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Chapter 4

Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of the Data

This chapter present analyses and interprets the data generated for the extent of
teachers classroom behavior, pupils classroom participation and pupils classroom
behavior, and significant differences of the variables between the two school districts and
its relationship among the aforementioned variables.

Teachers Classroom Behavior

The variable was measured in this study using the following indicators; clarity,
disclosure, enthusiasm, interaction, organization, pacing, rapport, and speech, and the data
generated for this indicators are shown in Table 2 to 10 for both Labangan I and II school
districts.
Clarity. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers classroom behavior of
the two school districts was shown in Table 2.
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.63, interpreted
as always, is posted on Item 10 (Explains subjects matter in familiar colloquial language),
and the lowest mean of 2.53, also interpreted as sometimes, is posted on Item 2 (Uses
concrete everyday examples to explain concepts and principles).

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The overall mean of 3.16 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I school district,
indicating that their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of clarity is sometimes.
For Labangan II school district, the highest mean of 3.73, interpreted as always, is
posted on Item 1 (Gives several examples of each concept), and the lowest mean of 3.03,
Table 2
Extent of Teachers Classroom Behavior in terms of Clarity
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean
1. Gives several examples of each
concept
2. Uses concrete everyday examples to
explain concepts and principles
3. Defines new or unfamiliar terms
4.Repeats difficult ideas several times
5. Stresses most important points by
pausing, speaking, slowly, raising
voice, so on
6. Uses graphs or diagrams to facilitate
explanation
7. Points out practical applications of
concepts, answers pupils questions
thoroughly
8. Suggests ways of memorizing
complicated ideas
9. Writes key terms on blackboard or
overhead screen
10. Explains subjects matter in familiar
colloquial language
Over-all Weighted Mean

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

3.33

Always

3.73

Always

2.53

Sometimes

3.24

Sometimes

3.10
3.30
3.19

Sometimes
Always
Sometimes

3.55
3.24
3.48

Always
Sometimes
Always

2.73

Sometimes

3.03

Sometimes

3.03

Sometimes

3.36

Always

3.53

Always

3.36

Always

3.22

Sometimes

3.24

Sometimes

3.63

Always

3.52

Always

3.16

Sometimes

3.38

Always

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never

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Interpreted as sometimes, posted on Item 6 (Uses graphs or diagrams to facilitate
explanation).
The overall mean of 3.38 is garnered by teachers in Labangan II schools, indicating
that their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of clarity is always.
The findings for the two groups of respondents show that teachers in Labangan I
practiced classroom behavior of clarity only on the sometimes level, while those in
Labangan II practiced it always. According to Cooper and Simonds (2003), teachers act on
a different manner of presenting knowledge that could be easily understood by learners.
This is best way to affect teaching and learning process especially in the elementary level.
Disclosure.

The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers classroom

behavior of the two school districts was shown in Table 3.


As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.80, interpreted
as always, is posted on Item 1 (Advises pupils on how to prepare for tests or exams), and
the lowest mean of 3.00, also interpreted as sometimes, is posted on Item 3 (Tells pupils
exactly what is expected of them on tests, essays, or assignments).
Table 3
Extent of Teachers Classroom Behavior in terms of Disclosure
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean
1. Advises pupils on how to prepare for
tests or exams
2. Provides sample exam questions
3.Tells pupils exactly what is expected of
them on tests, essays, or assignments
4. States objectives of each lecture
5. Reminds pupils of test dates or
assignment deadlines

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

3.80

Always

3.45

Always

3.43
3.00

Always
Sometimes

3.58
3.52

Always
Always

3.34
3.34

Always
Always

3.50
3.70

Always
Always

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6. States objectives of course as whole

3.42

3.45

Always

3.53

Always

Always

Over-all Weighted Mean

3.39

Always

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never
The overall mean of 3.39 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of disclosure is always.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.70, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 5 (Reminds pupils of test dates or assignment deadlines), and the lowest mean of
3.45, interpreted as always, is posted on Item 1 (Advises pupils on how to prepare for tests
or exams) and Item 6 (States objectives of course as whole).
The overall mean of 3.53 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of disclosure is also always.
The findings revealed that teachers always practiced classroom behavior of
disclosure of both school districts. This type of behavior shows explicitness concerning the
course requirements, grading system and criteria of giving achievement performance of the
pupils. The class becomes more inclusive and builds a sense of interaction when
information is more available and reliable (Schrammel, 2006).
Enthusiasm. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers classroom
behavior of the two school districts was shown in Table 4.
As shown in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.53, interpreted as
always, is posted on Item 9 (Reads lecture verbatim from prepared notes or text), and the

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lowest mean of 2.35, interpreted as rarely, is posted on Item 6 (Walks up aisles beside
pupils).
The overall mean of 2.84 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of enthusiasm is sometimes.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.71, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 5 (Makes eye contact with pupils), and the lowest mean of 2.89, interpreted as
sometimes, is posted on Item 8 (Tells jokes or humorous anecdotes).
Table 4
Extent of Teachers Classroom Behavior in terms of Enthusiasm
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

