Sei sulla pagina 1di 243

Flora and dynamics of an upland

and a floodplain forest in Pea


Roja, Colombian Amazonia
Flora y dinmica de bosques de
tierra firme y de vrzea en Pea
Roja, Amazonia colombiana

Londoo, AC 2011 Flora and dynamics of an upland and a floodplain


forest in Pea Roja, Colombian Amazonia.

PhD dissertation, Universiteit van Amsterdam.

The work presented in this Thesis was mainly funded by Tropenbos Colombia, the Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in
Higher Education (NUFFIC) and COLCIENCIAS. Research was
conducted at the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics
(IBED), Universiteit van Amsterdam.
ISBN: 978-90-76894-97-3
Lay-out: Ana Catalina Londoo Vega.
Cover: Canopy of the upland plot (left); young leaves of Pseudomonotes
tropenbosii (centre); canopy of the floodplain plot (right).
No part of this dissertation may be reproduced in any format, by print,
photocopy, microfilm or by any other means without the written
permission from the author.

Flora and dynamics of an upland and a floodplain


forest in Pea Roja, Colombian Amazonia
Flora y dinmica de bosques de tierra firme y de
vrzea en Pea Roja, Amazonia colombiana

ACADEMISCH PROEFSCHRIFT

ter verkrijging van de graad van doctor


aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam
op gezag van de Rector Magnificus
prof. dr. D.C. van den Boom
ten overstaan van een door het college voor promoties
ingestelde commissie, in het openbaar te verdedigen
in de Agnietenkapel op
dinsdag 21 juni 2011, te 14.00 uur

door

Ana Catalina Londoo Vega


geboren te Medelln, Colombia

Promotiecommissie

Promotores:

Prof. dr. A.M. Cleef


Prof. dr. H. Hooghiemstra

Co-promotor:

Dr. J.F. Duivenvoorden

Overige leden:

Prof. dr. P. Baas


Prof. dr. P.J.M. Maas
Prof. dr. R.G.A. Boot
Prof. dr. J.H.D. Wolf
Dr. ir. H.F.M. Vester

Faculteit der Natuurwetenschappen, Wiskunde en Informatica

A mi Padre
A mi Esposo

Slo lo que cambia, permanece


Herclito

Contents

1.

Introduction

2.

Site description of the upland and floodplain plots

17

3.

A new genus and species of Dipterocarpaceae from


the Neotropics.
I. Introduction, taxonomy, ecology, and distribution

31

Arquitectura de Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum


platyspermum y Virola pavonis (Myristicaceae)

49

Composicin florstica de dos bosques (tierra firme y vrzea)


en la regin de Araracuara, Amazonia colombiana

85

4.
5.
6.
7.

Forest dynamics of an upland and a floodplain plot


near Pea Roja, Colombian Amazonia

111

Synthesis

141

Literature

149

Summary, Resumen, Samenvatting

179

Appendices

191

Agradecimientos

235

Curriculum vitae

239

1
Introduction
Ana Catalina Londoo Vega

1.1

The importance of Amazonian forests

The Amazon Basin, which encompasses the catchments of the Amazon


River and the rivers of the Guiana Shield that drain into the Atlantic
Ocean, and a substantial part of the basin of Orinoco River, is covered by
the largest continuous area of tropical forests in the world. Amazonian
forests represent the habitat for about one-tenth of all species of the world.
As such, the Amazon Basin has a fundamental role in the origin and
conservation of genetic resources worldwide. However, Amazonian
forests, just as most of the tropical forests in Africa and Asia, are severely
threatened by mankind. Deforestation rates of humid tropical forests vary
around 142,000 km2 per year (FAO 2001; Achard et al. 2002; Fearnside
and Laurance 2003). In the past two decades increasing attention has been
paid to the important role of the Amazon Basin in Global Change,
especially regarding climate change, the cycling of water and carbon, and
the emission of greenhouse gasses (Junk and Furch 1985; Phillips et al.
1998; Canadell et al. 2000; Watson et al. 2000; Holmgren et al. 2001;
Houghton et al. 2001; Clark et al. 2003; Malhi and Phillips 2004). Changes
in atmospheric CO2 concentrations probably influence the composition,
diversity and dynamics of the forests (Clark et al. 2003; Laurance et al.
2004). It is in this context that studies about the biomass and carbon
fixation of tropical forests are being intensified in recent years (Brown
1997; Silver et al. 2000; Brown 2002). Most of these studies depend on
measurements of forest productivity in permanent plots, which is often
estimated on the basis of yearly tree growth by diameter increments and
tree mortality.
1.2

Permanent plots to study long-term forest dynamics

The adequate conservation of tropical forests and wise use of their natural
resources depend to a large extent on our knowledge of the variation in
these forests, both in space and in time. Long-term studies in permanent
forest plots consisting of repeated surveys in well-demarcated and georeferenced plots, allow the quantification of the temporal variation of
forest resources (Campbell et al. 2002). Non-permanent plots to describe
Amazonian forests along environmental gradients have been used
successfully in exploratory surveys (Gentry 1988b; Duivenvoorden and
10

Lips 1993; ter Steege et al. 2003; Duque 2004; Benavides 2010). Yet, such
plots have the disadvantage that they, similar to a photograph, only
provide a limited view at a certain time. In contrast, permanent plots not
only admit a detailed description of the habitat at a particular site, but also
allow detecting temporal changes in the forest. Such information is
indispensable to predict future changes in the diversity and distribution of
species (Losos and Leigh 2004). Beyond the initial inventory of the
vegetation in permanent plots it is necessary to measure forest changes in
the long run, through continuous monitoring of the floristic composition,
structure, growth, mortality and survival of species, preferably at more
than one site (Comiskey et al. 1999).
Permanent plots have been used extensively to study long-term changes of
vegetation and the natural processes that allow the coexistence of species
in relation to the environment (Bakker et al. 1996; Herben 1996; Rees et
al. 2001; Hubbell 2004). Early studies conducted in tropical forests
primarily aimed at measuring the diameter growth for silvicultural
management and timber harvesting (Bell 1971). Recent studies include
other objectives such as quantifying carbon stocks and their relation to
global flows (Dallmeier 1992; Phillips et al. 1998; Orrego et al. 2003). The
oldest plots in tropical forests stem from the first part of the twentieth
century, and were established in Philippine dipterocarp forests (Richards
1952), on the islands of Trinidad and Tobago (Bell 1971), in Peninsular
Malaysia (Manokaran and Swaine 1994) and in Uganda, Africa (Sheil et
al. 2000). The largest plots (25 to 50 ha) are now part of the CTFS network
(Center for Tropical Forest Science) of the Smithsonian Tropical Research
Institute (STRI) (Losos and Leigh 2004), which manages, for example, the
well-known plot on Barro Colorado Island (Panama). Another network is
that by the Amazon Forest Inventory Network (RAINFOR) (Malhi et al.
2002; Malhi and Phillips 2004), which mostly supports 1-ha plots.
In Colombia, permanent forest plots were initially installed to monitor
growth of timber species like Cupressus lusitanica (Tschinkel 1972; del
Valle 1979), Cordia alliodora, Tectona grandis, Eucalyptus saligna, and
Cariniana pyriformis. In the 1980's permanent forest plots were started in
the Choc region (western Colombia) (Gonzlez et al. 1991; Gonzlez
1995; del Valle 1996a, 1998ab, 1999) and Amazonia (Londoo 1993, this
dissertation). In 2000 about 70 permanent plots were being maintained
11

(Vallejo et al. 2005; lvarez et al. 2008). By mid 2006, these plots covered
at least 100 ha. Overall, the two plots described in this dissertation have
particular significance as they are among the oldest permanent forest plots
in Colombian Amazonia, and in Colombia as a whole.
1.3
Floristic and ecological research in the permanent forest plots at
Pea Roja
Between 1986 and 2000 the Tropenbos-Colombia Programme supported
forest ecological research in the mid catchment of the Caquet River, with
its epicenter in Araracuara (Fig. 1-1). The programme started with a land
unit survey of a large area (10,000 km2), east of Araracuara. Based on the
ecological maps (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995) in late 1988
several sites were selected as representative for the principal land units, in
order to develop long-term monitoring studies of forest ecosystem
functioning. The following selection criteria were applied: a)
Representation: the land unit should have a wide cover in the Middle
Caquet area and in the Colombian Amazon as a whole, b) Accessibility:
the site should be well accessible by river from Araracuara to allow
efficient transport of personnel and equipment, c) Control, surveillance
and security: sites should offer some protection for permanently installed
research equipment (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1990). The sites selected
were located in the area of Nonuya community of Pea Roja. One site
belonged to the land unit classified as Tertiary Sedimentary Plain and the
other site was located on a rarely inundated flood plain of the Caquet
River (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1990). With all parties involved it was
agreed to develop a long-term research on the flora, structure and
dynamics of the forest vegetation at these two monitoring sites. At each
site a permanent plot of 1.8 ha was established for the long-term study of
the forest. Uniform criteria were used for the establishment, i.e. the sites
were chosen in such a way that very large (multiple tree gaps by wind
throw) canopy gaps were avoided. Also, the physiography, forest
(Duivenvoorden et al. 1988) and soils were as homogeneous as possible.
From that moment on, in and outside these plots, a series of ecological
studies have been successfully carried out by students from Colombia and
other nationalities, for example those regarding plant-animal relationships

12

(van Dulmen 2001; Parrado 2005), hydrology (Tllez 2003) and nutrient
cycling (Tobn 1999; Tobn et al. 2004ab).

Fig. 1-1. Location of Araracuara in Colombian Amazonia. The shaded area


around Araracuara and Pea Roja is given in more detail in Fig. 2-1.
There is no doubt that the activities of Tropenbos-Colombia triggered the
intensification of the botanical explorations in Colombian Amazonia. In
spite of considerable progress in the past years (Snchez 1997; Rudas and
Prieto 2005) it is still common that about one fifth of the species
encountered in Amazonian forest surveys remains unidentified. Also, most
identifications rely on sterile specimens. Therefore, the contribution of
taxonomy to describe and categorize the species diversity of Amazonian
forests is of utmost importance. Obtaining fertile botanical specimens of
tree species is a challenge in tropical forests, because many species are
sterile during a large part of the year. More importantly, many tree species
are hard to encounter during botanical surveys because of their scattered
occurrence in small populations. In this regard, the discovery of a new
species of the family of Dipterocarpaceae, in one of the permanent plots
established in the Pea Roja community was an extraordinary event.
Before this discovery, the family of Dipterocarpaceae, which belongs to
13

one of the most dominant, species rich, and economically important tree
families in tropical forests of Asia (Whitmore 1975; Ashton 1982), was
only represented by one single species in the Neotropics (Pakaraimaea
dipterocarpacea Maguire & Ashton recorded in Guyana). The record of
Pseudomonotes tropenbosii Londoo, lvarez and Forero in the upland
plot near Pea Roja along the Caquet river emphasizes the
phytogeographical links of Colombian Amazonia with the Guiana Shield
region (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995) and even with Africa and
Madagascar (via the subfamily Monotoideae; Morton 1995), and
underscores the unique position and value of this permanent plot.
The architecture of a plant is the morphological expression of its genome
in a given time, and a result of the balance between endogenous growth
processes and exogenous constraints exerted by the environment
(Barthlmy et al. 1991; Hall 1995). The objective of architectural
analysis is to identify the endogenous processes that control growth and
shape of the whole plant, by means of observation. Three key concepts
have been developed: the architectural model (Hall and Oldeman 1970),
the architectural unit (delin 1977) and the reiteration (Oldeman 1974).
The concepts of model and reiteration unit have provided a valuable tool
for studying the structure and form of plants. Plant architecture further
determines how resources are allocated in plants, for example, regarding
the capture of light, water transport, mechanical stability, and resistance to
wind (Vester 1997; Poorter and Werger 1999). Vester (1997) analyzed
successive architectural development of tree taxa in successional forests
near Araracuara. He showed that on the basis of detailed observations,
architectural analysis yields understanding of the mechanisms of
succession in secondary forest or in old-growth forests. Architectural
analysis thus has the potential to supply significant information regarding
forest dynamics in permanent plots, to complement the demographic
information of recruitment, growth and mortality.
Arguably, two principal results emerged from the ecological surveys of the
Middle Caquet area (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995; Urrego 1997;
Quiones 2002; Duque 2004; Snchez 2005; Benavides 2010). The first
was the clear recognition of the high tree species diversity per unit of area
(Valencia et al. 1994; Duivenvoorden 1996), which ranks among the
highest level for tropical forests worldwide. Several explanations for the
14

