o teatrale o quantaltro poich il Cantico non possiede nulla confacente a tali forme artistiche
(ibid., 859-860).

70

Vittorio Ricci

piuto, per motivare il suo naturale e poetico sviluppo e compiutezza integrali in


8,1-5, in cui termina la tensione della seconda sezione in cui i temi trovano soluzione definitiva, anche se momentanea e nella fluidit della loro rievocazione
psico-spirituale, per giustificare, anzi rivelare la giusta prospettiva espositiva e
dottrinale dellAmore in 8,6-7. I temi per sono per un verso capovolti e per un
verso finalmente spiegati nella loro valenza simbolica: non pi il bacio richiesto dallamata nella segretezza del suo desiderio socialmente contrastato o controllato, esposto al pericolo della vergogna pubblica, ma la sua stessa incomprimibile iniziativa (8,1 rispetto a 1,2); lintroduzione ugualmente non pi richiesta per il desiderio di lei, ma intrapresa da lei sempre nel clima desiderativo, in
un luogo non pi solo immaginario e rievocativo (i vv. 1,16c-17 servono a enfatizzare plasticamente un contesto simbolico, non materiale), ma un luogo rievocante loriginario scenario pregno di valenza creaturale (la casa della madre),
come la vigna, e non pi nellipotetico luogo appartenente personalmente a
lui, ma nel luogo vero e proprio appartenente a lei, che non riceve pi lintroduzione ma la compie (8,2 rispetto a 2,3) sempre nellorizzonte del desiderio. Ma
tutto ci ancora come sogno, da cui lAmore (si) sveglia attraverso lamata
(nel)lamato in un modo originario e nativo, svelando cos in 2,5b il significato
metaforico del melo, cui lei rassomiglia lui, e che ora diviene simbolicamente lunico luogo originario, quello del suo concepimento genetico (8,5cd), perch l lui gi era da sempre e per sempre il suo lui secondo quanto lAmore
stesso ha dettato e destato (nel destarsi in lui per lei e in lei per lui).
Un dialogo ininterrottamente differito e senza parole
Bench si sia insistito con una certa eccedenza piuttosto speciosa sul dialogare dei due, ci pare di poter provare che non accade nessun vero dialogo tra
lamato e lamata, nessuna vera comunicazione discorsiva, ma una comunicazione profonda di anime, anzi il sussurro e il sospiro di una simile tensione interattiva e speculare mediante limpiego di figure retoriche tratte dalla simbolica metaforica della fauna e della vegetazione, della ritrattistica pittorica, delle
sensazioni polisensoriali, in una lussureggiante ricchezza di oggetti e di scenari
come la ricchezza dellAmore, che fa impoverire di tutto arricchendo completamente di tutto e specialmente di s in modo da mostrarsi saziet perfetta e
insieme privazione assoluta.
Se si tralascia il proemiale indefinibile e surreale quadretto di 1,72,3, in cui
non si dialoga tra i due, ma ci si loda quasi per dissolversi luno nellaltra, per
assimilare quasi geneticamente, originariamente lidentit dellaltro come
quellunica propria vera, per essere nella verit di s ed essere o raffigurare
anche la bellezza vera per laltro, esclusivamente per laltro, non si riesce a ri-

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

71

levare un duetto dialogico di una certa consistente conversazione, giacch il


parlarsi dei due come non sapersi e non doversi dire nulla se non lestaticit
del loro desiderio amoroso. Con il corpus del poema si intenti a sforzarsi di
ritrarre e rendere in qualche modo durevole e percettibile questa permanente
condizione estatica, che, sebbene intrinseca, congenita e oltre la ordinaria e
culturale consapevolezza, irrompe improvvisa e istantanea nella coscienza con
tutto il suo strascico di effetti e sconvolgimenti interni, che donano lebbrezza
lucida della vita e della propria vita in una previa intesa totalmente saturante che
prima e dopo ogni possibile eloquio verbale si tratta quasi di un linguaggio
pre-originario, precedente a quello derivante dallimposizione dei nomi da
parte di Adamo o di ogni possibile linguaggio convenzionale, storicamente istituito e descrittivo, anche se umano, anzi rievocante e nominante lessenza stessa umana, il nome dellamato-amore.
I vv. 2,8-18 che dovrebbero rappresentare il primo incontro dialogico, in
effetti un puro invito dellamato allamata, ad alzarsi e andare via, ma il tutto
si svolge chiaramente in un contesto di volizione e di ispirazione particolare,
che pare renda presente concretamente ci che solo sospirato e anelato, anche
perch non c nessun amato e non c nessunamata reali, se non ogni essere
umano che pu e dovrebbe liberamente, se lo vuole, essere un amato per unamata e unamata per un amato nellAmore, cio scoprire il vero volto di tale potenza universale e unica nella sua stessa realt data naturalmente. Non si tratta di
un dramma amoroso pi o meno paradigmatico di due, come ad es. quello di
Elena e Paride o quello di Dafne e Psiche, e in ambito biblico, quello di Abramo
e Sara o quello di Anna ed Elkana, ma del felice dramma (la felice azione
tribolata) che lAmore.
Allinvito indefinito e immaginario di (una) lei a (un) lui in 1,10 e ripetuto in
1,13 di alzarsi e di andare via15 non vi seguito, anzi viene in qualche modo
contrastato il suo presunto reale richiamo sia in 2,17, in cui lamata ordina allamato di tornare simile a gazzella o a un cucciolo di cervo sui monti di beter prima
che si faccia giorno, che la stessa scena ultima con cui si chiude il poema con
una variazione omonimica del verbo e del luogo e senza pi la locuzione indicante la coordinazione temporale, ma inequivocabile nella sua significazione allegorica, quale intimo luogo immaginario del desiderio amoroso, con una evidente
corrispondenza in 4,6, data lesatta ripetizione della coordinazione temporale, in
15 Bench si sia notato che i due verbi alzarsi e andare via vengono seguiti da %l' (ma
solo per il primo verbo in 13 si ha la grafia singolare di yk>L)' (Ravasi, Il Cantico, 247-248 e nota 13),
non si rilevato che per il primo verbo mQ' non si trovano n si citano paralleli mentre usuale per
il secondo verbo %l:x.' La costruzione di mQ' con la preposizione l> rarissima (cf. Sal 94,16) e, per
quanto ci risulta, inesistente in senso di dativo etico con connotazione riflessiva (non si ritrova
nemmeno nelle altre due occorrenze nel Cantico (3,2; 5,5 sempre espresso da lei in prima persona);
una tale singolarit spiega abbondantemente entrambi i testi filologicamente problematici.

72

Vittorio Ricci

cui lamato dice di intraprendere questo ritorno. In 3,1, immediatamente successivo a 2,7, in cui lambientazione temporale notturna, si determina la vera situazione passata riproposta e rammentata, la ricerca affannosa e travagliata dellamato assente e non trovato a fianco sul giaciglio. Luscita notturna, furtiva e ardita,
dellamata per la citt una descrizione alquanto immaginaria, che intende esprimere plasticamente e sensibilmente a che punto la forza damore di colei che
debole per amore pu arrivare. Il ricercare e non trovare, il ricercare e trovare, lo
stringere a s fino a ununione totale, indivisibile, costitutiva sono rappresentazioni di uno stato onirico, in cui il desiderare lamato si mostra in tutta la sua veemenza anche con punte crudeli al fine di comunicare lefficacia molteplice e polivalente della sua potenza. Una simile interpretazione immediatamente orientata dallintercalare per la seconda volta del ritornello con cui lei si rivolge alle
figlie di Gerusalemme per scongiurarle di non risvegliare lAmore in 3,5, non
preceduto dal ritornello dellabbraccio di lui a lei come alla sua prima occorrenza
in 2,7 e alla sua terza e ultima in 8,14, in cui finalmente si scioglie tale tensione
desiderativa e il senso della desiderata (e immaginata) introduzione di lui da parte di lei nella casa della propria genitrice, come desiderio espresso da compiere
assolutamente in 3,4 e compiuto in certo qual modo (idealmente, eroticamente,
nelloriginariet e profondit dellattrazione totale, di morte e di vita) in 8,15. In
5,2 si ribadisce lamata dormiente e il suo intimo in vigile attesa e il rumore
particolare dellamato, che prima se ne andato sui monti (4,5), cio rientrato in
quella estaticit amorosa, in quel luogo segreto in cui scopre continuamente il
volto perfetto e amoroso dellamata, e poi sceso nel giardino (5,1), cio in
quella assimilazione totale di lei, in quellabitarla, viverla nella preziosit unica e infinita della contemplazione amorosa, in cui forse avvenuto anche il contatto fisico (non lo crediamo, perch superfluo e sempre rinviante a quella tensione di unificazione completa e permanente verso linfinit assoluta dellAmore
per vivere e assimilare il tutto, lessenziale dellesistenza e lessenza della vitamorte, dellessere mortale e immortale) o meramente il suo desiderio. Forse semplicemente sono avvenuti solo lo sguardo del viso e lincontro degli occhi nel
desiderio che avvenisse una reciproca fusione totale che per la sua forza irresistibile ha fatto s che se ne avvertisse tutta lintensit, e forse ha sortito effetti pi
densi di quanto se ne sarebbe potuto percepire con una sua realizzazione fisica.
I due non si sono mai comunicati nullaltro che le genuine intensit sempre
varie, sempre nuove e pure continue in crescendo di drammaticit e di sublimit, che anche un crescendo opposto, della loro mortale debolezza e del loro
destino assoluto segnato da tale ineluttabile e imprescindibile debolezza, che
il segreto della pace e della loro naturale e spirituale appartenenza, in cui tutto
dato loro veramente da vivere e conoscere nella sua splendida gloria; i due non
hanno altro che comunicarsi la straordinaria ordinariet della reciproca attrazione amorosa che li porta a venire a conoscenza dellAmore in tutta la sua

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

73

sconvolgente e divina bellezza, in tutta la sua immortale misteriosit coniugatasi con la limitatezza mortale di un amarsi umano sensibile e intellettivo.
Questo dialogo senza parole svolto principalmente con descrizioni reciproche reali, ideali e simboliche della loro persona in contrapposizione o in controluce alle due relative immagini sociali, che sono tracciate in 3,7-11 per lui (Salomone) e in 7,1-6 per lei (Salummita), o di ci che si rappresentano del loro
profilo sociale.
La divina fiamma dellamore mortale
La drammatizzazione e la trasfigurazione poetiche dellamore umano o
dellAmore in s stesso, colto per e nei i suoi risvolti umani, sono le cifre o le
codificazioni ermeneutiche e semantiche pi adatte e suscettibili di considerazione per cantare ci che umanamente accade per intima universale necessit
e con fatale stabilit, anzi ci che in modo apparente paradossalmente il pi
instabile e insieme il pi stabilmente ricorrente nella natura umana e non solo.
Tale operazione riflessa e vigile e al contempo di una ispirazione incontrollabile e impulsiva, tesa in s stessa non a delineare una scienza dottrinale o
pedagogica, non a caratterizzare anatomisticamente la fenomenologia pi o
meno psicologica dellerotica umana, ma ad annunciare lincomprensibile sapienza divina, a illuminare la sorgivit sovrumana, che fonda e sostanzia segretamente e continuamente la sua natura desiderativa ed erotica. La nota teologica lunico vero elemento di distinzione assoluta tra il Cantico e tutto il
resto della letteratura dello stesso genere, giunta fino a noi completa o meno,
oppure indirettamente da fonti seconde. Ma proprio questa nota inafferrabile,
inenarrabile, assolutamente enigmatica, tanto che esoterica, potenzialmente percepibile da tutti ma necessitante di una disposizione e preparazione
esoteriche appunto, di una natura non comune per chi vi si apre, vi si sintonizza debitamente, soprattutto in ci che non tanto suscettibile di canto, ma
a cui il canto allude e rinvia per la sua insuperabile inespressivit, incontemplabilit, inconoscibilit per cui unesegesi che vorrebbe spiegare tutto del
Cantico sarebbe gi illudersi sin dallinizio, perch esso rimane di per s refrattario a ogni operazione esplicativa in senso esaustivo comune o secondo la
pi ovvia aspettativa attanziale.
Si consuma con una finissima operazione di intercalari letterari ci che si pu
definire la sublimit divina del desiderio erotico umano, sublimit tanto pi elevata quanto pi colta nella sua dimensione ironica, di lievit assoluta. La dinamica cinetica delle peripezie, imprese, gesta, intraprendenze, fatiche eccessive e
anche larditezze damore non sono altro che la plastica segnalazione e la simbolica raffigurazione di quanto umanamente rimane impossibile, iperbolico, in una

74

Vittorio Ricci

parola altro, e quindi tragico o drammatico che comunque non pu essere


confinato in termini di rendimento positivo o negativo. Il divino, che vi si
condensa e vi trapela continuamente anche se enigmaticamente o cripticamente,
tutto ci che viene descritto come incessante rinvio a una storia sacra, totale,
infinita a cui lumanit si sente ispirata e in cui si sente immersa ineluttabilmente,
anzi continuamente suscitata e sollecitata nella sua umanit pi vera, pi intima,
e cui continuamente lumanit non pu non disattendere e ininterrottamente desiderare di attuare radicalmente, di esserlo compiutamente, ma in ci il divino non
mortificato come in caso di opposizione peccaminosa o di perverso o meno
investimento di esso ad altri esiti o fini mercantili o di altro genere snaturante
lumano nel divino e il divino nellumano. Lassoluta e insormontabile inettitudine umana allamore divino e la tensione pura a raggiungerlo, perch il disagio
umano a un tale amore nella sua verit infinita o trascendente si sciolga e vi si
compi, esaltano questo stesso Amore che non si smarrisce e non si fa smarrire mai
e non fa smarrire soprattutto gli smarriti in esso (anche nei momenti pi acuti di
falsificazione o di riduzionismi o formalismi dovuti a moventi deficitari umani o
convenzionali o istituzionali). Lirragiungibilit dellAmore e quindi la sua eroticit psichica e istintuale nella sua conformazione umana lasciano cogliere il divino di esso, anche se con un fare o mimare persino comico, quasi infantile, sproporzionato e a tratti persino apparentemente sconveniente. In tale piega letterariamente feconda e positiva, il divino si insinua quasi furtivo e innominabile, quasi
mancante e obliato pi che attivo e pienamente presente, non tanto con unazione
determinante, ma quasi con un lasciar fare e agire che con un dettare e realizzare
infallibili. Il divino dellamore anchesso si lascia coinvolgere completamente
nellumano e dallumano, si lascia perdere e ritrovare e ancora perdere negli
amanti e con gli amanti nella loro erotica e imperfetta e sempre perfettibile
perfezione damore sempre compiuta e sempre da compiere dinamicamente e
affannosamente, anzi tragicamente.
Il riso ironico e mitigante del divino trapela come figura del suo complottare (creativo e creante, vocazionale, direi, non indotto surrettiziamente) e dellindirizzare leterno dellamore stesso nella storicit umana e individuale degli
amanti; al contempo questo riso ironico si colora terribile e impetuoso nel suo
tragico volto umano, che cos giunge allegoricamente a trasferirsi in quella forma divina che gli pi propria e pi essenziale, e in tal modo riesce a conoscere la forza della morte e la terribilit dello Sheol, laddove giunge la fiamma
divina dellAmore stesso, che tutto vince e avvince, illumina e trasfigura, e da
nulla pu essere sopraffatto e oppresso, oscurato e sfigurato.

La debolezza damore e il suo incantevole sogno nel Cantico

75

Conclusione: il balsamo contemplativo ed enigmatico


dellAmore divino
Il Cantico rappresenta quellunit profonda di visione del mondo e in essa di
quella immagine specifica del mondo erotico-amoroso, che bench, peculiare della cultura antica e della sua tradizione, in cui storicamente circoscritta, capace
a tuttoggi di rivelare e illuminare lenigmaticit stessa di tale realt essenziale,
strutturale e universale, continuamente presente in ogni animo umano e continuamente sfuggente, forza autoconoscitiva e conoscitiva straordinaria, che trascende
e fa trascendere sempre le ordinarie facolt apprensive, intellettive e volitive umane, pur non annullandone, anzi in qualche modo esigendole ed esaltandole.
Linattingibilit in s dellAmore, che continuamente si rende attingibile nella sua partecipazione kenotica ed effusiva di conformabilit umana, persino
nel suo apice pi vuoto e nullo di morte, di tormento infernale, di estremizzazione pi spettrale e insussistente quale la vacuit abissale dellAde o dello
Sheol, il vero movente della ineguagliabile opera pseudosalomonica. La capacit onniabbracciante e penetrante di eros tale da infiltrarsi nelloriginario e
radicalmente individuale e per ci irripetibile, che fa la autentica differenza di
ciascuno verso tutti gli altri, e tale da sostenere laltrimenti insostenibile frammento onirico-inconscio di un istinto erotico e patologico in se stesso, cio
anche ibridamente e violentemente deformante la stessa forma non mitica e
non mitizzabile dellamore erotico, anche se miticamente o allegoricamente
risaltato o cantato, rappresenta la tensione quasi congenita e continuamente
ambita dellautore del poema pseudosalomonico, a offrire una balsamicit, un
refrigerio che non pu essere che la ricerca teoretico-contemplativa, anzi latentemente eucologica. Si predispone insieme anche la provocazione, anche
sovvertitrice e veemente, persino impaziente e mai pronta, addirittura ineluttabilmente differita, di quel punto estatico e supremo, in cui tutto si scioglie e si
rinsalda, trova la sua compiutezza e si lascia travolgere di nuovo dalla sua attesa. Tutto, insomma, teso al compimento escatologico, al trascendente, allallegorico della creazione poetica dellamore; tutto si profonde in uno spazio di
abbandono al divino come biblicamente o mosaicamente rivelato per una contemplazione del teologico e del suo aspetto estetico, della conoscenza del bello
in s in cui si coglie laltrimenti non attingibile o inesorabilmente perso almeno
in questa forma piena e suprema.
Vittorio Ricci
SSL, Pontificio Istituto Biblico, Roma

Gregor Geiger
Akzentuierung zur semantischen Differenzierung:
nifal wayyiqtol in masoretischer Vokalisierung

Ziel dieser Untersuchung ist es, einige Unregelmigkeiten in der Vokalisierung und der Akzentuierung der wayyiqtol-Formen im nifal im Hebrisch
der masoretischen (tiberiensischen) Tradition1 zu beschreiben und mglicherweise zu erklren. Es geht dabei um die Vokalisierung des zweiten Radikals in
den Formen ohne Endungen, d. h. in den Formen im Singular mit Ausnahme
der 2. Person feminin, des Kohortativs und der Formen mit Sufx.2 Wurzeln,
deren zweiter oder dritter Konsonant schwach ist, sind hier nicht behandelt.
Ich vergleiche die wayyiqtol-Formen mit den entsprechenden yiqtol- und weyiqtol-Formen sowie dem Imperativ.
Es gibt in der masoretischen Tradition verschiedene Formen(-Gruppen), in
welchen die Akzentuierung eine semantische oder funktionale Differenzierung
ausdrckt (z.B. !#" %$ (&' *) $+ !#"& %$ (' *) $+).3 Hier geht es darum, fr die Akzentuierungen
%(&, -) ". '+ und %(/ -& ) ". '+ eine solche Differenzierung vorzuschlagen.
Bei der Beschreibung von Vokalisierung und Akzentuierung sind vier verschiedene prosodische Situationen zu unterscheiden: regulre Kontextformen,
Pausalformen, Formen in nesiga4 und Wrter, die mit dem folgenden Wort
durch maqqef verbunden sind.
1. yiqtol und weyiqtol
Die regulre Vokalisierung des Imperfekts beim starken Verb ist %(, -) "!, d. h.
die letzte Silbe ist mit !ere, die Vorletzte mit qama! vokalisiert. Die AkzentuTextgrundlage ist die BHS.
Die Formen mit Sufx auszunehmen ist Theorie. Es gibt in der hebrischen Bibel keine
Imperfektformen im nifal eines starken Verbs im Singular mit Sufx. Ebenso theoretisch sind
die wayyiqtol-Formen der 1. Person Plural; es gibt dafr keine Belege im nifal.
3
Ausfhrlich dazu REVELL, Perfect.
4
Formen, deren Akzent von der letzten auf die vorletzte Silbe zurckgezogen ist; s. dazu
REVELL, Nesiga.
1
2

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 77-88

78

Gregor Geiger

ierung ist milra, d. h. der Wortakzent ist auf der letzten Silbe. Diese regelmige Vokalisierung ist in Kontext und in Pausa gleich.5 Das trifft auch auf die
Vokalisierung in den wenigen belegten weyiqtol-Formen zu.6 Sie ist unabhngig von indikativer oder volitiver Funktion.7 Ist die Form mit maqqef mit dem
folgenden Wort verbunden und dadurch ohne eigenen Wortakzent, hat die letzte Silbe segol.8 Steht die Form in nesiga (d. h., sie ist milel, auf der vorletzten
Silbe betont), hat die letzte Silbe meistens segol,9 seltener pata"10 oder !ere.11
Solche unterschiedlichen Vokalisierung in nesiga nden sich auch bei anderen
Wrtern,12 sie haben also nichts mit der spezischen Situation des nifals zu
tun. Die Vokalisierung der letzten Silbe kann sich unter dem Einu von Laryngal13 oder von 014 als drittem Radikal ndern. Die Vokalisierung des Imperativs ist identisch mit der des Imperfekts, mit Ausnahme der Wurzel 012.15
2. wayyiqtol
Die meisten wayyiqtol-Formen haben die gleiche Vokalisierung und Akzentuierung wie die entsprechenden yiqtol-Formen. Es gibt also in der Regel
keine Betonungsverschiebung, wie sie bei wayyiqtol-Formen anderer Stmme
' 4 ! vs. 013
/ 4 . '+). Diese Verschiebung ist dann phonetisch
verbreitet ist (z. B. 013
mglich, wenn die letzte Silbe geschlossen, die vorletzte Silbe offen ist und einen langen Vokal hat.16
Im einzelnen ndet sich folgendes: Die meisten Formen sind milra (s. u.,
2.1), die letzte Silbe hat normalerweise !ere,17 Vokalisierung und Akzentuierung sind also gleich wie bei den normalen yiqtol-Formen. In Pausa ist der AkBeispiele: 056, 7"!) , Gen 11,6 (Kontext); 8*:9 , ); "!, Ex 21,20 (Pausa).
Beispiele: <>= , ); "! $+, Ex 23,12 (Kontext); ?09 , @) A" $+, Gen 38,24 (Pausa).
7
Beispiel fr Jussiv: A05 , B) "!C%3' , 2 Sam 3,29.
8
Drei Belege: Obd 9, Est 7,3, 2 Chr 2,13.
9
13 Belege: 1 Kn 8,26, Jes 28,27, Ez 33,12, Ps 102,19, Ijob 3,3; 21,30; 38,24, Spr 13,13;
19,23; 27,14, Koh 7,26; 10,9, Neh 4,14.
10
Nur D 'EF5 ) #, , Ijob 18,4.
11
Fnf Belege der Wurzel GAH im Buch Ester (2,13; 5,3.6; 7,2; 9,12).
12
Siehe dazu REVELL, Nesiga, 46.
13
Kontext: in der Regel %(&' -) "!, z. B. FJI ' )K "!, Gen 41,31; Ausnahme: L' 0M , -) "!, Jer 16,6 (kaum als
Pausalform zu erklren) Pausa: %(&, -) "!, z. B. F' D9 , N) 3" , Gen 21,24 nesiga: %(' -& ) "!, z. B. LA' OI ) "!, Ez
24,27 maqqef: nur CFD' N)P "!, 1 Kn 1,51.
14
Kontext: meistens %(&, -) "!, z. B. 056, 7"!) , Gen 11,6; Ausnahmen: 06= ' F) A, $+ (2x) und 0D= ' N) #" , Ez 32,28
Pausa: %(&, -) "!, z. B. 0Q9 , 3) #, , Ri 16,10; folgende anders vokalisierten Flle knnen als Pausalformen angesehen werden (sie haben aber nicht silluq oder atna"): 01'R 39) !, (Gen 10,9, Num 21,14),
01'S 3) ,! (Ps 87,5) und 0T)R )U#" (Ex 34,19) nesiga: %(/ -& ) "! (vier Belege) maqqef: nicht belegt.
15
Siehe Appendix 2.
16
Zu Einzelheiten s. REVELL, Imperfect, 420.
17
Ausnahmen (pata" in der letzten Silbe): die Wurzeln III.lar., einige Formen III.! sowie
alle elf Belege der Wurzel VF! (II.lar.).
5
6

Akzentuierung zur semantischen Differenzierung: nifal wayyiqtol in masoretischer Vokalisierung 79

zent ebenfalls milra, die letzte Silbe hat entweder pata" oder !ere.18 Einige
Verben sind immer milel (2.2), die letzte Silbe ist mit segol vokalisiert. Einige
Verben haben beide Akzentuierungen (2.3). Formen in nesiga (also milel)
sind selten,19 es gibt keine Form mit maqqef.
Im folgenden soll gezeigt werden, da die milra-Formen in der Regel eher
passive, die milel-Formen eher aktive Bedeutung haben.
2.1 milra
Es gibt 45 Wurzeln, deren wayyiqtol immer endbetont ist.20 Die meisten
von ihnen sind regulre Passivformen des aktiven qals, z. B. die Wurzel GAH. In
wenigen Wurzeln wird der nifal als Passiv anderer Stmme verwendet, z. B.
FHT, als aktiv dient der hifil. Einige Formen sind eher reexiv oder stativ als
passiv, z. B. F*D. Der nifal von *D3, ringen mit jemandem, ist jedoch aktiv
und indirekt transitiv; freilich kann die Form auch als reziprok gedeutet werW 3" *D= , 3) ,. '+, Gen 32,25. FD<,
den. Das einzige relevante Vorkommen ist XYR F" <!
21
schwren, ist aktiv und indirekt transitiv. Das heit also, die meisten, aber
nicht alle, endbetonten Formen haben passive Bedeutung.
2.2 milel
Vier Wurzeln sind immer milel: 8L%, ?ZH, 8F> und J16, vielleicht auch %L!.22
8L%23 hat aktive Bedeutung und ist indirekt transitiv, selten auch direkt, z. B.
8 "!0\ ) >$ 3CA
/ 3/ 8LM/ [) ". '+, Ri 12,4. Ein qal dieser Wurzel ist selten und wird nur in Poesie
verwendet. ?ZH ist der passiv des qals, in der Bedeutung geschlagen werden.24
Allerdings kann das Geschlagenwerden auch als aktiv angesehen werden; die
LXX bersetzt beispielsweise vier der fnf relevanten Formen mit dem aktiven Verb ptai/ein, d. h. anstoen oder strzen. Das angefhrte Beispiel ist
Siehe Appendix 1.
Zehn Belege, z. B. D</ L5 ) #, '+, Ps 106,31.
20
*D3, %T3, 013, %JD, %]D, F*D, %1Z, ^>], *FE, *%L II, FJ!, J%!, 0Q!, VF!, 0A!, JLT, FHT, DAT,
VL%, JT%, L*%, (%1, ^%1 II, 2>H, %6H, GAH, 0ZQ, ^1Q, 0FQ, 0AQ, 06F, 0AF, J*>, LQ>, *F6, 0D*,
%]*, 2J*, 02*, FD2, 0D2 I, AL2, F12, ^>2 und 2>A.
21
In einigen Fllen auch direkt, z. B. ]F) D_ <$ FD' N) ]" , Num 30,3; es gibt allerdings keine solchen direkt transitiven Belege im wayyiqtol. Von den 22 belegten Formen stehen fnf in nesiga,
d. h. sie sind milel (Gen 24,9, 1 Sam 28,10, 2 Sam 19,24, 1 Kn 2,8, Ez 16,8). Die Vokalisierung
ndert sich dabei nicht, sie ist immer FD' N) ". '+. In Pausalstellung sind keine Formen belegt.
22
Keine dieser Wurzeln ist in der 1. Person belegt (weder Singular noch Plural), so da
nicht feststellbar ist, ob diese Formen anders betont wren als die 2. oder 3. Person (wie entsprechende Formen in anderen Stmmen, s. REVELL, Imperfect, 420).
23
20 Belege fr wayyiqtol.
24
Fnf Belege, z. B. 8!#\ " <$ %" >$ !5H, >$ %" %3M , 0) a$ "! ? /Z`=;) ". '+, 1 Sam 4,2.
18
19

80

Gregor Geiger

dementsprechend als kai eptaisen anh\r Israhl enwpion allofu/lwn bersetzt. Die beiden Belege von 8F> stehen beide im selben Kontext: Jemand erR
8F5/ O) #" '+, Gen
zhlt seinen Traum, whrend sein Geist umgetrieben wird: XLK0
R"
8F5/ O) #" '+, Dan 2,3. Die antiken bersetzungen bersetzen diese
41,8, und !LK0
Verben mit passiven Formen, aber man kann die Aktion auch als aktive betrachten. Martin LUTHER bersetzt beispielsweise Dan 2,3 mit der hat mich erschreckt. J16 ist nur ein einziges Mal belegt, 0XF\ O$ %F' D5 ' %$ %3M , 0) a$ "! J1/ b= ) ". '+, Num 25,3.
Dieses Verb kann als reexiv angesehen werden, so bersetzen die antiken
bersetzungen oder auch die Einheitsbersetzung (So lie sich Israel mit
Baal-Pegor ein). Das Verb ist indirekt transitiv; man kann die Aktion auch als
aktiv betrachten, so kann man es ins Englische bersetzten: Israel joined. %L!
ist nur einmal belegt, 8!0\ " L, 3c 8!1)!
M " AF= ' D$ <" JXFR %L5/ .) ". '+, Gen 8,12; die Vokalisierung als
nifal ist schwer zu erklren.25 Die Bedeutung des Verbs scheint aktiv, die Akzentuierung kann als nesiga erklrt werden.
Es gibt also kein klar passives Verb, welches regelmig milel betont ist.
2.3 milra und milel
Drei Wurzeln sind sowohl milel als auch milra betont: ?Q3, 8LH und 032.26
Bei der Wurzel ?Q3 gibt es einen klaren Bedeutungsunterschied zwischen
beiden Akzentuierungen. Als normale reexive Form in der Bedeutung sich
versammeln ist das Wort milra betont. Es gibt dafr zwei Belege: ]<4M / 1 ?Q= , 3) ,. '+
) 3/ W%3, 0) a$ "! <!3C%
I " B) ?Qd, 39) ., '+, Ri 20,11. Fnf Formen
]\H/ Lc Y' ]C%
9 ' 3/ , Num 11,30, und 0!F"R ]C%
' 3/ ?Q/ 3M ) ,. '+, in der Bedeutung stersind milel betont, stets im Ausdruck +!Y9 ) FC%
ben.27 Es ist eine anthropologische (oder theologische) Frage, ob man das
Sterben als aktiv oder als passiv ansehen will. Aber das am hugsten in dieser
Bedeutung verwendete hebrische Verb, A+1, wird im (normalerweise aktiven)
qal benutzt.
Das Verb 8LH ist zweimal milra: XY9 3" !0= , Lc 3' *LM ) 6$ "! 8L= , ); ". '+, Gen 24,67, und 04B5 $E ". '+
R ) $! 8L5/ ;) ". '+
+J9 ) Q) Lc D4 05 B$ 8LS, ); ".e '+ XA!
\ 0" 7$ 8]5 / %) , Ps 106,45. Siebenmal ist es milel, z. B. ]+]
]a= ) FC!
) B9 " , Gen 6,6. Es wird in zwei leicht unterschiedlichen Bedeutungen verwendet. Es kann bedauern/bereuen bedeuten, das Subjekt ist dabei immer
Gott; oder es kann sich trsten oder getrstet werden meinen. Diese beiden Bedeutungen sind zu einem Teil parallel zu den beiden Akzentuierungen.
In der Bedeutung bedauern ist das Wort in allen sechs Fllen milel.28 In der
In Gen 8,10 steht in einer ansonsten identischen Formulierung 8!0\ " L, 3c 8!1)!
M " AF= ' D$ <" JXFR %L5/ .) '+.
Keine dieser Wurzeln ist in der 1. Person belegt.
27
Gen 25,8.17; 35,29; 49,33, Dtn 32,50.
28
]a= ) FC!
) B9 " ]+]
R ) $! 8L5/ ;) ". '+, Gen 6,6; ]F)R 0) ]C%
5 ) F' ]\+]
) $! 8LM/ ;) ". '+, Ex 32,14; ]F)R 0) ]C%
5 ) 3/ ]W )+] $! 8LI/ ;) ". '+, 2 Sam
24,16; ]FM ) 0) ]C%
) 3/ ]+]
R ) $! 8L5/ ;) ". '+, Jer 26,19; ]Fh ) 0) ]C%
) F' 8!]f
"S 3g ]) 8L5/ ;) ". '+, Jona 3,10; ]F)R 0) ]C%
) 9 F' 8L5/ ;) ". '+, 1 Chr
21,15.
25
26

Akzentuierung zur semantischen Differenzierung: nifal wayyiqtol in masoretischer Vokalisierung 81

Bedeutung sich trsten ist es einmal milra: XY9 3" !0= , Lc 3' *LM ) 6$ "! 8L= , ); ". '+, Gen 24,67;
einmal ist es milel: ]JK]
S ) $! 8L5/ ;) ". '+, Gen 38,12: Es ist die Rede von Juda, nach dem
Tod seiner kanaanitischen Frau Bat-Shua. Das naheliegendste Verstndnis ist,
getrstet zu werden, auch die antiken bersetzungen verstehen so.29 Eventuell ist aber in diesem Kontext auch eine Interpretation als bedauern mglich,
was freilich eine ethische Wertung des Verhaltens Judas, seiner Mischehe, bedeuten wrde. Problematisch bleibt (sofern man nicht Textverderbnis annimmt)30 das poetische +J9 ) Q) Lc D4 05 B$ 8LS, ); ".e '+, Ps 106,45: Das Subjekt ist Gott, eine Interpretation als bedauern/bereuen liegt nahe.
032: Die Bedeutung brig bleiben, brig gelassen werden kann als aktiv oder als passiv interpretiert werden. Die LXX bersetzt mit einer passiven,
die Vulgata mit einer aktiven Verbform. Die Form ist zweimal milra betont
$ 3!]M " 03= , N) #" '+, Rut 1,3, und !=H, N$ 1" ]N)R 3" ]9 ) 0W 3, N) #" '+
(beide Mal im Buch Rut): ]!9) H/ D) !=H, <K
i<!
9 ) 3" 1K
, ]!
) JM / %) $!, Rut 1,5; einmal ist sie milel: ]D9 ) #, 7' X#M 3" 0<= / 3'c +9 L' Hh4 Ck3' 03/ Nj ) "! '+, Gen 7,23.
Es ist kein Unterschied in der Bedeutung zu erkennen.
Zusammenfassend lt sich feststellen: Es gibt eine Verbindung zwischen
aktiver und passiver Bedeutung31 und Akzentuierung: Es gibt keine klar passive Form, die milel betont ist, whrend die meisten aktiven Formen milel betont sind, auch wenn das letztere weniger konsequent ist. Mglicherweise sind
die Ausnahmen, die aktiven Formen mit milra-Akzent, analog zu den anderen, den passiven nifal-Formen gebildet, die weitaus huger sind.
3. Erklrungsmglichkeiten fr diese Akzentuierungen
Ich glaube nicht, da die verschiedenen Vokalisierungen Spuren einer Unterscheidung sind zwischen einer ursprnglich langen yaqtulu-Form, die zu einem indikativen yiqtol geworden ist, und einer ursprnglich kurzen yaqtulForm, aus der das wayyiqtol-Tempus entstanden ist, wie beispielsweise die
Formen ]4 2/ Fc '! und 4 2F' '. '+ erklrt werden knnen. Es geht ja in dieser Untersuchung nur um wayyiqtol-Formen.

Siehe dazu DHLING, Gott, 28.


Siehe z. B. den Apparat der BHS, der auf der Grundlage der Peschitta vorschlgt, die Vokalisierung zu ndern (ich bin mir nicht sicher, was mit l $H '. '+ gemeint ist; die Rckbersetzung
des syrischen Nona rbdo lt 8L, "; '. '+ vermuten).
31
Auch JENNI, Stammformen, 63, sieht die Funktion des nifals nicht ausschlielich als passiv: Das hebrische Nifal bezeichnet das Geschehen eines Vorgangs oder einer Handlung am
Subjekt selber ohne Rcksicht auf die Art oder den Grad der Mitwirkung dieses Subjekts an diesem Geschehen. Freilich pat diese Funktionsbestimmung nicht zu den aktiv-transitiven Verben 8L% oder FD2.
29
30

82

Gregor Geiger

Die Grammatik von GESENIUS-KAUTZSCH32 erklrt die milel-Formen als Analogie zu anderen Formen in nesiga. Das ist mglich, aber es erklrt nicht, warum diese Analogie hauptschlich bei aktiven Formen greift.
E. J. REVELL weist in verschiedenen Arbeiten auf phonetische Zusammenhnge zwischen der Wortstruktur und unterschiedlichen Betonungen der wayyiqtol-Formen hin. Zwei Beobachtungen sind dabei auch fr die hier behandelten Formen relevant:
Stress is penultimate where the penultimate syllable is open, but both antepenultimate and nal syllables are closed. Stress is nal where either antepenultimate
or nal syllable is open as well as the penultimate.33

Er macht diese Beobachtung zunchst fr Formen der ersten Person von


schwachen Wurzeln (solche Formen sind hier nicht Thema). Die Erweiterung
auf die anderen Personen34 ist freilich nicht allgemein durchfhrbar: Alle hier
behandelten wayyiqtol-Formen haben offene vorletzte, geschlossene letzte und
drittletzte Silben, mten also milel sein.
Eine detailliertere Beobachtung ber nifal-Formen mit milel-Akzent gibt
er in der Funote eines Artikels, der allgemein von Betonungsmustern handelt,
wieder:
As far as I have noted, these roots are III p, or II guttural, III m or r, except for
wayyi!!'!m"d Nu 25:3.35

Diese Erklrung ist also rein empirisch, er gibt keine Motivation fr sie.
Ein schwerwiegenderer Einwand ist jedoch, da diese Beobachtung nicht fr
alle Flle zutrifft. Selbst wenn man, mit einigen Schwierigkeiten, einige der
milra-Belege als Pausalformen erklren kann, fr wenigstens drei Flle ist das
nicht mglich, da sie verbindende Akzente tragen und nicht am Ende einer
grammatischen Einheit stehen: XY9 3" !0= , Lc 3' *LM ) 6$ "! 8L= , ); ". '+, Gen 24,67; ]<4M / 1 ?Q= , 3) ,. '+
) H/ D) !=H, <K
$ 3!]M " 03= , N) #" '+, Rut 1,3; hnlich (mit dem schwach
]\H/ Lc Y' ]C%
9 ' 3/ , Num 11,30; ]!9
c %/ 19 / D5%, 0W F, m) ". '+, 2 Kn 6,11.
trennenden pa#$a) ist 80R ) 3Ck
Meiner Meinung nach gibt es keine phonetische Erklrung fr die unterschiedlichen Akzentuierungen. Auch ich habe keine eindeutige Erklrung.
Mglicherweise haben aber drei Faktoren das Bild beeinut: 1. Einige andere
passive wayyiqtol-Formen, die phonetisch milel sein knnten, sind ebenfalls
milra. 2. Es gibt Reste verschiedener Vokalisierungsmuster im hebrischen
nifal. 3. Mglicherweise hat man es hier mit Spuren eines alten Gt-Stammes
zu tun.
51 n.
REVELL, Imperfect, 424; vgl. dazu S. 420, Anm. 4: Such difference also occurs in some
forms with open penultimate syllable from the nifal () stem, but this is not regular.
34
REVELL, Imperfect, 424, Anm. 12: The same conditions hold for 3rd person forms, including the nifal () forms which show penultimate stres with waw consecutive.
35
REVELL, Stress, 441, Anm. 18.
32
33

Akzentuierung zur semantischen Differenzierung: nifal wayyiqtol in masoretischer Vokalisierung 83

3.1 Andere passive wayyiqtol-Formen


Die Verbindung zwischen aktiver und passiver Bedeutung einerseits und
verschiedenen Betonungen andererseits sind nicht auf den nifal beschrnkt.
Im in der Regel aktiven qal sind die entsprechenden wayyiqtol-Formen milel
betont, wenn dies phonetisch mglich ist und wenn das Wort nicht in Pausa
steht. Milel-Betonung ist phonetisch nur bei einigen schwachen Wurzeln
' 4 ! vs. 013
/ 4 . '+. Im piel ist milel-Betonung phonetisch mglich,
mglich, z. B. 013
wenn der zweite Radikal 3, F oder 0 ist. Die meisten, aber nicht alle Formen
sind milel betont. Dagegen sind die einzigen beiden belegten hofal-Formen,
M ' '+,
in welchen milel-Betonung phonetisch mglich wre, endbetont: 8<9 ) A1K#
2 Kn 11,16, und 3K]\ ]' 8X 5.7' 0>M ' #_ '+, Sach 11,11. Im pual sind keine relevanten
R 8F5/ O) A$ #" '+, Dan 2,1.36 Fr
Formen belegt, im hitpael gibt es nur einen Fall, XLK0
diese Form mag das gleiche gelten wie fr die beiden nifal-Formen der Wurzel 8F>,37 da sie nmlich sowohl als passiv als auch als aktiv angesehen werden knnen. Das heit also, die wayyiqtol-Formen aller Stmme zeigen die
gleiche Tendenz wie die nifal-Formen: Wenn sowohl milel- als auch milraBetonung phonetisch mglich sind, gibt es keine eindeutig passive Form, die
milel betont ist, wohingegen die meisten aktiven Formen so betont sind.
3.2 Reste verschiedener Vokalisierungsmuster
Es gibt Reste verschiedener Vokalisierungsmuster im nifal. Im Biblischen
Hebrisch nden sich solche verschiedenen Vokalisierungen bei den Wurzeln
mediae geminatae (FnF). Es gibt Imperfekt-Formen mit a-Vokal (von 15 verschiedenen Wurzeln)38 und mit o-Vokal (von fnf Wurzeln).39 Keine Wurzel
hat eindeutige Formen in beiden Bildungen. Die Formen mit o-Vokal knnen
alle als passiv angesehen werden. Die meisten Formen mit a-Vokal zwar auch,
aber weniger konsequent. Daneben haben zwei homonyme (?) starke Wurzeln
mglicherweise eine doppelte Bildung: Die Wurzel 0TE in der Bedeutung ge$ ,
nannt werden, heien bildet das yiqtol regelmig 0T, )U "! (z. B. JXF9 0T= , )U "!C34 %9 X1M <K
Jer 11,19; auch in Pausa: 0\T, )U "!C34 %9 JXF= , Ijob 24,20; 0\T, )U "! 34 %5 <!D" )Z $+, Ijob 28,18). Die
" T9 ) $+ (Ex 34,19, mglicherweise in Pausa)
unsichere Form ]a9 / )+ 0X<= 0(/ OM / 0T)R )U#" oW $H*$ 1C%
kann als von der Wurzel 0TE II, mnnlich sein, abgeleitet erklrt werden; die
LXX, sofern sie eine dem Masoretischen Text entsprechende Vorlage bersetzt, versteht das Wort so.
8L9 ) /HA$ 3/ +9 ), Ps 119, 52, ist in Pausa.
hnlich BADEN, Hithpael, 36f.
38
00D, %%Z, LLJ, 81J, %%L I, 00L, AAL, ?>T, JJ1, QQ1, **1, DDQ, %%*, LL2 und QQ2; bei
%%L I ndet sich auch eine Bildung mit i-Vokal (Lev 21,9).
39
EED, **D, 810, FF0 und V60.
36
37

84

Gregor Geiger

Weitere Hinweise mag man in anderen semitischen Sprachen nden, die eine Form haben, die dem hebrischen nifal entspricht, besonders Arabisch,
Ugaritisch und Akkadisch. Der arabische VII. Stamm ist yanfailu vokalisiert.
Es gibt keine unterschiedlichen Vokalisierungsmuster, aber es gibt das (seltene) Passiv yunfaalu. Im Ugaritischen ist bei den meisten Formen nicht bekannt, wie sie zu vokalisieren sind. Es gibt Hinweise auf eine Vokalisierung
yiqqatil.40 Der Akkadische N-Stamm hat zwei verschiedene Vokalisierungsmuster, in der Regel im Zusammenhang mit der Vokalisierung des G-Stamms.
Allerdings unterscheiden sich die Vokalisierungen zwar im Prsens (ipparras
und ipparris), welches mit dem hebrischen yiqtol verbunden werden kann,
nicht jedoch im Prteritum (ipparis), welches zum hebrischen wayyiqtol analog ist. Die Wurzeln, die im Masoretischen Text regelmig milra sind und
die im akkadischen N-Stamm belegt sind, kommen dort mit beiden Vokalisierungen vor.41 Interessanterweise ist keine Wurzel, die im hebrischen wayyiqtol milel ist oder die beide Akzentuierungen hat, im akkadischen N-Stamm
sicher belegt. Aus diesem Grunde mag man versuchen, solche nifal-Formen
als nicht ursprngliche Bildungen zu erklren, also als nicht ursprngliche NStmme.
3.3 Spuren eines alten Gt-Stammes
Eine Alternative wre, in solchen Formen Spuren eines alten Gt-Stammes
zu sehen. Es ist mglich, da in einem frheren Stadium der Sprachentwicklung das t des Gt-Stammes an den ersten Wurzelkonsonanten assimiliert wurde, ebenso wie das n des N-Stammes. So htte sich also ein ursprngliches
yaqtatil(u) zu yaqqatil (d. h. %(, -) "!) entwickelt, ein ursprngliches yanqatil(u)
ebenso. Phonetisch ist eine solche Assimilierung mglich. J. S. BADEN diskutiert diese Mglichkeit;42 er kommt zu einem leicht unterschiedlichen Schlu:
Eine Reihe von Formen, die als nifal vokalisiert sind, seien ursprnglicher hitpael. Er ndet dabei eine Verbindung mit dem ersten Wurzelkonsonanten: Ist
er dental, frikativ oder sibilant, werde dadurch die Assimilation des t erleichtert. Fr die Formen, die fr die vorliegende Untersuchung relevant sind, ndet
sich keine solche Verbindung, aber das kann daran liegen, da die Zahl der belegten Formen beschrnkt ist: von den sieben (acht?) Wurzeln, die hier zur
Diskussion stehen, ist nur J16 frikativ und 032 sibilant. H. GZELLA diskutiert in
einem Artikel, der allgemein das Genus des hebrischen Verbs behandelt,
ebenfalls die Mglichkeit einer Verbindung mit dem Gt-Stamm in anderen seTROPPER, Grammatik, 535f.
Beispiel fr eine a-Vokalisierung des Prsens: J%!/wal!dum; Beispiel fr i-Vokalisierung:
GAH/nad!num (die akkadischen Beispiele folgen V. SODENS Handwrterbuch).
42
BADEN, Hithpael.
40
41

Akzentuierung zur semantischen Differenzierung: nifal wayyiqtol in masoretischer Vokalisierung 85

mitischen Sprachen (und erwhnt als mgliche Beispiele dafr 032 und, mit
Einschrnkungen, 8L%).43
Die Vokalisierung des Gt-Stammes in den relevanten Sprachen ist folgendermaen: Der arabische VIII. Stamm ist yaftailu gebildet, im (seltenen) passiv yuftaalu. Das heit, die Vokalisierung ist mit dem VII. Stamm, dem nifal,
identisch. Im Ugaritischen gibt es keine sicheren Hinweise, wie der zweite
Wurzelkonsonant vokalisiert war.44 Im Akkadischen hat der Gt-Stamm drei
Vokalisierungsmuster: iptaras, iptaris und iptarus, in der Regel in bereinstimmung zum jeweiligen G-Stamm. Von den stets milel vokalisierten Wurzeln und von denen mit wechselnder Vokalisierung gibt es allerdings fast keine Belege im akkadischen Gt-Stamm; einzig ?ZH hat die entfernte Parallele nak!pum (mit i-Vokal, ittakip). In der Mescha-Inschrift nden sich vier Gt-Formen. Wir wissen nicht, wie sie zu vokalisieren sind, aber interessanterweise
sind alle Formen vom Verb 8L%.
4. Zusammenfassung
Es ist nicht mglich, die Entwicklung der verschiedenen Vokalisierungen
der nifal-Formen im vormasoretischen Hebrisch mit Sicherheit zu rekonstruieren. Drei Faktoren mgen zur Differenzierung beigetragen haben: Die Analogie zu anderen aktiven oder passiven Formen, alte unterschiedliche Vokalisierungsmuster des nifals sowie Reste einer Gt-Bildung. Die Analogie zu den
anderen Formen scheint mir evident. Dagegen sind die beiden anderen Faktoren eher Denkanste; es gelingt nicht, klare Linien aufzuzeigen.
Appendix 1: wayyiqtol-Pausalformen
Yiqtol-Formen ndern sich im nifal nicht in Pausa, sie haben die Form
%(&, -) "!. Es gibt nur vier Ausnahmen: 0T)R )U#" , Ex 34,19, und dreimal die Form 01' 3)P ,!.45
Alle vier Formen sind von Wurzeln, deren dritter Konsonant 0 ist. Es gibt freilich auch Wurzeln III.!, die regelmig sind, also keine Pausalform haben,
z. B. 0Q9 , 3) #, , Ri 16,10. Es sei bemerkt, da keines dieser vier Wrter in sicherer
Pausalposition, d. h. mit silluq oder atna", steht.

43
44
45

GZELLA, Voice, bes. 309f.


TROPPER, Grammatik, 519.
Siehe Anm. 14.

86

Gregor Geiger

Im wayyiqtol-Tempus gibt es dagegen zwei verschiedene Pausalformen:

%(&' -) ". '+ und %(&, -) ". '+. Sechs Formen sind mit pata"46 belegt, sieben mit !ere.47 Es ist

nicht mglich, zu zeigen, da die beiden Vokalisierungen lexikalisch bedingt


sind, denn die 13 Formen kommen von 12 verschiedenen Wurzeln (die beiden
identischen Formen stehen im selben Kapitel des ersten Buches Samuel). Es
ist keine Verbindung zum Stil, zur Gattung oder zur Abfassungszeit des Textes
zu entdecken.
J. BEN-DAVID stellt in seiner Dissertation ber Pausalformen fest, da es eine Tendenz zu pata" in Pausalform gebe, wenn der letzte Konsonant Sibilant oder % ist.48 Diese phonetische Erklrung greift fr drei der sechs Formen,
aber nach dieser Erklrung mten auch %]9 , 7) #" '+, Ijob 4,5, und Q39 , Y) ". '+, Ijob 7,5,
mit pata" vokalisiert sein. Selbst wenn man dies als Besonderheit des Buches
Ijob oder der poetisch akzentuierten Bcher erklren mchte, denke ich nicht,
da dieses phonetische Phnomen die beiden verschiedenen Vokalisierungen
erklrt.
Es gibt keine Verbindung zu den verschiedenen wayyiqtol-Kontextformen,
von denen Abschnitt 2 handelt. Von fnf der zwlf Wurzeln nden sich auch
Kontextformen, sie sind immer milra. Es handelt sich um die pata"-Formen
%1\ ' )p ". '+ und <>9 ' ); ". '+ und um die !ere-Formen %]9 , 7) #" '+, (\%, Y) ". '+ und L' QM , O) ". '+. Aufgrund dessen, was ber die unterschiedlichen Kontextformen festgestellt wurde, habe
ich geprft, ob es eine Verbindung zwischen diesen beiden verschiedenen Vokalisierungen und einer aktiven oder passiven Bedeutung gibt. Mir scheint, es
gibt keine. Es gibt passive Formen mit pata" (z. B. %1\ ' )p ". '+, Gen 21,8) und aktive
(z. B. 8J9 ' 0) ,. '+, Jona 1,5), es gibt passive Formen mit !ere (z. B. Q39 , Y) ". '+, Ijob 7,5)
und aktive (z. B. %]9 , 7) #" '+, Ijob 4,5). Auch ein Vergleich mit dem akkadischen NStamm fhrt zu keinem klaren Ergebnis. Fr die !ere-Formen nden sich Parallelen mit beiden akkadischen Vokalisierungsmustern,49 fr die pata"-Formen
gibt es keine aussagekrftige Parallelen im akkadischen N-Stamm.
Ich habe keine Erklrung fr die beiden verschiedenen Pausalformen.

%1\ ' )p ". '+, Gen 21,8; <>9 ' ); ". '+, Ex 31,17; F09 ' -) ". '+, 1 Sam 15,27; <9H' 3) ,. '+, 2 Sam 12,15; *\H' L) ,. '+, 2 Sam
17,23; 8J9 ' 0) ,. '+, Jona 1,5.
47
(%9 , Y) ". '+, 1 Sam 19,12; (\%, Y) ". '+, 1 Sam 19,17; 0D\ , N) #" '+, Jer 51,8; %]9 , 7) #" '+, Ijob 4,5; Q39 , Y) ". '+, Ijob 7,5;
A>\ , [) ". '+, Rut 3,8 sowie L' QM , O) ". '+, 2 Sam 4,4 (nicht sicher Pausalform).
48
BEN-DAVID, *Q>], 180.
49
Beispiele: A>%/lap!tum (a/i); 0D2/!eb"rum (i).
46

10

Akzentuierung zur semantischen Differenzierung: nifal wayyiqtol in masoretischer Vokalisierung 87

Appendix 2: Imperativ der Wurzel 012


Der endungslose Imperativ zeigt zwei Bildungen: %(&, -) ]" , milra, und %(/ -& ) ]" ,
milel. Die milra-Bildung ist die gewhnliche, in Kontext50 wie in Pausa, mit
Ausnahme der Wurzel 012. Von dieser Wurzel sind 18 endungslose Imperative im nifal belegt, 17 davon milel.51 Da zwlf dieser Formen in der Formel
o%$ 01/ N) ]" 52 stehen, erklrt die Grammatik von JOON und MURAOKA53 die anderen
Flle von 01/ N) ]" 54 als Analogiebildung zu dieser Formel. Ich stimme dieser Erklrung zu, mchte aber noch einen Faktor ergnzen, der die Vokalisierung
ebenfalls beeinut haben knnte. Der nifal der Wurzel 012 ist nicht passiv.
Er kann als reexiv betrachtet werden, allerdings ist die Reexivitt oft noch
explizit durch die Prposition % mit einem Sufx ausgedrckt. So knnte der
milel-Akzent durch andere, nicht passive milel-Vokalisierungen von wayyiqtol-Formen beeinut sein. Allerdings ist einschrnkend hinzuzufgen: Auch
die Imperative der Wurzeln 8L% und 8LH (in der Bedeutung bedauern) mten dann milel sein, so wie ihre wayyiqtol-Bildungen. Sie sind es aber nicht,
sie sind milra, so wie die anderen Imperative.
Gregor Geiger, ofm
Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem

50
In %6, );]q " , Spr 6,5, gibt der prpositive Akzent de"i den Wortakzent nicht zu erkennen; das
!ere lt milra-Betonung vermuten.
51
milra: 01,r N) ]" , Jes 7,4; in 01/ N) ]q " , Ijob 36,21, gibt der prpositive Akzent de"i den Wortakzent nicht zu erkennen; das segol lt milel-Betonung vermuten.
52
Alle zwlf in der Tora.
53
51 b; REVELL, Stress, 441, Anm. 19, erwhnt ebenfalls die zwlf Flle von o%$ 01/ N) ]" . Die
anderen milel betonten Formen bringt er mit nesiga in Verbindung, welches appear to occur
under circumstances different from those typical for nesiga.
54
JOON-MURAOKA, ebd., bergehen 01,r N) ]" , Jes 7,4 (01/ N) ]" always occurs with the mil'el
stress).

11

88

Gregor Geiger

Bibliographie
BADEN J. S., Hithpael and Niphal in Biblical Hebrew: Semantic and Morphological Overlap, Vetus Testamentum 60 (2010) 33-44.
.]nH2A 8!%2+0! ,-!&.' *.,/# -!&.+% "*!+,+ &()' "#!#$# !%&' "#!#$ ,l! J+JCGD
DHLING J.-D., Der bewegliche Gott: Eine Untersuchung des Motivs der Reue
Gottes in der Hebrischen Bibel (Herders Biblische Studien 61), Freiburg
et al. 2009.
GESENIUS W., KAUTZSCH E., Hebrische Grammatik, Leipzig 281909 (Nachdruck:
Hildesheim, Zrich, New York 71995).
GZELLA H., Voice in Classical Hebrew against Its Semitic Background, Orientalia 78 (2009) 292-325.
JENNI E., Zur Funktion der reexiv-passiven Stammformen im Biblisch-Hebrischen, Proceedings of the Fifth World Congress of Jewish Studies IV,
Jerusalem 1969, 61-70.
JOON P., MURAOKA T., A Grammar of Biblical Hebrew (Subsidia Biblica 27),
Roma 22006 (Nachdruck: 2008).
REVELL E. J., Nesiga and the History of the Masorah, in E. FERNNDEZ TEJERO
(ed.), Estudios Masorticos (V Congreso de la IOMS), Madrid 1983,
37-48.
Id., Stress and the Waw Consecutive in Biblical Hebrew, Journal of the
American Oriental Society 104 (1984) 437-444.
Id., First Person Imperfect Forms with Waw Consecutive, Vetus Testamentum 38 (1988) 419-426.
V. SODEN W., Akkadisches Handwrterbuch, Wiesbaden 1965-1981.
TROPPER J., Ugaritische Grammatik (Alter Orient und Altes Testament 273),
Mnster 2000.

12

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa


Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

Nel Nuovo Testamento il concetto di circoncisione attestato, allinfuori di


Gv 7,22-23, unicamente negli scritti di due autori: Paolo e Luca. La precedenza
spetta allapostolo delle genti1. Nel suo epistolario, per limitarsi soltanto ai termini principali, il verbo circoncidere () adoperato 9 volte, mentre il
sostantivo derivato circoncisione () vi compare 31 volte. Anche in
Luca, bench non possa competere con Paolo, il linguaggio della circoncisione
sembra rivestire una certa rilevanza: appare 7 volte, 3 volte2. A questi termini si possono aggiungere laggettivo corradicale incirconciso
(), che nel NT ricorre solo in At 7,51, e il sostantivo prepuzio
(), attestato in At 11,3 (e altrove 19 volte nel corpus paolino). Rilevati questi dati statistici, ci si chiede quale sia il valore e la portata di questo rito
israelita nellopera lucana e, in particolare, nel contesto teologico del piano salvifico che Dio realizza in Cristo a beneficio di Israele e delle genti.
Alla nascita di Ges a Betlemme langelo proclam ai pastori una grande
gioia destinata a tutto il popolo: oggi, nella citt di Davide, nato per voi un
Salvatore, che Cristo Signore (Lc 2,11). Pi tardi Pietro, trascinato davanti al
tribunale ebraico per il fatto di aver guarito nel Tempio uno storpio nel nome di
Ges, ricapitol ai capi del popolo di Israele lesito (solo in apparenza negativo)
della missione del Messia di Nazaret: Questo Ges la pietra, che stata scartata da voi, costruttori, e che diventata la pietra dangolo. In nessun altro c la
salvezza; non vi infatti, sotto il cielo, altro nome dato agli uomini, nel quale
stabilito che noi siamo salvati (At 4,12). Di fronte a questi testi, da cui risulta
chiaramente che la salvezza dipende dalladesione per fede alla persona di Ges
Cristo, unico salvatore, sorge la domanda se e quale ruolo possa avere ancora la
circoncisione, rivendicata dagli ebrei come mezzo necessario per essere incorporati nella comunit dellalleanza e diventare eredi delle promesse di salvezza,
1 Sulla circoncisione secondo Paolo cf. N.E. Livesey, Circumcision as a Malleable Symbol
(WUNT II/295), Tbingen 2010, 77-122.
2 Cf. O. Betz, , , in H. Balz - G. Schneider (ed.), Exegetisches Wrterbuch zum Neuen Testament, III, Stuttgart etc. 1983, cols 186-189.

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 89-125

90

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

destinate alla discendenza di Abramo. Tenteremo di dare una risposta a questo


interrogativo, analizzando i passi lucani relativi alla circoncisione.
1. Lalleanza della circoncisione
risaputo che nellantichit la circoncisione maschile era diffusa nelle culture
di diversi popoli del mondo. Nel Medio Oriente la praticavano i semiti occidentali
(cf. Ger 9,24-25), a differenza di quelli orientali (Mesopotamia). Consisteva in una
semplice incisione della pelle oppure nellamputazione dellintero prepuzio3. A
parte il modo di eseguirla, occorre notare soprattutto un diverso valore accordato a
questo rito. Se per gli altri popoli la circoncisione svolgeva anche un importante
ruolo religioso (un rituale della pubert), per gli ebrei questo atto assunse un netto
significato etnico-confessionale, diventando lespressione della loro fede jahvistica
e il segno tangibile (seppure nascosto) della partecipazione allalleanza con Dio.
Un collegamento diretto con lidea del patto si verific verso lepoca dellesilio.
Fu in quel periodo che la tradizione sacerdotale (il Codice P) accolse lantica usanza, fatta risalire a un comando di Yhwh ma praticata fino allora in modo elastico,
e la impose a tutti gli ebrei maschi quale segno della loro appartenenza al popolo
dellalleanza4.
NellAntico Testamento la circoncisione viene menzionata per la prima volta
nel racconto sacerdotale di Gen 17, lunico testo biblico di tipo eziologico che
spiega il significato proprio del rito ebraico. Esso viene definito qui come alleanza perenne (MDlwo tyrb;V ) e come il segno dellalleanza (tyrb;V twa) tra Dio,
Abramo e la sua discendenza (vv. 10-11.13)5. Unallusione al racconto genesiaco
presente nel discorso di Stefano, il quale ricorda ai suoi avversari che Dio die3 In base alle testimonianze bibliche ed extrabibliche sembra che la forma pi radicale della
circoncisione fosse una nota distintiva degli ebrei; cf. J.M. Sasson, Circumcision in the Ancient
Near East, JBL 85/4 (1966) 473-476; R.C. Steiner, Incomplete Circumcision in Egypt and Edom:
Jeremiah (9:24-25) in the Light of Josephus and Jonckheere, JBL 118/3 (1999) 497-505.
4 Per unagile presentazione della circoncisione nel Pentateuco (origine, prassi e significato)
cf. inter alia P.R. Williamson, Circumcision, in T.D. Alexander - D.W. Baker (ed.), Dictionary of
the Old Testament: Pentateuch (CCBS 1), Downers Grove IL 2003, 122-125. Tra le recenti monografie dedicate a questo tema vogliamo segnalare: K. Grnwaldt, Exil und Identitt. Beschneidung,
Passa und Sabbat in der Priesterschrift (BBB 85), Frankfurt a.M. 1992; A. Blaschke, Beschneidung: Zeugnisse der Bibel und verwandter Texte (TANZ 28), Tbingen - Basel 1998, 64-105; D.A.
Bernat, Sign of the Covenant. Circumcision in the Priestly Tradition (SBL. Ancient Israel and Its
Literature 3), Atlanta GA 2009. Un problema a parte resta quello del modo in cui allalleanza con
Dio sono chiamate a partecipare le donne ebree, a cui non viene richiesta la circoncisione della carne;
cf. a tale proposito J.M. Lieu, Circumcision, Women and Salvation, NTS 40 (1994) 358-370;
S.J.D. Cohen, Why Arent Jewish Women Circumcised? Gender and Covenant in Judaism, Berkeley
CA 2005.
5 Si veda S.B. Hoenig, Circumcision: The Covenant of Abraham, JQR 53 (1962-63) 322334; E. Isaac, Circumcision as a Covenant Rite, Anthropos 59 (1964) 444-456.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

91

de [ad Abramo] lalleanza della circoncisione ( ) (At 7,8a).


La locuzione lucana, per quanto sia insolita (hapax legomenon biblico)6, mette in
risalto la profonda relazione tra i due doni di Dio: lalleanza e la circoncisione si
fondono in un rapporto che per il giudaismo diventer inseparabile7. Secondo il
volere di Dio, il patto stretto da lui con Abramo deve essere sanzionato nellatto
della circoncisione; vale a dire, la circoncisione sar un segno esterno e distintivo
dellalleanza con Dio (cf. Rm 4,11: ), oltre che un sigillo
della sua protezione e benedizione per Israele8.
In quanto segno, la circoncisione ha pertanto la funzione di simboleggiare laggregazione alla comunit di Israele e di far ricordare agli ebrei gli obblighi e i benefici derivati dal patto con Yhwh; motivo per cui ogni maschio incirconciso, in
quanto violatore dellalleanza, deve essere estirpato dal popolo (Gen 17,13-14)9.
In concreto, la fedelt allalleanza si manifestava nel rifiuto delle pratiche pagane
e nellosservanza della legge. Lesatto contrario avvenne al tempo dei Maccabei,
quando alcuni uomini scellerati di Israele costruirono un ginnasio a Gerusalemme
secondo le usanze delle nazioni, cancellarono i segni della circoncisione e si allontanarono dalla santa alleanza. Si unirono alle nazioni e si vendettero per fare il
male (1Mac 1,14-15). La circoncisione, considerata nellambiente greco-romano
6 L.T. Johnson, The Acts of the Apostles (Sacra Pagina 5), Collegeville MN 1992, 116: The
expression itself is unusual. Cf. per Libro dei Giubilei 15,28, dove la circoncisione detta il
segno dellalleanza; e Ps. Filone, Liber Antiquitatum Biblicarum 9,13.15: testamentum carnis.
Lespressione di Luca parallela a quelle che pi tardi compariranno spesso negli scritti rabbinici:
hDly mI tyrb;V e rDcb;D tyrb;V ; cf. H.L. Strack - P. Billerbeck, Kommentar zum Neuen Testament aus
Talmud und Midrasch. II: Das Evangelium nach Markus, Lukas und Johannes und die Apostelgeschichte, Mnchen 1924, 671; L.M. Barth, Berit Mila in Midrash and Agada, in Id. (ed.), Berit
Mila in the Reform Context, Los Angeles - New York 1990, 104-112.
7 Nel discorso di Stefano si segnala questo legame, senza voler denigrare o criticare la circoncisione, come rileva giustamente J. Jervell, Die Apostelgeschichte (KEKNT 3), Gttingen 1998, 234
nota 689: Von einer Kritik an der Beschneidung sprt man nichts, in sintonia con H. Conzelmann,
Die Apostelgeschichte (HNT 7), Tbingen (1963) 19722, 52. Cf. anche G.A. Krodel, Acts (Augsburg
CNT), Minneapolis MN 1986, 142.
8 E. Jacquier, Les Actes des Aptres (B), Paris 1926, 209, parlava di un gnitif dappropriation:
un pacte par circoncision; mentre per D. Marguerat, Les Actes des Aptres (112) (CNT Va),
Genve 2007, 242: Le gnitif a valeur objective : lalliance se donne pour signe et pour visibilit
la circoncision. A mio avviso, si tratta di un genitivo esplicativo (epesegetico): la circoncisione
un termine determinante che illumina o spiega quello determinato (lalleanza); cf. R. Pierri, Del
genitivo epesegetico nel Nuovo Testamento, Collectanea Christiana Orientalia 7 (2010) 197-215,
qui 203-204; oppure di un genitivo soggettivo, come ritiene S. Lgasse, Stephanos. Histoire et
discours dtienne dans les Actes des Aptres (LD 147), Paris 1992, 31.
9 Per una discussione pi articolata rinvio a M.V. Fox, The Sign of the Covenant. Circumcision in the Light of the Priestly t Etiologies, RB 81 (1974) 557-596; J. Goldingay, The Significance of Circumcision, JSOT 88 (2000) 3-18; M. Neihoff, Circumcision as a Marker of Identity.
Philo, Origen and the Rabbis on Gen. 17:1-14, JSQ 10 (2003) 89-123. Cf. anche J. Fleishman, On
the Significance of a Name Change and Circumcision in Genesis 17, JANES 28 (2001) 19-32, per
il quale il cambio del nome (da Abram in Abraham) e latto della circoncisione dovevano significare
la separazione dagli altri popoli e dai loro costumi perversi, soprattutto nel campo della sessualit.

92

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

una mutilazione indecente, era un marchio fisico (fin troppo visibile in una palestra
dove si entrava nudi) per il quale gli ebrei venivano immediatamente riconosciuti
e derisi. La ricostruzione del prepuzio per via chirurgica o mediante lallungamento del residuo della pelle (una tecnica nota come epispasm) consentiva quindi di
cancellare la loro diversit, ma al tempo stesso costituiva una rottura plateale
dellalleanza con Yhwh10.
Alcuni anni dopo, nel 167 a.C., il re Antioco IV Epifane intraprese una riforma
che mirava a consolidare tutto il suo regno con lintroduzione delle usanze ellenistiche. Anche agli ebrei fu impedito con forza di seguire le loro tradizioni e di osservare le leggi paterne (1Mac 1,41-64; 2Mac 6). Non solo veniva punito con la
morte chiunque volesse fare la circoncisione, ma era vietato persino di professarsi giudeo (2Mac 6,6). una riprova che lo scopo principale della riforma fu
quello di sradicare una mentalit e non il popolo; di qui la persecuzione che aveva
una matrice religiosa e non etnica. Come il termine (geografico) giudeo, anche
la circoncisione cominci a perdere gradualmente la sua connotazione nazionale e
territoriale per diventare lespressione dellappartenenza religiosa e culturale11.
Quello che dora in poi doveva distinguere gli ebrei da altri abitanti delluniverso
greco-romano era il modo di vivere e le usanze proprie degli ebrei, anzitutto la
circoncisione, avvertita dai pagani come un segno proprio del giudaismo e simbolo della diversit ebraica. Lo storico romano Tacito, voce autorevole di una percezione comune, riferisce che gli ebrei adottarono la circoncisione per distinguersi
da altri popoli per tale differenza. Quelli che si convertono al loro modo di vivere
seguono la stessa pratica12.
Della dimensione internazionale del giudaismo, presente in ogni parte del mondo abitato, testimone anche Giuseppe Flavio che nelle sue Antichit giudaiche,
10 Cf. Libro dei Giubilei 15,33-34; Giuseppe Flavio, Antichit giudaiche XII,5,1 240-241.
Per contrastare questa pratica, diffusa fino al II sec. d.C. e di cui si sente leco in 1Cor 7,18a, i rabbini imposero regole pi rigide (periah: lo spogliamento) per la circoncisione (milah), sicch si
rendeva difficile lallungamento del prepuzio (meshikhat orlah). Cf. N. Rubin, Brit Milah: A Study
of Change in Custom, in E.W. Mark (ed.), The Covenant of Circumcision. New Perspectives on an
Ancient Jewish Rite (Brandeis Series on Jewish Women), Hanover NH 2003, 87-97. Sulla circoncisione nella letteratura rabbinica cf. L.A. Hoffman, Covenant and Blood. Circumcision and Gender
in Rabbinic Judaism (CSJH), Chicago 1996; Blaschke, Beschneidung, 247-316.
11 Cf. A. Sisti, Il valore della circoncisione al tempo dei Maccabei, LA 42 (1992) 33-48;
S.J.D. Cohen, The Beginnings of Jewishness. Boundaries, Varieties, Uncertainties (Hellenistic Culture and Society 31), Berkeley - Los Angeles CA 1999, spec. 109-139.
12 Historiae V,5,2; cf. Orazio, Satira 1,9,70; Petronio, Fragmenta 37; Giovenale, Satira 14,99;
Marziale, Epigrammi 7,30. su questo sfondo etnico-culturale che va letta la distinzione palesata
nel NT (Paolo e Luca) tra giudei e greci, tra circoncisi e incirconcisi, tra quelli che provengono dalla circoncisione e quelli che hanno il prepuzio, una distinzione non dovuta al luogo
dorigine ma al credo professato e alla pratica dei costumi; cf. L. Troiani, La circoncisione nel
Nuovo Testamento e la testimonianza degli autori greci e latini, in G. Filoramo - C. Gianotto (ed.),
Verus Israel. Nuove prospettive sul giudeocristianesimo. Atti del Colloquio di Torino (4-5 novembre
1999) (Biblioteca di cultura religiosa 65), Brescia 2001, 95-107.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

93

unopera terminata intorno al 93-94 d.C., racconta le circostanze che portarono


alla conversione della dinastia dellAdiabene13. Sullesempio della madre, Elena,
che cominci a venerare Dio alla maniera tradizionale dei giudei e a vivere secondo i loro costumi, anche suo figlio Izate decise di divenire giudeo e si dichiar
pronto a sottoporsi alla circoncisione, perch riteneva che non sarebbe stato saldamente giudeo, se non si fosse circonciso (XX,2,4 38). Quando per la madre
venne a saperlo, cerc in tutti i modi di distoglierlo da questo proposito: i sudditi,
infatti, non avrebbero gradito che il loro capo osservasse usanze straniere. Alla fine
Izate si lasci convincere da Anania, un mercante giudeo che ebbe parte nella sua
conversione: Il re disse lui poteva venerare Dio anche senza essere circonciso,
se veramente aveva deciso di aderire alle pratiche nazionali dei giudei, perch era
quello che contava pi della circoncisione ( 41). La questione, tuttavia, fu solo
rinviata. Quando dalla Galilea giunse un altro giudeo, Eleazaro, che aveva fama di
essere estremamente rigido circa il rispetto delle leggi patrie e sosteneva con rigore lobbligo di osservare il precetto della circoncisione, spinto da lui, alla fine
Izate si fece circoncidere ( 43-46).
Da questa testimonianza risulta evidente che, nel periodo della stesura di Lc-At,
diventare giudeo non implicava un cambio di nazionalit, bens ladesione allo
stile di vita degli ebrei ispirato alla legge di Mos e sancito dalla circoncisione14.
Come dimostra tuttavia il consiglio di Anania e la posizione contraria di Eleazaro,
lopinione degli stessi ebrei sulla necessit della circoncisione dei pagani e sul
valore di questo rito per i convertiti non era per nulla unanime15. Infatti, varie fonti letterarie provenienti dalla diaspora greco-romana fanno ben intendere che ai
pagani che desideravano venerare Yhwh conformemente alla tradizione (timorati
13 Cf. J. Neusner, The Conversion of Adiabene to Judaism: A New Perspective, JBL 83
(1964) 60-66; L.H. Schiffman, The Conversion of the Royal House of Adiabene in Josephus and
Rabbinic Sources, in L.H. Feldman - G. Hata (ed.), Josephus, Judaism, and Christianity, Detroit
- Leiden 1987, 293-312; G. Gilbert, The Making of a Jew: God-Fearer or Convert in the Story of
Izates, USQR 44 (1991) 299-313.
14 S.J.D. Cohen, Crossing the Boundary and Becoming a Jew, HTR 82 (1989) 13-33, descrive sette modi diversi di condotta, in cui si esprimeva il rispetto e laffezione dei gentili nei riguardi del giudaismo. Parlando poi di Giuseppe Flavio, osserva: In general Josephus defines conversion to mean the adoption of the practices and customs of the Jews. And of all the practices and
customs of the Jews Josephus singles out circumcision. For him to adopt the customs of the Jews
and to be circumcised are synonymous expressions (p. 27). Sul modo in cui Giuseppe Flavio
presenta specificamente la circoncisione al mondo pagano cf. L.R. Lincoln, Josephus Apologetic
Strategy: The Case for Circumcision, Acta Patristica et Byzantina 20 (2009) 324-340.
15 Lo stesso Flavio, che narra la circoncisione degli idumei (edomiti) al tempo di Giovanni
Ircano (Antichit giudaiche XIII,19,1 257-258), pi avanti scrive che Erode il Grande, di discendenza idumea, fu etichettato (da Antigono) un idumeo, cio un mezzo giudeo (XIV,15,1 403).
Questa ambiguit circa la giudaicit dei convertiti resa bene da Cohen, Crossing the Boundary,
30: In the eyes of outsiders a proselyte or convert was a gentile who became a Jew. But in the eyes
of (some?) Jews, a gentile who converted to Judaism became not a Jew but a proselyte, that is, a Jew
of a peculiar sort.