1.Speaks in dramatics or expressive way


2. Moves about while lecturing
3.Gestures with hands or arms
4.Exhibits facial gestures or expressions
5. Makes eye contact with pupils
6. Walks up aisles beside pupils
7. Gestures with head or body
8. Tells jokes or humorous anecdotes
9.Reads lecture verbatim from prepared
notes or text
10.Smiles or laugh while teaching

2.48
2.47
2.77
2.45
3.42
2.35
2.93
3.07
3.53

Rarely
Rarely
Sometimes
Rarely
Always
Rarely
Sometimes
Sometimes
Always

3.36
3.47
3.62
3.24
3.71
3.07
3.03
2.89
3.00

Always
Always
Always
Sometimes
Always
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes

2.90

Sometimes

3.17

Sometimes

Over-all Weighted Mean

2.84

Sometimes

3.26

Always

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never
The overall mean of 3.26 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of enthusiasm is always.

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The findings for the two groups of respondents show that teachers in Labangan I
practiced classroom behavior of enthusiasm only on the sometimes level, while in those in
Labangan II practiced it always. Accordingly, some teachers solicit for pupils attention
and interest by using appropriate language and humorous lesson material. This usually
happened on a situation when teachers have interest and excitement in teaching a diverse
group of students and providing the best opportunity for student success. It is an effort to
attain a friendlier teacher-pupil classroom environment. Baum (2002) contend that a more
important thing to happen in a classroom is that teachers involvement and excitement
communicate themselves to students, helping to engage them in a learning process
Interaction. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers classroom
behavior of the two school districts was shown in Table 5.
Table 5
Extent of Teachers Classroom Behavior in terms of Interaction
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

1.Encourages pupils question and


comments during lectures
2. Corrects pupils when they make errors
3.Praises pupils for good ideas
4. Asks questions of individual pupils
5. Asks questions of class as a whole
6. Incorporates pupils ideas into lecture
7. Presents challenging, thought
provoking ideas
8. Uses a variety of media and activities
in class
9. Asks rhetorical questions

2.94

Sometimes

3.34

Always

2.69
2.97
2.81
2.55
2.53
2.83

Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes

3.34
3.69
3.03
2.97
3.14
3.11

Always
Always
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes

1.70

Never

2.17

Rarely

2.77

Sometimes

2.69

Sometimes

Over-all Weighted Mean

2.64

Sometimes

3.05

Sometimes

36
Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always
2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 2.97, interpreted
as sometimes, is posted on Item 3 (Praises pupils for good ideas), and the lowest mean of
1.70, interpreted as never, is posted on Item 8 (Uses a variety of media and activities in
class).
The overall mean of 2.64 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of interaction is sometimes.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.69, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 3 (Praises pupils for good ideas), and the lowest mean of 2.17, interpreted as rarely, is
posted on Item 8 (Uses a variety of media and activities in class).
The overall mean of 3.05 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of interaction is also sometimes.
The findings revealed that teachers sometimes practiced classroom behavior of
interaction of both school districts. This action is an approach used by most teachers to
foster students participation through the use of high-level questioning to stimulate pupils
critical thinking skills.
Moreover, Down (2005) also pointed out that teaching interaction approach is also
designed to help pupils learn appropriate social and school-related behaviors. It begins
with an expression of affection and incorporates descriptions of the appropriate activities
and feedback.
Organization. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers classroom
behavior of the two school districts was shown in Table 6.

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As shown in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.48, interpreted as
always, is posted on Item 5 (Explain is how each topic fits into the course a whole), and
the lowest mean of 3.05, interpreted as sometimes, is posted on Item 7 (Periodically
summarizes points previously made).
The overall mean of 3.23 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of organization is sometimes.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.72, interpreted as always, is posted on
Table 6
Extent of Teachers Classroom Behavior in terms of Organization
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

1. Uses heading and subheadings to


organize lectures
2. Puts outline of lecture on blackboard
or overhead screen
3. Clearly indicates transition from one
topic to the next
4. Gives preliminary overview of lecture
at the beginning of class
5. Explain is how each topic fits into the
course as a whole
6. Begins class with review of topics
covered last time
7. Periodically summarizes points
previously made

3.26

Always

3.21

Sometimes

3.32

Always

3.69

Always

3.23

Sometimes

3.52

Always

3.10

Sometimes

3.55

Always

3.48

Always

3.62

Always

3.19

Sometimes

3.72

Always

3.05

Sometimes

3.41

Always

Over-all Weighted Mean

3.23

Sometimes

3.53

Always

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never
Item 6 (Begins class with review of topics covered last time), and the lowest mean of 3.21,

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interpreted as sometimes, is posted on Item 1 (Uses headings and subheadings to organize
lecture).
The overall mean of 3.53 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of organization is always.
The findings for the two groups of respondents show that teachers in Labangan I
practiced classroom behavior of organization only on the sometimes level, while in those
in Labangan II practiced it always. They differ descriptively on the practice of classroom
organizational behavior which involves the ways of organizing or structuring the subject
matter. The lectures and topics to be discussed fit to the needs of the pupils as Baum
(p. 73) contend that an effective approach to classroom management includes organization
of instruction and support activities, and procedures and behavior rules in line to effective
teaching.
Pacing. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers classroom behavior of
the two school districts was shown in Table 7.
Table 7
Extent of Teachers Classroom Behavior in terms of Pacing
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean
1. Spends less time on obvious points
2. Sticks to major theme of lecture
3. Covers substantial material in class
sessions
4. Ask if pupils understand before
proceeding to the next topic
5.Sticks to the point in answering pupils
questions