high upper Amazonian tree species diversity have been put forward
(Duivenvoorden 1995; ter Steege et al. 2006). In most of these, the unique
properties of the geological setting (speciation triggered by the unique
configuration and the highly dynamic environment in the Tertiary; Hoorn
and Wesselingh 2010) and the climatic history of northwestern Amazonia
(continuous high humidity throughout the Pleistocene favouring species
survival; Lips and Duivenvoorden 1994; Mayle et al. 2004) play a key
role. The second result was the evidence and documentation that forest
composition and forest diversity systematically changed across land units,
which differed regarding flooding, drainage and soil nutrient
concentrations. High levels of forest diversity were consistently recorded
in the well-drained uplands (Duivenvoorden 1996; Duivenvoorden and
Duque 2010). On the other hand, poor drainage, seasonal flooding and
extremely low levels of soil nutrient availability were always associated
with low levels of tree species diversity (Urrego 1997; Duivenvoorden and
Duque 2010). Furthermore, litterfall measurements in combination with
studies of the standing stock of litter on the forest floor indicated that the
aboveground decomposition of organic matter (a proxy of net primary
above-ground forest productivity; Vogt et al. 1998) was substantially
higher in floodplains of the Caquet than in well-drained uplands (Lips
and Duivenvoorden 1996). Summarizing, in view of the physiographic
setting of the two permanent forest plots at Pea Roja, a general picture
emerged from the ecological survey that soil fertility, forest disturbances,
and above-ground forest productivity in floodplains of the Caquet River
were higher than in the well-drained uplands. However, because these
survey results were not based on permanent plots, information about forest
dynamics could not be incorporated. In more recent studies in Amazonia at
continental scales, forest dynamics have been correlated with forest
diversity. Wide-scale correlations between tree mortality (Phillips et al.
2004), wood specific gravity (Baker et al. 2004), above-ground biomass
(Baker et al. 2004; Mahli et al. 2006), above-ground wood productivity
(Malhi et al. 2006) and tree species diversity (ter Steege et al. 2006) have
been reported along geological gradients from eastern Amazonia to upper
Amazonian watersheds. In short, low diversity forests were associated to
low levels of forest dynamics (low mortality, low productivity) and low
levels of soil fertility, whereas high diversity forests showed a relatively
15

high mortality (and high wood productivity) and were found on relatively
rich soils. Is this general scheme, obtained from Amazonia as a whole,
useful to predict forest dynamics and forest diversity in a spatially more
limited area like that of Colombian Amazonia?
1.4

Aims and outline of this dissertation

The principal aim of this dissertation is to provide basic knowledge about


the structure, species composition, and forest dynamics of two permanent
forest plots established in contrasting land units (upland and floodplain), in
the central part of Colombian Amazonia. In Chapter 2 a description of the
two plot sites is given, including details of the plot design and set-up. This
information serves as background to the next chapters, but is also essential
to warrant a sound continuation of the monitoring activities in the coming
decades. Chapter 3 reports on the discovery and description of the new
genus and species of the family Dipterocarpaceae that appeared as one of
the more dominant species in the upland plot. Chapter 4 gives a treatment
of the architecture of three subcanopy species of the nutmeg family
(Myristicaceae), a pantropical family of mostly tree species. It describes
the development of these species from seedlings in the undergrowth to
senile trees. The main purpose of this chapter was to evaluate the extra
value of architectural analysis for studies regarding forest dynamics in
permanent plots. The following two chapters give accounts on the species
composition (Chapter 5) and forest dynamics (Chapter 6) in the two
permanent plots. Which species, genera and families characterize these
plots? How is the distribution of taxa among families and genera? What is
the species composition relative to the habits or growth forms? How are
the modes of death? Do mortality and recruitment differ between the
plots? Do the patterns in tree species composition and forest dynamics in
the plots correspond to predictions based on the general model of
Amazonian forest diversity as function of geology? Finally, in Chapter 7 a
synthesis is given, followed by the summaries in English, Spanish and
Dutch and the appendices.

16

2
Site description of the upland and
floodplain plots
Ana Catalina Londoo Vega

2.1

Location and accessibility

The permanent plots are located about 30 km east (and 70 km


downstreams) of Araracuara (Fig. 2-1), in the basin of the Caquet River,
Colombian Amazonia. This area is part of the community of Pea Roja
(Nonuya ethnicity), which is under the jurisdiction of the so-called
Corregimiento de Puerto Santander, Departamento del Amazonas. The
access to Araracuara from Bogot is by air. Reaching the upland plot
requires about 2 km walking from the maloca in Pea Roja. The floodplain
plot can be reached by river, navigating upstream along the Caquet river
from the maloca in Pea Roja for about 2.5 km and then walking ca. 0.5
km.
2.2

Climate

The information about the current climate in the study area is based on two
meteorological stations: one in Araracuara and one in Pea Roja. At
Araracuara daily records were available from 1979-1990 (station code
4413501 located at 160 m altitude above sea level; Duivenvoorden and
Lips 1995). Climate data from Pea Roja were automatically recorded
every 20 minutes between November 1992 and August 1997 (Tobn 1999)
at a station located at 039' S and 725' W at 150 m above sea level, at 2.5
km distance from the upland and floodplain plots. Disregarding slight
differences between the records from both climate stations, which can be
attributed to the different length of the registration period, the climate of
this part of the Middle Caquet Basin is characterized by an annual rainfall
of ca. 3100 mm, an average yearly temperature of 25C and a relative
humidity of 87% (Fig. 2-2). This climate is classified as Afi, equatorial
superhumid with no dry season (Kppen 1936), i.e. more than 60 mm
rainfall in all months and a temperature difference of less than 5C
between the warmest and the coldest month. According to the life zone
system of Holdridge (1982; Holdridge et al. 1971) the Middle Caquet
area is classified as humid tropical forest (bh-T).

18

Figure 2-1. Location of the two permanent plots (M1 = upland plot; M2 = floodplain plot) at Pea Roja, in the middle
part of the Caquet Basin, Colombian Amazonia. The map is derived from Duivenvoorden and Lips (1995).
19

Figure 2-2. Climate diagram of Araracuara, Colombian Amazonia. Taken


from Duivenvoorden and Lips (1995).
Both sources (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995; Tobn 1999) agree that the
daily fluctuations in temperature are higher than the yearly fluctuations,
and that the range of day and night temperatures is larger in the dry period
than in the wet period. High temperatures occur in January and February
and low temperatures in June. The latter are associated with a so-called
"friaje" or "cold spell" which is a local phenomenon caused by the
movement of cold air masses coming from the south of the continent
through the Amazon Basin, and whose appearance has also been reported
in Brazil (Salati 1985; Tobn 1999). The average monthly maximum
temperature at Araracuara ranged from 29.5C to 32.1C and the average
monthly minimum values from 21.2 C to 22.6C (Duivenvoorden and
Lips 1995). At Pea Roja the maximum temperature rarely exceeded 35C
and the minimum did not fall below 19C (Tobn 1999).
Despite the similarity between the mean annual precipitation at Araracuara
and Pea Roja, there were a few differences in the yearly distribution
pattern. At Araracuara, the average annual rainfall was 3059 mm and
showed a unimodal distribution with high values around May, and low
values around January (Fig. 2-2; Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995). At Pea
Roja the annual average rainfall was 3420 mm and showed a bimodal
pattern with a slight decrease in June (Tobn 1999) and between
20

December and February. The wettest month was September not May, as in
Araracuara.
The distribution of rainfall through the year is determined by the trade
winds (Domnguez 1987; Botero 1999). Although Araracuara belongs to
the Southern Hemisphere its rainfall pattern is typical for that of the
Northern Hemisphere, and is furthermore characterized by the absence of a
pronounced dry season (Salati 1985). In Colombian Amazonia the pattern
of rainfall is controlled by the north-south movement of the belt of
intertropical convergence. Most of the rainfall occurs in the afternoon and
evening (Tobn 1999; Tllez 2003). At Pea Roja, the wettest year was
1994, and the driest year was 1995. On average it rained on 197 days per
year, corresponding to 616 hours of rainfall per year (Tobn 1999; Tllez
2003).
2.3

Hydrology

Pea Roja is located in the catchment of the Caquet River. This river
originates in the Andes and, with a length of 2200 km, it is the largest river
in Colombian Amazonia. It is a so-called white-water river, which implies
that its water tends to have a whitish color due to suspended clay. The
river water has a neutral pH (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993). The water
level of the Caquet River varies annually according to four seasons: low
water, rising water, high water and falling water (Rodrguez 1999). The
variation in river water level recorded at several stations along the river
ranges from 6.5 m to 8.5 m, with peaks during July-August and low water
levels between December-February (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993;
Urrego 1997). In addition to water levels associated to the annual flood
cycles, occasionally (once every 3 to 11 years) the river water level rises to
exceptional heights. The origin of this phenomenon is unknown, but it has
been linked to global climate change, periods of large sunspot activity, or
to the influence of El Nio events (van der Hammen and Cleef 1992;
Botero 1999).
The floodplain of the Caquet River is called vrzea (Prance 1980; Junk
1984, 1990; Padoch et al. 1999). It is built up by fine sediments which are
deposited during overflows (Eden et al. 1982; Hoorn 1990;
Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995). Currently there is no evidence of

21

gravel transport. The Caquet River is actively eroding sediments of its


fluvial terraces, especially along its southern river bank (Eden et al. 1982).
2.4

Land units

The upland plot (also denominated monitoring plot 1, or M1) is located on


a land unit, which was classified as Tertiary Sedimentary Plain by
Duivenvoorden and Lips (1993, 1995). This land unit covers between 8590% of the Colombian Amazon (PRORADAM 1979; Botero 1999). It can
be seen as upland or "tierra firme" because it is never flooded by river
water (Botero 1999; Duivenvoorden et al. 2001). Locally, uplands are also
known as "monte firme" (Spanish) or "baj+h (Muinane).
The permanent plot is located along the upper slope of a valley (Fig. 2-3)
developed in the Tertiary Sedimentary Plain along the left side
(downstream) of the Caquet River, opposite Sumaeta Island (Fig. 2-1), in
the Pea Roja community. The plot coordinates are 039'31'' S, 724'38''
W. Its altitude is approximately 210 m above sea level.
The soils in the upland plot were classified as Ultisols: Kanhapludults in
stable positions and Paleudults in positions with more active erosion (SSS
1987; Alarcn 1990). The soils are deep and show a ABtC profile. In some
sectors gravelly sandy materials are found at the top, sometimes with
abundant charcoal, which may well be a result of ancient human activity.
Textures are sandy loam to clay in the upper horizons, sandy loamy clay in
the middle part, and clay or sandy clay in the lower part of the pedon. A
detailed soil profile description of a soil pit located just outside the
permanent plot (20 m from the northwestern border) was presented by
Duivenvoorden and Lips (1993, 1995; plot 125) and is in Appendix 1
(profile 125). At this same location (plot 125) Lips and Duivenvoorden
(1996) measured a yearly above-ground fine litter fall of 680 54 g m-2 y-1
(mean one SD) in 1989-1990. The Mean Residence Time of the organic
material in the ectorganic horizons was 3.3 y (Duivenvoorden and Lips
1995).