94

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

di Dio), ossia rispettando i costumi ebraici, specie quelli in materia sessuale, la


circoncisione spesso non veniva richiesta quale condizione preliminare per essere
affiliati al giudaismo. Lala pi intransigente senzaltro la richiedeva. Solo in un
secondo tempo, una volta ammessi nella comunit di Israele, la circoncisione si
rendeva auspicabile ai fini di una piena integrazione (proseliti)16, come lo era daltronde losservanza di altre prescrizioni della legge mosaica17.
Naturalmente, e lo conferma anche il dibattito in seno al giudaismo dellet
ellenistica, la circoncisione da sola non era sufficiente per assicurare i benefici
dellalleanza di Abramo, tanto per gli ebrei quanto per i loro simpatizzanti pagani.
Del resto la Bibbia in primo luogo che, anticipando quasi il problema, mette in
luce che la circoncisione nella carne deve essere una consacrazione totale a Dio e
non un atto formale-cultuale. I passi biblici, dove si insiste sullesigenza di circoncidere metaforicamente le labbra (Es 6,12.30), lorecchio (Ger 6,10) e soprattutto
il cuore (Lv 26,41; Dt 10,16; 30,6; Ger 4,4; 9,25; Ez 44,6-9), non sono un invito a
spiritualizzare il rito, quanto piuttosto un richiamo a rispettare il senso originale
della circoncisione18. Sulla stessa linea donda si pone in un certo senso Paolo,
quando scrive che giudeo colui che lo interiormente, e la circoncisione quella del cuore (Rm 2,29). Senza lintima adesione allalleanza con Dio, che per un
ebreo si concretizza nellosservanza della legge, la circoncisione rimane un segno
vuoto (cf. Rm 2,25; 4,12; 1Cor 7,19; Gal 5,6; 6,15; Fil 3,3).
La metafora biblica nota anche a Luca che per bocca di Stefano chiama gli
ebrei della diaspora che lo accusavano di bestemmia: testardi e incirconcisi
() nel cuore e nelle orecchie (At 7,51). Stefano non ha voluto di
certo negare il fatto che erano circoncisi. Sulla scia dei profeti dellAT, ha rinfac16 Divenne obbligatoria invece nellepoca successiva, quando ad opera dei rabbini nacque un
vero e proprio rituale della conversione dei proseliti (Talmud di Babilonia, Yebamot 46a-b; Gerim
1,1); cf. S.J.D. Cohen, The Rabbinic Conversion Ceremony, JJS 41 (1990) 177-203.
17 Cf. J.J. Collins, A Symbol of Otherness. Circumcision and Salvation in the First Century,
in J. Neusner - E.S. Frerichs (ed.), To See Ourselves as Others See Us. Christians, Jews, Others in
Late Antiquity (Scholars Press Studies in the Humanities), Chico CA 1985, 163-186 = in Id., Seers,
Sibyls & Sages in Hellenistic-Roman Judaism (Supplements to the JSJ 54), Leiden etc. 1997, 211238, dove vengono analizzati: Oracoli Sibillini III e IV, Lettera di Aristea, Giuseppe e Asenet, le
opere di Filone Alessandrino e di Giuseppe Flavio. Con Collins, anche se sembra non conoscere il
suo studio, concorda Troiani, La circoncisione, 107: In conclusione, si pu formulare lipotesi
che la circoncisione, nel Nuovo Testamento come pure in altre fonti contemporanee, designi una
parte del variegato mondo dei seguaci della legge che si estendeva dalle colonne dErcole alla Persia. Come dice Giuseppe, essa non che il culmine del giudaizzare. Sullo stesso tema si veda
inoltre N.J. McEleney, Conversion, Circumcision and the Law, NTS 20 (1974) 319-341, spec.
320-333; J. Nolland, Uncircumcised Proselytes?, JSJ 12 (1981) 173-194; M. Goodman, Jewish
Proselytizing in the First Century, in J. Lieu et alii (ed.), The Jews among Pagans and Christians
in the Roman Empire, London - New York 1992, 53-78 (qui 73-74).
18 J.S. Derouchie, Circumcision in the Hebrew Bible and Targums: Theology, Rhetoric, and
the Handling of Metaphor, BBR 14/2 (2004) 194: from the beginning Israels covenant sign
pointed to an inward reality, and all instances of metaphorical circumcision seem to have grown out
of this basis. Alle pp. 193-200 vengono discussi i passi biblici citati sopra.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

95

ciato loro soltanto di non aver dato prova nella vita come i loro padri (cf. v. 39)
della piena dedizione a Dio e al suo piano di salvezza. Anche in questo caso il
criterio di (in)fedelt allalleanza della circoncisione (v. 8) losservanza della
legge (v. 53: voi che avete ricevuto la legge mediante ordini dati dagli angeli e non
lavete osservata)19.
2. Giovanni Battista e Ges: circoncisi allottavo giorno
Come testimoniano i vangeli sinottici, la circoncisione non fu oggetto della
predicazione di Ges. Eppure egli parlava spesso di temi tipici della teologia giudaica, come il sabato, la prassi del digiuno, le leggi della purit o il rapporto con i
peccatori. Solo in Gv 7,22-23 Ges accenna al rito della circoncisione, peraltro
senza alcuna punta polemica nei suoi riguardi. Questo dimostra che al tempo di
Cristo la circoncisione degli ebrei era un fatto fuori discussione nel giudaismo
della madrepatria20. in tale contesto positivo che siamo invitati a rileggere gli
unici due riferimenti alla circoncisione nel terzo vangelo.
Nei capitoli iniziali del suo primo libro indirizzato a Teofilo Luca racconta
lannuncio, la nascita e i primi anni di vita di Giovanni Battista e di Ges (Lc
1,52,52). Gli eventi che si susseguono nel tempo e nello spazio sono disposti
quasi in parallelo. Ci vale anche per il rito della circoncisione, praticato su entrambi i protagonisti otto giorni dopo la loro nascita, e connesso con la cerimonia
dellimposizione del nome21.
19 Cf. G. Ross, Atti degli Apostoli. Commento esegetico e teologico, Roma 1998, 322. Non
direi tuttavia come pensa J. Zmijewski, Die Apostelgeschichte (RNT 5), Regensburg 1994, 316
che qui si tratta di una relativizzazione (die Relativierung) del segno dellalleanza da parte di
Stefano, il quale mettendo laccento sullobbedienza a Dio e alla sua Parola punterebbe verso una
circoncisione interiore. Luca infatti, a differenza di Paolo, non sembra affatto propenso a voler
spiritualizzare la circoncisione.
20 Cf. F.W. Horn, Der Verzicht auf die Beschneidung im frhen Christentum, NTS 42 (1996)
479-505 (qui 480).
21 nota la struttura letteraria elaborata da R. Laurentin, Structure et thologie de Luc I-II,
Paris 1957, secondo cui in Lc 1-2 sono contenuti due dittici, quello delle annunciazioni (a Zaccaria
e a Maria) e quello delle nascite (di Giovanni e di Ges), seguiti ciascuno da un episodio complementare. Nel tentativo di risolvere alcune difficolt di questa strutturazione, E. Galbiati, La circoncisione di Ges (Luca 2, 21), BeO 8 (1966) 37-45 (= in Id., Scritti Minori, II, Brescia 1979, 449460), ha proposto, traendo lo spunto dalle composizioni narrative dellAT, di distinguere in Lc 1-2
gli episodi sviluppati e dialogati (scene) e le annotazioni brevi e aride (notizie). E cos alla notizia della nascita nella serie del Battista (1, 57-58) corrisponde la meravigliosa scena della
nascita di Ges (2, 1-20); viceversa alla scena della circoncisione e imposizione del nome di
Giovanni (1, 59-57 sic!) corrisponde la semplice notizia della circoncisione e imposizione del
nome di Ges (2, 21), e non la scena della presentazione (2, 22-39). Questultima sar invece
parallela alla visitazione (1, 39-56) (p. 38). Lultimo punto viene contestato da T. Stramare, La
circoncisione di Ges. Significato esegetico e teologico, BeO 26 (1984) 193-203 (qui 195), secondo cui tra gli episodi della circoncisione (Lc 2,21) e della presentazione (Lc 2,22-24) esiste una

96

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

Lavvenimento riguardante Giovanni inizia con le parole: E accadde che allottavo giorno vennero per circoncidere () il bambino e volevano chiamarlo con il nome di suo padre, Zaccaria (Lc 1,59). Il racconto prosegue mettendo in
mostra una scena dialogata, che ruota intorno al nome da imporre al bambino (vv.
60-63). Pi avanti si registra un evento analogo, in cui coinvolto il figlio di Maria:
E quando furono trascorsi gli otto giorni per circonciderlo (
), allora gli fu dato il nome Ges, quello con cui era stato chiamato dallangelo prima che egli fosse stato concepito nel grembo (Lc 2,21). Come si pu vedere, Luca narra gli stessi fatti, anche se la notizia sullimposizione del nome a
Ges risulta alquanto scarna rispetto alla vivace scena parallela riguardante Giovanni.
Unaltra osservazione concerne il racconto simmetrico della circoncisione, su
cui vogliamo focalizzare lattenzione. In parte a motivo della sintassi e in parte
complice lo stile laconico dei due testi lucani, gli interpreti tendono facilmente a
enfatizzare lepisodio dellimposizione del nome, lasciando nellombra quello della circoncisione, soprattutto quella di Ges22. Riesce difficile cogliere la vera funzione dellatto della circoncisione nel racconto lucano, anche perch si presta poca
attenzione al valore dellespressione ottavo giorno. Questo particolare, messo
bene in luce in Lc 1,59a e 2,21a, non una semplice indicazione di tempo, ma un
riferimento specifico alla legge biblica della circoncisione23.
stretta connessione che rimanda a Lv 12,3.6. Al di l della validit di queste proposte, palese
lintenzione di Luca di voler raccontare che Giovanni e Ges furono entrambi sottoposti allo stesso
rito della circoncisione e che in quelloccasione fu dato loro il nome.
22 Alcuni esempi: J.M. Creed, The Gospel According to St. Luke. The Greek Text with Introduction, Notes, and Indices, London 1930, 38: The fact of the circumcision of Jesus is implied, but in
no way emphasied. The emphasis falls upon the naming of the child; H. Schrmann, Das Lukasevangelium. Erster Teil: Kommentar zu Kap. 1,1-9,50 (HTKNT 3/1), Freiburg etc. 1969, 119: die
Beschneidung nur Situationsangabe ist; G. Leonardi, Linfanzia di Ges nei Vangeli di Matteo e di
Luca, Padova 1975, 220: evidente che a lui [Luca] sta a cuore non tanto la circoncisione
riferita brevemente e indirettamente con una proposizione subordinata quanto limposizione del
nome Ges; similmente R.E. Brown, The Birth of the Messiah. A Commentary on Infancy Narratives in Matthew and Luke, Garden City NY 1979, vede nella circoncisione an attached notice
(p. 431) che Luca subordinates [it] totally to the naming of Jesus (p. 432); L. Legrand, On
lappela du nom de Jsus (Luc II, 21), RB 89/4 (1982) 481-491: La circoncision joue un rle
secondaire tant pour Jsus en II, 21 que pour Jean en I, 59. Cela correspond au rle secondaire quelle
a dans la thologie de Luc (p. 483; cf. p. 485); Stramare, La circoncisione di Ges, 197.
23 Lesempio emblematico quello di Brown, The Birth of the Messiah, 432, secondo cui la
notizia di Luca sullottavo giorno concerne la cronologia degli eventi: the circumcision serving as
a chronological intermediary (eight day) between the birth and the purification/presentation; e in
seguito aggiunge che Luca gives non legal context to the circumcision; sulla stessa linea Legrand,
On lappela, 482: La circoncision nest mentionne que pour servir de cadre chronologique.
Invece per Galbiati, La circoncisione di Ges, 40-41, lottavo giorno si riferisce al compimento
delle predizioni su Giovanni (Lc 1,13.20) e su Ges (Lc 1,31); cf. F. Bovon, Lvangile selon saint
Luc (1,1-9,50) (CNT IIIa), Genve 1991, 120: le v. 21 parle de laccomplissement des jours; ainsi
se ralise le programme prvu dans 1, 26-38. difficile comprendere il motivo del verdetto di M.
Wolter, Das Lukasevangelium (HNT 5), Tbingen 2008, 108: Der Hinweis auf die Beschneidung

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

97

a) Il precetto di circoncidere il figlio lottavo giorno


La circoncisione dei figli maschi allottavo giorno dalla nascita un requisito
della legge mosaica e precisamente del Codice sacerdotale (P). In Gen 17,12 Dio
diede ad Abramo, con il quale concludeva un patto, il seguente ordine: Quando
avr otto giorni ( ), sar circonciso tra voi ogni maschio di generazione in generazione24. Questa norma, obbligatoria non soltanto per gli ebrei ma
anche per gli schiavi stranieri di loro propriet, fu prontamente eseguita da Abramo
che circoncise se stesso, suo figlio Ismaele e tutti i maschi della casa sua (vv. 2327); e lo fece, nonostante Dio gli avesse detto prima che Ismaele sarebbe stato
escluso dallalleanza perenne che avrebbe stipulato con Isacco e la sua discendenza (vv. 19-21). Il comando di Dio fu adempiuto alla lettera per la prima volta solo
un anno dopo, in seguito alla nascita di Isacco25: Abramo, poi, circoncise
() Isacco lottavo giorno ( ), come gli aveva ordinato
Dio (21,4). A differenza di Ismaele, circonciso allet di tredici anni (17,25), Isacco venne circonciso otto giorni dopo la nascita; per questo la sua circoncisione, che
rispetta scrupolosamente il tempo stabilito da Dio, il segno dellalleanza26. Il
precetto divino di far circoncidere i figli maschi viene ripetuto dopo lesodo
dallEgitto e indicato al popolo come norma generale da osservare per tutti gli
israeliti. E anche questa volta lautore sacerdotale mette laccento sul tempo fissa[Lk 1,59] dient jedoch lediglich der Zeitangabe und sollte nicht als Beleg fr die in V. 6 gegebene
Auskunft ber die Gesetzestreue der Eltern des Kindes interpretiert werden (ma egli non dice,
purtroppo, perch non si deve farlo); 133: Auch hier [Lk 2,21] fungiert der Hinweis auf die Beschneidung lediglich als nebenschliche Zeitangabe ( ).
24 Lottavo giorno menzionato inoltre in Lxx Gen 17,14 ( ), che costituisce
unaggiunta rispetto al testo masoretico. Tuttavia, con la versione greca concorda anche il Pentateuco
samaritano e il Libro dei Giubilei 15,14, e ci potrebbe deporre a favore dellautenticit della
variante dei Lxx; cf. M. Thiessen, The Text of Genesis 17:14, JBL 128/4 (2009) 625-642; Id.,
Contesting Conversion. Genealogy, Circumcision and Identity in Ancient Judaism and Christianity,
Oxford - New York 2011, 17-42, 67-86.
25 Questa notizia ripresa in diverse fonti giudaiche (Filone Alessandrino, Quaestiones et solutiones in Genesim 3,38 e gli scritti rabbinici: Genesi Rabbah 60,5; Pesiqta de-Rav Kahana 12,1;
Rabbah Ct I,2,5); per i testi cf. Thiessen, The Text, 639 nota 52.
26 Viceversa, linadempienza del tempo della circoncisione porta allesclusione dallalleanza
(cf. Lxx Gen 17,14). Parafrasando il racconto genesiaco, il Libro dei Giubilei (un apocrifo redatto
verso il 160-150 a.C.) offre questo commento: non vi trasgressione di un sol giorno rispetto
allottavo giorno, poich una legge eterna, stabilita e scritta nelle tavole del cielo. E tutti quelli che
sono nati e non si circoncidono la carne del prepuzio fino allottavo giorno, non appartengono ai
figli del patto che il Signore promise ad Abramo e appartengono, invece, ai figli della corruzione
(15,25-26; tr. P. Sacchi). Se ne evince che il Libro dei Giubilei ha rafforzato lordine di Gen 17,12;
cf. Livesey, Circumcision, 18-19. Questa usanza fu nota a Origene: I giudei affermano che la circoncisione principale quella che si fa lottavo giorno, ed del tutto diversa da quella dovuta alle
circostanze (Contro Celso 5,48; tr. A. Colonna); cf. Ps. Clemente, Recognitions 9,28. Invece, secondo i rabbini, la circoncisione pu essere praticata tra lottavo e il dodicesimo giorno di vita
(Mishnah, Shabbat 19,5; cf. anche Talmud di Babilonia, Shabbat 137a).

98

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

to per eseguire il rito: E lottavo giorno ( ) circoncider


() la carne di suo (di figlio maschio) prepuzio (Lv 12,3)27.
Nella tradizione sacerdotale del Pentateuco ci sono altre ricorrenze, dove compare la stessa formula stereotipa di sette-otto giorni (Lv 8,339,1; 14,8-10; 15,1314; 22,27; 23,36; Nm 6,9-10; 29,12.35). In questi testi larco di sette giorni indica
un tempo congruo di preparazione o purificazione rituale per poter prendere parte
allevento cultuale che avr luogo nellottavo giorno, il quale non sembra comunque rivestire un significato particolare28. Il caso pi vicino alla legge della circoncisione labbiamo in Lv 22,27, dove si restringe luso degli animali sacrificali a
partire dallottavo giorno di vita: Quando nascer un vitello o un agnello o un
capretto, star sette giorni presso la madre; dallottavo giorno in poi, sar gradito
come vittima da consumare con il fuoco per il Signore (cf. Es 22,29). Poich la
circoncisione viene prescritta per lottavo giorno, implicito che nei sette giorni
precedenti il neonato (sia quello animale che quello umano) doveva restare con la
madre; anche perch, dopo aver partorito un figlio maschio, la madre rimane impura per sette giorni (Lv 12,2)29. Daltro canto, mentre un animale dichiarato
pronto per il sacrificio a partire dallottavo giorno, il bambino umano invece deve
essere circonciso proprio in quel giorno. Tale necessit non dipende dal fatto che
lottavo giorno abbia qui uno speciale potere rituale, ma sottolinea semplicemente
che si tratta del primo giorno nella vita dellinfante ebreo in cui possibile praticare il rito30.
La notizia di Luca sulla circoncisione di Giovanni Battista e di Ges allet di
otto giorni indice di una prassi diffusa nellambiente giudaico al tempo di Cristo.
Ne testimone anche Paolo che rievoca la sua esperienza personale (Fil 3,5), mentre il quarto vangelo vi allude in modo indiretto: ai giudei che gli rimproveravano
di aver guarito un uomo di sabato e quindi di aver profanato il riposo festivo, Ges
27 J. Milgrom, Leviticus 1-16. A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary (AB 3),
New York 1991, 747: The purpose of this interpolation is to emphasize the uniqueness of this rite;
not the rite itself, which was practiced ubiquitously by Israels Semitic neighbors, but the timing of
the rite, which in Israel alone was performed in infancy and, precisely, on the eighth day.
28 Bernat, Sign of the Covenant, 61: In all but one of the seven/eight-day sequences, the eighth
day is not a particularly auspicious or climactic day. Rather, it is the first day following the crucial
seven days.
29 Da ci dipende la spiegazione talmudica dellottavo giorno: Perch la Torah ordina la circoncisione allottavo giorno? Perch gli ospiti non gioiscano da soli, mentre il padre e la madre
sono tristi (limpurit della puerpera impedisce il rapporto sessuale) (Nidda 31b). Invece per i
midrashim (Rabbah Dt 6,1; Pesiqta Rabbati 48,4), lo si deve alla compassione di Dio che ha rimandato la circoncisione allottavo giorno, affinch il neonato acquistasse maggiore forza fisica; cf.
anche Filone Alessandrino, Quaestiones et solutiones in Genesim 3,48.
30 Unaltra interpretazione, teologica, offre N.M. Sarna, Genesis (The JPS Torah Commentary), Philadelphia etc. 1989, 125: The eighth day is particularly significant because the newborn
has completed a seven-day unit of time corresponding to the process of Creation. Sulla prassi
ebraica della circoncisione dei bambini cf. inoltre W.H.C. Propp, The Origins of Infant Circumcision in Israel, Hebrew Annual Review 11 (1987) 355-370.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

99

ricorda che di sabato viene compiuta unaltra azione, paragonabile alla sua opera
di guarigione: la circoncisione (si presume pertanto che lottavo giorno cadeva
proprio di sabato), che non viene reputata una trasgressione della legge di Mos
(Gv 7,23), ma ritenuta addirittura obbligatoria31.
Nellopera lucana si parla di tre bambini ebrei che furono circoncisi lottavo
giorno; oltre a quelle di Giovanni Battista e di Ges, viene menzionata anche la
circoncisione di Isacco. Il fatto ricordato nel discorso di Stefano: E cos egli
(Abramo) gener Isacco e lo circoncise () lottavo giorno (
) (At 7,8b). Pur non essendo una citazione letterale, il passo allude
chiaramente allevento narrato in Gen 21,4, anche se lordine della clausola temporale sembra ripreso da Lv 12,3 (o da Lxx Gen 17,14)32. Linclusione di questa
notizia in apparenza marginale in un discorso che riassume la lunga storia di
Israele crea meraviglia e induce a supporre che non si tratti affatto di un particolare casuale. Colpisce inoltre che Stefano, parlando di Abramo, abbia tralasciato di
ricordare la circoncisione del patriarca. Se lha fatto, vuol dire che sapeva (e cos
pure Luca) che, secondo il comando di Dio, il segno dellalleanza la circoncisione fatta lottavo giorno. Per questo motivo Stefano ha dato lesatta indicazione del
tempo, al fine di sottolineare che la circoncisione di Isacco fu la prima ad essere
eseguita secondo il volere di Dio. Se questa intuizione giusta, anche la seconda
parte di At 7,8b, ellittica, andrebbe intesa allo stesso modo, ossia integrandola con
entrambi i verbi (e non solo con il primo, come fanno di solito le traduzioni) della
prima parte: E cos Abramo gener Isacco e lo circoncise lottavo giorno, e Isacco
[gener] Giacobbe [e lo circoncise lottavo giorno], e Giacobbe [gener] i dodici
patriarchi [e li circoncise lottavo giorno]33. Dato che il v. 8 serve per collegare la
31 Si legge nel Talmud, Shabbat 132a: E lottavo giorno il prepuzio (del bambino) deve essere
circonciso, anche se ci accade nel giorno di shabbat La circoncisione e i suoi preparativi soppiantano il shabbat: questo il punto di vista di R. Eliezer Ora, i rabbini sono in dissacordo con
R. Eliezer per quanto attiene ai preparativi della circoncisione; mentre quanto alla circoncisione
stessa, tutti ritengono che essa soppianti il shabbat. Cf. J.D. Derrett, Circumcision and Perfection:
A Johannine Equation (John 7:22-23), EvQ 63/3 (1991) 211-224.
32 Lo stesso ordine compare in Lc 1,59 ( ). Questa lezione, attestata nei
codici pi rinomati (tra cui il Sinaitico e il Vaticano), da preferire rispetto alla variante
, presente in alcuni manoscritti (A 053 f1 M), che riflette lordine di Gen 21,4 e mostra
uno stile migliore rispetto alla lezione accettata dalle edizioni critiche. In ogni caso, come indica
luso dei Lxx, la scelta tra le due varianti non incide sul senso dellespressione.
33 H. Braun, Geschichte des Gottesvolkes und christliche Identitt. Eine kanonisch-intertextuelle Auslegung der Stephanusepisode Apg 6,18,3 (WUNT II/279), Tbingen 2010, 195: Ausdrcklich wird Isaak in den Bund Gottes mit Abraham einbezogen durch den Hinweis, dass Abraham Isaak am achten Tag beschneidet, und dasselbe ber Isaak und Jakob festgehalten wird:
. Da in dieser Notiz ein Verb fehlt, kann vor dem Hintergrund von 7,8b sowohl
als auch ergnzt werden. Dasselbe gilt fr die ebenfalls elliptische Notiz
(7,8d), die wohl nicht nur die Zeugung der zwlf Patriarchen
durch Jakob, sondern auch deren Beschneidung impliziert. Tuttavia, a Braun, il quale scrive a ragione che ist das Gebot der Beschneidung ein kategorischer Imperativ, der keine Ausnahme duldet
(p. 197), sembra sfuggire limportanza della circoncisione fatta lottavo giorno. Questo particolare

100

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

storia di Abramo (vv. 2-7) con quella di Giuseppe-Giacobbe (vv. 9-16)34, di conseguenza la promessa fatta da Dio ad Abramo e fondata sullalleanza passer ai suoi
discendenti non solo per via generazionale, ma con la circoncisione lottavo giorno;
cos che essi diventeranno eredi dellalleanza della circoncisione (v. 8a). Si
comprende allora perch Luca, in At 7,8b, come pure in Lc 1,59 e 2,21, oltre a ricordare il fatto della circoncisione, abbia voluto precisare il tempo in cui venne
eseguita, quello stabilito dalla legge. Altrove nella Bibbia sono menzionati (solo)
altri due casi di ebrei circoncisi lottavo giorno (Gen 21,4: Isacco; Fil 3,5: Paolo)35.
Quindi, dei cinque episodi, tre sono propri di Luca ed difficile pensare che egli li
abbia rievocati senza una precisa intenzione, tanto pi che i testi in questione presentano uno stile tipicamente lucano36.

non stato neppure notato dai commentatori che prima di Braun hanno avuto la stessa intuizione:
Jacquier, Les Actes, 209: il faut complter la phrase : Isaac engendra et circoncit Jacob; G.
Sthlin, Die Apostelgeschichte (NTD 5), Gttingen (1962) 19807, 106; G. Schneider, Die Apostelgeschichte. I. Teil: Einleitung. Kommentar zu Kap. 1,1-8,40 (HTKNT 5/1), Freiburg etc. 1980, 455:
Beide Prdikate (er zeugte er vollzog die Beschneideung) sind auch mit Isaak und Jakob zu
verbinden; F.F. Bruce, The Book of the Acts (NICNT), Grand Rapids MI (1954) 19882, 135: the
sign of the covenant was trasmitted from generation to generation, from Isaac to Jacob, and from
Jacob to his twelve sons; Johnson, The Acts, 116: the birth (and implied circumcision) of Jacob,
and of Jacobs twelve sons. Restano sul vago: J. Roloff, Die Apostelgeschichte (NTD 5), Gttingen
1981, 120; Jervell, Die Apostelgeschichte, 234. Bene, invece, ha evidenziato il fenomeno R. Pesch,
Die Apostelgeschichte. Apg 1-12 (EKK 5/1), Neukirchen - Vluyn 1986, 250: Auf der Einhaltung
der Beschneidung am achten Tag liegt ein Akzent, auch bei den Aussagen ber Isaak und Jakob
sowie Jakob und die zwlf Patriarchen.
34 J. Kilgallen, The Stephen Speech. A Literary and Redactional Study of Acts 7,2-53 (AnBib
67), Rome 1976, 45-46: transitional verse.
35 Sulla circoncisione di Paolo cf. Y. Matta, Circoncis le huitime jour. Larrire-fond juif
de lidentit de Paul en Philippiens 3,4-6, RevSR 85/2 (2011) 181-209.
36 Ci vale non solo per At 7,8b, ma anche per i due passi evangelici. In Lc 1,59a compare la
costruzione semitizzante (septuagintismo) seguita da un verbo finito, molto cara a
Luca (22 volte in Lc); cf. Brown, The Birth of the Messiah, 369; lo stesso autore, a proposito di Lc
2,21 scrive: The verse describing the circumcision/naming is highly Lucan in construction (p.
431); dello stesso avviso J. Jervell, Die Beschneidung des Messias, in A. Fuchs (ed.), Theologie
aus dem Norden (SNTU A 2), Linz 1976, 68-78 (qui 70). Ma gi A. Plummer, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to S. Luke (ICC 30), Edinburgh (1896) 19235, 61,
osservava che il passo lucano contains an unusual number of marks of Lk.s style. Infatti, fa
parte dello stile di Luca la forma , che comparir altre 7 volte in Lc-At. Un influsso semitico risente pure luso del che serve per introdurre unapodosi (
); cf. M.-J. Lagrange, vangile selon saint Luc (B), Paris 1926, 80; F. Blass - A. Debrunner,
Grammatik des neutestamentlichen Griechisch, Gttingen 200118, 442,5a. Infine, limpiego
dellarticolo davanti allinfinito ( ) perfettamente nello stile di Luca che usa questa
forma 37 volte nella sua opera. Sulla costruzione a senso , cf. Blass - Debrunner, Grammatik, 400,2; e R. Pierri, Linfinito con articolo al genitivo nel Nuovo Testamento, LA
57 (2007) 381-403 (qui 385-386), con opportune precisazioni.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

101

b) Il significato della circoncisione di Ges lottavo giorno


Fin dallinizio i cristiani ebbero in grande considerazione il fatto che Ges
fosse stato circonciso, tanto che la circoncisione non solo divenne oggetto di aspre
dispute teologiche, ma era presente pure, soprattutto a partire dal medioevo, nella
mistica e nella piet popolare (almeno 21 localit del continente europeo si gloriavano di possedere le reliquie del santo prepuzio), e persino nella musica e nellarte sacra37.
Un altro tipo di interesse, in prevalenza apologetico, caratterizzava il periodo
patristico. Il tema della circoncisione di Ges fu sfruttato allora nei testi dialogici,
nei quali i cristiani si confrontavano con gli ebrei (in modo reale o immaginario)
per riaffermare la propria identit religiosa38. Se da una parte gli apologisti cristiani riconoscevano il valore della circoncisione e della legge ebraica di fronte al
mondo pagano, dallaltra invece sottolineavano il loro superamento nella nuova
alleanza. La circoncisione serviva quale prova per confermare la vera umanit di
Ges, i suoi legami di sangue con la razza ebraica e la sua rivendicazione di essere
il Messia della stirpe di Davide, venuto per dare compimento alla legge e per portare agli ebrei il messaggio della salvezza. Ma nello stesso tempo la circoncisione
di Ges veniva indicata come fine del vecchio rito ebraico39. In tal modo la circoncisione era giudaizzata e messa a fondamento della giudaicit di Ges, e insieme
de-giudaizzata, perch a partire da essa si cercava di rimarcare limpronta nongiudaica dei cristiani i quali, pur avendo ripudiato la circoncisione, facevano riferimento a questo rito e alla legge ebraica per ribadire la loro diversit40.
37 Cf. Blaschke, Beschneidung, 441-443; J.J. Mattelaer - R.A. Schipper - S. Das, The
Circumcision of Jesus Christ, The Journal of Urology 178 (2007) 31-34: it seems paradoxical
that uncircumcised Christian artists created so many images relating to the circumcision of Jesus
in painting and sculpture (p. 31). Fino al 1960 la chiesa cattolica celebrava il 1 gennaio (lottavo
giorno dopo il Natale) la festa della Circoncisione di Ges, le cui origini risalgono al VI secolo;
cf. F. Cabrol, Circoncision (fte de la), in F. Cabrol - H. Leclercq (ed.), Dictionnaire darchologie
chrtienne et de liturgie, III/2, Paris 1914, 1717-1728. Intorno a questa festa fior una ricca
produzione omiletica; cf. ad es. M. Aubineau, Proclus de Constantinople, In illud: Et postquam
consummati sunt dies octo (Lc 2, 21), in E. Lucchesi - H.D. Saffrey (ed.), Mmorial Andr-Jean
Festugire. Antiquit paenne et chrtienne (Cahiers dorientalisme 10), Genve 1984, 199-207;
C. Dohmen, Und als der achte Tag erfllt war (Lk 2,21). Wider das Vergessen der
Beschneidung Jesu, BiLi 80/4 (2007) 276-279. tuttora celebrata nelle chiese ortodosse orientali,
mentre nella liturgia romana, con la riforma promossa dal concilio Vaticano II, al suo posto fu
ricollocata la solennit di Maria Santissima Madre di Dio.
38 Cf. A.J. Jacobs, Dialogical Differences: (De-)Judaizing Jesus Circumcision, JECS 15/3
(2007) 291-335, che studia diversi testi: Giustino il Martire, Dialogo con Trifone 67,5.7; Origene,
Contro Celso 1,22; 5,48; Evagrio il Gallo, Altercatio Simonis Iudaei et Theophili Christiani 3,14;
5,18; Ambrosiaster, Liber quaestionum 50; Ps. Atanasio, Quaestiones ad ducem Antiochum 37.
39 By taking circumcision upon himself, Christ both affirms the significance of the Jewish
ritual and yet renders it moot and past-tense [] Christs circumcision was at once a scrupulous
adherence to the law and a total obliteration of that law: Jacobs, Dialogical Differences, 310, 330.
40 Seguendo lo stesso criterio di rilettura patristica, A.J. Jacobs offre ulteriori approfondimenti

102

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

Per quanto sia interessante, questa storia degli effetti (Wirkungsgeschichte)


non offre contributi decisivi alla comprensione del significato del testo di Luca e
del valore attribuito alla circoncisione di Ges nel contesto pi ampio di Lc-At.
Non sono neppure convincenti i pi recenti tentativi che si prefiggono di togliere
il velo sulla circoncisione di Ges narrata da Luca. C chi vede in questo episodio
un segno della solidariet del divino Redentore con il genere umano41; chi ritiene
che Luca, conservando il riferimento alla circoncisione, abbia lasciato intendere
che il rito ebraico trattato dal terzo evangelista con circospezione ha trovato
in Ges il suo compimento e superamento42; chi, infine, ipotizza che Luca
abbia voluto fornire con il suo racconto una risposta critica alla questione lasciata
aperta da Paolo43. Queste interpretazioni hanno in comune la ricerca del senso di
Lc 2,21 mediante il ricorso ad altre fonti, mentre il significato teologico-ecclesiale
della circoncisione di Ges presente e va inquadrato nel testo stesso e si lascia
cogliere nel contesto storico in cui levangelista lo ha inserito.
Anche un lettore distratto si accorger subito che nei capitoli iniziali del terzo
vangelo si respira un clima prettamente giudaico44. Oltre al culto celebrato nel
Tempio di Gerusalemme, colpisce linsistenza con cui Luca descrive la vita quotidiana degli ebrei ordinata dalla legge (, , , )45. I membri delle due famiglie protagoniste del racconto, quella sacerdotale di Giovanni e
quella davidico-regale di Ges, vengono presentati come ebrei ortodossi. I genitori di Giovanni, Zaccaria e Elisabetta, erano entrambi giusti davanti a Dio e osservavano irreprensibili tutte le leggi e le prescrizioni del Signore (Lc 1,6). Inoltre,
di Zaccaria si dice che entr nel Tempio secondo lusanza del servizio sacerdotale (v. 9). Luca ha messo in luce con maggiore cura losservanza della legge da
parte della famiglia di Ges. Giuseppe e Maria vennero al Tempio con il loro figlio
in altri studi: Blood Will Out: Jesus Circumcision and Early Christian Readings of Exodus 4:2426, Henoch 30/2 (2008) 311-332; The Kindest Cut: Christs Circumcision and the Signs of Early
Christian Identity, JSQ 16 (2009) 97-117.
41 Galbiati, La circoncisione di Ges, 40.
42 Stramare, La circoncisione di Ges, 199.
43 J. Keiser, The circumcision of Jesus (Luke 2:21), Scriptura Nouvelle Srie (Montral) 9/2
(2007) 39-52: Paul nowhere claims that Jesus was uncircumcised, to be sure, but his indifference
[towards circumcision] provides a plausible motivation for Luke to mention that Jesus was circumcised on the eighth day (p. 51), e ci perch Paolo, cos ragiona Keiser, dichiarando lirrilevanza
della circoncisione per essere in Cristo, potrebbe aver insinuato that Jesus circumcision is unimportant. Ma lo stesso Paolo non si vantava forse di essere stato circonciso allet di otto giorni?
(Fil 3,5, non citato da Keiser).
44 Uno dei primi ad accorgersene fu Marcione, il quale elimin Lc 1-2 dalla sua versione del
vangelo di Luca, non riuscendo a sopportare la giudaicit di questi racconti, di cui la circoncisione
di Ges il segno pi marcato, come osserva a ragione J.B. Tyson, Marcion and Luke-Acts. A Defining Struggle, Columbia SC 2006, 99: Jesus Jewishness is nowhere more emphatically signified
than in the story of his circumcision.
45 Bisogna convenire con Jervell, Die Beschneidung des Messias, 73: Eine Hauptangelegenheit in der lk Vorgeschichte besteht darin, da das Gesetz erfllt wird.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

103

per adempiere le prescrizioni richieste per la purificazione rituale (Lc 2,22: secondo la legge di Mos) e per lofferta del sacrificio in riscatto del fanciullo (vv. 23.24:
come prescrive la legge del Signore). Proprio in quelloccasione, mentre portavano il bambino Ges per fare ci che la legge prescriveva a suo riguardo, essi
incontrarono nel santuario il vecchio Simeone (v. 27). I genitori di Ges fecero
ritorno a Nazaret, non prima per di aver adempiuto ogni cosa secondo la legge
del Signore (v. 39). Ma anche in seguito la famiglia di Ges continuava a osservare la legge, come lascia intendere la loro abitudine di recarsi ogni anno in pellegrinaggio a Gerusalemme per la festa di Pasqua. Quando Ges ebbe dodici anni,
vi salirono secondo la consuetudine della festa (vv. 41-42).
La notizia della circoncisione di Ges, come pure quella parallela riguardante
Giovanni46, si inserisce nel quadro generale, in cui Luca ritrae allalba dellera
messianica la vita, ispirata alla legge di Dio, delle due famiglie ebree. Questo tessuto di vita ebraico doveva essere familiare ai lettori giudeo-cristiani dellopera
lucana, ma anche a quelli convertiti dal paganesimo, nutriti dalla Scrittura ebraica
(Lxx) e istruiti sulle radici della loro fede (cf. Lc 1,4; 2,42). Per questa ragione
probabilmente Luca non si sforza di spiegare gli atti compiuti in Lc 1-2 dai protagonisti del racconto; levangelista vuole mettere in luce piuttosto il motivo delle
loro azioni. Del resto, la pratica della circoncisione era talmente nota che appariva
superfluo spiegarla. Parlando della circoncisione di Ges, e lo stesso vale per quella di Giovanni, Luca non ha trascurato il particolare del tempo dellesecuzione del
rito (ottavo giorno), facendo intendere che quellatto costituiva il compimento
della legge prescritta da Dio. Se prima ha elogiato la giustizia e la sottomissione di
Zaccaria e Elisabetta alla legge di Dio (Lc 1,6), successivamente dice lo stesso in
forma narrativa di Maria e Giuseppe47. Grazie alla loro piet, Ges, come ogni
ebreo, ha ricevuto il segno dellalleanza di Abramo ed entrato a far parte della
comunit del popolo dIsraele. Se con la circoncisione egli aderisce al popolo a cui
furono date le promesse, al tempo stesso egli si inserisce nellottica del piano di
Dio che tramite lui, il promesso Messia, porta la salvezza destinata in primo luogo
a Israele e poi a tutte le genti48. Latto della circoncisione rivela allora e assicura
46 Merita di essere riportato il breve commento di J.B. Green, The Gospel of Luke (NICNT),
Grand Rapids MI - Cambridge U.K. 1997, 108: Lukes initial characterization of Zechariah and
Elisabeth concerned their righteousness They obey the constraints of the covenant (circumcision
on the eighth day) as well as the comand of Gabriel regarding the naming of their child As people
who live blamelessly before the Lord (1:6), Zechariah and Elizabeth circumcise their son on the
eighth day.
47 Pure questa volta il commento di Green colpisce nel segno: He [Luke] presents Jesus family as obedient to the Lord, unquestionably pious. Thus: (1) they circumcise Jesus on the eighth day
(Gen 17:9-14; Lev 12:3; m. abb. 18:3) They piety is disclosed in the narrative equivalent of 1:6
(The Gospel of Luke, 140). Su questa linea prosegue anche W. Eckey, Das Lukasevangelium. Unter
Bercksichtigung seiner Parallelen. Teilband 1: Lk 1,110,42, Neukirchen - Vluyn 2004, 157-158.
48 Sullimportanza della circoncisione di Ges per la sua identit messianica insiste molto
Jervell, Die Beschneidung des Messias, 77-78: Jesus ist Israel Messias auch, weil er beschnitten

104

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

che la prossima missione del Messia Ges si realizzer in linea con il disegno salvifico previsto nella Scrittura. In sostanza si tratta dello stesso messaggio che traspare dal detto giovanneo di Ges: la salvezza viene dai giudei (Gv 4,22b). Per
Luca, che narra lo svolgimento storico del disegno salvifico di Dio, la circoncisione di Ges segna quindi linizio del compimento messianico del piano di Dio, che
ebbe il suo punto di partenza nellalleanza di Yhwh con Abramo e nelle promesse
fatte alla sua discendenza. Come verranno inseriti in questa alleanza e diventeranno partecipi delle promesse salvifiche anche quelli di altra razza (cf. At 10,28:
), ossia le nazioni pagane, una domanda che (per il momento) esula
dal testo di Luca, il quale si limita a considerare con vivo interesse la vita religiosa
del popolo dIsraele, le sue usanze e i suoi riti (compresa la circoncisione), perch
in seno a questo popolo Dio ha fatto sorgere il Messia Salvatore.
3. La bipartizione della chiesa nascente
Secondo la testimonianza degli Atti, la primigenia comunit cristiana era formata da giudei credenti in Cristo e da gentili convertiti. I due gruppi venivano
abitualmente distinti in base al loro legame con il rituale della circoncisione e definiti rispettivamente: circoncisi (ebrei) e incirconcisi (pagani)49.
La terminologia lucana doveva essere diffusa nellambiente di quel tempo. Ne
una prova lepistolario paolino, in cui si possono contare diversi esempi di espressioni analoghe (Rm 4,12; Gal 2,12; Col 4,11; Tt 1,10; cf. anche Rm 3,30; 1Cor
7,19; Gal 2,7; 5,6; 6,15; Col 3,11; Ef 2,11)50. Questo modo comune di parlare si
ispira probabilmente allAT, dove i nemici del popolo dIsraele vengono spesso
D colui che
identificati con il termine spreggiativo incirconcisi (laggettivo lro
D prepuzio, compare 35 volte nella
ha il prepuzio, associato al sostantivo hDlr o
Bibbia ebraica)51. Il vocabolo semitico stato tradotto dai Lxx con laggettivo
war. Ein unbeschnittener Messias ist fr eine frhe christliche und judenchristliche Betrachtung ein
Selbstwiderspruch Weil nun die Kirche die geradlinige Fortsetzung der Geschichte des Gottesvolkes und selbst Trger der Verheiungen ist, mu Lk markieren, da der Messias Jesus der echte
und wahre Messias ist.
49 Ai primordi della comunit giudeo-cristiana di Gerusalemme si fece sentire unaltra distinzione dovuta perlomeno ai fattori culturali (At 6,1): tra i cristiani locali di lingua ebraica ()
e quelli della diaspora di lingua greca (). Cf. C.C. Hill, Hellenists and Hebrews. Reappraising Division within the Earliest Church, Minneapolis MN 1992; D.A. Fiensy, The Composition of the Jerusalem Church, in R. Bauckham (ed.), The Book of Acts in Its First Century Setting.
IV: The Book of Acts in Its Palestinian Setting, Grand Rapids MI - Carlisle 1995, 213-236.
50 Cf. in merito E.E. Ellis, The Circumcision Party and the Early Christian Mission, in Id.,
Prophecy and Hermeneutic in Early Christianity. New Testament Essays (WUNT 18), Tbingen
1978, 116-128 (orig. 1968).
51 Allopinione di Derouchie, Circumcision, 191: the term foreskinned/uncircumcised
became a figure of speech for all those opposed to the LORD and his people.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

105

non circonciso, che nel NT si ritrova solo una volta in At 7,51,


dove Stefano stigmatizza lagire dei suoi avversari ebrei: Testardi e incirconcisi
() nel cuore e nelle orecchie. Lo stesso concetto viene espresso da
Luca (come pure e soprattutto da Paolo che lo predilige) col termine equivalente
che indica in senso proprio il prepuzio o il membro virile, e in
senso metaforico: lincirconcisione52.
La prima volta che nel libro degli Atti si assiste a un incontro (scontro) tra i due
mondi, tra circoncisi e incirconcisi, avviene in occasione dellingresso nella
chiesa del centurione romano Cornelio (At 10,111,18). Questo racconto, non a
caso giudicato come un vertice del secondo libro a Teofilo53, costituisce il punto
cruciale nel travagliato processo di apertura della comunit cristiana, finora esclusivamente etnico-ebraica, al mondo pagano. Cornelio, infatti, il primo gentile che
diventa membro della chiesa di Cristo. A dire il vero, il primo non ebreo che emise
la professione di fede in Ges fu leunuco etiope (At 8,26-39). Questo pagano,
devoto al Dio degli ebrei (v. 27: era venuto per il culto a Gerusalemme), dopo
una rapida istruzione impartitagli da Filippo, credette in Cristo e si fece battezzare.
Si trattava solo di una prima avvisaglia (cf. anche At 8,5-13: la conversione dei
samaritani) di quello che sarebbe accaduto dopo54. A differenza delleunuco, uno
straniero che abbandon subito la scena facendo ritorno al suo paese, Cornelio
entr a contatto diretto con la comunit giudeo-cristiana palestinese e in seguito a
un intervento di Dio fu ufficialmente accolto in essa da Pietro, capo della chiesa, e
battezzato insieme con tutta la sua famiglia. Questo evento straordinario non poteva di certo passare inosservato agli occhi vigili dei credenti ebrei. Proprio sulla
loro reazione vogliamo fermare ora la nostra attenzione.
Mentre Pietro sta pronunciando un discorso in casa di Cornelio, allimprovviso
scende sui presenti lo Spirito santo (At 10,44-48: la cosiddetta Pentecoste dei
gentili). Lauditorio era formato da due gruppi. Nella cerchia dei pagani si trova52 Cf. O. Betz, , in Balz - Schneider (ed.), Exegetisches Wrterbuch zum Neuen
Testament, I, Stuttgart etc. 1980, cols 32-133; J. Marcus, The Circumcision and the Uncircumcision
in Rome, NTS 35 (1989) 67-81 (qui 73-79); secondo lui, e sono termini
metonimici (pars pro toto) per designare gruppi di persone.
53 Marguerat, Les Actes, 363: un sommet du livre des Actes.
54 Cf. R.C. Tannehill, The Narrative Unity of Luke-Acts. A Literary Interpretation. II: The Acts
of the Apostles, Minneapolis MN 1990, 137, 143. Blaschke, Beschneidung, 451, fa notare che il
primo non circonciso accolto nella chiesa stato Cornelio, dato che sia i samaritani che gli etiopi
praticavano la circoncisione. Ma Luca non accenna a questo fatto. Pi convincente mi sembra
linterpretazione di J.-F. Racine, Lhybridit des personnages: une stratgie dinclusion des gentils
dans les Actes des Aptres, in E. Focant - A. Wnin (ed.), Analyse narrative et Bible. Deuxime
Colloque International du RRENAB, Louvain-la-Neuve, avril 2004 (BETL 191), Leuven 2005, 559566, secondo cui le prime azioni missionarie della chiesa, i cui beneficiari avevano un ambiguo
statuto etnico-religioso (i samaritani, leunuco etiope, il centurione romano Cornelio), indicano le
tre tappe successive di un processo dinclusione dei gentili nella comunit cristiana. Les deux
premires tapes manifestent une tendance inclure toutes sortes de gens dans lglise. La troisime
tape confirme cette tendance (p. 566).

106

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

vano, oltre a Cornelio, i suoi parenti e gli amici intimi che il centurione aveva invitato a casa sua (v. 24). Un secondo gruppo era costituito da alcuni fratelli venuti
con Pietro da Joppe, lodierna Giaffa (v. 23b). In quella citt portuale esisteva una
comunit giudeo-cristiana, cresciuta di numero in seguito al risuscitamento di Tabita operato da Pietro (At 9,36-42). Luca riferisce che questi fratelli (erano in sei,
come si dir in At 11,12b) furono colti da meraviglia alla vista di quanto stava accadendo: E i fedeli circoncisi, che erano venuti con Pietro, si stupirono che perfino sui pagani si fosse effuso il dono dello Spirito santo (At 10,45).
I fratelli di Joppe vengono caratterizzati da Luca come i credenti (provenienti)
dalla circoncisione ( ). Dovevano essere certamente ebrei
che professavano la fede nel Signore Ges. Il loro stupore non era dovuto alla discesa dello Spirito, ma al fatto che un tale dono salvifico precisa con enfasi Luca
era stato effuso anche sui pagani ( )55. In questa affermazione
sorprende il modo in cui viene designato il gruppo di Cornelio. Allinizio del racconto Luca ha fornito al lettore una descrizione etico-religiosa del centurione romano: era pio e timorato di Dio con tutta la sua famiglia; faceva molte elemosine
al popolo e pregava sempre Dio (v. 2; cf. vv. 30-31). Questa valutazione positiva
confermata dai subalterni di Cornelio che lo reputavano uomo giusto e timorato
di Dio, stimato da tutta la nazione dei giudei (v. 22a; cf. v. 35). Se ne evince che
Cornelio si contraddistingueva per la sua piet, rettitudine, generosit e sottomissione a Yhwh. Egli apparteneva alla categoria dei timorati di Dio (
), come venivano chiamati i credenti gentili che simpatizzavano con il
giudaismo e, pur non essendo circoncisi e aggregati a pieno titolo alla comunit
religiosa di Israele (come i proseliti), rispettavano alcune usanze ebraiche e frequentavano la sinagoga (At 13,16.26). evidente quindi che il soldato romano e i
suoi compagni non erano pagani nel vero senso della parola (goyim): gente empia, impura e idolatra. Eppure i fratelli di Joppe li hanno bollati come pagani, lasciando cos intendere che per un ebreo, un pagano rimane sempre tale. Non sembra tuttavia che Luca voglia qui biasimare i circoncisi, solo perch erano fortemente attaccati a un giudaismo etnico. Nonostante il loro pregiudizio sul conto dei
pagani, essi sono pur sempre per lui fratelli credenti in Cristo56.
55 Marguerat, Les Actes, 397: Le pointe porte sur le qui prcde . C.M. Martini,
Atti degli Apostoli (NVB 37), Roma 1970, 175, ritiene che i fratelli di Joppe si immaginavano che,
anche dopo il discorso di Pietro, sarebbe stata necessaria per Cornelio e i suoi laccettazione di tutte
le pratiche giudaiche prima di passare al battesimo e ricevere lo Spirito Santo. Mi sembra per che
qui laccento cada sul fatto che genera stupore (la salvezza donata a tutti) e non tanto sulle condizioni da richiedere ai pagani, di cui si parler in At 15,1.5. Infatti, con il avverbiale (cf. Blass
- Debrunner, Grammatik, 442,8), che compare pi volte in seguito (At 10,47; 11,1.15.17.18.20;
15,8), Luca vuole sottolineare che la salvezza si trova a disposizione sia dei giudei che dei gentili.
56 Mi vedo daccordo con C.K. Barrett, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Acts
of the Apostles. I: Preliminary Introduction and Commentary on Acts I-XIV (ICC), Edinburgh
1994, 529.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

107

Dei fatti avvenuti a Cesarea si sparse presto la voce e cos gli apostoli e i fratelli che stavano in Giudea vennero a sapere che anche i pagani avevano accolto la
parola di Dio (At 11,1). Lintera comunit della Giudea, i capi con tutti i credenti,
fu scossa dalla notizia che allannuncio del vangelo avevano aderito anche i pagani ( ), dove si sente leco della meraviglia da cui furono colti in
precedenza i compagni giudeo-cristiani di Pietro (At 10,45). E che nel primo come
nel secondo caso dietro lo stupore si celasse un sentimento di inquietudine religiosa, lo dimostra il prosieguo del racconto, allorch Luca narra la contestazione subita da Pietro al suo arrivo nella capitale della Giudea: quando Pietro sal a Gerusalemme, quelli (provenienti) dalla circoncisione muovevano critiche contro di lui
dicendo: Sei entrato in casa di uomini non circoncisi e hai mangiato con loro!
(At 11,2-3). Tuttaltro che un trionfo, il ritorno di Pietro a Gerusalemme stato
salutato da unondata di critiche che hanno preso di mira i suoi sospetti rapporti
damicizia con lambiente pagano. Pi esplicitamente, gli veniva rinfacciato di
essersi intrattenuto con uomini che hanno il prepuzio (
), ossia con gente incirconcisa e quindi assolutamente da evitare per un
giudeo (cf. 10,28a). Senza dire che lapostolo aveva persino condiviso con essi la
tavola, con il rischio di incorrere nellimpurit57. Se vero che Pietro ha varcato la
soglia dellabitazione di Cornelio (v. 27) ed probabile anche che abbia accettato
di fermarsi per alcuni giorni nella casa dei gentili (v. 48b), non si dice per da nessuna parte che egli abbia mangiato con loro, bench sarebbe stato del tutto naturale aspettarsi che a un ospite venisse offerto un pasto. Seppure leggermente ingrandita, laccusa rivolta a Pietro era fondata e sollevava un serio interrogativo: a
un giudeo, sia pure cristiano, era permesso avere una comunione domestica e conviviale con un gentile? Dalla risposta a questa domanda dipendeva il futuro della
missione cristiana. Un altro problema legato con questo anche se (per il momento) rimaneva ancora nascosto dietro le quinte era se un uomo con prepuzio,
vale a dire un pagano senza il segno dellalleanza di Abramo, qualora avesse deciso di diventare cristiano, dovesse farsi circoncidere per entrare a pieno diritto nel
popolo di Dio58. La ricapitolazione di Pietro dei fatti accaduti a Cesarea (vv. 4-18),
fornir una prima risposta a queste problematiche. Ora per ci interessa di scoprire
lidentit di coloro che le hanno sollevate: .
Dal testo di Luca non immediatamente chiaro se tutta la comunit contestava
lagire di Pietro o se si trattava soltanto di alcuni suoi esponenti. Supporre che a
quel tempo vi fosse nella Citt Santa, tra i cristiani, un gruppo composto di fedeli
57 Cf. R. Bauckham., James, Peter, and the Gentiles, in B. Chilton - C. Evans (ed.), The Missions of James, Peter, and Paul. Tensions in Early Christianity (Supplements to NovT 115), Leiden
- Boston 2005, 91-142 (qui 91-116); C.R. Sosa, Pureza e impureza en la narrativa de Pedro, Cornelio y el Espritu Santo en Hechos 10, Kairs nr 41 (2007) 55-78.
58 Cf. J. Taylor, Les Actes des deux Aptres. V: Commentaire historique (Act. 9,1-18,22) (B.
Nouvelle Srie 23), Paris 1994, 44-45; Barrett, The Acts, I, 533.

108

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

circoncisi, distinto da un altro che comprendesse i non circoncisi, una tesi difficile da sostenere59. In quella fase, infatti, tutta la chiesa era , in quanto tutti i suoi membri erano circoncisi. Per cui appare naturale concludere che i
contestatori di Pietro erano voce dellintera chiesa madre60. Se vero tuttavia che
agli inizi la comunit gerosolimitana era formata unicamente da ebrei circoncisi,
allora lespressione risulta a dir poco anacronistica61, a meno che
Luca non abbia voluto segnalare con essa la presenza in seno alla chiesa nascente
di una fazione di credenti particolarmente zelanti, che non erano disposti a fare
concessioni sui princpi del giudaismo62. Un dibattito del genere, che avrebbe coinvolto i cristiani di origine ebraica, non sarebbe affatto insolito, se si tiene conto del
clima aperto e pluralista che regnava nel giudaismo di quellepoca. Non irragionevole dunque pensare che nellora in cui la chiesa ex circumcisione stava aprendo
le sue porte ai fratelli ex gentibus, allinterno della comunit giudeo-cristiana fosse
sorta una discussione tra lala moderata e quella intransigente, verosimilmente
minoritaria, sul modo di accogliere i credenti provenienti dal paganesimo nel popolo di Dio63.
59 Cos ribadiva gi Jacquier, Les Actes, 338. Cf. anche O. Bauernfeind, Kommentar und Studien zur Apostelgeschichte (WUNT 22), Tbingen (1939) reprint 1980, 152.
60 Vari autori optano per questa ipotesi, ma pochi ne spiegano il motivo: Haenchen, Die Apostelgeschichte (KEKNT 3), Gttingen 1956, 341; Conzelmann, Die Apostelgeschichte, 73:
sind fr Lk nicht eine Gruppe, sondern die ganze Jerusalemer Gemeinde; sie heit hier
so, um auf die Problematik hinzuweisen; Roloff, Die Apostelgeschichte, 175; Krodel, Acts, 202;
J.A. Fitzmyer, The Acts of the Apostles. A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary (AB
31), New York 1998, 471; Jervell, Die Apostelgeschichte, 314: Die Leute, , sind
nicht eine Sondergruppe innerhalb der Gemeinde es sind alle Christen gemeint; Ross, Atti, 436
nota 6; Y. Mathieu, La figure de Pierre dans luvre de Luc (vangile et Actes des Aptres). Une
approche synchronique (B. Nouvelle Srie 52), Paris 2004, 272; Bauckham., James, 116.
61 Come ha notato giustamente R.P.C. Hanson, The Acts (NCB), Oxford 1967, 126.
62 Tra i fautori di questa posizione possiamo menzionare: A. Wikenhauser, Die Apostelgeschichte (RNT 5), Regensburg 1938, 81; Bruce, The Book of the Acts, 220; Sthlin, Die Apostelgeschichte, 158: Die Trger der Kritik mssen Vorlufer jener strengten Judenchristen, der sogennanten Judaisten, gewesen sein; Martini, Atti, 177: i Giudei convertiti di stretta osservanza;
Williams, Acts, 199; Johnson, The Acts, 197; J.J. Scott, Jr., The Churchs Progress to the Council
of Jerusalem according to the Book of Acts, BBR 7 (1997) 205-224 (qui 214); B. Witherington, III,
The Acts of the Apostles. A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary, Grand Rapids MI - Cambridge U.K.
1998, 362: a particularly vocal smaller group within the Jerusalem church; D.G. Peterson, The
Acts of the Apostles (PNTC 5), Grand Rapids MI - Cambridge U.K. 2009, 343; e soprattutto Marguerat, Les Actes, 400 nota 159, che adduce argomenti a suo favore: 1) lappellativo quelli dalla
circoncisione non equivale al duplice appellativo gli apostoli e i fratelli che stavano in Giudea,
con cui viene riacapitolata tutta la comunit; 2) Luca evita di mettere gli apostoli in una luce sfavorevole e non accenna ad alcun dissenso in seno ai Dodici; 3) nellepistolario paolino, dove si riscontra pi volte questa espressione, non si riferisce mai allintera comunit. Gli altri
esegeti, che si allineano a questa posizione, non accettano per la tesi dellesistenza di un partito
della circoncisione: I.H. Marshall, The Acts of the Apostles. An Introduction and Commentary
(Tyndale NTC 5), Grand Rapids MI (1980) reprint 1982, 195; Barrett, The Acts, I, 537; J.D.G. Dunn,
The Acts of the Apostles (Epworth Commentaries), Peterborough U.K. 1996, 149.
63 Secondo Ellis, The Circumcision Party, 116-117, almeno per quanto concerne At 11,2,

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

109

4. La circoncisione e la salvezza per mezzo della fede


Il problema appena sfiorato nella disputa originata a Gerusalemme in seguito
allingresso ufficiale di Cornelio nella chiesa, si ripresentato pi tardi nella diaspora e precisamente ad Antiochia, da dove partita lattivit evangelizzatrice di
Paolo e Barnaba. I due missionari, al ritorno dal loro fecondo viaggio apostolico,
riferirono alla comunit quanto Dio aveva fatto per mezzo loro e come avesse
aperto ai pagani la porta della fede (At 14,27). Luca non lo dice, ma lecito presumere che questi gentili credettero in Cristo e che con il battesimo furono accolti
nella chiesa. Lo stesso vale per la comunit antiochena che contava un gran numero di credenti di origine gentile (At 11,20-24). La loro pacifica esistenza fu per
turbata dallarrivo di certi individui giunti dal territorio giudaico. Ora alcuni, venuti dalla Giudea, cominciarono a insegnare64 ai fratelli: Se non vi fate circoncidere ( ) secondo lusanza di Mos, non potete essere salvati
(At 15,1). Anche se non viene detto, plausibile ritenere che dietro il pronome
si nascondano i giudeo-cristiani che in passato avevano criticato lagire di
Pietro (At 11,2-3)65. Una conferma in tale direzione viene dalla lettera scritta al
termine dellassemblea di Gerusalemme, dove si dice che essi provenivano dalla
chiesa madre (At 15,24: ), ma la loro fu uniniziativa a titolo personale, perch non avevano ricevuto alcun incarico ufficiale da parte dei capi della
chiesa ( ). Le idee diffuse da questi agitatori suscitarono il
dissenso di Paolo e Barnaba, i quali intavolarono con essi un dibattito alquanto
animato66. Non riuscendo per a raggiungere un consenso, alla fine si decise di
sottoporre la questione al giudizio dei dirigenti della chiesa madre. La missione fu
refers to a particular kind of Jewish believer. For it alludes to a dispute not between
Jewish and Gentile Christians but between two groups in the Jerusalem church. Cf. anche J.J. Scott,
Jr., Parties in the Church of Jerusalem as Seen in the Book of Acts, JETS 18 (1975) 217-227 (spec.
223-226).
64 Limperfetto ha un valore incoativo; cf. Mateos, El aspecto verbal en el Nuevo
Testamento (Estudios de NT 1), Madrid 1977, 218.
65 Cos ipotizza ad es. S.G. Wilson, Luke and the Law (SNTS MS 50), Cambridge 1983, 73;
Zmijewski, Die Apostelgeschichte, 433. Pi generico C.K. Barrett, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles. II: Introduction and Commentary on Acts XV-XXVIII (ICC),
Edinburgh 1998, 698, che fa leva sul termine Giudea, il quale va inteso nel senso etnico piuttosto
che geografico: siccome questi personaggi anonimi () provenivano dal territorio giudaico,
naturale aspettarsi che rappresentassero un punto di vista giudaico. Per Dunn, The Acts, 199; e
Fitzmyer, The Acts, 541, erano giudeo-cristiani, forse di formazione farisaica, come quelli che operano in At 15,5; pi sicuro X. Levieils, Identit juive et foi chrtienne : la place de ltranger dans
le peuple de Dieu (Ier-IVe sicles), in J. Riaud (ed.), Ltranger dans la Bible et ses lectures (LD
213), Paris 2007, 205-245 (qui 215). Alcuni manoscritti (il codice , il minuscolo 614 e pochi altri,
seguiti dal testo in margine della versione siriaca) hanno reso esplicito che si trattava dei credenti
del partito dei farisei, ma indubbiamente unaggiunta posteriore influenzata da At 15,5; cf. S.A.
Panimolle, Il discorso di Pietro allassemblea apostolica. I: Il concilio di Gerusalemme (Atti 15,
1-35) (StBi 1), Bologna 1976, 52.
66 Sulla litote (At 15,2), che compare 8 volte negli Atti, cf. H.J. Cadbury, Litotes

110

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

affidata a una delegazione guidata da Paolo e Barnaba. Durante il viaggio essi


raccontavano ai cristiani della Fenicia e della Samaria la conversione dei pagani,
suscitando grande gioia in tutti i fratelli (v. 3). Giunti a Gerusalemme, riferirono la
notizia alla comunit e ai suoi capi, ma questa volta la reazione non fu altrettanto
unanime. Si alzarono racconta Luca alcuni del partito dei farisei, che erano
diventati credenti, affermando: necessario circonciderli (
) e ordinare [loro] di osservare la legge di Mos (v. 5). Se non si pu dire
con certezza che alcuni del partito dei farisei siano da identificare con alcuni
venuti dalla Giudea (At 15,1)67, evidente che in entrambi i casi si trattava di
esponenti della stessa corrente conservatrice dei giudeo-cristiani. Lo conferma il
contenuto delle loro dichiarazioni, dove la circoncisione viene indicata come conditio sine qua non per essere salvati (dove con la salvezza si intende diventare
membri del popolo di Dio e beneficiari dei suoi doni)68. I sobillatori giunti ad Antiochia non negano la salvezza ai pagani, ma ritengono unicamente che senza la
circoncisione secondo la prassi mosaica ( ) impossibile ottenerla. Con questa posizione inflessibile collima la richiesta formulata da alcuni
farisei diventati credenti69. Anchessi, con la presunzione di interpretare il volere
di Dio (abitualmente Luca riserva il verbo impersonale al piano salvifico di
Dio)70, dichiarano impliciter che la salvezza dei pagani dipende dalla circoncisione,
nonch dallosservanza della legge di Mos ( )71.
In At 15,1-5 Luca ha preparato il terreno per il dibattito successivo (vv. 6-29),
che viene a ragione definito il cuore o il centro delle sue 72.
in Acts, in E.H. Barth - R.E. Cocroft (ed.), Festschrift to Honor F. Wilbur Gingrich. Lexicographer,
Scholar, Teacher, and Committed Christian Layman, Leiden 1972, 58-69 (qui 62-63).
67 Vanno distinti, secondo Haenchen, Die Apostelgeschichte, 427; G. Schneider, Die Apostelgeschichte. II. Teil: Kommentar zu Kap. 9,1-28,31 (HTKNT 5/2), Freiburg etc. 1980, 178 nota 37.
68 pertinente il commento di Barrett, The Acts, II, 699: It appears that Luke tells us in this
opening verse what the argument of the chapter is to be about: it will be about being saved, about
being a Christian at all. Il responsabile dellaccento messo sulla salvezza potrebbe essere stato
Luca, se si accetta lipotesi che egli abbia aggiunto i vv. 1-2 ai vv. 3-5 (le due fonti); cf. Taylor, Les
Actes, V, 201, 215-216.
69 evidente quindi che non tutti gli ex farisei pensavano allo stesso modo (anche Paolo era
fariseo: 23,6; 26,5). Con Ross, Atti, 562 nota 18, notiamo quindi la tendenza di Luca a isolare
alcuni (: At 15,1.5.24) contestatori rispetto al resto della comunit (v. 22).
70 Cf. Jervell, Die Apostelgeschichte, 390. D.J. Williams, Acts (NIBC 5), Peabody MA 1990,
262, ipotizza che i giudaizzanti potevano fondare il loro insegnamento sui passi di Es 12,48-49 e Is
56,6.
71 Nella letteratura rabbinica, erede della corrente farisaica, sar ben rimarcato il concetto
della circoncisione come condizione della salvezza. Si legge ad es. in Genesi Rabbah 21,9: Disse
Adamo: Chi salver i miei figli da questo fuoco [della Gehenna]? R. Hunah (ca. 350) in nome di R.
Abb (ca. 290) disse: La spada allude alla circoncisione. Per altri testi cf. H.L. Strack - P. Billerbeck,
Kommentar zum Neuen Testament aus Talmud und Midrasch. IV/2: Exkurse zu einzelnen Stellen
des Neuen Testaments, Mnchen 1928, 1063-1067; McEleney, Conversion, 333-334; Levieils,
Identit juive, 218-219.
72 Cf. Barrett, The Acts, II, 709. Non intenzione del nostro studio affrontare il problema dei
rapporti di At 15 con Gal 2,1-10. I due racconti si riferiscono senzaltro allo stesso evento e concor-

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

111

I partecipanti di quel raduno ecclesiale, passato alla storia come concilio apostolico, hanno dovuto rispondere alla provocazione dei giudeo-cristiani osservanti,
secondo cui i convertiti provenienti dalla gentilit, per diventare cristiani, dovevano essere prima aggregati al popolo dIsraele tramite la circoncisione. Dietro questa richiesta di natura pratico-legale si celava tuttavia un problema teologico fondamentale che si pu riassumere in questi termini: la circoncisione e losservanza
della legge mosaica sono o non sono necessari per la salvezza?
stato notato che la pericope di At 15,1-29 rassomiglia per certi aspetti a quella di At 11,1-1873. In entrambi i casi si assiste a una disputa che prende le mosse
dalle obiezioni sollevate dai fratelli sul conto dei gentili, e entrambe
le volte viene data una risposta che non centra direttamente lobiettivo. Lepisodio
di Cornelio, infatti, ha fatto sorgere il dilemma se agli ebrei, sia pure cristiani, fosse consentito intrattenersi con i pagani. Pietro, senza fornire una risposta precisa a
tale quesito, ha terminato il suo discorso con una dichiarazione generica sulla salvezza dei pagani (11,17), sufficiente per a rassicurare i suoi contestatori, i quali
hanno ammesso che anche ai pagani ( ) Dio ha dato la conversione per la vita (v. 18). In confronto a questo, il dibattito del cap. 15, come si
vedr in seguito, percorre un cammino inverso. La controversia nata dalle affermazioni di alcuni oltranzisti giudeo-cristiani circa le condizioni per la salvezza dei
pagani convertiti (la circoncisione e losservanza della legge di Mos) trova una
risposta generale sul diritto dei pagani ad essere ammessi nel popolo di Dio e si
conclude con la fissazione delle norme per regolamentare la comunione di mensa
tra i credenti giudei e quelli provenienti dal paganesimo (v. 29). solo a questo
punto che viene ufficialmente risolta la questione sollevata in At 11,2 dai circoncisi, mentre la risposta alle richieste fatte da alcuni venuti dalla Giudea e da
alcuni del partito dei farisei (At 15,1.5) va ricercata negli interventi complementari di Pietro e Giacomo74.
Il breve discorso di Pietro (vv. 7b-11) una riflessione sullagire di Dio nella
dano nella sostanza, ma il punto di vista di Luca si distingue nettamente da quello di Paolo. Per un
agile confronto cf. D. Trobisch, The Council of Jerusalem in Acts 15 and Pauls Letter to the Galatians, in C. Seitz - K. Greene-McCreight (ed.), Theological Exegesis. Essays in Honor of Brevard
S. Childs, Grand Rapids MI - Cambridge U.K. 1999, 331-338; G. Ross, La questione della legge
allassemblea di Gerusalemme nella prospettiva di Paolo (Gal 2) e di Luca (At 15), in G. Leonardi
- F.G.B. Trolese (ed.), San Luca evangelista testimone della fede che unisce. Atti del Congresso
Internazionale, Padova, 16-21 Ottobre 2000. I: Lunit letteraria e teologica dellopera di Luca
(Vangelo e Atti degli apostoli) (Fonti e ricerche di storia ecclesiastica padovana 28), Padova 2002,
521-534. Uno studio esaustivo: H. Zeigan, Aposteltreffen in Jerusalem. Eine forschungsgeschichtliche Studie zu Galater 2,1-10 und den mglichen lukanischen Parallelen (Arbeiten zur Bibel und
ihrer Geschichte 18), Leipzig 2005.
73 Cf. Barrett, The Acts, I, 534; II, 705.
74 R. Bauckham, James and the Gentiles (Acts 15.13-21), in B. Witherington, III (ed.), History, Literature, and Society in the Book of Acts, Cambridge 1996, 154-184, ha messo bene in risalto la stretta connessione tra i due discorsi: The two speeches of Peter and James present two
complementary forms of argument: from the experience of Gods action and from Scripture They
are linked by James opening reference to Peters (15.14a) and by the inclusio between the beginning

112

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

storia della salvezza. Partendo dallesperienza personale (lepisodio di Cornelio)


lapostolo asserisce che nei fatti di Cesarea si manifestata lintenzione di Dio di
concedere la salvezza ai pagani, come stato comprovato dal dono dello Spirito
santo elargito a tutti senza distinzioni: ai pagani () come anche ai giudei
() (vv. 7b-8)75. In effetti, Dio non ha fatto alcuna discriminazione tra noi e
loro ( ), vale a dire non ha tenuto conto delle differenze tra i giudei circoncisi e i pagani incirconcisi, ma ha guardato solo alla
fede, mediante la quale ha purificato il loro cuore (v. 9). Da questo straordinario
intervento divino Pietro trae le conseguenze per il problema attuale. Con un tono
polemico lapostolo punta il dito contro i giudeo-cristiani di osservanza farisaica
e li incalza con una domanda: Ora, dunque, perch tentate Dio, imponendo sul
collo dei discepoli un giogo che n i nostri padri n noi siamo stati in grado di
portare? (v. 10). Chiedere ai gentili convertiti di farsi circoncidere e di osservare
tutta la Torah, pretendere che si facciano prima ebrei. In questo modo si mette a
dura prova la pazienza di Dio, il quale ha deciso invece di purificare i gentili con
la fede e di renderli uguali agli ebrei cos come sono, senza cio dover rispettare
le loro leggi, tanto pi che neppure gli stessi ebrei sono in grado di osservarle76.
Ma se la legge non applicabile pienamente, c da chiedersi allora a quale fattore un ebreo, che non pu essere salvato dalla legge perch incapace di attuarla
nella sua totalit, riceve la giustificazione. A tale interrogativo vuole rispondere il
versetto finale dellintervento di Pietro.
I giudaizzanti reputavano la circoncisione necessaria per essere salvati (v. 1:
). Questa opinione smentita dallapostolo: per la grazia del Signore
Ges noi crediamo di essere salvati (), allo stesso modo come anche costoro (v. 11)77. Pietro, il quale allinizio del suo ministero aveva fatto sapere ai
capi religiosi del popolo dIsraele che solo in Cristo c la salvezza (At 4,12; cf.
of Peters speech (15.7: ) and the end of James speech (15.21:
) (pp. 179, 180).
75 giusta losservazione di S.A. Panimolle, Il discorso di Pietro allassemblea apostolica. II:
Parola, fede e Spirito (Atti 15, 7-9) (StBi 2), Bologna 1977, 19: il parallelismo tra pagani e giudei
costituisce realmente larticolazione e il telaio della prima sezione del discorso di Pietro.
76 Con il termine giogo () a symbol of the religious obligation of the Jews (Fitzmyer, The Acts, 548) che nellattuale contesto sembra riferirsi alla circoncisione e alla legge di Mos,
Pietro non intende di certo screditare la legge, rendendola cos inutile e priva di valore (pace Panimolle, Il discorso di Pietro, II, 21); egli accentua piuttosto lincapacit umana di osservarla; cf. la
discussione in J. Nolland, A Fresh Look at Acts 15:10, NTS 27 (1980-81) 105-115; Barrett, The
Acts, II, 718-719; Jervell, Die Apostelgeschichte, 392-393.
77 Nellespressione linfinito aoristo non indica il tempo in
cui si crede che la salvezza abbia luogo. Pertanto la frase, con linfinito oggettivo, pu riferirsi al
passato, presente o futuro: crediamo che siamo stati / siamo / saremo salvati; cf. Barrett, The Acts,
II, 720. Ma possibile anche, e questa sembra la scelta migliore, assegnare alla frase un senso pi
generale, con linfinito del fine (o della conseguenza) che denota un aspetto effettivo singolare:
crediamo di essere salvati; in tal modo la fede in Dio appare come condizione indispensabile o
premessa della salvezza (come lo era la circoncisione in At 15,1). Cf. Marshall, The Acts, 250; Tannehill, The Narrative Unity, II, 185; Johnson, The Acts, 263: the advantage of the present translation

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

113

anche 10,43), ora proclama con enfasi che la salvezza tanto degli ebrei quanto dei
pagani frutto della grazia del Signore Ges e la si ottiene attraverso la fede. la
terza volta che Pietro chiama in causa la fede: nei vv. 7b.11 ha usato il verbo
che forma uninclusione tematica del brano, mentre nel v. 9 appare il
sostantivo . La fede, un concetto tanto caro a Luca, designa ladesione al
messaggio evangelico o alla persona di Ges78. Nel passo in esame tuttavia la fede
strettamente legata con la grazia () di Cristo glorioso, fondamento della
salvezza79. In questo modo, pur usando la stessa terminologia di Paolo80, Luca
mette in mostra la sua teologia della salvezza. Infatti, in At 15,11 lantitesi tipicamente paolina tra fede (grazia) e opere (legge) se c, relegata sullo sfondo81. In
ogni caso a Luca interessa soprattutto lannuncio (fatto per bocca di Pietro) delluniversalit della salvezza che scaturisce dallevento Cristo quale dono di grazia fatto
allintera umanit e da accogliere mediante la fede82.
Il discorso di Giacomo (vv. 13b-21), prendendo le mosse dalle parole di Pietro,
offre una prova scritturale83 desunta dai profeti (il testo base di Am 9,11-12 in
combinazione con Zac 2,11; Os 3,5; Ger 12,15-16; Is 45,21) a sostegno della prova dallesperienza petrina di come fin da principio () Dio ha voluto
scegliere dalle genti un popolo ( ) per il suo nome (v. 14). Tutti e
due fanno riferimento al disegno salvifico predisposto da Dio a favore dei pagani:
per Pietro questo disegno si rivelato concretamente dai giorni antichi / da molto
[we are believing in order to be saved] is that it makes explicit the connection between faith and
salvation; simile Peterson, The Acts, 427.
78 Nel libro degli Atti il sostantivo adoperato 14 volte e il verbo 37 volte. Il
credere in Luca designa lelemento costitutivo del nuovo popolo di Dio: B. Prete, Il popolo
che Dio si scelto negli scritti di Luca, in Id., Lopera di Luca. Contenuti e prospettive, Leumann
(Torino) 1986, 355-375 (qui 367). Sulla fede in Luca cf. W. Schenk, Glaube in lukanischen Doppelwerk, in F. Hahn - H. Klein (ed.), Glaube im Neuen Testament. Studien zu Ehren von Hermann
Binder anllich seines 70. Geburtstages (BTS 7), Neukirchen - Vluyn 1982, 69-92; F.W. Horn,
Glaube und Handeln in der Theologie des Lukas (GTA 26), Gttingen 1983; J.M. Ntzel, Vom
Hren zum Glauben. Der Weg zum Osterglauben in der Sicht des Lukas, in L. Lies (ed.), Praesentia Christi. Festschrift Johannes Betz zum 70. Geburtstag, Dsseldorf 1984, 37-49.
79 Su questa correlazione cf. Nolland, A Fresh Look, 112-113.
80 Barrett, The Acts, II, 719: The language of the verse is superficially Pauline but lacks Pauls
precision. Per altri rilievi cf. S.A. Panimolle, Il discorso di Pietro allassemblea apostolica. III:
Legge e grazia (Atti 15, 10-11) (StBi 3), Bologna 1978, 74-76, 146.
81 Invece Tannehill, The Narrative Unity, II, 186, non nutre dubbi che in At 15,11 (e in At
13,38-39) Luca intends to preserve Pauls message of justification by grace through faith. Sulla
stessa linea donda M.-E. Boismard - A. Lamouille, Les Actes des deux Aptres. II: Le sens des rcits
(B. Nouvelle Srie 13), Paris 1990, 281: linfluence paulinienne sur le v. 11 est vidente; cf. F.
Refoul, Le discours de Pierre lassemble de Jrusalem, RB 100 (1993) 239-251, spec. 245246; ma lipotesi che Luca abbia composto At 15,11 a partire da Ef 2,8 e Gal 5,1-6 non mi pare
sostenibile.
82 Coglie bene il pensiero lucano Ross, Atti, 571: In questa frase, Luca capovolge la prospettiva: non i pagani sono salvati come i giudei, ma i giudei sono salvati allo stesso modo dei gentili.
83 Bauckham, James and the Gentiles, 154: After all, the matter under discussion is one of
halakhah (15.5), which could only be decided from Scripture.