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

2.89
1.82
2.67

Sometimes
Rarely
Sometimes

3.10
1.73
3.20

Sometimes
Never
Sometimes

3.59

Always

3.89

Always

2.78

Sometimes

2.73

Sometimes

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Over-all Weighted Mean

2.75

Sometimes

2.93

Sometimes

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.59, as
interpreted as always, is posted on Item 4 (Ask if pupils understand before proceeding to
the next topic), and the lowest mean of 1.82, as interpreted as rarely, is posted on Item 2
(Sticks to major theme of lecture).
The overall mean of 2.75 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of pacing is sometimes.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.89, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 4 (Ask if pupils understand before proceeding to the next topic), and the lowest mean
of 1.73, as interpreted as never, is posted on Item 2 (Sticks to major theme of lecture).
The overall mean of 2.93 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of pacing is also sometimes.
The findings revealed the similarity of both group of teachers in the two school
districts on the practiced facing as a behavior in the classroom. The rate of information,
efficient use of time and sticking to the point discussed in answering pupils questions were
sometimes practiced by the teachers. It appears here that this behavioral strategy was not
fully applied in the classroom of the aforementioned districts.
On this context, Schultz (2006) suggest that teachers should look on the pupils
opportunities to make simple but meaningful choices in their classroom routine that make
them willingly undertake.

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Rapport. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers classroom behavior
of the two school districts was shown in Table 8.
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.38, interpreted
as always, is posted on Item 1 (Addresses individuals pupils by name), and the lowest mean
of 2.10, interpreted as rarely, is posted on Item 2 (Announces availability for consultation
outside of class).
The overall mean of 2.71 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of rapport is sometimes.
Table 8
Extent of Teachers Classroom Behavior in terms of Rapport
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

1.Addresses individuals pupils by name


2. Announces availability for
consultation outside of class
3. Offers to help pupils with problems
4.Shows tolerance of other points of
view
5. Talks with pupils before or after class

3.38
2.10

Always
Rarely

3.50
2.43

Always
Rarely

2.21
2.77

Rarely
Sometimes

3.23
2.83

Sometimes
Sometimes

3.11

Sometimes

2.67

Sometimes

Over-all Weighted Mean

2.71

Sometimes

2.93

Sometimes

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.50, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 1 (Addresses individuals pupils by name), and the lowest mean of 2.43, interpreted as
rarely, is posted on Item 2 (Announces availability for consultation outside of class).

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The overall mean of 2.93 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of rapport is also sometimes.
The findings revealed that the practiced of rapport as behavior of the teacher in the
classroom is sometimes in both school. The sameness of the results shows that teachers of
both districts have time to time ensures interpersonal relations between teachers and pupils.
This finding is supported by (Ramsden, et. al, 1995) who states that teacher with
strong empathy to their pupils show they care about them as people. They are masters of
the subject matter and exhibit expertise in the subjects they are teaching. They have a
caring attitude, and a love of learning, knowledge of discipline and classroom management
technique. This motivates pupils who are subjected with variety of forces to earn good
grades. It is also in this quality that teachers recognize the pupils strength and weaknesses.
Speech. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers classroom behavior of
the two school districts was shown in Table 9.
Table 9
Extent of Teachers Classroom Behavior in terms of Speech
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean
1. Avoids stuttering, mumbling, or
slurring words
2. Speaks appropriate volume
3. Speaks clearly
4. Speaks at appropriate pace
5. Avoids saying um or ah
6. Voice has proper modulation and
variation
Over-all Weighted Mean

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

2.97

Sometimes

3.77

Always

3.10
3.41
2.79
2.14
3.03

Sometimes
Always
Sometimes
Rarely
Sometimes

3.23
3.73
3.62
2.67
3.53

Sometimes
Always
Always
Sometimes
Always

2.91

Sometimes

3.43

Always

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Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always
2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.41, interpreted
as always, is posted on Item 3 (Speaks clearly), and the lowest mean of 2.14, interpreted as
rarely, is posted on Item 5 (Avoids saying um or ah).
The overall mean of 2.91 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of speech is sometimes.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.77, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 1 (Avoids stuttering, mumbling, or slurring words), and the lowest mean of 2.67,
interpreted as sometimes, is posted on Item 5 (Avoids saying um or ah).
The overall mean of 3.43 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of speech is always.
The findings for the two groups of respondents show that teachers in Labangan I
practiced classroom behavior of speech only on the sometimes level, while in those in
Labangan II practiced it always. They differ descriptively on the practice of classroom
behavior on speech which involves teachers voice characteristics that are relevant to
classroom teaching.
Rogerson and Dodd (2005), state that difficulties in class management can result
from the lack of knowledge that the teachers have about the effect of their voice on their
pupils. Inappropriate voice and body movement that appears uncontrolled can often lead to
uninvited chatter and 'irritating misbehavior of pupils. Earnestness and energy in the voice,
its control and pleasing quality, and influence all harmonize assure effective
communication of ideas.