22

Figure 2-3. Detailed site map of the upland plot (Alarcn 1990;
Tropenbos-Colombia 1990). A: relief of the basin showing 2-m isohypses;
the values denote the altitude relative to an arbitrary reference point; the
total area shown covers 7.2 ha; B: map showing the terrain units and the
location of the permanent plot; C: cross-sections showing representative
soils along the slopes of the U-shaped valley and the V-shaped valley; D:
cover and name of the terrain units.
23

The floodplain plot (also denominated monitoring plot 2, or M2) is located


on a sporadically inundated floodplain of the Caquet River
(Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995). This land unit is characteristically
built up by so-called river bank complexes (convex-concave systems of up
to 2 m high river banks alternating with depressions, which run more or
less parallel to the main channel of the Caquet River) and poorly drained
basins. The plot was established along the right bank of the Caquet River
(downstreams) at 250 m distance from the river, and about 2.5 km north of
Sumaeta island (Fig. 2-1). The coordinates of the plot are: 0 37' S, 7210'
W. Its altitude is approximately 155 m above sea level.
The floodplain of the Caquet River is locally called "rebalse" or "bajo"
(Spanish), and "cajah (Muinane). In principle, the plot is only flooded
when the water level of the Caquet River is exceptionally high. This
occurs every 9-11 years (according to local indigenous informants). Such
events are known as "conejeras". Between May and July 1989 the water
level reached up to about 2 m above the average surface level of the plot.
Each year, between May and July, the concave parts of the plot (Fig. 2-4)
become inundated by rain water for about one month. This inundation
usually starts in a depression in the eastern part of the plot, which carries
water only during the rainiest time of year. For example, during June-July
1990, some parts of the plot were covered by standing water, at a depth of
less than 1 m for one month. Due to the low frequency of flooding by the
Caquet River, and the inundation of the lower parts by rainwater, the
forest in the floodplain plot can be seen as intermediate between a seasonal
vrzea and a swamp (sensu Prance 1980). However, in this dissertation the
terms vrzea and floodplain forest are used, in line with other studies in the
area (Urrego 1991). Given its transitional nature and the relatively low
influence of flooding by river water, we suggest caution when comparing
the results presented here with those of typical Amazonian vrzea.
The soil forming processes in the floodplain plot are highly influenced by
the continuous supply of organic material from the vegetation and the
periodic deposition of sediments during river floods. The fluctuations of
the water table induces the alternating reduction and oxidation of the soil
pedon. Evidence for this are the gray, olive-green and orange mottles,
which occur especially in the soils of the basins and at larger depth in the
soils of the convex river banks. Soils were classified as Typic Tropaquept,
24

Typic and Aquic Dystropept (SSS 1987; Ordez 1990). Duivenvoorden


and Lips (1993, 1995) described a soil pit in the plot (Appendix 1, profile
126). In the forest directly surrounding this pit they measured a yearly
above-ground fine litter fall of 1070 132 g m-2 y-1 (mean one SD) in
1989-1990 (Lips and Duivenvoorden 1996). The organic material in the
ectorganic horizons had a Mean Residence Time of only 1.0 y
(Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995).
2.5

Plot location, plot size and sampling set-up

The position of the plots within each land unit was selected such as to
ensure that the terrain characteristics regarding relief were similar.
Because slopes were hardly developed in the floodplain unit, the upland
plot was established at the summit and upper slope positions to minimize
the slope (Fig. 2-3). Both plots were set up in forests that lacked any sign
of recent human activities. Also in the buffer zones of 100 to 300 m
around the plots (Phillips and Baker 2002; Vallejo et al. 2005), no signs of
human activities were present.
The conspicuous presence of charcoal in the soils of the upland plot
(Alarcn 1990) and the remains of pottery found in nearby fluvial terraces
of the Caquet River (Mora et al. 1991; Mora 2003) demonstrate the
ancient human occupation and associated change of the forest cover at the
monitoring sites. However, at the time of the establishment of the plots the
forests did not show any evidence of recent human interventions. This was
also concluded from the presence in the forests of large trees with highly
valuable timber, as Cedrela odorata (Meliaceae, red cedar) in the
floodplain forest and Mezilaurus itauba (Lauraceae, Itaba) in the upland
forest.
At the start, in 1989 (Table 2-1) one square 1-ha plot was installed at the
upland site (part I in Fig. 2-5). Permanent plots of 1 ha have traditionally
been the standard unit of sample area in tropical moist forest inventories,
facilitating comparison and also yielding an optimal ratio area/perimeter
(Synnott 1979, 1991; Jonkers 1987; Alder and Synnott 1992; Dallmeier
1992). However, on the basis of analyses (not shown) of the first data
about the forest diversity using Hill's family of curves (Pielou 1975;
Magurran 1988; Krebs 1989) the plot size was increased to 1.8 ha
(Londoo and Alvarez 1991). To enlarge the original upland plot of 100 x
25

100 m, a strip of 20 m wide was added first (part II in Fig. 2-5). At a later
stage an extra strip of 50 x 120 m (part III in Fig. 2-5) was established to
obtain the final plot of 120 x 150 m (1.8 ha). One year later, in October
1990 (Table 2.1), an equivalent plot of 120 x 150 m (1.8 ha) was
established in floodplain forest, with identical parts I, II and III (Fig 2.5).
The plot inventories included all vascular plant individuals that were
entirely or partially rooted (i.e. with trunks attached to the soil) inside the
plots. Plants rooting precisely on the plot boundaries were included, even
if the aerial parts were outside the plot boundaries. The sampling intensity
was inversely proportional to the abundance of individuals per size class.
Large individuals (DBH 10 cm; DBH is diameter at 130 cm) were
sampled in the entire plot, while the smaller plants were only sampled in a
part (Fig. 2-5). The area of the subplots differed per size class (Dubois
1980; Matteuci and Colma 1982; Jonkers 1987; Campbell et al. 2002;
Oldeman et al. 2006). Large individuals were sampled in 10 x 10 m
subplots, intermediate sized shrubs, lianas and small trees in 5 x 5 m
subplots, and small plants (mostly herbs and seedlings) in 2 x 2 m subplots
(Table 2-2).
To minimise damage to the plants, the inventory was done in the following
sequence: a) demarcation of plots and subplots by setting up the grid of 10
x 10 m; b) inventory of size class C4 (Table 2-2); c) inventory of C1; d)
inventory of plants of size classes C2 and C3; and e) measurement of
additional variables.
Table 2-1. Installment and census dates of the permanent plots.
Activity
Upland
establishmenta
first measurementa and
establishmentb
second measurement
third measurement
fourth measurementc
Floodplain establishment
first measurement
second measurement
a

Date
September 01 1989
September 01 1990

Days Months Years

December 31 1993
December 31 1997
March 31 1999
October 01 1990
January 31 1994
April 30 1999

1200 40
1440 48
450 15

3.3
4.0
1.3

1200 40
1890 63

3.3
5.3

only 1 ha; badditional 0.8 ha; conly trunk mortality and recruitment

26

Figure 2-4. Detailed map of the floodplain plot (M2) (Ordez 1990;
Tropenbos-Colombia 1990; Londoo 1993). A: map showing the terrain
units and the location of the permanent plot; the total area shown covers
7.2 ha; B: cross-section, indicating the representative soils and drainage;
C: cover and name of the terrain units.

27

Figure 2-5. Design of the 1.8-ha permanent plots. The roman values I, II,
and III indicate the different stages of plot establishment (see text). A:
general design; B: design and coding of subplots used to sample the
different size classes; C: sampling area for DBH 10 cm (the largest size
class C1); D: sampling area for plants with DBH < 10 cm and DBH 5
cm (size class C2); E: sampling area for plants with DBH < 5 cm and Ht
3 m (size class C3); F: sampling area for plants with Ht < 3 m (size class
C4). Size classes are defined in Table 2-2.

28

These variables were measured (or subsequently calculated) using standard


methods (Synnott 1979; Caillez 1980; Synnott 1991; Philip 1994; Lema
1995, 2002) and included density (number of individuals), family
(Mabberley 1990), genus and species identification, trunk diameter (DBH
in cm) height (Ht in m, measured using a Blume-Leiss type hypsometer),
crown diameter (in m), biomass (in kg of dry above-ground mass),
mortality, survival, recruitment, and tree growth (quantified through
diameter and biomass increase).
Table 2-2. Sampling intensity per size class. DBH = DBH is diameter at
130 cm above the soil surface; Ht = plant height. Sampling intensity is the
proportion relative to 1.8 ha.
Class

Plant size

C1
C2

DBH 10 cm
DBH 5 cm and DBH
< 10 cm
Ht > 3 m, DBH < 5 cm
Ht 0.5 m, Ht 3 m

C3
C4

Subplot size
(m)
10 x 10
5x5

Subplots Area
(ha)
180
1.8
360
0.9

Sampling
intensity (%)
100
50

5x5
2x2

120
300

16.7
6.7

0.3
0.12

29

30

3
A new genus and species of
Dipterocarpaceae from the
Neotropics. I. Introduction,
taxonomy, ecology, and
distribution
Ana Catalina Londoo Vega, Esteban lvarez, Enrique
Forero & Cynthia M. Morton
Brittonia 47: 225-236 (1995)

3.1

Introduction

In 1986 the Tropenbos Foundation initiated activities in Colombia with the


goal of promoting studies related to the management of tropical humid
forests. In this context, two areas were selected in the Colombian Amazon
for general pilot studies including floristic composition, diversity,
structure, and biomass (lvarez 1993; Londoo 1993). Among the
specimens collected by Londoo, lvarez, and collaborators from a "tierra
firme" site near the town of Araracuara, during field work carried out
between 1988 and 1991, was a large, ecologically important tree with
long-winged fruits. So far the plants have not been collected in full flower,
only in bud. Seedlings were observed and photographed elsewhere in the
same vicinity by the Dutch forester H. F. M. Vester (pers. comm.) in 1990.
From the start, placement of the materials collected by Londoo, lvarez,
and collaborators in the appropriate taxonomic group, even at the family
level, proved difficult. Contacts between Tropenbos and The New York
Botanical Garden allowed Londoo to work with Brian Boom in NY on
the identification of this obviously new genus and species. Based on
external morphological features, the conclusion was reached that the plant
probably belonged to the Dipterocarpaceae.
The family Dipterocarpaceae was until recently considered paleotropical
(Maguire 1977). The discovery in Guyana of Pakaraimaea
dipterocarpacea Maguire & Ashton (Maguire and Ashton 1977) required a
redefinition of the circumscription and content of the family. Maguire,
Ashton, and de Zeeuw (in Maguire and Ashton 1977) described a new
subfamily of the Dipterocarpaceae, subfam. Pakaraimoideae, to
accommodate the new monotypic genus from the New World. In 1977,
therefore, Dipterocarpaceae included two Old World subfamilies
Dipterocarpoideae of Tropical Asia and Malesia and Monotoideae of
Tropical Africa and Madagascar and the new Neotropical subfamily
Pakaraimoideae.
Since the information available on the new taxon was scarce and consisted
only of a few herbarium specimens which were mostly in fruiting
condition, sterile, or in bud, accompanied by the field notes made by the