114

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

tempo ( ), vale a dire nella chiamata alla fede del centurione Cornelio84; Giacomo, a sua volta, fonda il piano eterno di Dio nella promessa
contenuta nella Scrittura. In Am 9,11-1285, come in nessun altro passo scritturistico,
si dice chiaramente che con la restaurazione escatologica di Israele nei tempi messianici tutte le nazioni ( ) in quanto gentili, ossia senza il dovere di
diventare ebrei, entreranno a far parte del popolo di Dio. Di conseguenza la prassi
iniziata da Pietro risulta perfettamente in linea con il volere di Dio che non esige
dai gentili passati alla vita di fede la circoncisione e la piena osservanza della Torah.
Con una celata allusione alle richieste avanzate dai cristiani intransigenti (vv. 1.5),
Giacomo giudica perci inopportuno creare difficolt (v. 19: ) ai
gentili che si convertono e si limita a proporre alcune prescrizioni di carattere rituale (idolatria, immoralit, cibi impuri, sangue) al fine di rendere pi facile la
convivenza tra i fratelli giudei e quelli di origine pagana (v. 20)86.
Il problema sollevato dai giudeo-cristiani sulla necessit della circoncisione dei
gentili e il seguente dibattito al concilio apostolico vanno compresi sullampio
sfondo del giudaismo del Secondo Tempio. Come si detto nel paragrafo introduttivo di questo studio, tra gli ebrei del tempo circolavano varie opinioni sul modo di
accogliere i pagani nel popolo eletto87. Un interessante esempio lo offre la storia
della conversione della famiglia reale di Adiabene, che presenta molti punti di
84 Cf. Refoul, Le discours de Pierre, 243. Pace B. Prete, Valore dellespressione
in Atti 15,7. Nesso cronologico, oppure istanza teologica della Chiesa delle
origini?, in Id., Lopera di Luca, 494-508, per il quale le parole di Pietro non avrebbero un senso
cronologico, bens quello teologico (lelezione divina dei pagani fa parte fin dallinizio delleconomia
salvifica).
85 Il testo profetico citato da Giacomo dipende probabilmente da una versione ebraica del libro
di Amos, diversa dalla Lxx e dal testo masoretico. Per una discussione dettagliata dei problemi
linguistici e storico-tradizionali della citazione lucana si pu vedere: J. dna, Die Heilige Schrift
als Zeuge der Heidenmission. Die Rezeption von Amos 9,11-12 in Apg 15,16-18, in J. dna et alii
(ed.), Evangelium Schriftauslegung Kirche. Festschrift fr Peter Stuhlmacher zum 65. Geburtstag, Gttingen 1997, 1-23; Id., James Position at the Summit Meeting of the Apostles and the
Elders in Jerusalem (Acts 15), in J. dna - H. Kvalbein (ed.), The Mission of the Early Church to
Jews and Gentiles (WUNT 127), Tbingen 2000, 125-161; D. Rusam, Das Alte Testament bei Lukas
(BZNW 112), Berlin 2003, 416-431; J.A. Meek, The Gentile Mission in Old Testament Citations in
Acts. Text, Hermeneutic and Purpose (LNTS 385), London - New York 2008, 56-94.
86 Le quattro clausole di Giacomo, accolte nel decreto apostolico, rappresentano le norme di
purit (Lv 17-18) che nellIsraele antico erano imposte anche agli stranieri residenti (gerim); cf. C.
Perrot, Les dcisions de lAssemble de Jrusalem, RSR 69 (1981) 195-208; T. Callan, The
Background of the Apostolic Decree (Acts 15:20, 29; 21:25), CBQ 55 (1993) 284-297; R. Deines,
Das AposteldekretHalacha fr Heidenchristen oder christliche Rchksichtname auf jdische
Tabus?, in J. Frey et alii (ed.), Jewish Identity in the Greco-Roman World. Jdische Identitt in der
griechish-rmischen Welt (AJEC 71), Leiden - Boston 2007, 323-395.
87 Cf. inoltre A.F. Segal, Conversion and Universalism: Opposites that Attract, in B.H.
McLean (ed.), Origins and Method. Towards a New Understanding of Judaism and Christianity.
Essays in Honour of John C. Hurd (JSNT SS 86), Sheffield 1993, 163-189: Judaism did not have
a single policy on the status of the Gentiles; there was no single Judaism of the day (p. 162).

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

115

contatto con At 1588. Nella vicenda narrata da Giuseppe Flavio, che abbiamo visto,
entrano in scena due ebrei che professano opinioni diametralmente opposte in
merito alla circoncisione dei gentili convertiti. Anania non la reputava necessaria,
trattandosi di un marchio identitario dei giudei (), mentre per Eleazaro era
obbligatoria, perch raccomandata dalla legge (). la stessa posizione intransigente assunta da una cerchia dei giudeo-cristiani in At 15,1.5. Invece la maggioranza dei giudeo-cristiani moderati, in cui si riconosce anche Luca, si allineata sulla posizione liberale di Anania, secondo il quale i gentili, per essere graditi
al Dio di Israele, non avevano bisogno di diventare giudei facendosi circoncidere89.
Probabilmente erano giunti a questa conclusione, perch non sarebbe neppure possibile dal momento che, secondo il comando divino ricevuto da Abramo, il rito
della circoncisione doveva essere eseguito lottavo giorno dalla nascita.
evidente quindi che la decisione del concilio apostolico non necessariamente
deve essere vista come un fattore di rottura con il mondo giudaico. Non tutti gli
ebrei, infatti, ritenevano indispensabile la circoncisione per aderire al giudaismo.
Secondo la concezione di Luca, il cristianesimo nascente erede e continuatore del
popolo di Israele. Per Luca tuttavia ci che lega la chiesa allantico Israele non
tanto la circoncisione richiesta dalla legge mosaica, quanto invece ladesione al
piano salvifico di Dio, promesso al popolo dIsraele, compiuto nel Messia Ges e
ora esteso a chiunque crede. Come ebrei diventano cristiani per la fede in Cristo,
per la stessa ragione vengono aggregati alla comunit della salvezza i gentili convertiti. La circoncisione che Luca reputa un costume proprio degli ebrei (At 15,1:
) per questi ultimi superflua. La realt fondamentale dellessenza del credente non pi ladesione al popolo eletto tramite la circoncisione,
ma ladesione a Cristo per mezzo della fede. questa lunica condizione per essere salvati.
5. La circoncisione di Timoteo: uneccezione che conferma la regola
A poca distanza dal concilio apostolico che ha svincolato i gentili convertiti
dallobbligo della circoncisione, Luca narra lepisodio della circoncisione di Timoteo ad opera di Paolo (At 16,1-3). Questo racconto non solo sembra contraddire a
prima vista le decisioni emanate dal concilio, ma si pone altres in contrasto con la
88 Le somiglianze tra i due racconti sono state poste in luce da D.R. Schwartz, God, Gentiles,
and Jewish Law. On Acts 15 and Josephus Adiabene Narrative, in P. Schfer (ed.), Geschichte
Tradition Reflexion. Festschrift fr Martin Hengel zum 70. Geburtstag. I: Judentum, Tbingen
1996, 263-282: Dealing with nearly contemporary events, both address the issue of Gentiles who
wish to worship God and the question whether they must observe Jewish law; both term Jewish laws
not only nomoi but also eth (customs); both give special attention to circumcision; and both refer
to Jewish law as the law(s) of Moses (p. 263).
89 Cf. Levieils, Identit juive, 226.

116

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

posizione di Paolo che nelle sue lettere appare piuttosto critico nei riguardi della
circoncisione (1Cor 7,18-19; Gal 2,3; 5,2.11; ma cf. anche At 15,1-2a). Va da s
che alcuni esegeti abbiano espresso dubbi sulla storicit del racconto lucano90.
Dopo un breve cenno ai luoghi raggiunti da Paolo (Derbe e Listra), Luca presenta il futuro collaboratore dellapostolo: Vi era qui un discepolo chiamato Timoteo, figlio di una donna giudea credente e di padre greco: era assai stimato dai
fratelli di Listra e di Iconio (vv. 1b-2). Timoteo vantava una discendenza mista
etnica e religiosa. Mentre sua madre (si chiamava Eunice, secondo 2Tm 1,5)
descritta come una , verosimilmente cristiana, di suo padre si dice
semplicemente che era un greco (). Quanto a Timoteo, lecito presumere
che fosse cristiano, come suggerisce la sua qualifica di discepolo stimato dai
fratelli91. In seguito Luca riferisce il comportamento di Paolo nei confronti di
Timoteo e ne adduce la motivazione: Paolo volle che quello partisse con lui, e,
avendolo preso, lo circoncise ( ) a causa dei giudei che si trovavano in quelle regioni: tutti infatti sapevano che suo padre era greco (v. 3). La
ragione per la quale Paolo circoncise Timoteo non era dovuta propriamente alla
missione, bens allopinione dei giudei ( ). Sembra perci che
Paolo abbia voluto rispettare i sentimenti di quelle persone a cui era ben nota la
situazione familiare di Timoteo. Questa spiegazione risulta per troppo vaga e richiede ulteriori precisazioni.
Le proposte fatte dagli autori moderni per chiarire lenigma della circoncisione
di Timoteo seguono, pur con varie sfumature, la via tracciata dallesegesi patristica92. Secondo Girolamo, Timoteo era un etnico-cristiano e, bench non ne avesse
bisogno, Paolo ha ritenuto opportuno circonciderlo per ragioni pratiche al fine di
guadagnarsi il favore dei giudei. Si tratterebbe quindi come si legge nella nota
90 Cf. Haenchen, Die Apostelgeschichte, 463-465; Conzelmann, Die Apostelgeschichte, 97:
Timotheus ist bereits Christ; so kommt eine Beschneidung auf keinen Fall in Frage; W. Schmithals,
Paulus und Jakobus (FRLANT 85), Gttingen 1963, 78-80; P. Vielhauer, On the Paulinism of
Acts, in L.E. Keck - J.L. Martyn (ed.), Studies in Luke-Acts. Essays Presented in Honor of Paul
Schubert, Philadelphia PA 1966 (orig. ted. 1950), 33-50 (qui 40-41); W.O. Walker, Timothy-Titus
Problem Reconsidered, ExpT 92 (1980-81) 231-234; Roloff, Die Apostelgeschichte, 240; A.
Weiser, Die Apostelgeschichte. Kapitel 13-28 (TKNT 5/2), Gtersloh 1985, 402; J. Becker, Paul:
Apostle to the Gentiles, Louisville KY 1993 (orig. ted. 1989), 127. Per una presentazione dettagliata degli argomenti pro e contro la storicit di At 16,1-3 cf. Zmijewski, Die Apostelgeschichte,
586-588 e Blaschke, Beschneidung, 460-463; questultimo autore, riconoscendo lepisodio sehr
wahrscheinlich historisch, ritiene poi (p. 464) che fu Paolo in persona a eseguire la circoncisione,
in accordo con la posteriore legislazione rabbinica (Talmud babilonese, Chullin 9a).
91 Cos inter alia Bauernfeind, Kommentar, 204; Haenchen, Die Apostelgeschichte, 461; Barrett, The Acts, II, 759; Peterson, The Acts, 450. Se questo vero, daltro canto il testo lucano non
permette di concludere con assoluta certezza che egli fosse giudeo-cristiano, come pensa Fitzmyer, The Acts, 574: Timothy would then be a Jewish Christian, and this would provide the background for Pauls decision to have him circumcised.
92 Per una buona sintesi cf. S.J.D. Cohen, Was Timothy Jewish (Acts 16.1-3)? Patristic Exegesis, Rabbinic Law and Matrilineal Descent, JBL 105 (1986) 241-268 (qui 254-263).

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

117

della nuova Bibbia CEI di un gesto di rispettosa strategia missionaria in accordo


con 1Cor 9,2093. Ma se per Timoteo la circoncisione non aveva alcun valore teologico, in tal caso Paolo potrebbe essere tacciato di ipocrisia o di mendacit. Per
sconfessare una simile accusa, Agostino si sentito perci in dovere di correggere
la tesi di Girolamo. A suo avviso lapostolo non ha agito affatto con inganno o per
simulazione, ma stato mosso da compassione e piet verso il giudaismo a cui
rimasto sempre leale. Se egli ha circonciso Timoteo, lha fatto per far capire ai
cristiani convertiti dal paganesimo che la legge giudaica, essendo di origine divina,
merita rispetto e gli ebrei hanno il diritto di praticarla94. Se Timoteo fosse stato un
giudeo, lipotesi di Agostino potrebbe apparire plausibile, ma anche lui, come Girolamo (e cos pure la maggioranza degli studiosi dal II al XVIII secolo), lo reputava un pagano convertito. Il primo a sostenere che Timoteo era giudeo di nascita
fu Ambrosiaster. Siccome Timoteo era figlio di madre giudea, la sua circoncisione
risultava perfettamente lecita e in linea con la legislazione rabbinica. Il principio
della discendenza matrilineare, fissato nella Mishnah (Qidduin 3,12; Yebamot
7,5), tuttavia, non era ancora in vigore nel I secolo95. Ciononostante, molti commentatori si riferiscono, in un modo o nellaltro, a questa norma96.
93 Nei tempi recenti questa esegesi vista con simpatia da C.S.C. Williams, A Commentary of
the Acts of the Apostles, London 1957, 188; Martini, Atti, 229; Schneider, Die Apostelgeschichte, II,
200-201; Krodel, Acts, 298; C.J. Hemer, The Book of Acts in the Setting of Hellenistic History
(WUNT 49), Tbingen 1989, 185-186; Tannehill, The Narrative Unity, II, 190; Williams, Acts, 275:
It was a matter of expediency, nothing more (cf. 1 Cor. 7:19; Gal. 5:6; 6:15); Zmijewski, Die
Apostelgeschichte, 589; Ross, Atti, 595; Peterson, The Acts, 449, 451.
94 Tra i difensori moderni di questa posizione possiamo ascrivere Hanson, The Acts, 166; J.C.
ONeill, The Theology of Acts in its Historical Setting, London 19702, 104-105; Sthlin, Die Apostelgeschichte, 277; Wilson, Luke and the Law, 64-65.
95 Si vedano in particolare gli studi di S.J.D. Cohen, The Matrilineal Principle in Historical
Perspective, Judaism 34 (1985) 5-13; The Origins of the Matrilineal Principle in Rabbinic Law,
AJSR 10 (1985) 19-53; e in forma abbreviata in Id., Was Timothy Jewish, 263-268. Di parere
diverso C. Bryan, A Further Look at Acts 16:1-3, JBL 107 (1988) 292-294, che produce una
ricostruzione delle premesse di una tale pratica di cui in At 16,1-3 si avrebbe una prova che
fornirebbero ai rabbini le condizioni per la soluzione del problema. Sembra inoltre che gi Filone
Alessandrino reputava la discendenza matrilineare un fattore basilare dellidentit giudaica; cf. M.R.
Niehoff, Jewish Identity and Jewish Mothers: Who was a Jew according to Philo?, Studia Philonica Annual 11 (1999) 31-54. Si pu vedere anche S. Sorek, Mothers of Israel: Why the Rabbis
Adopted a Matrilineal Principle, Women in Judaism: A Multidisciplinary Journal 3/1 (2002) pp.
12: disponibile in internet: http://wjudaism.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/wjudaism/article/viewArticle/197 (accesso: 16.IV.2011), che offre una spiegazione diversa rispetto a quella di Cohen
delladozione del principio della discendenza matrilineare da parte dei rabbini.
96 Cf. Conzelmann, Die Apostelgeschichte, 97; Jervell, Die Apostelgeschichte, 412; J. Munck,
The Actes of the Apostles (AB 31), Garden City NY 1967, 155; R. Pesch, Die Apostelgeschichte.
Apg 13-28 (EKK 5/2), Neukirchen - Vluyn 1986, 96; G. Ldemann, Das frhe Christentum nach
den Traditionen der Apostelgeschichte. Ein Kommentar, Gttingen 1987, 183; Bruce, The Book of
the Acts, 304; Johnson, The Acts, 284, 289; P. Bossuyt - J. Radermakers, Tmoins de la Parole de la
Grce. Lecture des Actes des Aptres. 2: Lecture continue (Collection Institut dtudes Thologiques
16), Bruxelles 1995, 506; Fitzmyer, The Acts, 575; Witherington, The Acts, 476-477. Cf. anche il
commento in nota della Bibbia di Gerusalemme.

118

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

Nel tentativo di far luce sullambigua identit di Timoteo gli studiosi hanno
fatto di solito affidamento alle radici etniche dei suoi genitori, traendone la conclusione che egli doveva essere di sicuro un pagano o un ebreo. Tale esegesi si ispira
in buona parte alla comprensione moderna della terminologia etnica, che tende a
separare letnicit dalla religione e trascura fattori importanti che nellantichit
incidevano sulla definizione rimanendo nel nostro ambito di studio di un
o di un 97. Questa riduzione (indebita e fuorviante) si percepisce
chiaramente nel caso del termine greco , la cui doppia traduzione nelle
lingue moderne tradisce il desiderio di distinguere la dimensione geografica (giudeo) da quella religiosa (ebreo israelita). Questa non una preoccupazione di
Luca che si mostra molto flessibile nellimpiego del termine, riferendolo quasi
sempre a persone concrete. Dal suo punto di vista non si riduce a un
semplice titolo di appartenenza o del credo professato, ma rimanda a una gamma
di aspetti sociali e culturali che delineano lidentit propria del popolo giudaico
() nei confronti di altri gruppi etnici98. in tale concezione che bisogna intendere il significato di in At 16,1.3. Nel v. 3 questo termine si riferisce
ai membri delle comunit ebraiche che vivevano sulle sponde del Mar Mediterraneo. Nel v. 1 invece designa lidentit etnica di un individuo. Ad eccezione di At 19,34, in tutti gli altri casi (13,6; 16,1; 18,2.24; 19,13.14; 22,3; 24,24)
lindicazione di qualcuno come giudeo ha un puro valore descrittivo e non palesa alcun tono negativo o polemico. Se la madre di Timoteo viene presentata come
e , la valutazione positiva riguarda la fede della donna, non la sua
giudaicit. Ci dimostra che si pu essere giudeo, senza vincoli religiosi.
Come , anche un termine etnico polivalente che va ben
oltre lelemento geografico (abitante della Grecia) o religioso (pagano politeista).
Esso rappresenta invece una sintesi di questi e di altri fattori culturali. Assente nel
terzo vangelo, questo termine compare 9 volte negli Atti99. Allinfuori di At 21,28,
in tutte le altre ricorrenze lappellativo non riveste alcun significato nega97 Scrive a tale proposito E.D. Barreto, Ethnic Negotiations. The Function of Race and Ethnicity in Acts 16 (WUNT II/294), Tbingen 2010, 74: Such ethnic terminologies encompass a range
of identity markers including geography, religion, myths of origin, and other factors. To narrow the
scope of either term to just religion or geography misses their full nuance and discursive ability.
Quanto segue trae molti spunti da questo valido studio (pp. 74-98, 110-113).
98 Si comprende allora perch attestato solo 5 volte nel terzo vangelo, laddove il
mondo ebraico entra a contatto con le autorit romane; abbonda invece negli Atti (79 volte), soprattutto nella seconda parte, quando la missione cristiana si immerge nellambiente sociale e culturale
greco-romano.
99 At 14,1; 16,1.3; 17,4; 18,4; 19,10.17; 20,21; 21,28. I termini correlati: ellena
la (donna) greca (17,12); Ellada la Grecia (20,2); in lingua ellena il
greco (21,37); ellenista un ebreo della diaspora greca (6,1; 9,29; 11,20). Su
questultimo termine si veda la recente dissertazione di M. Zugmann, Hellenisten in der Apostelgeschichte. Historische und exegetische Untersuchungen zu Apg 6,1; 9,29; 11,20 (WUNT
II/264), Tbingen 2009.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

119

tivo e anche quando usato accanto a non segnala mai unopposizione


o rivalit etnica, ma semplicemente si riferisce alla totalit dei destinatari dellannuncio cristiano (14,1; 18,4; 19,10.17; 20,21; cf. 17,4). Cos pure in At 16,1.3,
dove il padre di Timoteo viene presentato come greco, nulla lascia pensare che
laccostamento alla moglie giudea e credente sia una critica indirizzata al suo
status religioso di pagano idolatra100.
Nel caso di Timoteo, la questione che fosse giudeo o greco risulta dunque una
falsa alternativa101. In realt egli possiede una doppia eredit etnica: ebraica e greca. Eppure Luca, oltre a qualificarlo come discepolo molto stimato dai fratelli,
non sente il bisogno di identificarlo sotto questo aspetto. Il modo sommario con cui
Luca descrive questo personaggio manifesta unintenzione letteraria che oltrepassa il valore storico dellepisodio e punta verso un fine teologico102. Infatti, letta nel
suo contesto, la pericope della circoncisione di Timoteo acquista un significato
particolare. Nella trama degli Atti si tratta certamente di un momento di svolta: le
decisioni prese al concilio di Gerusalemme hanno aperto la strada allevangelizzazione delle genti e Paolo sta iniziando ora il suo secondo viaggio che introdurr il
vangelo in un mondo multietnico. In tale prospettiva Timoteo, pur essendo un
personaggio reale ( ), al tempo stesso assume il volto di un
personaggio corporativo ( )103. Nel prosieguo degli Atti egli verr menzionato pi volte tra i collaboratori di Paolo (17,14-15; 18,5; 19,22; 20,4), ma non
ricoprir un ruolo di protagonista. Parimenti in At 16,1-3, il suo agire, peraltro del
tutto passivo, non riveste alcuna importanza, mentre in primo piano posta la sua
complessa identit etnica. La personalit di Timoteo incarna cos quella tensione
tra lessere giudeo e lessere greco, solo in apparenza inconciliabile, che la missione cristiana cercher di attenuare nel segno unificante della fede in Cristo104. Come
100 Pace Haenchen, Die Apostelgeschichte, 461; Schneider, Die Apostelgeschichte, II, 200:
Timotheus ist der Sohn einer glubiggewordenen Jdin und eines heidnischen Vaters; Fitzmyer,
The Acts, 576: Greek would mean that his father was a heathen, not a Jew; Ross, Atti, 594;
Peterson, The Acts, 450. Corretto invece Barrett, The Acts, II, 759: here means simply
non-Jew, not specifically Greek.
101 Cf. Barreto, Ethnic Negotiations, 63.
102 J. Rius-Camps, El camino de Pablo a la misin de los paganos. Comentario lingstico y
exegtico a Hch 13-28 (Lectura del NT 2), Madrid 1984, 91: Lucas pretende ir ms all del personaje real, conocido por el nombre Timoteo (cf. 17,14.15; 18,5; 19,22; 20,4), describiendo por su
medio un grupo de discpulos con doble ascendencia, juda y pagana.
103 Sulla personalit collettiva di Timoteo cf. B.J. Malina, Timothy: Pauls Closest Associate
(Pauls Social Network: Brothers and Sisters in Faith), Collegeville MN 2008, 1-20.
104 D. Marguerat, La premire histoire du christianisme (Les Actes des aptres) (LD 180),
Paris - Genve 1999, 96: La double appartenance culturelle et religieuse est encore nette avec le
collaborateur que se choisit Paul pour remplacer Barnab Timothe symbolise par sa double filiation lglise qui peut natre dsormai : une glise compose de la part dIsral rallie au Christ et
des croyants issus du paganisme. Jusque dans le dtail, lidentit de Timothe concide avec celle
de lglise qui se forme, car lantriorit est rserve lIsral croyant le juif dabord, puis le
Grec. Cf. anche Barreto, Ethnic Negotiations, 118.

120

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

dimostra per la vicenda di Timoteo, questo sforzo di gettare un ponte tra il giudeo
e il greco non tender a cancellare le differenze etniche, bens a integrarle e a farle
convivere nellunico popolo di Dio105. la continuazione di quel processo iniziato
nellassise di Gerusalemme, che ha trovato un modus vivendi per far convivere i
cristiani circoncisi e quelli incirconcisi. La circoncisione di Timoteo non smentisce
quindi il principio stabilito al concilio apostolico, secondo il quale la fede in Cristo
lunico fondamento della salvezza; lo corrobora del resto il sommario lucano
sulla riuscita promulgazione del decreto conciliare (v. 4), che fa seguito allepisodio in questione. Quei giudei della diaspora che conoscevano lascendenza mista
di Timoteo attribuivano grande importanza allusanza etnica della circoncisione106.
Per questa ragione Paolo ha deciso di circonciderlo, pur sapendo di compiere un
gesto simbolico. Nel caso di Timoteo, infatti, non si trattava di una circoncisione
praticata lottavo giorno dalla nascita, come vuole la legge, per cui il rito, eloquente sul piano etnico, non poteva mutare la sua identit religiosa, e di certo non
agli occhi di Luca.
6. Il Paolo lucano e la circoncisione
In At 21,21 viene menzionata per lultima volta la circoncisione nellopera lucana. Il passo fa parte della pericope che racconta il ritorno di Paolo a Gerusalemme dal suo terzo viaggio missionario (21,15-26). Dopo una breve sosta a Cesarea,
lapostolo e i suoi compagni giungono alla Citt Santa, dove ricevono un caloroso
benvenuto da parte dei fratelli (v. 17). Il giorno seguente i missionari si recano in
visita ufficiale alle autorit della chiesa madre (v. 18). Durante lincontro Paolo
riferisce a Giacomo e agli anziani del suo operato tra le genti ( )
(v. 19). I responsabili della comunit gerosolimitana, rendendo gloria a Dio, riconoscono lesito felice della missione ai gentili. A questo punto Luca riporta un discorso degli anziani (vv. 20b-25), verosimilmente pronunciato dal loro portavoce:
Giacomo. Egli fa anzitutto notare a Paolo che il suo successo missionario non
lunico; infatti, anche tra i giudei ( ) ci sono numerosi credenti e tutti sono zelanti della legge107. Come la cifra eccessiva del numero dei giudeo105 Barreto, Ethnic Negotiations, 69: Lukes vision is of a community united around Jesus
without the requirement of ethnic effacement.
106 Johnson, The Acts, 284: the act of circumcision signifies loyalty to the ancestral traditions
(the ethos of the Jewish ethnos).
107 Che cio osservano la legge (cf. v. 24e; 22,3). Lespressione di Luca (
) richiama la maniera caratteristica di chiamare gli ebrei devoti al tempo della crisi maccabaica (1Mac 2,27.42; 2Mac 4,2) e a Qumran (1QS 1,7; 6,13-14). I zelanti giudeo-cristiani
potrebbero essere collegati con il movimento esseno degli zeloti o dei sicari, come ipotizza R.H.
Eisenman, Sicarii Essenes, The Party of the Circumcision, and Qumran, in F. Garca Martnez
- M. Popovi (ed.), Defining Identities: We, You, and the Other in the Dead Sea Scrolls. Proceedings

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

121

cristiani (decine di migliaia), anche il loro zelo unanime (tutti) per la legge fa
parte probabilmente della retorica di Giacomo108, il quale da un lato cerca di bilanciare il resoconto di Paolo sulla missione nel mondo pagano, e dallaltro prepara il
terreno per il rilievo mosso a Paolo. I giudeo-cristiani osservanti, infatti, sono stati
informati in pi riprese () che egli avrebbe insegnato lapostasia da Mos a tutti quanti i giudei sparsi tra le genti, dicendo di non circoncidere pi (
) i loro figli n di camminare pi secondo le usanze tradizionali
() (v. 21). Giacomo sembra di non prestare fede a simili dicerie ma per
dissipare ogni dubbio suggerisce a Paolo di dare prova di fedelt alla legge compiendo un pubblico atto di culto109. In chiusura, e in apparenza senza un legame
con quanto detto prima, ricorda a Paolo che i gentili convertiti sono tenuti a osservare le clausole emesse dal concilio apostolico. Paolo evidentemente si lasciato
convincere dalle parole degli anziani, perch il giorno dopo ha eseguito nel Tempio
quanto gli stato consigliato di fare (v. 26).
In questa pericope Luca ha ripreso lo schema narrativo del concilio di Gerusalemme (At 15,3-5.12.13b.21). Oltre ai rimandi espliciti al concilio nei vv. 19.25, vi
compaiono gli stessi protagonisti (Paolo, Giacomo e gli anziani)110 e al centro
dellattenzione si trova la questione della circoncisione che poteva mettere in pericolo lunit della chiesa. Il concilio ha risolto il problema spinoso della circoncisione dei gentili convertiti, ritenuta da certi giudeo-cristiani necessaria per la salvezza. Ora invece linteresse della comunit gerosolimitana si sposta dalla missione ai gentili a quella ai giudei. E anche questa volta la circoncisione emerge in
primo piano. Il concilio, liberando i pagano-cristiani dallobbligo della circoncisione, ha affermato che la fede in Cristo lunica condizione della salvezza. legittimo supporre che i giudeo-cristiani si fossero chiesti allora se, in base a tale principio, anche loro dovessero abbandonare la prassi della circoncisione e altre usanof the Fifth Meeting of the IOQS in Groningen (STDJ 70), Leiden - Boston 2008, 247-260 (specie
249, 259-260), il quale mette a confronto le informazioni di Giuseppe Flavio con le testimonianze
di Qumran e degli autori cristiani (Ippolito, Origene, Girolamo).
108 Marshall, The Acts, 344: a rhetorical overstatement. Per G. Rinaldi, Giacomo, Paolo e i
Giudei (Atti 21,17-26), RivBib 14 (1966) 407-423 (qui 410), laggettivo , pi che la quantit
(tutti quanti), potrebbe indicare lintensit al posto di un avverbio (moltissimo), al fine di sottolineare il rigore dellattaccamento: tra i giudeo-cristiani di cui parla Giacomo c una frangia di
osservanti estremamente attaccata alla legge. Lintuizione pare giusta, bench linterpretazione si
ricava pi dal contesto che dalluso dellaggettivo. Laffermazione di Giacomo, infatti, che rientra
peraltro nello stile iperbolico di Luca, del tutto intenzionale.
109 Domandandosi che cosa fare (v. 22), Giacomo fa capire che egli e gli anziani non temono
la reazione di tutti (v. 20) i giudeo-cristiani, ma solo di quelli pieni di zelo per la legge, rileva
Pesch, Die Apostelgeschichte, II, 220.
110 utilie segnalare anche una grande inclusione tra la venuta di Paolo a Gerusalemme per il
concilio e il suo ultimo arrivo: lintera attivit missionaria di Paolo posta sotto il segno dellunit dellapostolo con la chiesa-madre, dellunit dunque tra la chiesa pagano-cristiana e quella giudeo-cristiana (Ross, Atti, 748).

122

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

ze ebraiche111. Le voci che circolavano sul conto di Paolo, il quale si sarebbe pronunciato in tal senso, hanno allarmato la chiesa di Gerusalemme, i cui membri si
vantavano di essere al tempo stesso credenti in Cristo e zelanti custodi delle tradizioni giudaiche.
ragionevole pensare che non tutti i giudeo-cristiani fossero strenui osservanti della legge mosaica, ma ci non vuol dire ancora che i pi zelanti fossero
diventati partigiani della posizione intransigente di alcuni del partito dei farisei112.
Come si evince dalle parole dellaccusa, i credenti zelatori non invocano la necessit della circoncisione per i convertiti dal paganesimo n vogliono imporre loro
losservanza della legge113. Essi non sono interessati alla questione degli etnicocristiani, bens alla sorte dei loro connazionali della diaspora, ai quali Paolo a
loro modo di vedere avrebbe insegnato lapostasia da Mos. Secondo le dicerie,
questo insegnamento eversivo riguardava labbandono delle usanze tradizionali
dei giudei (che potevano includere losservanza del sabato e delle norme sulla
purit), in particolare quella della circoncisione dei loro figli (At 21,21:
). Loggetto di preoccupazione dei giudeo-cristiani fedeli alla
legge non fu quindi il pensiero di Paolo sulla circoncisione in genere, ma il suo
presunto piano di abolire la prassi ebraica della circoncisione che essi, nonostante
la fede in Cristo, si sentivano in dovere di osservare quale elemento delletica specifica del loro popolo. Bench il termine possa riferirsi al bambino (di
entrambi i sessi) di et indeterminata (in Lc 2,48 Maria si rivolge con questo appellativo al Ges dodicenne), evidente che in At 21,21 si tratta del rito ebraico
prescritto dalla legge (Gen 17; Lv 12) e ben noto a Luca (Lc 1,59; 2,21; At 7,8): la
circoncisione del figlio maschio lottavo giorno dalla nascita.
Non c modo di precisare lidentit di coloro che hanno diffuso le voci negative intorno alloperato di Paolo. Con ogni probabilit la campagna denigratoria fu
diretta dai giudei della diaspora venuti a Gerusalemme per la festa (in At 21,27-28
i giudei della provincia dellAsia denunciano Paolo per aver insegnato a tutti e
dovunque contro i pilastri del giudaismo)114. Cera da aspettarsi che linsegnamento di Paolo suscitasse questo genere di accuse (cf. Gal 5,2-3.6.11.15; 1Cor
111 Jervell, Die Beschneidung des Messias, 77: Er [Lk] schreibt seine Apg nicht, um zu
zeigen, da die Heiden keine Beschneidung brauchen. Diese Sache war schon lngst erledigt, Apg
15,1ff. Von Belang ist aber die Lage der Judenchristen gerade in dieser Situation.
112 Come pensa ad es. Williams, Acts, 365; Peterson, The Acts, 585: the expression zealous
for the law implies that many had been influenced by the Pharisaic position (cf. 15:5).
113 Pace Fitzmyer, The Acts, 693: Such Jewish Christians would adhere rigorously to the law
and insist on its observance by all who become members of the New Covenant (Christianity).
114 Ma non si pu neppure escludere un coinvolgimento da parte dei giudeo-cristiani giudaizzanti; cf. Pesch, Die Apostelgeschichte, II, 218 nota 2. Allopinione di Barrett, The Acts, II, 1007:
Luke may be thinking of those mentioned in 15.1, 5; cf. Marshall, The Acts, 343. In ogni caso si
trattava di mestatori, dal momento che le notizie divulgate da essi erano certamente false; cf.
Schmithals, Paulus und Jakobus, 74.

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

123

7,18-19). Nondimeno, se egli ha relativizzato il valore della circoncisione di fronte alla fede in Cristo, ci non vuol dire necessariamente che abbia impedito ai genitori ebrei di far circoncidere i loro figli. Di una simile affermazione non c
traccia nellepistolario paolino, n tantomeno negli Atti, dove Paolo viene raffigurato come un devoto osservante della legge e delle usanze ebraiche (18,18b;
20,6.16b; 21,26; 22,3; 23,1.5; 24,14-18; 25,8; 26,4-5; 28,17)115. Per Luca le calunnie rivolte a Paolo erano quindi prive di fondamento, come le false accuse mosse
in precedenza contro Stefano e Ges (6,13-14)116.
Nonostante lattenzione dellepisodio si focalizzi direttamente su determinati
fatti legati con linsegnamento di Paolo, la vera questione riguardava i principi che
nessuno dei protagonisti del racconto si sentito per in dovere di richiamare. Dal
punto di vista di Giacomo, a quei giudei venuti alla fede non si poteva vietare di
seguire le usanze tradizionali ( ), peraltro ispirate alla legge mosaica (cf. At
6,14), di cui lesempio fondamentale era la circoncisione dei figli. su questa linea
che si potrebbe leggere il richiamo finale del discorso di Giacomo. Ricordando le
norme di purit imposte dal concilio ai gentilo-cristiani, egli sembra voler dire a
Paolo che i pagani convertiti sono dispensati dalla legge (della circoncisione), ma
non dalla legge che conserva il suo valore. Se questo vale (in parte almeno) per gli
etnico-pagani, a maggior ragione deve valere per i giudeo-cristiani. Secondo Giacomo, insomma, un giudeo pu essere credente in Cristo e zelante della legge.
Questa posizione irenica non viene smentita da Paolo il quale, senza fare alcuna
obiezione, compie il rito ebraico raccomandatogli. Nello svolgimento dei fatti colpisce che, nonostante siano stati entrambi presenti al concilio apostolico, n Paolo
n Giacomo abbiano fatto riferimento al principio annunciato da Pietro: per la
grazia del Signore Ges [e non per la circoncisione] noi [ebrei] crediamo per essere salvati, allo stesso modo come anche costoro [pagani] (At 15,11). Senza lasciarsi andare a congetture su questa omissione, non si pu alla fine dubitare che per
115 Si veda R. Hvalvik, Paul as a Jewish BelieverAccording to the Book of Acts, in O.
Skarsaune - R. Hvalvik (ed.), Jewish Believers in Jesus. The Early Centuries, Peabody MA 2007,
121-153, spec. 139-151: It is clear that Luke wanted to paint Paul as a pious Jew (p. 152); D.
Marguerat, Paul et la Torah dans les Actes des aptres, in Id. (ed.), Reception of Paulinism in Acts.
Rception du paulinisme dans les Actes des aptres (BETL 229), Leuven 2009, 81-100; Paul and
the Torah in the Acts of the Apostles, in P. Oakes - M. Tait (ed.), Torah in the New Testament. Papers
Delivered at the Manchester-Lausanne Seminar of June 2008 (LNTS 401), London - New York
2009, 98-117.
116 Cf. Peterson, The Acts, 586. Alcuni commentatori (Johnson, The Acts, 290; Witherington,
The Acts, 475; Barrett, The Acts, II, 763; Peterson, The Acts, 451) ritengono che in At 16,1-3 Luca
avrebbe preparato il terreno per At 21,21, mettendo in luce in anticipo che le accuse nei confronti di
Paolo erano ingiustificate. Nonostante una certa ragionevolezza, questa ipotesi non accettabile per
due motivi: 1) in At 21,21 Paolo non viene accusato di essere infedele alla legge (gli viene contestato il suo modo poco ortodosso di insegnare), per cui un racconto in chiave apologetica non era
necessario; 2) in At 16,3 si ha il caso della circoncisione di un adulto di radici etniche miste, mentre
in At 21,21 si fa riferimento alla circoncisione eseguita secondo la legge lottavo giorno dalla nascita ai bambini nati dai genitori ebrei. Cf. anche Hvalvik, Paul, 151-152.

124

Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa

Luca solo la fede in Cristo, il Signore morto e risorto, assolutamente necessaria


per la salvezza tanto dei gentili quanto dei giudei117. Rispettando questo principio
di fondo, nulla impedisce allora ai giudeo-cristiani di coltivare, se lo ritengono
opportuno, le usanze dei loro padri (cf. At 28,17), per conservare la propria giudaicit e lappartenenza al popolo ebraico.
Conclusione
I riferimenti alla circoncisione nellopera lucana sono disseminati nei tre tempi
della storia della salvezza, secondo la celebre divisione di H. Conzelmann: il tempo di Israele (At 7,8), il tempo di Ges (Lc 1,59; 2,21) e il tempo della chiesa
(At15,1.5; 16,3; 21,21). il primo indice dellimportanza attribuita da Luca a
questo rito giudaico. Certo, la circoncisione non occupava il centro degli interessi
teologici del terzo evangelista, ma egli non poteva neppure ignorarla, visto che tra
i destinatari dei suoi scritti si trovavano anche gli ebrei credenti in Cristo. Non
doveva essere affatto facile conciliare le esigenze dei giudeo-cristiani, che non si
sentivano di abbandonare la circoncisione e altre usanze del loro popolo, e la sensibilit dei gentilo-cristiani, i quali non avrebbero gradito limposizione forzata di
questi costumi a loro estranei. Mantenendo un grande equilibrio, Luca riuscito
tuttavia a rispettare i sentimenti e le esigenze di entrambi i gruppi etnici senza offendere nessuno.
Dal modo in cui ne parla evidente che Luca non nutriva alcuna ostilit nei
riguardi della prassi israelita della circoncisione che egli dimostra di conoscere
bene. Secondo il volere di Dio, questo segno dellalleanza (At 7,8) doveva essere
eseguito lottavo giorno dalla nascita di un figlio ebreo. Proprio in quella data, a
riprova della fedelt dei loro genitori alla legge, furono circoncisi Giovanni Battista
e Ges (Lc 1,59; 2,21) e inseriti cos nel popolo dIsraele secondo il piano salvifico predetto nelle Scritture.
Non senza difficolt i primi credenti in Cristo hanno compreso questo disegno
di Dio che prevedeva la nascita di un popolo formato da circoncisi (ebrei) e
incirconcisi (pagani). Di certo provvidenziale, lepisodio della conversione di
Cornelio ha fatto spalancare la porta della comunit cristiana ai fratelli ex gentibus, costituita finora esclusivamente dai credenti ex circumcisione. La successiva
discussione sul valore salvifico della circoncisione terminata con la decisione
del concilio apostolico che ha ribadito il ruolo decisivo della fede in Cristo quale
condizione unica per essere salvati. Alla luce di questo principio teologico, valido
117 Pace Jervell, Die Beschneidung des Messias, 77: Die Fortsetzung in Apg 21,22ff zeigt,
da Paulus die Beschneidung und das Gesetz als unbedingt notwendig fr die Judenchristen ansah.
Dies, weil die Beschneidung das Zeichen der Verheiung und des Bundes ist (il corsivo mio).

Fede e opere in Luca. Il caso della circoncisione

125

per tutti (At 15,11), i pagani convertiti sono stati dispensati dallobbligo della
circoncisione. Questa disposizione voleva dire forse che anche i giudeo-cristiani
erano sollecitati ad abbandonare lantica prassi e altri costumi del loro popolo
ispirati alla legge mosaica? Non necessariamente, come lascia intendere lepisodio della venuta di Paolo a Gerusalemme. Dissipando le false accuse contro lapostolo (At 21,21), Luca (per bocca di Giacomo) assicura i giudeo-cristiani che il
loro attaccamento alle usanze paterne degno di rispetto. Non solo, ma secondo
la visione lucana che si pu dedurre dal racconto della circoncisione di Timoteo
(At 16,3), possibile far convivere nel popolo di Dio i credenti di varia provenienza, uniti dalla fede comune in Cristo ma liberi di esprimere la loro identit etnica
e culturale. Per cui non sar forse esagerato dire che auctor ad Theophilum in
qualche modo ha indicato la strada per la formazione di una chiesa multietnica e
pluralista, una chiesa capace di gettare un ponte tra i diversi popoli, al fine di
raggiungere quellunit di fede in Cristo nel pieno rispetto della propria identit
etnica e culturale.
Lesaw Daniel Chrupcaa
Studium Theologicum Jerosolymitanum

Frdric Manns
The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

Introduction
The assumption that the Fourth Gospel (FG) was written in the last decade
of the first century is today almost universally accepted. The historicity of the
FG has been contested by many commentators of the Gospel1 who prefer to
define it as a witness of the history of the Johannine community rather than a
witness of the historical Jesus. Patristic interpreters recognised John as a spiritual Gospel, while the external facts were preserved in the Synoptics2. John has
been seen as primarily theological, while the Synoptics were seen as more Jewish and more historical. The importance he gives to symbolism has been noted
many times. For many readers symbolism implies ahistoricity. The quest of the
historical Jesus was based on the Synoptic Gospels and ignored generally the
FG. It is notable that in the FG the Johannine community still appears to define
itself in relation to Judaism rather than as part of a wider Christian Church. The
discourses of the FG seem to be concerned with the issues of the Church-Synagogue debate: We speak of what we know and bear witness to what we have
seen: but you do not receive our testimony3. Christianity is still presented as a
movement within Judaism. The miracles of Jesus focused on in the FG are presented as signs meant to engender faith in Jesus among the Jews4. The criticism
1 F. Strauss, Das Leben Jesu, Tbingen 1835; F.C. Baur, Critical Investigation concerning
the Canonical Gospels, Tbingen 1847; E. Renan, Vie de Jsus, Paris 1863; A. Loisy, Le quatrime Evangile, Paris 1903; in his opinion the author did not want to write history, but to clothe
in symbolic garb his religious ideas and theological speculations. Even for J.D. Crossan, The
Historical Jesus. The Life of a Mediterranean Jewish Peasant, New York 1991, the FG is not a
source for authentic Jesus tradition.
2 Clement of Alexandria quoted by Eusebius, Hist. Eccl. 6.14.7. M.M. Thompson, The
Spiritual Gospel: How John the Theologian writes History, in P.N. Anderson et alii (ed.), John,
Jesus and History. I: Critical Appraisals of Critical Views, Atlanta GA 2007, 103-108.
3 Jn 3:11.
4 Judaism linked signs with the expectation for prophets. See J. Sanh 11:4,1. Signs-prophets
like Teudas who tried to part the Jordan and the Egyptian prophet who waited for the walls of Jerusalem to collapse wanted to anticipate the eschatological deliverance. Josephus, Ant. 20:97-99.

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 127-210

128

Frdric Manns

of historicity in the past was not exempt from philosophical and hermeneutical a
priori5. Even liberal Jews who started to study the message of Jesus 200 years ago
accepted only the Synoptics, but not the FG, since John invented the myth of
the divinity of Jesus6.
The view of history represented by the school of Bultmann, with its distinction
between Historie and Geschichte, made it possible to consider the events surrounding the person of Jesus theologically independent from chronology. This
meant that the connection between the historical Jesus and the kerygma is established at the level of meaning if not of terminology7. G. Bornkamm in his Jesus
of Nazareth claimed that the evangelists did not transmit verifiable facts about
Jesus, but instead illuminated the distinctive character of His person and work.
In this sense the primitive tradition about Jesus can be described as a margin full
of history8. But the sources to which we owe almost exclusively our historical
knowledge of Jesus are the Synoptics. Bultmann himself saw Johns task not as
the handing down of an historical tradition about Jesus, but as the presentation of
the eschatological occurrence centred in the Christ-event in such a way that it
existentially strikes the believer9.
Bultmann did not allow to John the perspective of covenant Heilsgeschichte10,
but O. Cullmanns article LEvangile johannique et lHistoire du Salut pointed
out the way in which the incarnate life of Jesus in the FG throws light backwards
and forwards on the whole history of salvation in order to reformulate the OT
pattern of creation followed by the history of Israel11. Later the essay by N.A.
Dahl on The Johannine Church and History, while denying that John was either
an historian of the past or a theologian of Heilsgeschichte, appealed to the christocentric view of history contained in the FG, by which the significance of Christ

Jesus new exodus miracle providing bread in the wilderness may have influenced some expectations, but it fitted in the new exodus pattern of the biblical prophets (Is 12:2, 35:1.8-10, 40:3, 51:11,
Zech 10:10). The FG portrays Jesus as greater than Moses (3:14, 5:45-47, 6:32, 9:28).
5 H.J. de Jonge, The Loss of Faith in the Historicity of the Gospels: H.S. Reimarus (ca 1750)
on John and the Synoptics, in A. Denaux (ed.), John and the Synoptics (BETL 101), Leuven
1992, 409-421.
6 F. Manns, Les Juifs et Jsus: 2000 ans dinterrogations, 200 ans de recherches exgtiques,
in E. Franco (ed.), Mysterium Regni, ministerium Verbi (Mc 4,11; At 6,41). Scritti in onore di
mons. Vittorio Fusco (ABI. Suppl. RivBib 38), Bologna 2000, 157-200. G. Vermes, Jesus the Jew,
London 1973, 19. D. Flusser - R.S. Notley, The Sage from Galilee. Rediscovering Jesus Genius,
Grand Rapids MI 2007, 9.
7 Bultmann averted that Christian faith is an engagement with the existential truth imbedded
in the traditions about Jesus. A. Schweitzer offered an irrelevant but historical Synoptic Jesus,
while Bultmann offered a relevant but non historical Johannine Jesus.
8 G. Bornkamm, Jesus of Nazareth, London 1960, 26.
9 R. Bultmann, Theology of the New Testament, II, London 1955, 69.
10 Ibid., 8-9.
11 O. Cullmann, LEvangile Johannique et lHistoire du Salut, NTS 11 (1965) 111-122.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

129

might be understood and appropriated12. But the question remains: to what extent
do Historie and Geschichte in the FG part company?
Some exegetes have nevertheless accepted a few historical elements in the
FG13. Those who claim that the FG is unreliable historically because of its theology and christology forget that even the Synoptics have their own theology as
Marxen, Luz and Conzelmann have shown it. The question of historical criti12 N.A. Dahl, The Johannine Church and History, in W. Klassen - G.F. Snyder (ed.), Current
Issues in the New Testament Interpretation, New York 1962, 129.
13 J.A. Robinson, The Historical Character of St. Johns Gospel, London 1908; E.H. Askwith,
The Historical Value of the Fourth Gospel, London 1910; A.C. Headlam, The Fourth Gospel as
History, Oxford 1948; E. Stauffer, Historische Elemente im vierten Evangelium, in E.H. Amberg - U. Kuhn (ed.), Bekenntnis zur Kirche. Festschrift E. Sommerlath, Berlin 1960, 33-51;
A.J.B. Higgins, The Historicity of the Fourth Gospel, London 1960; L.G. Cox, Johns Witness
to the Historical Jesus, BETS 9 (1966) 173-178; E. Trocm, Quelques travaux rcents sur le
Jsus de lhistoire, RHPR 52 (1972) 485-498; R.J. Campbell, Evidence for the Historicity of
the Fourth Gospel in John 2:13-22, in E. Livingstone (ed.), Studia Evangelica, VII, Berlin 1982,
101-120; P. Pokorn, Der irdische Jesus im Johannesevangelium, NTS 30 (1984) 185-218; V.
Eppstein, The Historicity of the Gospel Account of the Cleansing of the Temple, ZNW 55 (1964)
42-58; P. Fredriksen, From Jesus to Christ. The Origins of the New Testament Images of Jesus,
New Haven - London 1988, 189-199: Johns information is historically more sound than the
Synoptics in the probable duration of Jesus ministry, the Sanhedrins concern for the political
consequences of his preaching, the pitch of popular messianic excitement around Passover, the
extent of the Jewish authorities involvement on the night of Jesus arrest, the date of his arrest
relative to Passover; C. Perrot, Jsus et lhistoire, Paris 1993, 2 ed.; F. Bovon, Le Jsus historique travers les recherches rcentes, Cahier Evangile et Libert 118 (1993) I-VI; J. Zumstein,
La rfrence au Jsus terrestre dans lEvangile selon Jean, in D. Marguerat et alii (ed.), Jsus
de Nazareth. Nouvelles approches dune nigme (Le Monde de la Bible 38), Genve 1998, 462.
There is no history according to Zumstein except in the re-reading of history (Jn 2:22, 12:16, 20:9,
8:28, 13:7, 14:20, 16:25). The re-reading of the life of Jesus in the light of the Spirit is not a falsification of history, but an interpretative action which gives to the life of Jesus his ultimate truth;
R. Bauckham, The Testimony of the Beloved Disciple. Narrative, History and Theology in the
Gospel of John, Grand Rapids MI 2007; F.F. Bruce, New Testament Documents. Are they Reliable?, Downers Grove IL 1981, 52-54: John does not divorce the story from its Palestinian context; M.M. Thompson, The historical Jesus and the Johannine Christ, in R.A. Culpepper et alii
(ed.), Exploring the Gospel of John. Essays in Honour of D. Moody Smith, Louisville KY 1996,
28: There are items only in John that are likely to be historical and ought to be given due weight.
Jesus first disciples may once have been followers of the Baptist. There is no a priori reason to
reject the report of Jesus and his disciples conducting a ministry of Baptism for a time. That Jesus
regularly visited Jerusalem, rather than merely at the time of his death is often accepted as more
realistic for a pious, 1st century Jewish male; F.J. Moloney, The Fourth Gospel and the Jesus
of History, NTS 46 (2000) 42; H. Wansbrough, The Four Gospels in Synopsis, in J. Muddiman
- J. Barton (ed.), The Oxford Bible Commentary. The Gospels, New York 2001, 1012-1013:
Johns knowledge of things around Jerusalem is often superior to the Synoptics; C.L. Blomberg,
The Historical Reliability of Johns Gospel, Downers Grove IL 2002; C.S. Keener, The Gospel of
John. A Commentary, Peabody MA 2003, 171-232 (A Jewish Context); P.N. Anderson, The
Fourth Gospel and the Quest for Jesus, London - New York 2006, 154: The Johannine presentation of Jesus is historically preferable over the Synoptics; D.M. Smith, The Fourth Gospel in
Four Dimensions. Judaism and Jesus, the Gospels and Scripture, Columbia SC 2008. The FG
based on an eyewitness should be taken seriously as an independent Gospel. P.N. Anderson et alii
(ed.), John, Jesus and History. II: Historicity in the Fourth Gospel, Atlanta GA 2009.

130

Frdric Manns

cism of the FG must be considered anew after a study of literary criticism and
after giving a definition of History14. It has a double aspect: can the FG be considered historical in the sense that it reports what really happened and the words
Jesus pronounced? Secondly, can the presentation of Jesus made in the FG be
labelled as historical in the sense that it can be analysed by historical methods
only or is the portrait of Jesus coloured by the historical circumstances of the
Johannine community? To put it in another way: did the author intend his Gospel to be read literally as depicting the historical Jesus or did he fashion it to be
perceived as a kind of allegory? Does the FG deserve the title of Gospel or is
it only a witness of the history of the early Christian community? We shall have
to give an answer to both questions.
While at the beginning of the 19th century the FG was regarded as a valuable
source for the life of Jesus, by the end of the century a few critics thought that it
provided no historical information at all. The Jesus Seminar in America rejected
the historicity of the FG15 but it is not representative of the current critical consensus. What has caused scholars of the 20th century to move in a more conservative direction, so that it is no longer exaggerated to argue that the FG contains some amount of independent, reliable material? All these questions must be
examined. The Third Quest accepts among the criteria of historicity the fact that
Jewish realia are mentioned16. Today many scholars accept the FG as more Jewish and more historical than what was thought in the 1950s. Historical Jesus research has developed in the last decades from postminimalism concerning the
authenticity of Jesus traditions to a new moderate confidence in the historicity of
the Gospels. Critical research into the origins of the FG will permit a re-evaluation of this Gospel. We shall start with a brief status quaestionis before examining
again the problem of the historicity of the FG, being aware that Antiquity had its
own definition of History.
1. Status quaestionis
1.1. The traditional view that the Gospel was written toward the end of the
first century gave way to a theory that pushed its date into the middle of the sec14 History is not only the study of the past. The events of the past are connected with a theological explanation. History must be distinguished from annals which relate simply the facts. John
regards history as enlightened understanding of the events.
15 R. Funk, Roy W. Hoover and the Jesus Seminar. The Five Gospels, San Francisco CA 1993.
16 C.A. Evans, Assessing Progress in the Third Quest of the Historical Jesus, JSHJ 4 (2006)
35-54; J.H. Charlesworth, Jesus Jewishness: Exploring Jesus Place in Early Judaism, New York
1991; P.M. Bogaert, Lidentit juive de Jsus: une question dactualit, RTL 33 (2002) 351-370;
C.S. Keener, The Historical Jesus of the Gospels, Grand Rapids MI 2009, dedicates a whole
chapter to Jesus and Judaism (pp. 33-46).

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

131

ond century. But the well-known discovery in 1933 of the Rylands Fragment
(papyrus 52, containing a few verses from John 18), which can be dated no later
than A.D. 135, seemed to restore the FG to its traditional setting17.
If John was known in Egypt in the first quarter of the second century, the
beginning of the second century is a terminus ad quem of its redaction. Commonly the span 90-100 for the redaction of the FG was agreed by those who
defended apostolic authorship and those who rejected it, among both Catholics
and Protestants. Many commentators scarcely bothered to discuss the issue of
dating, and the place it occupied in introductions, compared with that of authorship, was minimal. The old view that John, an eyewitness of the events (Jn
19:35), composed the FG in Ephesus near the end of his life was displaced by
attempts to attribute the work to a non-Palestinian, Hellenistic author influenced
by gnostic thought18.
1.2. A second important element in the dating of the FG was the discovery in
1948 of the Dead Sea Scrolls which permitted to verify that many features used
as evidence for a Hellenistic background did not contradict a Palestinian setting
of the FG. Expressions such as sons of Light, walking in the darkness, Spirit of truth and eternal Life are known in the Dead Sea Scrolls and the FG. The
FG does not need a late date or a Hellenistic provenance, since a first century
Palestinian Jew could have expressed himself as the Johannine Jesus did. Many
alternate theories have appeared in the last decades19. O. Betz20 tried a comparison of the Johannine Paraclete concept and the Scrolls materials. He focused
upon the forensic quality of the Paraclete and found contacts with the intercessory agent, most especially the angel Michael who was identified with the Spirit
of truth. He believed that the figure of Michael served as a model for the portrayal of the Paraclete. His hypothesis was shared by G. Johnston21 who agreed
that the Scrolls literature provided the most helpful parallels for understanding
the figure of the Paraclete. L. Morris22 while studying the dualism of the Essene
community and that of the FG, stressed the differences between the two groups,
17 R.E. Brown, The Gospel According to John, I, New York 1966, lxxxiii: The dating of this
papyrus to 135-150 has been widely accepted.
18 R. Bultmann, The Gospel of John. A Commentary, Oxford 1971.
19 F.-M. Braun, Larrire-fond judaque du quatrime Evangile et la communaut de
lalliance, RB 62 (1955) 5-44; R.E. Brown, The Qumran Scrolls and the Johannine Gospel and
Epistles, in K. Stendahl (ed.), The Scrolls and the New Testament, New York 1957, 183-207; G.
Quispel, Qumran, John and Jewish Christianity, in J.H. Charlesworth (ed.), John and Qumran,
London 1972, 137-155.
20 O. Betz, Der Paraklet. Frsprecher im hretischen Sptjudentum, im Johannes-Evangelium und in neu gefundenen gnostischen Schriften (Arbeiten zur Geschichte des Sptjudentums und
Urchristentums 2), Leiden 1963.
21 G. Johnston, The Spirit-Paraclete in the Gospel of John (SNTS MS 12), Cambridge 1970.
22 L. Morris, The Gospel According to John, Grand Rapids MI 1971.

132

Frdric Manns

but admitted that the similarities are too numerous to be considered as accidentals. He accepted the hypothesis that the Essenes thought was transmitted to the
Johannine community through some followers of John the Baptist who had been
members of the Essene community.
J.A. Charlesworth23 did not accept a literary dependence between the Dead
Sea Scrolls and the FG which employed the language of the Essenes to articulate
its own images coming from the Christian world. But some Essenes who memorised 1QS 3-4 could have entered the Johannine school and could have shared the
idea of predestination. A. Hanson24 analysed the relationship between Jn 17 and
the Hodayot XV. He concluded that the Qumran Psalm was the nearest parallel
of Jn 17. He also asserted that there was a link between the FG and the Essenes
on the matter of predestination. O. Bcher25 thought apropos the dualism of the
FG that the OT imagery had been affected by Jewish sectarian thought of the kind
known at Qumran before being transmitted to the Evangelist. Johannine theology
was at home not in Pharisaic thought, but in apocalyptic Judaism. For O. Cullmann26 the background of the FG was a syncretistic Judaism made up of Essene
Judaism, the Baptist sect and Samaritanism.
The variety of results showed that there is nothing like a clear consensus of
scholarship even if more efforts were being expanded in the area of the Jewish
background of the FG. The resemblances to concepts in Jewish Hellenism and in
Jewish Apocalyptics, both rooted in the OT, cannot omit the differences nor the
Evangelists peculiar theology.
All theses studies send us back to the hermeneutical circle: our understanding
of a particular passage depends on our ability to place that passage within its
proper context, yet we cannot describe that context prior to some interpretive
work on the text. It would be a mistake to ignore the theories altogether. As long
as they are understood for what they are, as working hypotheses only, they can
provide a basis for exegesis. Nowadays exegetes prefer to speak about intertextuality and intratextuality27.
On the other hand it is no longer possible to make a sharp distinction between
Hellenistic and Palestinian Judaism when searching for the historical framework
23 J.A. Charlesworth, A Critical Comparison of the Dualism in 1QS 3:13-4:26 and the Dualism contained in the Gospel of John, in Id. (ed.), John and the Dead Sea Scrolls, New York
1990, 76-106.
24 A. Hanson, Hodayot XV and John 17: A Comparison of Content and Form, Hermathena
18 (1974) 48-58.
25 O. Bcher, Der johanneische Dualismus im Zusammenhang des nachbiblischen Judentums, Gtersloh 1965.
26 O. Cullmann, The Johannine Circle, Philadelphia PA 1976.
27 J. Zumstein, Intratextuality and Intertextuality in the Gospel of John, in T. Thatcher - S.D.
Moore (ed.), Anatomies of Narrative Criticism. The Past, Present and Futures of the Fourth
Gospel as Literature (SBL. Resources for Biblical Study 55), Leiden - Boston 2008, 121-135.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

133

of the FG. Nearly every Jewish movement and Judaism of the first century was
pluralistic28 has been proposed as the historical setting for the FG. It remains
nevertheless important to distinguish between pre 70 pluralistic Judaism and post
70 mainly Pharisaic Judaism.
R. Bultmann was convinced that the real context of the FG was gnosticism29.
A pre-christian gnosis known in the Dead Sea Scrolls had already influenced
Judaism before the beginning of the Christian movement. Among his disciples S.
Schulz30 maintained that the concept of logos came from Hellenistic Jewish speculation about wisdom, especially from Sir 24:5-31 and Wis 9:9-12. A gnostic
speech tradition influenced the FG in Jn 8:28, 12:23 and 13:31. The theology of
Christ sent by the Father, even the incarnational thought and the Paraclete idea
were gnostic categories. L. Schottroff31 underlined that the Johannine christology
had to be understood in the context of gnostic dualism. Christ was the worldly
revealer whose earthly appearance was preserved in the Christian language of his
incarnation but whose heavenly reality alone was important for faith.
Even R. Schnackenburg32 admitted that the FG took into consideration the
gnostic manner of speaking of the Son of God and bound it with his view of the
Son christology. There were contacts between the gnostic redeemer and the Johannine christology. Gnostic concepts also influenced Johns dualism, especially
its concept of life. But the purpose of the FG was in part to respond to gnostic
concerns. The Johannine eschatology provided a response to the gnostic pre-occupation with the relationship of the individual with space and time.
G. MacRae33 suggested that the FG drew from a syncretistic milieu which
included among others gnostic elements, in order to articulate a view of Jesus
with an universal opening. There were still other contacts with the OT exhibited
in the FG.
Scholarship has shifted during recent decades toward the elucidation of the
OT and rabbinic thought as possible roots of the FG34. The question of the OT
quotations in the FG has often been discussed: did the Evangelist quote from
memory or was his use of the OT free or even dependent from Jewish midrash.
28 C. Perrot, La pluralit thologique du Judasme au 1er sicle de notre re, in Marguerat
et alii (ed.), Jsus de Nazareth, 157-176.
29 R. Bultmann, The Gospel of John. A Commentary, Oxford 1971. E. Ksemann did not accept his masters position. See R. Bultmanns book: Das Verhltnis der urchristlichen Christusbotschaft zum historischen Jesus (SHAW.PH 1960/3), Heidelberg 1960.
30 S. Schultz, Das Evangelium nach Johannes, Gttingen 1972.
31 L. Schottroff, Johannes 4:5-15 und die Konsequenzen des Johanneischen Dualismus,
ZNW 60 (1969) 199-214.
32 R. Schnackenburg, The Gospel According to St. John, New York 1968.
33 G. MacRae, The Fourth Gospel and Religionsgeschichte, CBQ 32 (1970) 17-24.
34 F. Manns, Lvangile de Jean la lumire du Judasme (SBF. Analecta 33), Jerusalem
1991, reprinted 2000.

134

Frdric Manns

Prophetic and wisdom motifs were predecessors of the Johannine Christ according to F.-M. Braun35. The prophetic literature was determinative for the FGs
envoy motif according to J.P. Miranda36, while J.-A. Bhner37 found two levels
in this motif: the first reflecting Jewish apocalyptic thought and the second the
rabbinic idea of the shaliah38. Jesus is the Fathers appointed agent, but at his
return to the Father he commissioned the Paraclete and his followers to continue
this mission. M. McNamara39 thought that the Targumic materials coming from
the Synagogue was crucial for understanding the quotations of Scripture especially in the descending-ascending motif, whereas H. Moeller40 saw sapiential
ideas in the background of the FG. J. Coppens study on the Son of man41 suggested that we are in the presence of a midrash on Daniels Son of man image,
with the FG borrowing from Isaiahs Ebed Yhwh his main idea of glorification
and exaltation.
R. Brown42 was convinced that the I am sayings in the absolute form came
from the Greek translation of Deutero-Isaiah in which monotheism was asserted.
The allegorical speeches linked with the formula I am in Jn 4:10-14 came from
the wisdom speech of Sir 24:21. In the eucharistic discourse of chapter 6 it is
possible to find interweaving themes such as the gift of manna in the desert and
Jesus as the Messiah similar to Moses, the messianic banquet and sapiential
themes according to A. Feuillet43 and T. Preiss44. P. Borgen45 preferred to present
Jn 6 as a synagogal homily with a midrashic interpretation of the manna. J.A.
Simonis46 saw in Jn 10 the christological reading of the biblical images of the

35 F.-M. Braun, Jean le thologien. Les grandes traditions dIsral et laccord des critures
selon le quatrime vangile (B), Paris 1964.
36 J.P. Miranda, Die Sendung Jesu im vierten Evangelium. Religions- und theologiegeschichtliche Untersuchungen zu den Sendungsformeln (SBS 87), Stuttgart 1977.
37 J.A. Bhner, Der Gesandte und sein Weg im 4. Evangelium. Die kultur- und religionsgeschichtlichen Grundlagen der johanneischen Sendungschristologie sowie ihre traditionsgeschichtliche Entwicklung (WUNT II/2), Tbingen 1977.
38 The language of agency appears in the Qumran halakah (CD 11:2, 11:18-21). The rabbinic
idea was studied by C. Safrai, Relations between the Diaspora and the Land of Israel, in S.
Safrai - M. Stern (ed.), The Jewish People in the First Century, Assen 1974, 205.
39 M. McNamara, The New Testament and the Palestinian Targum to the Pentateuch (AnBib
27), Rome 1966.
40 H. Moeller, Wisdom Motifs and Johns Gospel, BETS 6 (1963) 93-98.
41 J. Coppens, Le Fils de lhomme dans lEvangile johannique, ETL 52 (1976) 28-81.
42 Brown, The Gospel According to John I, 533-538.
43 A. Feuillet, Les ego eimi christologiques du quatrime vangile, RSR 4 (1966) 5-22,
213-240.
44 T. Preiss, tude sur le chapitre 6 de lEvangile de Jean, ETR 46 (1971) 144-156.
45 P. Borgen, Bread from Heaven. An Exegetical Study of the Concept of Manna in the Gospel
of John and the Writings of Philo (Suppl. to NovT 10), Leiden 1965.
46 A.J. Simonis, Die Hirtenrede im Johannes-Evangelium. Versuch einer Analyse von Johannes 10,1-18 nach Entstehung, Hintergrund und Inhalt (AnBib 29), Rome 1967.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

135

Shepherd rather than a mandean gnostic thought. R. Borig47 searched for the roots
of Jn 15 in the OT images of the vine. The Paraclete passages have been explained
by Vawter48 as influenced by Ezechiel. Jewish angelology had also converged in
the Paraclete theology as well as the OT tandem relationship of Moses-Joshua
and Elijah-Elisha. U. Mller49 preferred to look for the background to the Paraclete in the notions surrounding the departing hero and the authentication of his
testimony was prepared in the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs. S. Pancaro50
explored the concept of the Law to demonstrate the centrality of the relationship
of Jesus to the Torah in the FG. The revelation of God in Jesus was understood
as obedience to the Torah in contrast to the resistance to faith manifested by the
opponents of Jesus.
Passover motifs in the FG could be explained by the OT reading and the interpretation of the Synagogue as R. Le Daut51 showed. J.K. Howard52 thought
that the Passover idea was intended to present Jesus as the Passover lamb. L.
Morris53 found the Passover motif also present in Jn 2 and Jn 6 as well as in the
Farewell Discourse.
1.3. C.H. Dodds study Historical Tradition in the Fourth Gospel marked a
great turn in Johannine studies. The British Scholar accepted that the tradition
behind the FG came from Hellenistic Judaism. Yet an important question remained: what was the evangelists relation to that tradition? Dodd had no doubt
that it was an external and second-hand relation54. But the presupposition was that
the FG was incorporating material which, at a distance of place and time, he did
not fully understand55. The writer of the FG did not know the Synoptics, but
rather both the writers of the FG and the Synoptic tradition utilised a common
oral tradition56. This explains how similarities between John and the Synoptics
47 R.