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Summary of Teachers Classroom Behavior. Table 10 presents the summary of the
variable for teachers classroom behavior for Labangan I and Labangan II districts.
As indicated in the table, for teachers in Labangan I district, the highest mean of
3.39, interpreted as always practiced, is posted for disclosure, and the lowest mean of 2.64,
interpreted as sometimes practiced, is posted for interaction. The rest of the components
are anchored on the sometimes practiced scale. The over-all mean for the variable of 2.95,
interpreted as sometimes practiced, which indicates that the teachers in the Labangan I
district practiced the components of classroom behavior only sometimes.
Table 10
Summary of Teachers Classroom Behavior
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Over-all
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

Over-all
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

1. Clarity
2. Disclosure
3. Enthusiasm
4. Interaction
5. Organization
6. Pacing
7. Rapport
8. Speech

3.16
3.39
2.84
2.64
3.23
2.75
2.71
2.91

Sometimes
Always
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes

3.38
3.53
3.26
3.05
3.53
2.93
2.93
3.43

Always
Always
Always
Sometimes
Always
Sometimes
Sometimes
Always

Over-all Average Weighted Mean

2.95

Sometimes

3.26

Always

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Sometimes
1.76 2.50 Rarely
1.00 1.75 Never
For teachers in the Labangan II district, the highest mean of 3.53, interpreted as
always practiced, is posted for disclosure and organization, and the lowest mean of 2.93,

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interpreted as sometimes practiced, is posted for pacing and rapport. Three other
components are anchored on the always scale: clarity, enthusiasm and speech. The rest of
the components are anchored on the sometimes practiced scale. The over-all mean for the
variable of 3.96, interpreted as always practiced, which indicates that the teachers in the
Labangan II district practiced the components of classroom behavior always.
The findings for the two groups of teachers reveal that they are differently
categorized practicing the classroom behavior to sometimes and always for Labangan I and
Labangan II, respectively. This observation conforms to the objective of the study, which is
to establish the significance difference between teachers in the Labangan I and Labangan II
in terms of the variables. The conclusion of this problem, however, is held in abeyance,
pending to the result of the testing of the hypothesis.

Pupils Classroom Participation

The variable was measured in this study using the following indicators; procedural
participation, and substantive participation and the data generated for this indicators are
shown in Table 11 and 13 for both Labangan I and II school districts.
Procedural Participation. The data generated for this sub-variable of pupils
classroom participation of the two school districts was shown in Table 11.
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.68, interpreted
as always, is posted on Item 4 (I bring textbook with me when coming to school), and the
lowest mean of 2.29, interpreted as seldom, is posted on Item 9 (I find that I spend a lot of
time chatting, socially with my friends in the class).

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The overall mean of 3.24 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of pupils class participation in terms of procedural participation is often.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.43, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 3 (I arrive to lessons punctuality), and the lowest mean of 2.25, interpreted as seldom,
is posted on Item 9 (I find that I spend a lot of time chatting, socially with my friends in the
class).
The overall mean of 3.08 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of pupils class participation in terms of procedural participation is often.
The findings shows that pupils of both districts practiced procedural participation
from time to time on submitting home work, arriving to lessons punctuality, bringing
Table 11
Extent of Pupils Class Participation in terms of Procedural Participation
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean
1. I submit home work on time
2. I complete assigned task on time
3. I arrive to lessons punctuality
4. I bring textbooks with me when
coming to school
5. I do not unnecessary shouting in the
class
6. I try to participate in group
discussions during classes
7. I put a lot of effort into everything I do
in the class
8. I find it difficult to follow the
teachers instructions
9.I find that I spend a lot of time
chatting, socially with my friends in
the class
10. If I dont finish all the exercises we
are given during time, I try to finish
them at home

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

3.64
3.49
3.61
3.68

Always
Always
Always
Always

3.34
3.14
3.43
3.40

Always
Often
Always
Always

2.62

Often

2.80

Often

3.50

Always

3.26

Always

3.49

Always

3.21

Often

2.82

Often

2.53

Often

2.29

Seldom

2.25

Seldom

3.26

Always

3.40

Always

46

Over-all Weighted Mean

3.24

Often

3.08

Often

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Often
1.76 2.50 Seldom
1.00 1.75 Never
textbook in coming to class, and participating in classroom discussion. Some practiced
only once in a while in spending time chatting with friends in the class. The overall
condition of both districts makes the teacher a favorable situation on developing an attitude
and dispositions necessary for classroom participation. It makes easy for the teachers in
making rules and standard in setting a participative classroom environment.
Moreover, Souza, Dallimore, and Pilling (2006) states there always be a procedure
that needs to be followed while the teacher is teaching. They further pointed out that
pupils procedural participation in class is a learning centered approach which teachers
really want to develop. This is a means of setting a course of action in letting the pupils
exchange ideas and feel a sense of familiarity with their peers and the teacher.
Substantive Participation. The data generated for this sub-variable of pupils
classroom participation of the two school districts was shown in Table 12.
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.68, interpreted
as always, is posted on Item 10 (I find that I want to know more about the topics that we
cover in class), and the lowest mean of 1.72, interpreted as never, is posted on Item 9 (I
find the things we do in class to be dull and dry).