32

collectors, efforts were made to obtain additional data from pollen


morphology and wood anatomy.
Pollen grains were studied by Londoo in Colombia and by Forero and
Morton in New York. The short pollen description included in this paper is
a summary of observations made by these researchers. Pollen grains were
prepared following the usual procedure of acetolysis (Erdtman 1952;
Nilsson and Praglowski 1992) and were examined by light and scanning
electron microscopy.
A complete account of the wood anatomy, including a detailed comparison
with plant families related to the Dipterocarpaceae, has been prepared by
Morton at NY and is included as Part II of this paper. [see Morton 1995;
addition this Thesis]. A molecular analysis has not been possible for a
number of reasons but is currently being attempted by Dr. S. Dayanandan
at Boston University. [After the publication of the taxon the analysis of
phylogeny and biosistematics based on molecular and morphological data
was done, and strongly supports the placement of Pseudomonotes within
subfamily Monotoideae of the Dipterocarpaceae (Morton et al. 1999);
addition this Thesis].
The excellent papers by Maguire (1977), Maguire and Ashton (1977), de
Zeeuw (1977), and Giannasi and Niklas (1977) on Pakaraimaea have been
instrumental for our evaluation of the information available on the new
Dipterocarpaceae described here. Peter S. Ashton, the world expert on this
family and one of the authors of Pakaraimoideae and Pakaraimaea, has
given us considerable advice and has maintained an interest in the subject
from the beginning.
The name proposed for this new entity is Pseudomonotes tropenbosii. The
generic name serves to indicate closeness to the African subfamily
Monotoideae; the specific epithet recognizes the work being carried out by
the Tropenbos Foundation in the Colombian Amazon.
3.2

Anatomy-Morphology

Habit. Tree 25-30 m tall, to 70-80 cm diam.; bole straight, cylindrical,


unbranched until 18-22 m; buttresses poorly developed, planks or slightly
rounded; bark surface dark brown to yellowish brown, fissured
longitudinally and flaky; slash light-brown-colored with brownish orange
33

laminations, oxidizing to dark brown; exudate watery, sparse, slowly


flowing, with a slightly sweet flavor; sapwood bone-colored, oxidizing to
light brown.
Branchlets. Branchlets terete, glabrous; stipule scars prominent,
amplexicaul, horizontal or slightly convex (Fig. 3-1A).
Leaves. Leaves alternate, conduplicate in vernation, in bud 4-8 x 2-3 mm,
ovoid, acute; stipules 4-8 x 2-3 mm, triangular, glabrous, caducous; mature
blades 9-23 x 6-16 cm, broadly oblong-ovate, entire, upper surface with
rare glandular hairs, lower surface with sparse glandular hairs (Fig. 3-2A),
chartaceous, dark shiny green above, with a red point on the base of blade
on midrib appearing as a vestigial gland, light green below, drying pale
olive-green above and light brown below, base obtuse-subcordate, apex
refuse and apiculate, or rarely only apiculate; midrib prominent beneath,
evident but plane to shallowly depressed above, often projected in a short
apiculum; venation open at the base of the leaf, turning brachidodromous
toward the apex; secondary veins (10)11(16) pairs, parallel or obscurely
reticulate, alternate, ascending at 60-70 from perpendicular, the
connecting loops at 0.5-1.5 mm from the margin; plane or slightly
depressed above, prominent below, tertiary veins transverse, plane above,
prominulous below (Fig. 3-1A).
Petioles. Petioles 3-10 cm long, apically swollen, glabrous, with an adaxial
furrow (Fig. 3-1A).
Inflorescence. Inflorescence axillary, subcymose, 5-7 cm long; branches
alternating on peduncle (Fig. 3-1A); bracts caducous (not seen), bracteoles
small. Flowers bisexual, actinomorphic; flower bud 5-8 x 2-4 mm (flowers
observed only in bud), ovoid-lanceolate, calyx glabrous, forming a shallow
cup at the base, calyx lobes 5, 1.5 x 1.5 mm, equal, deltoid (Fig. 3-1B),
corolla glabrous, greenish white, petals 5, contorted, 5-8 x 1.5-3 mm,
oblong, apex obtuse (Fig. 3-1B).
Stamens. Stamens numerous, free, cyclic, filaments terete, varying from
short (1 mm) to long (4 mm), attenuate toward apex, anthers basi-versatile,
2-lobed, 4-celled, 2 outer cells longer than 2 inner cells, opening by ventral
longitudinal slits, introrse, connective broad (very expanded), continued

34

into a triangular appendage one-fourth to one-half as long as the body of


the anther (Fig. 3-1C-E, Fig. 3-2B).
Pollen grains. Pollen grains monads, isopolar, radially symmetrical and
medium sized. Grains circular in outline in polar view, tricolporate, rarely
tetracolporate, sometimes trisyncolporate. Ectoapertures meridionally
aligned, long, nearly approaching each other at the poles. Endoapertures
lolongate, located at the center of the colpus, approximately 8.6 m long
and 3.5 m wide. Exine sculpturing minutely reticulate to foveolate, the
lumina polymorphic in outline and more accentuated at the poles. Exine
columellate, tectate-perforate (Fig. 3-2C-G).
Ovary. Ovary syncarpous, 3-locular, glabrous, ovoid, (articulating) with
three minute, terminal styles (Fig. 3-1C); ovules apparently one per
loculus, apparently anatropous; placentation axial, sub-basal; placenta
relatively massive (Fig. 3-1G, Fig. 3-3A, B).
Fruit. Nut dry, 3-4 x 1.5-2 cm, glabrous, ovoid, pericarp woody (Fig. 31F). Seed 1 per fruit (Fig. 3-1G, H). Calyx in fruit persistent, all 5
segments accrescent, becoming thinly papyraceous at maturity, aliform,
10-16 x 1.5-2.5 cm, 1 or 2 slightly shorter than others, oblanceolate, apex
rounded, base cuneate, lobes united at base into a shallow cup (Fig. 3-1F),
green, maturing to brown colored. The pericarp splitting along three
sutures at germination.
Germination epigeous, with the hypocotyl well developed and the
cotyledons exposed, later becoming photosynthetic (Fig. 3-4A, B).
3.3

Phenology

This species is poorly known, but according to observations made in the


field between December 1988 and April 1991, the species was
encountered fertile on only one occasion, during a short period of time.
Consequently, it is probable that the reproductive cycles are neither annual
nor of long duration.

35

Fig. 3-1. Pseudomonotes tropenbosii. A. Habit sketch. B. Bud. C. Flower


bud, median long section. D. Androecium. E. Stamens, lateral, dorsal and
ventral views. F. Sepals subtending young fruit. G. Ovary, cross section.
H. Seed. (A-E, Londoo et al. 1239; F-H, Londoo et al. 1698.)

36

Fig. 3-2. Pseudomonotes tropenbosii. A. Vesture of sparse glandular hairs,


lower surface of leaf (280 x SEM). B. Anther (40 x SEM). C-G. Pollen
grains. C. Equatorial view, upper optical section (800 x LM). D. Equatorial
view, medium optical section (800 x LM). E. Oblique polar view (960 x
SEM). F. Equatorial view (960 x SEM). G. Detail of exine (2880 x SEM).
(A-G, Londoo et al. 1239.)

37

Fig. 3-3. Pseudomonotes tropenbosii. A. Ovary, long (28 x SEM). B.


Anatropous, sub-basal ovule (120 x SEM). (A, B, Londoo et al. 1239.)
3.4

Geography

This species is known only from the region of Araracuara (Colombia,


Departamento del Amazonas), about 50 km downstream on the Rio
Caquet, near the locality of Pea Roja, ca. 0034' S, 7908' W, at 200-300
m elevation, from 5 collections gathered between October 1989 and April
1990. Seedlings belonging to this taxon were observed and collected by
lvarez in October 1990. H. F. M. Vester (pers. comm.) observed
seedlings in November 1990 near the village of Puerto Santander, along La
Morelia Creek, a few kilometers south of Araracuara.
3.5

Ecology

According to Londoo (1993), the vegetation corresponds to a mixed


forest, with a canopy height of 25-30 m (Fig. 3-4C). The diversity of this
forest is high, with 209 species/ha for plants with dbh of 10 cm or greater,
and close to 700 species/ha of vascular plants (herbs, ferns, shrubs, palms,
lianas, vines, except epiphytes). Using the method of Curtis and Mclntosh
(1951), when the importance value index (IVI) is calculated for the
vegetation with a dbh of 10 cm or greater, this new dipterocarp has the
highest of all IVIs (6%) and thus constitutes the most ecologically
important species in this forest.

38

3.6

Climate

The climate of the region is classified as equatorial superhumid without a


dry season (Type Afi of Kppen (1936), cited by Duivenvoorden and Lips
(1993)), with more than 60 mm of rain per month and with a difference in
temperature of only 5C or less between the hottest and coldest months.
The region corresponds to the Tropical Humid Forest (bosque hmedo
tropical, bh-T) life zone of Holdridge (1982). According to Duivenvoorden
and Lips (1993), annual average rainfall is 3059 mm (data from 1979 to
1990), with highest precipitation in April, May, and June and slight
decreases in August, December, January, and February. Annual average
temperature is 26C.
3.7

Geology and Soils

With respect to soils and geology, this species occurs in upland ("tierra
firme," i.e., not flooded by rivers) that belongs to a dissected sedimentary
plain built up by non-to slightly consolidated, clayey to sandy, Miocene
fluvial sediments (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993; Hoorn 1994). The
species grows on summits of hills and along shoulders of slopes. The soils
are deep and well-drained. They are loose and sandy at the surface and
become increasingly clayey with depth. According to Duivenvoorden and
Lips (1995: Profile 125)[Appendix 1; addition this Thesis], they are
classified as Typic Kandiudults (SSS 1992) or Xanthic Ferralsols (FAO
1988). They are strong brown (7.5 YR 5/6) in the B horizon, acid (between
3.7 pH in horizon A and 4.9 pH in horizon B), with a very low cation
exchange capacity (ca. 10 cmol(+)/kg clay). The levels of exchangeable
cations and base saturation are very low (less than 15%), and there is a low
level of available phosphorous (1 ppm P, according to Bray II). The
presence of charcoal within the uppermost 30 cm indicates possible sites
of ancient human occupation. The soil is covered by a thick, well-rooted
(10 cm) humus form which consists of an L, F, and discontinuous granular
H horizon.

39

Fig. 3-4. Pseudomonotes tropenbosii. A. Young fruits (Londoo et al.


1698). B. Seedlings. C. Mixed forest, type locality.
3.8

Economic Use

No known use by the Nonuya Indians.


40

3.9

Vernacular Names

Berye-m+qu+ (Muiname dialect, spoken by the Nonuya Indians). This


name translates into Spanish as rbol de madera astillosa. There is,
however, no known Spanish name.
3.10