Borig, Der wahre Weinstock, Mnchen 1967.


Vawter, Ezechiel and John, CBQ 26 (1964) 451-454.
49 U. Mller, Die Parakletenvorstellung im Johannesevangelium, ZTK 71 (1974) 31-77.
50 S. Pancaro, The Law in the Fourth Gospel, Leiden 1975.
51 R. Le Daut, La nuit pascale. Essai sur la signification de la Pque juive partir du Targum
dExode XII 42 (AnBib 22), Rome 1963, 2 ed. 1975.
52 J.K. Howard, Passover and Eucharist in the Fourth Gospel, SJT 20 (1967) 330-337.
53 L. Morris, The Gospel According to John, Grand Rapids MI 1971.
54 C.H. Dodd, Historical Tradition in the Fourth Gospel, Cambridge 1963, 59, 431.
55 Historical Tradition, 94.
56 The same idea was developed by P. Gardner-Smith who stressed the independence of the
FG from the Synoptics. J.D.G. Dunn, Christianity in the Making. I: Jesus Remembered, Grand
Rapids MI 2003, accepted also the influence of the oral tradition in the FG. Tradition is a loaded
term that can refer also to historical tradition. This point is important for our purpose. We shall
return to it illustrating the problem with an example. Many other exegetes have shown the independence of the Johannine tradition from the Synoptics, which gives us a possibility to date the
Gospel earlier as the majority does. For the independence theory, see D. Moody Smith, John
among the Gospels. The Relationship in Twentieth-Century Research, Minneapolis MN 1992,
48 B.

136

Frdric Manns

could exist. In this debate, however, the assumption that knowledge of meant
literary dependence on was generally accepted. Some scholars have underlined
that these two elements need to be distinguished57.
For Dodd, the FG was assigned to an Hellenistic environment late in the first
century58. Though probably a speaker of Aramaic59 , the author of the FG had
different interests; he would have had no motive to invent the details he gave.
Dodds summary of Johns account of the trial of Jesus seems to accept its historicity60: It is aware of the delicate relations between the native and the imperial
authorities. It reflects a time when the dream of an independent Judaea under its
own king had not yet sunk to the level of a chimaera, and when the messianic idea
was not a theologumenon but impinged on practical politics, and the bare mention
of a king of the Jews stirred violent emotions; a time, moreover, when the
constant preoccupation of the priestly holders of power under Rome was to damp
down any first symptoms of such emotions. These conditions were present in
Judaea before A.D. 70, and not later, and not elsewhere. This, I submit, is the true
Sitz im Leben of the essential elements in the Johannine trial narrative. This narrative is far from being a second-hand edition of the Synoptics. While there is
evidence for some sort of elaboration by the author, the most probable conclusion
is that in substance it represents an independent strain of tradition, which must
have been formed in a period much nearer the events than the period when the
Fourth Gospel was written, and in some respects seems to be better informed than
the tradition behind the Synoptics61.
The FG is clearly not dependant upon the Synoptics. Some sources were used
that antedated the first Gospel62. His description of the topography of Jerusalem63,
his awareness of the geographical and spiritual divisions of Palestine before 7064,
and his use of metaphors and arguments, which would be difficult to understand
outside a Jewish context in this period65 are remarkable. It seems that the FG was
13-84. According to the FG the predication of Jesus did not use parables, did not speak of the
nearly coming of the Kingdom and did not contain discussions or reinterpretation of the Torah.
See also R.E. Brown, An Introduction to the New Testament, New York 1997, 362-364.
57 B. de Solage, Jean et les Synoptiques, Leiden 1979.
58 Historical Tradition, 120, 243, 246.
59 Historical Tradition, 424.
60 E.P. Sanders, The Historical Figure of Jesus, London 1993, 72, admits that Johns account
of Jesus trial is to be prefered to the Synoptic trial.
61 Historical Tradition, 120.
62 Jn 7:53-8:11 is generally presented as a later addition to the FG, but it does not mean that
it is devoid of reliable Jesus traditions: in fact, the story of a woman caught in adultery has all the
characteristics of early Jesus traditions: the Palestinian colouring, the halachic concerns and the
debates over adultery found in the pre-70 Jewish traditions.
63 Historical Tradition, 180.
64 Historical Tradition, 243-246.
65 Historical Tradition, 332-333, 412-413.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

137

shaped in Jewish-Christian circles in Judaea, close to the synagogue, prior to the


war of 70. It then had suffered from a period of cultural isolation until it was reused in Hellenistic circles of Asia Minor in the 60s.
But this evidence of early tradition in a late document posed problems. Dodd
gave several examples of tradition that appeared to have become frozen in a
primitive state. Regarding the political background to the scene of the feeding of
the crowd reflected in the attempt of the participants to seize Jesus and make him
king (6:15), Dodd explained it as follows: If it was locked away for half a century, how and where did it survive in this crystallized condition, with those almost forgotten elements in the background of the story which made it at the time
so significant for the immediate followers of Jesus?66.
Thus Johns comment in Jn 6:15 about the crowd wanting to declare Jesus
king after the feeding of the 5000, made historical sense in the political context
of occupied Palestine by the Romans. Johns description in chapter 11:48 of the
Jewish authorities being alarmed that Jesus popularity might lead to a Roman
intervention against the country was also possible.
Another example is given in Jn 7:23, If a child is circumcised on the Sabbath
to avoid breaking the law of Moses, why are you indignant with me for giving
health on the Sabbath to the whole of a mans body?. The text reflected contemporary rabbinic disputes: The Sitz im Leben of such tradition must have been
within a Jewish environment and in all probability it belongs to an early period.
Once the Church, by that time mainly Gentile, had ceased to have relations with
the synagogue, such discussions would no longer be kept alive, and only isolated
traces of them remain, embedded in the gospels67.
Finally, the most interesting example is found in the predictions by Jesus of
his leaving and coming back in 14:3 and 16:16. The FG antedated the development of these sayings into predictions of either resurrection or parousia. I suggest that John is here reaching back to a very early form of tradition indeed, and
making it the point of departure for his profound theological interpretation; and
further, that the oracular sayings which he reports have good claim to represent
authentically, in substance if not verbally, what Jesus actually said to his disciples
a better claim than the more elaborate and detailed predictions which the Synoptics offer68.
The Johannine presentation of a continuing parousia beginning on Easter
represented a primitive form of the tradition, before it was taken over by Paul and
the later pages of the Synoptics in an apocalyptic context.
The question of how or when the evangelist received his material, is not clear66
67
68

Historical Tradition, 222.


Historical Tradition, 333.
Historical Tradition, 420.

138

Frdric Manns

ly answered by Dodd. He agrees that it must have come directly or indirectly


from a circle of Jewish-Christian disciples in Judaea who were witnesses to the
tradition69. Regarding the form in which the tradition came to him, Dodd answered: That some parts of it may have been written down by way of aide-mmoire is always possible, and such written sources may have intervened between
strictly oral tradition and our Fourth Gospel70.
It is possible that the tradition was as near to the events in space or time as
Dodd claimed. There was no need to repeat the evidence which in recent years
has led to a revaluation of the historical tradition behind the FG71, reinforcing the
conclusion, that it reflected contact with a Palestinian world which disappeared
in the year 70. The external evidence was much stronger than critics have said.
Dodd, who thought apostolic authorship improbable but not impossible72, considered also patristic witnesses: His (Irenaeus) evidence is formidable, even if
it is not conclusive. Anyone who should take the view that in the absence of any
cogent evidence to the contrary it is reasonable to accept Irenaeus testimony is
on strong ground73.
Even those who had no inclination to regard the FG as early drew attention
not only to pieces of historical detail included in later material, but also to theological categories integral to the FG which appeared to be primitive74. Dodd was
convinced that the FG contained the most penetrating exposition of Jesus real
teaching75.
1.4. Another important contribution for understanding the Sitz im Leben of
the FG came from J.L. Martyn76. After the negation of the historicity of the FG
by many Protestants, Martyn tried to recuperate, in a pioneering work, partial
historicity reading the FG at two levels77. According to him, the FG presents a
intertexture drama taking place on two historically different levels at the same
time. The reference in John 9 to the blind man who was healed by Jesus and
subsequently cast out of the synagogue because of his acceptance of Jesus as
Tradition, 246-247.
Tradition, 424.
71 A.M. Hunter, The Gospel According to John, Cambridge 1965; E. Stauffer, Historische
Elemente im vierten Evangelium, in E.H. Amberg - U. Kuhn (ed.), Bekenntnis zur Kirche. Festgabe fr E. Sommerlath, Berlin 1960, 33-51; J.B. Lightfoots lectures on The Authenticity and
Genuineness of St Johns Gospel, in Id., Biblical Essays, London 1904, 1-198.
72 Historical Tradition, 17.
73 Historical Tradition, 12.
74 We shall discuss this element in the chapter on the high christology of the FG.
75 C.H. Dodd, The Apostolic Preaching and Its Developments, London 1938, 75.
76 J.L. Martyn, History and Theology of the Johannine Community, New York 1968.
77 Studying Johannine symbolism, X. Lon-Dufour arrived at the same conclusion of the two
level reading. See his article: Towards a Symbolic Reading of the Fourth Gospel, NTS 27 (1981)
439-456.
69 Historical
70 Historical

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

139

the Messiah, can be read at two levels. On the first level the conflict of Jesus
with his opponents was expressed; on the second level the conflict of the Johannine community with the members of the synagogue was presented. The author
made no distinction between past and present. The same drama represented both
Jesus and the Christians, the Jewish leaders of Jesus time and the Jewish leaders of the Evangelists day. The Johannine community was experiencing conflict
with the local Synagogue78. Some Jews were abandoning the synagogue to embrace Christian faith, while other Jewish-Christian believers were trying to hold
the new faith and maintained their allegiance to the Jewish community. The use
of the expression excluded from the synagogue in Jn 9:22, 12:42 and 16:2
referred to the Birkat ha Minim, the excommunication decided at the Jamnia
council. The two communities lived a struggle which made them both defensive. The main question can be put in this way: Can one follow Moses and Jesus
at the same time?
The essay of W. Meeks79 confirmed partially Martyns hypothesis. His investigation of the Moses motif in the FG showed that the Johannine tradition was
shaped by interaction between a Christian community and a hostile Jewish community. His comparison of the agent theme in the FG and in Philo pointed in that
direction. The polemics of the FG were due to the failure of the Johannine community to win Jews to their membership.
Other supporters of this thesis were H. Leroy80 with his form critical study of
the misunderstanding in the FG and E. Grssers81 examination of the polemical
treatment of the Jews. The main subject remained the Jewish-Christian relationship. R.H. Fullers study on the Jews82 in the FG also established the way this
expression arose from the Church-Synagogue conflict. R. Schnackenburg and
R.E. Brown both understood the Jews as contemporaries of the Evangelist.
Jews and Christians were locked in a difficult struggle. The synagogue ban of
Jewish-Christians had effected the Johannine community. Brown83 considered
the entire Gospel as a chronological retelling of Johannine community history.
78 Even the Pontifical Biblical Commission seems to repeat this position in the Document:
The Jewish People and their Sacred Scriptures in the Christian Bible, n. 78: The Fourth Gospel
recalls these events, and re-evaluates them in the light of the experience of the Johannine communities that had encountered opposition from the Jewish communities.
79 W. Meeks, Am I a Jew?- Johannine Christianity and Judaism, in J. Neusner (ed.), Christianity, Judaism and Other Greco-Roman Cults. Studies for Morton Smith at Sixty. I: New Testament, Leiden 1975, 163-186.
80 H. Leroy, Rtsel und Missverstndnis. Ein Beitrag zur Formgeschichte des Johannesevangeliums, Bonn 1968.
81 E. Grsser, Die antijdische Polemik im Johannesevangelium, NTS 11 (1964) 74-90.
82 R.H. Fuller, The Jews in the Fourth Gospel, Dialog 16 (1977) 31-37.
83 R.E. Brown, The Community of the Beloved Disciple. The Life, Loves and Hates of an Individual Church in the New Testament Times, New York 1979. On the surface the FG is a story
about Jesus. Below the surface the story of the community is being told.

140

Frdric Manns

For M. de Jonge84 the Johannine christology was developed to assist Christians


in responding to the objections of Jewish protagonists. The figure of Nicodemus
represented the Jewish Christians who were trying to cling to their Jewish identity. Another element of this struggle was underlined by S. Pancaro85. Behind the
theme of the Torah in the FG he saw a conflict between the authority of Jesus and
the authority of the Torah. Judaism was trying to defend itself after the crisis that
followed the destruction of the Temple. It condemned the Christian as heretics.
The FG was written to defend the Johannine community.
That there is a connection to be drawn in the FG between genuine early tradition and late editing is the presupposition behind the problem that has perplexed recent interpreters and commentators, namely, the history of the Johannine tradition86.
A.T. Lincolns approach to the historicity of the Gospel of John87 adopted J.L.
Martyns two-level approach, whereby the issues known by the Johannine community in conflict with their opponents are collapsed into the issues that Jesus
originally knew in his conflicts with the religious leaders of his time. What we
have in the FG is an anachronistic reading of the ministry of Jesus through the
lens of the Johannine communitys faith experience around A.D. 90. Lincoln
stated it this way: Frequently the moulding of the story of Jesus by the concerns
of a later perspective is such that the two are collapsed together and Jesus, in the
setting of his mission and in debate with his opponents, expresses the convictions
of the evangelist and his community in their debates with opponents88. The
symbolic language used in the FG is open to readings of the text at different levels89. Lincoln followed the typical two-level interpretation of this passage by
stating that the casting out of the healed man in Jn 9:22 was historically dubious.
He argued that it was a created story meant to represent those in the Johannine
community who had been cast out of the synagogue due to the adoption of the
twelfth benediction of the Shemone Esre established around A.D. 85. Lincoln did
not interact with recent scholarship that is quite critical of this two-level reading
84 M. de Jonge, Nicodemus and Jesus. Some Observations on Misunderstanding and Understanding, BJRL 53 (1971) 338-358.
85 Pancaro, The Law in the Fourth Gospel.
86 B. Noack, Zur johanneischen Tradition. Beitrge zur Kritik an der literarkritischen Analyse
des vierten Evangeliums (Teologiske skrifter 3), Copenhagen 1954; R. Gyllenberg, Die Anfnge
der johanneischen Tradition, in W. Eltester (ed.), Neutestamentliche Studien fr Rudolf Bultmann, Berlin 1954, 144-147.
87 A.T. Lincoln, The Gospel According to Saint John, London - New York 2005. See also his
article: We know that his testimony is true: Johannine truth claims and historicity, in Anderson
et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and History, I, 178-197.
88 p. 47.
89 X. Lon-Dufour, Towards a Symbolic Reading of the Fourth Gospel, NTS 27 (1981)
439-456.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

141

of John 990. He lists C.L. Blombergs book The Historical Reliability of the Fourth
Gospel as a conservative approach to issues of historicity.
In 1990, D. Moody Smith could state without fear of contradiction, that J.L.
Martyns version of the Johannine community hypothesis, constituted one of the
assured paradigms in Johannine study on which others could confidently build
their own theories91. A decade and a half later, this consensus has significantly
eroded. In fact, some former proponents of the hypothesis have publicly renounced it92, while others have severely criticized it as inadequately taking into
account the testimony of the early church93 and as being at odds with first-century Christianity94, not to mention the difficulty the Johannine mission theme
presents for radically sectarian readings of Johns Gospel. Criticism of the two
level drama also came from the Swedish School. T. Hgerland95 evaluated the
allegorical reading of the FG first through a search for ancient parallels that would
constitute a genre of the two level drama, secondly through a discussion of the
alleged intra-textual indications of the Gospels allegorical character. He reached
the conclusion that both the search for ancient two-level genre96 and the search
for hints of allegory in the text are unsuccessful. The hypothesis of a Johannine
two level drama is therefore implausible. The FG should be considered as ancient
biographies or Lives97.
Curiously enough, F. Dreyfus98, a converted Jew to Christianity, admitted that
the Historical Jesus would have pronounced all the sentences attributed to him in
the FG. Even the long discourses pronounced by the Johannine Jesus contained
historical elements, since oral traditions are very firm in the East.

We shall come back to this topic in the chapter about the Birkat ha Minim.
Smith, The Fourth Gospel in Four Dimensions.
92 R. Kysar, The Whence and Whiter of the Johannine community, in J.R. Donahue (ed.),
Life in Abundance. Studies of Johns Gospel in Tribute to R.E. Brown, Collegeville MN 2005,
65-81.
93 M. Hengel, Die johanneische Frage. Ein Lsungsversuch (WUNT 67), Gttingen 1993.
94 R. Bauckham - C. Mosser (ed.), The Gospel of John and Christian Theology, Grand Rapids
MI 2008.
95 T. Hgerland, Johns Gospel: A Two-Level Drama?, JSNT 25 (2003) 309-322.
96 The FG is neither an apocalyptic text nor a fictional novel which sometimes play on a twolevel drama.
97 R.A. Burridge, What are the Gospels? A Comparison with Graeco-Roman Biography
(SNTS MS 70), Cambridge 1992. Philo wrote De Abrahamo and De Josepho which he designates
as Lifes, but there are completely allegorical. In his Life of Moses Philo wants to depict the historical Moses.
98 F. Dreyfus, Jsus savait-il dtre Dieu?, Paris 1984. The main focus of the FG is put on the
question: Who is the Messiah? Three times Jesus is explicitly said to be the Messiah (1:41, 4:2526, 11:27). The FG is an evangelical tool aimed to convince Jews that Jesus is the Messiah. The
quotations of the OT suppose a readership steeped in the biblical lore. Even more no explanation
are given for the titles the Son of Man or the prophet (1:21, 6:14).
90
91

142

Frdric Manns

1.5. A new step in the research of historicity of the FG came from an anglican
scholar. J.A.T. Robinson in his book The Priority of John99 affirmed that much of
what is considered as an established fact is no more than preference and presumption. The FG is not a recycler of Synoptic material, but an editor of independent
traditions. Divergence in the accounts does not suggest that the event did not take
place. The view that John has been historically inventive in his Gospel is not correct. The two level theory cannot be accepted since no Evangelist so clearly
notes the difference between what the disciples understood at that time and what
they came to see later through the Spirit100. Liberal Protestant scholarship perpetuated in the presuppositions of the form- and redaction critics that there is a
great gulf between the Jesus of history and the Christ of faith, or between events
and their interpretation, between facts and symbolism. It regarded the FG as a
myth and therefore not history simply because it was the spiritual Gospel. M.
Hengel insisted that the FG did not differ from other Lifes in the ancient world or
from the story-cycles of the OT101. The early Christian community cared much
about the Jesus of history as it appears in Acts 10:37, 26:26 and Jn 18:20. Where
the Gospel narrative accounts can be checked for consistency with surviving
material, the account in the FG is commonly the more plausible.
Robinson gave three motives for preferring the chronology of the FG to that
of the Synoptics. First, Johns account of Jesus ministry is always consistent.
Seasonal references always followed in the correct sequence. Geographical distances were consistent with indications of journey times, and references to external events always cohered with the internal chronology of Jesus ministry. The
same cannot be said for the three Synoptic accounts. For example, the harvesttide story of Mk 2:23 is shortly followed by reference to green springtime pasture
in 6:39.
Robinson appealed also to the critical principle applied in textual study, that
the account was most likely to be original that explained best the other variants.
It would be relatively easy to have created the Synoptic chronology by selecting
and editing from Johns chronology; whereas expanding the Synoptic chronology
to produce that found in John, would have required a rewriting of the sources.
Robinson claimed finally that elements consistent with Johns alternative
chronology can be found in each of the Synoptic accounts, whereas the contrary
was never the case. Hence, Marks explicit claim that the Last Supper was a
Passover meal was contraindicated by his statement that Joseph of Arimathea
bought a shroud for Jesus after his death; which would not have been possible if
it were a festival day.
99 See from the same author, The New Look in the Fourth Gospel, in K. Aland - F.L. Cross
(ed.), Studia Evangelica (TU 73), Berlin 1959, 338-350.
100 J.A.T. Robinson, The Priority of John, London 1985, 35.
101 Acts and the History of Earliest Christianity, Philadelphia PA - London 1980, 3-34.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

143

Robinson suggested that the Gospel originally began with the verses of the
Prologue and the first chapter concerned with John the Baptist (1:6-9, 15:19ff.),
and that a second layer of poetic meditation and theological commentary was
added later102. Two possible conclusions follow thus. One is that the Logos theology of the Prologue properly belongs to the environment of the FG rather than to
its background. The other is that the history of the Gospel has its own primacy.
1.6. R.E. Browns commentary of the FG, considered as classical, took over
Martyns hypothesis. The Evangelist has modified the historical course of events
for theological reasons103. Jesus ministry in Samaria according to Jn 4 functions
as a means of relating the reception of the Samaritans into the Johannine community104.
His exegesis relies on a five stage compositional theory introduced to explain
the literary problems in the present text of the FG. The Christian community was
inter-acting with various groups:
- Christians of apostolic churches with their Christology which was perceived
by the Johannine community as insufficiently developed. But unity with them
was still possible (Jn 17:22-23).
- Jewish Christians who depended on signs and who did not accept Christs
divinity. The Johannine community did not regard them as true believers (Jn
6:60-66).
- Crypto-Christians who had not broken with the synagogue (Nicodemus could
be a prototype of this group).
- Adherents of John the Baptist who viewed the Baptist as more important than
Jesus (the polemic of Jn 1:8 and 3:30).
- The Jews who were unbelieving members of the synagogue and persecuted
members of the Johannine community. They excommunicated those professing faith in Jesus (Jn 9:34).
- The world, a symbol of those who rejected the message of Jesus (Jews
included).
There is no explicit evidence for such reconstruction. The groups are pure
inferences from the Gospels text, which does not directly address these issues.
102 J.A.T. Robinson, The Relation of the Prologue to the Gospel of St John, in The Authorship and Integrity of the New Testament (SPCK Theological Collections 4), London 1965, 70-72.
103 Brown, The Community of the Beloved Disciple, 20-21.
104 Brown, The Community of the Beloved Disciple, 35-36. A closer look at the Gospel of
Lk9:52-53 shows that Jesus and his disciples requested lodgings in a Samaritan village. Browns
conclusion turns out to be unwarranted and his reconstruction of the history of the early community is without secure foundation.

144

Frdric Manns

Moreover, reconstructions of this sort suggest that the characters described in the
Gospel, insofar as they represent a specific situation at the end of the first century, do not always correspond to realities at the time of Jesus ministry.
Brown proposes different stages for the composition of the FG105:
1. A core of traditional material pertaining to the words and works of Jesus.
2. The development of this material in Johannine style and patterns through
preaching and teaching, in oral and finally written forms.
3. The organization of (2) into a consecutive written gospel in Greek.
4. A second edition by the same hand, expanding the material to meet the
needs and groups of persons.
5. A final redaction by another author, though incorporating material stemming from the preaching days of the evangelist (and therefore at points not
differing in style or vocabulary from the rest of the gospel).
This process of relectures occupied a long period of time. Stage 1 can be
dated between 40 and 60; stage 2, lasting several decades, and therefore overlapping 1, went on till circa 75; stage 3, the first edition of the gospel, was set in
circa 75-85; 4, its revision, occupied the late 80s and early 90s; 5, the final redaction, took place circa 100.
As far as the author is concerned, stage 1 could go back to John, son of Zebedee; stages 2-4 were the work of his disciples and in particular of one principal
disciple (the evangelist); stage 5 was the work of yet another disciple (the redactor) after the evangelists death.
There was no gap between the evangelist and his source- material; for the
disciple of the apostle was in contact with him and belonged to his circle. Apart
from the linguistic difficulty of believing that John, son of Zebedee, could himself
have written these things, it was the later stages of composition that made it inconceivable that the finished form of the FG could be the work of an eyewitness.
The part of hypothesis remains considerable. The criteria to distinguish the
different groups and stages of composition are not always convincing. Even more
there seems to be no dramas on different levels in antiquity. The narrative sections
of the FG show no traces of an intention to tell anything else than Jesus life. In
the discourses the wording sometimes brings in a suspicion that a community of
believers have put their words on Jesus lips, but to distinguish such words from
sayings that ultimately come from Jesus himself is difficult. The FG does not
exhibit any desire to present a history of a Johannine community. It aims only to
pass on historical and theological knowledge of Jesus. The FG has certainly been

105

John, I, xxiv-ix, xcviii-cii.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

145

coloured by the setting in which is was written, but its lack of historical reliability is nowadays questioned.
But in his publication The Death of the Messiah106, Brown warned against
assuming that the Synoptics are recording the historical facts and that the FG has
reorganized them theologically. In 2003 Brown with the help of F.J. Moloneys
editing concluded: Today there is a growing tendency to take seriously many of
the historical, social, and geographical details peculiar to narratives found only
in the Fourth Gospel107.
1.7. The recent commentary of the FG by U.C. von Wahlde108 draws from the
work of Bultmann and to some degree from Brown. It established a theory that
separates the final form of John into three layers or editions as he calls them.
Written probably between 60-65 A.D. edition 1 offered the skeleton story of
the Gospel as it currently is. This ground layer has a low Christology, used signs
as the keyword for Jesus miracles, focuses on a broad range of terms for the
antagonists (Pharisees, chief priests, rulers), and developed a plot line where such
enemies of Jesus grew in anger until they plotted to kill him. This first author was
probably Jewish and had a strong knowledge of the Jesus tradition. His purpose
was evangelistic and his writing community probably had contact with or deep
knowledge of the ministry of John the Baptist.
The redactor of the second level edited the text with a theological agenda, and
neglected and even obscured the narratological progression of the text. This edition focused on the antagonists simply as the Jews. It was this edition especially that intended to communicate to Jewish Christians who had been rejected
by the synagogal community. A high Christology was woven into the text at this
point. This edition probably was produced 65-70 A.D. The last redactor had even
less of an interest in the narrative and made purely theological changes. He infused the perspective of the Elder (1Jn written prior to this edition), brought an
apocalyptic perspective, added the prologue, and developed the eucharistic language. This redaction was produced 90-95 A.D.
For a small but growing number of scholars, the question of the FGs historical purpose has been displaced by the relatively ahistorical concerns of
New York - London 1994.
An Introduction to the Gospel of John, New York 2003, 91.
108 U.C. von Wahlde, The Gospel and Letters of John, 3 vols, Grand Rapids MI 2009-2010.
See also the commentaries of R. Schnackenburg, M.-E. Boismard - A. Lamouille, X. Lon-Dufour, J. Zumstein, J.H. Neyrey, Y. Simoens and C.S. Keener. Keeners introduction (The Gospel
of John, Peabody MA 2003) goes on to discuss the social contexts of the Gospel, the Jewish
Context of the Gospel, Revelatory Motifs in the Gospel-Knowledge, Vision, Signs, and christology and other theology. The Jewish context of this socio-historical approach allows him to argue
that much of the material found in Johns Gospel is historical and accurately depicts the life of
the historical Jesus.
106
107

146

Frdric Manns

structuralism or of narrative theology. Essays in Semeia or the book by R.A.


Culpepper point in that direction. The FG is assessed as a work of art or as an
autonomous text but not in terms of that texts place in the history of Christianity or in Jesus life109.
How is it that so many contradictory opinions about the historicity of the FG have
been expressed? The Vor-verstndniss of the authors must have played an important
role. Most of the commentators maintain the late redaction of the FG which describes the trajectory of the developing Christianity rather than Jesus life.
It has to be remembered that more and more exegetes consider a pre-70 hypothesis as plausible. Among them we must cite A.C. Headlam110, L. Morris111,
G.A. Turner112, F.L. Cribbs113, O. Cullmann114, C.L. Blomberg115, J.A.T. Robinson116, D. Wenham117 and P.N. Anderson118. J.P. Meier considers the Fourth Gospel among the most important sources in the search for the historical Jesus119.
Thesis and antithesis call for a new synthesis.
2. Methodology
The main problem remains the methodological one. How should we proceed?
The traditional criteria of historicity have been presented many times120. They
must be implemented by a new research since the structure of the Gospel seems
to be unitarian. Internal and external criticism must complete each other. There
109 R.A. Culpepper, Anatomy of the Fourth Gospel. A Study in Literary Design, Philadelphia
PA 1983.
110 A.C. Headlam, The Fourth Gospel as History, Oxford 1948.
111 L. Morris, Studies in the Fourth Gospel, Grand Rapids MI 1969, 288.
112 G.A. Turner, The Date and Purpose of the Gospel of John, BETS 6 (1963) 82-85.
113 F.L. Cribbs, A Reassessment of the Date of Origin and the Destination of the Gospel of
John, JBL 89 (1970) 38-55.
114 Cullmann, The Johannine Circle, 97. In his book Jsus et les rvolutionnaires de son
temps, Neuchtel 1970, he tries to precise the position of the historical Jesus towards the Zealots.
115 Blomberg, The Historical Reliability.
116 J.A.T. Robinson, Redating the New Testament, Philadelphia PA 1976, 290-311.
117 D. Wenham, A Historical View of Johns Gospel, Themelios 23 (1998) 5-21.
118 P.N. Anderson et alii (ed.), Jesus, John and History. II: Aspects of Historicity in the Fourth
Gospel, Atlanta GA 2009.
119 J.P. Meier, A Marginal Jew. Rethinking the Historical Jesus. I: The Roots of the Problem
and the Person, New York 1991, 44.
120 N. Perrin, Rediscovering the Teaching of Jesus (NTL), London - New York 1967; Keener,
The Historical Jesus of the Gospels. A lot of confusion about the historicity of Jesus came from
the fact that people claimed they were doing a quest for the historical Jesus when de facto they
were doing theology, a theology historically informed. D.L. Bock, Studying the Historical Jesus.
A Guide to Sources and Methods, Grand Rapids MI 2002. G. Theissen - D. Winter, Die Kriterienfrage in der Jesusforschung. Vom Differenzkriterium zum Plausibilittskriterium (NTOA 34),
Freiburg (Schweiz) - Gttingen 1997.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

147

has always been a tension between the dissimilarity criterion (material is authentic when it differs from both conventional first century Judaism and post-Eastern
Christianity) and the criterion of Palestinian environment (material must cohere
with what is conceivable in an early first century Jewish context). Both N.T.
Wright and G. Theissen have created more nuanced criteria. Wright speaks of a
double similarity and dissimilarity criterion121. It is not realistic to expect Jesus
to have differed completely from his Jewish background or to have been completely misunderstood by his followers. Yet he taught and acted in distinctive
ways compared with his contemporaries. Thus a combination of similarities and
dissimilarities from both Judaism and Christianity will probably support authenticity. Theissen rejects the dissimilarity criterion in favour of the criterion of
historical plausibility122. The saying or deed must be plausible in its historical
context and demonstrate some influence in early Christianity, while at the same
time it must disclose Jesus individuality within his original context. In addition
multiple attestation provides an important criterion of authenticity, since John
remains independent from the Synoptics as Dodd has proved it. Multiple attestation includes the recurrence of similar teachings, events, themes, motifs or literary forms. Of course they remain large areas of subjectivity in the application of
these criteria, because we know only a small portion of ancient Judaism and
early Christianity. New Testament scholars give generally a lip service to the notion of Jesus Jewish background, forgetting the oral tradition which was conservative123.
In modern research the historical Jesus is the pre-Eastern Jesus. Questions of
historicity focus on how much we can know about the ministry of Jesus prior to
his death. The FG however assumes that truly understanding the pre-Eastern Jesus involves also a post-Eastern perspective. What Jesus did and said was not
understood prior to his resurrection (Jn 2:22, 12:16). The FG approach to history is peculiar124.
In assessing the historical reliability of an ancient author one should not employ modern standards of historiography, but rather valuate the text relative to the
literary standards of the ancient world125. However we must still ask whether the
information provided by an ancient historian is reliable enough. The notion of
history in antiquity doesnt exclude a personal interpretation of the facts126. HisN.T. Wright, The Original Jesus. The Life and Vision of a Revolutionary, Oxford 1996, 131-133.
G. Theisssen - D. Winter, The Quest for the Plausible Jesus, Louisville KY 2002.
123 T. Sding, Was kann aus Nazareth schon Gutes kommen? (Joh 1:46). Die Bedeutung des
Judenseins Jesu im Johannesevangelium, NTS 46 (2000) 21-41.
124 The criteria of historicity have been studied by P. Anderson, Why is this study needed,
in Anderson et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and History, I, 37-67.
125 Keener, The Historical Jesus of the Gospels, 95-108 (Ancient Historiography as History).
126 S. Byrskog, Story as History History as Story. The Gospel Tradition in the Context of
Ancient Oral History (WUNT 123), Tbingen 2000.
121

122

148

Frdric Manns

tory is the discipline that records and interprets past events. The FG hermeneutical principle is repeatedly making explicit that it is engaged in interpreting Jesus
traditions. Scholars of ancient history have always recognised the subjectivity
factor in their available sources. History is not objective, transparent, unified,
or easily knowable and consequently is extremely problematic as a concept for
grounding the meaning of a literary text; the binarism we casually reinforce
every time we speak of literature and history, text and context, is unproductive
and misleading. Literature is part of history, the literary text as much a context
for other aspects of cultural and material life as they are for it. Rather than passively reflecting an external reality, literature is an agent in constructing a cultures sense of reality127.
The author of the FG presents himself as a witness128. The biblical category
of witness is known and is essential in an historical work: If I bear witness to
myself, my testimony is not true; there is another who bears witness to me and I
know that his witness is true (Jn 5:31-32). John the Baptist, the works the Father
gave Jesus to accomplish, the Scripture and the Father himself bear witness to
Jesus. After the piercing of Jesus side the author of the FG comments: He who
saw it has borne witness his testimony is true, and he knows that he tells the
truth that you may believe (Jn 19:35). To insist upon this witness means to
recognise the historicity of the narrated events. The FG in his presentation of the
life of Jesus wants to show the fulfilment of Scripture in it.
To avoid confusion about the historical events several distinctions must be
made. The first distinction is to remember that the pre-70 Judaism was a pluralistic reality which we know from the apocalyptic, the wisdom, the Qumranic, and
the intertestamental literature. Historian as Josephus are very important in this
task. Even Philo of Alexandria must be taken into consideration, if we do not
accept the late date for the Johannine redaction. After the year 70 Judaism became
essentially Pharisaic. Viewing Jesus within the framework of early Judaism
means to examine all the movements of Judaism to check Jesus Jewishness and
the essential reliability of the traditions preserved in the FG.
127 J. Howard, New Historicism and Renaissance Drama, in R. Wilson - R. Dutton (ed.),
New Historicism and Renaissance Studies, London - New York 1992, 28.
128 R.E. Brown, The Problem of Historicity in John, in Id., New Testament Essays, Milwaukee
1965, 143-167; R. Bauckham, Jesus and the Eyewitnesses, Cambridge 2006. Rather than a historical chronicling of data, the witness of the Beloved Disciple articulates the meaning of events and
sayings, validating the historical significance of the subjective. Johannine historicity cannot be
confirmed with certainty; one can only attest to the authenticity of its witness. His witness is true.
Jn 21:24 could be an autobiographical note indicating that the author of the FG is the beloved disciple or it could be the sphragis, the seal which identifies the author and certifies the authenticity of
the document or its content. John makes explicit that he was writing interpreted history, and that the
interpretation was an essential part of the meaning. But the historicity of the FG can be determined
only in a community context. A.T. Lincoln, We know that his Testimony is true: Johannine Truth
Claims and Historicity, in Anderson et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and History, I, 179-198.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

149

The second distinction to be made is between tradition and redaction. A


late redaction can contain early traditions. The importance of the oral tradition
in the Jewish world has been acknowledged for the Mishnah as well as for the
Gospels129.
We shall proceed progressively. The first step to consider will be the expulsion
of the Jewish Christians from the Synagogue. Does John allude to the Birkat ha
Minim and therefore the redaction of his Gospel would be late, or does he mention
other persecutions of the followers of Jesus? The anti-Jewish polemic could witness a pre-70 situation when Judaeo-Christianity was still a part of the Jewish
community.
The old assumption that the high christology of the FG could not have developed earlier then the last decade of the first century can be challenged since the
pre-existence of the Son of man is attested in the book of Enoch. The high christology of the FG is old, as it shall be remembered. The FG uses typology: T.F.
Glasson has shown it130. John was familiar with an early form of Messianic expectation which embodied a parallelism between the Messiah and Moses. The
knowledge of the Synoptics in the FG is not proved. We shall have to examine
those two problems.
Since the FG uses very often symbolism, which can be read on different levels, it is urgent to discover the origin of this symbolism. At the same time well
have to examine to use of the Scripture, since the FG presents the life of Jesus as
a fulfilment of Scripture.
Another step will be the examination of the Jewish feasts in the FG which are
mentioned very often. Since they precise the Jewish context of the FG they encourage the study of the Jewishness of Jesus131. Is the author of the FG coming
from a priestly tradition since he knows well the priestly traditions? The answer
to that question could help us to focus on the origin and the date of the FG.
The problem of the relation of the FG with the Synoptics must be studied, even
superficially to prove if possible their independence. Many authors have expressed the hypothesis that the author of the FG knew aramaic132. Is this hypothesis in favour of an early date? Wisdom traditions are old and can be dated. If they
129 B. Gerhardsson, Memory and Manuscript. Oral Tradition and Written Transmission in
Rabbinic Judaism an Early Christianity (The Biblical Resource), Grand Rapids MI 1998 [orig.
1961]; H.C. Schimmel, The Oral Law, Jerusalem 2006, 3 ed.
130 T.F. Glasson, Moses in the Fourth Gospel (SBT 40), London 1963.
131 Johns portrayal of the Jews is usually hostile (1:19, 2:18-20, 3:25, 5:10.15.16.18, 6:41
etc.), but sometimes it is positive (4:9, 11:45, 12:9.11). The expression Feast of the Jews is
neutral (2:13, 5:1, 6:4, 7:2, 11:55). Sometimes the Jews function as an ethnic adjective (2:6, 18:20,
19:31.40.42). The expression King of the Jews (18:33.39, 19:3.19) can be traditional since the
Gospel of Matthew knows it.
132 The problem of the aramaisms in the FG and the wisdom traditions have been treated in
my article A Jewish Approach to the Gospel of John, Antonianum (2012), in print.

150

Frdric Manns

are present in the FG they provide us with an important historical element. Since
they are present in many discourses, they can contribute to precise the origins of
the discourses. Finally archaeology, very often ignored by exegetes, can help the
historian to reconsider the reality. The FG knows the geography and the history
of Israel, no doubt. These different approaches of the FG can help to underline its
historicity and its Jewish background.
The conclusion of Miller133 must be remembered: Those who believe the
Gospels to be fundamentally historical maintain that events in the Gospels should
be regarded as historical unless proven otherwise. Conversely, those who regard
the Gospels as essentially fictive maintain that events in the Gospels should be
taken as unhistorical unless proven otherwise.
3.1. The Birkat ha Minim reconsidered once more
According to J.L. Martyn a special indication gives a precise marker for the
terminus post quem of the FG: the Birkat ha Minim which was added to the Shemone Esre after the destruction of the Jerusalem temple134. With other exegetes,
he holds that the use of the adjective aposynagogos (9:42, 12:42, 16:2), and in
particular the statement in 9:22 that the Jewish authorities had already agreed
that anyone who acknowledged Jesus as Messiah should be banned from the
synagogue, reflect the formal exclusion of Christians from Judaism with the
introduction of the twelfth blessing of the Shemone Esre, against the Heretics
But this is an inference whose precarious basis must be exposed in some details,
since it is frequently made with an apodictic tone.
The text of the Benediction has known modifications but the original form can
be established taking into consideration the Palestinian version found in the Cairo Genizah135:
For the renegades let there be no hope, and may the arrogant kingdom soon
be rooted out in our days, and the Notzrim (Nazarenes) and the Minim (heretics)
perish in a moment and be blotted out from the book of life and with the righteous
may they not be inscribed. Blessed art thou, O Lord, who humblest the arrogant136.
133 R. Miller, Historical Method and the Deeds of Jesus. The Test Case of the Temple Demonstration, Forum 8 (1992) 6.
134 For the history of this Benediction see D. Flusser, Jewish Sources in Early Christianity,
Jerusalem 1989; D. Flusser, Das Schisma zwischen Judentum und Christentum, EvTh 40 (1980)
232.
135 S. Schechter, Genizah Specimens, JQR 10 (1898) 656-657; J. Mann, Genizah Fragments of the Palestinian Order of Service, HUCA 2 (1925) 269-338; L. Finkelstein, The Development of the Amidah, JQR 16 (1925-26) 142-169; K. Kohler, The Origin and Composition of
the Eighteen Benedictions with a translation of the Corresponding Essene Prayers in the Apostolic Constitutions, HUCA 1 (1924) 387-425.
136 Martyn, History and Theology, 31-40, 148-150.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

151

First of all the benediction is concerned with the arrogant kingdom of Rome.
Its primary point was the deliverance from the political oppression of the Romans137. Then it curses the Notzrim and the Minim, two different categories. As
it is known the blessing which had to be recited in loud voice was intended as a
test-formula138 which Judaeo-Christians who claimed to be Jews could not recite.
The blessing was directed against Jewish Christians of a Judaising kind, who accepted Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah of Israel. They were called the Notzrim
as we have it in the Acts of the Apostles 24:5. Next to them the Minim are mentioned. The term has a long story139. In the later texts Minim were Jews of different origin who had problems with orthodoxy.
The aim of the benediction was to unite Judaism against those who threatened
its unity.
There is nothing in this benediction to connect it with the situation in the kind
of Greek-speaking city which Martyn makes the setting and starting-point of his
reconstruction of the history of the FG140. Unless one begins with a late date for
the Gospel, there is no more reason for reading the events of 85-90 into 9:22 than
for seeing a reference to Bar-Kochba in 5:43, which has become a curiosity of
criticism141.
Recent studies by D.R.A. Hare regard this connection as unproven142. The
author makes the point that exclusion from the community was already a regular
137 P. Schfer, Die sogenannte Synode von Jabne: Zur Trennung von Juden und Christen im
ersten/zweiten Jh. n. Chr., Judaica 31 (1975) 54-64.
138 K.L. Carroll, The Fourth Gospel and the Exclusion of Christians from the Synagogues,
BJRL 40 (1957-8) 19-32. S.J. Joubert, A Bone of Contention in Recent Scholarship: the Birkat
ha-Minim and the Separation of Church and Synagogue in the First Century AD, Neotest 27
(1993) 351-363.
139 Keener, The Gospel of John, 207-214 (Unwelcome in the Synagogues) quotes all the
rabbinic texts and the Church Fathers (Justin, Jerome, Origen and Epiphanius) as well as the
modern studies.
140 Martyn, History and Theology, 17-41.
141 Thus K.L. Carroll asks: Why is it that John alone reports this development when the three
earlier Gospels apparently know nothing of it? The answer to this question can be found in the
late date at which the Fourth Gospel was produced and in the fact that the author, whoever he may
have been, was a gentile. Neither of these statements is in any way derived from or based upon
the evidence of the Benediction itself (The Fourth Gospel and the Exclusion of Christians from
the Synagogues, BJRL 40 [1957-58] 19).
142 D.R.A. Hare, The Theme of Jewish Persecution of Christians in the Gospel According to
St. Matthew (SNTS MS 6), Cambridge 1967, 48-56. See also R. Kimelman, Birkat Ha-Minim
and the Lack of Evidence for an Anti-Christian Prayer in Late Antiquity, in E.P. Sanders et alii
(ed.), Jewish and Christian Self-Definition. II: Aspects of Judaism in the Graeco-Roman Period,
London - Philadelphia 1981, 226-244. Kimelman suggests that the expulsion texts may function
as a deterrent against returning to the Synagogue, constructing a world in which such a return
would be met with rejection. The expulsion texts could also serve to mollify any ambiguity associated with the choice to follow Jesus. W. Horbury, The Benediction of the Minim and Early
Jewish-Christian Controversy, JTS 33 (1982) 19-61.

152

Frdric Manns

discipline at Qumran143, which used very similar language in anathematizing its


heretics. In fact the word describing the action in Jn 9:34, ekballein (to throw out),
is used in similar circumstances of Jesus thrown out from the Synagogue of
Nazareth (Lk 4:29), of Stephen (Acts 7:58), and of Paul (Acts 13:50). The warning of Jn 16:2 They will ban you from the synagogue says no more than Lk
6:22: How blessed are you when men hate you, when they outlaw you and insult
you, and ban (ekballein) your name as infamous144. The verb describes the treatment recorded in Acts (13:45-50, 14:2-6.19, 17:5-9.13; 18:6-7.12-17) as meted
out to Paul in the late 40s and early 50s and which in the year 50 Paul himself
testifies in 1Thess 2:13-16 about the Christians in Judaea: You suffered the same
things from your own countrymen as they did from the Jews, who killed the Lord
Jesus and the prophets and drove us out145. This treatment was true not only of
his converts but, from his personal experience described in Acts 9:29 and 22:18.
Conflict between the Jewish Christians and the leaders in Jerusalem certainly
predate both 70 and the later Birkat ha-Minim.
Even more, the empire-wide curse of the benediction which was the first part
of the benediction doesnt find any echo in the FG.
Another verb was linked by some authors to the Birkat ha-Minim: in Jn 9:28
the verb loidore applies to reviling and abusing which would be nearly as accurate as the more precise malediction. Nevertheless the term has a broader
application146 and includes Jesus sufferings in 1Pet 2:23. Like the text of Jn 7:49
this is at most a simple hint.
Jewish scholars from their point of view do not accept the traditional explanation of the Birkat ha Minim. The twelfth blessing of the Shemone Esre tackled an
internal Jewish problem147. First of all J. Heinemann148 remembered that the Birkat ha Minim has known an evolution during centuries. Before the destruction of
the temple the Minim were the members of the Kingdom of evil, the Romans and
their collaborators. Under Gamaliel II the Minim were Jewish heretics. The
Tosephta Berakot 3:25 adds an interesting detail for the recitation: The blessing
of the Minim must be linked to the blessing of the Perushim. The word Perushim can not signify the Pharisees here. It probably meant the Essenes. In a
recent document from the Dead Sea Manuscripts the Essenes define themselves

1QS 10:85.18, 6:24-7:25, 8:16-17:22-23, CD 9:23, and Josephus, BJ 2:143.


Dodd, Historical Tradition, 410, makes this comment: The prospect of such exclusion
was before Christians of Jewish origin early enough, at least, to have entered into the common
tradition behind both Luke and John.
145 It is significant that no reference to this passage is made in the lengthy discussion of the
question by Martyn.
146 Acts 23:4, 1Cor 4:12.
147 Kimelman, Birkat Ha-Minim; Horbury, The Benediction of the Minim.
148 J. Heinemann, Structure et contenu de la liturgie juive, Concilium 98 (1974) 45-46.
143
144

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

153

with the verb parashnou: we separated149. The same verb is used by them in 1QS
8:12-14, CD 8:16 and 1QFl 1:14-16. D. Flusser150 admitted also that the Birkat
ha Minim in its early version dated from the Maccabean period mentioned the
Perushim, probably the Essenes. In a latter phase the word Notzrim (Nazareans)
was added. So the Birkat ha Minim did not mention the Jewish Christian at the
beginning, but the Essenes. Its earliest formulation must have been very ancient.
Only in a second moment it was applied to the Jewish believers in Jesus.
Even more: the FG presents Jerusalem and the temple still in use. We shall see
the importance of the Jewish feasts later. Of all the writings in the New Testament
the FG is the one in which we might most expect an allusion to the doom of Jerusalem, if it had already been accomplished. For the focus of the FG is on the
rejection by Jerusalems Judaism of the one who comes to his own people (1:11)
as the Christ, the King and the Shepherd of Israel. This coming and this rejection
must inevitably mean the judgment of a religion, represented by the Torah (1:17),
the jars of purification (2:6), the localized worship of Jerusalem (4:21), the sabbath (5:10-18), and the manna that perishes (6:3-11). Yet, even if the Evangelist
has the capacity for symbolism and irony, it is hard to find any reference which
reflects the events of 70. The saying about the destruction of the temple, which
in the FG (2:19) is not a threat by Jesus to destroy the temple but a statement that
if this temple be destroyed he would rebuild it in a three days, is related to
the events not of 70 but of 30151. Destroy this temple and is recognized as a
Hebraism for the conditional clause. So it is seen as a prophecy not of what the
Romans would do in the rebellion, but of what God would do in the resurrection.
The cleansing of the temple with which it is associated in John occurs not in the
politically context of the Synoptics at the end of the ministry, where it foreshadows the end of the nation, but is focused entirely upon Jesus all-consuming
concern under the influence of the Baptists preaching for the religious purity of
Israel. We shall return to it later.
There is the explicit prophecy of Roman intervention placed on the lips of the
Jewish leaders in 11:47-48: This man is performing many signs. If we leave him
alone like this the whole people will believe in him. Then the Romans will come
and sweep away our temple and our nation.
149 E. Qimron - J. Strugnell, An unpublished Halakic Letter from Qumran, The Israel Museum Journal 4 (1985) 9-12.
150 D. Flusser, Das Schisma zwischen Judentum und Christentum, EvTh 40 (1980) 232; Id.,
Judaism and the Origins of Christianity, Jerusalem 1988, 636, thinks that the real break occurred
only with the Bar-Kochba revolt in the year 135 C.E., but recognises that the same sectarian
separatist trend which characterised Qumran quickly separated Jewish Christianity from the rest
of Judaism.
151 C.H. Dodd, The Interpretation of the Fourth Gospel, Cambridge 1953, 302, who argues
that the Johannine form of the saying is more primitive than the Markan. He is supported by B.
Lindars, The Gospel of John, Grand Rapids MI 1981, ad loc.

154

Frdric Manns

Yet this is an unfulfilled prophecy. Caiaphas is represented in retrospect as


prophesying truer than he knew but this is not that the temple and the nation
would be swept away but that Jesus should die for the people rather than the
whole nation be destroyed (11:49-52). It is in fact remarkable that there is nothing
in John corresponding to the detailed prophecies of the siege and fall of Jerusalem. And this is true despite the fact that every other feature of the synoptic
apocalypses (apart from the preaching to the Gentiles) is represented in the Johannine last discourses: the injunction against alarm, the fore-warning against apostasy, the prediction of travail and persecution for the sake of the name, the need
for witness, the promise of the Spirit as the disciples advocate, the reference to
that day, when, in an imminent coming, Christ will be seen and manifested, the
elect will be gathered to him, and the world will be judged.
There are in fact three indications in John that Jerusalem and its temple are
still standing. The first is in 2:20, when the Jews make the unmotivated observation that Herods temple has been a building for forty-six years. The building was
not finished till circa 63, shortly before it was destroyed152. Yet there is no presentiment of its destruction, as there is in the comment on the temple buildings
in Mk 13:2. But though the context would seem almost to cry out for such interpretation, it may still be said that there is no reason why it had to be mentioned.
In any case, the point in time is intended to reflect the perspective of Jesus, not
of the evangelist though the constant assumption is that this is not a distinction
that John cares to observe or preserve.
The second passage is found in Jn 4:21. In his discussion with the Samaritan
woman Jesus says: The hour is coming when neither on this mountain nor in
Jerusalem will you worship the Father. If the temple of Jerusalem was in ruins,
Jesus would not have uttered this prophecy.
In the third passage the reference is quite clearly to the time of the evangelist.
In Jn 5:2 the FG introduces the story of the healing of the cripple with the words:
Now at the sheep-pool in Jerusalemt here is a place with five colonnades. Its
name in the language of the Jews is Bethesda. This is one of Johns topographical details that have been confirmed by archaeology153. It reveals a close acquaintance with Jerusalem before 70. It has to be noticed that the FG says not
was but is using the present tense. Too much weight must not be put on this 152 Josephus,

Ant. 20:219.
J. Jeremias, The Rediscovery of Bethesda, John 5.2, Louisville KY 1966; The Copper
Scroll from Qumran, ExpT 71 (1959-60) 228. Cf. more generally, W.F. Albright, The Archaeology of Palestine, Harmondsworth 1949, 244-248; Recent Discoveries in Palestine and the Gospel of John, in W.D. Davies - D. Daube (ed.), The Background of the New Testament and Its
Eschatology, Cambridge - New York 1956, 153-171; R.D. Potter, Topography and Archaeology
in the Fourth Gospel, in Aland - Cross (ed.), Studia Evangelica, 329-337 (reprinted in The Gospels Reconsidered, Oxford 1960, 90-98); A.J.B. Higgins, The Historicity of the Fourth Gospel,
London 1960, 78-82; A. Hunter, According to John, Cambridge 2011, 49-55.
153

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

155

though it is the only present tense in the context, and elsewhere (4:6, 11:18, 18:1,
19:41) he assimilates the topographical descriptions to the tense of the narrative.
Of course it can be attributed to a source, which the evangelist has not bothered
to correct. The natural inference, however, is that the FG is writing when the
building he describes is still standing154. For J.A.T. Robinson this detail reflects
the situation before 70155. If this is the case, the Birkat ha Minim, in its definitive
form, would not be mentioned in Jn 9:22, rather a general situation of persecution
of the believers in Jesus.
The FG questions the problem of the persecutors who will kill some of Jesus
disciples believing to give glory to God (Jn 16:2). The main passage to be examined is Jn 15:18-16:4: If the world hates me, be aware that it has hated me before
it hated you A slave is not greater than his master. If they persecuted me, they
will persecute you An hour is coming when everyone who kills you will think
he is offering a worship (latreia) to God. The theme of hatred and persecution
is present in Jn 5:16-18, 15:18.20, 16:33, while the theme of putting to death is
present in Jn 12:9-11 and 16:2. The exclusion from the synagogue has to be considered in this global context. Confessing Jesus publicly and being ready to suffer
rejection is a characteristic of genuine disciples.
The persecution of Jesus and the desire to kill him is already expressed in Jn
5:16-18. The Jews persecution of Jesus stems from his performing a healing on
the sabbath. The imperfect edikon points to many occurrences and not to a single
case. Jn 15:18 predicts hatred for the disciples. F. Moloney156 calls attention to a
shift in the subjects of 15:18 and 15:20: The shift from ho cosmos to the use of
the third person plural indicates to the reader that this hatred and rejection have
their source in a recognizable group in the narrative. The saying A slave is not
above his master occurs in Jn 13:16 after the washing of the disciples feet and
in Jn 15:20 which implies the opposite of Jn 13:20. At the end of the first farewell
discourse Jesus mentions the hardship that the disciples will face.
Jn 7:13 and Jn 20:19 mention actions taken on account of the fear of the
Jews. Such fear is understandable given the Gospels indications of possible
exclusion from the synagogue mentioned in Jn 9:22. B. Lindars157 suggests that
the agreement mentioned in Jn 9:22 means a definite policy rather than ad hoc
decisions.
Jn 12:42-43 offers a second example: many of the authorities believed in
154 J.A. Bengel, Gnomon Novi Testamenti, ad loc.: Scripsit Joannes ante vastationem urbis.
So too K.A. Eckhardt, Der Tod Johannes als Schlssel zum Verstndnis der Johanneischen
Schriften (Studien zur Rechts- und Religionsgeschichte 3), Berlin 1961, 57-58.
155 Robinson, The Priority of John, 72-80.
156 F. Moloney, Glory not Dishonour. Reading John 13-21, Minneapolis MN 1998, 68.
157 B. Lindars, The Persecution of Christians in John 15:18-16:4a, in W. Horbury - B. McNeil (ed.), Suffering and Martyrdom in the New Testament, Cambridge 1981, 48-69.

156

Frdric Manns

him, but because of the Pharisees they did not confess him, lest they be excluded from the Synagogue. R.E. Brown158 recognises that the Evangelists disapproval has to do with the Pharisees of Jesus time as well as with the contemporary Jews who did not make public confession. One of them was Nicodemus159 who was a well known historical figure. J. Neyrey160 highlights the
contrast between these Jesus-believing Pharisees and others who had openly
confessed him when he entered Jerusalem.
Jn 12:9-11 remembers the decision of the chief priests to kill Jesus after the
resurrection of Lazarus. The chief priests decided to put also Lazarus to death,
because after Jesus sign people came to see him. The crowd who saw what happened was bearing witness. The verb emarturei in the imperfect tense means that
the crowd continued to bear witness.
Finally in Jn 16:2 Jesus announces that some of his believers will be killed.
Members of the synagogue will pursue some of those excluded and kill them. The
persecutors will come from the synagogue. The only persecutors are Jewish.
Schnackenburg161 considers it a real possibility that Jews did kill Jesus followers.
It is interesting that in one of the earliest writings of the NT, 1Thessalonians,
Paul speaks of the Jews, who killed both the Lord Jesus and the prophets, and
drove us out (2:14-16). There Paul is referring to the Jews driving Christians
out, right back in the 40s A.D. So Johns portrayal of the Jews in his Gospel is
not necessarily post-70, after all, relations between Jesus and the Jewish authorities were not entirely cordial.
For Brown it is almost unbelievable that the agreement of John 9:22 reflects
a situation in Jesus lifetime162, but there is no compelling reason to assign it to a
situation that obtained only at the end of the first century. There seems to be no
ground even for placing it among the material added to the FG at a later stage. In
any case, as Dodd has it, the sanction of excommunication from the synagogue
was a menace which would have no terrors for any but Jewish Christians163. It
Brown, The Gospel According to John, I, 487. Cf. Jn 3:1, 7:50.
Z. Safrai, Naqdimon b. Guryon: A Galilean Aristocrat, in J. Pastor - M. Mor (ed.), The
Beginnings of Christianity,Jerusalem 1997, 293-314; R. Bauckham, Nicodemus and the Gurion
Family, JTS 47 (1996) 1-37. The presence of Jewish Believers in Jesus is confirmed in the Rabbinic Literature. See P.S. Alexander, Jewish Believers in Early Rabbinic Literature, in O. Skarsaune - R. Hvalvik (ed.), Jewish Believers in Jesus. The Early Centuries, Peabody MA 2007,
659-701.
160 J. Neyrey, The Gospel of John, New York 2007, 220.
161 Schnackenburg, The Gospel According to St. John, III, 122. See also C.K. Barrett, The
Gospel According to St John, Philadelphia PA 1978, 2 ed., 486.
162 The Gospel According to John, I, 380. Like Martyn, History and Theology, 19, 31-32, he
thinks that it implies a formal agreement of the Council and refers it indirectly to the ordinance
of the Synod of Jamnia. When John wishes to indicate a formal decision of the authorities he
makes it clear (11:47.53.57).
163 Historical Tradition, 412.
158
159

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

157

underlines the presumption found throughout the FG that those to whom it was
addressed were, primarily, Jews rather than Gentiles.
For many exegetes it was taken for granted that the FG reflected the tense situation between Jews and Christians after 80 that it may seem bold to question it164.
The absence of reference to the Sadducees is frequently said to reflect their demise
after 70: yet the chief priests and their party are certainly not absent, but still very
busy. The FG never speaks of the scribes either yet they certainly did not disappear
after 70, but rather started their midrashic reading of Scripture. In fact John is remarkably well informed about the parties and divisions of Judaism before the Jewish war and attempts to prove him ignorant tend to recoil upon those who make
them165. While there are many things upon which in the absence of evidence it would
be prudent to suspend judgment, there is nothing which is anachronistic or which
requires a later perspective. Above all, there is nothing that suggests that the temple
is already destroyed or that Jerusalem is in ruins signs of which calamity are
present in any Jewish or Christian literature that can with any certainty be dated in
the period of 70-100 A.D. For all these reasons Jn 9:22 does not have to be dated
from the 80s and the Birkat ha Minim cannot be its background.
3.2. The Johannine High Christology
Many commentators, to justify the late date they attribute to the redaction of
the FG, invoke its high christology166 which puts the emphasis on the divinity of
Jesus and refers to the notion of his pre-existence. But R.G. Hamerton-Kelly167
has shown that the idea of preexistence is known in Judaism in the Book of Enoch
and in the Book of Wisdom168. This includes the existence of the Messiah before
Creation, the existence of his name and his existence after the creation of the
world. Two Biblical passages favour the view of the preexistence of the Messiah:
Mic 5:1, speaking of the Bethlehemite ruler, says that his goings forth have been
from of old, from everlasting (The Targum translates: From you shall come
C.K. Barrett, The Gospel of John and Judaism, London 1975, 40-58.
Stauffer, Historische Elemente, 341.
166 Brown, The Community of the Beloved Disciple, 51-54. The High Christology emerged from
a period after a group of Jews of anti-Temple views and their Samaritans converts entered the Community. G. Segalla, Giovanni, Roma 1984, 4 ed., 89-96. Many commentators seem to forget that the
FG portrays Jesus as saying in 14:28: The Father is greater than I. R.N. Longenecker, New Wine
into Fresh Wineskins. Contextualizing the Early Christian Confessions, Peabody MA 1999, 112,
argues that Johns Christology is not necessarily higher than the Synoptics, rather he spells out the
conclusion to which the other three Evangelists, each in his own way, were pointing.
167 R.G. Hamerton-Kelly, Preexistence, Wisdom and the Son of Man. A Study of the Idea of
Pre-existence in the New Testament (SNTS MS 21), Cambridge 1973.
168 Wis 24:6-9 admits that Wisdom was created by God before everything. We shall return to
Jn and the Wisdom in paragraph 3.7. The idea of preexistence of the Messiah is present also in
the Midrash Pesita Rabbati 34-37 which is old.
164
165

158

Frdric Manns

forth before me the Messiah, to exercise dominion over Israel, he whose name
was mentioned from before, from the days of creation). Dan 7:13 speaks of one
like the Son of man, who came with the clouds of heaven, and came to the
Ancient of days.
In the Messianic similitudes of Enoch (37-71) three preexistences169 are spoken of: The Messiah was chosen of God before the creation of the world, and
he shall be before Him to eternity (48:6). Before the sun and the signs of the
zodiac were created, or ever the stars of heaven were formed his name was uttered in the presence of the Lord of Spirits (God; 48:3). Apart from these passages, there are only general statements that the Messiah was hidden and preserved by God (42:6-7, 46:1-3), without any declaration as to when he began to
be. His preexistence is affirmed also in 2 Esdras170, according to which he has
been preserved and hidden by God a great season; nor shall mankind see him
save at the hour of his appointed day (12:32, 13:26.52, 14:9), although no mention is made of the antemundane existence either of his person or of his name171.
For the Rabbis, of the seven objects fashioned before the creation of the world172,
the last one was the name of the Messiah173. The Targum regards also the preexistence of the Messiahs name as implied in Mic 5:1, Zech 4:7, and Ps 72:17.
The Spirit of God which moved upon the face of the waters (Gen 1:2)
is the spirit of the Messiah174. Referring to Ps 36:10 and Gen 1:4, Pesita Rabbati declares (161b): God beheld the Messiah and his deeds before the Creation, but He hid him and his generation under His throne of glory. Seeing
him, Satan said, That is the Messiah who will dethrone me. God said to the
Messiah, Ephraim, anointed of My righteousness, thou hast taken upon thee
the sufferings of the six days of Creation (Pesita Rabbati 162a; comp. Yalut
Is, p. 499). The preexistence of the Messiah in heaven and his high station
there are often mentioned. Akiba interprets Dan 7:9 as referring to two heavenly thrones the one occupied by God and the other by the Messiah175.
169 M. Black, The Messianism of the Parables of Enoch. Their Date and Contribution to
Christological Origins, in J.H. Charlesworth (ed.), The Messiah. Developments in Earliest Judaism and Christianity (The First Princeton Symposium on Judaism and Christian Origins), Minneapolis MN 1992, 145-168.
170 About 90 A.D.
171 Compare 2 Baruch 29:3.
172 Abot 5:6, Mekilta, Ex 16:32, Pirqe de Rabbi Eliezer 3, Pesahim 54a, Nedarim 39b, Sifre
Deut 33:21, TjI Gen 2:2, TjI and TN Gen 49:27, TjI and TN Ex 12:6, TjI Num 22:28. F. Bhl,
Das Wunder als Bedingung und die Schpfung in der Abendmmerung, Die Welt des Orients
8 (1975) 77-90.
173 Ps 72:17, Pesahim 54a, Tanhuma, Naso, ed. Buber, no. 19; and parallels.
174 GenR 8:1, comp. Pesita Rabbati 152b, which reads as follows, alluding to Is 11:2: The
Messiah was born [created] when the world was made, although his existence had been contemplated before the Creation.
175 ag 14a (comp. 1 Enoch 55:4, 69:29), with whom God converses (Pes 118b, Suk 52a).

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

159

That the Johannine high christology is old can be proved by the early Hymns
contained in Pauls letters176. Phil 2:5-11, a pre-pauline hymn, speaks of Jesus
having emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, put on the cross, and then
being highly exalted. We do not have Johns descending/ascending language
here, but we have something very like it. The author sees Jesus as pre-existent;
and his super-exalt word is related to the Greek word used in John, when he
speaks of Jesus being lifted up on the cross. Many scholars have claimed that
Phil 2:5-11 is a hymn that existed before Paul wrote Philippians and which he
took over in his letter; in which case we find that Johannine christology was
anticipated possibly earlier than Paul in the hymns of the early church. Exegetes
have also seen Col 1:15-20 as an early hymn, and it is even more Johannine:
its description of the pre-existent Jesus as the one through whom God created
the world is strikingly similar to the prologue of Johns Gospel177.
Finally the FG gives to Jesus twice the title of Son of Joseph178. It is
probably the messianism of the Messiah son of Joseph that lies behind this
title. Recent discoveries have shown the antiquity of this title which was generally explained in the context of the defeat of Bar-Kochba.
The FG alone gives Jesus the title of Monogens (1:14-18, 3:16.18; cf. Gen
22:2) and of the Chosen One (Jn 1:34) which comes from Is 42:1.
The exalted christology of Jn 1:1-18 is relatively unique among the Gospels but must be assessed in the light of of recent studies of the broader forms
of Jewish monotheism current in Jesus day and the earliness of the rise of
high christology in Christianity.
F. Hahn179 spoke of an antiquated christology in the FG which appeared
at an early stage of the tradition but was blurred and covered over by later
christological statements. Referring to traditional material, not only in Jn
6:14 (the prophet and king) but in 7:40-42 (the prophet and the Messiah of
David), 4:19 and 9:17 (a prophet), 4:25 (Messiah) and 3:2 (a teacher sent by
God), he wrote: We have to reckon with a very early christological tradition
of the primitive church. In such pieces of tradition as Mk 6:1-5.14-16 and 8:28
this has already completely faded180.
About the gospels central category of sonship Hahn wrote: The early
view is still clearly preserved in the Gospel of John. The after-effect also
176 R.J. Karris, A Symphony of New Testament Hymns, Collegeville 1996. M. Hengel, Hymns
and Christology, in Id., Between Jesus and Paul. Studies in the Earliest History of Christianity,
Philadelphia PA - London 1983, 79-96; 188-190.
177 See also Ga 4:4 and Rom 1:3-4. 1Cor 1-4 discloses an early Christian debate about the concept of Revelation well before the rise of Gnosticism. It could provide a good parallel to the FG.
178 Jn 1:45 and Jn 6:42.
179 F. Hahn, The Titles of Jesus in Christology. Their History in Early Christianity, London
1969, 352.
180 Hahn, The Titles of Jesus in Christology, 383.

160

Frdric Manns

shows itself here and there elsewhere in the New Testament181. We can conclude that we are nearer in this gospel to the original parabolic source of the
Father-Son language and the Hebraic understanding in terms of character
rather than status than in any other part of the New Testament.
Cullmann agreed with him: Except for the Gospel of John and the first (Jewish-Christian) part of Acts, no New Testament writing considers Jesus the eschatological Prophet who prepares the way for God182.
At last it has to be remembered that in the Synoptics many Jesus sayings
represent a high self-evaluation. The highest expression of Jesus exalted selfawareness is found in Mt 11:28-30. All the Evangelists portray Jesus with a high
self-understanding. The so called high Christology is not uniquely Johannine.
The eg eimi formula is not a creation of the FG. It appears in Ex 3:14 and in
Mk 6:50, 14:62. Mark stresses that Jesus spoke with authority. While the Markan Jesus emphasises messianic secrecy, the Johannine Jesus majors in messianic disclosure. The Synoptic Jesus speaks in parables while the Johannine
Jesus develops the I am metaphors.
3.3. The quotations of Scripture
Many studies have been done on the quotations of Scripture in the FG183. The
conclusion of most exgetes is that the FG utilises more the Hebrew text, than the
LXX. Sometimes he uses a composite text. Lets have a quick look upon the
Hahn, The Titles of Jesus in Christology, 316.
O. Cullmann, The Christology of the New Testament, London 1963, 38. See also Cribbs,
A Reassessment of the Date of Origin, 46.
183 E.D. Freed, Old Testament Quotations in the Gospel of John (Suppl. to NovT 11), Leiden
1965; G. Reim, Studien zum alttestamentlichen Hintergrund des Johannesevangeliums (SNTS
MS 22), Cambridge 1974; M.J.J. Menken, Old Testament Quotations. Studies in Textual Form
(CBET 15), Kampen 1996, 11; The Old Testament Quotation in John 19,36. Sources, Redaction, Background, in C.M. Tuckett et alii (ed.), The Four Gospels 1992. Festschrift Frans
Neirynck (BETL 100), III, Leuven 1992, 2101-2118, and The Textual Form and Meaning of
the Quotation from Zechariah 12:10 in John 19:37, CBQ 55 (1993) 494-511; The Use of the
Septuagint in Three Quotations in John: 10,34; 12,38; 19,24, in C.M. Tuckett (ed.), The Scriptures in the Gospels (BETL 131), Leuven 1997, 367-393 and Observations on the Significance
of the Old Testament in the Fourth Gospel, in G. Van Belle et alii (ed.), Theology and Christology in the Fourth Gospel. Essays by the Members of the SNTS Johannine Writings (BETL 184),
Leuven 2005, 155-175; H. Hbner, Vetus Testamentum in Novo. 1/2: Evangelium secundum
Iohannem, Gttingen 2003; F.-M. Braun, Jean le Thologien. I: Et son vangile dans lglise
ancienne; II: Les grandes traditions dIsral et laccord des critures selon le quatrime
vangile; III*: Sa thologie. Le Mystre de Jsus-Christ; III**: Sa thologie. Le Christ, notre
Seigneur hier, aujourdhui, toujours (B), Paris 1959; 1964; 1966; 1972; B.G. Schuchard,
Scripture within Scripture. The Interrelationship of Form and Function in the Explicit Old
Testament Citations in the Gospel of John (SBL DS 133), Atlanta GA 1992; P. Beauchamp, 1.
Lun et lautre Testament. 2. Accomplir les critures, Paris 1990; Lecture christique de
lAncien Testament, Bib 81 (2000) 105-115.
181
182

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

161

twenty explicit quotations of the Old Testament which are introduced by graph,
nomos and logos.
Jn 1:23
Jn 2:17 (+2:22)
Jn 6:31
Jn 6:45
Jn 7:37-38
Jn 7:42
Jn 8:17
Jn 10:34
Jn 12:13
Jn 12: 14-15
Jn 12:34
Jn 12:38
Jn 12: 39-40
Jn 13:18
Jn 15:25
Jn 17: 12
Jn 19:24
Jn 19:281
Jn 19:36
Jn 19:37

Is:40:3
Ps 69 (68):10; Zech 14:21
Ps 78 (77):24; Ex 16:4
Is 54:13
Ps 78 (77):16.20 (LXX); Zech 14:8;
Ps 114 (113A):8
2Sam 7:12; Ps 89 (88):4-5.36-37; Is
11:1.10
Deut 19:15
Ps 82(81):6
Ps 118:25
Zph 3:14; Is 40:9; Zech 9:9
Ps 89 (88):35
Is 53:1
Is 6:9-10
Ps 41 (40):10
Ps 35 (34):19; Ps 69 (68):5
Is 57:4 (LXX); Pr 24:22 (LXX)
Ps 22 (21):19
Ps 69 (68):22; Ps 22 (21):16: Ps 42
(41):2-3; Ps 63 (62):2
Ex 12:10 (LXX); Num 9:12; Ps 34
(33):21
Zech 12:10

Eipen Esaias
Gegrammenon esti
Esti gegrammenon
Esti gegrammenon
H graph
H graph
En t nom gegraptai
Gegrammenon en t nom
egraugazon
Esti gegrammenon
Ek tou nomou
Ho logos plrth
Eipen Esaias
H graph plrth
Plrth ho logos en t nom
H graph plrth
H graph plrth
Teleith h graph
H graph plrth
Graph legei

It should be noted that the quotations are marked with a special sign in Codex
Vaticanus, the dipl184. Careful attention to the literary character of the FG reveals how pervasive the influence of the OT has been in its composition185. The
prophet Isaiah is quoted explicitly at the beginning (1:23) and at the end of the
first part of the Gospel (12:38-40). The prophet Zechariah is quoted explicitly
and implicitly in between passages (2:13-22 and 12:12-16). This symmetrical
construction has the effect of highlighting the centre, namely the belief of the
disciples alluded to by the references to Zechariah. Isaiah is mentioned by name.
184 U. Schmid, Dipls im Codex Vaticanus, in M. Karrer et alii (ed.), Von der Septuaginta
zum Neuen Testament Textgeschichtliche Errterungen (Arbeiten zur neutestamentlichen Textforschung 43), Berlin - New York 2010, 112.
185 Freed, Old Testament Quotations.