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The overall mean of 2.66 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of pupils class participation in terms of substantive participation is often.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.49, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 10 (I find that I want to know more about the topics that we cover in class), and the
lowest mean of 1.91, interpreted as seldom, is posted on Item 3 (When I come across
material I dont understand, I guess answers rather than to work it out).
The overall mean of 2.62 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of pupils class participation in terms of procedural participation is also often.
The findings show that pupils of both districts similarly practiced substantive
participation especially looking forward in coming to class and finding to know more
about the topics to be covered in class. It is means of giving weight or value for a better
participation on learning specific task prescribe by the teacher during a class discussion.
Chapman, Meuter, Toy, and Wright (2010) stressed that learning would be more
Table 12
Extent of Pupils Class Participation in terms of Substantive Participation
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean
1. I get actively involved in all the
activities we do in class
2. I get a sinking feeling when I have
to face homework for the class
3. When I come across material I dont
understand, I guess answers rather
than to work it out
4. I look forward to coming to the class
5. I find my thought wandering during
classes
6. I become absorbed in what I am doing
in class that I loss track of time
7. I tried to avoid being ask questions in

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

3.38

Always

3.25

Often

2.08

Seldom

2.18

Seldom

2.00

Seldom

1.91

Seldom

3.38
2.15

Always
Seldom

3.27
2.07

Always
Seldom

2.47

Seldom

2.58

Often

2.79

Often

2.02

Seldom

48
the class
8. When we cover new materials in class,
I try to figure it out how it fits me
with what I already know
9. I find the things we do in class to be
dull and dry
10. I find that I want to know more about
the topics that we cover in class
Over-all Weighted Mean

2.92

Often

3.35

Always

1.72

Never

2.05

Seldom

3.68

Always

3.49

Always

2.66

Often

2.62

Often

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Often
1.76 2.50 Seldom
1.00 1.75 Never
substantive when pupils raise their hands and at the same time answer the question
correctly. A substantive question is one of some importance, and a substantive response is
one that contains some information and value. It incorporates thoughtfulness and
willingness to exert the effort to comprehend complex ideas and master difficult skills.
Summary of Pupils Classroom Participation. The summary of the data generated
for this variable are indicated in Table 13 for pupils in Labangan I and Labangan II
districts.
Table 13
Summary of Pupils Classroom Participation
Labangan I
Indicators

1. Procedural Participation
2. Substantive Participation
Over-all Average Weighted Mean

Labangan II

Over-all
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

Over-all
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

3.24
2.66

Often
Often

3.08
2.62

Often
Often

2.95

Often

2.85

Often

49
Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always
2.51 3.25 Often
1.76 2.50 Seldom
1.00 1.75 Never
As indicated in the table, the highest mean of 3.24 for Labangan I and 3.08 for
Labangan II, is posted for procedural participation, and interpreted often practiced. While
the lowest mean of 2.66 for Labangan I and 2.62 for Labangan II, is posted for substantive
participation, and interpreted as often practiced, respectively. The over-all mean for the
variable of 2.95, indicate that the pupils in the Labangan I district practiced the
components of classroom participation only oftentimes. While for Labangan II, the over-all
mean for the variable of 2.85, indicate that the pupils in the Labangan II district also
practiced the components of classroom participation only oftentimes.
The findings for the two groups of pupils reveal that they are similarly categorized
practicing the classroom participation to oftentimes for Labangan I and Labangan II,
respectively. This observation does not conform to the objective of the study, which is to
establish the significance difference between pupils in the Labangan I and Labangan II in
terms of the variables. The conclusion of this problem, however, is held in abeyance,
pending to the result of the testing of the hypothesis.

Pupils Classroom Behavior


The variable was measured in this study using the following indicators; taskoriented, relations-oriented, and self-oriented, and the generated for this indicators are
shown in Table 14 to 17 for both Labangan I and II school districts.

50
Task-Oriented Behavior. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers
classroom behavior of the two school districts was shown in Table 14.
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.40, interpreted
as always, is posted on Item 10 (I evaluate ideas and suggestions from classmates if good
or applicable), and the lowest mean of 3.00, interpreted as often, is posted on Item 9 (I
classify ideas and suggestion of classmates).
The overall mean of 3.16 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of task-oriented behavior is often.
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.06, interpreted as often, is posted on Item7
(I offer relevant facts about a problem facing the group), and the lowest mean of 2.53,
interpreted as often, is posted on Item 5 (I ask for classification of problems in class).
The overall mean of 2.73 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of task-oriented behavior is also often.
The findings inferred that pupils of both districts oftentimes focus on getting the
Table 14
Extent of Pupils Classroom Behavior in terms of Task-Oriented Behavior
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean
1. I offer new ideas to a classmate or
groups classmates
2. I volunteer a new method in doing a
class project or task
3. I suggest solutions to classmates or
groups problems
4. I offer a new type of group set up to
classmates
5. I ask for classification of problems in