Taxonomic Treatment

Pseudomonotes (Dipterocarpaceae subfam. Monotoideae) Londoo,


lvarez & Forero, gen. nov.
TYPE: Pseudomonotes tropenbosii Londoo, lvarez & Forero.
Omnibus ab aliis Dipterocarpaceis trichomatum fasciculatorum defectu,
sepalis insigniter aliformibus (10-16 cm usque longis), necnon ovulis in
quoque loculo solitariis subbasaliter affixis diversae, insuper distributione
neotropica praestantes.
Pseudomonotes tropenbosii Londoo, lvarez & Forero, sp. nov. (Fig. 31).
TYPE: COLOMBIA. Amazonas: Araracuara, Rio Caquet, margen
izquierda, frente a la isla Sumaeta, 0039' S, 7208' W, 26 Apr 1990 (fr),
Londoo et al. 1698 (HOLOTYPE: COL; ISOTYPES: A, COAH, FMB,
JAUM, NY).
Notulis supra sub genere expositis in familia unica.
Tree 25-30 m tall, to 70-80 cm diam.; branchlets terete, glabrous. Leaves
alternate, stipulate, stipules 4-8 mm long, 2-3 mm wide, triangular,
glabrous, caducous; mature blades 9-23 cm long, 6-16 cm wide, broadly
oblong-ovate, entire, chartaceous, upper surface with rare glandular hairs,
lower surface with sparse glandular hairs, dark shiny green above, with a
red point on the base of blade on midrib appearing as a vestigial gland,
light green below, drying pale olive-green above and light brown below,
base obtuse-subcordate, apex retuse and apiculate, or rarely only apiculate;
midrib prominent beneath, evident but plane to shallowly depressed above,
often projected in a short apiculum; secondary veins (10)11(16) pairs,
alternate, plane or slightly depressed above, prominent below; tertiary
veins transverse, plane above, prominulous below; petioles 3-10 cm long,
glabrous. Inflorescence axillary, subcymose, 5-7 cm long. Flowers
bisexual, actinomorphic; flower bud 5-8 mm long, 2-4 mm wide (flowers
41

only observed in bud). Calyx glabrous, forming a shallow cup at the base,
calyx lobes 5, deltoid, 1.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide. Corolla glabrous,
greenish white, petals 5, contorted, 5-8 mm long, 1.5-3 mm wide, oblong,
apex obtuse. Stamens numerous, cyclic, hypogynous, free, filaments terete,
anthers basi-versatile, 2-lobed, 4-celled, introrse, connective broad (very
expanded), continued into a triangular appendage one-fourth to one-half as
long as the body of the anther; pollen grains isopolar, tricolporate, rarely
tetracolporate, and sometimes trisyncolporate, exine minutely reticulate to
foveolate, columellate, tectate-perforate. Ovary glabrous, 3-locular,
placentation axial, sub-basal, ovules one per loculus (as far as known),
apparently anatropous; styles terminal, minute. Fruit a dry nut, 3-4 cm
long, 1.5-2 cm wide, glabrous, ovoid, pericarp woody. Calyx in fruit
persistent, all 5 segments accrescent, thinly papyraceous, aliform, 10-16
cm long, 1.5-2.5 cm wide, oblanceolate, apex rounded, base cuneate, lobes
united at base. Seed 1 per fruit.
Distribution: Known only from the type locality in the vicinity of
Araracuara, Department of Amazonas, Colombia, at 200-300 m elevation.
No open flowers have been seen. The plants have been collected in bud in
November and in fruit in April.
Paratypes: COLOMBIA. Amazonas: Araracuara, Villazul, Ro Caquet,
margen izquierda, frente a isla Sumaeta, 0034' S, 7208' W, 200-300 m,
20 Oct 1990 (sterile), lvarez et al. 1184 (COAH); detrs maloca J.
Moreno, 0034' S, 7208' W, 9 Oct 1989 (sterile), Londoo et al. 899 (A,
COAH, NY); frente a isla Sumaeta, 0034' S, 7208' W, 200-300 m, 31
Oct 1989 (sterile), Londoo et al. 983 (COAH, NY), 3 Nov 1989 (sterile),
Londoo et al. 1097 (COAH, JAUM, NY), 7 Nov 1989 (buds), Londoo et
al. 1239 (A, COAH, COL, NY), 1239A (COAH).

42

Table 3-1. Features of Pseudomonotes and subfamilies of Dipterocarpaceae.


Wood rays
Resin or
secretory ducts

Dipterocarpoideae
Multiseriate

Stipules
Leaf venation

Wood with resin canals;


secretory cavities in pith
absent
Small or lage, often fugacious
Secondary veins commonly
strongly parallel and
connecting with primary;
sometimes reticulate

Pubescence

Trichomes fasciculate,
commonly single-celled or
multi-cellular; often glandular

Sepals

Petals
Stamens

Anthers

5, in flower imbricate or
valvate and connate forming a
tube at base; often becoming
accrescent and aliform in fruit
5, variously pubescent
5-numerous, 1-several-cyclic;
filaments sometimes united
below the middle
2-lobed, basifixed, (2)4-

Monotoideae
Uniseriate (sometimes
biseriate)
Wood without resin canals;
secretory cavities in pith

Parkaraimoideae
Biseriate (sometimes
uniseriate)
Wood without resin
canals; secretory cavities
in pith
Small, fugacious
Secondary veins reticulate

Pseudomonotes
Uniseriate (sometimes
biseriate)
Wood without resin
canals; secretory
cavities in pith
Small, fugacious
Secondary veins parallel
or obscurely reticulate

Trichomes glandular

5, variously pubescent
Numerous, several-cyclic;
filaments free

Trichomes fsciculate,
commonly single-celled;
nither grandular nor
granular
5, in flower imbricate not
connate; becomng
accrescent and shortly
aliform in fruit
5, glabrous
Numerous, several-cyclic;
filaments free

2-lobed, basifixed, 4-thecate,

2-lobed, basifixed, 4-

2-lobed, basifixed, 4-

Small, fugacious
Secondary veins obscurely
parallel (transverse), or
reticulate
Trichomes fsciculate,
commonly single-celled;
often granular
5, in flower imbricate not
connate; becoming aliform
and accrescent in fruit

5, in flower connate
forming a shallow cup
at base; accrescent and
aliform in fruit
5, glabrous
Numerous, cyclic;
filaments free

43

tetracolpate, exine 2-3 layered

Pollen
Ovary

Fruit

Ecology
Geography

44

Tricolpate, rarely tetracolpate,


exine 2-3 layered
2(3)-celled, each locule 2ovulate; ovules pendulous
anatropous; placentation
midaxial
Normally 1-seeded by
abortion of 5 ovules;
indehiscent or loculicidally
tardily splitting along sutures
Trees of primary rain forest
and savanna woodland
Tropical Asia, Malesia, 13
genera with ca. 550 species

basiversatile, not at all


conspicuosly, or moderately
apically appendaged
Tricolporate, exine 4-layered
3(4)-celled, each locule 2ovulate; ovules pendoulous,
anatropous; placentation
midaxial
Normally 1-seeded by
abortion of 5 ovules;
indehiscent or loculicidally
splitting along sutures
Trees of savanna or savanna
woodland
Tropical Africa and
Madagascar; 2 genera, 57
species

thecate, basivesatile,
strongly appendaged

thecate, basiversatile;
apically apendaged

Tricolporate, exine 4layered


4(5)-celled, each locule 4
ovulate; ovules
pendulous, probably
anatropous; placentation
midaxial
1-seeded; probably tardily
loculicidally dehiscent

Tricolporate, exine ()
layered
3 celled, each locule
probably 1-ovulate;
ovules pendulous,
anatropous; placentation
axial, sub-basal
1-seeded; tardily
loculicidally dehiscent

Trees of savanna or
savanna woodland
Tropical America, one
genus; unispecific

Trees of mixed forest


Tropical America, one
genus; unispecific

3.11

Relationships

A review of the relationships between Dipterocarpaceae and other families


of angiosperms was carried out by Maguire and Ashton (1977) and is not
attempted again here. Closely related families include the Ochnaceae,
Sphaerosepalaceae, Sarcolaenaceae, Caryocaraceae, and Quiinaceae of the
Theales; and Elaeocarpaceae, Tiliaceae, Sterculiaceae, Bombacaceae, and
Malvaceae of the Malvales. Similarities in wood anatomy between the
Dipterocarpaceae and the Crypteroniaceae, Combretaceae, Myrtaceae,
Vochysiaceae, Lecythidaceae, Caryocaraceae, Quiinaceae, and
Sarcolaenaceae were explored by Morton in part II of this paper. [see
Morton (1995). The phylogeny and biosystematics based on molecular and
morphological data were studied by Morton et al. 1999; addition this
Thesis]
The family Dipterocarpaceae is pantropical in distribution and is known to
grow well in primary rain forest, savannas, and savanna woodlands. The
family consists of some 16 genera and nearly 600 species (Cronquist
1981), organized in three well-marked subfamilies that, until the discovery
of Pseudomonotes, were clearly segregated geographically (Table 3-1).
Subfamily Dipterocarpoideae, which was present in East Africa at least
during the Upper Tertiary (Ashton 1982), is currently known from
Tropical Asia and Malesia and includes 13 genera and around 550 species.
Monotoideae has so far been recognized as having African and
Madagascan distribution. Two genera and 57 species of Monotoideae have
been described until now. Pakaraimoideae is a monotypic subfamily
confined to a small portion of the old Roraima Formation of northeastern
South America.
The Dipterocarpaceae are trees or, seldom, shrubs with simple, alternate
leaves and with stipules that are for the most part small and caducous,
leaving persistent scars. The indument of scarce glandular trichomes found
on the upper and lower surface of the leaves in Pseudomonotes is common
in the Dipterocarpoideae but is absent from the Monotoideae and the
Pakaraimoideae. The new entity differs from the rest of the
Dipterocarpaceae in the absence of fasciculate trichomes. The leaf
venation shows alternate secondary veins common to most

45

Dipterocarpaceae, while the transverse tertiary veins are absent in


Pakaraimoideae.
The inflorescence of all family members is axillary, and the flowers can be
arranged in racemes, panicles or cymes, the latter being fairly uncommon.
In general, bracts and bracteoles are small and fugacious.
The flowers are generally bisexual and actinomorphic. The sepals of
Pseudomonotes provide one of the strongest connections between the new
taxon and the Dipterocarpaceae because of their aliform nature. There are
5 sepals in all Dipterocarpaceae, and they are variously free or connate at
the base, then forming a cupule or shallow cup. Aliform sepals may or
may not be present in the Dipterocarpoideae but are universal in
Monotoideae; they are present but short in Pakaraimoideae (Ashton, pers.
comm.). In Pseudomonotes, on the other hand, sepals become
conspicuously aliform; the calyx is persistent in fruiting condition as with
all Dipterocarpaceae, with its segments accrescent, thinly papyraceous,
reaching 10-16 cm in length. The corolla has 5 petals which are longer
than the sepals, convolute in bud and contorted as in Monotoideae. In
Pakaraimaea the petals are shorter than the sepals. The Monotoideae
allegiance is further supported by the numerous free stamens, with basiversatile anthers that are introrse and provided with a broad connective
continued into a triangular appendage one-fourth to one-half as long as the
body of the anther. To be sure, similar character combinations are also
found in some Dipterocarpaceae (Vatica and some species of Shorea,
according to Maguire and Ashton 1977).
Pollen grains in the family range in size from 17 m to 87 m (Maury et
al. 1975) and can be tricolpate or tricoporate, with a 2-, 3-, or 4-layered
exine. Pseudomonotes pollen grains are tricolporate (rarely tetracolporate)
and small (19.4-21.7 m). Monotoideae agrees with the new taxon in
having tricolporate grains, although the grains are somewhat larger.
The gynoecium of the Dipterocarpaceae consists of (2)3(5) carpels united
to form a compound, plurilocular ovary with a terminal style that can be
entire or shortly lobed. Placentation is for the most part axial, median, with
2(4) ovules per locule. The overwhelming majority of dipterocarps have 3
carpels, each with 2 ovules. Strikingly, our observations suggest that the
new taxon has one ovule per locule, and the placentation, while axial, is
46

clearly nearly basal (sub-basal). The 1-ovuled ovary cells should therefore
be regarded as tentative until more and better flowers are obtained. The
ovary is 3-locular and the ovules are pendulous and anatropous as in the
rest of the family. The style appears as three minute, terminal styles.
The fruit of Pseudomonotes is, as in all members of the family, dry,
usually with a woody pericarp that splits along three sutures at
germination, and 1-seeded.
Morton (Part II, below) compared the anatomy of the wood, bark, and pith
of Pseudomonotes with those of several families of flowering plants
belonging to the subclasses Dilleniidae and Rosidae (Cronquist 1981).
Wood anatomical features indicate close relationships to the Monotoideae
with which it shares the mostly uniseriate wood rays, the lack of resin
canals in the wood, and the presence of secretory cavities in the pith
(Bancroft 1935). Resin canals are absent but mucilage cavities are present
in Pakaraimoideae (De Zeeuw 1977), while resin canals are present and
secretory cavities are absent in Dipterocarpoideae (Guerin 1906, Gottwald
and Parameswaran 1966).
On the basis of the information gathered in the field, herbarium, and
laboratory, it is concluded that the new taxon belongs to subfamily
Monotoideae of the Dipterocarpaceae. These two groups share the
uniseriate (or rarely biseriate) wood rays, presence of secretory cavities in
the pith, lack of resin canals, single gland on the upper surface of the
lamina at the base of the midrib, and basi-versatile anthers.
The new entity differs from the rest of the Dipterocarpaceae in the absence
of fasciculate trichomes and in having sepals in fruit conspicuously
aliform (reaching 10-16 cm in length), and one ovule per locule with
nearly basal (sub-basal) placentation.
The addition of Pseudomonotes tropenbosii to subfamily Monotoideae
makes this the only subfamily of the Dipterocarpaceae with different
taxonomic elements currently growing in the Old as well as the New
World. The new taxon appears to be confined to a small area in the
southwesternmost limit of the Guayana Highland and the superposed
Roraima Formation sediments in Amazonian Colombia.