162

Frdric Manns

The three parts of Scripture Torah, Prophets and Writings are quoted. But
explicit quotations must be completed by implicit quotations or simple allusions. Even more, the written Torah was completed by the oral Torah. It must
be noted also that Jesus employs the forms of reasoning well known as the middot of Hillel186. Finally as P. Borgen187 and B. Lindars188 have shown the FG
uses homiletic patterns introduced by a Scripture quotation. The concepts of the
quotation are interpreted and a concluding section echoes the introduction.
Hays and Green, in an interesting article189, have underlined the meaning of
the Old Testament quotations in the New Testament. First of all, they argue that
the listeners were Jews who were used to find their relation to God through the
Scriptures. Secondly, they lived the events of their time with a prophetic spirit
looking for the fulfilment of the promises. Finally, the history of salvation was
expressed through the images of the Old Testament.
The Torah-Gospel polemic is prominent also in the OT quotations. The wellknown antithesis of 1:17 (The law was given through Moses; grace and truth
came through Jesus Christ) must be understood in the light of 5:46: (If you
believed Moses, you would believe me). The new order instituted by Christ
must be seen as a fulfilment, not a rejection, of the OT message190. John compares the ultimate revelation of Gods character in the flesh with Gods revelation of his character on Mount Sinai. This is clarified by the compounding of
allusions to the account of Moses vision of Gods glory in the setting of his
second receiving of the Law (Jn 1:14 and Ex 33:18-19, 34:6). Grace and truth
were present in the Law, but they came more fully in Christ, Gods word. Moses
saw only part of Gods glory; in Jesus all of Gods character is unveiled. The
claim we beheld his glory in Jn 1:14 compares the vision of Jesus with the
central biblical theophany. Connected with Jesus incarnation it claims to find
theological meaning in the historical Jesus. John does not separate history from
theology. He offers both as part of his witness.
The impact that the OT had in the structuring of Johns narrative was considerable. The FG preserves Palestinian debates anchored in the Hebrew Scriptures. Genesis 1-2 reports that God completed his creation on the sixth day and
rested on the seventh day. Gen 2:2 has: And God completed on the seventh day
Manns, Lvangile de Jean la lumire du judasme, 307-319.
Borgen, Bread from Heaven, 28-58.
188 Lindars, The Gospel of John, 51-54.
189 R.B. Hays - J.B. Green, The Use of the Old Testament by the New Testament Writers,
in J.B. Green (ed.), Hearing the New Testament Strategies for Interpretation, Grand Rapids MI
1995, 222-238.
190 In Codex Vaticanus in Jn 1:18 there a white space which indicates a separation. Why was
v. 18 separated from 1:1-17? V. 18 is the conclusion of the Prologue but has a double function. It
announces the main theme of the Gospel. Christ, since he is in the womb of God, is the one who
reveals the Father.
186
187

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

163

the work he had been doing. That means that God worked on the seventh day.
The FG seems to know the debates over interpreting this verse to mean that God
did not work on the seventh day as the LXX has it. John, knowing these competing traditions, has Jesus respond with a surprising knowledge of the Hebrew
version of Gen 2:2: My Father is working still, and I am also working (Jn
5:17). Jesus was working as the Father on the sabbath.
Chap. 6 provides a good example in the bread of life discourse, since the
Exodus 16 background is accepted by many exegetes191. The FG is very close
to the Palestinian expectation of the coming one like Moses192. Mosaic typology
is present in the whole FG193: the giving of the Torah at 1:17, the Paschal Lamb
at 1:29, 19:30-32, the brazen serpent at 3:14, the giving of the manna at 6:31-58
and the water from the rock at 7:38 (found also in Paul). Mosaic typology is
found in the repeated appeal to Jesus miracles as signs in order to authenticate
his mission to the Jewish people. John ends his Gospel with an emphasis on the
signs Jesus did (20:30-31), just as Deut 34:10-12 did for Moses.
Exodus 16 itself is part of a larger narrative (Ex 15:22-17:7) that emphasizes
the goodness of YHWH in providing food for his people. Different incidents are
recorded here:
In Ex 15:22-27 the people were thirsty and the water they found was bitter.
God was testing them, but they grumble in their trial; still, the Lord provided
drinking water for them.
In chap. 16 the people were hungry and they murmured again (vv. 3,7). This
incident was also described as a time of testing (v. 4), and the Lord provided
manna for their needs (vv. 13-16).
Chap. 17 records another incident when the people were thirsty. Their grumbling was more serious, since they turned the tables on God by testing him (vv.
2-3). The Lords generosity was even more dramatic, since he, who is the Rock,
stood on the rock of Horeb, ready to be struck so that the people may have water to drink (v. 6).
The trial of the Israelites in the wilderness corresponds to Adams temptation, a point made subtly in the narrative by the use in 16:15 of a phrase taken
from Gen 1:29194. Moreover, 6:23 appears to connect the giving of the manna
to the Passover celebration by the use of another phrase taken from Ex 12:6. So
the Exodus 16 narrative received an eschatological expectation. Within the
191 G. Balfour, The Jewishness of Johns Use of the Scriptures in John 6:31 and 7:37-38,
TynB 46 (1995) 357-380.
192 J.C. Inostroza Lanas, Moiss e Israel en el desierto. El midrs paulino de 1 Cor 10,1-13,
Salamanca 2000, 129-156.
193 B. Malina, The Palestinian Manna Tradition. The Manna Tradition in the Palestinian
Targums and its Relationship in the New Testament Writings (Arbeiten zur Geschichte des
spteren Judentums und des Urchristentums 7), Leiden 1968.
194 U. Cassuto, A Commentary on the Book of Exodus, Jerusalem 1967 [orig. 1951], 196, 198.

164

Frdric Manns

pages of the OT itself, the giving of the Spirit (mentioned in the corresponding
passage in Num 11:17) was tied to the gift of manna and water (Neh 9:20). 2
Baruch promises that the treasury of manna will again descend from on high
(29:8), while the rabbinic midrashim give an explicit messianic interpretation195.
Did the author structure his narrative according to the parallels of Ex 15-17?
Just as that passage speaks of God providing water-manna-water, so the FG
presents Jesus as the one who provides his people with living water (Jn 4:13-14),
manna (6:32-35), and living water (7:37-38). The FG makes a point of advising
that the feeding of the five thousand took place near the time of Passover (6:4)196,
when the Ex 16 narrative was read in the synagogues. The messianic expectations may have been heightened. The desire to make Jesus king on the spot
(6:15) is understandable in this context. John also exploited the theme of the
peoples grumbling (6:41.43.61.66), present in the Exodus context197 and alluding to Adams temptation (6:37; cf. Gen 3:24, 6:50; cf. Gen 2:17 and 3:3, 6:51;
cf. Gen 3:22)198, and reminded of the significance of the Spirits instruction
(6:63; cf. also v. 45, a quotation from Is 54:13).
In Jn 19:34 the evangelist describes Jesus struck with the soldiers spear.
Blood and water came out from his side. Much research has been done on the
significance of this gesture. For John this was a matter of great importance, as
it appears from the affirmation in the following verse (19:35). The allusion to
Ex 17 among others is too clear to be missed. The long-suffering God, abundant
in grace and truth, was suffering for his people, that they might receive the
Spirit of salvation199.
The notion of seeing God and Gods glory is central in the FG. John keeps
the motif of glory, hearing and seeing God, but he ties these ideas exclusively
to Jesus. The story of the Revelation at Mount Sinai played a central role to
understand these affirmations. A Sinaitic framework is found in Jn 1:14.18: We
saw his glory, glory of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.
The allusion to Ex 33:18 and Ex 34:5-6 is evident. The Son mediated the vision
of Gods glory, while a direct vision of God was denied to Moses (Ex 33:20).
The same view is formulated in Jn 1:18: No one has ever seen God. The only
Son who is in the bosom of the Father, he has made him known.
195 Midrash on Eccl 1:9, As the first redeemer caused manna to descend, so will the latter
redeemer cause manna to descend.
196 The hypothesis of M.A. Daise, Feasts in John. Jewish Festivals and Jesus Hour in the
Fourth Gospel (WUNT II/229), Tbingen 2007, 118-152, which sees in Jn 6:4 the Second Passover of Num 9:9-14 does not reflect the Johannine theology nor the reality.
197 R. Le Daut, Une aggadah targumique et les murmures de Jean 6, Bib 51 (1970) 80-83.
198 A. Guilding, The Fourth Gospel and Jewish Worship. A Study of the Relation of St. Johns
Gospel to the Ancient Jewish Lectionary System, Oxford 1960, 62.
199 G.M. Burge, The Anointed Community. The Holy Spirit in the Johannine Tradition, Grand
Rapids MI 1987, 93-95, 133-35.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

165

The brief allusion to Is 54:13 in Jn 6:45-46 also draws on features from the
Sinai theophany as indicated by the ideas of hearing and seeing God. According
to the FG those who are taught by God have heard from him without actually seeing him. By contrast the FG says that the Jewish authorities have never heard the
voice of God nor seen his form (Jn 5:37). It is possible that Gods form (eidos)
was the pre-existent Son of God who was the only one who has seen the Father
(Jn 6:46). By rejecting Jesus as the Son, the Jewish authorities demonstrate that
they did not see Gods form at the Sinaitic epiphany. This interpretation receives
support from the FGs comment on Isaiahs vision (Is 6:1-10) in which John seems
to identify the glory as the glory of Jesus seen by the prophet (Jn 12:42).
In the story of the Sinaitic Revelation the verb to ascend plays an important
role (Ex 19:20, 24:1-2). According to Jewish tradition Moses entered heaven
when he ascended the mountain200. The comment of Jn 3:13 No one has ascended into heaven seems to serve as a polemic against the idea of Moses
ascent and against similar claims of other human beings.
In Jn 18:19 the high priests opening question during the Passion regards
Jesus teaching and his disciples. The high priest is drawing on the categories of
the false prophet as condemned in Deut 13:1-5, 18:20: one who leads astray
disciples and falsely presumes to speak in Gods name. Anyone familiar with
Deuteronomy would understand the implication of the high priests question. At
the precise moment when the high priest asks Jesus if he is a false prophet, the
prophecy of 13:26-38 comes through.
In his christological reading of the Scriptures the FG is kerygmatic in the
general sense of being written under the invitation of an evangelistic appeal. It
also reproduces a pattern of the kerygma. Prophecy has been fulfilled in the
incarnation (Jn 1:1-2.14; cf. Is 60:19). In this fulfilment the humanity and even
Davidic descent of Jesus appear (1:14, 7:42), his death (11:49-52) and resurrection (20:8-9). By his exaltation Jesus enters into his glory (15:1-6). The Holy
Spirit given to the church is the sign of Christs presence and power (7:3, 14:1,
20:21). An eschatological consummation, accompanied by the parousia of
Christ, is anticipated (6:39-40.44, 14:3); and, as in the kerygma, an appeal to
faith is made (20:31).
Quotations form only a small part of the use of the Old Testament in the
Johannine writings. As underlined by many authors the formal quotations in
the FG have a variety of introductions. The cry of the triumphal entry which
comes from Ps 118:26 has no introduction (Jn 12:13). A fulfilment citation
in Jn 18:9 used for a saying of Jesus comes from an unidentified source and
reminds to Jn 6:39.
C.C. Torrey claimed that all the quotations came from the Hebrew Bible and
200

Josephus, Ant. 3:96, LAB 12:1, Mekilta, Ex 19:20.

166

Frdric Manns

were made from memory with customary freedom and arrangement201. Bernard202
thinks that the OT citations show a knowledge of Hebrew (1:23, 6:45, 12:15.40,
13:18) as well as of the Septuagint (2:17, 12:38, 17:17, 19:24); however some citations are indecisive on this issue (6:31, 7:42, 8:17, 10:34, 12:13.34, 15:25, 19:28.36).
The idea of fulfilment of Scriptures is fundamental in the FG. The cleansing of
the temple (2:17), the hatred of the people (15:25), the loss of Judas (17:12), the
division of the garments and the casting of lots for the robe (19:23-24), the thirst
of Jesus on the cross (19:28), the limbs left unbroken (19:36), and the pierced side
(19:37) are presented as fulfilments of Scripture. They form a basis of faith (19:35).
In addition to the specific quotations, the FG contains many echoes of Scripture.
The prologue opens with identical words to Genesis (LXX): In the beginning (en
arch), and speaks of light and darkness (1:5) which were separated in the first
chapter of Genesis. The terms arch (beginning), phs (light), zo (life),
skotos (darkness), sperma (seed), and kosmos (world) are found alike in Gen
1:1-2:1 and the FG. Genesis is meditated upon in Psalm 33:6, 9 which speaks of
the creation of heavens by the word of Gods mouth, and of his commanding and
things coming to be. God is still working after the six days of creation (5:17). The
themes of Genesis are also present in the Passion narrative. The garden (Kpos in
the Aquila version), the thorns, and the temptation of Jesus recall the story of Adam.
Scripture is a preparation for the Messiah (5:39) which is a Jewish concept.
Christ was a natural way to translate Messiah into Greek203. The figures of the
Patriarchs Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are mentioned in connection with him204.
Abraham looked to Christs day (8:56), Isaac was bound like Jesus (18:12) and
bore the wood of his sacrifice (19:17), and one greater than Jacob who opened
a well (4:12ff.). David is mentioned in 7:42. The Lamb (amnos) of God205 who
takes away the sin of the world (1:29.36) likely echoes Is 53:7-12. The Messiah
is the one of whom Moses and the prophets wrote (1:45, 5:46). Explicit references to Moses appear far more widely in the FG206.
C.C. Torrey, The Four Gospels. A New Translation, New York - London 1933, 4 ed., 275.
J.H. Bernard, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to St. John,
I, New York 1929, 79. See also Freed, Old Testament Quotations, 126.
203 John is the only New Testament writer to include the semitic terms.
204 Braun, Jean le thologien. II: Les grandes traditions dIsral, has shown that the great
concepts of the Old Testament are represented more completely in the FG than they are in the
Synoptics. In addition John is the only Evangelist to assert that Jesus was a Jew and that he taught
in synagogues and in the temple and who held Moses in high honour. Even more he recognises
that salvation comes from the Jews. The FG was addressed to a Jewish audience. The information
about Jesus in conjunction with John the Baptist in 1:19-51 and 3:22-30 is increasingly being
accepted as historical, especially in that it exalts John early on and shows Jesus emerging out of
the Baptists circle.
205 Isaac was compared to the lamb in TN Gen 22.
206 Jn 1:17.45, 3:14, 5:45-46, 6:32, 7:19.22-23, 9:28-29. A heavy emphasis is put on parallels
with Moses.
201
202

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

167

Old Testament images represent the relation of Christ and his people. The
Good Shepherd figure (l0:l) is based upon several Scripture passages (Ps 23:1,
Is 40:11, Jer 23:1-4, Ezek 34:1, 37:24) as are the vine and the branches (15:1;
cf. Ps 80:8-13, Is 5:1-7, Jer 2:21, Ezek 15:1, 19:10.14, Hos 10:1). While the use
of the Scriptures in the FG reflects Jewish exegetical tradition at the time of the
writing207, it has its own modifications of that tradition.
The Spirit resting upon Jesus recalls Is 11:2 where the LXX uses anapausetai
(will rest), the verb John uses. The angels ascending and descending on the
Son of man echo the Jacobs ladder episode (Gen 28:12, Jn 1:51). The Passover
is alluded to three times (Jn 2:13.23, 6:4, 11:55), and it seems that the writer
presents Jesus as the Passover lamb. He died at the very moment the Pharisees
sacrificed the lambs in the Temple. Jesus claims superiority to the temple (2:19).
The writer makes use of the serpent raised by Moses (3:14), the manna given in
the desert (6:31) and Jacobs well in Samaria (4:12). The Torah only judges a
man after having heard him (7:51); the testimony of two witnesses is true (8:17;
cf. Deut 19:15). Circumcision is given by Moses (7:22). The woman taken in
adultery is to be stoned (8:1; cf. Lev 20:10, Deut 22:22). There is a two-fold
resurrection to life and to judgment (5:29; cf. Dan 12:2). The symbol of light
of the world goes back to the Scripture, but is applied to Israel (Is 49:6). The
bringing of other sheep into the fold rests upon Is 56:8.
S. Neill is convinced that the central clue to the understanding of the FG is
to be found in the writers use of Scripture208. It is clear that OT quotations are
a feature of considerable importance of the FG. C.K. Barrett opened up a productive line of Johns investigation in this respect in his article The Old Testament in the FG209. Barretts main contention is that Johns comprehensive
knowledge of Scripture enabled him to use its testimony material in a significant
manner. Testimonia emerge in the FG, directly and in the Synoptics, not as verbal parallels, but in the form of themes based on the Old Testament and as part
of the theological texture of the whole work (1:29, 10:1-16). In this way the FG
offers a summation of the OT, which demonstrates the essential more than the
historical relation existing between the OT and Christ. It has to be remembered
that Testimonia literature is known also in the Writings of the Dead Sea, especially in the Florilegium210.
In his volume on the Historical Tradition in the Fourth Gospel, C.H. Dodd
gave attention to Johns use of Scripture211, but to a rather different effect. His
Le Daut, La nuit pascale.
S.C. Neill, The Interpretation of the New Testament 1861-1961, London 1964, 320.
209 C.K. Barrett, The Old Testament in the Fourth Gospel, JTS 48 (1947) 155-169.
210 G.J. Brooke, Exegesis at Qumran: 4Q Florilegium in Its Jewish Context (JSOT SS 29),
Sheffield 1984.
211 Dodd, Historical Tradition, 47-49. See the whole section on testimonies in the Johannine
207
208

168

Frdric Manns

suggestion, with particular reference to the passion narrative212, was that the
theological canon which controlled the Evangelists selection of testimony material depended on the testimonies themselves, and not the reverse. The facts in
the tradition dictated the choice of OT testimonia, and Johns selection provided
the same key to the interpretation of the suffering and death of Christ as that
which was evident from the Synoptic Gospels, and which was certainly primitive. There was embedded in the Passion narrative of the FG an understanding
of the Passion in terms of the Righteous Sufferer of the Psalms, the Suffering
Servant of Deutero-Isaiah, and the martyred leader of Zechariah, which were
primitive, and which the FG may be supposed to owe to pre-canonical tradition.
In other words, where Johns passion narrative included testimonies drawn from
parts of the Scripture in which the early church as a whole was interested from
the standpoint of unfulfilled prophecy, it is probable that we are in contact with
the common tradition of the Church rather than with a distinctively Johannine
theology.
Another point has to be noticed: some agreements between Paul and the FG
are striking213. They could help to date some traditions. There is an affinity in
the estimation of Christs person (Jn 1:1.14, Phil 2:6), and the work of revelation
(Jn 1:18, 2Cor 4:4-6) as well as redemption (Jn 10:10, Rom 3:25). There is also
a close correspondence in the treatment of the relation between Christ and the
Father, which is seen to be one of identity in respect of their person (Jn 10:30,
Col 1:15), love (Jn 1:18, Col 1:13), work (Jn 5:17, Eph 3:10) and teaching
(Jn7:16, 1Cor 1:24). Again, links between John and Paul can be discovered in
their representation of Christs relationship to the Spirit (Jn 15:26, Rom 8:10),
in the presentation of the Church as the Israel of God (Jn 15:1-6, Rom 9:6-8214)

Passion Narrative, ibid. 31-49. See also B. Lindars, New Testament Apologetic, London 1961,
265-272.
212 John has no sleeping disciples in the garden nor does Jesus suffer anguish. A large cohort
of soldiers bringing lanterns and torches is sent to arrest Jesus. In response to their quest for Jesus
of Nazareth he answers three times I am (18:5.6.8). The name of the ear severing incident is
mentioned. Annas is described as the Father in law of the high priest Caiaphas. Both are known
from historical sources. The judges bench used by Pilate is situated on a stone pavement (lithostrotos) and by its hebrew name (Gabbatha). The place where Jesus is crucified is the place of the
scull (Golgotha). The inscription posted on the cross is rendered in Hebrew, Latin and Greek.
Water and blood are pouring from the pierced side of Jesus. The weight of the embalming spices
is described as being around a hundred pounds along with the linen wrapping burial customs of
the Jews. All these details have been added as a factor of historicising the drama. For the historicity of the Passion account in John see H.K. Bond, At the Court of the High Priest: Historicity
and Theology in John 18:13-24, in Anderson et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and History, II, 313-323.
213 P. Benoit, Paulinisme et Johannisme, in Id., Exgse et Thologie, III, Paris 1968,
300-317.
214 John and Paul quote the same texts from the OT: Jn 12:38, Rom 10:16 (Is 33:1), Jn 12:40,
Rom 11:8b (Is 6:10; cf. Is 29:10).

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

169

and their unity (Jn 17:1-26, Eph 2:14-18). Christian life is characterised by love
(Jn 13, 1Cor 13).
It is in the area of the Christ and Christian relationship, that parallels of far
reaching significance occur. Most significant of all is the appearance of a doctrine of individualism within the Johannine and Pauline literature, in spite of the
evident expression in both of the corporate unity of the ecclesia. Schweizer and
Moule have both pointed to this aspect of the presentation of the Christian experience in the FG215. It is the individual who is to abide in Christ, the true Vine
(Jn 15:5-6); and it is also the individual who becomes incorporated by baptism
into Christ (Rom 6:3-11), baptism, with its concomitants of faith and love (Jn
3:5, 1Cor 6:10, and the Christian life, with its tension between bondage and
freedom, flesh and spirit (Jn 8:31-47, Gal 4:21-30). Yet in both cases the corporate dimension to personal commitment is made. The relation between Christ
and the Christian also finds a corresponding expression in both Paul and John
when they speak of salvation (Jn 3:17, Rom 5:8-11), the status of being in
Christ (Jn 15:4).
Pauls eschatological motifs in 1Thess 4-5 coincide with the FGs eschatology. Jesus taught future eschatology216. The FG insists upon the eschatological
hour of Jesus217. The same evidence that supports the Synoptic emphasis on
future eschatology in Jesus teaching also reinforces the Johannine tradition of
realised eschatology, that is a period of living in the shadow of the imminent
messianic era. If Aune218 is correct in his understanding of realised eschatology
in the Hymns of the Dead Sea Scrolls, it is noteworthy that realised and future
eschatology (in the War Scroll) coexisted in the Qumran community. As in
Paul219, realised eschatology in the FG is inaugurated by Jesus presence and
glorification, then realised and anticipated in believers experience through the
Spirit. In his Farewell Discourse Jesus replace most of the expectation of his
future coming with an emphasis of the Spirits coming. This realised eschatology doesnt exclude the eschatological future.
These impressive parallels do not prove or even suggest that John depended
directly upon Paul. They simply indicate, as C.K. Barrett pointed out220, a com215 E. Schweizer, The Concept of the Church in the Gospel and Epistles of St John, in A.J.B.
Higgins (ed.), New Testament Essays. Studies in Memory of Thomas Walter Manson, Manchester
1959, 230-245, esp. 233-237; C.F.D. Moule, The Individualism of the Fourth Gospel, NT 5
(1962) 171-190.
216 B. Witherington, III, Jesus, Paul, and the End of the World. A Comparative Study in New
Testament Eschatology, Downers Grove IL 1992.
217 R. Kysar, The Fourth Evangelist and His Gospel, Minneapolis MN 1975, 210.
218 D.E. Aune, The Cultic Setting of Realized Eschatology in Early Christianity (Suppl to
NovT 28), Leiden 1972, 29-44.
219 Rom 8:11.23, 1Cor 6:14, 15:12-13, 2Cor 1:22, 5:5.
220 C.K. Barrett, The Gospel According to St. John, London 1955, 45-49.

170

Frdric Manns

mon dependence on the early Christian tradition. Finally it has to be noticed that
the FG does not treat Scripture as the rabbis did after 70. No characteristic of
the Jewish midrash is found in the FG221. Rather the idea of fulfilment shows
the point the FG intends to put into evidence222.
3.4. The Jewish Feasts
The way in which Jesus fulfilled the Jewish feasts is a fascinating problem. The Hebrew word for feasts (moadim) literally means appointed
times. God carefully planned and orchestrated the timing and sequence of
each of these seven feasts to reveal a special story. The seven annual feasts of
Israel were spread over seven months of the Jewish calendar, at set times appointed by God223.
The question of the feasts in the Gospel of John has been a longstanding
problem in the New Testament studies. In fact, the feasts are associated with the
temple of Jerusalem which was still standing, and then suppose a theology of
the temple. One must choose between the Synoptics and the Johannine tradition
of Jesus ministry itinerary. Either Jesus visited Jerusalem several times during
his ministry, or he visited it only once when he was tried. Many scholars believe
that Johns presentation is closer to a realistic rendering of what an observant
Jew would have done before the fall of Jerusalem in 70 C.E. The Johannine
presentation seems historically preferable to the single Jerusalem visit of the
Synoptics.
Jn 7:39 has Jesus offering living water at the feast of tabernacles, which
may be significant in view of the fact that the festival involved a daily waterpouring ceremony: a procession would go down to the pool of Siloam below the
temple, fill a golden jar with water, and then return to the altar in the temple2,
where the water was poured out at the side of the altar. The Johannine picture
of Jesus going up to various feasts in Jerusalem is one that makes better historical sense than the Synoptic picture, where Jesus is only described as making
one visit to the holy city at the end3 of his ministry.
221 The Pharisaic midrash is characterised by the many different interpretations proposed and
introduced by the expression: dabar aher.
222 R. Vignolo, La morte di Ges nel quarto Vangelo come compimento (Gv 19,28-30), in
G. Ghiberti et alii (ed.), Opera Giovannea, Leumann - Torino 2003, 273-288. P.M. Beaude, Laccomplissement des Ecritures, Paris 1980.
223 J. Milewski, Les ftes de plerinage dans la tradition juive (Lectures du judasme), Paris
2011. The main Jewish Feasts have been studied by Le Daut, La nuit pascale. See also J. Potin,
La fte juive de la Pentecte. tude des textes liturgiques (LD 65a-b), 2 vols, Paris 1971; R. Vicent, La festa ebraica delle capanne (Sukkot). Interpretazioni midrashiche nella Bibbia e nel
giudaismo antico, Roma 2000; D. Felsch, Die Feste im Johannesevangelium. Jdische Tradition
und christologische Deutung (WUNT II/308), Tbingen 2011.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

171

Exegetes explained the role the Jewish feasts play in the FG. Some have
treated the feasts as literary devices structuring the narrative: M.-E. Boismard
with A. Lamouille, D. Mollat, D.D. Williford and G.A. Yee. Boismard in his
article of 1951: LEvangile quatre dimensions contended that the six feasts
served as a septenary structure that casts Christ as a perfect Messiah and a new
creator224. The feasts have been woven into a septenary structure that permeated
the entire gospel. In his commentary published in 1977 Boismard argued that
the feasts provide an imperfect foil to the perfect Passover of Christ. The six
feasts do not appear until strata IIB and III diffused IIA Tabernacle feast. In IIB
there is a sevenfold use of healthy in the healing of the lame man of Jn 5, the
sevenfold use of the verb to open the eyes in Jn 9, the sevenfold use of the
verb to wash in Jn 13, the sevenfold use of I am in the discourse following
7:28, the sevenfold use of the name Martha in the resurrection of Lazarus, the
sevenfold use of Thomas name in the Gospel, the sevenfold use of the verb to
bear fruit in Jn 15:1-16, the sevenfold use of the verb to give testimony in Jn
5:31-47 and the mention of the seven disciples in Jn 21:2.
The six feasts serve as a foil, contrasting the obsolete imperfect feasts with
the newly created Passover of Christ. The Jewish worship is replaced by the
Christian cult centred on the Passover. To the separations God made in the first
three days of Genesis correspond several replacements that Christ effected in
the first three weeks of his ministry (1:19-6:71). To the luminaries God furnished in the fourth day of Genesis correspond several cosmic and life-giving
features ascribed to Christ from the fourth to the sixth week of his ministry (7:119:42). To the rest God took on the seventh day corresponds Christs repose
during the seventh week of his resurrection (20:1-31).
For D. Mollat the feasts provide commemorative symbolism for Johannine
christology. In the two first editions of the Bible de Jrusalem, Mollat argued
that the feasts provide the structural medium into which all other features of the
gospel fit; they give the hermeneutical context in which the miracles and discourses find their meaning. The feasts are the milestones of the Johannine
Kerygma with Jesus activity in Jerusalem as a centre. By the septenary of the
feasts the FG meant to signify Jesus life and ministry as the messianic perfection. Jesus put an end to all the Jewish institutions.
In the third edition Mollat changed his hypothesis. The goal of the FG was
not to signify that Jesus came to put an end to the liturgy of the old covenant.
224 The FG contains seven discourses (3:3-21, 4:5-27, 5:19-47, 6:27-71, 7-8, 10:1-39, 14:117,26), seven miracles (2:1-11, 4:53-57, 5:1-15, 6:1-13, 6:17-21, 9:1-7, 11:1-44), seven responses of faith (2:23, 4:39, 7:31, 8:30, 10:42, 11:45, 12:37), seven expressions of Jesus salvific relation to humankind (6:35-56, 8:12, 10:7, 10:11-14, 11:25, 14:6, 15:1-5) and seven days of the first
week of his public ministry (1:29, 1:38, 1:41, 1:45, 1:49, 1:51). Jesus ministry is an act of new
creation.

172

Frdric Manns

The feasts facilitate the FG christology and underscore the scope of the rejection Jesus met. Williford in his unpublished dissertation written for Southwest
Baptist Theological Seminary saw in the feasts the symbols of the final reality
revealed in Jesus. He linked chap. 3 of the FG to the first Passover of Jn 2:13.
The spiritual rebirth of Jn 3:3-8 corresponded to the natural birth from Abraham
required for the participation in Exodus. Jesus crucifixion alluded to in 3:14
allowed participation in the Kingdom of God as the paschal lamb had done it
for Israel. God giving his only begotten Son in Jn 3:16 drew upon Isaacs Aqedah (Jub 17:15-18:18) dated at Passover.
For Yee the feasts enjoy a calendrical rapport with the Johannine sabbaths225.
The motive pushing the FGs use of feasts was the Johannine communitys need
to craft its identity in the wake of the temples destruction and over against of
tannaitic modifications. The author includes the sabbath texts. Tabernacles was
the feast during which the first and the second temple were consecrated and
provided the pattern of the feast of Dedication. Jesus too in Jn 2 cites Zech 14:21
a verse associated with Tabernacles. The Passover of chap. 6 presents Jesus as
the new Moses. Jesus crossing of the sea of Tiberias alludes to Moses crossing
of the Sea of Reeds in Ps 77:20-21. The messianic discourse of Jn 7:25-31 responds to the eschatological / exodus themes: the new temple and the rock in
the wilderness motifs. A. Guilding226 and M.D. Goulder227 have assumed that
the feasts are liturgical hints calibrated to Johannine practice, while others see
the feasts as representatives of the Jewish matrix from which Johannine christianity emerged. In fact the feasts engage the Johannine motif of Jesus hour228.
For A. Destro and M. Pesce the FG wanted to show to the members of their
communities how their new religious system had come about. John created a
dialectic in its narrative between the systems from which they came and the
system into which they grew. By remembering the movement of John the Baptist and his baptism with water, the Samaritan cult at Garizim and the Jewish
pilgrimages, the FG evoked the exclusion from the Baptist movement, from the
Samaritan community and from the Jewish synagogue. From a Jewish periodic225

1989.

G.A. Yee, Jewish Feasts and the Gospel of John (Zacchaeus Studies. NT), Wilmington DE

226 Guilding, The Fourth Gospel and Jewish Worship. This liturgical approach assumes that
the feasts reflect a ritual referent outside the text. Those referents are the Jewish Lectionary. The
main problem remains open: from which period comes the Jewish Lectionary?
227 M.D. Goulder, The Evangelists Calendar. A Lectionary Explanation of the Development of
Scripture (Speakers lectures in Biblical studies University of Oxford. Faculty of Theology, 1972),
London 1978. The author proposes his theory: the feasts in the FG correlate to the Sabbaths, Sundays
and Pascal Rites of the Quartodeciman Lenten Season. The FG was fashioned as a lectionary for
quartodeciman baptismal candidates instruction.
228 A. Destro - M. Pesce, I riti nel vangelo di Giovanni, in L. Padovese (ed.), Atti del lV Simposio di Efeso su S. Giovanni apostolo (Turchia: La Chiesa e la sua storia 6), Roma 1994, 85-105.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

173

ity of time measured by feasts the community passed to a new periodicity of


time, characterized by Jesus hour, the moment in which Jesus accepted his own
destiny. Four moments structure the FG: the time before the hour (1:19-12:22),
the advent of the Hour (12:23-17:26), the time within the Hour (18:1-19:42),
and the period after the Hour (20:1-21:25). The main Jewish feasts took place
before the Hour in 1:32-11:54 and served to introduce other rites into the narrative. The Hour was introduced in the first Passover in Jn 2:13 and reached to the
last Passover in Jn 11:55. It was followed by the theme of the temple, the Fathers House in Jn 2:16 and in Jn 14:2. The new temple announced in 2:21
became the indwelling of God in his people by the Spirit. This seems to reflect
the change of liturgical scenery anticipated at Jn 4:21-23. The same alteration
occurred with the ritual purity. At the wedding of Cana the Jewish ritual of purity is mentioned as well as in Jn 3:25 and in Jn 11:55. In Jesus Farewell Discourse cleanness is operated by the word Jesus has spoken (Jn 15:3). Jewish
rituals are being transformed during the period that occurs between the first
Passover and the coming of Jesus Hour. M.A. Daise229 addressed the question
of the rationale lying behind the six feasts in the FG by arguing that, in an earlier recension, those feasts were sequenced into a single, liturgical year and gave
temporal momentum for the motif of Jesus Hour. His argument assumed that,
in an earlier edition of the FG, chapters 5 and 6 were inverted; and it turned on
the premise that the Passover at Jn 6:4 was to be read not as a regular Passover,
observed on 14 Nisan, but as the Second Passover of Num 9:9-14, observed
on 14 Iyyar. Too many hypothesis must be proven before accepting his argumentation.
Recently R. Infante dedicated another study on the Jewish Feasts230. His
conclusions are resumed in six points. (1) The FG has a christological dimension
focused upon the Hour of Jesus. It is unfair to limit a section of the feasts running from chapter 5 to 10. Passover is mentioned in chapter 2 and in chapter
11:55. The whole Gospel presents the Jewish feasts as the background of Jesus
activities. There is no need to accept the hypothesis of a lectionary or of a triennial reading system. (2) The destruction of the temple in 70 A.D. signified a
transformation of the feasts and the Jewish cult. The Jewish disciples of Jesus
wanted to keep the memory of the cult and the rites in which they were formed,
229 Daise, Feasts in John. See also M.J.J. Menken, Die jdische Feste im Johannesevangelium, in M. Labahn et alii (ed.), Israel und seine Heilstraditionen im Johannesevangelium. Festgabe
fr Johannes Beutler SJ zum 70. Geburtstag, Paderborn etc. 2004, 269-286; B.D. Johnson, The
Jewish Feasts and Questions of Historicity in John 5-12, in Anderson et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and
History, II, 117-129: The Gospel of Johns strategy of using the Jewish Feasts suggests that they
are recollections from before 70 C.E. and further remembrances from a time before the Spirit was
understood to be given to Jesus believers in a Johannine thought-world (p. 129).
230 R. Infante, Le feste di Israele nel Vangelo secondo Giovanni (Parola di Dio 32), Cinisello
Balsamo (MI) 2010.

174

Frdric Manns

even if these were read now in the light of Jesus life. (3) The FG gives a new
definition of the christian cult which is a cult in Spirit and truth. As the rabbis
had to reorganise the Jewish cult without the temple, the FG had to scrutinise
Jesus teachings in order to accord it with the Jewish tradition. Since Jesus
brought the revelation from his Father, he wanted to permit the encounter between man an God. (4) There is no antisemitism in the FG and no criticism of
the temple231. Salvation comes from the Jews. The FG doesnt know rabbinic
Judaism, but only a Judaism in formation and Jewish communities which lived
in dialectic tension with the Christians. But the FG is far away from the situation
described in Ignatius letters and in Justins Dialogue with Trypho232. The mention of the Jews in the FG indicates very often the belonging to a nation, as
the Samaritans or the Romans. Jesus himself is called ioudaios in Jn 4:9.
Many institutions are called Jewish as the purification (2:6), the burial (19:40),
the feasts (2:13, 5:1, 6:4, 11:55, 19:42), the High Priest (19:21), or the guards
(18:12). Often the term Jews is limited to the chiefs of the nation (1:19,
2:18.20, 19:20.31). Jews who came to visit Mary in Bethany believed in Jesus
(12:42). The exclusion of Jesus disciples from the Synagogue was in fact an act
of antisemitism. (5) The author of the FG was a member of the priestly aristocracy233. (6) The FG presents a theology of the new creation and a theology of
redemption. The Feasts of Israel have a cosmical dimension as well as a theological one, especially as a re-reading of the book of Exodus. To present Jesus
as the encounter place of God means that the FG is concerned with the theology
of creation. God creates because his love generates life. He asks the world to
return freely to him. To take part in the Jewish feasts meant to celebrate Gods
love which generated life and joy.
M. Theobald234 was convinced that the presence of a Judaeo-Christian community could be discovered in the FG. In fact, there are seven mentions of the
Jews who believed in Jesus235. These mentions have a special place in the structure of the first part of the gospel:
J. Lieu, Temple and Synagogue in John, NTS 45 (1999) 51-69.
R. Pesch, Antisemitismo nella Bibbia? Indagine sul Vangelo di Giovanni (GdT 328), Brescia 2007. M. Lowe, Who were the Ioudaioi?, NT 18 (1976) 101-130. Some authors are convinced the FG has in mind the Judaeo-Christians: G. Lindeskog, Das jdisch-christliche Problem.
Randglossen zur einer Forschungsepoche (Historia religionum 9), Uppsala 1986; C.G. Lingard,
The Problems of Jewish Christians in the Johannine Community (Tesi Gregoriana. Serie Teologia
73), Roma 2001; M.C. Broer, LEvangile de Jean et le christianisme juif (nazoren), in D.
Marguerat (ed.), Le dchirement. Juifs et Chrtiens au premier sicle (Le Monde de la Bible 32),
Genve 1996, 179-202.
233 M. Hengel, La questione giovannea (Studi biblici 120), Brescia 1998, 296-318; F. Manns,
Traditions sacerdotales dans le quatrime Evangile, LA 57 (2007) 215-228.
234 M. Theobald, Das Johannesevangelium Zeugnis eines synagogalen Judenchristentums, in Id., Studien zum Corpus Iohanneum (WUNT 267), Tbingen 2010, 204-255.
235 Jn 2:23, 7:31, 8:30, 10:42, 11:45, 12:11.42.
231

232

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

175

2:23; 3,1 polloi episteusan (2:23), Pascha in Jerusalem, archn tn Ioudain


(3:1) Nicodemus is a representative of a group of believers (3:2), smeia poiein
(2:23, 3:2).
6:1-13.14: A great crowd followed Jesus (6:2), basileus (6:15), ochlos
(6:2.5.22.24), epoisen smeion (6:2.14).
7-8: Twice there is the repetition of the faith of the Jews in Jesus (7:31, 8:31),
hotan hupsste ton huion tou anthrpou (8:28), Sperma Abraham-Tekna tou
Abraham (8:3).
10:40-42, 11:45, 12:9-19: Basileus (12:13.15), ochlos (12:9.12.17.19), smeion (10:41, 11:47).
12:42: Pascha (12:1), archontn polloi episteusan eis auton (12:42), smeia
popoikotos (12:37).
The Jews who believed in Jesus were inhabitants of Jerusalem. Jn 7:3 suggested that Jesus had disciples236 in Jerusalem: Go to Judaea that your disciples
(there) may see the works you are doing. These disciples accepted the Johannine high christology237. A split occurred among the crowd and among the authorities238. In fact many disciples abandoned Jesus because they feared the
Jews239.
If the presence of Jewish believers in Jesus is attested240, the observance of
the Jewish feasts of pilgrimage becomes an historical fact. Jn 11:48 is a prophecy of the destruction of the temple, but the temple was still standing when John
wrote his gospel.
But in his article Heilige Orte-heilige Zeiten241, Theobald proposed to see
the unique true holy place in the Johannine Jesus himself.
The key importance of the Jewish feasts supposes the existence of the temple
and must be dated before 70. During the feast of the Dedication John mentions
even Solomons portico (10:23) which is known in the Acts 3:11 and 5:12. The
feast of Tabernacles supposes the existence of the Pool of Siloam. The unbelief
236 Jn 6:66 calls his disciples the twelve. So here the disciples in Jerusalem are different from
the twelve.
237 Even John the Baptist admits the preexistence of Jesus (Jn 1:30).
238 Jn 7:43 (schisma), 9:16 (schisma), 10:19 (schisma).
239 Jn 7:13, 9:22, 12:42, 19:38, 20:19. Nicodemus came at night (3:2, 19:39). But the blind
man who was healed adored Jesus openly (9:38).
240 See Acts 4:36, 9:27, 11:22-26.
241 Studien zum Corpus Iohanneum, 389-404: Dass schon in Israels Festen Heil gefeiert and
damit vergegenwrtigt wrde sagt der Evangelist nirgends und setzt es auch nicht stillschweigend
voraus; eine heilsgeschichtliche Selbstndigkeit dieser Art verwehrt er gerade dem jdischen
Festkreis wie dem Tempel (p. 399).
But S. Haber, Going up to Jerusalem. Purity, Pilgrimage, and the Historical Jesus, in Id.,
They Shall Purify Themselves. Essays on Purity in Early Judaism (Early Judaism and Its Literature 24), Leiden - Boston 2008, 181-206, reads Jn 11:55 as a proof that Jesus as a pilgrim accepted the Jewish traditions.

176

Frdric Manns

of Jesus brothers (7:1-13) attested in the Synoptics is unlikely to have been


invented. Charges of Johns portrait of Jesus and the Jews as anti-semitic are
thoroughly unjustified.
3.5. John and the Synoptics
Since the problem has been treated many times242, we shall illustrate our
position studying only three examples: the miracles as signs in the FG, the purification of the Temple243 and the problem of the last supper as a paschal meal.
3.5.1. Jews expected not only significant signs before the final deliverance
and special miracles at the end244 but pondered the promised signs of the messianic era offered by the prophets. The signs made by the prophets245 anticipated the signs that would take place in the messianic time246. While the Synoptics speak of miracles made possible because of the force Jesus received, the
FG prefers to present the work of Jesus as series of signs he accomplished. Signs
perform an authenticating function in Early Christianity. They perform an ambiguous function which emphasises the potential hiddenness of Gods revelation to those who were not persevering disciples. Jn 20:30-31 provides a clear
indication that the signs are a focal point calling to faith. The link between signs
and faith is inadequate but is is a step on the way to discipleship.
The FG emphasises the sign function of Jesus miracles: they point to a reality that must be interpreted. He develops his theme especially from the terms
use in the biblical exodus narratives which permitted to associate the signs with
242 C.H. Dodd, Some Johannine Herrenworte with Parallels in the Synoptic Gospels, NTS
2 (1955) 75-86. The accounts of John the Baptist in Jn 3:22-29 and 4:1 would have provided an
interesting parallel with the Synoptic presentation of the Baptist. Dodd, Historical Tradition,
162-173, has shown that the narratives of the anointing of Jesus, the feeding of the multitude, the
cleansing of the Temple, the entry into Jerusalem, the arrest and the trial are independent from the
Synoptics in the FG. See also D. Guthrie, New Testament Introduction. The Gospels and Acts,
London 1965, 263-275. P. Gardner-Smith, St. John and the Synoptic Gospels, Cambridge 1938.
John, like Paul, is silent about Jesuss miraculous birth in Bethlehem. John does not from any of
the royal Psalms and never refers to Jesus as the Son of David. John in his account of the Passion
does not mention the miracles that accompanied Jesus crucifixion. John and Paul assert that Jesus
himself and not the Son of man will return and judge (Jn 5:25-29, 6:44, 14:3, 2Cor 5:10). F. Neirynck, John and the Synoptics, in M. de Jonge (ed.), Lvangile de Jean. Sources, rdaction,
thologie (BETL 44), Leuven 1977, 73-77, and C.K. Barrett, The Gospel According to St. John.
An Introduction with Commentary and Notes on the Greek Text, London - Philadelphia PA 1978,
2 ed., 15, remain convicted that the Synoptic Gospels are the sources of the FG.
243 It would have been easier to study the Passion account of the Synoptic and John. This kind
of study would have taken to much space. Higgins, The Historicity, 22-39, has shown that John
4:46-54 and John 6 are independent from the Synoptic parallels.
244 Sir 33:1-8, 36:1-8.
245 Is 35:5-6.
246 Pesita de Rav Kahana 9:4.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

177

Moses. Moses signs generated belief247. As with signs-faith in the FG, those
who had initially believed in Moses turned on him when the circumstances grew
difficult248.
Signs have a christological function and witness to Jesus identity. They
manifest his Glory249 which is ultimately revealed by the cross250.
Since the FGs audience moved in a Jewish milieu, John insisted on presenting Jesus as greater than Moses. The association of hearing water transformed
into wine would remind Moses first sign, a water transformation sign251. Jesus
giving food in the wilderness was an explicit reference to Moses. Jesus signs
would publicly identify him as the Messiah.
The FG does not present Jesus as a new Moses, but as greater than Moses.
The healing signs of 4:50-54, 5:5-9 and 9:6-7 do not fit Moses ministry except
by way of allusion to the serpent lifted in the desert in 3:14. Further Jesus does
not simply provide bread as Moses did: he is the true manna252. His healing
power better matches the ministries of Elijah and Elisha, who according to Jewish belief were supposed to come back. If John the Baptist is not Elijah253, as the
Synoptics have it, it is permitted to expect that Jesus subsumes this title.
The signs operated by Jesus intend to communicate more than such categories can contain. The discourse that interprets Jesus healing in 5:5-9 subordinates Jesus to the Father but makes him responsible for the raising up of the
death as it shall appear in 11:43-44. The signs reveal in fact Jesus identity.
The FG version of the Centurion at Capernaum in Jn 4:46-54 can hardly be
understood as a revision of the corresponding miracle story in Q (Mt 8:5-13, Lk
7:1-10), because the part that goes beyond Q (Jn 4:52) expresses the nave view
of miracle which the redactional passage of Jn 4:48 criticises.
The FG connects the feeding sign with Jesus walking on the sea in 6:16-21.
His I am statement speaks of his divinity. Moses witnessed Gods glory when
he received the gift of the word254 at Sinai. In the FG Jesus is the gift of Gods
word, the logos. The disciples became the new Moses in beholding his glory.
The signs are associated with the response they evoke: faith or unbelief. The
Ex 4:30-31.
Ex 5:21-23.
249 Jn 2:11, 11:40.
250 Jn 2:18-21.
251 Ex 7:20.
252 Jn 6:35.
253 Jn 1:21. In refusing to identify the Baptist with Elijah, the FG may stand in line with an
early tradition. In the Synoptics the Baptists ministry ends as Jesus ministry begins. In the FG
there is a significant period of overlap, when both the Baptist and Jesus teach and baptise. The
FG preserves a tradition that acknowledge that the two figures worked at the same time and in
similar ways. Since the tradition concerning this parallel ministry created problems that needed
to be addressed, it might well have been historical.
254 Ex 33:18-34:7.
247
248

178

Frdric Manns

FG links also the signs to knowing God, since they function as a divine self
revelation. Jesus joins God the Father as the supreme object of salvific revelatory vision and knowledge.
3.5.2. The Johannine setting of Jesus temple act is put at the beginning of
the Gospel contrary to the Synoptics who put it at the end of Jesus life. A look
at the Synoptic and the Johannine narrative shows similarities and differen
ces255. Mk 11:15-16 which is considered as the primitive text describes the
cleansing of the temple in this way: Jesus drives out those who were buying and
selling. He overturns the chairs of the sellers of doves. He prohibits to carrying
skeuos through the temple. The FG adds that Jesus drove out the sellers of sheep
and oxen, the animals fit for the sacrifices, making a whip. Jesus comment is
justified in Mark by a reference to Scriptures which is a compilation of Is 56:7
and Jer 7:11 which put the spotlight on the temple. In the FG Jesus comment is
introduced by the verb eipen, even if Jesus words can allude to Zech 14:20-21.
The explicit scripture quotation of Ps 69:10 which focuses on Jesus himself is
attributed to the disciples in Jn 2:17. The FG lacks the Markan detail about the
prohibition of carrying skeuos. It can be an autonomous elaboration of a tradition common with Mark256 or an account based on an independent257 tradition.
The FG places the event in the Jerusalem temple at the beginning of Jesus
ministry in the context of Passover. According to O. Cullmann258, the choice of
the FG to place the narrative at the beginning of Jesus preaching was in order
to underline the importance which the idea of worship receives in the Gospel,
255 D. Moody Smith, Jr., John 12:12 ff. and the Question of Johns Use of the Synoptics,
JBL 82 (1963) 58-64.
256 I. Buse, The Cleansing of the Temple in the Synoptics and in John, ExpT 70 (1958-59)
22-24; R.T. Fortna, The Fourth Gospel and Its Predecessor. From Narrative Source to the Present
Gospel, Philadelphia PA 1988, 121.
257 Dodd, Historical Tradition, 156-162; Brown, The Gospel According to John, I, 118-120.
Schnackenburg, The Gospel According to St. John, I, 353; Lindars, The Gospel of John, 138; R.
Bauckham, Jesus Demonstration in the Temple, in B. Lindars (ed.), Law and Religion. Essays
on the Place of the Law in Israel and Early Christianity, Cambridge 1988, 74; G.W. Buchanan,
Symbolic Money Changers in the Temple, NTS 37 (1991) 281; P.M. Casey, Culture and Historicity: the Cleansing of the Temple, CBQ 59 (1997) 324; M.A. Matson, The Contribution to
the Temple Cleansing by the Fourth Gospel, in E.H. Lovering (ed.), SBL 1992 Seminar Papers,
Atlanta GA 1992, 499; H.D. Betz, Jesus and the Purity of the Temple (Mk 11:15-18). A Comparative Religion Approach, JBL 116 (1997) 457; A. Yarbro Collins, Jesus Action in Herods
Temple, in A. Yarbro Collins - M.M. Mitchell (ed.), Antiquity and Humanity. Essays on Ancient
Religion and Philosophy, Tbingen 2001, 47; E. Trocm, Larrire-plan du rcit johannique de
lexpulsion des marchands du Temple (Jean 2,13-22), in H. Lichtenberger (ed.), Geschichte
Tradition Reflexion. Festschrift fr M. Hengel. III: Frhes Christentum, Tbingen 1996, 260;
P. Fredriksen, The Historical Jesus, the Scene in the Temple and the Gospel of John, in Anderson et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and History, I, 249-276.
258 O. Cullmann, A New Approach to the Interpretation of the Fourth Gospel, ExpT 71
(1959-60) 42.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

179

that which the whole life of Jesus is meant to illustrate, that from now on worship is no longer limited to the temple, but to the person of Christ.
The Johannine chronology is preferred by Lagrange259, Taylor260, Campbell261, Robinson262, Eppstein263 and Murphy OConnor264.
Jesus action was directed against the abuses of the temple which stemmed
from greed and corruption among the ruling priests, especially from the family
of Annas. The corruption of the priesthood is evident from Josephus writings
and from rabbinic Literature265. Jesus in fact criticised the priesthood. According to Bauckham Jesus was against the temple monopoly on the sale of doves
which resulted in exorbitant prices266. Richardson267 explains Jesus action from
the fact that Tyrian Sheqels, which had on the obverse the figure of the God
Melqart and on the reverse the Ptolemaic eagle, were the coinage required by
the temple authorities. Even more the tax of the Half Sheqel was not to be payed
every year, but once in a lifetime according to Ex 30:11-16, Neh 10:32 and
4Q159. Betz268 advanced the hypothesis that Jesus wanted to extend the holiness
of the inner court to the whole temple mount protesting against Herods remodelling of the Temple which resulted in the transformation of the courtyards into
a profane civic centre. At the beginning of the tradition it is possible to assume
that a change of some sort had taken place. The Johannine original contribution
was the idea of Resurrection as a rebuilding of the spiritual Temple. An inquiry
should be done about the Old Testament ideas which could have influenced the
Johannine narrative. The easiest detectable presence of the OT must be found
in Jesus comment on the event.
Jesus action in the Temple was inspired by the prophecy of Zech 14:21 as
259 M.-J.

Lagrange, Evangile selon Saint Jean, Paris 1925, 65.


Taylor, The Gospel According to St. Mark, London 1952, 461-462.
261 R.G. Campbell, Evidence for the Historicity of the Fourth Gospel in John 2:13-22, in
E.A. Livingstone (ed.), Studia Evangelica VII. Papers presented to the Fifth International Congress on Biblical Studies held at Oxford, 1973 (TU 126), Berlin 1982, 117.
262 Robinson, The Priority of John, 127-131.
263 V. Eppstein, The Historicity of the Gospel Account of the Cleansing of the Temple, ZNW
55 (1964) 42-58.
264 J. Murphy OConnor, Jesus and the Money Changers (Mark 11:15-17; John 2:13-17),
RB 107 (2000) 53.
265 C.A. Evans, Jesus Action in the Temple and Evidence of Corruption in the First Century
Temple, in D.J. Lull (ed.), SBL 1989 Seminar Papers, Atlanta GA 1989, 522-539.
266 Bauckham, Jesus Demonstration in the Temple, 72-89; J.F. McGrath, Destroy the
Temple: Issues of History in John 2:13-22, in Anderson et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and History, II,
35-43.
267 P. Richardson, Why Turn the Tables? Jesus Protest in the Temple Precincts, in E.H.
Lovering (ed.), SBL 1992 Seminar Papers, Atlanta GA 1992, 507-523. According to G. Theissen,
The First Followers of Jesus. A Sociological Analysis of the Earliest Christianity, London 1978,
47-48, Jesus was a representative of the Galilean Peasantry opposed to the citys urban practices.
268 H.D. Betz, Jesus and the Purity of the Temple (Mark 11:15-18). A Comparative Religion
Approach, JBL 116 (1997) 455-472.
260 V.

180

Frdric Manns

read in the Synagogue. Carr269 suggested Zech 6:12-13, a text about the Branch
who will build the temple of the Lord and interpreted in the Targum as the Messiah270, as the proposed referent of the graph of Jn 2:22. The Dead Sea Scrolls
understood the Branch of David as a messianic title271. 4Q161 places the appearance of the Branch in an eschatological context: Its interpretation concerns the
Branch of David who will arise at the end of days. 4Q252 provides a synonymic title for the Branch: until the coming of the Messiah of righteousness, the
Branch of David.
The Targum of Zech 6:12 gives a clearly messianic interpretation: Say unto
him: Thus says the Lord of Hosts: Behold the man whose name is the Messiah.
He is destined to be revealed and to be anointed and he shall build the temple
of the Lord. Even in Tg Zech 3:8 the messianic reading is proposed: Hear now,
Joshua, the High Priest and your companions who sit before you, for they are
men worthy of having miracles performed for them. Behold I bring my servant,
the Messiah, who is to be revealed. The Lxx translated the Branch as anatol272
(the sunrise).
If the Branch refers to the messianic figure, the temple which he must rebuilt
will be a different temple from the one rebuilt by the former exiles. Zechariah
believed that the rebuilding of the temple is Gods work and such deed will inaugurate the eschatological age. Many texts speaking of the new temple and the
new Jerusalem are from the same period. Among them 1 En 90:29, 91:13, Jub
1:15-17.26-29, Tg Is 53:5, Tb 14:5 (LXX), Ps. Sal 17:30 and 2Sam 7:11-14 in
4QFlorilegium (4Q174). The idea of a messianic rebuilding of the temple is
also present in the rabbinic Literature273, especially in GenR 49:8; NumR
9:6,13:2.
Jesus addressing the sellers of doves tells them: Do not make the house of
my Father a house of commerce (oikon emporiou). The noun emporion is a
hapax in the New Testament and means a public market. Scholars274 agree that
this expression alludes to Zech 14:21: On that day there shall no longer be any
269 A. Carr, Christus aedificator: A Comparison between St. John II.19 and Zechariah VI.13,
Exp 7 (1909) 41-49.
270 Zech 3:8 also introduced the Branch interpreted in the Targum as the Messiah. There is a
special emphasis in the description of the Branch and the building of the Temple. See W.H. Rose,
Zemah and Zerubbabel. Messianic Expectations in the Early Postexilic Period (Library of Hebrew Bible / Old Testament Studies [JSOT SS] 304), Sheffield 2000.
271 4Q161 8-10 17; 4Q174 1-31 11; 4Q252 V 3-4; 4Q285 IV (fr. 7) 3-4.
272 According to Philo, Conf. 62-63, the name reflected the incorporeal Divine image dwelling
in the man described by Zechariah.
273 D. Juel, Messiah and Temple. The Trial of Jesus in the Gospel of Mark (SBL DS 31), Missoula MT 1977.
274 M. Nobile, Le citazioni di Zaccaria nel Vangelo di Giovanni, in A. Passoni dellAcqua
(ed.), Il vostro frutto rimanga (Gv 16[sic! for 15],16). Miscellanea per il LXX compleanno
di Giuseppe Ghiberti, Bologna 2006, 65-66; A.J. Kstenberger, John, in G.K. Beale - D.A.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

181

merchant (cenaany) in the house of the Lord of hosts. Canaanite means a


merchant in Job 40:30, Pro 31:24 and Is 23:8. Even the Talmud Pesah 50a affirms that the word means trader. The Targum of Gen 38:2 and Zech 14:21
translates the word Canaanite as a trader (tagar)275. There was an ancient
tradition which interpreted Zech 14:21 to mean that on the day of the Lord there
would no longer be traders in the temple. On that day Jerusalem would be entirely sacred276.
The Johannine originality in the cleansing of the temple evokes the image of
the marketplace. It is not a pure chance that what differentiates Johns account
from the Synoptics is an allusion to Zechariah. On the one hand it can be an
argument for the original connexion of the narrative with the triumphal entry of
Jesus as found in the Synoptics. On the other hand it indicates the interpretative
key which opens the true meaning of Jesus act in the temple, namely the messianic character of the act reserved to the day of the Lord as expressed in the
Jewish interpretation of Zech 3:6 and 14.
Let us conclude with another piece of evidence. Mt 11:25-27//Lk 10:21-22,
have the prayer of Jesus: I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that
you hid these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to
babes. Yes, Father, because such was your good pleasure. All things have been
delivered to me by my Father, and no one knows the Son except the Father, nor
does anyone know the Father except the Son, and anyone to whom the Son
wishes to reveal him. These words of Jesus, being common to Matthew and
Luke, are widely recognised by scholars as going back to early tradition (to the
Q source, postulated by many scholars, and datable back to around A.D. 50).
What is extraordinary about them is how Johannine they are: the language of
Father and Son, the idea of knowing the Father and the Son and the idea of
revelation to Jesus followers and not to others are all concepts that are important in John. So here are these Johannine characteristics attributed to Jesus decades before Jamnia.
3.5.3. The Last Supper of Jesus, a paschal meal?
It was the merit of J. Jeremias to have put clearly the question: was the last
super of Jesus a paschal meal277? A first objection must be answered: is it possible in the context of Pesah to condemn somebody to death? The answer given
Carson (ed.), Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament, Grand Rapids MI
2009, 415-512.
275 Jerome in his Com. in Zachariam III,14 (PL 25:1540) says: Pro Chananeo Aquila interpretatus est mercatorem.
276 H.J. de Jonge, The Cleansing of the Temple in Mark 11:15 and Zechariah 14:21, in C.M.
Tuckett (ed.), The Book of Zechariah and its Influence, Aldershot 2003, 87-100.
277 J. Jeremias, Die Abendmahlsworte Jesu, Gttingen 1960, 3 ed., 8-82. See also E. Ruckstuhl, Die Chronologie des Letzten Mahles und des Leidens Jesu, Einsiedeln 1963.

182

Frdric Manns

by Jeremias was positive. Jewish halakah considered the case of a false prophet during the pilgrimages, in order to inform the whole community278. In fact we
know that Jesus was considered as a false prophet279.
Another problem arises which is linked to the differences between the Synoptics and the FG. According to the Synoptics Jesus celebrated the Jewish Passover280 , while for the FG he died at the very moment the Jews sacrificed the
paschal lamb in the temple281. Was the FG only preoccupied to present Jesus as
the real paschal lamb282? The Synoptics during the paschal meal mention the
interpretative words of Jesus in the context of a Jewish seder283.
J. Jeremias position has not be accepted by all the exegetes. G. Borkamm284
rejected the fourteen arguments of Jeremias. Since the early Church celebrated
eucharist every Sunday and not once a year it meant that the last supper of Jesus
was not a paschal meal. E. Schweizer285 preferred the Johannine chronology
instead of that of the Synoptics. Jesus celebrated a supper at night in Jerusalem,
but it does not mean that it was a paschal seder. The theological reflexion of the
early Church saw in the eucharist a new Passover (1Cor 5:7) and was responsible for the rest. P. Benoit286 was convinced that Jesus wanted to eat the Passover
meal with his disciples in order to give a new significance to the Jewish Passover. According to F. Hahn287 the farewell meal of Jesus was rapidly united to the
Passover as 1Cor 5:7 and Jn 19:36 show it.
X. Lon-Dufour288 saw in the last meal of Jesus a farewell meal which was
common in Judaism. All the arguments of J. Jeremias were abandoned. E. Galbiati289 presented another hypothesis: Jesus would have anticipated the celebration of the Passover according to the old rites, but without the immolation of the
lamb. He would have acted out of his personal authority and substituted the
eucharist to the lamb. Finally H.-J. Klauck290 preferred to come back to the helSanh 11:7; Sanh 89a.
14:67.
280 Mk 14:12-16,Mt 26:17, Lc 22:15.
281 Jn 19:14. See also Jn 18:28.
282 Jeremias, Die Abendmahlsworte, 77.
283 Jeremias, Die Abendmahlsworte, 50-55. Cf. Mishnah, Pesahim 10:4 and Ex 12.
284 G. Bornkamm, Herrenmahl und Kirche bei Paulus, NTS 2 (1955-56) 202-206.
285 E. Schweizer, Das Herrenmahl im Neuen Testament. Ein Forschungsbericht, ThLZ 79
(1954) 577-592.
286 P. Benoit, Les rcits de lInstitution de leucharistie et leur porte, in Id., Exgse et
Thologie, I, Paris 1961, 210-239.
287 F. Hahn, Die alttestamentliche Motive in der urchristlichen Abendmahlsberlieferung,
EvTh 27 (1967) 337-374.
288 X. Lon-Dufour, Le partage du pain eucharistique selon le Nouveau Testament (Parole de
Dieu), Paris 1982. There is no mention of the lamb, nor of the bitter herbs.
289 E. Galbiati, LEucaristia nella Bibbia, Milano 1982, 46-48.
290 H.-J. Klauck, Herrenmahl und hellenistischer Kult. Eine religionsgeschichtliche Untersuchung zum ersten Korintherbrief (Neutestamentliche Abhandlungen 15), Mnster 1982.
278 T.

279 Mk

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

183

lenistic milieu: the greek rite of the theophagy would explain better the Eucharistic rite.
Other authors have preferred to underline the Old Testament anticipations of
the meal. S. Aalen291 thought that Jesus would have entered the logic of the
sacrifices of the Old Testament in order to find communion with God. He wanted to fulfil the concept of covenant. For H. Schrmann292 the gesture of Jesus
had a prophetic dimension. The sign he celebrated became reality. Through his
action the disciples could participate to the death of Jesus. The gesture of Jesus
signified the gift of his life.
The hypothesis of A. Jaubert293 that Jesus would have followed the old
priestly calendar brought a new element which was discussed and accepted by
many exegetes. Jesus would have celebrated the Passover Wednesday night.
The different condemnations of Jesus would have taken place during three days.
This hypothesis is not conclusive. Another hypothesis can be proposed.
When Passover happened to fall on a Sabbath294, as it was the case for the last
Passover of Jesus, Pharisees and Sadducees were divided. Let us start quoting
the texts which are basing this hypothesis.
Flavius Josephus tells in Antiquitates Judaicae 17:2.26-31 that King Herod
the Great wanted to settle peace on the borders of his Kingdom: And now it
was that Herod, being desirous of securing himself on the side of the Trachonites,
resolved to build a village as large as a city for the Jews, in the middle of that
country, which might make his own country difficult to be assaulted, and whence
he might be at hand to make sallies upon them, and do them a mischief. Accordingly, when he understood that there was a man that was a Jew coming out of
Babylon, with five hundred horsemen, all of whom could shoot their arrows as
they rode on horse-back, and, with a hundred of his relations, had passed over
Euphrates, and now abode at Antioch by Daphne of Syria, where Saturninus,
who was then president, had given them a place for habitation, called Valatha,
he sent for this man, with the multitude that followed him, and promised to give
him land in the toparchy called Batanea, which country is bounded with Trachonitis, as desirous to make that his habitation a guard to himself. He also engaged
to let him hold the country free from tribute, and that they should dwell entirely
without paying such customs as used to be paid, and gave it him tax-free. The
name of the village was Bathyra and the chief was Zamaris.
291 S.

292 H.

1975.

Aalen, Das Abendmahl als Opfermahl im Neuen Testament, NT 6 (1963) 128-152.


Schrmann, Jesu ureigener Tod. Exegetische Besinnungen und Ausblick, Freiburg

293 A. Jaubert, La date de la Cne. Calendrier biblique et liturgie chrtienne, Paris 1957; A.
Moda, La date de la Cne: sur la thse de Mlle Annie Jaubert, Nicolaus 3 (1975) 53-116.
294 According to J. Jeremias, the 14 and 15 of Nisan could not happen during a Friday in the
years 28, 29 and 32. The years 30 and 31 seem to confirm the Johannine thesis.

184

Frdric Manns

Rabbinic Literature has many narratives of the promotion of Hillel who came
from Babylon to the rang of Patriarch after a discussion with the elders of Bathyra. The short version is found in Tosephta Pesahim 4:13-14: One time the
fourteen of Nisan coincided with the Sabbath. They asked Hillel the Elder: As
to the Passover Sacrifice does it override the prohibitions of the Sabbath? He
said to them: Now do we have only a single Passover sacrifice in the course of
the year which overrides the prohibitions of the Sabbath? We have many more
than three hundred Passover sacrifices in the year and they all override the prohibitions of the Sabbath. All the people in the courtyard ganged up on him. He
said to them: The daily whole offering is a public offering and the Passover
sacrifice is a public offering. Just as the daily whole offering is a public offering
and overrides the prohibitions of the Sabbath, so the Passover sacrifice is a
public offering and overrides the prohibitions of the Sabbath. Another matter:
In connexion with the daily whole offering Scripture states: Its season (Num
28:2 bemoado) and in connexion with Passover Scripture states: Its season
(Num 9:2 bemoado). Just as the daily whole offering in connexion with Its
season is stated, overrides the prohibitions of the Sabbath, so the Passover
sacrifice is a public offering and overrides the prohibitions of the Sabbath.
The long version is found in the Talmud of Jerusalem, Pesahim 6:1: One
time the fourteen of Nisan coincided with the Sabbath. Nobody knew if the
Passover sacrifice should override the prohibitions of the Sabbath. They said:
Here there is a Babylonian whose name is Hillel. He studied under Shemaya and
Abtalion. He can answer this question. They called him. Now do we have only
a single Passover sacrifice in the course of the year which overrides the prohibitions of the Sabbath? We have many more than three hundred Passover sacrifices in the year and they all override the prohibitions of the Sabbath. All the
people in the courtyard ganged up on him. He said to them. The daily whole
offering is a public offering and the Passover sacrifice is a public offering. Just
as the daily whole offering is a public offering and overrides the prohibitions of
the Sabbath, so the Passover sacrifice is a public offering and overrides the
prohibitions of the Sabbath. Another matter: In connexion with the daily whole
offering Scripture states: Its season (Num 28:2 bemoado) and in connexion
with Passover Scripture states Its season (Num 9:2 bemoado). Just as the
daily whole offering in connexion with Its season is stated, overrides the
prohibitions of the Sabbath, so the Passover sacrifice is a public offering and
overrides the prohibitions of the Sabbath. He gave them explanation the whole
day. They did not accept them till he said: I have received this teaching from
Shemaya and Abtalion. When they heard this, they nominated him Patriarch.
Shemaya and Abtalion are known in Rabbinic Literature as the fourth couple

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

185

of pairs, the transmitters of the oral tradition295. Even Josephus mentions the
Pharisee Pollion and his disciple Sameas in Antiquitates 15:3. Sameas was
saved when Herod the Great took power296.
After the period of the pairs, the leading teachers from Jose ben Joezer till
Hillel who stood at the head of the Sanhedrin, one as president (Nasi) and the
other as vice-president (Ab bet Din), Hillel started the period of the tannaim, the
teachers of the oral law. A discontinuity happened between those two periods.
Maybe a change of calendar. Herod the Great massacred many teachers. The
oral law probably was forgotten till Hillel gave an answer to a concrete problem
of halakah to the elders of Bathyra.
Hillels argumentation is based on the principle of gezerah shawah. When
the same expression is used in two verses of Scripture, it is permitted to apply
the same halakah to both of them. In Num 28:2 and in Num 9:2 we find the
expression bemoado: in its season for the whole offering which was presented every day and for the sacrifice of Passover. Since the whole offering is
presented in the temple even on Sabbath, so the Passover offering can be brought
even on Sabbath. So Passover can be celebrated on Sabbath and is more important than the prohibitions of the Sabbath.
The Jews of Jn 18:28 who did not enter the praetorium so that they might
not be defiled but might eat the Passover were Pharisees who had to eat the
Passover Friday night. Only the Pharisees followed the teaching of Hillel. Sadducees preferred their own interpretation. When the fourteen of Nisan coincided with a Sabbath, Pharisees ate the Passover meal Friday evening at the
beginning of the Sabbath, while the Sadducees ate it on Thursdays night.
Keeping in mind this difference it is possible to solve the problem of the
Synoptics and the FG. According to the Synoptics Jesus ate the Passover on
Thursday with the Sadducees. According to John he died on Friday when the
Pharisees started the immolation of the Passover lambs.
In this way the FG is historic. Eating the Passover with the Sadducees Jesus
wanted to signify that he was the High Priest who was offering the sacrifice of
his life.
3.6. Jesus Jewishness297
The study on the Jewish Feasts has shown that Jesus as an orthodox Jew who
frequented and prayed in the Temple as a pilgrim. The negative use of the criterion of dissimilarity as applied to Jesus continuity with early Judaism and ear1:10.
15:4.
297 This argument has been tackled by C.S. Keener, The Gospel of John, I, Peabody MA 2005,
2 ed., 171-232.
295 Abot
296 Ant.

186

Frdric Manns

ly Christianity has been criticised in recent years298. Early Christians were interested in Jesus life from the beginning299. Judaism was a pluralistic reality
before 70300. Galilee had its own halakah and its own rules301. Apocalyptic and
Wisdom movements were very strong. But most of Judaism was united on general practices and certain basic issues such as monotheism, the gift of Torah and
Israel as Gods covenant people. After 70 this diversity began to diminish in
Palestine and Pharisees gained in influence. But the FG depicts the Pharisees of
Jesus lifetime302.
First of all it has to be remembered that John was a pillar of the Jewish mission according to Gal 2:7-9. Many authors have proposed to classify Jesus
among the hasidim of Galilee who sometimes were healers and even performed
miracles303. In particular the healing Jesus did at Cana in Jn 4:46-54 has a parallel in Berakot 34b. The two narratives are similar in details304, but differ in their
298 E.P. Sanders, Jesus and Judaism, Philadelphia 1985, 16; G. Vermes, Jesus and the World
of Judaism, London 1983, 21; G.N. Stanton, The Gospels and Jesus, Oxford 1989, 161; M.J.
Borg, Conflict, Holiness and Politics in the Teaching of Jesus, New York 1984, 21; R.T. France,
The Authenticity of the Sayings of Jesus, in C. Brown (ed.), History, Criticism and Faith. Four
Exploratory Studies, Leicester, U.K. - Downers Grove IL 1976, 110-111; Meier, A Marginal Jew,
I, 173.
299 B. Chilton, Judaic Approaches to the Gospels (University of South Florida international
studies in formative Christianity and Judaism 2), Atlanta GA 1994. Jews were also interested in
the Lifes of their Fathers. See Philos expositions on Abraham; Joseph and Moses, the Liber Antiquitatum Biblicarum, the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs and Josephus treatment of Jacob,
Joseph, Samson and Saul.
300 Diaspora Jewish background, because of the parallels between the FG and Philo, has been
proposed by Keener, The Gospel of John, 175-180. Asian Judaism is known by Josephus, but it
doesnt explain the importance of the Temple and the Jewish Feasts nor the conflict with the
Synagogue. The Gospel was not written to evangelise Diaspora Jews (20:30-31). To limit the
conflict between the Jewish Christian and the other Jews to Ephesus (p. 197) and to Asia Minor
Churches doesnt respect the information we have from the Gospels. Rabbinic texts suggest that
many Jewish Christians of Palestine sought to maintain their presence in the Synagogue as part
of their solidarity with Israel (Ber 24b, Meg 4:8-9). Keener fails to distinguish here tradition and
redaction.
301 F. Manns, La Galile dans le quatrime Evangile, Antonianum 72 (1997) 351-364. Galileans turn out to be more receptive than the Judaens (1:43, 2:1, 4:3, 7:1.9). We lack evidence for
the Cynic presence in Galilee as Crossan pretends it. The FG shows how a Galilean leader would
have been received by the religious elite of Jerusalem. While finding his Davidic credentials lacking the Judaean leaders fail to note Jesus fulfilling the biblical typology of the prophet like Moses
(Deut 18:15-22) and accuse him of being insufficient in keeping the Law of Moses. Jesus in the
FG reflects the realism of 1st century C.E. Palestine. The Johannine Jesus comes across as one of
the people of the land (am ha aretz). Here we have the historical realism of the northern prophet
spurned by the southern religious leaders.
302 We have studied the value of Rabbinic Texts for Johannine study in our article: Targum and
Rabbinical Literature as a possible Background of the New Testament, in M. Vugdelija (ed.), Biblija - knjiga Mediterana par excellence. Zbornik radova s meunarodnog znanstvenog skupa
odranog od 24. do 26. rujna 2007. u Splitu (Biblioteka Knjiga Mediterana 61), Split 2010, 151-165.
303 G. Vermes, Jesus the Jew, London 1973, 69-82.
304 E.E. Urbach, The Sages, Jerusalem 1975, 112.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

187

basic aim, since the purpose of Jesus signs was to accentuate his might and
power.
Other charismatics were known in rabbinic Literature, especially Honi and
Haninah ben Dosa. This Galilean hasid was able to heal from a distance and to
announce from there an immediate cure. If my prayer is fluent in my mouth, I
know that the sick man is favoured, if not I know that the disease is fatal, used
to say Haninah. It seems that Jesus was part of the first century Galilean charismatic Judaism. As the hasidim he insisted more on deeds then on study. E.P.
Sanders prefers to see Jesus as a charismatic prophet who, as Elijah305 and Elisha
or even Isaiah306, healed occasionally307. Prophets offering signs of deliverance
would probably be understood as offering eschatological deliverance. But Judaism withheld the title prophet with the article from their contemporaries reserving the full restoration of prophecy for the end of time. But ancient categories were fluid.
The FG explains Palestinian usages, but priests, Levites, Pharisees, Elijah
and Isaiah appear after the prologue without any explanation. John deals with
Jewish issues in 2:6 (purification vessels308) and 7:22-23 (circumcision on the
Sabbath309). It means that his Gospel can not be read without some knowledge
of Judaism. We have seen that John is most interested in the sense of the Bible
as a whole, read from a christocentric perspective. His use of the OT is not dependent on the Synoptics. He communicates in a hermeneutic intelligible in his
Jewish milieu310 and uses the Targums. He reveals his Jewish interests in his
articulation of Christology. Jesus is the paschal lamb (1:29, 19:36), the king of
Israel. His cross is Jacobs ladder (1:51) and Jesus himself is the uplifted serpent
305 Elijah

was an eschatological figure as it appears in Mal 4:5 and Sir 48:10.