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

3.04

Often

2.79

Often

3.19

Often

2.76

Often

3.21

Often

2.86

Often

3.08

Often

2.60

Often

3.17

Often

2.53

Often

51
class
6. I ask information and facts from
authoritative sources
7. I offer relevant facts about a problem
facing the group
8. I tell my classmates my own
experiences about the problem at
hand
9. I classify ideas and suggestion of
classmates
10. I evaluate ideas and suggestions
from classmates if good or applicable
Over-all Weighted Mean

3.17

Often

2.65

Often

3.26

Always

3.06

Often

3.06

Often

2.64

Often

3.00

Often

2.81

Often

3.40

Always

2.61

Often

3.16

Often

2.73

Often

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Often
1.76 2.50 Seldom
1.00 1.75 Never
necessary task, or series of tasks, at hand in order to achieve their group goals. However,
Arana, et. al (2009) stressed out that these types of students are less concerned with the
idea of catering to their peers, and more concerned with finding the step-by-step solution
required meeting specific goals. They will often actively define the work and the roles
required, put structures in place, and plan, organize, and monitor progress within the team.
It create greater group efficacy as they are known to produce varying outcomes under
different circumstances.
Relation-Oriented Behavior. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers
classroom behavior of the two school districts was shown in Table 15.

Table 15
Extent of Pupils Classroom Behavior in terms of Relations-Oriented Behavior
Labangan I
Items

Labangan II

52
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

1. I coordinate the activities of


classmate or group
2. I praise classmates for good work
3. I agree with classmates to certain idea
or proposal
4. I show affectionate feelings to
classmates
5. I help promote oneness in a group or
among classmates
6. I help settle conflicts that arise in my
group
7. I encourage classmates to participate
in group task
8. I tell classmates about acceptable
courses of action
9. I clarify the goals or objectives of
group activities
10. I help assess group activities to lead
to goal or objective
11. I act as a friendly classmate

3.51

Always

3.17

Often

3.61
2.85

Always
Often

3.38
2.21

Always
Often

3.48

Always

3.10

Often

3.41

Always

3.06

Often

3.57

Always

3.06

Often

3.12

Often

3.28

Always

3.37

Always

2.92

Often

3.33

Always

3.30

Always

3.30

Always

2.96

Often

3.49

Always

3.33

Always

Over-all Weighted Mean

3.37

Always

3.07

Often

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Often
1.76 2.50 Seldom
1.00 1.75 Never
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 3.61, interpreted
as always, is posted on Item 2 (I praise classmates for good work), and the lowest mean of
2.85, interpreted as often, is posted on Item 3 (I agree with classmates to certain idea or
proposal).
The overall mean of 3.37 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of relations-oriented behavior is
always.

53
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 3.38, interpreted as always, is posted on
Item 2 (I praise classmates for good work ), and the lowest mean of 2.21, interpreted as
often, is posted on Item 3 (I agree with classmates to certain idea or proposal ).
The overall mean of 3.07 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of relations-oriented behavior is often.
The findings show that there is a disparity on the description of the pupils behavior
in Labangan I and Labangan II. Pupils in Labangan I have an always relation-oriented
behavior, while in Labangan II only have an oftentimes related-oriented behavior. They
look on the satisfaction, motivation and the general well-being of the group members.
Arana, et. al (p, 125) elaborated that these actions encourages good teamwork and
collaboration, through fostering positive relationships and good communication. It also
prioritizes the welfare of everyone in the group, and will place time and effort in meeting
the individual needs of everyone involved.
Self-Oriented Behavior. The data generated for this sub-variable of teachers
classroom behavior of the two school districts was shown in Table 16.
As indicated in the table, for the Labangan I, the highest mean of 2.53, interpreted
Table 16
Extent of Pupils Classroom Behavior in terms of Self-Oriented Behavior
Labangan I

Labangan II

Items
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

54
1. I stay out of classmates or group
2. I criticize the actions and activities of
the group
3. I resist unreasonably any proposal
from the group
4. I bring back on issue already rejected
by classmates
5. I try to call attention of classmates or
group
6. I brag to classmates about the things I
achieve
7. I reject inferior position offered to me
by the group
8. I assert authority to classmates or
group
9. I make classmates do something for
personal purpose
10. I interrupt classmates who give
suggestions.
11. I assert myself to be superior than the
other members in the group
12. I maintain distance from classmates
or group
13. I do not participate actively in class
interactions

1.78
2.13

Seldom
Seldom

2.04
1.81

Seldom
Seldom

2.41

Seldom

2.25

Seldom

1.98

Seldom

1.48

Never

2.11

Seldom

1.88

Seldom

1.89

Seldom

1.51

Never

2.09

Seldom

1.91

Seldom

2.36

Seldom

1.43

Never

2.53

Often

1.96

Seldom

2.17

Seldom

1.83

Seldom

2.11

Seldom

1.90

Seldom

2.11

Seldom

1.88

Seldom

1.96

Seldom

2.40

Seldom

Over-all Weighted Mean

2.13

Seldom

1.87

Seldom

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Often
1.76 2.50 Seldom
1.00 1.75 Never
as often, is posted on Item 9 (I make classmates do something for personal purpose ), and
the lowest mean of 1.78, interpreted as seldom, is posted on Item 1 (I stay out of
classmates or group).
The overall mean of 2.13 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan I, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of self-oriented behavior is seldom.