47

3.12

Acknowledgements

We wish to thank the institutions that have provided financial assistance to


the authors: Fundacion Tropenbos-Colombia; Universidad Nacional de
Colombia-seccional Medelln; Jardn Botnico "Joaqun Antonio Uribe,"
Medelln; Universidad de Antioquia; Corporacin Colombiana para la
Amazonia-Araracuara; and The New York Botanical Garden. We are
particularly indebted to Jorge Ignacio del Valle, Alvaro Cogollo, Juan
Guillermo Saldarriaga, and Brian Boom, who helped us in many ways.
Peter S. Ashton kindly reviewed several versions of the manuscript and
suggested important improvements. We are grateful to Klaus Kubitzki for
his very useful review of the manuscript. Rupert Barneby provided the
Latin diagnosis, and Bobbi Angell prepared the illustration of the new
taxon (Fig. 3-1). Ramiro Fonnegra and Mercedes Giron (Universidad de
Antioquia) assisted with pollen studies in Medelln. J. Duivenvoorden and
J. Lips (Universiteit van Amsterdam) helped with the description of soils
and geology. Also, we appreciate the field assistance of all the people of
the Centre Experimental Araracuara and of the indigenous community
Nonuya of Pea Roja.

48

4
Arquitectura de Iryanthera
tricornis, Osteophloeum
platyspermum y Virola pavonis
(Myristicaceae)
Eliana Mara Jimnez Rojas, Ana Catalina Londoo Vega &
Henricus F. M. Vester
Caldasia 24(1): 65-94 (2002)

4.1

Introduccin

La familia Myristicaceae est representada en Amrica por cinco gneros:


Compsoneura (11 especies), Iryanthera (20 especies), Osteophloeum (2
especies), Otoba (8 especies) y Virola (40 especies); adems, el gnero
asitico Myristica (1 especie) ha sido introducido por su valor comercial.
En ciertas regiones la presencia de la familia es tan conspicua que
constituye uno de los elementos ms importantes de la flora (Smith
1938ab; Herrera 1994). Tal es el caso de los bosques de guandal, en el
Pacfico colombiano, donde especies como Otoba gracilipes (A.C. Smith)
A.H. Gentry, Virola reidii Little y Virola sebifera Aubl. constituyen los
elementos dominantes de la vegetacin (del Valle 1996b). La familia
tambin tiene una amplia representacin en la cuenca amaznica,
importante centro de distribucin en Amrica (Smith 1938a). Las
Miristicceas juegan un papel importante en la composicin, la estructura
y la diversidad de los bosques de la regin de Araracuara y el Medio
Caquet, principalmente en el Plano Inundable de los Ros Amaznicos
(en suelos moderadamente a bien drenados), el Plano Inundable del Ro
Caquet (en suelos bien drenados) y en el Plano Sedimentario Terciaro, o
tierra firme (en suelos moderadamente a bien drenados y mal drenados)
(Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993; Londoo 1993; Londoo y lvarez 1997;
Snchez 1997). Entre las Miristicceas econmicamente importantes la
ms conocida a nivel mundial es la nuez moscada asitica (Myristica
fragans Houtt.), fuente de nuez moscada, macs y de aceites medicinales y
aromticos (Schultes y Raffauf 1990), pero en Suramrica algunas
especies tienen mltiples usos, con gran valor actual y potencial (Schultes
y Raffauf 1990; Herrera 1994). Algunas poseen maderas comerciales,
como Virola surinamensis (Rol. ex Rottb.) Warb. en Brasil (Rodrigues
1982) y O. gracilipes, V. reidii y V. sebifera en Colombia (del Valle
1996b), mientras otras se destacan por sus compuestos qumicos; por
ejemplo, en Iryanthera tricornis Ducke, Osteophloeum platyspermum
(Spruce ex A. DC.) Warb., Virola pavonis (A. DC.) A.C. Sm., V. sebifera
y V. surinamensis se han encontrado alcaloides, esteroides y estilbenos,
entre otros (Rodrigues 1982; Schultes y Raffauf 1990; Bennett y Alarcn
1994).

50

Los aborgenes amaznicos utilizan frecuentemente un gran nmero de


Miristicceas como medicinas y narcticos, por ejemplo: Iryanthera
macrophylla (Benth.) Warb., Osteophloeum platyspermum, Virola
calophylla (Spruce) Warb., V. cuspidata (Spruce ex Benth.) Warb., V.
duckei A. C. Sm., Virola elongata (Benth.) Warb., V. pavonis, V. sebifera
y V. surinamensis (Schultes y Raffauf 1990; Bennett y Alarcn 1994). En
el Medio Caquet las comunidades indgenas las utilizan principalmente
como fuente de alimentos, de medicinas, de sustancias empleadas en
prcticas culturales, de maderas para la construccin de malocas y para la
elaboracin de herramientas y utensilios de uso domstico (la Rotta 1982,
1989; Snchez y Miraa 1991; Urrego y Snchez 1997).
Los estudios sobre arquitectura de la vegetacin se iniciaron en los
bosques tropicales, con nfasis en la parte area de los rboles. La
arquitectura de una planta es la expresin morfolgica de su programa
gentico en un momento dado, como resultado del equilibrio entre los
procesos endgenos de crecimiento y las restricciones exgenas ejercidas
por el medio (Barthlmy et al. 1991; Hall 1995). El objetivo del anlisis
arquitectnico es identificar los procesos endgenos que controlan el
crecimiento y la forma de toda la planta, por medio de la observacin.
Desde su concepcin este anlisis es integral y dinmico, y maneja tres
conceptos fundamentales: el modelo arquitectnico (Hall y Oldeman
1970), la unidad arquitectnica (delin 1977) citado por (Barthlmy et al.
1991) y la reiteracin (Oldeman 1974). El desarrollo de los conceptos de
modelo, unidad y reiteracin ha proporcionado una valiosa herramienta
para estudiar la estructura y la forma de las plantas; adems, se ha
reconocido que la arquitectura juega un papel importante en la asignacin
de recursos a todas las partes de stas, en la captura de la luz, en el
transporte de agua, en la estabilidad mecnica y en la resistencia a los
vientos (Vester 1997; Poorter y Werger 1999).
Para entender la arquitectura de una planta es necesario observar todos los
ejes que la componen. Un eje es un tronco, una rama, o cualquier otro
rgano vascular, cilndrico, alargado y delgado, originado por su
meristema terminal, que porta hojas, flores o yemas (Oldeman 1990b). La
arquitectura de una planta puede considerarse como un sistema jerrquico
cuya estructura depende del patrn de ramificacin (delin 1991) y de la
diferenciacin de los ejes. stos, en conjunto, constituyen el mejor criterio
51

para analizar las reacciones del rbol hacia los otros rboles y su medio
(Vester 1997). El modelo arquitectnico, determinado por el tipo de
crecimiento, la morfologa de los ejes, la ramificacin y la posicin de la
sexualidad, se define como el programa de crecimiento que determina las
fases sucesivas del desarrollo de la planta (Hall et al. 1978). Debido a las
grandes variaciones que puede presentar un modelo dado entre diferentes
especies, se emplea la unidad arquitectnica, definida como la expresin
especfica del modelo para una especie en particular, que incluye mayor
detalle aquitectnico en la descripcin del patrn de ramificacin mediante
una secuencia de diferenciacin (delin 1977) citado por (Barthlmy et
al. 1991). El desarrollo de ejes fuera de la expresin normal de la unidad
arquitectnica se denomina reiteracin (Hall et al. 1978), proceso
morfogentico que duplica total o parcialmente el modelo arquitectnico
(Oldeman 1974). Las fases sucesivas del crecimiento de un rbol se
analizan mediante el diagrama arquitectnico, o secuencia de dibujos que
representa el desarrollo arquitectnico del rbol (Vester 1997), que
comprende los rboles potenciales (juveniles con potencial para expandir
su copa), del presente (rboles maduros con copas plenamente
desarrolladas) y del pasado (rboles viejos con copa debilitadas y daadas)
(Hall et al. 1978). Por ltimo, el plan de organizacin puede ser
jerrquico o polirquico, y est definido por la dominancia apical del eje
principal (delin 1991).
Las Miristicceas del mundo con estudios arquitectnicos son pocas, pero
todos los trabajos previos concuerdan en que stas crecen conforme al
modelo arquitectnico de Massart (Hall et al. 1978; Drnou 1994; Loubry
1994; Loup 1994). Ya desde mediados del siglo XIX, durante sus viajes a
la Amazonia, el botnico Richard Spruce haba hecho detalladas
descripciones sobre la ramificacin y la fisionoma que incluan conceptos
arquitectnicos incipientes sobre las Miristicceas, las cuales llamaron
mucho su atencin por su forma tan caracterstica (Spruce 1861) citado por
(Madrin 1996). Ms tarde, en 1923 Jean Massart estudi y describi un
ejemplar de V. surinamensis en el Jardn Botnico de Ro de Janeiro (Hall
et al. 1978), sentando las bases de lo que despus fue denominado como
modelo arquitectnico de Massart (Hall y Oldeman 1970). Ms
recientemente, esta misma especie ha sido investigada intensivamente

52

(Barthlmy et al. 1991; Drnou 1994; Loup 1994), al igual que Virola
michelii Heckel (Comte 1993) citado por (Loubry 1994).
Adems de ocurrir en la familia Myristicaceae, el modelo de Massart est
bien representado tanto en rboles tropicales (v.g. Ceiba pentandra (L.)
Gaertn., Ocotea guianensis Aubl.), subtropicales (v.g. Araucaria
heterophylla (Salisb.) Franco), como de zonas templadas (v.g. Abies
balsamea (L.) Mill., Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl.) (Hall et al.
1978). Sin embargo, son pocas las especies con estudios arquitectnicos,
como: Ocotea oblonga Mez (Vester 1997), Symphonia globulifera L.f.
(Loup 1994) y algunas Araucaria spp. (Veillon 1978).
En Colombia los estudios sobre arquitectura de la vegetacin son bastante
escasos. Entre ellos se encuentran los realizados en la regin de Araracuara
en palmas (Echeverri 1993), en el desarrollo de los bosques secundarios y
sus especies ms importantes (Vester y Saldarriaga 1993; Vester 1997) y
sobre Myristicceas (Jimnez 2000). Tambin se han estudiado los
cativales en la regin de Urab (Ros 1996) y la arquitectura del roble
(Quercus humboldtii Bonpl.) en Antioquia (Echeverri 1997).
En este artculo se presenta el anlisis arquitectnico de tres especies de
Miristicceas del dosel en dos bosques de tierra firme. Con base en los
trabajos previos sobre la arquitectura de otras especies de la familia, se
parti de la hiptesis de que las especies, pertenecientes a tres gneros
diferentes, deban exhibir igualmente el modelo de Massart. Se estudi el
desarrollo del modelo arquitectnico en estas especies, la conformacin de
la unidad arquitectnica, los tipos de reiteracin, el plan de crecimiento y
el plan de organizacin arquitectnica a nivel del rbol, as como la
similitud arquitectnica entre las tres especies. Adems, se investig si
existan semejanzas con otras especies de la familia previamente
estudiadas, y cmo el desarrollo arquitectnico favorece la sobrevivencia
de los rboles para alcanzar el dosel.
4.2

rea de estudio

La investigacin se llev a cabo en la regin de Araracuara (Amazonia


colombiana), en el Resguardo Indgena Nonuya de Pea Roja, en dos
bosques maduros de tierra firme (sin inundacin), localizados en las
unidades de paisaje: Plano Sedimentario Terciario y Terraza Baja del Ro
53