38:21.
307 E.P. Sanders, Jewish Law from Jesus to the Mishnah, London 1990, 3.
308 In chapters 2 to 4 the idea of purification remains fundamental. Jesus cleanses the Temple
and the debate between John the Baptists disciples and Jewish leaders from Jerusalem was about
purification. The discussion with Nicodemus is about new birth from water and Spirit. To the
Samaritan woman Jesus announces the gift of living water. Ritual baths (miqwaot) are present
everywhere in Palestine. Washings accompany Jesus miracle in 9:7. Jesus poses an alternative
form of cleansing (13:10-11, 15:3). Connections between the troubled waters of the Pool of
Bethesda and Jesus commanding the blind man to wash in the Pool of Siloam in Jn 9 illumine
the salutary character of purification issues alluded in both stories. Jesus declaring in the Temple
that from ones innermost being shall flow rivers of living water (7:38) takes a new light in this
context. Jesus offers from within what the restorative and empowering work of living water avails
from without.
309 In Jn 2:1-11 Jesus provides the wine necessary for the wedding feast celebrated on the
third day (a historical detail) alluding to Jewish traditions about God wedding Israel at Sinai or
the Torah as wine. See A. Serra, Contributi dellantica letteratura giudaica per lesegesi di Gv
2,1-12 e 19,25-27, Roma 1977.
310 He uses the typology of Isaac. See J.E. Wood, Isaac Typology in the New Testament,
NTS 14 (1967-68) 583-589.
306 Is

188

Frdric Manns

(3:14). He is the eschatological manna (6:32) and the source of water in


Ezechiels new Temple (7:37-39). He is greater than Jacob (4:12), than Abraham
and the prophets (8:53). He is the agent of Gods present creation (5:17) and the
hope for resurrection (11:25). He is the Shepherd promised by Ezechiel 34
(10:11).
There are items in the FG that are likely to be historical even if the Synoptics
do not remember them. Jesus first disciples may have been followers of John the
Baptist (Jn 1:35-42) and there is no a priori reason to reject the report of Jesus
and his disciples baptising (Jn 3:22-26). Hospitality which is characteristic of the
semitic societies is underlined in Jn 1:39, 2,1-11, 4:5-41, 12:2-9, 13:2-20 (foot
washing as a gesture of hospitality), 21:5-13. The ritual purifications (13:8-9),
the status of the Samaritans (4:9), the sabbath regulations (5:1-18) have an historical value. The saying of Jn 5:17 My Father is working still and I work has
a strong claim of authenticity because of its radical rejection of Jewish justification of the sabbath based on Gen 2:2. That Jesus regularly visited Jerusalem,
rather than merely at the time of his death as the Synoptics have it, is more realistic for an observant Jew. That the priest Annas really commanded and was the
figure pulling the strings behind the scene at Jesus trial, as the FG has it, seems
to be historical. Even the extended discourses seem to represent more plausibly
the kind of debates that Jesus had with his opponents, rather than the brief encounters of the Synoptics. Finally the Father-Son relationship was central to Jesus teachings as the FG has it.
Some material found only in the FG has parallels in the Synoptics even if it
is presented in different settings. There is a charge of demon possession made
in the Synoptics with respect to his exorcism (Mk 3:22), but in the FG it is found
with reference to his teachings (Jn 7:20, 8:48, 10:21). In both the FG and the
Synoptics Jesus distances himself from his family (Mk 3:31-35, Jn 2:4) and his
brethren fail to understand him (Mk 3:21, Jn 7:5). The table fellowship with
sinners and tax collectors of the Synoptics has no parallel in the FG, but there
is a discussion about whether Jesus is a sinner (Jn 9:16) and Jesus pronounces
forgiveness of sins (Jn 5:14). Implicit and explicit analogies are made of Jesus
as a shepherd (Lk 15:4-7, Jn 10:1-18). The idea of agency has a firm place in
the Gospel tradition (Mt 10:40, Mk 9:37, Lk 9:48, Jn 5:23, 8:19, 13:20). The
saying formulates a principle and a role of agency among persons as stated in
Jewish halakah: An agent is like the one who sent him311. The starting point
for the evolution of the terminology of birth from above is Jesus logion about
the need of becoming like children in order to enter Gods Kingdom (Mt 18:3).
311 Another rule for the practice of agency among persons is formulated in Jn 13:16: A servant is not greater than his master, nor is he who is sent greater than he who sends him. A close
parallel occurs in GenR 78: The sender is greater than the sent.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

189

The idea of rebirth was typically Jewish312. Jesus brethren appear in Jn 2:12 and
7:3 as in Mk 3:31-35, Mt 12:46, 13:55, Lk 8:19-21. During the Passion the
answer Jesus gives to Annas has the same tone as his reply to the Sanhedrin in
Lk 22:67. Moreover his omniscience (13:26, 16:19) is not absent from the Synoptics (Mt 11:27, Lk 10:22). The humanity of Jesus is stressed (4:6-7, 11:35) as
in Mk 4:35-41. Jn 12:25 has parallels in Mk 8:35, Jn 13:20 in Mt 10:40, Jn 4:35
in Mt 9:37, Jn 5:47 in Lk 16:31, Jn 13:13 in Lk 6:46, Jn 14:26 in Lk 12:12, Jn
16:32 in Mk 14:27, Jn 18:11 in Mt 26:52.
3.7. Historical value of the Johannine Discourses
Jesuss sayings in the FG are shaped by the theological ideas of the Evangelist, but some of them are derived from earlier traditions. The best example is
found in Mt 11:25-27. Even if Jesus teachings in John serve the Evangelists
interests, they are no creations by the Evangelist.
A Jewish scholar, I. Abrahams expressed the opinion that in the discourses
the FG enshrines a genuine tradition of an aspect of Jesus teaching which has
not found a place in the Synoptics313. Dodd evidenced a high regard for the
FGs saying material arguing that a number of units are traditional and show
aramaic originals. A few of them may go back to Jesus himself314. For example
Jn 10:1-5 is a fusion of two traditional parables. The current combination is
referred to as a paroimia, which could be a synonym of parabol as an alternative translation of the aramaic matlah. This evidence leads him to conclude that
the FG reaches back to primitive aramaic tradition315. The motif of Jesus departure and return in Jn 13-14 is known also in the Synoptic return parables. The
original motif was an oracular utterance of Jesus conveying the assurance that
his death meant a separation and was only temporary. The Synoptic branch of
tradition referred it to the parousia, but the Johannine tradition interpreted it as
an announce of the resurrection. Jn 16:17 suggests neither tendency and is more
primitive316.
R.E. Brown feels that the FG rests upon an independent tradition. A text like
Jn 6:16-21 is certainly more primitive than the Synoptic sources. But in the
course of the Evangelists preaching the sayings of Jesus were woven into

312 Philo,

Quaest. in Ex 2:46: Moses ascent to Sinai was a second birth.


Abrahams, Studies in Pharisaism and the Gospels, I, London 1917, 12.
314 Dodd, Historical Tradition, 335.
315 Dodd, Historical Tradition, 382-383.
316 Dodd, Historical Tradition, 418. But in the self revelatory remarks of Jesus the FG is following a convention of Greek writers.
313 I.

190

Frdric Manns

lengthly discourses much like the discourses of the personified Wisdom in the
OT. The Liturgy demanded longer explanation317.
R. Bultmann quotes among the sources of the FG the revelation-discourses,
the Offenbarungsrede318, which were written in aramaic and originated with
John the Baptists community, to which the Evangelist once belonged. Some
characteristics derive from this source including the Prologue, the I am sayings, the lifted up sayings, the Farewell discourses, the Final Prayer, the Paraclete sayings, the Son of Man sayings and the abide sayings319. The features of the discourses throw light upon an old Palestinian sayings tradition.
Since they came from the Baptist milieu, they are like the texts of the later Baptist sect of the Mandeans, who espoused a gnostic mythology. The FG historicised the revelation-discourses by working them into his portrait of Jesus life.
Bultmanns conclusion is that the FG can not be taken into account for a source
of Jesus teaching320.
B. Lindars holds a high view of the FGs traditional base321. Jn 8:35 is a
condensed parable of the slave and the son. The amen sayings indicate that John
is making use of his own stock of traditions.
A special place is reserved to the Farewell speeches among the discourses.
Chapters 13 to 16 are often considered as having a parallel construction. Some
scholars have challenged the thesis of the duplicate discourses322, others have
argued for distinct discourses offered by Jesus himself on different nights of the
Passover week323.
T. Thatcher is convinced that large units of the FGs discourses can be patterned after oral speech genres like riddles324. 38 riddles of different kinds are
present in the FG. They highlight the importance of public debate in oral cultures
where ability to resolve difficult problems was considered a mark of wisdom. A
pattern of ambiguity, misunderstanding and clarification in the Johannine dialogues leads Jesus to communicate deeper truths about himself. Jesus riddles can
317 Brown,

The Gospel According to John, I, xxxiv-xxxvii.


Bultmann, The Gospel of John: A Commentary, Oxford 1971, 161.
319 Bultmann, The Gospel of John, 16-18, 149, 266, 307, 489, 552.
320 For a criticism of Bultmanns position see D.A. Carson, Current Source Criticism of the
Fourth Gospel: Some Methodological Questions, JBL 97 (1978) 414-418.
321 B. Lindars, Discourse and Tradition: The Use of the Sayings of Jesus in the Discourses
of the Fourth Gospel, JSNT 13 (1981) 83-101.
322 J.M. Reese, Literary Structure of Jn 13:31-14:31; 16:5-6.16-33, CBQ 34 (1972) 321331. The verse 14:36 could be a quotation of Ex 33:1, since the Book of Exodus inspired many
passages of the Farewell speech.
323 B. Witherington, III, Johns Wisdom. A Commentary on the Fourth Gospel, Louisville KY
1995, 244.
324 T. Thatcher, The Riddles of Jesus in John. A Study in Tradition and Folklore (SBL MS 53),
Atlanta GA 2000. The same author insisted upon oral tradition in his book: Jesus, the Voice and
the Text. Beyond the Oral and the Written Gospels, Waco TX 2008.
318 R.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

191

only be answered by those who have a special knowledge. The recognition that
many Johannine dialogues are riddles raises serious questions about the development approach which sees the FG as the product of a long process of composition.
The FGs discourses as riddle sessions evidence a high degree of structural unity.
Seven riddles are held together in the farewell speeches325:
1. You are all clean, but not all of you (13:10), Confusion (13:11), Answer
(13:12-20).
2. One of you will betray me (13:21), Confusion (13:24), Answer (13:26-32).
3. Where I am going you can not come (13:33), Confusion (13:36-37), Answer
(13:38-14:3).
4. You know the way where I am going (14:4), Confusion (14:5), Answer (14:6).
5. Now you know him and have seen him (14:7), Confusion (14:8), Answer
(14:9-18).
6. A little while and the world will no longer see me (14:19), Confusion (14:22),
Answer (14:23-16:15).
7. A little while and you will no longer see me and again a little while and you
will see me (16:16), Confusion (16:17-18), Answer (16:19-28), Understanding (16:29-30), Prayer (17:1-26).
Some authors are more critical326. E.P. Sanders is convinced that a prophetic
involvement can be verified in the Johannine sayings material327. Substantial
portions of the Johannine discourses were composed prophetically as 1Cor 14
confirmed it for the Corinth community. Inspired by the Spirit some writers
reformulated the words of Jesus in the context of the communitys charismatic
worship328. But in fact there is no certain evidence that the discourses emanated
from a Christian prophet329. The Paraclete served to bring to remembrance Jesus sayings according to Jn 14:26. Although this included interpretation, it
grounded the Paracletes revelation of Jesus in real history. In fact, the discourses of the FG do not present themselves as prophecies. Written and oral
collection existed330. Memorisation can be checked in the literary structures and
325 Thatcher,

The Riddles of Jesus in John, 202-203.


Fortna, The Fourth Gospel and its Predecessor. From Narrative Source to Present
Gospel, Philadelphia 1988, 7. The FGs discourses are largely Johannine compositions. D. Moody
Smith, The Setting and Shape of a Johannine Narrative Source, NTS 21 (1974-75) 222-248:
The discourses are spoken from the standpoint of a spirit-inspired post-resurrection community.
327 E.P. Sanders, The Historical Figure of Jesus, New York 1993, 71.
328 D. Moody Smith, Johannine Christianity. Essays on its Setting, Sources and Theology,
Columbia SC 1984, 30; Aune, The Cultic Setting, 101.
329 D. Hill, New Testament Prophecy (Marshalls theological library), London 1979, 169.
330 R.A. Culpepper, The Johannine School. An Evaluation of the Johannine School Hypothesis Based on an Investigation of the Nature of Ancient Schools, Missoula MT 1975, 193. For
Urbach, The Sages, 305, oral law took precedence over and was more precious than Scripture in
later sources. G. Segalla, Ges di Nazaret fondamento storico del racconto evangelico giovanneo, Teologia 1 (2004) 14-42, also recognises an oral tradition behind the discourses of the FG.
326 R.

192

Frdric Manns

in parallelism331. Disciples of Jesus learned and transmitted his teachings no less


carefully than most ancient disciples transmitted the wisdom of their masters332.
Even more, the gospel of Mark admits that the teaching of Jesus had two
levels: after speaking to the crowds Jesus explained his teachings to the disciples
in the house. That the FG composed the discourses without any historical basis
is unlikely. He believed that his interpretative activity was inspired by the Paraclete who was to guide the community to the truth according to Jn 16:13-15, as
he guided the OT prophets.
It is significative that Johns discourses often interpret the events they accompany. They function as speeches in ancient narratives did: they provide the
writers clues to the meaning of the historical narrative. Such interpretative
amplification did not violate the protocols of ancient history writings333. John
uses a simple language but uses also enigmas because of their levels of meaning.
Accuracy in reporting the substance does not suggest anything in the nature of
a verbatim transcript. Ancient readers never expected it. Liberties in wording
were accepted. Ancient authors relied on their memories to arrange information.
Since John regards Jesus teaching as authoritative and does not use it merely
for rhetorical purpose, it is likely that he would preserve it where it was possible.
That he had access to Jesus teaching is confirmed by occasional overlap with
Synoptic material even if he remains independent from them.
Only Jesus reports lengthy interchanges between himself and the Jerusalem
leaders. Historically these discussions can have taken place especially during
the Passion week. Some teachings are also directed towards the disciples. Private instruction is historical as it results from the rabbis teachings334.
The task of separating Johannine construction in the discourses from genuine
tradition is difficult. Yet it is not a hopeless job, especially where sayings resembling Synoptic utterances are embedded. In Jn 12:25 the sentence: He who
loves his life loses it and he who hates his life on this world will keep it for
eternal life has a parallel in Mk 8:35: For whoever would save his life will
lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospels will save it. Jn
13:16: A servant is not greater than his master, nor is he who is sent greater
than he who sent him has a parallel in Mt 10:24: A disciple is not above his
teacher, nor the servant above his master. While the Synoptics follow the semitic method in their treatment of the words of Jesus, the FG prefers the targumic paraphrase and explanation which was accepted in the Synagogue.
331 Josephus,

Life 8; Against Apion 1:60.


Witherington, III, The Christology of Jesus, Minneapolis MN 1990, 181. Jesus disciples were already communicating his teaching during his lifetime.
333 See the speeches in Josephus Jewish War which reflect his own style and communicate
his own perspective.
334 See 4 Ezra 14:45-47, T. Hag 2:1, Pes 119a, GenR 8:9.
332 B.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

193

An apparently unique feature of Jesus speech is the prefatory amen335.


The double form could have a liturgical origin336. Whether Jesus prefaced some
of his utterances with amen and others with amen, amen is not impossible.
Repetitions in the vocatives are common in the New Testament and in Jewish
Literature. Since the FG is independent from the Synoptics his tradition is not
necessarily later than theirs. In Jn 12:15 which quotes Zech 9:9 in a shorter form
than Mt 21:5, the FG and the Synoptics draw independently from a testimony
of the pre-canonical tradition. The same can be said about Jn 12:40 which quotes
Is 6:10 in a different way than Mt 13:14 and Acts 28:25-27.
Different views have been put forward for Jesus discourses from radical to
conservative. J. Taylor has presented five views of ancient scholars in this regard337. Renans characterisation of the theology of Jesus discourses in the FG
as gnostics is no longer accepted338.
Keener, in his commentary of the FG, underlines Jewish imagery and perplexing phrases found in the Farewell Discourses which are the revelation of
the Father and the Paraclete, the Spirit of truth339.
An argument against the historicity of the dialogues is that they follow a set
pattern. Jesus speaks obscurely. His listeners misunderstand him. He does not
explain, but makes a further affirmation. The picture is in fact more varied than
that. Some misunderstandings are not cleared up by Jesus (2:22, 7:35, 8:22,
12:29). Many requests for enlightenment are answered by Jesus (6:34-41, 13:36,
14:5, 14:8, 14:22, 16:29). Finally there are also other types of misunderstanding
(10:6, 12:16, 13:28). The opponents of Jesus often wilfully misunderstand him.
The pattern pointed out is a part of a literary device, but it represents a historical
reality. Lack of understanding on part of the disciples is a theme orchestrated in
the Gospel of Mark.
The real analogy for the Johannine discourse is the preaching of the Prophets, especially of Jeremiah. The life of Jeremiah bears some comparison to that
of Jesus and it revolves around the welcome or the refusal given to his words
spoken on behalf of God. His biography flows from his prophetic mission and
his discourses have a biographical character. John is a simple man who retells
and reproduces what he has seen and heard.
335 D. Daube, The New Testament and Rabbinic Judaism (Jordan Lectures in Comparative
Religion 2), London 1956, 388-393.
336 See also LAB 22:6, 26:5. The double amen in the FG frequently reflect historical material and often core sayings that generate the dialogue which follows.
337 J. Taylor, The Johannine Discourses and the Speech of Jesus. Five Views, Scripture
Bulletin 14 (1984) 33-41.
338 Renan, Vie de Jsus, 69.
339 Keener, The Gospel of John, II, 930-1049. John draws upon Wisdom for his portrayal of
Jesus and also for his portrayal of the Paraclete. Personified Wisdom imagery plays an important
role in the FG.

194

Frdric Manns

In fact there was a Jewish practice of preserving the ipsissima verba of wise
men and Rabbis. The literature of the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs was
well known in the Jewish milieu. Even to those familiar with the Greek literary
conventions nothing could have been more obvious than to place his own message in the lips of ones Master, as Plato did for Socrates. John stands at the
meeting point of Greek and Jewish tradition.
John was a witness, as he underlines it. He tried to bring out the fullness of
meaning of Jesus sayings he meditated for years. John is not a mystic in the line
of Plato, but a prophet in the line of Jeremiah. The sources of many passages in
the discourses lie in a tradition of sayings of Jesus which was independent from
the Synoptics.
3.8. Archaeology as a confirmation of Historicity of the FG
The FG is well known as the most historical one and the most theological340.
There is apparently a contradiction: the real cult must be celebrated in Spirit and
Truth according to Jn 4:21-23, but Jesus with his disciples comes to Jerusalem
to celebrate the Jewish feasts in the Temple. He seems to admit holy places and
sacred times as all religions do.
The FG does not know places such as Chorozain, Nain, the Decapolis, Gadara, Caesarea Philippi, but mentions Cana and Tiberias. Some of the places
occur elsewhere than in the FG, such as Nazareth, Capernaum, Betsaida and
Golgotha. But the FG traditions are independent from those of the Synoptics.
Our intention is to present a short summary of the recent archaeological work
done to prove the historicity of the FG. Archaeology must be illuminated by the
literary sources341. We voluntarily leave aside the excavations of the southern
part of the Jerusalem temple made by B. Mazar342, the excavations of the Herodian quarter made by N. Avigad343 and those of Golgotha made by V. Corbo344.
340 J.B. Higgins, The Historicity of the Fourth Gospel, London 1960; P.N. Anderson, Aspects
of Historicity in the Gospel of John: Implications for Investigations of Jesus and Archaeology,
in J.H. Charlesworth (ed.), Jesus and Archaeology, Grand Rapids MI 2006, 587-618.
341 J.H. Charlesworth, Jesus within Judaism. New Light from Exciting Archaeological Discoveries, London 1989; Anderson, Aspects of Historicity in the Gospel of John; J.H. Charlesworth, Pour savoir ce qutait Jrusalem avant sa destruction, il faut lire Jean, Le Point 1
(2008-2009) 24-25.
342 E. Mazar - B. Mazar, Excavations in the South of the Temple Mount. The Ophel of Biblical
Jerusalem (Qedem 29), Jerusalem 1989. John knew that Solomons portico was an ideal shelter
from the cold winter blasts (Jn 10:22-23). In Jn 1:51 the new reading of Jacobs ladder provides
a new theology of the Temple. S. Safrai, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem at the End of the Second
Temple Period, in H. van Praag (ed.), Studies on the Jewish Background of the New Testament,
Assen 1969, 12-21.
343 N. Avigad, Excavations in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City 1969-1971, in Y. Yadin
(ed.), Jerusalem Revealed, Jerusalem 1975, 41-51.
344 V. Corbo, Il Santo Sepolcro di Gerusalemme. Aspetti archeologici dalle origini al periodo

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

195

A whole book would not be sufficient to summarize them. We also ignore the
historicity of persons like Nicodemus studied recently by Z. Safrai345 and
Bauckham346. It means that our study is restricted.
A few words must be said about the stone vessels mentioned in Jn 2:6 and in
the Mishnah tractate Kelim. This major datum goes back to Jesus time347 and
was discovered in many places of Galilee. We limit ourselves to the study of the
two cities of Bethany, the two pools of Jerusalem, mount Garizim and Capernaum, places mentioned in the FG. But very few exegetes take into consideration the archaeological data, and remain on the literary level.
3.8.1. Two places called Bethany
Excavations made during the year 1996 in Bethany beyond the Jordan in
preparation for the great Jubilee348 confirmed the historicity of the place.
Jn 1:28 mentions the locality: These things took place in Bethany beyond
the Jordan, where John was baptising. Jn 10:40-42 repeats the same information: Then Jesus went back across the Jordan to the place where John had been
baptising in the early days. Here he stayed and many people came to him. They
said, Though John never performed a miraculous sign, all that John said about
this man was true. And in that place many believed in Jesus.
Jn 3:22-4:2 portrayed Jesus as baptising in Judaea; along with John the Baptist, as it appears, and before Johns arrest. There is no hint of this baptising
ministry of Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels: they merely describe Jesus as being
baptised by John, and then starting to minister in Galilee after Johns arrest. The
passage of the FG looks strongly like an independent information that John got
about Jesus, and could be a plausible information. It contains snippets of topographical information: thus John speaks of the Baptist baptising in Aenon, near
crociato (SBF. Collectio maior 29), 3 vols, Jerusalem 1981-1982. We only mention the archaeological proof of the crucifixion from Giveat Mivtar published by J. Zias in the Israel Exploration
Journal 35 (1985) 22-27.
345 Z. Safrai, Naqdimon b. Guryon: A Galilean Aristocrat, in J. Pastor - M. Mor (ed.), The
Beginnings of Christianity. A Collection of Articles, Jerusalem 1997, 293-314. Other names as
Malchus in Jn 18:10 fit the historical event. Perhaps the FG provides a reliable tradition that
contains history.
346 R. Bauckham, Nicodemus and the Gurion Family, JTS 47 (1996) 1-37; Id., The Bethany Family in John 11-12. History or Fiction, in Anderson et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and History,
II, 185-203, offers some thoughtful reasons why we should not ignore Lazarus in spite of the silence of the Synoptics.
347 P. Richardson, Khirbet Qana (and other villages) as a Context for Jesus, in Charlesworth
(ed.), Jesus and Archaeology, 120-144.
348 The Identification of Bethany Beyond the Jordan, in J.C. Laney, Selective Geographical
Problems in the Life of Christ (Doctoral Dissertation, Dallas Theological Seminary, 1977); R.
Riesner, Bethany beyond the Jordan (John 1:28). Topography, Theology and History in the
Fourth Gospel [The Tyndale NT Lecture 1986], TynB 38 (1987) 29-63.

196

Frdric Manns

Salim, because there was much water. Johns story of Jesus baptising alongside
the Baptist seems unlikely to have been invented by the evangelist, since it
makes Jesus appear like John, even perhaps a disciple of John. It is quite clear
that the writer of Johns Gospel wanted to avoid any such impression, since he
goes out of his way to have the Baptist affirming Jesus superiority; but the way
he does so gives weight to the suggestion that the early church had some problems with the followers of John the Baptist who claimed that he, the baptiser
who came first, was greater than Jesus, the baptised who came second. The
Christians therefore insisted on the superiority of Jesus. Johns account suggests
that the Churchs baptism was not something new for them, but the continuation
of something that Jesus himself had started at the beginning of his ministry.
In Jn 3:30, when people ask him about the competition that Jesus seems to
represent, the Baptist says: He must increase, but I must decrease. The most
striking verse in this connection is 1:20, where John has been asked who he is,
and he confessed, he did not deny, but confessed, I am not the Christ. Notable here are the terms of Johns denial and also the way the denial is emphasized
by the evangelist. Thus he confessed, he did not deny, he confessed. The reason the FG writes in these terms is probably because people were claiming that
John the baptiser was greater than Jesus the baptised. They were arguing that
John had the greater claim to being the Messiah: they recalled that Jesus worked
alongside John baptising in Judaea, and maintained that he was Johns disciple.
The synoptics may have been sufficiently embarrassed by this period in Jesus
ministry simply to jump over it; but John is bolder, recording the parallel ministry, in the process making it very clear that Jesus was recognised by John as
the far greater one.
The reference to Bethany beyond the Jordan river is intended to distinguish
it from the other Bethany located on the slope of the Mount of Olives which is
mentioned in Jn 11:1, 12:1. The location of this village is confirmed by John,
who visited it, as it appears from Jn 12:18: Now Bethany was near Jerusalem,
about two miles off.
a) Bethany beyond the Jordan
A long tradition from the Byzantine period onwards located the place of
Johns baptism not far away from the east bank of the Jordan river, north of
where it flows into the Dead Sea.
Immediately after his baptism Jesus went to the desert to be tempted by
Satan (Lk 4:1-13). This affirmation confirms the site in the Jordan valley. The
obvious location of the wilderness would be the desert of Judaea around Jericho.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

197

Archaeological Evidence
More than twenty remains of churches, caves and baptismal pools dating from
the Roman and Byzantine periods have been discovered in the 1996 excavations.
The place where John baptised is known as Wadi Kharrar.
It keeps also the memory of the ascension of Elijah into heaven (2Kgs 2:6-12)
at a hill called Tell Mar Elias. As Elijah was walking along with his disciple Elisha,
suddenly a chariot of fire and horses of fire appeared and separated the two of
them, and Elijah went up to heaven in a whirlwind.
Jn 1:25-28 seems to have known this tradition: Now some Pharisees who had
been sent questioned him: Why then do you baptise if you are not the Christ, nor
Elijah, nor the Prophet?. I baptise with water, John replied, but among you
stands one whom you do not know. He is the one who comes after me, the thong
of whose sandal I am not worthy to untie. This happened at Bethany beyond the
Jordan, where John was baptising.
Taking into account some pre-1948 information and the early pilgrims accounts, Jordanian archaeologists discovered the site. Five baptismal pools from
the Roman and Byzantine periods, a Byzantine monastery, many Byzantine
churches (some of them with mosaics and Greek inscriptions), caves of monks
and hermits, and a small hostel for pilgrims came to light. These discoveries have
led the scholars to conclude that this was the place called Bethany beyond the
Jordan, where John baptised Jesus.
Tell Mar Elias
Ruins of three churches, three caves and three pools, reachable by a wooden
bridge, were found in a small hill. Starting on the west side, a cave forms the apse
of a small Byzantine church, with apses. A few fragments of a mosaic floor were
found.
Northwest of this area the ruins of a larger Byzantine church can be seen. Built
into the apse a black stone commemorates the chariot of fire that took Elijah into
heaven. The mosaic floor includes a Greek inscription dating it to the 6th century.
Two Roman pools are visible on the northeastern side of the hill. A deep well
was added. Around the tell a large rectangular pool, plastered on the bottom, can
be seen. Four steps lead into it. Probably the two pools were used for collective
baptisms.
A few meters from a modern arch, the foundations of a large rectangular building that has been presented as a prayer hall, with fragments of a mosaic floor, are
still there.
Also nearby a system of water channels, pools, a well and a large plastered

198

Frdric Manns

cistern have been discovered. Water was channeled to these pools from several
kilometres away in order to permit the ceremonies of baptism.
From Tell Mar Elias it is possible to go to the southern side of Wadi Kharrar,
which passes several Byzantine sites as it turns west towards the Jordan river.
About 500 m west of the tell, a complex of hermits cells has been discovered.
Nearby the large Baptism pool a building which could be a pilgrims hostel was
excavated.
A deep plain, called in arabic the zor, is flanking the river Jordan on both
sides. Steps provide access to two Byzantine hermits caves. One of them also
has three apses.
A path leads into the ruins of the 7th-century Church of John the Baptist. The
original altar and a mosaic floor, which was placed on top of an arch to prevent
flooding, are still visible. The support pillars of the arch lie on the north side of
the church. A marble fragment inscribed IOY BATT was discovered in the
church, confirming its dedication to John the Baptist. A Byzantine marble stairway leads from the apse of the church to the spring of John the Baptist.
Literary Sources
Many literary sources confirm this tradition. The first historical mention of
this site is made in the writings of the anonymous Pilgrim of Bordeaux who
wrote in 333 A.D. and affirmed that Jesus was baptised five Roman miles north
of the Dead Sea, which is in fact the place where Wadi Kharrar flows into the
Jordan river.
Theodosius was the first pilgrim to mention the church at the Jordan river, built
at the end of the 5th century by the Emperor Anastasius to commemorate John the
Baptist. Built on arcades and square in shape, the church had a marble column
with an iron cross marking the spot where the people thought that Jesus had been
baptised.
Pilgrims from the 5th till the 7th centuries mentioned churches in the lower
Jordan river region commemorating the baptism of Christ.
Arculf during the seventh century saw the ruins of the church at this spot on
the east bank, a wooden cross in the river, and steps leading into the water from
the west bank. Another nearby chapel was said to have marked the spot where
Jesus cloths were kept while he was being baptised. Byzantine icons depict the
angels keeping Jesus cloths during his baptism.
Archaeological evidence and literary sources confirm each other.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

199

b) Bethany near Jerusalem


Archaeological Evidence
Bethany near Jerusalem was excavated by the american archaeologist S.
Saller349 during the years 1949-1953. He discovered the Byzantine and the Crusader Churches with their mosaics in the Arab village called Azarieh. He also
revealed Lazarus tomb under the nearby mosque. The village seems to be very
old. Iron Age jars has been found in tombs located in the garden of the Combonian Sisters. Most recently in the property of the Passionist Fathers remains of
several houses and ritual baths from the Roman Period were found, while digging for the construction of the separation wall between Israel and Palestine.
From the early Christian period a Jewish bath (miqweh) transformed into a
place of prayer with inscriptions and crosses has been discovered nearby in the
property of the French Sisters of Charity in 1969.
Bethany was a small village on the southeastern slope of the Mount of Olives, less than two miles from Jerusalem. It was situated on the edge of the
wilderness of Judaea, on the hills descending eastward to the Dead Sea. It dates
at least from the Roman times, and nearby an Iron Age settlement that is believed to be the biblical Ananiah (Neh 11:32) has been discovered.
Literary Sources
Bethany was the home of Jesus friends, Martha, Mary and Lazarus. Apparently, He and His disciples visited their home when they came to Jerusalem for
the Jewish feasts.
When Lazarus fell ill, his sisters sent for Jesus, whom they knew to be in the
Jordan valley. Jesus intentional delay brought Him and His disciples to Bethany
four days after Lazarus had been buried. This delay was planned for Jesus to prepare his own disciples to accept the faith into the resurrection.
When He arrived in Bethany, He accompanied Martha and Mary to Lazarus
tomb. He ordered that the stone be taken away from the tomb and cried: Lazarus
come forth! The dead came out alive! The news of this miracle spread instantly
to nearby Jerusalem. It was this miracle (John calls it a sign) that hurried the Sanhedrins plan to put Jesus to death (Jn 11:45-54).
A week before his death, Mary anointed Jesus feet in the home of Simon the
leper in Bethany (Jn 12:2-11). A great multitude came to see Lazarus himself. The

349 S.J. Saller, Excavations at Bethany (1949-1953) (SBF. Collectio maior 12), Jerusalem
1957, reprinted 1982.

200

Frdric Manns

reaction of the leaders was rapid: they took counsel that they might put Lazarus
to death (Jn 12:9-11).
Eusebius of Caesarea and the Pilgrim of Bordeaux (333) mention the tomb of
Lazarus in a crypt. Jerome recorded later visiting the Tomb of Lazarus as the guest
room of Mary and Martha, which is the Lazarium mentioned by the pilgrim Egeria
in her account of the liturgy on Saturday in the seventh week of Lent: Everyone
arrives at the Lazarium, which is Bethany by the time they arrive there, many
people have gathered that they fill not only the Lazarium itself, but all the fields
around. This structure known as the Lazarium was destroyed in an earthquake
and was replaced by a larger Church of St Lazarus in the 6th century. The church
was mentioned by Theodosius before 518 and by Arculf around 680, and survived
intact until the Crusader times350.
3.8.2. The two pools of Jerusalem: Bethesda and Siloam
a) Bethesdas pool
Archaeological Evidence
In the excavations conducted in the 19th century, Schick discovered a large
tank situated about 100 feet north-west of St Annes Church, which he claimed
was the Pool of Bethesda. Father Cr a White Father continued the excavations
in the property of St Annes near Lions Gate351 in 1956. Remains of a small
crusader Church were visible on top of the pool. Ruins of a twin pool came to
light. The pool supplied water to the temple during the period of the first and
second temple. In the Old Testament references to the upper pool, could have
been the name of the northern pool (Is 7:3, 2Kgs 18:17). The FG describes the
pool as having five porches, which were excavated at the site. Another pool with
five porches has been discovered since in the Hasmonean Jericho.

350 During the Crusades, King Fulk and Queen Melisanda built a large Benedictine monastery
dedicated to Mary and Martha, and repaired the old church of Lazarus. She also built a new west
church to St Lazarus over his tomb and fortified the monastic complex with a tower. After the fall
of the Crusader kingdom in 1187, the Benedictines left the place. The village seems to have been
abandoned thereafter. In 1384, a mosque had been built on the site. In the 16th century, another
mosque was built in the Crusader vault, which made Christian access to the tomb more difficult.
However, the Franciscans were permitted to cut a new entrance on the north side of the tomb and
at some point the original entrance from the mosque was blocked. In 1952-55 a new Franciscan
church was built over the Byzantine church of St Lazarus and the Crusader church of Mary and
Martha. In 1965, a Greek church was built west of the Tomb of Lazarus.
351 A. Duprez, Jsus et les dieux gurisseurs. propos de Jean, V (Cahiers de la Revue Biblique 12), Paris 1970.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

201

Next to the pools were baths and a healing centre. These baths are probably
the site of the healing miracle of Jesus mentioned in Jn 5:1-9.
The first pool of the Bethesda reservoir was based on a dam that collected
rain water flowing in the valley and stored it in a natural lake. Then the waters
were directed from the lake to the temple of Solomon in an open channel.
In the 3 century B.C. a second pool was added to increase the water capacity for the temple. The two pools were connected with a central portico that
separated the pools in the centre, splitting them to a northern and southern pool.
This central dike is still visible. Around the pools many columns found during
the excavations formed a protection for those who came there. The area of the
twin pools was large: 120 m by 50 m and 15 m deep.
Herod the Great constructed a new water system at the north of Bethesda,
making the twin pools obsolete. Herod Agrippa in 44 A.D. constructed a new
wall, which blocked the water entirely, and so the pools got another use.
Later, maybe during the period of Emperor Hadrian, the area of the pools was
expanded and turned into a popular healing centre. The Romans erected, in the
south-east side of the pools, a temple dedicated to Asclepius352. Many votive objects came to light during the excavations. They can be seen in the Museum of the
White Fathers near Lions gate.
Until the 5th century the area was used as a baths centre, and its waters were
famous for its healing powers, and were the source of its name Beth-Hesda the
house of the graceful waters. The site was also named sheep pool, because the
sheep that were sacrificed in the temple had to be washed before being sacrificed.
Literary Sources
The FG tells about the miraculous healing of a paralysed man by Jesus,
which was bathing in the waters among a multitude of invalid people: After
this there was a feast of the Jews; and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. Now there is
at Jerusalem by the sheep market a pool, which is called in the Hebrew tongue
Bethesda, having five porches And a man was there, which had an infirmity
thirty and eight years. Jesus healed him: Rise, take up thy bed, and walk. And
immediately the man was made whole, and took up his bed, and walked.
Eusebius of Caesarea (265-340) called the pool the pool of the sheep and called
it Beth-Zata. The Pilgrim of Bordeaux and Cyril of Jerusalem mention the place.
When Juvenal was Patriarch of Jerusalem (422-458), a large basilica (45
m x 18 m) was constructed in the area of the pools. It was supported by seven
arches, and was built over the dike and the pools. It was dedicated to St Mary
of the Probatic. The church also appears on the 6th century Madaba map.
352 The

Greek God of medicine.

202

Frdric Manns

b) The pool of Siloam


Archaeological Evidence
Modern excavations have permitted to rediscover the authentic Siloam
pool353. Till recently pilgrims were shown a very small artificial pool at the
exit of Hezekias tunnel close to the place where the well known Siloam inscription, which has been dated to Hezekias reign, was found. The inscription
records the construction of the tunnel during the 8th century B.C. This earliest
known Hebrew inscription of any length was accidentally discovered near the
lower end of the Siloam aqueduct in 1880, and published by Schick. It was not
an official inscription, and consequently there is no kingly name and no date,
but the prevalent view is that it was made by the people who did Hezekias work
(2Kgs 20:20). Unfortunately this inscription was violently removed from its
place. The fragments have been collected and are now put together in the Istanbul archaeological museum.
During the 5th century a church was built, probably by the empress Eudoxia,
at this place, to commemorate the miracle of Jesus healing a blind man (Jn 9).
The pilgrim Antonius Martyr (570 A.D.) mentions it. The Persians in 614 destroyed the Church. Bliss and Dickie excavated it.
During the Autumn of 2004, workers repairing a sewer near the present day
pool uncovered stone steps, and R. Reich and E. Shukron were called on the
place; it very quickly became obvious to them that the steps were a part of the
Roman pool. Excavations started and confirmed the initial hypothesis; the discovery was announced on August 2005. Since the place belongs to the Greek
orthodox Church, excavations are stopped for the time being.
A wide paved square and two long segments of the stone paved and stepped
road which led from the pool towards the Temple Mount were found. It led the
people who gathered around the pool to the Temple Mount. At the same time,
the main drainage system was constructed here.
Literary Sources
The pool is probably the lower pool referred to in Is 22:9, the waters of
which Hezekiah stopped. The waters of Siloam are referred to in Is 8:5-6: Because this people have refused the waters of Siloam that go gently, now
353 H. Shanks, The Siloam Pool where Jesus Cured the Blind Man, BAR 31:5 (SeptemberOctober 2005) 16-23; U.C. von Wahlde, The Pool of Siloam: The Importance of the New Discoveries for Our Understanding of Ritual Immersion in late Second Temple Judaism and the
Gospel of John, in Anderson et alii (ed.), John, Jesus and History, II, 155-174.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

203

therefore, behold, the Lord is bringing up against them the waters of the River,
mighty and many, the King ofAssyria.
The contrast between the little stream flowing from the Gihon and the great
Euphrates is used as a figure of the difference between the apparent strength of
the little kingdom of Judah and the House of David on the one hand, and the might
of Rezin and Remalias son. Although it is quite probable that in those days there
was an open streamlet in the valley, yet the meaning of Siloam, sent or conducted, rather implies an artificial channel. There is also archaeological evidence
that some of the waters of Gihon were at that time conducted by a rock-cut aqueduct along the side of the Kidron valley. It was not, however, till the days of
Hezekiah that the great tunnel aqueduct was made (2Kgs 20:20). Hezekiah also
stopped the upper spring of the waters of Gihon, and brought them, straight down
on the west side of the City of David (2Ch 32:30). Probably the exit of the water
at Gihon was entirely covered up and the water flowed through the tunnel and
merged in the pool made for it near the mouth of the Tyropeon valley.
This pool is also probably described as the Pool of Shelah in Neh 3:15: a pool
lying between the Fountain Gate and the Kings Garden. It may also be the
kings pool of Neh 2:14. If we were in any doubt regarding the position of the
pool of Siloam, the explicit statement of Josephus354 would make us sure: the
fountain, which was a plentiful spring of sweet water, was at the mouth of the
Tyropeon.
3.8.3. Mount Garizim
Archaeological Evidence
Ruins still exist at the top of Garizim, even if access to Samaria remained
problematic for a long time. A wall around the octagonal church built in the 5th
century, can be seen, as can portions of the former castle. In the centre of the
plateau a smooth surface, containing a hollow, is considered by the Samaritans
as a portion of their former temple.
A substantial archaeological survey was made in the middle of the 20th century, while the site was under the administration of Jordan in the area of the
mountain known as Tell el-Ras, situated on the northern peak at the end of the
northern ridge. This excavation, which continued under Israels jurisdiction,
uncovered corinthian columns, a large rectangular platform (65 m x 44 m) surrounded by 2 m thick and 9 m high walls, and an 8 m wide staircase leading
down from the platform to an esplanade of marble. The complex also has a series of cisterns in which Roman ceramics were found. The excavations, now
354 War

V, iv, 1.

204

Frdric Manns

named Structure A, have been dated to the time of Emperor Hadrian, because of
numismatics and external evidence and are believed to be a temple dedicated to
the God Zeus.
Underneath these remains a large stone structure built on top of the bedrock
was found. This structure, known as Structure B, nearly half cubic, consists almost entirely of limestone slabs, fitted together and has no internal rooms or
dividing walls. It was surrounded by a courtyard similar to the platform above
it, and was dated to the Hellenic era by ceramics found in a cistern cut into the
bedrock. The archaeologists considered Structure B to be the altar built by the
Samaritans in the 5th or 6th century B.C.
Recently Y. Magen355 continued the excavations under the Byzantine church
built by Eudoxia and discovered there the ruins of an ancient temple of the Samaritans. Many Samaritan inscriptions were found and published in the book:
Early Christianity in Context (Jerusalem 1993). Even Samaritan synagogues
were found in the area.
Literary Sources
After the end of the Babylonian exile a schism between Samaritans and Jews
occurred regarding Mount Garizim as the holy place chosen by God according
to Book of Deuteronomy. Subsequently, the Samaritans built a temple there,
arguing that this was the location of the Israelite temple which had been destroyed probably in the 5th or 4th century B.C. Though it had been destroyed
by his time, the historian Josephus affirms that the temple on Garizim was
similar to the one in Jerusalem, and that it was surrounded by fortifications.
The religious tension between Jews and Samaritans lead to the destruction
of the temple by J. Hyrcanus in the 2nd century B.C. according to Josephus.
However, the mountain continued to be the holy place of the Samaritans, as it
is mentioned in the FG. Coins from Nablus included within their design a depiction of the temple; surviving coins from this mint, dated to 138-161 C.E., show
a huge temple complex, statues, and a staircase leading from Nablus to the
temple itself. Mount Garizim is one of the two mountains in the vicinity of the
city of Nablus, and forms the southern side of the valley in which Nablus is
located, Mount Ebal being on the northern side.
The mountain is sacred to the Samaritans who regard it as having been the
place chosen by God for the temple. It continues to be the centre of Samaritan
355 Y. Magen, Mount Garizim and the Samaritans, The Samaritan Sarcophagi, Qedumim, A Samaritan Site of the Roman-Byzantine Period, The Ritual Baths (Miqvaot) at Qedumim and the Observance of Ritual Purity Among the Samaritans, Samaritan Synagogues, in
F. Manns - E. Alliata (ed.), Early Christianity in Context. Monuments and Documents (SBF. Collectio maior 38), Jerusalem 1993, reprinted 2002.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

205

religion to this day, and most of the population of Samaritans live in the proximity to Garizim. The Passover is celebrated by the Samaritans on Mount Garizim,
and it is also considered as the location of the sacrifice of Abrahams son.
3.8.4. Capernaum
Archaeological Evidence
Remains of the synagogue were identified in 1838 by Watzinger and Kohl
as Capernaum, even if the name of the city has not yet be found in any inscription. The site was bought by the Franciscans at the end of the 19th century. They
conducted excavations, mainly of the synagogue and of the octagonal church
south of it between 1968 and 1972, and in 1978-2000. The synagogue was partially restored356. The Jewish archaeologist Tsapheris conducted also excavations in the area of the Greek Orthodox Church and published the results of it.
Capernaum was founded during the Hellenistic period. During Jesus ministry in Galilee, it was a large village. In the late Roman and Byzantine periods it
became a prosperous town along the shore of the Sea of Galilee. The inhabitants
were fishermen, farmers and workers in the glass industry. A Roman milestone
with an inscription from the period of the Emperor Hadrian attests to the main
highway (via maris) passing near the village. The via maris linked Galilee with
Damascus. Recent excavations in Magdala have discovered an old synagogue
dated before 70 and the harbour of the city. Bottles of perfume found there have
been carefully studied. Many coins from Tyre and Sidon have been discovered
in the city. The results have been published in Liber Annuus 2009. Literary
sources are known, especially from Josephus, and give a lot of details of the city.
The old houses of Capernaum were arranged in insulae (areas) with streets
separating them. They were constructed of local basalt and cement and their
walls were covered with plaster. The plan of the houses was simple: a large
courtyard was surrounded by rooms. Each house had generally one entrance,
from the street. The courtyards were paved with basalt, and staircases which
gave access to the roof were built along their walls. Many ovens were found in
the courtyards, and the houses contained numerous grinding stones made of
basalt. One place with huge grinding stones may have been a public oil press.
The Synagogue
The synagogue of Capernaum had an beautiful structure. Built of white limestone blocks from the hills of Galilee, its colour contrasted with the buildings
356 S.

Loffreda, Recovering Capernaum, Jerusalem 1985.

206

Frdric Manns

of dark basalt surrounding it. It stood on a platform, two meters above an earlier synagogue of basalt stone. Oriented north-south, it had a palm decorated,
southern faade oriented towards Jerusalem.
It consisted of a prayer hall (20.5 m x 18.5 m), a beth midrash to the east
(20.5 m x 11 m) and an entrance porch running along the faade of the synagogue. Staircases, on both sides of the entrance porch, led to it. The prayer hall
was reached from the beth midrash by a single entrance. All parts of the synagogue were paved with thick slabs of limestone. Other staircases were discovered at the back, outside of the building. They were supposed to lead the women to the matroneum.
Three entrances in the southern wall opened to the prayer hall. The hall was
divided by two rows of columns and consisted of three narrow aisles. The columns were placed on high pedestals and decorated with Corinthian capitals.
Stone benches were located along the western and eastern walls.
The beth midrash was divided by columns into a central part, with three covered
porticos along the walls. An Aramaic inscription, on a column which stood there,
reads: Halfu son of Zebida, the son of Johanan, made this column. May he be
blessed.
The date of the synagogues construction has been discussed. All agree that
it is not the 1st century A.D. synagogue from the time of Jesus. According to
most scholars, the Galilee synagogue type, to which the Capernaum synagogue
belongs, dates to the early Byzantine period. It includes late Roman architectural elements. Historical data also support this construction date. After the destruction of the Jerusalem temple, the Jewish population was living mainly in
Galilee. Their majority made the building of synagogues possible. In the excavations, in the foundations of the artificial podium on which the synagogue
stood, some remains of the 1st century village were found, which existed until
the 4th century. Pottery and a huge number of coins found beneath the floor of
the synagogue date the structure to not earlier than the 4th century.
Beneath the prayer hall of the synagogue a paved floor extending over a large
area was found. The foundation of the western wall of the prayer hall was constructed of basalt, and its direction was slightly different from the wall above it.
The excavators concluded that the floor and the lower western wall were remains of an earlier synagogue. It was common practice to build synagogues on
the ruins of previous ones. The late date for the synagogue is now accepted,
since most of the Synagogues of Galilee are from the same period.
Located a few meters south of the synagogue, were remains of a dwelling of
the 1st century BC, identified as the house of St Peter. During this early period,
religious significance was attributed to it, rooms were added and its walls and
floors were covered with light-coloured plaster. The building and its largest
room (7 x 6.5 m served as a domus ecclesia (domestic church). Pilgrims who

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

207

visited the place in the late Roman period left graffiti on its walls in Greek,
Latin and Syriac, as well as Christian symbols. The graffiti are preserved in the
Museum of the Flagellation monastery.
Literary Sources
Capernaum was a centre of Jesus activities in Jewish Galilee and became
known as His city (Mt 9:1), where he performed several miracles, and visited
the synagogue. His homily on the bread of life was delivered there as the Gospel
of John 6 has it. The city is also mentioned in Josephus Flavius (Life 72), who was
brought there in the hospital after being wounded in a battle. Rabbinic sources,
especially QohR, mention the presence of Minim, probably Judaeo-Christians, in
the city. Christian sources of the Byzantine period describe Capernaum as a village inhabited by Jews and Christians. Egeria the famous pilgrim visited the place.
In her diary quoted by Peter the deacon a mention is made to the house of Peter.
In the early Muslim period, Capernaum continued to prosper, then declined and
was abandoned in the 11th century. Its ruins were called in Arabic Tel Hum, preserving the ancient Hebrew name Kefar Nahum (the village of Nahum).
Most of the recent excavations in Judaea, Samaria and Galilee have shown that
the author of the FG knew the geography and the culture of the Jewish nation of
his time. One of the conclusion permitted after this enquiry is that the FG is a
reliable source.
Conclusion
Ever since ancient times, people have wondered why the FG is so different
from the other gospels. In John the ministry of Jesus appears to last at least three
years. In the other gospels his ministry seems to last only one year. In John the
unnamed Beloved Disciple plays an important role in the story. The other gospels never mention this person. As depicted in the first three gospels, Jesus
normally uses common language, and tends to make short simple statements
that go straight to the point. But in the FG he talks in a different style, and often
gives long speeches of a type not found in the other gospels.
In the first three gospels, Jesus frequently employs parables in his teaching.
In the FG he hardly ever uses parables. John contains several theological concepts not mentioned in the other gospels. Examples include the description of
Jesus as the Eternal Word, and the idea of the Paraclete, or Holy Spirit, acting
as a Comforter. In the first three gospels, Jesus sometimes performs exorcisms on people possessed by demons. The FG doesnt mention any exorcism.
John describes several remarkable miracles that arent reported in the other

208

Frdric Manns

gospels. These include the conversion of water into wine at Cana (Jn 2:1-11),
giving sight to a man born blind (Jn 9:1-8), and the raising of Lazarus (Jn 11:145). On the other hand, John says nothing at all about the birth of Jesus, and his
temptation by Satan. The first three gospels affirm that Simon of Cyrene helped
Jesus carry the cross to Golgotha. But Jn 19:17 says that Jesus carried the cross
the full distance himself.
The FG adds some extra details to the accounts of the crucifixion and the
resurrection. These include the spear thrust into the side of Jesus, the presence
of his mother at the cross, and his appearance to Mary Magdalene outside the
tomb. Actually there is a very simple explanation for many of the differences.
It is suggested by Jn 21:24, which recalls that the FG is based on the memories
and the witness of the beloved disciple. The fact that the other gospels never
mention this disciple suggests that their authors didnt get any information from
him. So this disciple was probably the source for the stories that are unique in
the FG.
To sum up on the question of authorship, perhaps the point can be made by
comparison and contrast. Brown argues for the identity of the beloved disciple
with John son of Zebedee, but denies the identity of the beloved disciple with
the evangelist. Cullmann357 on the contrary argues for the identity of the beloved disciple with the evangelist, but denies the identity of the beloved disciple
with John. He believes he was an anonymous Judaean disciple, a former follower of the Baptist, in part an eye witness, but not one of the twelve. Why he
should ever have been identified with John or how the gospel or the Johannine
circle was so called remains a mystery.
The concerns found in the FG are those typical of the pre 70 Church: the unity
of the believers, the brotherly love, the Messiaship of Jesus, the relationship of the
Church to Israel, the mystery of Israels unbelief and the Jewish persecutions. At
the end of the first century new problems were arising: the false prophets, the loss
of early enthusiasm, apostasy, the anti-christ, church discipline and organisation.
All these problems are lacking in the FG. The mention that some Jewish leading
authorities had believed in Jesus (12:42-43, 19:38-42) and that Jesus died for the
nation of Israel in order that the whole nation should not perish (11:50-52) are
indications that the FG belongs to the earlier period of the first century rather to
the later period. Its Sitz im Leben should be found in the situation of Jewish Christianity in the years preceding the outbreak of the Roman Jewish war. The author,
a Jewish Christian, tried to convince the Jews that Jesus was the Messiah of Israel. All we know about the Jewish Christian community of Jerusalem comes from
the Acts of the Apostles358. They devoted themselves to the apostles teachings
Johannine Circle, 74-85.
Schmitt, LEglise de Jrusalem ou la Restauration dIsral daprs les cinq premiers

357 The
358 J.

The Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel

209

and fellowship, in the breaking of bread359 and the prayers (Acts 2:42). They
were baptised360 in the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:5). Mary361 was in their midst (Acts
1:14). Since they were one heart, one soul and put everything in common, they
lived the ideal of the Shema Israel, loving God with their heart, their soul and their
means362. Peter proclaimed the Kerygma (Acts 2:4-42) and was associated with
John (Acts 3-4). Both were witness of the early persecution (Acts 4). The Book
of Acts and the FG give a great importance to the Jews363, a term which can have
a geographic, political and religious meaning364. They both remember the evangelisation of Samaria365.
It was not our purpose to draw conservative conclusions about the date of
the FG. It can not be denied that the FG displays a concentration on Judaism
even if it was written in Greek. But this Judaism which can be defined as a
Judaistic Hellenism reflects the situation before the destruction of the temple
and provides the real setting of the Johannine tradition. The FG is concerned
chapitres des Actes, RevSR 26 (1953) 209-218.
359 Jn 6.
360 Jn 3.
361 Jn 2:1-11, 19:25-27.
362 F. Manns, Le Seigneur notre Dieu est un, in Id., LIsral de Dieu. Essais sur le christianisme primitif (SBF. Analecta 42), Jerusalem 1996, 21-32. See the case of Nicodemus.
363 Of the 180 occurences of hoi Ioudaioi 150 are in Acts and in the FG. The expression is used
to characterise those who oppose Jesus and the movement begun by those Jews who became followers of Jesus. Scholars acknowledge that the expression was born in the increasing heated struggle for credibility between two strains of the first century Judaism, the smaller of which accepted
Jesus and the larger did not. Jesus movement came from Judaism. See J. Ashton,The Identity and
Function of the Ioudaioi in the Fourth Gospel, NT 27 (1985) 40-75. Generally Jews represent the
Jewish leaders who were endeavouring to centralise authority. Johns response is to ironically reverse this charge, granting the authorities the title they covet while undermining their right to it.
According to the TjI and TN Gen 49:8 the Jews were called Jews after the name of Juda who receives
the messianic blessing. They call themselves Jews, but they are not (Rev 2:9, 3:9). The Jews in
the FG are for its author the antithesis of what their name implies. The same irony is used in the FG
when John speaks of their Law (7:51, 8:17, 10:34, 15:25). This claim may concede that it belongs
to them, but it is ironic insofar as its supposedly meaning is undermined by its use in the Gospel.
364 U.C. von Wahlde, The Gospel of John and the Jews, NTS 28 (1982) 33-60; M. Lowe,
Who were the Ioudaioi?, NT 18 (1976) 101-130. Probably the term Ioudaioi is found in the
Targum (TjI and TN) of Gen 49:8 which is the blessing of Juda and has a messianic meaning:
Juda, thy brethren will praise you, for they shall be called Yehoudim after your name. Midrash
GenR 49:8 knows the same popular etymology which means that it was well known. This messianic origin would gave a positive and a dramatic character to it.
365 Jn 4 and Acts 8. Jn 4 contains many historical information about Samaria. Many authors
find it historically plausible that Jesus himself had an encounter with a Samaritan woman. Evidence for this includes the remarkable accuracy of the geographical references to Jacobs well,
the Gospels familiarity with the Samaritan belief about the location of worship and the coming
of the eschatological prophet, and the fact that some Galileans did travel through Samaria on their
way to and from Jerusalem. The historical Jesus took some interest in Samaria. The most significant argument is that Jesus chose twelve disciples, foreshadowing his hope for the restoration
of Israel; this would include the tribes that had once settled in Samaria.

210

Frdric Manns

with Jews and Greeks and finds it necessary to translate Hebrew words into
Greek as Rabbi, Rabbouni and even Messiah. Questing for the historical Jesus
in its original form is difficult. A new Quest is possible in which the kerygmatic understanding of the existence of Jesus can be tested. The FG speaks in
terms of Kerygma, which was the primitive way of presenting the life of Jesus.
That is why it emphasises the category of witness. The paradosis and the early
redaction of the FG derive from John the apostle.
Archaeological studies have confirmed Johns accuracy concerning the geography of Palestine. Traces of pre 70 Jewish culture characterise Johns landscape while the Pauline epistles contain various echoes of otherwise uniquely
Johannine tradition. Narratives scattered about the FG show that it was concerned to distinguish what the disciples understood before Jesus death and
resurrection from the insights discovered only after Easter. The recurring motif
of testimony was exploited to convince the Jews of the truth of the Christian
faith.
Our research is not claiming to have demonstrated historically that all of the
FG would have been considered accurate. It collected a surprisingly large
amount of evidence that points in the direction of historicity.
Frdric Manns, ofm
Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem

Giorgio Giurisato
Atti degli Apostoli:
le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

Il punto di partenza di questo studio unosservazione dei due eminenti


studiosi inglesi Westcott - Hort sulla somiglianza tra le divisioni degli Atti dei
codici Sinaiticus, Vaticanus e Amiatinus. Riporto il testo:
Again it is remarkable that the principal Latin system of divisions of
the Acts, found in the Codex Amiatinus and, slightly modified, in other
Vulgate MSS, is indicated by Greek numerals both in ( with large irregular omissions) and in B, but is otherwise unknown in Greek MSS
and literature. The numerals were apparently inserted in both MSS, certainly in , by very ancient scribes, though not by the writers of the text
itself, B indeed having antecedently a wholly different set of numerals.
The differences in detail are sufficient to shew that the two scribes followed different originals: the differences of both from the existing Latin
arrangement are still greater, but too slight to allow any doubt as to
identity of ultimate origin. The coincidence suggests a presumption that
the early home, and therefore not improbably the birthplace, of both
MSS was in the West1.

Il testo citato merita alcune annotazioni e suggerisce una ricerca ulteriore:


1. Sinaiticus (= ), Vaticanus (= B) e Amiatinus (= A). I tre codici dividono
il testo in pericopi, numerate mediante lettere greche da e B, e numeri
romani (cambiati in arabi nella seguente sinossi) da A. Il Sinaiticus presenta non solo large irregular omissions, ma anche una numerazione
molto piccola e talmente sbiadita da essere quasi illeggibile, sia quando
il testo che essa accompagna ugualmente sbiadito (ad esempio: f. 299,
col. 3, lin. 22; f. 301, col. 2, lin. 34; f. 301, col. 3, lin. 46; f. 301, col. 4,
lin. 38), sia quando ben conservato e chiaro (ad esempio: f. 300, col.
1 B.F. Westcott - F.J.A. Hort, Introduction to the New Testament in the Original Greek with
Notes on selected Readings, New York 1882, Reprint 1988, 266, n. 349.

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 211-227

212

Giorgio Giurisato

1, lin. 47; f. 300, col. 3, lin. 47; f. 301v, col. 3, lin. 30; f. 302, col. 1, lin.
22; f. 302, col. 2, lin. 45; f. 302, col. 4, lin. 11). Per mettere in luce la
numerazione del Sinaiticus sarebbe necessaria una ricerca a parte, che
qui non possibile. Perci in questo studio mi limiter al confronto tra
il Vaticanus e lAmiatinus.
2. Le numerazioni dei tre codici hanno una comune origine. Tra le numera
zioni di e B, e (still greater) tra queste e quella di A, per i due autori
vi sono delle differenze, ma non tali da mettere in dubbio la loro comune
origine: The differences () but too slight to allow any doubt as to
identity of ultimate origin. certamente pi facile e sicuro istituire un
confronto tra le diverse numerazioni che spiegarne lorigine: Westcott
- Hort, diversamente da quanto si pensa in genere oggi, sono inclini a
vederla in the West, probably at Rome2.
3. Sinossi delle numerazioni. Westcott - Hort parlano di differences in
detail tra le varie numerazioni, ma non ne danno i dettagli reali in modo
che il lettore possa rendersi conto di quanto estese siano tali differenze.
necessaria perci una ricerca ulteriore, che metta in sinossi le numerazioni e ne esamini i vari aspetti.
4. Somiglianza tra la numerazione di B-recente e quella di A. Sopra stata
motivata lesclusione di da questo studio. A sua volta B ha due numera
zioni: una pi antica in lettere greche piccole (B-antica) B indeed
having antecedently a wholly different set of numerals e una pi recente in lettere greche grandi (B-recente)3. La sinossi comprender quindi le due numerazioni del Vaticanus e quella dellAmiatinus. Delle due
numerazioni del Vaticanus, si nota subito che la B-recente quella pi
simile alla numerazione dellAmiatinus.

2 Ibidem, 267, n. 351, i due studiosi precisano ulteriormente: Taking all kinds of indications
together, we are inclined to surmise that B and were both written in the West, probably at Rome;
cf. pi avanti nota 10.
3 La delimitazione delle pericopi liturgiche, indicata con i termini / posti a volte sul
margine destro, coincide solo saltuariamente con le due numerazioni. Ad esempio non coincide: p.
1382, col. 3, lin. 21 (); p. 1383, col. 1, lin. 37 (); p. 1384, col. 3, lin. 32 (); p. 1386,
col. 1, lin. 11 (); coincide con B-antica: p. 1383, col. 2, lin. 21 (); coincide con B-recente: p. 1384, col. 1, lin. 40 ().

Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

B = Codex Vaticanus
B-antica
B-recente

213

A = Codex Amiatinus

1,1-14

1,1-14

1,1-14

1,15-26

1,15-2,4

1,15-26

2,1-47

2,5-13

2,1-13

3,1-4,31

2,14-21

2,14-21

4,32-5,11

2,22-28

2,22-35

5,12-42

2,29-41

2,36-40

6,1-8,3

2,42-47

2,41-47

8,4-40

3,1-26

3,1-26

9,1-30

4,1-12

4,1-12

10

9,31-42

10

4,13-22

10

4,13-22

11

9,43-11,18

11

4,23-31

11

4,23-31

12

11,19-30

12

4,32-37

12

4,32-37

13

12,1-23

13

5,1-11

13

5,1-11

14

12,24-13,12

14

5,12-21a

14

5,12-16

15

13,13-14,5

15

5,21b-33

15

5,17-39a

16

14,6-23

16

5,34-42

16

5,39b-42

17

14,2415,39

17

6,1-8

17

6,1-7

18

15,4016,40

18

6,97,10

18

6,87,2a

19

17,1-15

19

7,11-34

19

7,2b-53

20

17,16-34

20

7,358,1a

20

7,548,1a

21

18,1-17

21

8,1b-8

21

8,1b-8

22

18,18-28

22

8,9-17

22

8,9-17

23

19,120,1

23

8,18-25

23

8,18-25

24

20,2-12

24

8,26-40

24

8,26-40

25

20,13-38

25

9,1-9

25

9,1-21

26

21,1-14

26

9,10-31

26

9,22-31

27

21,1522,29

27

9,32-43

27

9,32-43

28

22,3023,10

28

10,1-18

28

10,1-24a

29

23,11-35

29

10,19-29

29

10,24b-33

214

Giorgio Giurisato

30

24,1-23

30

10,30-48

30

10,34-48

31

24,24-26

31

11,1-26

31

11,1-26

32

24,2725,12

32

11,27-30

32

11,27-12,5

33

25,13-22

33

12,1-17

33

12,6-17

34

25,2326,32

34

12,18-25

34

12,18-25

35

27,128,10

35

13,1-12

35

13,1-12

36

28,11-31

36

13,13-25

36

13,13-25

37

13,26-51

37

13,26-52

38

13,5214,7

38

14,1-7

39

14,815,23a

39

14,8-28

40

15,23b-39

40

15,1-21

41

15,4016,13

41

15,2216,1a

42

16,14-24

42

16,1b-6

43

16,25-34

43

16,7-13

44

16,3517,4

44

16,14-15

45

17,5-21

45

16,1617,4

46

17,22-33

46

17,5-15

47

17,34-18,11

47

17,16-34

48

18,12-28

48

18,1-11

49

19,1-12

49

18,12-23

50

19,13-23

50

18,2419,12

51

19,24-20,16

51

19,13-22

52

20,17-38

52

19,23-40

53

21,1-9

53

20,1-38

54

21,10-14

54

21,1-9

55

21,15-25

55

21,10-14

56

21,26-40

56

21,15-25

57

22,1-11

57

21,26-40

58

22,12-30

(?)

22,1-22

59

23,1-11

58

22,23-30

Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus


60

23,12-21

59

23,1-22

61

23,22-35

60

23,23-30

62

24,1-23

61

23,31-35

63

24,2425,12

62

24,1-21

64

25,13-27

63

24,2225,12

65

26,1-23

64

25,13-27

66

26,24-32

65

26,1-23

67

27,1-26

66

26,24-32

68

27,2728,10

67

27,1-26

69

28,11-31

68

27,2728,2a

69

282b-10

70

215

28,11-31

I. Osservazioni sui dati della sinossi


1. Numero delle pericopi. La numerazione di B-antica ha 36 pericopi, quella di B-recente 69, lA 70. Non si prende in esame qui la questione
dellulteriore suddivisione delle pericopi di A mediante lettere pi grandi e sporgenti, di colore nero, non rosso come gli incipit delle pericopi.
2. Posizione delle due numerazioni di B. La numerazione di B-antica non
solo scritta in lettere pi piccole rispetto a quella di B-recente, ma
anche abitualmente staccata dalle colonne del testo pi di quanto non lo
sia la numerazione recente: questa dunque sta alla destra di quella. Ma
in due casi la posizione invertita e la numerazione antica posposta:
p. 1381, col. 3, lin. 42; p. 1384, col. 1, lin. 40. In tre casi il numero antico coperto da quello recente, ma ancora visibile ed ripetuto a destra
di quello recente: p. 1410, col. 1, lin. 10; p. 1413, col. 2, lin. 27; p. 1414,
col. 1, lin. 27.
3. Numerazione e dipl. La numerazione di B-recente e la dipl (>) si trovano
ambedue nel margine sinistro vicine al testo. interessante allora osservare
come si comporta la prima rispetto alla seconda: di regola infatti la dipl
accompagna una citazione dellAntico Testamento da capo a fondo, fino
alla riga dove termina lultima parola (ad esempio: p. 1384, col. 1, lin.

216

Giorgio Giurisato

40; p. 1384, col. 3, lin. 37; p. 1386, col. 2, lin. 3.16; p. 1387, col. 2, lin.
30)4. Cos nella stessa riga possono coincidere lultima dipl e il numero
che segna linizio della nuova pericope. Ci avviene di fatto due volte: in
un caso il numero di B-recente rispetta la dipl ed spostato leggermente pi sotto (p. 1384, col. 2, lin. 34); in un altro sembra non permettere alla dipl di accompagnare la citazione fino allultima riga, dove ha
preso posto il numero, ma senza nessuna visibile cancellazione della dipl
(p. 1391, col. 3, lin. 29). Si sa inoltre che mentre la dipl attribuita
alla prima mano5, la numerazione di B-recente ritenuta tardiva (posteriore alla B-antica): per questo fatto non si pu parlare di priorit di Brecente rispetto alla dipl, ma piuttosto di un caso eccezionale, motivato
forse dal fatto che nellultima riga c solo la seconda parte del nome
AIGY-PTON per la quale potrebbe non essere richiesta la dipl6 o essere
sostituita dal segno simile a uno svolazzo che segue la dipl della penultima riga.
4. Il numero 52 di B-recente. In B-recente manca il numero 52, che secondo la numerazione greca corrisponde a . Probabilmente si riferisce al
discorso di Paolo a Mileto, dal momento che anche altri discorsi costituiscono pericopi autonome (ad esempio: 59 = = 23,1-11; 65 = =
26,1-23); la pericope avrebbe quindi questi dati (scritti in corsivo nella sinossi): 52 = = 20,17-38; quella precedente terminerebbe in
20,16; quella seguente 53 = riprende invece regolarmente in 21,1.
4 La regola cos formulata da U. Schmid, Dipls im Codex Vaticanus, in M. Karrer et alii
(ed.), Von der Septuaginta zum Neuen Testament. Textgeschichtliche Errterungen (Arbeiten zur
neutestamentlichen Textforschung 43), Berlin 2010, 112: Bemerkenswert erscheint, dass die Zitate in aller Regel von der ersten Zeile mit atl. Text an bis zur letzten durchgngig markiert sind.
5 Quanto allepoca di inserimento della dipl, sembra non esserci dubbi che sia della prima
mano: Die (mit Ausnahme von Passagen in Hebr und 2Kor) flchendeckende Auszeichnung des
Codex Vaticanus, die zudem wahrscheinlich von einer einheitlichen Hand erfolgte, sowie die Merkmale dieser Hand deuten auf eine Zitatmarkierung noch im Produktionsprozess hin (M. Sigismund,
Die Dipl als Zitatmarkierung in den grossen Unzialcodices - Versuch eines Fazits, in Karrer et
alii [ed.], Von der Septuaginta zum Neuen Testament, 150). Alla stessa conclusione arrivano Payne
- Canart in base allesame dellinchiostro: Since the ink color () match the original ink of the
text, the original writing of all three (text, diples, distigmai) should be considered part of the original
production of Codex Vaticanus: Ph.B. Payne - P. Canart, Distigmai Matching the Original Ink of
Codex Vaticanus: Do They Mark the Location of Textual Variants?, in P. Andrist (ed.), Le manuscrit
B de la Bible (Vaticanus graecus 1209). Introduction au fac-simil, Actes du Colloque de Genve
(11 juin 2001), Contributions supplmentaires (Histoire du texte biblique 7), Lausanne 2009, 213;
cf. G. Giurisato - G.M. Carlino, I segni di divisione del Codex B nei vangeli, LA 60 (2010) 137154.535-541 (sulla dipl: 145-146).
6 Si noti per che negli Atti di B la dipl accompagna anche la seconda parte delle parole nei
seguenti casi: BA-BYLNOS (p. 1392, col 2, lin. 6), AY-TOY (p. 1394, col. 2, lin. 4), mentre non
si registra nessun altro caso analogo a quello esaminato.

Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

217

5. Il numero 57 dellAmiatinus. In A il numero 57 comprende At 21,26


22,22. Occorre dire per che allinterno di questa pericope in 22,1 la parola Viri scritta in rosso, in sporgenza, con la prima lettera pi grande,
come gli incipit delle 70 pericopi. In 22,1 quindi la parola Viri potrebbe
segnare linizio di una nuova pericope, come in B-recente (57 = =
22,1-11); ma nel margine sinistro resta solo un frammento illeggibile del
numero, molto probabilmente cancellato dallo stesso scriba. Infatti in
22,23 continua in modo giusto con il numero 58: ci significa che la eventuale correzione (abrasione) del numero 58 in 22,1 stata fatta subito, non
in un secondo tempo. Inoltre nellelenco degli argumenta, posto allinizio
del libro degli Atti, la numerazione non presenta incertezze: il numero 57
riassume quanto nel testo esposto in 21,2622,22.
6. Due errori di numerazione dellAmiatinus. Nel testo di A tra i numeri LXVI
/ LXVIIII, invece di LXVII / LXVIII si leggono di nuovo i numeri LVII /
LVIII: evidentemente in questi due casi manca il numero X.
7. Rapporto tra le pericopi delle tre divisioni. Rispetto a B-recente e A, Bantica ha circa met pericopi: meno numerose, quindi, ma pi ampie. In
vari casi una pericope di B-antica suddivisa in diverse pericopi da Brecente e da A; viceversa solo una pericope di B-recente suddivisa in
due da B-antica. Ecco come si articola il rapporto tra le pericopi:
Una pericope di B-antica divisa in quattro da B-recente e A, in modo
uguale:
B-antica: 3,14,31
= B-recente e A: 3,1-26; 4,1-12; 4,3-22; 4,23-31.
Due pericopi di B-antica sono divise ciascuna in due sia da B-recente sia
da A, in modo uguale:
B-antica: 4,325,11
= B-recente e A: 4,32-37; 5,1-11.
B-antica: 21,1-14
= B-recente e A: 21,1-9; 21,10-14.
Una pericope di B-antica divisa in tre pericopi da B-recente e A, non in
modo uguale:
B-antica: 5,12-42
= B-recente: 5,12-21a; 5,21b-33; 5,34-42.

= A:
5,12-16; 5,17-39a; 5,39b-42.
Una pericope di B-antica suddivisa in cinque da A:
B-antica: 2,1-47 = A: 2,1-13; 2,14-21; 2,22-35; 2,36-40; 2,41-47.
Viceversa, due pericopi di B-antica sono fuse in una sola da B-recente:
B-antica: 24,24-26; 24,2725,12 = B-recente: 24,2425,12.

8. Pericopi con uguale delimitazione nelle tre divisioni:


B-antica, B-recente e A hanno in comune solo due pericopi: la prima
(1,1-14) e lultima (28,11-31);

218

Giorgio Giurisato

B-antica e B-recente hanno in comune una terza pericope: 24,1-23;


B-antica e A hanno in comune anchesse una terza pericope: 1,15-26;
B-recente e A hanno il numero pi alto di pericopi con la stessa delimitazione: su 69 pericopi di B-recente e 70 di A sono 26 quelle uguali
(nella sinossi sono segnate con lo sfondo grigio). Altre 6 pericopi sono
quasi identiche, differenziandosi solo per uno o due versetti allinizio o
alla fine; tutti questi casi rientrano nella lista dei sommari (pi avanti):
2,42-47 (B) 2,41-47 (A);
6,1-8 (B) 6,1-7 (A);
13,26-51 (B) 13,26-52 (A);
19,13-23 (B) 19,13-22 (A);
24,1-23 (B) 24,1-21 (A);
24,2425,12 (B) 24,2225,12 (A).
Complessivamente dunque considerevole il numero delle pericopi uguali (26) o quasi uguali (6). questa somiglianza, forte ed esclusiva, che ha
colpito i due studiosi Westcott - Hort e li ha indotti a scrivere: Again it is
remarkable that the principal Latin system of divisions of the Acts, found
in the Codex Amiatinus () is indicated by Greek numerals both in )(
and in B, but is otherwise unknown in Greek MSS and literature.
9. Gruppi di pericopi uguali. Riguardo alle 26 pericopi uguali si nota che
cinque sono isolate (1,1-14; 2,14-21; 9,32-43; 11,1-26; 28,11-31), mentre le altre formano dei gruppi di pericopi:
un gruppo composto di tre pericopi: 12,18-25; 13,1-12; 13,13-25;
uno di sei: 3,1-26; 4,1-12; 4,13-22; 4,23-31; 4,32-37; 5,1-11;
tre di quattro: primo gruppo: 8,1b-8; 8,9-17; 8,18-25; 8,26-40;

secondo gruppo: 21,1-9; 21,10-14; 21,15-25; 21,26-40;

terzo gruppo: 25,13-27; 26,1-23; 26,24-32; 27,1-26.
Questi raggruppamenti di pericopi sembrano rafforzare lidea del parallelismo tra le divisioni dei due codici. Esso diventa ancora pi consistente per il fatto che le 6 pericopi quasi identiche sono contigue con i
gruppi suddetti.
II. Osservazioni sulla delimitazione dei sommari nei due codici
I sommari costituiscono un tipo di testo caratteristico di At. La bibliografia al

Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

219

riguardo ampia e la si pu trovare nella recente monografia di Takashi Onuki7.


Nel paragrafo dedicato agli Atti (pp. 130-134) lautore d una lista dei sommari,
alla cui definizione dedica il primo capitolo (pp. 1-23); ma nella breve analisi dei
seguenti 14 sommari terr conto anche di altre liste8. In ogni caso qui non interessa esaminare i sommari in se stessi, ma nel loro rapporto con la delimitazione
delle pericopi nei due codici. Largomento quindi si connette con il tema principale di questo studio: il confronto tra le divisioni del testo in pericopi e la loro
delimitazione nei codici B e A. Non si prender perci in esame i sommari che si
trovano allinterno delle pericopi di B e A, ma solo quelli che toccano le estremit e segnano la delimitazione delle pericopi, il loro incipit e/o desinit, dove quindi possibile mettere a confronto il modo di B e A nel collegare i sommari al
loro contesto. La lista dei casi presi in considerazione la seguente (il primo
numero del Vaticanus, il secondo dellAmiatinus):
1. 2,42-47 2,41-47: le note caratteristiche del sommario (il participio
perifrastico e i verbi allimperfetto, che denotano unazione reiterata e
duratura) cominciano al v. 42, che lincipit di B e quello abitualmente
preferito dagli esegeti; ma due motivazioni spingono a includere anche
il v. 41: perch l sono indicati i soggetti del testo seguente e perch i vv.
41-42 sono legati dalle particelle / , per cui anche la delimitazione
di A risulta ben fondata9.
2. 4,32-37 4,32-37: il sommario sta nella prima parte della pericope (vv.
32-35), mentre i vv. 36-37 presentano il caso positivo di Barnaba (seguito,
7 T. Onuki, Sammelbericht als Kommunikation. Studien zur Erzhlkunst der Evangelien
(WMANT 73), Neukirchen - Vluyn 1997; una nuova edizione uscita nella collana BZNW 101, de
Gruyter 2001. Cf. L.E. Keck - J.L. Martyn (ed.), Studies in Luke-Acts. Essays Presented in Honor
of Paul Schubert, Philadelphia PA 1966, 87.
8 Alla monografia citata nella nota precedente sono da aggiungere alcuni titoli scelti sui
sommari di At: H.J. Cadbury, The Summaries in Acts, in F.G. Foakes Jackson - K. Lake (ed.),
The Beginnings of Christianity, 5 voll., London 1920-1933, vol. V, 392-402; J. De Zwaan, Was
the Book of Acts a posthumous edition?, HTR 17 (1924) 99-153; P. Benoit, Remarques sur les
sommaires des Actes 2,42 5, in Aux sources de la tradition chrtienne, Neuchtel - Paris 1950,
1-10 (= Exgse et thologie, Paris 1961, II, 181-192); H. Zimmermann, Die Sammelberichte
der Apostelgeschichte, BZ 5 (1961) 71-82; L. Cerfaux, La composition de la premire partie du
livre des Actes, ETL 13 (1936) 667-691 = Receuil L. Cerfaux (BETL 6-7), Gembloux 1954, II,
63-91; S.J. Noorda, Scene and Summary. A Proposal for Reading Acts 4,32-5,16, in J. Kremer
(ed.), Les Actes des Aptres. Traditions, rdaction, thologie (BETL 48), Leuven 1970, 475-483;
M.A. Co, The Major Summaries in Acts (2,42-47; 4,32-35; 5,12-16). Linguistic and Literary
Relationship, ETL 68 (1992) 49-85; G.E. Sterling, Athletes of virtue: An Analysis of the Summaries in Acts, JBL 113/4 (1994) 679-69; U. Wendel, Gemeinde in Kraft. Das Gemeindeverstndnis in den Summarien der Apostelgeschichte, Neukirchen - Vluyn 1998.
9 Per Co (The Major Summaries, 58-61) invece gli elementi sopra notati servono solo a collegare il sommario al contesto precedente, del resto it is preferable to view 2,42 as the beginning of a
new narrative unit, and therefore, as the opening verse of Summary: There are sufficient linguistic
and thematic interconnections in 2,42-47 to prove its literary unity and coherence (60-61).

220

Giorgio Giurisato

ma separato, da quello negativo di Anania e Saffira). Entrambi i codici


uniscono il sommario e il concreto esempio buono.
3. 5,12-21a 5,12-16: il sommario da tutti riconosciuto, e come tale delimitato da A, sta nei vv. 12-16; il codice B invece unisce lattivit taumaturgica
degli apostoli, contenuto del sommario (vv. 12-16), alla loro persecuzione
(vv. 17-21a), come causa ed effetto.
4. 5,34-42 5,39b-42: le caratteristiche proprie del sommario, che indicano
unazione continuata, si trovano alla fine, nei vv. 41-42; B vi premette il
discorso di Gamaliele, A solo la reazione del sinedrio alle parole del saggio
sinedrita.
5. 6,1-8 6,1-7: il sommario sta nel v. 7, e riguarda la diffusione della parola
di Dio e laumento del numero dei discepoli. B vi annette anche il sommario del v. 8 sullattivit di Stefano, che compiva segni e prodigi, dando
occasione a una violenta persecuzione (8,1); sembra pi appropriata la
scelta di A, che fa di questo secondo sommario linizio della nuova pericope, tutta riservata a Stefano (6,87,2a).
6. 8,18-25 8,18-25: la pericope, delimitata in modo uguale da B e A, racconta lepisodio di Simon mago e si conclude con il sommario
sullevangelizzazione della Samaria (v. 25): Essi poi, dopo aver testimoniato e annunziato la parola di Dio, ritornavano a Gerusalemme ed evangelizzavano molti villaggi della Samaria.
7. 9,10-31 9,22-31: il sommario sta nel versetto finale, comune alle due
pericopi, che hanno un inizio diverso: La Chiesa era dunque in pace per
tutta la Giudea, la Galilea e la Samaria; essa cresceva e camminava nel
timore del Signore, colma del conforto dello Spirito Santo (v. 31).
8. 13,26-5113,26-52: il sommario sta nel v. 52, collegato alla pericope seguente da B, a quella precedente da A: questa seconda delimitazione sembra preferibile, dal momento che la notizia sui discepoli erano pieni di
gioia e di Spirito Santo (v. 52) sembra intenzionalmente contrapposta
alla persecuzione contro Paolo e Barnaba (v. 50) del contesto precedente.
9. 17,22-33 17,16-34: B termina con la scena di Paolo che esce dallAreopago
(v. 33), A invece acclude anche la reazione positiva di un uomo e di una
donna, Dionigi lAreopagita e Damaris, e altri con loro (v. 34). La delimitazione di A sembra pi pertinente di quella di B, che collega questa

Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

221

finale ateniese con il racconto successivo riguardante la missione di Paolo


a Corinto.
10. 17,3418,11 18,1-11: B e A non hanno lo stesso incipit, ma terminano
ugualmente con il sommario del v. 11, che mostra Paolo in piena attivit a
Corinto: Cos Paolo si ferm un anno e mezzo, insegnando fra loro la
parola di Dio.
11. 19,1-12 18,2419,12: B e A terminano con lo stesso sommario sullattivit
taumaturgica di Paolo: Dio intanto operava prodigi non comuni per opera
di Paolo, al punto che si mettevano sopra i malati fazzoletti o grembiuli che
erano stati a contatto con lui e le malattie cessavano e gli spiriti cattivi
fuggivano (vv. 11-12). Lincipit delle pericopi diverso: entrambe raccontano episodi avvenuti ad Efeso, ma B in modo pi appropriato limita il
brano allopera di Paolo a cui si connette il sommario, mentre A unisce
allattivit di Paolo quella precedente di Apollo.
12. 19,13-23 19,13-22: la notizia del v. 22 sulla volont di Paolo di fermarsi
ancora un po di tempo nella provincia di Asia la conclusione della
pericope secondo A; con quella invece dello scoppio di un gran tumulto
ad Efeso (v. 23) termina la pericope di B. Questa per starebbe bene allinizio della pericope seguente, che racconta la sommossa degli orefici; perci
la delimitazione di A sembra pi aderente al testo.
13. 24,1-23 24,1-21: linizio delle pericopi uguale; la fine diversa. B
termina con i vv. 22-23 che costituiscono un sommario sulla condizione
carceraria di Paolo a Cesarea, simile a quella romana (28,30): Allora Felice, che era assai bene informato circa la nuova dottrina, li rimand dicendo: Quando verr il tribuno Lisia, esaminer il vostro caso, ordinando al
centurione di tenere Paolo sotto custodia, concedendogli per una certa
libert e senza impedire a nessuno dei suoi amici di dargli assistenza. A
invece si ferma alla fine del discorso di Paolo (v. 21); in questo caso la
delimitazione di B appare pi appropriata, perch lega il discorso di Paolo
alla conclusione dellepisodio.
14. 24,2425,12 24,2225,12: linizio delle due pericopi diverso, in correlazione alla fine delle due precedenti, dove A terminava con il discorso
di Paolo, mentre B aggiungeva la conclusione del governatore romano
sulla situazione di Paolo in carcere. Qui B inizia con un nuovo sommario
sullatteggiamento del governatore riguardo a Paolo durante la sua prigionia: Dopo alcuni giorni Felice arriv in compagnia della moglie Drusilla,

222

Giorgio Giurisato

che era giudea; fatto chiamare Paolo, lo ascoltava intorno alla fede in
Cristo Ges () Sperava frattanto che Paolo gli avrebbe dato del denaro;
per questo abbastanza spesso lo faceva chiamare e conversava con lui
(vv.24-26). I verbi allimperfetto sono caratteristici di un sommario, che
racconta azioni ripetute e continuate. A invece inizia con due sommari:
quello sulla situazione carceraria di Paolo (vv. 22-23) e questo appena
citato sul rapporto tra il governatore e Paolo. Il sovraccarico dei due sommari e lo stacco del primo dal contesto precedente mostrano che la delimitazione di B pi appropriata.
In conclusione, dalle osservazioni sui dati della sinossi (I) risulta che realmente,
come avevano notato Westcott - Hort, vi sono molte somiglianze tra la numerazione del Vaticanus e quella dellAmiatinus: circa trenta su 70 pericopi sono delimitate nello stesso modo. Quanto in particolare alla delimitazione dei sommari (II),
solo in due casi del tutto uguale (n. 2.6); in sei casi (n. 1.3.5.8.9.12) la scelta
dellAmiatinus sembra pi aderente al senso del testo; quattro casi sono tipici
nellillustrare il modo diverso dei due codici nel legare un sommario al contesto
precedente o seguente:



6,1-8 6,1-7;
13,26-5113,26-52;
17,22-33 17,16-34;
19,13-23 19,13-22.
III. Origine della somiglianza tra le divisioni di Atti in A e B

utile riportare qui laffermazione principale di Westcott - Hort citata allinizio di questo studio: Again it is remarkable that the principal Latin system of
divisions of the Acts, found in the Codex Amiatinus and, slightly modified, in
other Vulgate MSS, is indicated by Greek numerals both in ( with large irregular
omissions) and in B, but is otherwise unknown in Greek MSS and literature.
Tralasciando il Sinaiticus per le ragioni sopra addotte, la ricerca si concentrata
sul confronto tra le divisioni di B-recente e dellAmiatinus. La somiglianza delle
divisioni cos simili ed esclusive, che secondo i due studiosi sono otherwise
unknown in Greek MSS and literature un fatto innegabile. Come lo si pu
spiegare? Il Vaticanus (B) e lAmiatinus (A) due codici che hanno un indiscusso
primato, il primo tra i codici biblici greci del NT, il secondo tra i codici latini
della Vulgata appartengono a due lingue e a due mondi differenti, per cui quella somiglianza sembra difficile da spiegare, sia per contatto diretto, sia indiretto
mediante il riferimento a una fonte comune. Si pu solo procedere per ipotesi.

Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

223

1. Ipotesi di un contatto diretto


Per spiegare detta somiglianza Westcott - Hort sono inclini ad affermare la
identity of ultimate origin, collocando la nascita del Vaticanus in the West e
precisamente a Roma10. I due eminenti studiosi inglesi non offrono ulteriori indicazioni sul rapporto tra i suddetti codici. La loro ipotesi per si potrebbe accordare
con alcuni dati sicuri relativi alla storia del monastero e della biblioteca di Vivarium, da cui in fondo deriva lAmiatinus. Poco dopo la morte del fondatore, Cassiodoro ( 580), verso il 598 termin anche la vita del monastero e la biblioteca
vivariense and dispersa () giungendo a noi in varie biblioteche dEuropa,
specialmente in quella del Laterano e di Bobbio11. Il Codex Grandior, prodotto a
Vivarium secondo i criteri esposti da Cassiodoro nelle sue Institutiones (I,14.2)12,
10 A Roma essi ipotizzano lorigine non solo del Vaticanus, ma anche del Sinaiticus (cf. sopra,
nota 2): Taking all kinds of indications together, we are inclined to surmise that B and were both
written in the West, probably at Rome. Oggi questa tesi non trova il favore degli specialisti; C.-B.
Amphoux lo sostiene ancora per il Vaticanus. Per una sintesi delle varie posizioni cf. P. Andrist, Le
milieu de production du Vaticanus graecus 1209 et son histoire postrieure: le canon dEusbe, les
listes du IVe sicle des livres canoniques, les distigmai et les manuscrits connexes, in Id. (ed.), Le
manuscrit B de la Bible, 227-256. Westcott - Hort non dicono quanto tempo il codice B sia rimasto
a Roma o altrove in Occidente. La storia del codice sconosciuta fino a quando nel 1475 appare in
un catalogo della Biblioteca Vaticana; questo lungo arco di tempo quindi aperto alla ricerca e alle
ipotesi. Una proposta illuminante per la nostra questione quella di C.M. Mazzucchi, Per la storia
medievale dei codici biblici B e Q, del Demostene Par. gr. 2934, del Dione Cassio Vat. gr. 1288 e
dellIlias Picta ambrosiana, in A. Bravo Garca - I. Prez Martn (ed.), The Legacy of Bernard de
Monfaucon. Three Hundred Years of Studies on Greek Handwriting. Proceedings of the Seventh
International Colloquium of Greek Palaeography: Madrid - Salamanca, 15-20 September 2008,
Turnhout 2010, 133-141 (cf. pi avanti).
11 G. De Simone, Lesperienza monastico-culturale del Vivarium di Cassiodoro, in Il monachesimo occidentale: dalle origini alla Regula Magistri. XXVI Incontro di studiosi dellantichit
cristiana, Roma, 8-10 maggio 1997 (Studia Ephemeridis Augustinianum 62), Roma 1998, 137-146,
cit. 141; per la storia della ricerca sulla biblioteca cf. I. Schuster, Come fin la biblioteca di Cassiodoro?, La Scuola Cattolica 70 (1942) 409-414; L. Viscido, Appunti sulla biblioteca di Vivarium,
in Id., Studi cassiodorei, Soveria Mannelli 1983, 37-64; F. Troncarelli, Vivarium: i libri, il destino
(Instrumenta patristica 33), Turnhout 1998.
12 Institutiones = R.A.B. Mynors (ed.), Cassiodori Senatoris Institutiones, Oxford (1937)
19633, libri I-II; il testo disponibile anche online. Il nome del codice desunto dalla descrizione
dello stesso Cassiodoro: in pandecte latino corporis grandioris (I,5.2), in codice grandiore littera
clariore conscripto (I,14.2) e nella Expositio Psalmorum (CC 97, 133): in pandectis maioris capite; nelle Institutiones menziona anche un pandectes latino di formato minore: Hunc autem pandectem propter copiam lectionis minutiore manu in senionibus quinquaginta tribus aestimauimus
conscribendum (I,12.3), come pure un graecus pandectes (I,14.4; I,15,11), di cui si dir pi avanti.
Sul termine pandectes cf. J.H. Halporn, Pandectes, Pandecta, and the Cassiodorian Commentary
on the Psalms, Revue Bndictine 90 (1980) 290-300, che sul suo significato scrive: In the Latin
of Cassiodorus, the word pandectes refers to a one-volume Bible, i.e. a Bible containing the entire

224

Giorgio Giurisato

nel 678 si trova a Roma, dove labate Benedict Biscop lacquista e lo porta in Inghilterra (di qui poi scomparso). Di questo codice, che Beda ha potuto ammirare13, labate Ceolfrid, successore di Benedict negli anni 689-716, ha fatto eseguire
tre copie, due destinate ai suoi monasteri di Wearmouth e Jarrow (poi scomparse
con la soppressione dei monasteri sotto Enrico VIII)14, e una al papa; questa fu
consegnata a Gregorio II dal seguito dellabate Ceolfrid, il quale voleva fargliene
dono personalmente, ma morto durante il viaggio, a Langres, il 25 settembre del
71615. Intorno a questa data quindi la copia eseguita sul Codex Grandior arriva a
Roma, da dove poi passa al monastero di Monte Amiata, da cui il nome di Codex
Amiatinus, che, in seguito alla soppressione dellabbazia (1782), dal 6 settembre
1784 nella biblioteca Laurenziana di Firenze16. A Roma dunque dal 598, circa,
text of the OT and NT under one cover (p. 292). Quel graecus pandectes doveva quindi essere uno
dei rarissimi grandi codici, simile a quelli ben noti: Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, Alexandrinus.
13 Lo provano i testi seguenti: nel De tabernaculo (II,1565-1567: CC 119A, 81) Beda
scrive: quo modo in pictura Cassiodori Senatoris cuius ipse in expositione psalmorum meminit expressum vidimus; nel De templo (II,28-30: CC 119A, 192) annota: Has vero porticus
Cassiodorus Senator in pictura templi quam in pandecte posuit ut ipse in psalmorum expositione commemorat triplici ordine distinxit, e pi avanti (II,48-49: CC 119A, 193): Haec ut in
pictura Cassiodori distincta repperimus breviter adnotare curavimus. In due testi Cassiodoro
afferma di aver posto questa duplice pictura nel Codex Grandior: Nos enim et tabernaculum
() et templum ipsum fecimus pingi et in pandecte nostro corpore grandiore elegimus collocare (Expositio Psalmorum: in Ps. 86,40-43: CC 98, 789-790), tabernaculum templumque
Domini () quae depicta subtiliter lineamentis propriis in pandecte latino corporis grandioris
competenter aptavi (Institutiones I,5.2).
14 Di una copia sono rimasti dodici fogli e frammenti del tredicesimo foglio, conservati nella
British Library (Loan 81, Add. 37777 e Add. 45025). Cf. C.E. Wright, The dispersal of the Libraries in the Sixteenth Century, in F. Wormald - C.E. Wright, The English Library before 1700,
London 1958, 155.
15 Ne d notizia Beda il Venerabile: bibliothecam utriusque monasterii, quam Benedictus
abbas magna coepit instantia, ipse [Ceolfridus] non minori geminavit industria; ita ut tres pandectes
novae translationis [la Vulgata di Girolamo], ad unum vetustae translationis [la Vetus Latina] quem
de Roma attulerat, ipse super adiungeret; quorum unum senex Romam rediens secum inter alia pro
munere sumpsit, duas utrique monasterio reliquit (Beda, Historia Abbatum, in PL 94,725 = Baedae
Opera Historica. II: Vita Sanctorum Abbatum [The Loeb Classical Library], 428 e 440-441 sulla
data e il luogo della morte). La testimonianza confermata dallo stesso Beda nel De temporum
ratione, liber 66 (CC 123B, 534): Qui inter alia donaria, quae adferre disposuerat, misit ecclesiae
sancti Petri pandectem a beato Hieronimo in Latinum ex Hebraeo uel Graeco fonte translatum. Che
sia arrivato a destinazione risulta dalla lettera di ringraziamento del papa Gregorio II, citata dalla
anonima Vita Ceolfridi Abbatis, contenuta nella Historia Abbatum auctore anonymo (distinta da
quella che va sotto il nome di Beda), pubblicata da C. Plummer, Venerabilis Baedae Opera Historica, Oxford 1896 (reprint 1961-1975, ora anche online), I, 388-404 (lettera: 403).
16 S. Magrini, Per difetto del legatore: storia delle rilegature della Bibbia Amiatina in
Laurenziana, Qvinio. International Journal on the History and Conservation of the Book 3 (2001)
137-167: Quanto a lungo la Bibbia sia rimasta a Roma, invece, non risulta affatto chiaro (148);
largomento per cui si pu pensare all830 come al terminus ad quem pi sicuro che nel testo alterato della dedica si parla di un certo abate Pietro: siccome tra l830 e il 995 si sono susseguiti
quattro abati di nome Pietro, e non dato () determinare se uno di loro, e quale, vada effettivamente ricollegato allintervento sul testo della dedica (149), si pu concludere che almeno fino

Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

225

fino al 678 si trova il Codex Grandior, e dal 716 in poi (fino alla data imprecisata
in cui stato portato nel monastero del Monte Amiata) il Codex Amiatinus17.
Nellipotesi di un contatto indiretto tra B e A (cf. sotto), lo scriba della divisione
B-recente potrebbe aver visto il Codex Grandior prima della sua partenza per lInghilterra; nellipotesi di un contatto diretto, invece, lo scriba di B-recente potrebbe
aver visto lAmiatinus proveniente dallInghilterra, quando fu consegnato al papa
Gregorio II. Tale contatto a Roma potrebbe essere la spiegazione della forte somiglianza tra A e B-recente nella divisione di Atti. Nellipotetico incontro dei codici
Grandior/A e B a Roma, un eventuale influsso pu essere stato esercitato solo da
parte del Grandior o dellAmiatinus, dove la divisione di Atti nata col codice
stesso, non del Vaticanus, dove la divisione parzialmente simile stata aggiunta
pi tardi, in data incerta. Considerando tale divisione nellAmiatinus si possono
formulare tre ipotesi, ugualmente possibili e incerte: 1) gli amanuensi di Wearmouth-Jarrow avevano sotto gli occhi il Codex Grandior, da cui hanno preso la
divisione di Atti, senza copiare il testo della Vetus Latina18; 2) gli amanuensi hanno
preso la divisione di Atti dal codice da cui hanno copiato il testo della Vulgata19; 3)
gli amanuensi hanno lavorato sotto la supervisione di Beda e ne hanno seguito le
indicazioni20.
all830 (data in cui Pietro I inizia il suo abbaziato) il codice si trovasse a Roma. Ringrazio la dott.
ssa Sabina Magrini per avermi gentilmente inviato il suo studio.
17 Sul rapporto tra i due codici cf. G. Giurisato, Il Codex Amiatinus e il Codex Grandior di
Cassiodoro [in stampa].
18 B. Fischer, Codex Amiatinus und Cassiodor, BZ 6 (1962) 57-79: Die drei Pandekten
wurden usserlich nach dem Vorbild des Codex grandior angelegt; als Text nahm jedoch fr das AT
und das NT die Vulgata. Darber, woher dieser Vulgata-Text genommen wurde, sagen die Quellen
nichts. Die Herstellung der Pandecten setzte also nicht nur Schreib- und Malarbeit, sondern mindestens eine gewisse Redaktions- bzw. Editionsttigkeit voraus (p. 67).
19 Per Atti il modello sembra un manoscritto proveniente da Roma, con influssi di Beda:
Wieder zeigt sich eine gemeinsame Schicht mit den gleichen spanischen Handschriften (Cavensis, Totetanus). Aber diesmal sind auch klare Beziehungen sowohl des Amiatinus wie des
Cavensis zu einer rmischen Handschrift zu erkennen. Und daneben treten willkrliche nderungen auf, die mindestens teilweise mit Bedas Kommentar zusammenzuhngen scheinen
(Fischer, Codex Amiatinus und Cassiodor, 77; in nota Fischer aggiunge che il codice, scritto
verso l800, con cui il testo di Atti dellAmiatinus ha un chiaro rapporto, si trova nella biblioteca Vallicelliana, B. 25).
20 Si tratta eventualmente di indicazioni orali, ma nelle due opere sugli Atti non ha scritto
nulla riguardo alla loro divisione: Expositio Actuum Apostolorum e Retractatio in Actus Apostolorum (CC 121, 1-99.101-163). Sul rapporto di Beda con le opere di Cassiodoro e con
lAmiatinus, cf. P. Meyvaert, Bede, Cassiodore and the Codex Amiatinus, Speculum 71
(1996) 827-883; R. Marsden, Manus Bedae: Bedes Contribution to Ceolfriths Bibles, Anglo-Saxon England 27 (1998) 65-85. stata notata la mano di Beda non solo nei testi, ma
anche nelle miniature poste allinizio del codice: la dedica, la figura di Esdra, il Prologo, il
Tabernacolo, il Pentateuco, e gli schemi dei libri biblici secondo Girolamo, Agostino e i vescovi Ilario di Poitiers e Epifanio di Cipro; sullordine di questi fogli cf. C. Chazelle, Ceolfrids
Gift to St Peter: the First Quire of the Codex Amiatinus and the Evidence of its Roman Destination, Early Medieval Europe 12 (2003) 132-149.

226

Giorgio Giurisato

2. Ipotesi di un contatto indiretto


Il fatto che si tratti di divisioni solo parzialmente simili potrebbe trovare una
spiegazione pi plausibile in un contatto indiretto, tramite una fonte comune, da
cui ogni scriba avrebbe attinto liberamente, con il risultato di circa 30 su 69/70
pericopi uguali. Qui occorre ricordare un fatto e una ipotesi. Il fatto che nelle
Institutiones Cassiodoro parla di un graecus pandectes, con il quale mettere a confronto i codici latini per la correzione del testo21. Oltre a questa notizia di Cassiodoro, del graecus pandectes portato forse da Costantinopoli, dove Cassiodoro
visse dieci anni non sappiamo nulla: se dopo la fine del monastero (circa il 598)
sia rimasto in Calabria o se sia stato portato a Roma, come il Codex Grandior, o
sia emigrato altrove. Mentre la biblioteca era fiorente, il graecus pandectes potrebbe essere stato la fonte da cui il Codex Grandior ha attinto la divisione di Atti,
trasmessa poi allAmiatinus; dopo la dispersione della biblioteca, il contatto del
graecus pandectes con il Codex Vaticanus pu essere avvenuto in due luoghi: o a
Roma, nel caso che il secondo sia stato col, come ipotizzato sopra (cf. nota 10), o
in Calabria. Qui viene in soccorso lipotesi formulata da C.M. Mazzucchi di una
permanenza del codice [Vaticanus] in Italia meridionale, pi precisamente in Calabria, tra i secoli VIII e X22. In quel tempo la biblioteca vivariense era gi scomparsa, per cui il graecus pandectes potrebbe essere venuto a trovarsi nello stesso
ambiente calabrese dove anche il Vaticanus era ospitato23, dando allo scriba di Brecente lopportunit di far propria la sua divisione di Atti, gi mutuata precedentemente dal Codex Grandior.
I rapporti tra i codici A e B si possono esprimere con lo schema seguente:
Contatto diretto a Roma dopo il 716:
Amiatinus Vaticanus
Contatto indiretto Due possibilit:
21 Cassiodoro accenna anche ad altri codici greci della sua biblioteca, ma di particolare
importanza il graecus pandectes: ideoque uobis et graecum pandectem reliqui comprehensum
in libris septuaginta quinque, qui continet quaterniones, in armario supradicto octauo, ubi et alios
graecos diuersis opusculis necessario congregaui, nequid sanctissimae instructioni uestrae
necessarium deesse uideretur (I,14.4); Quod si tamen aliqua uerba reperiuntur absurde posita...
recurratur ad graecum pandectem, qui omnem legem diuinam dinoscitur habere collectam (I,15.11).
22 Mazzucchi, Per la storia medievale dei codici biblici B e Q, 138.
23 Nonostante la simile consistenza, certo che il Codex Vaticanus non si identifica con il
graecus pandectes della biblioteca di Vivarium, a motivo delle differenti caratteristiche dei due
codici, ad esempio il secondo contiene quaternioni, il primo quinioni: ideoque uobis et graecum
pandectem reliqui qui continet quaterniones (Institutiones I,14.4). Sauf quelques exceptions,
le manuscrit [B] tait constitu entirement de quinions (P. Canart, Le Vaticanus graecus 1209:
notice palographique et codicologique, in Andrist [ed.], Le manuscrit B de la Bible, 20 = Prolegomena [Introduzione alledizione facsimile del codice B, Roma 1999], 1).

Atti degli Apostoli: le divisioni dei codici Vaticanus e Amiatinus

227

1) A B tramite il Codex Grandior:


Codex Grandior Vaticanus (a Roma prima del 678)
Codex Grandior Amiatinus (in Inghilterra)
2) A B tramite il graecus pandectes e il Codex Grandior:
graecus pandectes B (a Roma dopo il 598), oppure:
graecus pandectes B (in Calabria dopo il 598)
graecus pandectes Codex Grandior (in Calabria prima del 598)
Codex Grandior A (in Inghilterra)

In conclusione, sia il contatto diretto sia quello indiretto, suppongono entrambi
la presenza del Codex Vaticanus (B) in Occidente. Questa oggetto di ipotesi,
come quella del graecus pandectes dopo la dispersione della biblioteca vivariense,
mentre sono pi sicure le notizie riguardanti i codici Grandior e Amiatinus. Nel
tentativo di spiegare la somiglianza delle loro divisioni in Atti la presente ricerca
non poteva non considerare, oltre ai dati certi, anche quelli ipotetici.
Giorgio Giurisato
Theologische Schule, Benediktinerabtei Einsiedeln (CH)
Professore invitato Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem

Alfio Marcello Buscemi


Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass.
Un approccio filologico-esegetico

Col 3,1-4 un punto nevralgico dellargomentazione della Lettera ai Colossesi


e, per questo, ha ricevuto delle attenzioni esegetiche di particolare interesse. Alcune riguardano certi aspetti filologici del testo: la sua esatta traduzione, la giusta
interpretazione dei tempi verbali usati, il valore sintattico di alcune forme presenti
in esso e la funzione retorica che Col 3,1-4 assume nellinsieme del discorso paolino della Lettera ai Colossesi. Altre riguardano lo sfondo letterario di Col 3,1-4,
particolarmente lutilizzo dello sfondo giudaico-apocalittico al posto dellormai
superato sfondo gnostico e, connessa a tale scelta, linterpretazione escatologica di
Col 3,1-4. Non ho la pretesa di risolvere tutti questi problemi, ma solo di offrire un
contributo filologico-esegetico per una giusta interpretazione di questa piccola, ma
interessante pericope, che riveste unimportanza particolare per la teologia battesimale e i suoi influssi nella vita di ogni credente.
1. Alcuni problemi preliminari
Nel 1999, G. Swart in un breve e interessante articolo su Col 3,41, partendo da
alcune osservazioni di carattere filologico, sostiene che il testo di Col 3,4 non
tanto interessato at second coming of Christ, quanto a the visible manifestation
of a new Christ identity2. Lautore non nega che in Col 3,4 the eschatological
implication may be present, but is not foregrounded in this text3. Il punto principale della sua dimostrazione si pu riassumere in questaffermazione: Baptism
was the initial and decisive event signifying their identification with Christ. This
meant more than mere association; it was like obtaining a new identity. It could
best be imagined as dying and being resurrected to a new life. Now indeed, Christ
1 G. Swart, Eschatological vision or exhortation to visible Christian conduct? Notes on the
interpretation of Colossians 3:4, Neotestamentica 33 (1999) 169-177.
2 Swart, Eschatological vision, 174.
3 Swart, Eschatological vision, 176.

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 229-255

230

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

had become their life4. Per ottenere questo risultato, Swart procede da un principio
fondamentale della linguistic communication: the correct interpretation maximizes the relevance of the context rather than the role of the isolated word or
phrase5. Seguendo tale principio, Swart trova che Col 2,203,17 sia il migliore
contesto per tradurre e comprendere pienamente Col 3,4. E ci non stabilito arbitrariamente, ma the internal cohesion of this textual unit is secured by thematic
and stylistic means. Stylistically it concerns the following sets of contrasting images: dying-living, hiding-revealing, and undressing-dressing6. Lautore non solo
offre una serie di tali contrasti, ma tenta anche di dimostrare un modello concentrico in Col 3,3-47, che mi lascia alquanto perplesso. Infine, lautore, basandosi
filologicamente su una certa somiglianza tra Col 3,4 e 2Cor 4,108, ritiene che la
migliore traduzione di Col 3,4 sia la seguente: If you let it become visible that
Christ is your life, then to his glory it will also become manifest that you have
been raised to a new life with him9.
Ritengo che alcune intuizioni di G. Swart non vanno sottovalutate. In primo
luogo, che con il battesimo il cristiano riceve una nuova identit e che la sua
unione con Cristo non solo non una mere association, ma una reale
partecipazione alla vita del Cristo; anzi, Cristo divenuto la sua vita e il suo
vivere ha senso se il cristiano rimane in Cristo. Anche il principio che
linterpretazione non si pu basare solo su una parola o su una frase isolata dal
suo contesto, credo che sia valido sia per la linguistic communication che per
qualsiasi interpretazione basata anche sulla semplice filologia del testo. Ora, il
problema pi grosso, nellesposizione di Swart, sapere con quali criteri egli
abbia stabilito che il contesto di Col 3,4 Col 2,203,17. Veramente, egli
stesso esprime qualche dubbio a riguardo, in quanto un riferimento chiaro al
battesimo si ha solo a partire da 2,11-1210, ma sembra che per lui questi versetti
siano solo unanticipazione tematica di ci che sar svolto in maniera pi ampia
in Col 2,203,17. Di pi: baptism is the unifying theme permeating the entire
passage. Se ci fosse vero, perch non partire direttamente da 2,11-12,
stabilendo cos un contesto pi appropriato? Ma non lunico dubbio che ha
4

Swart, Eschatological vision, 173.


Swart, Eschatological vision, 173. Lautore rimanda allautorit di Wendland e Nida, pi
precisamente E. Wendland - E. Nida, Lexicography and Bible Translating, in J.P. Low (ed.),
Lexicography and Translation with special reference to Bible Translation, Roggebaai (Cape Town)
1985, 1-52.
6 Swart, Eschatological vision, 173.
7 Swart, Eschatological vision, 174-175.
8 Swart, Eschatological vision, 172 e 174-175. Veramente il paragone tra 2Cor 4,10 e Col
3,4, pi che filologico, semplicemente tematico. Cos, per arrivare al suo scopo lautore si appoggia sulla costruzione simile di 1Gv 3,2, testo che ledizione critica di Aland-Nestle (27 ed.) pone
come testo parallelo a Col 3,4.
9 Swart, Eschatological vision, 175.
10 Swart, Eschatological vision, 173.
5

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

231

lautore. Infatti, secondo lui, il lettore moderno potrebbe rimanere perplesso nel
vedere cambiare la divisione dei versetti e dei capitoli11. Veramente, non so a
quale lettore si riferisce lo Swart, in quanto qualsiasi studioso dellAT e del
NT sa che la divisione in versetti e in capitoli non originaria e che stata
stabilita tardivamente nel Medioevo. Ancora pi determinante mi sembra il fatto
che lautore possa scrivere quanto segue: The context in which Colossians 3:4
functions it seems to suggest an exhortation to the readers to realize or act
out their new identity as people who have both died and been raised to a new
life with Christ12. Se ci vero, lesortazione o il carattere esortativo del brano
incomincia solo con limperativo ta; a[nw zhtei'te di 3,1. Ci fa comprendere
che lautore ha usato solo due criteri per stabilire lunit del suo brano: il tema
unificante del battesimo e le corrispondenze verbali che si possono trovare
allinterno di Col 2,203,17. Ora, mi sembra che tutto ci sia poca cosa per
stabilire lunit di questa presunta pericope. Daltra parte, non mi sembra che
con 2,20 inizi una nuova pericope, in quanto Col 2,20-23 fanno parte della
pericope di Col 2,16-23, che mette in guardia i Colossesi dal farsi irretire dai
falsi maestri di Colosse e dalle loro pratiche ascetiche13. In ogni caso, Col 2,2023 va staccato da Col 3,1 a motivo del ritorno alla 2 persona plurale, dellou\n
inferenziale-metabatico, comune negli inizi della parenesi paolina (Gal 5,1;
Rom 12,1; Ef 4,1)14. Daltra parte, il nuovo ou\n inferenziale-metabatico di Col
3,5 e limperativo nekrwvsate, ripresa dellajpeqavnete di Col 3,315, introducono
uno sviluppo nuovo e pi particolareggiato della parenesi, basato sullo svestirsi
delluomo vecchio e rivestire quello nuovo. Nonostante ci, io credo che
laffermazione di Swart: il contesto determina il senso delle parole e della frase,
rimanga ancora valido, dato che il nucleo fondamentale di Col 3,1-4, il contesto
immediato di Col 3,4, rimane ancorato al battesimo (eij sunhgevrqhte tw/'
Cristw/') e invita ad avere una condotta adeguata con tale scelta di vita: ta; a[nw
zhtei'te (Col 3,1), ta; a[nw fronei'te, mh; ta; ejpi; th'" gh'" (Col 3,2).
Nonostante tale coincidenza, mi sembra che n la traduzione n linterpretazione comportamentale dello Swart siano da accettare. Infatti, non credo che la condizionale temporale o{tan + cong. possa equivalere alla semplice condizionale ejanv
11

Swart, Eschatological vision, 176.


Swart, Eschatological vision, 176.
13 Cf. A.M. Buscemi, Una rilettura filologica di Colossesi 2,23, LA 57 (2007) 227-250.
Alcuni autori (Lightfoot, Aletti) pongono una cesura in Col 2,20 a motivo della condizionale
eij ajpeqavnete, ma, sia che si pone un ou\n inferenziale o lo si omette, mi sembra che i vv. 20-23
appartengono concettualmente alla pericope di Col 2,16-23, dato che si continua a parlare di
precetti imposti da certe tradizioni di uomini.
14 W. Nauck, Das ou\n parneticum, ZNW 49 (1958) 134-135; A.M. Buscemi, Lettera ai
Galati. Commentario esegetico (SBF. Analecta 63), Jerusalem 2000, 493-494; P.T. OBrien, Colossians and Philemon (WBC 44), Waco TX 1982, 158.
15 Cf. anche OBrien, Colossians, 158.
12

232

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

+ cong. delleventualit nel futuro, in quanto non si riferisce n al passato n al


presente della vita del credente: If you let it become visible that Christ is your life,
ma ad un futuro che si deve realizzare. In questi casi, Paolo e la letteratura paolina
usano eij + indicativo: Se voi realmente lasciate divenire visibile che Cristo la
vostra vita. Daltra parte, non credo che il contesto esiga lintercambiabilit tra
o{tan + cong. e ejanv + cong. Swart lo motiva con il testo parallelo, addotto da Nestle-Aland, di 1Gv 2,3, che credo venga riportato solo per motivi tematici e non per
motivi formali. Ancora pi discutibile mi sembra il cambio del soggetto del passivo mediale fanerwqh',/ che sicuramente Cristo; non ho nessun problema ad accettare la traduzione di fanerovw con rendere visibile e dare al passivo un senso
mediale, in quanto non cambia molto nel senso del testo; infine, la traduzione della seconda frase troppo concettuale per essere credibile. Ognuno, a motivo del
contesto, pu inventare qualsiasi cosa o prestare al testo le proprie convinzioni.
meglio rimanere fedeli a ci che il testo ci propone.
Anche E. Delebecque16 insiste su una buona traduzione di Col 3,1-4 e le sue
osservazioni filologiche sui tempi verbali usati da Paolo mi sembrano di un
certo interesse esegetico, in quanto offrono delle nuances che contribuiscono ad
una comprensione migliore di questo testo paolino. Lautore esamina versetto per
versetto e alla fine offre la sua traduzione: Si donc il est vrai que vous ftes avec
le Christ ressuscits, perseverez dans la recherche des choses den-haut, l o le
Christ se trouve assis la droit de Dieu; les chose den-haut, tenez-les en lesprit,
non pas celles de dessus la terre; car, ds linstant que vous mourtes, votre vie est,
ensemble avec Christ, cache en Dieu. Lorsque le Christ, votre vie, sera manifest,
alors vous aussi, ensemble avec lui, serez manifests en gloire. In Col 1,1, Delebecque insiste su una migliore traduzione di eij sunhgevrqhte, mettendo in rilievo
il valore di eij: sil est vrai que, quello del passivo: i Colossesi ne ressuscitrent
pas tout seuls, par ses propres moyens e soprattutto quello dellaoristo: che non
va tradotto si vous tes ressuscits, che, come perfetto, insiste pi su uno stato
conseguente, ma con vous ftes resssuscits avec le Crist, che insiste sul momento preciso in cui i credenti hanno preso parte alla resurrezione con Cristo17. Tale
analisi non va rifiutata, ma a mio parere va precisata. Infatti, il passivo sottolinea
lintervento di Dio, ma nello stesso tempo va interpretato come un passivo permissivo: se vi lasciaste risuscitare con Cristo18. Infatti, il credente nel momento
del battesimo ha lasciato che Dio intervenisse nella sua vita. In quel momento, egli
16

395.

17

E. Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps chez Saint Paul (Col 3,1-4), Bib 70 (1989) 389-

Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps, 390.


H.W. Smyth, Greek Grammar, revised by G.M. Messing, Cambridge MA 1984, 1736; F.
Blass - A. Debrunner - F. Rehkopf, Grammatica del Nuovo Testamento, ed. italiana a cura di G.
Pisi, Brescia 1982, 314 (citato come BDR, Grammatica); L. Cignelli - R. Pierri, Sintassi di Greco
Biblico (LXX e NT). Quaderno II/a: Le diatesi (SBF. Analecta 77), Jerusalem 2010, 47-48.
18

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

233

ha deciso di unirsi a Cristo e per questo si lasciato immergere con Cristo nella
nuova vita. Buona anche linterpretazione dellimperativo presente zhtei'te, che
il signifie la dure, la persvrance nel ricercare le cose di lass19, dato che limperativo presente ha aspetto confermativo di azione gi esistente: continuate a
cercare, perseverate nella ricerca20. Meno buona linterpretazione di ejstivn
kaqhvmeno" di Col 1,1c. Sono daccordo con lautore che si tratti di una coniugazione perifrastica, ma di sicuro non un perfetto passivo perifrastico21, bens un
presente medio dinamico perifrastico22, pi precisamente un medio dinamico diretto: si assiso (da s)23 avente aspetto duraturo continuo: si assiso definitivamente e quindi risiede alla destra di Dio24. In Col 3,2, il Delebecque suggerisce di conservare il senso transitivo di fronei'te, impliquant un travail de lesprit.
Ma non mi sembra che il testo suggerisca unidea statica del pensare o riflettere, bens lidea dinamica del dirigere la propria mente verso qualcosa25. Inoltre,
mi sembra strano che lautore, cos attento a stabilire il senso preciso dei tempi
verbali, non abbia suggerito il senso confermativo del fronei'te di Col 3,2a e
quello interruttivo del mh; (fronei'te) ta; ejpi; th'" gh'": non (pensate/smettete
di pensare) alle cose che sono sulla terra di Col 3,2b26. In Col 3,3, Delebecque,
appogiandosi a Lc 2,21; At 1,10; Gv 14,7, suggerisce di tradurre: Car, ds linstant
que vous mourtes, votre vie est, ensemble avec Christ, cache en Dieu27. Una
tale traduzione non mi sembra fedele al testo: interpretare la proposizione indipendente ajpeqavnete come una proposizione dipendente temporale alquanto strano.
Mi sembra invece che il kai; hJ zwh; uJmw'n kevkruptai su;n tw/' Cristw/' vada
inteso in senso consecutivo: Infatti, voi moriste e cos/a tal punto che la vostra
vita sta definitivamente nascosta con Cristo. Tale senso del kaiv molto comune
19 Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps, 390. Il verbo perseverare va molto bene e non
c bisogno, come suggerisce Delebecque, di aggiungere qualche avverbio come toujours o sans
cesse, che daltra parte lautore ha fatto bene a non utilizzare nella traduzione suggerita.
20 J. Mateos, El aspecto verbal en el Nuevo Testamento, Madrid 1977, 222.
21 Kaqhvmeno" presente participio medio di kavqhmai: starsene seduto, risiedere, asse
dersi.
22 P.F. Regard, La phrase nominale dans la langue du Nouveau Testament, Paris 1919, 121, che
cita Col 3,1; N. Turner, A Grammar of New Testament Greek. III: Syntax, Edinburgh 1963, 88; cf.
anche Mateos, El aspecto, 113 e 115. Nessuno, per, vieta di prenderlo come un participio congiunto
modale: dove Cristo , sedendo/e siede alla destra o causale: poich siede alla destra (cf. J.B.
Lightfoot, Saint Pauls Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon, London 1927, 207, seguendo il
commento di Giovanni Crisostomo).
23 Cignelli - Pierri, Le diatesi, 88-89 e 90-91; ma anche J. Thayer, A Greek-English Lexicon of
the New Testament, Grand Rapids MI 1978, ad vocem kavqhmai 1: seat onesef, anche se poi sceglie il senso perfettivo in kavqhmai 2.
24 Mateos, El aspecto, 115.
25 Cf. Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem fronevw 2, e ad vocem sofiva, Synonyma, dove precisa il
senso profondo e specifico della frovnhsi"; R.Ch. Trench, Synonyms of the New Testament, Grand
Rapids MI 1948, 281-286; OBrien, Colossians, 163-164.
26 Mateos, El aspecto, 127.
27 Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps, 391-393.

234

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

sia in Paolo che nel NT e ci permette di non forzare il testo di Col 3,3 in base a
paralleli non perfettamente uguali a quello nostro.
H. Koester28, volendo precisare il senso dellespressione oiJ ta; ejpigeiva fronou'nte"
di Fil 3,19, fa riferimento a Col 3,2 e afferma: This fundamental exhortation refers
to the theological presupposition if you are risen with Christ (III,1) - a
presupposition which would have been as unacceptable to Paul as the exhortation
itself29. Nel tentativo di rendere credibile la sua affermazione, Koester aggiunge
una nota: There is not a single istance in the genuine epistles of Paul in which the
resurrection of the Christians in the past o present is referred to as basis of the
imperative. On the contrary, the resurrection of the believer remains a future
expectation, or it is contained in the imperative itself, that is, it is only present in
the dialectical demand to walk in the newness of life; see especially Rom vi. 1ff30.
Le affermazioni, cos perentorie di Koester, non meravigliano pi di tanto, in
quanto non dipendono tanto da ci che dice Paolo31, ma da come egli interpreta i
testi di Paolo. Ora, la sua chiave di lettura, sia di Rom 6,1-11 che di Col 3,1, quella
del giudaismo apocalittico32, che attendeva lavvento del Messia alla fine dei
tempi e, quindi, la salvezza definitiva al momento del trionfo del Regno di Dio.
Paolo non affatto un giudeo apocalittico, qua e l pu avere anche subito
qualche influsso secondario da tale movimento religioso-culturale, ma per lo pi
la sua escatologia rimane quella della duplice parusia del Cristo: quella storica e
28 H. Koester, The Purpose of the Polemic of a Pauline Fragment (Philippians), NTS 8 (196162) 317-332.
29 Koester, The Purpose, 329.
30 Koester, The Purpose, 329 nota 2.
31 Cf. per esempio cosa dice Paolo in Rom 6,4: sunetavfhmen ou\n aujtw/' dia; tou' baptivsmato"
eij" to;n qavnaton, i{na w{sper hjgevrqh Cristo;" ejk nekrw'n dia; th'" dovxh" tou' patrov", ou{tw"
kai; hJmei'" ejn kainovthti zwh'" peripathvswmen, e Rom 7,4: w{ste, ajdelfoiv mou, kai; uJmei'"
ejqanatwvqhte tw/' novmw/ dia; tou' swvmato" tou' Cristou', eij" to; genevsqai uJma'" eJtevrw/, tw/'
ejk nekrw'n ejgerqevnti, i{na karpoforhvswmen tw/' qew/.' La connessione tra la resurrezione di
Cristo e il nostro vivere in conseguenza mi sembra molto chiaro. Il credente partecipa alla
resurrezione di Cristo (sunhgevrqhte) e proprio per questo deve camminare in novit di vita e
portare frutti per Dio (cf. A.T. Lincoln, Paradiso ora e non ancora [BCR 48], Brescia 1985, 209210 e 224-225).
32 Cf. Koester, The Purpose, 330: Paolo refers to apocalyptic tradition in order to emphasize
that participation in the heavenly commonwealth presupposes that the Kyrios Jesus Christ has
overcome sin and death definitely once and for all, which he will do only in the parousia. Di pi,
a p. 329 nota 2 rimprovera D.M. Stanley, che, nella sua opera Christs Resurrection in Pauline Soteriology (AnBib 13, Romae 1961), unfortunately disregards the controversial issues that necessarly had to arise from a Christological reinterpretation of Jewish apocalyptic belifies. Giustamente, il Koester, lungo tutto il suo articolo, polemizza apertamente con unaltra chiave di lettura
dei testi paolini: linterpretazione gnostica dello Schmithals. A differenza del giudaismo apocalittico, lo gnosticismo sosteneva che il credente gi risuscitato e ormai reso impeccabile: la
salvezza lha aperto a una nuova esistenza totalmente redenta. Anche questa chiave di lettura non
affatto consona per interpretare il pensiero paolino. E per fortuna mi sembra che gli esegeti attuali lhanno definitivamente messa da parte. In ogni caso, non mi sembra che, per ovviare a un errore
di interpretazione, bisogna cadere in un altro errore, anche se di segno opposto.

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

235

quella futura degli ultimi tempi. Cristo, con la sua morte e resurrezione, ha gi
operato la salvezza di coloro che credono in lui. Essi, nel battesimo, mediante la
fede sono stati resi partecipi del mistero di morte-resurrezione di Cristo. Essi non
attendono la resurrezione, ma attendono il ritorno di Cristo per entrare nella sua
gloria. Nel battesimo sono stati introdotti in una nuova vita, meglio ancora sono
divenuti uno in Cristo (Gal 3,28), la loro vita (Col 3,2-3; cf. Gal 2,20); anzi, il
loro vivere Cristo (Fil 1,21). Ma c ancora unaltra idea che non quadra bene
nellaffermazione di Koester. In Col 3,1, lespressione condizionale eij sunhgevrqhte
non fa riferimento, come ha ben dimostrato Delebecque, ad uno stato di essere,
quanto al momento in cui il credente si lasciato afferare mediante la sua adesione
di fede dal mistero della morte-resurrezione di Cristo. Da quel momento il credente
ha orientato la propria esistenza in maniera totalmente differente da quella che
conduceva sotto la schiavit del peccato, della legge o degli elementi del mondo.
Pertanto, limperativo zhtei'te di Col 3,1, come anche il ta; a[nw fronei'te di Col
3,2, non sono altro che un invito alla coerenza. Avendo scelto di morire e risuscitare
con Cristo, il credente non pu fare altro che cercare le cose di lass, che lo
mantegono sempre in comunione con Colui che si assiso definitivamente alla
destra del Padre. E tale comunione con lui avr la sua manifestazione definitiva,
quando Cristo, loro vita, si manifester nella gloria (Col 3,4).
Sulla stessa linea interpretativa di una apocalyptic perspective sembra muoversi anche J.R. Levison33. Lautore, ritiene che il testo di 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7,
non solo condivide la stessa eschatological perspective34, ma chiarisce gli enigma di Col 3,1-6 o meglio tre aspetti importanti di Col 3,1-6: precisamente, la relazione tra laspetto spaziale di Col 3,1-2 e quello temporale di Col 3,3-4, il contenuto di le cose di lass e la determinazione delle membra sulla terra. In quanto al primo punto, lautore ritiene che a motivo dellattesa escatologico-apocalittica, the relationship between things above and life hidden must be the suppressed premise that things above are synonymous with life hidden or, in other
words, that life is hidden in the world above. If the Colossians believe that the life
is hidden above, awaiting final revelation, then, urges the author, they must seek
that life, those things which are above35. In quanto alle cose di lass, lautore
ritiene, basandosi sempre sul confronto con 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, che si tratti
della rivelazione apocalittica delle schiere angeliche alla fine dei tempi36. Meglio
ancora, alla fine dei tempi sar mostrato che at the center of this world is the thro33 J.R. Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7 and the Apocalyptic Dimension of Colossians 3:16, JBL 108 (1989) 93-108. Comunque, lautore ci tiene a distinguere la propria posizione da
quella di J. Gnilka, di A.T. Lincoln, di P.T. OBrien e di E. Schweizer, che si rifanno, nella loro
interpretazione, allo stesso modello interpretativo basato su 2 Apoc. Bar. 48,42-52-7 (cf. pp. 93-94
e ancora di pi le pp. 104-108).
34 Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 96.
35 Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 95.
36 Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 100.

236

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

ne of God, under which living beings dwell. Tale manifestazione rende chiara
laffermazione di Col 1,13: ringraziamo il Padre che ci ha resi capaci di aver parte alleredit dei santi nella luce e inoltre spiega tutta la polemica di Paolo contro
lerrore dei falsi maestri di Colosse, che erano propensi verso ladorazione degli
angeli (Col 2,8-23). Daltra parte, bisogna notare che Col 3,1-4 un transitional
passage37, che da una parte si richiama al superamento di tali errori attraverso
una condotta di vita ispirata al battesimo (Col 2,12-18) e daltra rilancia lattesa
escatologica attraverso a renewal process with ethical significance38. Tale mescolanza di escatologia ed etica non casuale, ma richiesta proprio dal carattere
apocalittico della rivelazione soggiacente sia in 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7 che in Col
3,1-6: While paradise, immortality, and angelic splendor costitute their hidden
life above, conformity to Gods image in their life below will qualify them to inherit their life above is to come. Christlike behavior (3,12), not vision, is the appropriate way to anticipate eschatological renewal39. In altre parole, the Colossian
authors exhortation to seek things above is an eschatological demand to concentrate on the hidden realities which will charaterize them when they are glorified in
the world above. Essi, per questo, non debbono cercare proleptic vision, ma
piuttosto debbono mettere a morte i vizi e prepararsi for physical trasformation
into eschatological splendor40.
La prospettiva di Levison, che coniuga la apocalyptic perspective con un a
renewal process with ethical significance, mi sembra pi accettabile41 che linterpretazione giudaico-apocalittica di H. Koester42. Intanto, ha visto chiaro che Col
37

Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 100 e 104.


Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 103-104.
39 Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 104.
40 Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 108.
41 Un giudizio positivo stato espresso anche da J.D.G. Dunn, The Epistles to the Colossians
and to Philemon. A Commentary on the Greek Text (NIGTC), Carlisle U.K. 1996, 202.
42 Comunque, sia lapocalyptic tradition di H. Koester che la apocalyptic perspective di
J.R. Levison sono una reazione critica a quel dominante sfondo gnostico o a quella lettura religionsgeschichtliche, a cui spesso ha fatto riferimento una certa esegesi del mondo tedesco (Bultmann, Schmithals, Schlier, Schweizer, Lohse e altri). Ad essi va aggiunto, per ci che riguarda Col
3,1-4 anche E.E. Grsser, Kol 3,1-4 als Beispiel einer Interpretation secundum homines recipientes, ZTK 64 (1967) 138-168, che, facendo riferimento a proprio allo sfondo gnostico, ritiene che
in Col 3,1-4 si ha una duplice dialettica: in 3,1-2 der Dialektik von Sein und Sollen, mentre in
3,3-4 der Dialektik von Sein und Werden (p. 147). In ogni caso, tale dialettica si determinata
nel Battesimo, che per questo lo si pu definire come die Himmelfahrt, in quanto in der Taufe
sind wir mit Christus gestorben, darum werden wir auch mit him auferstehen (p. 149; comunque,
cf. anche p. 147, in cui lautore fa riferimento anche ai misteri: Es geht um das Heilsgeshehen
bei der Taufe, das - in Anlehnung an Misterienvorstellungen - auch sonst als Partizipation am Sterben und Aufersthen Christi beschrieben wird). In primo luogo, tale Himmelfahrt ha una connotazione etica: die Himmelfahrt der Existenz realisiert sich nicht anders denn als Ablegen der
Snde und Tun des Guten (p. 153), ma anche una connotazione soteriologica e si realizza soprattutto quando il credente realizza la sua anabasis come unione con Cristo. Infatti, das Mitauferwecktsein besteht nicht abgesehen von oder neben dem konkreten Tun und Schicksal des Menschen.
38

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

237

3,1-4 un transitional passage e, quindi, va interpretato alla luce sia di ci che


precede, Col 2,8-23 che di ci che segue, Col 3,5-17 o, forse meglio, Col 3,54,6.
In ogni caso, Levison afferma giustamente che la parenesi paolina di Col 3,54,6
una ricerca delle cose di lass, che in qualche modo rendono il credente pronto a quello che egli chiama physical trasformation into eschatological splendor,
ma che di per s non altro che la manifestazione gloriosa del credente, quando
Cristo si manifester nella sua gloria43. Ci che mi sembra poco convincente ritenere, come punto centrale di Col 2,8-23, la polemica di Paolo sulladorazione
degli angeli. Per quanto importante essa possa essere, il centro del pensiero di
Paolo il fatto che il credente, nel battesimo, divenuto partecipe della morteresurrezione di Cristo. Ci dimostrato dal fatto che in Col 3,1-4 Paolo riprende
proprio la terminologia battesimale del morire e risorgere con Cristo, per potere
essere partecipe non solo della sua vita Cristo la vostra vita (Col 3,3.4) , ma
anche della sua gloria.
2. Analisi letterario-strutturale di Col 3,1-4
Uno dei limiti principali dei contributi suesposti quello di non aver stabilito
con accuratezza i limiti precisi della pericope e il suo contesto. Qualcuno, credo, li
supponga come dimostrate da precedenti analisi44; qualche altro, pur ritenendo Col
3,1-4 come a transitional passage, lo ritiene come parte integrante di un contesto
molto largo, che va da Col 2,12 a Col 3,1745; qualche altro ancora, pur di sostenere
il proprio schema culturale: dying-living, hiding-revealing, and undressingdressing46, preferisce parlare di enigma di Col 3,1-6 e di stabilire uno stretto
legame tra Col 3,1-4 e la parenesi seguente di Col 3,5-4,647. In ogni caso, nessuno
di questi autori ha sentito il bisogno di motivare filologicamente le proprie scelte.
Vielmehr: Das konkrete Schicksal ist es doch, in dem sich - fr die Betrachtung des Glaubens - das
Mitauferstandensein mit Christus offenbart (p. 159). E infine anche una connotazione escatologica,
che non si basa tanto sul pensiero apocalittico, n su un misticismo sciolto dalla storia, ma nella
certezza della Parusia e della nostra appartenenza a Cristo (pp. 166-168). Su questo punto cf. le brevi
ma interessanti osservazioni di Dunn, Colossians, 200-201, e le osservazioni critiche di Lincoln,
Paradiso, 210-211 e 223-226; M. Barth - H. Blanke - A Beck, Colossians. A New Translation with
Introduction and Commentary (AB 34B), New York 1994, 170-172.
43 A proposito di Col 3,4, non condivido laffermazione di Levison che i due passivi
fanerwqh/' e fanerwqhvsesqe siano da interpretare entrambi come divine passive, in quanto
fanerwqh/,' avendo come soggetto esplicito Cristo, da interpretare come mediale: quando Cristo
si manifester.
44 il caso di Delebecque, che, tutto preso dalle sue preziose e puntuali precisazioni filologiche,
trascura di precisare i limiti del testo e del suo contesto, che fanno parte di una buona interpretazione
e, quindi, anche di una buona traduzione.
45 Swart, Eschatological vision, 173.
46 Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 96.
47 Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48:42-52:7, 96.

238

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

Nonostante tali approsimazioni, qualcuno tra questi ha proposto anche delle strutture letterarie, che logicamente sono basate su qualche elemento lessicografico
indiscutibile e su qualche riferimento alla retorica48. Proprio per questo, cercher
in primo luogo di stabilire i limiti del testo e del suo contesto, di determinare la
funzione retorica di Col 3,1-4, di presentare una sua struttura letteraria e, infine
offrirne una interpretazione esegetica.
a) Limiti e contesto di Col 3,1-4
Sono parzialmente daccordo con chi definisce Col 3,1-4 a transitional
passage, in quanto lou\n inferenziale-metabatico di Col 3,1, comune negli inizi
della parenesi paolina (Gal 5,1; Rom 12,1; Ef 4,1)49, pone in stretta relazione Col
3,1-4 con Col 2,16-23; inoltre, a motivo del binomio lessicografico: ajpeqavnete
sunhgevrqhte tw/' Cristw/)' 50, lou\n fa riferimento chiaro a Col 2,12 e, quindi a
Col 2,8-15. Pertanto, Col 3,1-4 ha una stretta relazione con tutto ci che precede:
con 2,16-23 con linvito a ta; a[nw zhtei'te di Col 3,1 e ancor di pi con linvito
in stile diatribico di Col 3,2: ta; a[nw fronei'te, mh; ta; ejpi; th'" gh'"; con 2,8-12
per un duplice motivo: il credente, infatti, non deve uniformarsi ad una filosofia
umana, basata sulle tradizioni umane e sugli elementi del mondo (Col 2,8), ma
deve cercare la propria identit cristiana essendo stato reso partecipe nel battesimo
alla morte-resurrezione di Cristo (Col 2,12)51. Ma Col 3,1-4 non solo in
relazione con ci che precede, ma anche con ci che segue: lou\n inferenzialemetabatico di Col 3,552 e limperativo aoristo nekrwvsate53, una ripresa
48

Swart, Eschatological vision, 174-175.


Nauck, Das ou\n parneticum, 134-135; Buscemi, Galati, 493-494; OBrien, Colossians,
158; J. Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis of Colossians, ed. by M.F. Kopesec, Dallas TX 1983,
168; M.Y. MacDonald, Colossians and Ephesians (Sacra Pagina 17), Collegeville MN 2000, 129;
M.M. Thompson, Colossians and Philemon, Grand Rapids MI 2005, 69.
50 Su questo punto cf. Grsser, Kol 3,1-4, 151, che collega giustamente questo ou\n parneticum con quanto detto precedentemente in Col 2,8-23 e, in particolare con Col 2,12. Barth et alii,
Colossians, 391-392, basandosi sulla somiglianza tra Col 2,20 e Col 3,1, in quanto entrambi si riferiscono al battesimo (Col 2,11ss), pensano che 3,1-4 potrebbero essere la parte finale della precedente sezione (Col 2,6-23), ma il fatto che Col 3,1 si collega contestualmente a Col 3,3 fa propendere a legare Col 3,1-4 alla parenesi che segue in Col 3,1-17. evidente che a Barth et alii interessano pi i contenuti che una concreta divisione letteraria di Col 3,1-4. Anzi, proprio perch non
danno alcun peso ai due ou\n inferenziali-metabatici di Col 3,1.4, non riescono a comprendere pienamente la loro funzione nel discorso di Paolo.
51 Per una connessione di Col 3,1-4 con ci che precede cf. anche Dunn, Colossians, 200;
Thompson, Colossians, 69.
52 Notato pure da Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 168.
53 Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 168, nota giustamente una differenza semantica tra
limperativo presente di Col 3,1.2, che invita a perseverare nella ricerca delle cose dellalto, e
limperativo aoristo di Col 3,5, che ingiunge (imperativo iussivo) di far morire tutto ci che appartiene alla terra.
49

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

239

dellindicativo aoristo ajpeqavnete di Col 3,354, introducono uno sviluppo nuovo e


pi particolareggiato della parenesi55, basato sullo svestirsi delluomo vecchio e
rivestire quello nuovo. C di pi, il credente non invitato solo a conformarsi con
la morte di Cristo, ma ancor di pi a risorgere con Cristo, al punto tale che
Cristo divenga la sua vita. Proprio per questo, credo che lou\n inferenzialemetabatico di Col 3,5 introduca tutta la parenesi di Col 3,54,656. Se tutto ci
vero, Col 3,1-4 una pericope a se stante e il suo contesto quello battesimale di
Col 2,8-23, che istruisce il credente a saper guardarsi (Col 2,16) dai falsi maestri
operanti a Colosse, e quello escatologico-comportamentale di Col 3,54,6, che
invita il credente ad essere coerente con la propria identit di persona che si
lasciato coinvolgere nel mistero di morte-resurrezione di Cristo57.
b) La funzione retorica di Col 3,1-4
Tale posizione intermedia, se la esaminiamo da un punto di vista retorico, assume nel discorso epidittico di Paolo una funzione particolare, chiamata ananosis58.
Essa, da una parte, aveva la funzione di un transitus, per rendere meno brusco il
passaggio59, daltra si presentava come una subpropositio, che proponeva in forma
nuova la tesi iniziale e la adattava alla nuova argumentatio, e infine offriva anche
una partitio, che presentava i momenti essenziali o probationes che intendeva svolgere. Non si tratta ci da sottolineare di una nuova propositio da dimostrare,
ma di unananosis, cio di un richiamo alla propositio principale di 1,9b: i{na
plhrwqh'te th;n ejpivgnwsin tou' qelhvmato" aujtou'. In tal modo, non solo si
54

Cf. anche OBrien, Colossians, 158.


Anche questo elemento stato notato diligentemente da Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 168. Egli nota anche il passaggio dal comando positivo al comando negativo, ma ci mi sembra
che non sia dovuto al comando in se stesso, ma al fatto che il comando di Col 3,5 fa riferimento
allaoristo indicativo di Col 3,3 e solo indirettamente al comando di Col 3,1.2. Sulluso dellimperativo nella parenesi di Col 3,14,6 cf. W.T. Wilson, The Hope of Glory. Education & Exhortation
in the Epistle to the Colossians (Supl. NT 88), Leiden - New York - Kln 1997, 42-43 e 46.
56 Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 167, sembra metterlo in connessione solo con Col
3,5-16. Ma io credo che anche la tavola di famiglia di Col 3,184,1 e le esortazioni generali di
Col 4,2-6 sono anchessi una ricerca delle cose dellalto in vista della piena comunione di vita con
Cristo (cf. Dunn, Colossians, 199).
57 Cf. anche Thompson, Colossians, 69; Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 245-246.
58 M. Wolter, Der Brief an die Kolosser. Der Brief an Philemon (TKNT 12), Gtersloh 1993,
164-165, ritiene Col 3,1-4 la peroratio dellargumentatio di 2,9-23; cf. anche B. Witherington, III,
The Letters to Philemon, the Colossians, and the Ephesians. A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on the
Captivity Epistles, Grand Rapids MI 2007, 167. Mi sembra che Col 3,1-4 non ha alcuna caratteristica
attribuibile a una peroratio; anzi, i due imperativi ta; a[nw zhtei'te e ta; a[nw fronei'te sono una
spia chiara che si sta procedendo dallindicativo della salvezza (sunhgevrqhte, ajpeqavnete)
allimperativo della salvezza; in altre parole, abbiamo il passaggio evidente a una nuova fase del
discorso epidittico di Paolo o dellautore di Colossesi.
59 H. Lausberg, Handbook of Literary Rhetoric. A Foundation for Literary Study, ed. by D.E.
Orton - R.D. Anderson, Leiden - Boston - Kln 1998, 287-28 e 343-345.
55

240

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

evita il frazionamento del discorso, ma si mantiene lunit essenziale delle


argumentationes illustranti la propositio principale.
Servendosi di elementi emozionali e razionali60, il transitus di Col 3,1 molto
interessante da un punto di vista retorico. Infatti, il richiamo allessere risuscitati
con Cristo nella protasi della realt ha lo scopo di auditorium movere; un
appello non discutibile della propria convinzione di fede e sta alla base del proprio
eijkov" o identit cristiana. Di pi: la base portante di quella ejpivgnwsi" tou'
qelhvmato" aujtou' di 1,9b. Proprio per questo, lapodosi, insistendo sempre
sullauditorium movere, invita i credenti di Colosse ta; a[nw zhtei'te, interpretando
in maniera fedele il passivo permissivo plhrwqh'te di 1,9b come un ricercare le
cose di lass, via maestra per arrivare alla piena conoscenza della volont di
Dio61. In tal modo, il transitus, anche se in termini generali, intende auditorium
docere, in quanto suggerisce un modo concreto di vivere lesperienza credente
dellessere risuscitati con Cristo62.
Ci diviene ancora pi evidente nella subpropositio di Col 3,2, dove il ta; a[nw
fronei'te, mh; ta; ejpi; th'" gh'" interpreta la fede in Cristo, come gi la propositio principale di 1,9b, in dimensione gnoseologico-esperienziale. In tal senso
molto significativo luso del termine fronevw. Infatti, frovnhsi" un sinonimo
di sofiva e di suvnesi": la sofiva il sapere nella forma pi alta e carica di senso,
la suvnesi" la comprensione dellimportanza delle cose, la frovnhsi" il sapere
individuare le linee pratiche di attuazione di unidea o di un comportamento religioso63, la capacit di distinguere ci che bene e ci che male, il discernimento di ci che porta alla conoscenza della volont di Dio e di ci che allontana da
essa. L antivqeton kata; kw'lon e kata; ojnomasivan di Col 3,264, daltra parte,
esprime molto bene il discernimento cristiano tra le cose di lass e le cose
della terra. Cos, per il credente, avere la frovnhsi" significa mettersi alla sequela di Cristo: morire con lui, nascondere con Cristo la propria esistenza e
nello stesso tempo attendere la sua manifestazione nella gloria, in modo che
anche noi saremo manifestati con lui, che la nostra vita.
In tale dinamica di morire e vivere si dibatte lesistenza cristiana e la partitio
di Col 3,3-4 diviene elemento sia di pathos che di concreto insegnamento epidittico
per il conseguimento di tale gloria. Anzi, il morire e vivere con Cristo diviene
un locus a causa65, usato abbastanza comunemente in un discorso epidittico, in
60

Lausberg, Literary Rhetoric, 344-345.