55
For the Labangan II, the highest mean of 2.40, interpreted as seldom, is posted on
Item 13 (I do not participate actively in class interactions), and the lowest mean of 1.43,
interpreted as never, is posted on Item 8 (I assert authority to classmates or group).
The overall mean of 1.87 is garnered by teachers in the Labangan II, indicating that
their extent of teachers classroom behavior in terms of self-oriented behavior is also
seldom.
The findings indicated that the group of pupils in the aforementioned districts is
generally not a self-oriented behavior. The pupils show concerned with its other by helping
oneself and at the same helping others. They tended to avoid behaviors that could build a
negative effect on fostering positive interaction, create conflicts, dissatisfaction, resentment
and even boredom with group peers. A self-oriented behavior is to perceive things
according to how a person will be affected by a situation without consideration for other
people, or the environment the person finds themselves in (Griffin and Ebert, 2010).
Summary of Pupils Classroom Behavior. Table 17 presents the summary of the
variable for pupils classroom behavior for Labangan I and Labangan II districts.
As indicated in the table, for pupils in Labangan I district, the highest mean of 3.37,
interpreted as always practiced, is posted for relation-oriented behavior, and the lowest
mean of 2.13, interpreted as seldom practiced, is posted for self-oriented behavior. The
other component is anchored on the often practiced scale. The over-all average weighted
mean for the variable of 2.87, which indicates that the pupils in said district oftentimes
practiced the components of pupils classroom behavior.
For teachers in the Labangan II district, the highest mean of 3.07, interpreted as
Table 17
Summary of Pupils Classroom Behavior

56
Labangan I
Indicators

Over-all
Weighted
Mean

1. Task-Oriented Behavior
2. Relations-Oriented Behavior
3. Self-Oriented Behavior
Over-all Average Weighted Mean

Interpretation

Labangan II
Over-all
Weighted
Mean

Interpretation

3.16
3.37
2.13

Often
Always
Seldom

2.73
3.07
1.87

Often
Often
Seldom

2.87

Often

2.56

Often

Hypothetical Mean Range: 3.26 4.00 Always


2.51 3.25 Often
1.76 2.50 Seldom
1.00 1.75 Never
seldom practiced, is posted for relation-oriented behavior, and the lowest mean of 1.87,
interpreted as sometimes practiced, is posted for self-oriented behavior. Three other
components are anchored on the always scale: clarity, enthusiasm and speech. The other
component is anchored on the often practiced scale. The over-all mean for the variable of
2.56, which indicates that the pupils in said district oftentimes practiced the components of
pupils classroom behavior
The findings for the two groups of teachers reveal that they are differently
categorized practicing the classroom behavior to sometimes and always for Labangan I and
Labangan II, respectively. This observation conforms to the objective of the study, which is
to establish the significance difference between teachers in the Labangan I and Labangan II
in terms of the variables. The conclusion of this problem, however, is held in abeyance,
pending to the result of the testing of the hypothesis.
Testing of the Hypotheses

57
There were four hypotheses proposed for testing in terms for there validity, using
the 0.05 level of significance.
Hypothesis No. 1. There are significant differences of the levels of practice of
teachers classroom behavior between the two school districts.
Table 18 shows the result of the test of significant difference in the levels of
practice of classroom behavior between teachers in Labangan I and Labangan II districts.
Table 18
Test of Significant Difference of Teachers Practiced Classroom Behavior between
Labangan I and Labangan II School Districts

Components

1. Clarity
2. Disclosure
3. Enthusiasm
4. Interaction
5. Organization
6. Pacing
7. Rapport
8. Speech

F-Stat
Value

4.5511
0.8269
6.2700
1.9280
4.3848
1.5327
0.9088
7.1241

Probabilit
y
Value

Decision
of the
Hypothesi
s

0.0218
0.8406
0.0114
0.6022
0.0267
0.6271
0.7546
0.0154

Accept
Reject
Accept
Reject
Accept
Reject
Reject
Accept

Interpretation

Significant
Not Significant
Significant
Not Significant
Significant
Not Significant
Not Significant
Significant

As shown in the table, for clarity, enthusiasm, organization and speech, the testing
yielded probability values of 0.0218, 0.0114, 0.0267, and 0.0154 respectively, which are
lower than 0.05 level of significance, those accepting the hypothesis and established a
significance difference between teachers in the two school districts on the aforementioned
components.
For disclosure, interaction, pacing and rapport, the testing yielded probability