Caquet (nomenclatura de paisajes segn Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993),


ambos sin intervenciones antrpicas recientes. Las observaciones se
efectuaron en las reas de monitoreo, establecidas para estudiar la
estructura (Londoo 1993; Londoo y lvarez 1997) y el funcionamiento
(Londoo y Jimnez 1999; Tobn 1999) de estos ecosistemas. La regin
pertenece a la zona de vida bosque hmedo tropical (bh-T) (Holdridge
1982). En Araracuara la temperatura promedia anual es de 25.7 C, la
precipitacin promedia anual es de 3059 mm, con un rgimen de
distribucin unimodal, y la humedad relativa es alta, con promedios
mensuales entre 82-92% (Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993).
La parcela permanente donde se realiz este estudio es la misma reportada
por Londoo y lvarez (1997), cuyos suelos fueron clasificados como
Typic Kandiudults o Xanthic Ferrasols, grupo ecolgico de los AcriFerrasols (Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993). Las Terrazas Bajas, con una
extensin mayor que la parte actualmente inundable de la Llanura Aluvial
del Ro Caquet, tienen una altitud entre 200-250 msnm. El sitio de
estudio est localizado en las partes planas bien drenadas, con suelos
clasificados como Typic Paleudults o Haplic Acrisol, grupo ecolgico de
los Ali-Acrisols (Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993). Las coordenadas de las
parcelas de estudio son: 039'31'' S, 7204'38'' W en el Plano Sedimentario
Terciario, y 040' S, 7205' W en la Terraza Baja.
El bosque del Plano Sedimentario Terciario es uno de los de mayor altura
en la regin, y tiene el ms alto nmero de especies arbreas
(Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993). La fisionoma del sotobosque generalmente
est dominada por palmas acaules. El dosel superior es cerrado, entre 2037 m de altura, con promedio de 27 m y algunos emergentes que pueden
alcanzar hasta 42 m. Los rboles con dimetro a la altura del pecho (DAP
a 1.30 cm del suelo) mayor que 20 cm sobrepasan los 20 m de altura, y la
densidad arbrea total (DAP 1 cm) es, en promedio, de 711 rboles por
0.1 ha, de los cuales 72 tienen DAP 10 cm. Por otro lado, en la Terraza
Baja el bosque se caracteriza por la presencia de rboles gruesos en
combinacin con una densidad arbrea relativamente baja, sobre todo en
los dimetros inferiores (DAP 40 cm), el sotobosque es relativamente
abierto, no est dominado por palmas acaules y los bejucos son
relativamente abundantes. El dosel superior tiene una altura promedio de
22 m, con algunos emergentes que pueden alcanzar hasta 35 m. En
54

general, slo los rboles con DAP > 30 cm sobrepasan la altura de 20 m, la


densidad arbrea total es, en promedio, de 609 rboles por 0.1 ha, de los
cuales 44 tienen DAP 10 cm, mientras los rboles con DAP 60 cm
estn bien representados.
4.3

Materiales y Mtodos

La investigacin se realiz en dos fases; la primera consisti en la


seleccin de las especies e individuos, y la segunda, en el anlisis
arquitectnico propiamente dicho.
Seleccin de las especies
Esta fase inicial tuvo una duracin aproximada de mes y medio, y
comenz con una revisin de las muestras botnicas de las Miristicceas,
previamente colectadas en la zona de estudio (Londoo 1993; Londoo y
lvarez 1997), en el herbario Amaznico Colombiano (COAH). Se
tomaron anotaciones sobre la distribucin local a nivel de unidades de
paisaje y sobre algunas caractersticas morfolgicas como: tamao de la
lmina foliar, forma de la nerviacin y tipo de tricomas, para facilitar el
reconocimiento posterior de las especies en el campo. Tambin se
consultaron descripciones y claves botnicas de la familia, y se elabor
una gua rpida de campo con fotocopias a color de las muestras botnicas
de las especies reportadas para los sitios de estudio. Todos los nombres de
las especies que aparecen en el texto fueron consultados en la pgina de la
red del Jardn Botnico de Missouri, especficamente en la base de datos
sobre nomenclatura VAST (VAScular Tropicos) (Missouri-BotanicalGarden 2001).
Luego, en el campo se recorrieron las parcelas y las reas adyacentes,
observando todas las Miristicceas presentes y localizando algunos
individuos; esta informacin, sumada a la que se tena de trabajos previos
(datos inditos Londoo 1993), permiti escoger definitivamente las
especies para el estudio. Los criterios para seleccionarlas fueron: alta
importancia dentro del bosque evaluada mediante el ndice de valor de
importancia, IVI en el Plano Sedimentario Terciario (Londoo 1993),
presencia de individuos en todos los estados de desarrollo (plntulas,
juveniles, adultos y seniles) y, por ltimo, facilidad de identificacin en el
campo.
55

Las especies escogidas fueron: Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum


platyspermum y Virola pavonis. Posteriormente, se eligieron los
individuos para realizar las observaciones arquitectnicas. Se prefirieron
los rboles con buena visibilidad desde el suelo (principalmente en sus
copas), sin excesiva carga de epfitas, lianas, bejucos o estranguladoras,
para realizar adecuadamente las observaciones; adems, nuevamente se
trat que stos se encontraran en distintos estados de desarrollo (juveniles,
adultos y viejos) y en sitios con diferentes condiciones ambientales dentro
del bosque, localizados en todos los estratos. Cada individuo seleccionado
fue marcado permanentemente e identificado mediante una muestra
botnica. Las colecciones se depositaron en el herbario Amaznico
Colombiano (COAH), donde se hizo la verificacin final de las
identificaciones realizadas en campo. Adicionalmente, se colectaron ramas
como muestras de detalles arquitectnicos, registrando el lugar del rbol
donde estaba insertada para permitir la correcta interpretacin
arquitectnica, que se depositaron en la Fundacin Tropenbos, en Bogot.
Anlisis arquitectnico
Esta segunda fase tuvo una duracin aproximada de tres meses, en la cual
se efectuaron las observaciones arquitectnicas: primero en los individuos
juveniles, luego en los intermedios y, por ltimo, en los adultos y seniles.
Los rboles de menor altura se observaron directamente, mientras que para
efectuar el anlisis de las copas de los ms altos se utilizaron telescopio y
binculos. En algunos casos, las observaciones se realizaron directamente
desde el dosel, empleando equipo de escalar para subir a plataformas y a
cuerdas instaladas sobre rboles vecinos, y as obtener una mejor
visibilidad de los rboles ms grandes, con las copas ms complejas.
Se dibujaron perfiles a escala de todos los individuos seleccionados, as
como algunos detalles, principalmente de ramas y de reiteraciones. Para
realizar los perfiles a escala de cada rbol y de los detalles, se tomaron las
siguientes mediciones: dimetro a la altura del pecho (DAP), dimetro
promedio de copa (DC) con base en la medicin de ocho radios de copa,
altura total (HT) y de fuste, y otras hasta la insercin de ramas o
reiteraciones importantes. Los rboles fueron dibujados de la manera ms
real posible, para lo cual las caractersticas morfolgicas y arquitectnicas
de cada uno de los ejes fueron descritas detalladamente.
56

En el campo tambin se registraron algunos parmetros de copa,


adoptando una simplificacin de las cinco categoras de Dawkins (1958),
de la siguiente manera: a) Calidad de copa: medida as: 3= buena (copa
simtrica y vigorosa), 2= regular (condicin intermedia, con algunos
defectos en cuanto a la simetra y a la densidad del follaje), 1= deficiente
(copa pobre, poco vigorosa y fracturada, con proporciones sustanciales de
ramas sin follaje o ramificacin incompleta, marcadamente asimtrica); b)
Posicin de copa: considerada como: 3= buena (copa completamente
expuesta, con plenas entradas verticales y laterales de luz), 2= regular
(condicin intermedia, parcialmente expuesta con entradas verticales o
laterales de luz), 1= deficiente (con muy pocas entradas de luz o
totalmente cubierta). Tambin se describieron cualitativamente las
condiciones del lugar donde se encontraba cada individuo dentro del
bosque, incluyendo aspectos como si el rbol se encontraba dentro de un
claro natural o en el borde de ste, y la presencia de disturbios recientes
causantes de daos en el rbol, e.g. ramas y rboles cados alrededor o
sobre l, que se podan relacionar con reiteraciones traumticas.
Para confirmar y detallar el modelo (Hall et al. 1978) y definir la unidad
arquitectnica (delin 1977) citado por (Barthlmy et al. 1991), se
efectuaron las siguientes observaciones morfolgicas y arquitectnicas
para cada eje (Hall et al. 1978; Oldeman y Hall 1980, Bell 1993): el tipo
de crecimiento (continuo o rtmico; definido o indefinido; monopdico o
simpdico), la descripcin de las unidades de crecimiento, el patrn de
ramificacin (continuo, rtmico o difuso; monpodico o simpdico), su
origen (prolptico o silptico), su diferenciacin morfolgica (ortotropa o
plagiotropa; plagiotropa secundaria o plagiotropa por aposicin,
presencia de ejes mixtos) y, por ltimo, la presencia y la localizacin de la
sexualidad en los ejes, entendida como cualquier estructura reproductiva,
sea flor, fruto o ambas
Para construir el diagrama arquitectnico (Vester 1997) y describir el
desarrollo del plan de organizacin a nivel del rbol (Oldeman y Teller
1989; Oldeman 1990ab; delin 1991), adicionalmente se detectaron y
clasificaron los tipos de reiteracin presentes en cada individuo: total o
parcial; adaptativa o traumtica; prolptica o silptica; automtica;
arbrea, arbustiva o herbcea (Oldeman 1974; Hall et al. 1978; de Castro
1980) y (delin 1984) citado por (Bell 1993), registrando su localizacin
57

dentro del rbol. En el diagrama se diferenciaron los rboles potenciales,


del presente y del pasado (Oldeman 1974; Hall et al. 1978), con base en
las mismas caractersticas morfolgicas y arquitectnicas, considerando
los rboles suprimidos como una categora diferente (Oldeman 1990b).
Posteriormente, los dibujos de campo fueron llevados a formato digital. En
la construccin del diagrama arquitectnico los esquemas se elaboraron
despus de realizar un anlisis comparativo de los perfiles y de los planos
exactos obtenidos por la observacin directa de los rboles en el campo. Se
analiz la dispersin de los datos de DAP y HT de todos los individuos
segn el potencial de desarrollo con respecto a la lnea de la relacin
armnica del modelo (HT = 100DAP) (Hall y Oldeman 1970; Hall et al.
1978). El anlisis se realiz para cada especie por separado y para el
conjunto total de datos.
4.4