Su questo punto cf. Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 128-129, anche se non cita Col 3,1-2.
62 Su questo punto cf. le interessanti osservazioni di Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 40-50, sulla
funzione filofronetica (p. 49) delle esortazioni paoline nella Lettera ai Colossesi.
63 Per lappartenenza del termine fronevw al vocabolario gnoseologico, cf. Thayer, Lexicon, ad
vocem sofiva Sun.; G. Bertram, frhvn, GLNT, XV, 133-174.
64 Lausberg, Literary Rhetoric, 787 e 793-796.
65 Lausberg, Literary Rhetoric, 378-381.
61

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

241

quanto indica il motivo fondante per agire in un determinato modo66. La vita del
cristiano, stando a Col 3,1-4, deve essere regolata in base al kerygma fondamentale
della fede: i credenti sono morti con Cristo a tutto ci che terrestre, ma anche
sono risuscitati con Cristo, dal quale attendono la loro gloria futura (3,3-4)67. Ma
sia il morire e vivere di Cristo come il morire e vivere del cristiano con Cristo
sono azione stabilite nel passato (cf. gli aoristi: sunhgevrqhte, ajpeqavnete), per
questo il locus a causa si trasforma in locus ex efficientibus o ab effectis o
e[kbasi"68. La terminologia pu oscillare secondo langolazione di come si legge
il testo: se laccento viene posto sulla morte e risurrezione di Cristo, allora
dovrebbe essere un locus ex efficientibus, ma se viene posto, come sembra fare il
testo di Col 3,1-4, sulla decisione del cristiano che scaturisce da queste azioni
salvifiche, allora mi sembra che lagire del cristiano sia una conseguenza
dellazione salvifica del Cristo, e quindi un locus ab effectis. In base a tale dinamica
dellessere partecipi al morire e vivere con Cristo, la parenesi di Col 3,54,6
contiene tre argumenta ab effectis: Col 3,5-17: spogliarsi delluomo vecchio
rivestirsi delluomo nuovo; Col 3,184,1: applicazione alla vita familiare; Col
4,2-6: varie raccomandazioni generali.
c) La struttura letteraria di Col 3,1-4
La breve pericope di Col 3,1-4 divisibile in tre parti e mostra uno schema
inclusivo del tipo ABA. La suddivisione basata sullasindeto tra Col 3,1 e 3,2 e
sul gavr esplicativo di Col 3,3, che stabilisce una leggera cesura tra Col 3,2 e 3,3-469.
In concreto, la divisione di Col 3,1-4 si presenta nel seguente modo70:
A. Col 3,1: Motivazione cristologico-escatologica

Eij ou\n sunhgevrqhte tw/' Cristw/,'
ta; a[nw zhtei'te,
ou| oJ Cristov" ejstin ejn dexia/' tou' qeou' kaqhvmeno":
66

Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 113-117.


Per una simile divisione del testo cf. J.-N. Aletti, Saint Paul. ptre aux Colossiens (B n.
s. 20), Paris 1993, 39 e 215-217, che definisce in diversi modi questo inizio della parenesi: principes (3,1-4) (p. 39), 3,1-4: exhortations introductives (p. 215), exhortations generales et principes (p. 217). Tale caratterizzazioni, per quanto aderenti al carattere parenetico della pericope,
hanno poco a che fare con la retorica, che in questi casi usa proprio largumentum o locus a causa.
68 Lausberg, Literary Rhetoric, 380-381.
69 OBrien, Colossians, 158, basandosi su F. Zeilinger, Der Esrtsgeborene der Schpfung.
Untersuchungen zur Formalstruktur und Theologie des Kolosserbrief, Berlin 1974, 60-62, ritiene
che la pericope divisibile in 2 parti, ma non viene addotto alcun motivo formale o contenutistico
per dimostrare tale divisione.
70 Per una struttura diversa, basata su criteri di struttura semantica, cf. Callow, A Semantic
Structure Analysis, 167.168.
67

242

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

B. Col 3,2: Conoscenza e condotta coerente di vita


ta; a[nw fronei'te,
mh; ta; ejpi; th'" gh'".
A Col 3,3-4: Motivazione cristologico-escatologica
ajpeqavnete ga;r
kai; hJ zwh; uJmw'n kevkruptai su;n tw/' Cristw/' ejn tw/' qew/.'

o{tan oJ Cristo;" fanerwqh/,' hJ zwh; uJmw'n,
tovte kai; uJmei'" su;n aujtw/' fanerwqhvsesqe ejn dovxh/.
Osservazioni sulla struttura
Lunit della pericope determinata da molti elementi formali:
- da alcune inclusioni letterarie:
-- il dativo sociativo tw/' Cristw/' di Col 3,1a trova corrispondenza in su;n tw/'
Cristw/' di Col 3,3a, entrambi sono completati dallinclusione letterariocontenutistica tra il sunhgevrqhte tw/' Cristw/' di Col 3,1a e lhJ zwh; uJmw'n... su;n
tw/' Cristw/' di Col 3,3a;
-- dallinclusione letterario-contenutistica tra ejn dexia/' tou' qeou' di Col 3,1c e
ejn tw/' qew/' di Col 3,3a e ejn dovxh/ di Col 4,4b;
-- dallinclusione letterario-contenutistica tra sunhgevrqhte di Col 3,1a e
ajpeqavnete di Col 3,3a, che insieme rappresentano il kerygma fondamentale della
fede cristiana, che sta alla base del vivere cristiano;
- dal continuo ripetersi del termine Cristov" (Col 3,1c; 4,4b), soprattutto nella
sfumatura del complemento di partecipazione: tw/' Cristw/' di Col 3,1a, su;n tw/'
Cristw/' di Col 3,3a e su;n aujtw/' di Col 4,4c;
- dal dominio della seconda persona plurale: sunhgevrqhte di Col 3,1a, zhtei'te
di Col 3,1b, fronei'te di Col 3,2a, hJ zwh; uJmw'n di Col 3,3b e 3,4a, uJmei'"...
fanerwqhvsesqe di Col 4,4b, che sottolinea limportanza che la pericope riserva ai
credenti, ma ancor di pi al loro eijkov" o identit cristiana.
La suddivisione della pericope, come si detto basata soprattutto sullasindeto
tra Col 3,1 e Col 3,2, suddivisione che rafforzata dalle inclusioni letterario-formali
tw/' Cristw/' - oJ Cristov" di 3,1ac e dei due indicativi sunhgevrqhte - ejstivn kaqhvmeno"
di Col 3,1ac, che formano come una cornice letteraria allimperativo ta; a[nw zhtei'te;
inoltre, basato sul gavr esplicativo di Col 3,3, che introduce una nuova motivazione
cristologica per letica cristiana.
A. Col 3,1: Motivazione cristologica ed escatologica: la suddivisione si articola

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

243

in tre momenti71, stabiliti dallalternarsi tra lindicativo e limperativo: sunhgevrqhte


- zhtei'te - ejstivn kaqhvmeno". I due indicativi formano una cornice letteraria
allimperativo ta; a[nw zhtei'te, ma con due funzioni differenti: laoristo indicativo
di eij sunhgevrqhte tw/' Cristw/' fa riferimento al battesimo (Col 2,12) da cui ha
inizio il vivere cristiano, mentre il presente perifrastico di ou| oJ Cristov" ejstin
ejn dexia/' tou' qeou' kaqhvmeno" indica la meta verso la quale il credente dirige la
propria esistenza. In altre parole, i due indicativi sono la base cristologica ed
escatologica dellimperativo etico del vivere cristiano72. Dal punto di vista retorico
rappresenta come il transitus dallesposizione dottrinale alla trattazione parenetica,
dallindicativo della salvezza allimperativo della salvezza73, passaggio che
letterariamente stabilito attraverso l
ou\n inferenziale-metabatico.
B. Col 3,2: Conoscenza e condotta coerente di vita. La suddivisione consta di
due parti in antitesi formale e contenutistica: Col 3,2a con limperativo iussivo
fronei'te comanda di pensare alle cose di lass, mentre Col 3,2b con la particella negativa mhv e lellissi di fronei'te vieta di pensare alle cose della terra. Data
lellissi di fronei'te, invece di un chiasmo del tipo ABBA74, le due parti risultano
uninclusione letterario-formale del tipo ABA:

ta; a[nw

fronei'te

mh; ta; ejpi; th'" gh'"
in cui le due frasi ellittiche ta; a[nw e mh; ta; ejpi; th'" gh'" fanno da cornice
allelemento pi importante del comando: fronei'te.
A Col 3,3-4: Motivazione cristologica ed escatologica. Introdotta dal gavr
esplicativo, la suddivisione caratterizzata da un parallelismo alternato del tipo
ABAB75 e i due elementi di tale parallelismo sono ben distinti attraverso
lasindeto di Col 3,476, ma mantenuti uniti dal ripetersi dellespressione hJ zwh;
uJmw'n di Col 3,3b e Col 3,4a, dallinclusione letteraria su;n tw/' Cristw/' di Col
3,3a e dal su;n aujtw/' di Col 3,4b e dallinclusione contenutistica tra ejn tw/' qew/'
di Col 3,3a e ejn dovxh/ di Col 3,4b. Il primo parallelismo di Col 3,3 caratterizzato
71 Per una divisione di Col 3,1 cf. OBrien, Colossians, 158, anche se risulta strano che lavverbio locativo ou| introduca una indirect question, mentre introduce una normale proposizione
relativa locale (Smyth, Greek Grammar, 2498; J. Viteau, tude sur le Grec du Noveau Testament.
I: Le verbe: Syntaxe des propositions, Paris 1893, 226 e 238; W. Bauer - W.F. Arndt - F.W. Gingrich
- W. Danker, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature,
Chicago - London 2000, ad vocem ou| 1ab; citato come BADG, Lexicon).
72 Cf. anche OBrien, Colossians, 171; Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 42-43.
73 Cf. anche OBrien, Colossians, 159.
74 Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 170, rileva una struttura chiastica tra Col 3,2-3, ma
purtroppo il gavr di Col 3,3, anche se in maniera leggera, stabilisce una cesura, tra il comando e la
sua motivazione. Col 3,3 appartiene alla motivazione di Col 3,3-4.
75 Anche OBrien, Colossians, 159, e Dunn, Colossians, 202 n. 4, accennano a un parallelismo
allinterno di Col 3,3-4.
76 Tale asindeto stato notato anche da OBrien, Colossians, 166.

244

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

dallaoristo ajpeqavnete e dal perfetto kevkruptai, che interessa sia il passato del
credente: al momento del battesimo egli morto con Cristo, sia il suo presente:
la sua vita, a motivo di quella morte, ora nascosta con Cristo e orientata
totalmente a Dio77. Il secondo parallelismo di Col 3,4 pi uniformente rivolto
al futuro, come dimostrano la proposizione temporale-ipotetica delleventualit
al futuro o{tan fanerwqh/' di Col 4,4a che il futuro fanerwqhvsesqe di Col 4,4b.
Tutta la sua vita, il credente non solo la vive con Cristo, ma anche orientata
verso la manifestazione ultima e definitiva del Cristo, allora (tovte) anchegli
con lui godr della manifestazione nella gloria. Tale futuro di gloria si trova in
netta antitesi con l
ajpeqavnete di Col 3,3a, in quanto la morte si trasformata
in vita ed divenuta partecipazione alla vita di Cristo, non sar pi nascosta, ma
manifestata in pienezza e in gloria.
3. Analisi esegetica
a) Battesimo e orientamento della vita in Cristo
Eij ou\n sunhgevrqhte tw/' Cristw/,' ta; a[nw zhtei'te, ou| oJ Cristov" ejstin
ejn dexia/' tou' qeou' kaqhvmeno": Se dunque veramente vi lasciaste risuscitare con
Cristo, cercate le cose di lass, dove Cristo risiede/si definitivamente assiso alla
destra di Dio. La congiunzione coordinante ou\n ha qui valore inferenziale:
dunque78 ed da unire allapodosi: ta; a[nw zhtei'te. Ci significa che quanto
stato detto in precedenza in Col 2,12, e che viene sintetizzato nellespressione eij
sunhgevrqhte tw/' Cristw/79
' , la base di ci che segue, precisamente della parenesi
che inizia con ta; a[nw zhtei'te di 3,1-480. Esiste, quindi, uno stretto rapporto tra
77 OBrien, Colossians, 158-159, sempre seguendo Zeilinger, ritiene che Col 3,3 sia tutto rivolto al passato, ma ci pu essere vero per laoristo ajpeqavnete di Col 3,3a, ma non per il perfetto
kevkruptai che di sicuro riguarda il passato, ma anche inizio di un presente diverso da quello
passato: dalla morte sorta la vita e tale vita definitivamente nascosta con Cristo.
78 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 2964; BDR, Grammatica, 451,1,3; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem ou\n
1a; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem ou\n a e g.
79 Lightfoot, Saint Pauls Epistles to the Colossians, 206, ritiene che eij ou\n sunhgevrqhte riprende leij ajpeqavnete di 2,20, in quanto entrambi rimandano al battesimo. In altre parole, la base
portante di tutta la parenesi paolina la nostra partecipazione alla morte e resurrezione di Cristo,
che il credente ha esperimentato nel battesimo. Cos, il sunhgevrqhte di Col 3,1 riassume tutta
lesperienza di morte-resurrezione esperimentata dal credente nel battesimo. Comunque, lelemento
decisivo non tanto il battesimo, quanto il fatto che nel battesimo il credente morto e risorto con
Cristo, come sottolinea Col 2,12.
80 Cf. Nauck, Das ou\n parneticum, 134-135, dove dimostra che Paolo (e altri autori neotestamentari) ha spesso usato tale ou|n per introdurre la parenesi (cf. Rom 6,1-11.12; 12,1; Gal 5,1; Col
3,1-2; 3,3-5; 3,9-12; 1Tess 5,1-5.6; ecc.); OBrien, Colossians, 159.

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

245

cristologia ed etica81. La congiunzione subordinante eij con indicativo introduce la


protasi di una condizionale della realt e, quindi, da un punto di vista sintattico, si
possono delineare due interpretazioni: a) la condizione pu essere considerata
come realmente esistente e allora eij equivale a una causale: poich/dato che vi
lasciaste risuscitare con Cristo82, che, avendo lindicativo, pone in evidenza il
fondamento portante delletica cristiana; b) la condizione reale, ma serve come
base per stabilire il proprio ragionamento83, allora il senso : se certamente, se
realmente vi lasciaste risuscitare con Cristo84; in altre parole, Paolo vuol sottolineare
che non basta essere stati resi partecipi nel battesimo alla morte e resurrezione di
Cristo, ma che bisogna lasciare che essa operi realmente nella vita del credente85.
Proprio per questo, laoristo indicativo passivo sunhgevrqhte va interpretato qui
come un passivo permissivo: se vi lasciaste risuscitare86 o pi liberamente: se
avete lasciato che Dio vi rendesse partecipi della resurrezione di Cristo, traduzione
che sottolinea la responsabilit personale del credente, mentre laoristo
complessivo di azione iterata e distributiva87, in quanto riguarda i singoli credenti.
Essi debbono ricordarsi sempre della decisione che hanno preso e porre a fondamento
della propria condotta di vita la loro partecipazione alla morte e resurrezione con
Cristo, come indica bene tw/' Cristw/,' un dativo sociativo di compagnia o di
partecipazione a unesperienza88, retto dal verbo composto sunhgeivrw89. E
larticolo determinativo individuante e anaforico90, sottolineando lidentit di
Cristo, sia quando il credente partecipa alla morte di Cristo che alla sua
resurrezione91. Pu sembrare strano92 che Paolo citi prima la partecipazione alla
resurrezione di Cristo (Col 3,1a) e solo dopo la partecipazione alla sua morte
(Col3,3), ma in entrambi i casi nella mente dellapostolo il mistero di Cristo uno
81 Cf. anche E. Lohse, Le lettere ai Colossesi e a Filemone, Brescia 1979, 245-246. Per tale
problematica cf. M. Adinolfi, La dialettica indicativo-imperativo nelle lettere paoline, Anton 52
(1977) 626-646; G. Strecker, Indicative and Imperative according to Paul, AusBR 35 (1987) 60-72.
82 Cf. OBrien, Colossians, 159.
83 Cos, per esempio, Aletti, Colossiens, 217.
84 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 2291,1, 2298 e 2298a; Viteau, tude, I, 184-186; BDR, Grammatica, 372,1; Turner, Syntax, 115; Zerwick, Graecitas biblica, 303-312; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem eij 1ab; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem eij 1aa.
85 Lightfoot, Saint Pauls Epistles to the Colossians, 207, sottolinea molto bene The change
affects not only his pratical conduct, but his intellectual conception also. Tutta la vita del cristiano
posta into a new sphere of being; Lincoln, Paradiso, 209, afferma giustamente che i Colossesi
non hanno compreso bene il significato del loro battesimo.
86 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1736; BDR, Grammatica, 314; L. Cignelli - G.C. Bottini, Le diatesi del verbo nel greco biblico (I), LA 43 (1993) 136-137.
87 Mateos, El aspecto, 287.
88 BDR, Grammatica, 193a; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem sunegeivrw 2b.
89 BDR, Grammatica, 202,1.8.
90 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1119 e 1119b; BDR, Grammatica, 252a; L. Cignelli - G.C. Bottini,
Larticolo nel greco biblico, LA 41 (1991) 3,2, p. 162.
91 OBrien, Colossians, 159.
92 Cf. anche Aletti, Colossiens, 216.

246

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

e inscindibile93. Lo dimostra il fatto che Col 3,3 incomincia con ajpeqavnete, ma


continua con lidea del vivere con Cristo94. Linversione dei concetti avvenuta
probabilmente solo per motivi stilistici, in quanto permetteva a Paolo di introdurre
meglio lantitesi spogliarsi delluomo vecchio rivestirsi delluomo nuovo di
Col 3,5-17, che lapostolo fa iniziare proprio con lidea del far morire le membra
che appartengono alla terra.
Ta; a[nw zhtei'te: cercate/perseverate nel cercare le cose di lass. Lespressione brachilogica ta; a[nw95 va integrata con il participio o[nta, un participio sostantivato con articolo determinativo generico: le cose che sono di lass96, oppure sottolineando laspetto duraturo continuo abituale del participio: le cose che
stanno lass97. Lavverbio locativo a[nw98, pi che una metonimia per cielo99,
indica qui qualcosa di superiore sia in senso qualitativo che spirituale. Infatti, il
termine, nel contesto di Col 3,1-4, viene precisato dallantitesi di Col 3,2: ta;
a[nw... ta; ejpi; th'" gh'", che indica una sfera superiore alla terra; inoltre, precisato dalla relativa di Col 3,1c: tale sfera superiore il luogo dove Cristo risiede/si definitivamente assiso alla destra di Dio100. Pertanto, le cose che stanno
lass indicano tutte quelle realt spirituali101 e quelle scelte che ci permettono di
93

Cf. anche OBrien, Colossians, 159.


Cf. anche Lincoln, Paradiso, 209.
95 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1153d; BDR, Grammatica, 266,1a; Turner, Syntax, 14; BAGD,
Lexicon, ad vocem oJ 2f; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem oJ 7a; Cignelli - Bottini, Larticolo, 5,3 e
nota 3, pp. 166-167.
96 Cf. Col 1,20; Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1122-1123; BDR, Grammatica, 413,1; Turner, Syntax, 14: The article with attributive adverbs; Cignelli - Bottini, Larticolo, 4, p. 164; cf. anche
MacDonald, Colossians, 127. Altri preferiscono parlare di avverbio sostantivato; cf. BAGD,
Lexicon, ad vocem a[nw 1, ma cf. la sua traduzione: seek what is above; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem
a[nw a: heavenly things.
97 Mateos, El aspecto, 133.
98 Sul senso dellavverbio a[nw, cf. F. Bchsel, a[nw, GLNT, I, 1009-1012; J. Beutler, a[nw,
EDNT, I, 112; H. Bietenhard, a[nw, DCB, 282-283.
99 Cf. in questo senso Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis of Colossians, 169; Dunn,
Colossians, 205; MacDonald, Colossians, 127. Barth et alii, Colossians, 393-394, ammettono che
ta; a[nw corresponds to the term heaven (p. 393), ma dopo una lunga e contorta dimostrazione,
in parte condivisibile, ammettono che, in base al contesto, the focus in 3,12ff is on the listed
virtues (p. 394). Ma anche tale affermazione cos puntuale, viene purtroppo letta in base a una
ricostruzione ideologica del brano.
100 Lincoln, Paradiso, 211, pensa che Paolo con lespressione ta; a[nw zhtei'te polemizza con i
suoi avversari che cercavano con il loro ascetismo (cf. Col 2,16-23) visioni o manifestazioni particolari di alta spiritualit. In ogni caso, Lincoln riconosce che Paolo fa pi riferimento alla propria tradizione giudaica che alle tradizioni gnostiche o mistiche. Per questo cita BHag 2,1: I miei padri accumularono tesori quaggi, io accomulai tesori per lass I miei padri accumularono tesori per
questo mondo e io ho accumulato tesori per il mondo futuro (Lincoln, Paradiso, 211 nota 46).
Laccento, comunque, mi sembra che ormai cada non tanto direttamente sulletica, quanto sul comportamento che i Colossesi devono tenere nel loro vivere con Cristo e in Cristo (cf. anche OBrien,
Colossians, 161).
101 Anche se le schiere angeliche fanno parte delle realt spirituali, non mi sembra che Col
3,1.2 li prenda direttamente in considerazione come vuole Levison, 2 Apoc. Bar. 48,42-52:7, 100.
94

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

247

essere in Cristo e con Cristo102. Se si tiene in conto anche del valore dellarticolo generico e del carattere introduttivo di Col 3,1-4, lespressione ta; a[nw
indica tutte quelle virt che permettono al cristiano di rivestirsi di Cristo e di
agire in unione a Cristo nella propria vita di ogni giorno: fate tutto nel nome del
Signore Ges (Col 3,17)103. Zhtei'te: il verbo deverbativo zhtevw, derivato da
una radice verbale indo-europea: fare uno sforzo104 + il suffisso in -evw dei verbi
di attivit105, indica il cercare, il ricercare con assiduit e impegno perseverante106; di pi: pu significare aspirare a qualcosa107, desiderare di possedere
qualcosa108. Il presente imperativo attivo, poi, ha aspetto confermativo di azione
gi esistente: continuate a cercare, perseverate nella ricerca109. In altre parole,
indica limpegno quotidiano del cristiano ad aspirare e desiderare le realt superiori che lo dirigono verso Cristo. Tale desiderare deve tradursi in azione: tutto il
proprio agire su questa terra diretto verso lalto110, dove sta il Cristo suo Signore. Limpegno qui, su questa terra, ma la direzione del proprio agire si eleva
verso lalto, cercando tutto ci che lo mantiene a contatto con Cristo e lo rende a
lui conforme111.
Ou| oJ Cristov" ejstin ejn dexia/' tou' qeou' kaqhvmeno". Lavverbio di luogo
ou|: dove112, indica la destinazione a cui si riferisce il desiderio del credente113,

Molto meglio Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 169: It refers to the spiritual values, or ethical standards, characteristic of heaven and its inhabitants.
102 Cf. anche Thompson, Colossians, 71.
103 Cf. le giuste osservazioni di Thompson, Colossians, 72, e che possono essere sintetizzate
con questa sua espressione: The spiritual life as described in Colossians consists not of attining to
visions of God, but rather of seeing the world from the perspective of Christ, seeing it through the
realities demostrated in Christ, hence, seeing with the vision that God gives in Christ.
104 J.H. Moulton - W.F. Howard, A Grammar of New Testament Greek. II: Accidence and WordFormation, Edinburgh 1976, 387.
105 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 866,2; Moulton - Howard, Accidence and Word-Formation, 387.
106 Per il senso del termine, cf. H. Greeven, zhtevw, GLNT, III, 1529-1533.
107 Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem zhtevw 1c, che cita proprio Col 3,1; Greeven, zhtevw, 1531.
108 BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem zhtevw 3a, che cita Col 3,1.
109 Mateos, El aspecto, 222; Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps, 390. Comunque, io non
credo che sia necessario porlo nel testo, dato che anche nelle nostre lingue limperativo presente pu
avere tale senso confermativo e durativo, deducibile dal contesto immediato.
110 Buona laffermazione di Dunn, Colossians, 205: ci che in vista a complete reorientation
of existence (cita anche Wolter, Der Brief an die Kolosser, 166); cf. Lincoln, Paradiso, 212-213.
111 Con E. Lohse, Le lettere ai Colossesi e a Filemone, Brescia 1979, 247; Wilson, The Hope
of Glory, 124 e 149-150. Lightfoot, Saint Pauls Epistles to the Colossians, 207, vede anche in
questo testo una certa polemica di Paolo con i suoi avversari. Forse, un accenno ad essa si pu vedere
nellantitesi di Col 3,2: ta; a[nw fronei'te, mh; ta; ejpi; th'" gh'", dove lespressione ta; ejpi; th'"
gh'" pu fare riferimento proprio alle pratiche della tradizione umana dei falsi maestri di Colosse.
112 Essendo derivato da un relativo (cf. Smyth, Greek Grammar, 341; BAGD, Lexicon, ad
vocem ou| 1ab; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem o{" II,11) introduce una proposizione relativa locativa
(Smyth, Greek Grammar, 2498; Viteau, tude, I, 226 e 238; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem ou| 1ab).
113 BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem ou| 1b.

248

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

ma nello stesso tempo anche il luogo dove sta Cristo114. In altre parole, la relativa
locativa spiega lavverbio a[nw, ma soprattutto afferma che la ricerca del credente
orientata a Cristo. Estivn... kaqhvmeno": coniugazione perifrastica: risiede/si
assiso definitivamente115; kaqhvmeno": presente participio medio di kavqhmai116:
starsene seduto, risiedere, assedersi; un medio dinamico diretto: si
assiso (da s)117 e ha aspetto duraturo continuo: si assiso definitivamente e
quindi risiede118. Insieme allespressione brachilogica locativa ejn dexia/1' 19:
alla destra, vicino a Dio120, descrive un certo stato o condizione di potere121.
In altre parole, siamo in presenza di una formula cristologica modulata sul
Sal110,1; Dan 7,13-14 e a cui fanno riferimento molti testi del NT (Mt 26,64;
Mc14,62; Lc 22,69)122 , riguardante lintronizzazione del Cristo alla destra del

114

Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem o{" II,11a.


Regard, La phrase nominale, 121, che cita Col 3,1; T.K. Abbott, A Critical and Exegetical
Commentary on the Epistles to the Ephesians and to the Colossians, Edinburgh 1922 (1897), 278;
Turner, Syntax, 88; Mateos, El aspecto, 113 e 115; Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps, 390.
Nessuno, per, vieta di prenderlo come un participio congiunto modale: dove Cristo , sedendo/e
siede alla destra o causale: poich siede alla destra (cf. Lightfoot, Saint Pauls Epistles to the
Colossians, 207, seguendo il commento di Giovanni Crisostomo: Oujk h[rkei Ta' a[nw eijpei'n, oujde;,
Ou| oj Cristov" ejstin, ajlla; tiv [l. v.: ajlla; prostivqhsin] En dexia'/ tou' Qeou' kaqhvmeno":
Non gli bastava dire: Le cose di lass, n: dove Cristo, ma perch? [l.v.: ma aggiunge:]
sedendo/perch siede alla destra di Dio). Laspetto duraturo continuo di azione simultanea a
quella della principale; ma la prima ipotesi mi sembra la migliore. OBrien, Colossians, 160-163,
afferma che the accent falls on the present fact of his exaltation (the participle kaqhvmeno", seated,
as distinct from the imperative or finite verb, describes a state or condition (p. 162; cf. MacDonald,
Colossians, 127). Non ho dubbi che qui si tratti dellesaltazione del Cristo, ma se c una costruzione
che indichi uno stato o una condizione stabile di esaltazione proprio la coniugazione perifrastica,
mentre, come ha visto il Crisostomo, lesaltazione indica una motivazione per cercare le cose di
lass; allo stesso modo, un participio congiunto di valore modale indicherebbe la modalit dello
stare di Ges alla destra di Dio. Credo proprio che la coniugazione perifrastica esprima meglio il
pensiero di Paolo e la formula cristologica che egli adduce per confermare i suoi credenti di Colosse
a ricercare le cose di lass.
116 Katav indica tra altre sfumature, il locale concreto e come preverbio assume un valore intensivo perfettivo (Moulton - Howard, Accidence and Word-Formation, 316; A.M. Buscemi, Luso
delle Preposizioni nella Lettera ai Galati [SBF. Analecta 17], Jerusalem 1987, 75).
117 Cignelli - Pierri, Le diatesi, 88-89 e 90-91; ma anche Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem kavqhmai
1: seat onesef, anche se poi sceglie il senso perfettivo in kavqhmai 2.
118 Mateos, El aspecto, 115. Come, gi detto, per Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps,
390, si tratta di un perfetto passivo perifrastico, ma in realt un presente medio dinamico perifrastico, avente aspetto duraturo continuo: risiede.
119 Lespressione completa sarebbe ejn dexia/' ceiriv (cf. Mt 5,30; At 3,7; Ap 1,16; comunque,
per luso dellespressione e per la sua interpretazione in Col 3,1 cf. Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem
dexiov"; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem dexiov" 2a-b).
120 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1687,1a; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem ejn 1c; Thayer, Lexicon, ad
vocem ejn I,1.
121 Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem kavqhmai 2.
122 Su questo punto cf. la lunga precisazione di Dunn, Colossians, 203-204, che discute non
solo sul riferimento cristiano allAT, ma anche sulla controversia giudaica con i cristiani riguardo a
115

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

249

Padre, quale Signore di tutti123. A lui appartiene il Regno, tanto che il Padre ha
reso i credenti partecipi del Regno del Figlio suo (Col 1,13; cf. 1Cor 15,2528)124. Lespressione nel suo insieme, quindi, rappresenta unulteriore motivazione
cristologica rispetto a Col 3,1a, ma anche una motivazione escatologica dellagire
del credente nel ricercare le cose di lass, verso cui egli orientato125.
b) Conoscenza e condotta coerente di vita
2 Ta; a[nw fronei'te, mh; ta; ejpi; th'" gh'": Pensate le cose dellalto, non quelle
della terra. La ripetizione di ta; a[nw voluta e, insieme allasindeto126, allantitesi ta; a[nw... ta; ejpi; th'" gh'" e alla costruzione inclusivo-chiastica, d una forte
enfasi alla frase. Essa, daltra parte, stabilisce attraverso il verbo fronei'te un crescendo rispetto al zhtei'te di Col 3,1127. Il verbo denominativo fronevw, composto
dalla radice fron- (derivato per cambiamento da frhvn mente)128 + il suffisso -evw
indicante attivit129, indica latto di pensare, il pensare, considerare, intendere130.
Esso, quindi, va oltre il cercare, in quanto invita a sentire costantemente131 le
cose di lass come parte della propria esistenza, del proprio pensare e del proprio
sentire132. Anzi a considerarle attentamente, comprenderle meglio e stabilire un
concreto atteggiamento e orientamento di vita133, cos da averne unejpivgnwsi" in
vista delladempimento del qevlhma di Dio nella propria vita di ogni giorno. Una
tale esaltazione del Cristo alla destra di Dio. Io, pero, non credo che tale questione toccasse gli avversari giudaizzanti di Colosse. Essi erano gi eterodossi anche per altri motivi.
123 F.F. Bruce, The Epistles to the Colossians, to Philemon and to the Ephesians (NICNT),
Grand Rapids MI 1984, 132.
124 Cf. anche Lohse, Colossesi, 247; OBrien, Colossians, 162-163.
125 Bruce, Colossians, 133-134, vi aggiunge un motivo ecclesiologico: il riferimento
allesaltazione di Cristo, non stato aggiunto for an ornamental purpose, ma perch his paraenetic sections regularly presuppose the content of the apostolic preaching. Credo, per, che
lintenzione di Paolo era proprio quella di dare un fondamento cristologico ed escatologico insieme
allorientamento di vita del credente (cf. anche Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 123-124).
126 Lasindeto, come elemento di enfasi, stato messo bene in evidenza da Delebecque, Sur
un problme de temps, 391.
127 Cf. anche Abbott, Colossians, 278: an advance on zhtei'te.
128 L. Rocci, Vocabolario greco-italiano, Milano - Roma - Napoli - Citt di Castello 1971, ad
vocem fronevw; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem fronevw; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem fronevw.
129 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 834d-f; Moulton - Howard, Accidence and Word-Formation, 387.
130 Rocci, Vocabolario, ad vocem fronevw.
131 Limperativo confermativo di azione gi esistente: continuate a pensare (Mateos, El
aspecto, 126) e aspetto duraturo continuo (idem, 123). Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 170:
Have your minds occupied with, keep thinking about.
132 Per il senso transitivo del verbo, cf. Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps, 391.
133 Cf. Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem sofiva, Synonyma, dove precisa il senso profondo e specifico della frovnhsi"; Trench, Synonyms, 281-286; Lincoln, Paradiso, 213-214; OBrien, Colossians,
163-164; Dunn, Colossians, 205; MacDonald, Colossians, 127-128; Barth et alii, Colossians, 395,
che traducono: orient yourselves toward.

250

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

perfetta conoscenza, infatti, porta al discernimento di ci che buono e gradito a


Dio (Rom 12,2) e utile a noi stessi e al nostro prossimo. Tale pensiero costante e
profondo permetter ai credenti di rifiutare le cose della terra. La particella negativa soggettiva mhv con lellissi del verbo, per dare enfasi al comando, una
brachilogia secondo lo sch'ma ajpo; koinou'. In base al contesto immediato, infatti,
la frase richiede lintegrazione mentale dellimperativo fronei'te134, e tale imperativo interruttivo: non (pensate/smettete di pensare) alle cose che sono sulla
terra135. Larticolo con frase preposizionale ellittica, ta; (o[nta) ejpi; th'" gh'",
anchesso nella sua sinteticit, intende mettere in evidenza il comando di porre fine
a comportamenti di adeguamento o di compromesso con certe tradizioni di uomini che tendono a prevalere sui credenti136 o di rinunciare a far riferimento137 a
certi comportamenti morali non adeguati alla propria fede138. Il primo articolo d
alla frase un valore generico: le cose che sono sulla terra139, mentre quello allinterno della frase preposizionale ha valore individuante deittico: le cose che sono
sulla/appartengono a questa terra140. Intesa in questo modo, lespressione pu
equivalere allaggettivo sostantivato ta; ejpigeiva: le cose terrestri (Fil 3,19)141,
ma, data la contrapposizione ta; a[nw - ta; ejpi; th'" gh'", credo che il senso mantiene
un senso qualitativo pi profondo142. Cos, se ta; a[nw indica tutte quelle virt
134 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 3018b e 3022; BDR, Grammatica, 479; Lausberg, Literary Rhetoric, 697-698.
135 Mateos, El aspecto, 127.
136 Lightfoot, Saint Pauls Epistles to the Colossians, 207; OBrien, Colossians, 171; D. Attinger, La Lettera ai Colossesi. Commento esegetico-spirituale, Magnano 1989, 72. Bruce, Colossians,
134, vi vede un accenno anche alle potenze angeliche: bisogna guardare ancora higher things than
the principalities and powers which dominate the planetary spheres, for Christ has ascended far
above these.
137 Stando a Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1689a N, ejpiv con genitivo denota una certa relazione
familiare con qualcosa; per questo il credente deve rinunciare a tale familiarit con le cose della
terra. Ma, forse, ancora meglio, dare ad ejpiv il senso di qualcosa su cui uno si appoggia e questo
qualcosa diviene un punto di riferimento, un fondamento per la propria vita. Per questo senso di
ejpiv + genitivo cf. BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem ejpiv I,1bb; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem ejpiv A1ce; Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps, 391.
138 Cf. anche Lohse, Colossesi, 248; Aletti, Colossiens, 218-219; Dunn, Colossians, 305; G. Ross,
Lettera ai Colossesi. Lettera agli Efesini (NT Commento esegetico e spirituale), Roma 2001, 49.
139 Cf. cap. 1,20; Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1122-1123; Cignelli - Bottini, Larticolo, 4, p.
164.
140 BDR, Grammatica, 252; Cignelli - Bottini, Larticolo, 3,2, p. 162.
141 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1153a; BDR, Grammatica, 263; Cignelli - Bottini, Larticolo,
5,1, p. 165; MacDonald, Colossians, 128.
142 OBrien, Colossians,164, ritiene che le due frasi antitetiche ta; a[nw - ta; ejpi; th'" gh'" rassomigliano molto a ci che Paolo indica come la sfera della carne e la sfera dello Spirito, cio
quelle cose che si fanno sotto influsso della carne o sotto linflusso dello Spirito. Tale somiglianza
non da negare, ma io credo che, in base al contesto, indicano tutte quelle cose che possono mettere il credente a contatto con Cristo o allontanarlo da lui. Lincoln, Paradiso, 214-217, ricorre alla
stessa contrapposizione, ma facendo rilevare che Paolo, nel contrastare la filosofia spiritualista
dei suoi avversari, rifiuta il dualismo cosmologico dei suoi avversari e pone come punto di riferimento Cristo, assiso alla destra di Dio. Pertanto, la ricerca delle cose di lass ha un orientamento

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

251

che permettono al credente di rivestirsi di Cristo e di agire in unione a Cristo nella


propria vita di ogni giorno, divenire credenti significa assumere un modo nuovo di
esistere, che lo rende capace di vivere in maniera virtuosa143. Allo stesso modo, se
ta; ejpi; th'" gh'" fa riferimento a tutti quei vizi delluomo vecchio (cf. Col 3,5-9)
che vogliono impossessarsi (cf. ejpiv) del credente, egli deve rifiutare tali comportamenti contrari al vivere in Cristo e alla comunione con gli altri credenti, corpo
di Cristo144.
c) In attesa della nostra manifestazione con Cristo
3 Apeqavnete ga;r kai; hJ zwh; uJmw'n kevkruptai su;n tw/' Cristw/' ejn tw/' qew/:'
Infatti, moriste/decideste di morire, e cos la vostra vita sta definitivamente nascosta con Cristo in Dio. Con il gavr esplicativo Paolo cerca di dare un fondamento allantitesi di Col 3,2145. E tale spiegazione si basa ancora su un crescendo
di grande intensit contenutistica, basata sul contrasto ajpeqavnete kai; hJ zwh; uJmw'n,
che fa riferimento allazione battesimale (Col 2,12.20). Nel battesimo, usando un
radicale parlare metaforico-identitario146, il credente muore con Cristo e ritorna a
vivere con Cristo e in Cristo147; anzi, Cristo stesso la sua vita (Col 3,4; Gal 2,19b20; Fil 1,21). Lindicativo attivo ajpeqavnete, che ha aspetto effettivo complessivo
di azione iterata e distributiva148, in quanto riguarda tutti e singoli i credenti, non
vuole indicare tanto lo stato di morte in cui i credenti si sono venuti a trovare al
momento del battesimo149, ma piuttosto il momento in cui decisero di morire con
Cristo o latto con cui decisero di essere resi partecipi della morte di Cristo150.
etico-religioso: realizzare la comunione con Cristo, svestendosi delluomo vecchio e rivestendo il
nuovo.
143 Lincoln, Paradiso, 220-222; Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 44-45.
144 Cf. anche Thompson, Colossians, 70-71: pensare alle cose di lass significa to orient
ones life and devotion to God rather than the self or the world; Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 114.
A questo proposito, cf. anche il duro commento del Crisostomo, che afferma che coloro che cercano
le cose di questa terra ricchezze e onori fanno torto a tutti quei poveri che circondano la chiesa,
ma che la chiesa, pur avendo tanti figli ricchi, non pu aiutare i suoi poveri (Joh. Crysostomus, In
Epistolam ad Colossenses Commentarius, c. III, Hom VII,2-5, PG 62,346-352).
145 OBrien, Colossians, 164, sembra dargli un senso causale: the grounds for (cf. anche
Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 170; MacDonald, Colossians, 128), ma non mi sembra che
Paolo voglia dare una motivazione di causa ed effetto, ma fornire motivi di riflessione sullatteggiamento da dover seguire nella propria vita da credenti.
146 Cf. anche MacDonald, Colossians, 128.
147 Il riferimento diretto a Cristo non c, ma mi sembra che lo richieda sia il su;n tw/' Cristw/'
di Col 3,3b che tutto il contesto di Col 3,1-4, che a sua volta fa riferimento a Col 2,12.20 (cf. anche
Dunn, Colossians, 206).
148 Mateos, El aspecto, 287.
149 Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 170, ritiene ajpeqavnete una metafora e, quindi traduce in maniera molto libera: Since you have ceased to behave like you formely did, like a person
who has died. Tale traduzione non rispetta n il senso teologico di Paolo n la sintassi greca.
150 Cf. le osservazioni critiche di Abbott, Colossians, 279, e di Delebecque, Sur un problme
de temps, 391-393; ma anche Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem ajpoqnhvskw II,2b.

252

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

Tenuto conto di ci, la traduzione migliore di ajpeqavnete moriste o meglio


decideste di morire151; inoltre, esso non va letto isolato152, ma in stretta connessione con con kai; hJ zwh; uJmw'n kevkruptai su;n tw/' Cristw/,' dove il kaiv assume
senso consecutivo: e cos/a tal punto che153, e il perfetto kevkruptai, avente
aspetto statico puro di azione simultanea a quella del verbo ajpeqavnete154, indica
che il credente, nel momento in cui decise di morire con Cristo155, entrato in
unesistenza nuova, che sta definitivamente nascosta con Cristo fino alla pienezza della sua manifestazione nella gloria156. E credo che sia importante notare
linsistenza sul nome Cristov" in Col 1,3157, perch nel Cristo che il credente,
non solo muore al mondo e alle sue norme e tradizioni, ma soprattutto trova in
Cristo ogni ricchezza (Col 2,3)158 e vive sempre orientato a Dio159. La sua vita
151 Il verbo intransitivo ajpoqnhvskw qui assume un senso leggermente mediale: Vi lasciaste
morire/decideste di morire (cf. Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1732: The active implies what the middle
expresses; G.B. Winer - W.F. Moulton, A Treatise on the Grammar of New Testament, Edinburgh
1882, 320-322; Cignelli - Pierri, Le diatesi, 9, pp. 28-30).
152 Cos bene Abbott, Colossians, 279.
153 Delebecque, Sur un problme de temps, 393, preferisce cambiare la struttura di tutto il
versetto, dando ad ajpeqavnete un senso temporale: ds linstant que vous mourtes. Il senso
giusto, ma non c proprio bisogno di trasformare cos fortemente la frase; basta dare il giusto
senso allindicativo aoristo e leggere il kaiv come consecutivo: e cos, molto comune in Paolo e in
tutto il NT (cf. Smyth, Greek Grammar, 2874; BDR, Grammatica, 442,2b; Zerwick, Graecitas
biblica, 455bg; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem kaiv 1bz; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem kaiv 2d-e).
154 Mateos, El aspecto, 397, cita Col 3,3.
155 Con Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 171; Attinger, Colossesi, 71.
156 Mi sembra un tentativo inutile quello di Koester, The Purpose, 329, di voler stabilire
uninsanabile discrepanza tra il pensiero di Paolo nelle cosiddette lettere autentiche e quello di
Col 3,1.3, perch usa in 3,1 laoristo sunhgevrqhte tw/' Cristw/,' tanto da affermare che il presupposto teologico se voi siete risuscitati con Cristo (3,1) sarebbe stato inaccettabile per Paolo
quanto la stessa esortazione a cercare e pensare le cose di lass. Tale letteralismo teologico non
ha senso, in primo luogo perch il dativo sociativo tw/' Cristw/' indica che il credente ha parte alla
resurrezione di Cristo se rimane unito a lui e che la sua nuova vita un cammino verso la resurrezione ultima, quando il credente parteciper alla manifestazione ultima e definitiva di Cristo. Il
credente, anche in Col 2,12 e 3,1-4 come gi in Rom 6 e in altri testi, non uno gnostico (cos sembra interpretarlo Grsser, Kol 3,1-4, 161), ma uno che si mantiene sempre unito a Cristo e Cristo,
mediante la fede, la sua vita (cf. anche le precisazioni di Lohse, Colossesi, 248 nota 12, di Aletti,
Colossiens, 221-222, e di Dunn, Colossians, 203, e con qualche incertezza anche MacDonald, Colossians, 130).
157 Con Lightfoot, Saint Pauls Epistles to the Colossians, 208.
158 Cf. C.F. Moule, The Epistles of Paul to the Colossians and to the Philemon, Cambridge
1957, 112.
159 Dunn, Colossians, 207, rileva che il verbo kruvptw non appare nelle cosiddette undisputed
Paulines, mentre appare laggettivo kruptov" e il verbo correlato ajpokruvptw. Anzi, proprio questo
verbo fa pensare a qualcosa di nascosto che deve essere svelato, soprattutto the hiddenness of the
divine mystery. Questopinione non da rifiutare; daltronde Col 3,4 parla di una futura manifestazione di Cristo e dei credenti. Ma, a mio parere, essa va integrata, in quanto lespressione la
vostra vita sta definitivamente nascosta con Cristo, unita al verbo ajpeqavnete, esprime unidea simile a quella di Gal 6,15-16: il credente nel tempo presente morto al mondo e alle sue tradizioni,
la sua vita divenuta una nuova creazione in Cristo (Bruce, Colossians, 134) ed egli agisce in

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

253

riflette quella del suo Signore160. H zwh; uJmw'n: ancora un richiamo al battesimo,
precisamente al sunezwopoivhsen uJma'" su;n aujtw/' di Col 2,13. I credenti sono
morti con Cristo, ma anche sono stati convivificati con Cristo. Vivono una nuova
esistenza mediante la loro fede che li ha resi partecipi della resurrezione di Cristo
(Col 2,12). Il genitivo uJmw'n, pi che valore possessivo, sembra avere un valore
soggettivo: il credente non vive una vita indipendente da quella di Cristo. Infatti,
lespressione hJ zwh; uJmw'n non va interpretata in senso etico: Cristo modello della
vita del credente, ma in senso esistenziale-religioso: il credente si lascia afferrare
da Cristo e Cristo lo fa agire a tutti i livelli del suo vivere personale, sociale, ecclesiale161. Ci confermato da quanto Paolo scrive in Col3,4: Quando si manifester/apparir Cristo, la vostra vita. Sia in Col 3,3 che in 3,4 abbiamo la stessa
espressione: hJ zwh; uJmw'n, ma con una differenza di prospettiva. Nella dimensione
escatologica del vivere cristiano tale vita kevkruptai su;n tw/' Cristw/' ejn tw/' qew/,'
mentre nella prospettiva ultima dellavvento glorioso del Cristo anche la vita del
credente sar manifestata nella gloria. In altre parole, la vita attuale del credente,
che egli condivide con Cristo, totalmente e definitivamente chiusa al mondo e
alle tradizioni degli uomini. Essa, in unione a Cristo, si svolge in Dio162, cio
sempre facendo riferimento a Dio, orientandosi a lui e vivendo per lui; tutta la sua
vita appartiene, come quella di Cristo, a Dio.
4 Otan oJ Cristo;" fanerwqh/', hJ zwh; uJmw'n, tovte kai; uJmei'" su;n aujtw/'
fanerwqhvsesqe ejn dovxh/: Quando si manifester/apparir il Cristo, la vostra
vita, allora anche voi con lui sarete manifestati nella gloria/gloriosi. La
congiunzione subordinante temporale-ipotetica o{tan163 della protasi in
correlazione stretta con lavverbio di tempo tovte dellapodosi, sottolineando
ancora la stretta relazione che intercorre tra il Cristo (oJ Cristov")164 e il credente

ogni occasione in totale comunione con Cristo. Tale esistenza, comunque, proiettata verso la piena manifestazione della gloria di Cristo e di quanti hanno creduto in lui.
160 Thompson, Colossians, 72; Wilson, The Hope of Glory, 116.
161 Cf. le buone osservazioni di Aletti, Colossiens, 220-221, e di Attinger, Colossesi, 71.
162 OBrien, Colossians, 166, sostiene che ejn tw/' qew/' modifichi sia hJ zwh; uJmw'n che su;n tw/'
Cristw/,' ma a mio parere lunico riferimento grammaticale possibile il verbo kevkruptai. Callow,
A Semantic Structure Analysis, 171, lo riferisce a kevkruptai e ritiene che si riferisce a Cristo e significhi: hidden from human sight and in the presence of God. Penso che il pronome personale
uJmw'n impedisca tale interpretazione e la vita dei credenti, per quanto nascosta con Cristo, continua
ad essere manifesta a chiunque, anche se molti non riescono a comprenderla pienamente. Barth et
alii, Colossians, 396, sono indecisi se dare a ejn tw/' qew/' senso strumentale: through God o senso
locativo: the location of concealment is God. Io credo che bisogna rispettare il testo e, quindi, ejn
tw/' qew/' si riferisce a kevkruptai: il credente nascosto con Cristo e vive con lui la propria esistenza
in Dio.
163 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1768a; Viteau, tude, I, 209; BDR, Grammatica, 455,1.
164 Larticolo determinativo individuante e anaforico (Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1119 e 1119b;
BDR, Grammatica, 252a; Cignelli - Bottini, Larticolo, 3,2, p. 162). Cf. anche Dunn, Colossians, 208, che vorrebbe tradurlo con this Christ.

254

Alfio Marcello Buscemi

(uJmei'")165. Proprio per questo, la frase, da un punto di vista formale, stabilisce


uninclusione letteraria del tipo ABA, che pone al centro lapposizione hJ zwh;
uJmw'n. Lespressione una ripresa del hJ zwh; uJmw'n di Col 3,3 e pone in rilievo
il fatto che il credente trova in Cristo la sorgente del proprio vivere166 e, quindi,
non solo condivide ora il nascondimento con Cristo, ma anche167, al momento
(tovte) della manifestazione di Cristo (oJ Cristo;" fanerwqh/')168, la sua
manifestazione nella gloria (kai; uJmei'" su;n aujtw/' fanerwqhvsesqe ejn dovxh/)169.
Il verbo denominativo fanerovw, composto dalla radice faner- (dallaggettivo
fanerov": manifesto)170 + il suffisso in -ovw dei verbi fattitivi denotanti causa
o fatto: rendere manifesto, manifestare, mostrare171, usato in Paolo circa
18 volte e spesso come sinonimo di ajpokaluvptw e in contesti chiaramente
escatologici (Rom 1,17; 3,21; 1Cor 4,5; 2Cor 5,10-11; Col 1,26)172. In base a
tutto ci, Col3,4 indica lultima manifestazione del Cristo, la sua parusia173,
165

Cf. anche OBrien, Colossians, 167.


Buona linterpretazione di Callow, A Semantic Structure Analysis, 172.
167 Abbott, Colossians, 279, nota che nel testo non appare alcun segno di collegamento, n un
dev n un kaiv, ma giustamente osserva con Bengel che ci avvenuto per motivi di enfasi: Sermo
absolutus lectorem totum repentina luce percellit.
168 Laoristo congiuntivo fanerwqh/' ha aspetto effettivo singolo di azione simultanea a quella
della principale (Mateos, El aspecto, 375), mettendo in evidenza la contemporaneit tra la manifestazione di Cristo e quella dei credenti.
169 Cf. anche J. Ernst, Le lettere ai Filippesi, a Filemone, ai Colossesi, agli Efesini (Il Nuovo
Testamento commentato), trad. it. di G. Bof, Brescia 1985, 302-303. Il futuro indicativo passivo
fanerwqhvsesqe ha aspetto effettivo collettivo (Mateos, El aspecto, 365), sia che il passivo lo si
intende come vero passivo o come un passivo con senso mediale riflessivo: vi mostrerete, apparirete. Sottolinea che tale manifestazione di gloria sar per i credenti reale e definitiva.
170 Rocci, Vocabolario, ad vocem fanerovw; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem fanerovw.
171 Smyth, Greek Grammar, 866,3; Moulton - Howard, Accidence and Word-Formation,
396-397.
172 Per luso di fanerovw nel NT e, in particolare in Paolo, cf. R. Bultmann - D. Lhrmann,
fanerovw, GLNT, XIV, 839-844; P.-G. Mller, fanerovw, EDNT, III, 413-414.
173 Cf. Ernst, Colossesi, 302, anche se ritiene che lattesa della parusia insolita per la lettera
ai Colossesi; cf. poi Dunn, Colossians, 208. Lohse, Colossesi, 250, afferma che lo{tan oJ Cristo;"
fanerwqh/' motivata dalla tradizione dellescatologia protocristiana e fa riferimento alla parusia di
Cristo. Ma tale riferimento alla Parusia isolato: di esso (= cui) non si fa parola nel resto della
Lettera ai Colossesi. Pi prudente Moule, Colossians, 110: This passage [Col 3,14] contains the
only explicit reference in this epistle to a future coming or revealing of Christ. Credo che abbia
ragione Moule. Infatti, riferimenti alla Parusia nella Lettera mi sembra che ve ne siano diversi (cf.
anche J.M.G. Barclay, Colossians and Philemon, Sheffield 2001, 89-92). Cos, in Col 1,18
laffermazione che Cristo il primogenito di coloro che risuscitano dai morti, per ottenere il primato su tutte le cose ha una chiara dimensione escatologica di ci che deve avvenire alla fine dei
tempi, quando Cristo si manifester. In Col 1,22-23 la tensione escatologica tra la riconciliazione
che Cristo ha operato e ci che i credenti devono attendere allude anchessa alla Parusia: per/cos
da presentarvi santi e immacolati e irreprensibili al suo cospetto, se in verit rimanete per la fede
ben fondati e stabili e senza che vi lasciate smuovere dalla speranza del Vangelo. Anzi, in tale
contesto, Paolo afferma che Cristo la speranza della gloria (Col 1,27-28), che certamente ha un
contatto letterario con lejn dovxh di Col 3,4 (cf. Attinger, Colossesi, 71). Infine, anche laccenno ai
collaboratori di Paolo, che hanno lavorato per il regno di Dio, va visto nellottica della seconda
166

Col 3,1-4: cercate le cose di lass. Un approccio filologico-esegetico

255

attesa dai credenti nella fede e nella speranza di poter essere definitivamente
partecipi (cf. anche 2Cor 5,10: tou;" pavnta" hJma'" fanerwqh'nai dei') a tale
gloria secondo il qevlhma di Dio Padre, che ci ha trasferiti nel Regno del Figlio
del suo amore (Col 1,13). La gloria di Cristo anche la gloria del credente, per
questo il credente proteso verso il futuro delladempimento pieno del suo
essere con Cristo. Nel battesimo ha condiviso il suo mistero di morte e
resurrezione, nel futuro condivider la sua gloria. oJ Cristo;" fanerwqh/': il
passivo probabilmente da intendere in senso mediale riflessivo intransitivo:
si mostrer, apparir174. Allora il mistero gi manifestato ai santi (Col1,26;
cf. 4,4)175 diverr realt concreta per i credenti, perch anchessi (kai; uJmei'")176
in unione a Cristo (su;n aujtw/')177 e per la misericordia di Dio178 avranno la loro
manifestazione nella gloria179, cio la loro partecipazione piena alla gloria di
Cristo (Rom 8,7: i{na kai; sundoxasqw'men) e al suo regno glorioso180.
Alfio Marcello Buscemi, ofm
Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem

manifestazione del Cristo. In conclusione, si pu dire con la Thompson, Colossians, 73, che forse
la Lettera ai Colossesi non d un forte risalto alla tensione tra la realt presente e la speranza futura.
Ma non c dubbio che this tension provides the fundamental framework of its conceptions about
the destiny of the believer whose life is identified with Christ. Comunque, cf. la buona esposizione
di Lincoln, Paradiso, 209-210 e 217-220; OBrien, Colossians, 168-169; Barth et alii, Colossians,
397-398 e 170-172; meno bene MacDonald, Colossians, 130.
174 Rocci, Vocabolario, ad vocem fanerovw; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem fanerovw 1ab; Thayer,
Lexicon, ad vocem fanerovw b; Cignelli - Pierri, Le diatesi, 44-45; Smyth, Greek Grammar, 814-819.
175 OBrien, Colossians, 167, pensa che Col 1,26 si riferisca solo alla Parusia del Cristo, ma io
credo che la continuit tra la prima manifestazione del Cristo e la sua seconda manifestazione non
va interrotta: c una stretta correlazione tra ci che stato manifestato ai santi e ci che sar manifestato ai credenti al momento della Parusia del Cristo.
176 Il kaiv qui particella addittiva: anche (Smyth, Greek Grammar, 2881; BDR, Grammatica, 442,8; BAGD, Lexicon, ad vocem kaiv II,2; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem kaiv II,1a).
177 Unito a fanerwqhvsesqe esprime, pi che il complemento di compagnia, la partecipazione
dei credenti alla manifestazione gloriosa di Cristo (Rocci, Vocabolario, ad vocem suvn B 1a; BAGD,
Lexicon, ad vocem suvn 1ag; Thayer, Lexicon, ad vocem suvn I,1a; Smyth, Greek Grammar, 1696b;
BDR, Grammatica, 221; Buscemi, Preposizioni, 95-96). Cf. anche Lincoln, Paradiso, 218.
178 Il passivo fanerwqhvsesqe certamente un passivo teologico: Dio Padre che ci ha resi
degni di partecipare alla gloria del Figlio, trasferendoci nel Regno del Figlio del suo amore (Col1,13).
179 Dunn, Colossians, 209, invece, a mio parere, si spinge troppo oltre a ci che afferma il testo
di Col 3,3-4, leggendo in esso anche una Adam christology: The scope of this Adam christology
is neatly spanned by the three with Christ formulations of 3:1-4, covering as they do the three
tenses of salvation: raised with Christ (past), hidden with Christ (present), revealed with Christ (future). Molto bello, ma poco convincente.
180 Secondo la bella interpretazione di Clemente romano: Oi} fanerwqhvsontai ejn th'/ ejpiskoph'/
th'" basileiva" tou' Cristou', che unisce strettamente Col 3,4 con Col 1,13 (cf. Lightfoot, Saint
Pauls Epistles to the Colossians, 208).

Rosario Pierri

Limperativo nel Nuovo Testamento:


in dialogo con J.D. Fantin

La recente pubblicazione del volume sulluso dellimperativo nel Nuovo


Testamento di Joseph D. Fantin, The Greek Imperative Mood in the New Testament. A Cognitive and Communicative Approach (Studies in Biblical Greek 12),
New York etc. 2010, sia per la materia discussa che per lapproccio offre interessanti spunti di riflessione. Non mancano contributi su questo tema, tuttavia
la monografia dellautore (= A.) si impone per la completezza dellindagine.
In questo contributo si proceder a una sintesi-presentazione del volume di
Fantin e alla discussione di alcuni aspetti1.
Le ragioni principali che hanno spinto Fantin ad approfondire luso dellimperativo nel Nuovo Testamento sono: la sua frequenza nella letteratura neotestamentaria; la necessit di studiare limperativo in relazione al congiuntivo e
allottativo; il tentativo di chiarire i rapporti tra la morfologia e la semantica del
comando e della proibizione (5-8).
Analisi sincronica. Per Fantin lanalisi sincronica ha la priorit nello studio
dei testi del NT. Nella nota 58 afferma che parole appartenenti a periodi precedenti o lo sviluppo grammaticale hanno poco valore per linterpretazione del
NT, a meno che non possa provare che uno scritto neotestamentario o un parlante del periodo sia consapevole della storia di un termine o dei fenomeni
grammaticali che lo caratterizzano e se ne serva nella comunicazione2 (23-34).
Nelle pagine successive lA. fa il punto della discussione tra i promotori di
un approccio descrittivo e quelli favorevoli allapproccio prescrittivo. Dopo una
lunga citazione tratta da Lyons3, insiste sul fatto che, nella prospettiva prescrittiva,
1 Si segue lo svolgimento della materia. I capoversi in grassetto sono la traduzione di titoli di
capitoli o di paragrafi. I corsivi sono dellA.
2 LA. poggia laffermazione su D.A. Carson, Exegetical Fallacies, Grand Rapids 1996, 35-37.
In altri termini il fattore diacronico sfugge a chi scrive o parla.
3 Il rimando a J. Lyons, Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics, Cambridge 1968, 43-44,
dove si dice che il linguista: 1) non sostiene che non abbia fondamento un approccio prescrittivo
della lingua; 2) afferma che la lingua standard di per s soggetta a cambiamenti, si fonda sulla
parlata di classi determinate socialmente e regionalmente, che non pi o meno corretta rispetto a

Liber Annuus 61 (2011) 257-283

258

Rosario Pierri

lo studio del greco del NT ha sempre come punto di riferimento il greco classico.
LA.4, il caso di dire, va in cerca dellaggettivo corretto espresso in qualche
grammatica e ne trova uno in quella di J.H. Moulton, Prolegomena, Edinburgh
1908, 80-81, dove Moulton, nel presentare luso dellarticolo nel NT, afferma
che esso rientra nelluso attico, per cui It might indeed be asserted that the NT
is in this respect remarkably correct when compared with the papyri5 (25-32).
Approccio strutturale. In precedenza Fantin ha sostenuto che la linguistica
permette di capire la lingua greca dalla propria prospettiva indipendentemente
dallinflusso del latino e della lingua di coloro che la studiano. Siccome manca
un parlante del tempo, diventa molto difficoltoso il tentativo di interpretare in
maniera sincronica il greco del NT (33).
Il sistema linguistico come rete di relazioni. Il sistema linguistico si compone di pi strati che interagiscono. Le tre maggiori componenti sono semiologia, grammatica e fonetica (semiology, grammar, phonology). Quanto alla gerarchia, lo strato superiore realizzato da quello inferiore. Si va dallespressione al concetto mediante la seguente stratificazione: fonologia, morfologia,
lexologia, semiologia (34-38).
Applicando tali nozioni allo studio dellimperativo, osserva Fantin, il semema /comando/ pu essere realizzato attraverso due forme (= diversificazione)
morfologiche (imperativo e congiuntivo); inoltre una forma morfologica (p.e.
limperativo) pu essere la realizzazione di due o pi sememi (/comando/, /richiesta/, /permesso/, ecc.).
Perci la ricerca dello studioso mira a determinare ogni risultato semantico
inerente alla scelta dellimperativo, e ha due scopi principali: determinare il
quella di unaltra classe o regione; 3) ritiene che la lingua sia usata per diversi fini e vada giudicata
in base a questi e non solo a criteri letterari, che, tuttavia, non vanno trascurati; 4) non entra nel
campo della critica letteraria. Nei quattro punti si sintetizza quanto riportato da Fantin.
4 Cf. Fantin, 32 nota 94.
5 noto che Moulton ha avuto un ruolo di primo piano nella definizione del greco adoperato
dagli autori dei testi del NT, mettendo in luce un notevole numero di elementi in comune con il
greco dei papiri non letterari (cf. A.T. Robertson, A Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the
Light of Historical Research, Nashville 19344, 6). I suoi studi, come quelli di tanti altri autori, hanno permesso di comprendere il greco del NT nella grecit comune (koin) del proprio tempo.
Lespressione correct, pertanto, non va intesa come prescrittiva, ma in linea, secondo luso dei
papiri. Va notato che la correttezza posta in relazione ai papiri e non allattico! La citazione completa di Moulton (80-81) : We pass on to the Article, on which there is not very much to say,
since in all essentials its use is in agreement with Attic. It might indeed.... vero che il paragrafo
immediatamente successivo alla citazione intitolato The Article: Correctness of NT Greek, ma
la correttezza, in base ai termini della discussione, non intesa come modello assoluto. Nel caso del
greco del NT dire che un uso, un significato si discostano da quello del greco classico, non significa
dire che il secondo corretto e il primo no. La discussione, casomai, verte sulluso letterario e
quello vernacolare.

Limperativo nel Nuovo Testamento: in dialogo con J.D. Fantin

259

significato primario o centrale del modo; identificare i vari sememi realizzati


nei vari contesti e determinare quali particolarit caratterizzano i vari passaggi.
Occorre andare per questo oltre il sistema linguistico e analizzare il processo
comunicativo (41-42).
La natura della comunicazione. Nelle pagine riservate a questo tema si
presenta il rapporto tra comunicatore (communicator), destinatario (receiver) e
il modello di comunicazione: comunicatore (communicator) codificatore (encoder) canale (channel) decodificatore (decoder) destinatario (receiver).
Non sempre la comunicazione lineare e immediata. Anche in questo caso,
osserva lA.: Unfortunately, communication is not so simple6. In una comunicazione operano fattori che possono essere definiti regole pragmatiche che
fanno riferimento a elementi non linguistici, per cui: The code model can only
work as long as communication consists of straightforward direct linguistic
material with explicit intentions and clear referents. Unfortunately, not all communication takes place in this way.
Dopo alcuni esempi di brevi scambi di parole tra due personaggi, lo studioso
arriva alla conclusione che in una comunicazione vi sono molti pi elementi di
quanti sono codificati e decodificati in un messaggio. Lintenzione di una comunicazione parte della comunicazione stessa: Thus, the notion of communicative intention is an important non-linguistic aspect of communication.
Per interpretare un enunciato nel suo contesto necessario un approccio
pragmatico, cos come sembra evidente che an inferential model of communication is superior to the code model.
Dopo aver presentato e avere evidenziato i limiti della teoria di Grice con
riferimento al conversational implicature e allenunciazione del cooperative
principle7, lA. si rif alla teoria della pertinenza (relevance theory = RT) di
Wilson e Sperber8, notando come, nonostante alcuni punti di contatto tra la teoria di Grice e la RT, esse siano in realt distinte.
Per Fantin necessario dare il giusto rilievo alluso figurato nelluso comune della lingua, perch la comunicazione si serve di linguaggio figurato e nonfigurato. Facendo propria una citazione di Sperber e Wilson9 afferma che non
ci sono elementi per ritenere linterpretazione letterale di unespressione come
6 Fantin fa questo esempio. In I ate chicken for dinner yesterday, il pronome I e lavverbio
yesterday possono oscillare. Il sistema linguistico stabilisce che Io si riferisce sempre al parlante, ieri non pu che essere il giorno precedente a quello dellenunciato.
7 Si rimanda a H.P. Grice Logic and Conversation, in P. Cole - J. Morgan (ed.), Syntax and
Semantics. 3: Speech Acts, New York 1975, 41-58.
8 Opera di riferimento D. Wilson - D. Sperber An Outline of Relevance Theory, Notes on
Linguistics 39 (1987) 5-24.
9 D. Sperber - D. Wilson, Relevance: Communication and Cognition, Oxford 19952, 233.

260

Rosario Pierri

la migliore: The speaker is presumed to aim at optimal relevance, not literal


truth.
Questo approccio non esclude la centralit del codice di comunicazione ma
non lo considera come suo unico fondamento. A questo punto lA. spiega in che
misura questa discussione sulla comunicazione in relazione allargomento
della sua monografia. Il punto da cui partire che siccome la comunicazione
deduttiva (inferential) e un codice serve come prova-elemento (evidence) per
contribuire allinterpretazione, evidente che il significato letterale (literal)
esplicito di unespressione in s potrebbe non rendere esattamente il significato
voluto di un enunciato. Occorre inoltre distinguere tra significato fuori contesto (contextless) e significato contestuale, semantico il primo, pragmatico il
secondo. Linterprete deve determinare quale significato pragmatico pi probabile (43-60).
Distinzione tra semantica e pragmatica. Un enunciato ha un suo significato che, fuori contesto, si presta a pi interpretazioni. In una situazione comunicativa il significato di un enunciato dato dal suo significato intrinseco e dai
fattori contestuali10. Si ha uninterazione tra enunciato in s e contesto, il primo
si realizza nellambito della conoscenza linguistica, il secondo deriva da fattori
non linguistici. LA. definisce come diretto il significato semantico e indiretto quello pragmatico.
Nella descrizione pragmatica di una forma o struttura il significato lessicale
delloccorrenza di un verbo da definire indiretta, perch non rientra nella
forma/struttura grammaticale. Nellanalisi del lessema il significato rientra nel
dominio della semantica lessicale (lexical semantics). Il significato semantico
rientra nel sistema linguistico senza riferimenti o dipendenze rispetto a fattori
non linguistici, mentre gli elementi pragmatici comprendono fattori non
linguistici. Le implicazioni di significato pragmatiche risultano da fattori non
linguistici (sociali in genere), dal significato linguistico contestuale indiretto
(indirect contextual linguistic meaning) che interagisce con il significato
semantico (60-63).
Limiti della ricerca. Nel sottoparagrafo Limitations lA. precisa i termini
della sua ricerca. Tra le tante e mutevoli teorie linguistiche adotta la NeuroCognitive Stratificational Linguistics (= NCSL) e la RT. Lo studio riguarda
luso dellimperativo e il suo significato e non come si esprimono il comando o
la proibizione in greco. Non trattata la nozione del tempo11. Limperativo
10 LA. fa notare come linterpretazione dellaffermazione ho comprato un cowboy cambia a
seconda di chi la pronuncia: un pap, un bambino, il presidente di una squadra di football.
11 Fantin deve riferirsi allaspetto.

Limperativo nel Nuovo Testamento: in dialogo con J.D. Fantin

261

discusso esclusivamente sul piano linguistico. Non sono considerate inoltre tutte le occorrenze dellimperativo del NT (pi di 1600), la ricerca si limita a
quelle di alcuni capitoli di libri scelti (66-68).
Fantin ammette che per certi aspetti lapproccio applicato nel suo studio non
si discosta radicalmente da quello della grammatica tradizionale12, anche se,
aggiunge, la sua metodologia perviene a un paradigma differente per spiegare
il modo. A suo avviso lanalisi tradizionale tende a dipendere dallintuizione
di ogni singolo studioso. Lapproccio proposto nel suo lavoro approfondisce gli
elementi contestuali per definire con maggiore rigore quando presente un
determinato significato o uso pragmatico (71).
Limperativo nel Nuovo Testamento e gli studi linguistici. Nel secondo
capitolo si afferma che limperativo assolve quattro usi principali: comando,
richiesta/supplica, permesso/tolleranza, proibizione, ai quali Fantin affianca
luso condizionale13. Quanto a questultimo uso, Wallace, secondo Fantin, ha
dimostrato che occorre in determinate condizioni: i casi indiscussi hanno limperativo nella protasi e lindicativo futuro nellapodosi secondo la costruzione
imperativo + + indicativo futuro. Nella costruzione imperativo + +
imperativo il principio che il primo una probabile protasi condizionale, il
secondo funge da indicativo futuro14.
Per taluni grammatici luso concessivo incluso in quello condizionale. Talora limperativo ha valore di dichiarazione (pronouncement), saluto (greeting), avvertimento (warning). Nel primo uso si ha il passivo (Mc 1,41
), dove la dichiarazione compie lazione espressa. Il saluto sembra
idiomatico con , , ma non, secondo Fantin, il plurale ,
che conserva il valore imperativale. Limperativo di avvertimento si ha esclusivamente con e . In questi casi la dipendenza delluso dal
lessema suggerisce di considerarli un comando come un altro (76-81).
Quanto alla terza persona dellimperativo greco, lA. ritiene che la difficolt
di traduzione in inglese si ricorre spesso a let che, a suo avviso, orienta
verso la sfumatura permissiva non debba cancellare le differenze: in 1Cor 7,15
permissivo, invece un vero comando in Gc 1,5 (82-83).
Dopo aver osservato che la diatesi passiva pu sembrare innaturale nelluso
12 Come termine di confronto rimanda a D.B. Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An
Exegetical Syntax of New Testament Greek, Grand Rapids 1996, 485-493.
13 In seguito lA. preciser che, con limperativo, condizionale non va inteso come un uso ma
come sfumatura. Gli esempi riportati per i rispettivi usi sono: Mt 2,20; Gv 5,11; Mt 6,9b-13;
Lc11,1; Mt 8,32; 1Cor 7,36; Rm 6,12; Ef 5,18; 1Gv 4,1; Mt 7,7; Gv 1,46.
14 Laffermazione condivisibile ma il rapporto tra le azioni. Studia e impara non assimilabile a studia e parti. Nel primo caso la semantica delle azioni determina la possibile relazione
condizionale tra le azioni, quindi tra le due proposizioni, anche fuori contesto.

262

Rosario Pierri

dellimperativo (si comanda a chi non compie lazione)15, Fantin allarga la riflessione ad autori che discutono dellimperativo, come Ermogene, Aristotele,
Apollonio Discolo, e ai papiri non letterari per concludere che luso del modo
nel NT e nella koin non si distacca sostanzialmente dalla grecit classica. Nelle grammatiche di greco classico si registrano in maniera uniforme gli usi
dellimperativo elencati sopra, anche se le definizioni non appaiono ben argomentate. Rispetto a classificazioni stilate su base intuitiva preferibile adottare
un sistema che consideri i partecipanti (participants), il significato del verbo e i
fattori pragmatici contestuali (85-88).
I tempi dellimperativo. Come si verifica nei Lxx e nella grecit in genere,
anche nel NT il perfetto imperativo raro. Delle attestazioni neotestamentarie
lunica ad avere forza imperativale in Mc 4,39, e Fantin ritiene che
da una sola occorrenza non si possano trarre conclusioni16.
Interessante lescursus proposto dallA. circa la teoria diffusa nelle grammatiche di greco sullopposizione tra presente e aoristo imperativo, soprattutto nel
caso delle proposizioni proibitive. La distinzione espressa da Winer17 stata
accettata allunanimit dai grammatici: Limperativo aoristo utilizzato in
relazione o ad unazione che passa rapidamente e dovrebbe aver luogo una sola
volta, o ad ogni modo a unazione intrapresa una volta soltanto Limperativo
presente utilizzato in relazione a unazione che gi cominciata e deve essere
continuata, o che duratura e ripetuta di frequente. Quindi impiegato comunemente nella lingua misurata e non emotiva delle leggi e dei precetti morali.
Lo stesso valso per le proibitive: il presente richiede la cessazione di unazione in corso, laoristo proibisce linizio di unazione. Tale opposizione, la cui
formulazione si deve probabilmente a G. Hermann (1827), fu divulgata da W.
Headlam (1903) e H. Jackson (1904), ma fu impugnata da H.D. Naylor (1905).
Al termine della discussione che ne segu, nella linea tracciata da Naylor, si
convenne che lopposizione su formulata non sempre valida. R.C. Seaton
(1906) conferm la posizione di Naylor, evidenziandone per la debolezza per
aver trascurato il significato lessicale dei verbi. Con K.L. McKay (1985) luso
dellimperativo ricondotto nellalveo corretto: la