58
values of 0.8406, 0.6022, 0.6271 and 0.7546 respectively, which are larger than 0.05 level
of significance, those rejecting the hypothesis and established no significant difference
between teachers in the two school districts on the aforementioned components.
The result of testing the first hypothesis shows that the hypothesis is accepted and
there is a significant difference on clarity, enthusiasm, organization and speech. This is so
because the indices posted by the two groups of teachers were categorized as sometimes
practices for Labangan I district and always practiced for Labangan II district. While no
significant difference was noted between the two school districts in terms of the other four
components of classroom behavior. This result is in order because the indices posted by the
two groups of teachers for the four other components were categorically similar.
Hypothesis No. 2. There are significant differences in the levels of pupils
classroom participations in the two school districts.
Table 19 shows the result of the test of significant difference in the levels of
classroom behavior between pupils in Labangan I and Labangan II districts.
Table 19
Test of Significant Difference of Pupils Classroom Participation between
Labangan I and Labangan II School Districts

Indicators

1. Procedural Participation
2. Substantive Participation

F-Stat
Value

0.9155
0.7028

Probabilit
y
Value

Decision
of the
Hypothesi
s

0.3626
0.2815

Reject
Reject

Interpretation

Not Significant
Not Significant

As shown in the table, the testing yielded probability values of 0.3626 and 0.2815
for procedural and substantive participations, respectively which are larger than 0.05 level

59
of significance, those accepting the hypothesis and established no significance difference
between pupils in the two school districts on the aforementioned components.
The result of testing the second hypothesis shows that the hypothesis is rejected and
there is no significant difference on procedural and substantive participations. This is so
because the indices posted by the two groups of pupils were categorized as oftentimes
practices for Labangan I district and always practiced for Labangan II district. While no
significant difference was noted between the two school districts in terms of the two
indicators of classroom participations. This result is in order because the indices posted by
the two groups of pupils for the two indicators were categorically similar.
Hypothesis No. 3. There are significant differences of the levels pupils manifest
classroom behaviors in the two school districts.
Table 20 shows the result of the test of significant difference in the levels pupils
manifest classroom behavior between Labangan I and Labangan II districts.
Table 20
Test of Significant Difference of Pupils Manifest Classroom Behavior between
Labangan I and Labangan II School Districts

Indicators

1. Task-Oriented Behavior
2. Relations-Oriented
Behavior
3. Self-Oriented Behavior

F-Stat
Value

Probabilit
y
Value

Decision
of the
Hypothesi
s

1.1027
6.2070

0.2651
0.0368

Reject
Accept

Not Significant
Significant

1.0451

0.2282

Reject

Not Significant

Interpretation

As shown in the table, for task-oriented behavior and self-oriented behavior, the
testing yielded probability values of 0.2651 and 0.2282, respectively which are larger than
0.05 level of significance, those rejecting the hypothesis and established a no significance

60
difference between pupils in the two school districts on the aforementioned indicators.
For relation-oriented behavior, the testing yielded probability value of 0.0368
which is smaller than 0.05 level of significance, those accepting the hypothesis and
established a significant difference between teachers in the two school districts on the
aforementioned indicator.
The result show that testing of the third hypothesis show that the hypothesis is
accepted only in the relation-oriented behavior indicator. This is so because the indices
posted by the two groups of pupils for relation-oriented behavior was categorized as
always for Labangan I district and often for Labangan II district. While no significant
difference was noted between the two school districts in terms of the other two indicators
of classroom behavior. This result is in order because the indices posted by the two groups
of pupils for the two indicators were categorically similar.
Hypothesis No. 4. There is a significant relationship between teacher behavior and
the following variables; pupils classroom participation, and pupils classroom behavior.
Table 21 shows the result of the test of significant relationship of teachers
classroom behavior with pupils classroom participation and pupils classroom behavior.

Table 21
Test of Significant Relationship between Teachers Classroom Behavior
and the following dependent variables

Indicators

1. Pupils Classroom
Participation
2. Pupils Classroom
Behavior

Pearso
n
r

Probabilit
y
Value

Decision
of the
Hypothesi
s

0.8156

0.0192

Accept

Significant

0.7944

0.0208

Accept

Significant

Interpretation

61
As shown in the table, the testing yielded probability values of 0.0192 and 0.0208
for pupils classroom participation and pupils classroom behavior, respectively which are
smaller than 0.05 level of significance, those accepting the hypothesis and established a
significant relationship of teachers classroom behavior with that of pupils classroom
participation and pupils classroom behavior.
The finding is supported by the study of Napell (2001) who stresses the contention
that behavior in the classroom can be categorized under two main headings: those that
inhibit learning and those that facilitate learning. Considerable behavior during classroom
discussion is an instructive teaching skill that helps promotes pupil classroom interaction
among peers and assists learning. While insensitive teaching hinder pupils classroom
curiosity and interferes learning.

Action Plan is Designed Improve the Pupils Class Participation and Behavior.
An action plan was designed to improve the pupils class participation and
behavior. The action plan has an intention to create an effective teachers classroom
behavior to enhance pupils classroom participation and behavior. Objectives, strategies,
resources, person responsible, time frame and the expected output of this action plan are
presented in Appendix C.