Resultados

En total se seleccionaron y dibujaron 51 individuos, cuya distribucin por


especie, sitio y estado de desarrollo se muestra en la Tabla 4-1. Debido a la
gran semejanza arquitectnica entre las tres especies todos los resultados
del anlisis se presentan conjuntamente.
Modelo y unidad arquitectnica
Las tres especies efectivamente crecen segn el modelo arquitectnico de
Massart (Hall et al. 1978). Los rboles son poliaxiales: el meristema de la
plntula se multiplica y produce otros meristemas que poseen desigual
grado de diferenciacin (uno da origen al tronco y los otros, a las ramas).
En todas las especies se encontr que la unidad arquitectnica alcanza tres
rdenes de ejes (Tabla 4-2) y el modelo se desarrolla de la siguiente
manera: el eje epicotiledonario conforma el eje principal (A1), orttropo,
con filotaxia alterna espiralada, monopdico, con crecimiento y
ramificacin rtmicos, constituido por la sucesin de unidades de
crecimiento cuyos lmites estn marcados por la presencia de hojas de
tamao reducido, junto con un cambio en el color y el grado de
lignificacin de la corteza.
A medida que el eje A1 crece en longitud, las yemas axilares, localizadas
en la parte distal (o terminal) de la ltima unidad de crecimiento, se
desarrollan dando origen a los ejes A2, antes de que el meristema terminal
58

del eje A1 entre en estado de reposo; i.e. los ejes A2 son silpticos. Luego,
el meristema terminal del eje A1 reanuda su actividad y se produce la
siguiente unidad de crecimiento, y as sucesivamente. Los ejes A2 se
disponen rtmicamente, formando pisos de ramas muy conspicuos,
localizados en posicin acrotnica dentro de las unidades de crecimiento
del eje A1. Los ejes A2 presentan una orientacin horizontal con filotaxia
alterna dstica, acompaada de una pequea torsin de los pecolos que
acenta su carcter plagitropo; son monopdicos, con crecimiento rtmico
y tienen ramificacin difusa, ya que no hay un patrn visible en la
aparicin de los ejes A3. Los A3 exhiben filotaxia alterna dstica y
tambin son plagitropos, en menor grado que los ejes A2, son
monopdicos, con crecimiento rtmico, pero sin ramificacin. Difieren de
los ejes A2 en su origen: los primeros son silpticos, mientras los A3,
prolpticos. Adicionalmente, los ejes A2 estn conformados por un
nmero mayor de unidades de crecimiento en comparacin con los ejes A3
que slo desarrollan dos o tres unidades de crecimiento; en consecuencia,
los ejes A2 son de mayor longitud que los A3. Las estructuras
reproductivas (flores y frutos) se encuentran en los ejes A2 y A3; debido a
su posicin axilar dentro de los ejes, la localizacin de la sexualidad no es
importante en el modelo de Massart, puesto que no interfiere con el
crecimiento vegetativo del rbol (Hall et al. 1978).
Tipos de reiteracin
Las tres especies estudiadas presentaron gran capacidad de reiteracin;
todas las reiteraciones fueron de tipo prolptico. Por una parte, se hallaron
reiteraciones traumticas en individuos pertenecientes a todas las fases de
desarrollo del rbol; por otra, se detectaron reiteraciones adaptativas en
ciertas fases. Siguiendo el desarrollo de las especies, primero surgen las
reiteraciones adaptativas parciales sobre los ejes A2; despus, las totales.
Estas ltimas tambin se localizan principalmente sobre los ejes A2 ms
lignificados, de mayor dimensin, y eventualmente sobre el eje A1. Una
vez que los individuos han alcanzado el dosel, que en el caso de las tres
especies estudiadas corresponde a los rboles del presente, fue posible
identificar reiteraciones arbreas, arbustivas y herbceas.

59

Tabla 4-1. Nmero de individuos observados en el anlisis arquitectnico.


Sitio: PST: Plano Sedimentario Terciario, TB: Terraza Baja. Potencial de
desarrollo: PO: rboles potenciales, PR: rboles del presente, PA: rboles
del pasado, SU: rboles suprimidos. N: nmero de individuos.
Especie

Sitio

Iryanthera tricornis

Osteophloeum
platyspermum

Virola pavonis

Todas las especies


Total

PST
TB
Subtotal
PST

Potencial de desarrollo
PO
PR
PA
SU
16
1
0
4
0
3
0
0
16
4
0
4
2
2
1
0

Total
N
21
3
24
5

TB
Subtotal
PST
TB
Subtotal
PST
TB
N
%

7
9
4
0
4
22
7
29
57

14
19
5
3
8
31
20
51
100

1
3
0
3
3
3
7
10
19

5
6
0
0
0
1
5
6
12

1
1
1
0
1
5
1
6
12

%
41
6
47
10
27
37
10
6
16
61
39
100

Diagrama arquitectnico y plan de organizacin a nivel del rbol


Se identificaron ocho fases de desarrollo arquitectnico con base en los
rdenes de ejes y la cantidad, la localizacin y el vigor de las reiteraciones
presentes en los rboles observados. Aunque entre las caractersticas
arquitectnicas y las dimensiones del rbol no existe una relacin estricta
(Hall et al. 1978; Vester 1997), se presenta el rango de altura de los
individuos pertenecientes a cada fase como referencia. Para una mejor
ilustracin de las fases de desarrollo se realiz un diagrama arquitectnico
esquemtico (Figura 4-1), que muestra la dinmica del crecimiento de las
especies, desde su establecimiento como plntulas, pasando por el estado
de rboles maduros del dosel, hasta que finalmente llegan a ser rboles con
envejecimiento natural.
Fase 1: plntula (Figura 4-1, Figura 4-2A). Comprende individuos en el
estado inicial de desarrollo, inmediatamente despus de la germinacin,
que alcanzan alturas hasta 0.5 m. Fase caracterizada por presentar
nicamente el eje epicotiledonario (A1), o tronco, sin ramificar, con dos o
tres unidades de crecimiento, claramente reconocibles por el cambio
60

drstico en el tamao de las hojas, en el color de la corteza y la progresiva


disminucin de la longitud de los entrenudos que muestran su
crecimiento rtmico. Dada la dificultad para identificar con certeza la
especie de cada plntula, no fue posible observar esta fase para cada
especie por separado. No obstante, las observaciones realizadas en el
campo permitieron definirla en general para todas las Miristicceas
presentes en los dos sitios de estudio.

Tabla 4-2. Unidad arquitectnica de Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum


platyspermum y Virola pavonis. Uc: Unidad de crecimiento. Cambio en
corteza: en el color y el grado de lignificacin.
Caracterstica
Estructura
Crecimiento

Tipo
Direccin
Longevidad

Uc

Ramificacin

Simetra
Lmites

No. de hojas
Tipo
Cronologa
Localizacin
Insercin

Hojas

Filotaxia

Sexualidad

Presencia
Localizacin

Eje A1
monopodio
rtmico
-orttropo
-vertical
la vida del
rbol
radial
-hojas
pequeas
-cambio en
corteza
-hilera de ejes
A2
entre 5-9
rtmico
inmediata
acrotnica
alternaespiralada
no
-

Eje A2
Monopodio
Rtmico
-plagitropo
-horizontal
Larga

Eje A3
monopodio
rtmico
-plagitropo
-oblicua
corta

Bilateral
-hojas
pequeas
-cambio en
corteza
-

bilateral
-hojas
pequeas
-cambio en
corteza
-

entre 5-8
Difuso
Retardada
Acrotnica
ca. 90 con eje
A1
alterna-dstica

entre 5-8
no ramificado
40-70 con eje
A2
alterna-dstica

S
-lateral
-en tres
ltimas Uc

s
-lateral
-en tres
ltimas Uc

61

Fase 2: juvenil pequeo (Figura 4-1, Figura 4-2B). Comprende rboles


potenciales, con alturas entre 0.5-2 m, caracterizados por tener un tronco
(eje A1) ramificado rtmicamente, portando los ejes A2, dispuestos en
pisos muy conspicuos. En esta fase los ejes A2 an no se han ramificado.
Cuando los individuos presentan ms de un piso de ramas se observa que
los ejes A2 se distribuyen espacialmente para evitar al mximo el
sombreado entre las ramas de los pisos adyacentes. Adems, se observa
una fuerte autopoda: los ejes A2 que se producen primero van muriendo a
medida que el eje A1 crece en altura y produce nuevos A2 en la parte
superior de la copa.

Figura 4-1. Diagrama arquitectnico de Iryanthera tricornis,


Osteophloeum platyspermum y Virola pavonis. F: fase arquitectnica. A:
eje reiterado. Rt: reiteracin total.
Fase 3: juvenil mediano (Figura 4-1, Figura 4-2C-D). Al igual que la fase
anterior, tambin comprende rboles potenciales, con alturas entre 2-5 m.
En esta fase el rbol expresa claramente su modelo arquitectnico, y
presenta la relacin armnica del mismo; es decir, el individuo se
encuentra sobre la lnea de referencia HT = 100DAP (Figura 4-3). Estos
rboles exhiben la unidad arquitectnica completa consistente en tres
62

rdenes de ejes diferentes: A1, A2 y A3 (Figura 4-1, Tabla 4-2). Hasta esta
fase, el desarrollo del rbol sigue un plan de organizacin jerrquico, en el
cual existe una fuerte dominancia del meristema apical del eje A1 y una
subordinacin de los ejes A2 y A3.
Fase 4: juvenil grande (Figura 4-1, Figura 4-2E-H). Esta fase an
comprende rboles potenciales, con alturas entre 5-15 m, con la unidad
arquitectnica completa. En este momento el rbol comienza a sobrepasar
el umbral definido por la expansin de la copa conforme al desarrollo del
modelo y reacciona mediante la produccin de numerosas reiteraciones
adaptativas parciales (Rp, Figura 4-2E-H). stas son muy abundantes en
los primeros pisos de ramas (ejes A2), o sea las ms bajas y viejas, las
cuales son igualmente las ms largas y plagitropas, que gradualmente
disminuyen en longitud hacia la parte superior de la copa. Frecuentemente
se observa que el crecimiento de los ejes A2, inicialmente con un carcter
marcadamente monopdico (con crecimiento indefinido), se va tornando
progresivamente definido (monopodios inestables) en virtud de la muerte
de su meristema terminal. La desaparicin de este meristema terminal
ocasiona el desarrollo de yemas laterales, ubicadas en las axilas de las
hojas ms cercanas al pice, que hasta ese momento se encontraban en
estado de latencia (Figura 4-4F, H).
Estas yemas producen complejos reiterados adaptativos, denominados
tenedores (Barthlmy et al. 1991). stos, vistos sobre un plano, pueden
ser sencillos (dos reiteraciones, Figura 4-4A) o mltiples (tres o ms
reiteraciones, Figura 4-4I), que segn su aparicin, pueden sobreponerse
unos a otros modificando totalmente la arquitectura de las ramas. Por otra
parte, en la parte media y proximal de los ejes A2 ms viejos, se observa el
desarrollo de ejes dediferenciados (ejes A2, Figura 4-4C, F-I). En esta
fase se inicia el plan de organizacin polirquico.
Fase 5: transicin entre rbol potencial y rbol del presente (Figura 4-1,
Figura 4-5A-B, F), cuyos individuos se consideraron como rboles del
presente, generalmente con alturas entre 15-25 m, que excepcionalmente
pueden alcanzar hasta 40 m. Sus copas exhiben una arquitectura ms
compleja con gran parte de los caracteres propios de los rboles del
presente, que se encuentran prximas a alcanzar su mxima capacidad de
desarrollo. Las reiteraciones adaptativas parciales de los ejes A2 son ms
63

abundantes y lignificadas, al igual que los ejes A2 que las portan. Se


presenta una proliferacin de ramitas prolpticas (A3) en toda la copa y,
adems, empiezan a aparecer las primeras reiteraciones adaptativas totales
insertadas directamente sobre todo en los ejes A2 (Figura 4-6). El plan de
organizacin polirquico contina ganando importancia.

Figura 4-2. rboles potenciales de Iryanthera tricornis (It), Osteophloeum


platyspermum (Op) y Virola pavonis (Vp). A: plntula (fase 1). B-H:
rboles potenciales. B: fase 2. C-D: fase 3. E-H: fase 4. +: eje muerto. Uc:
unidad de crecimiento. Rp: reiteracin parcial. Rt: reiteracin total.

64

Figura 4-3. Relacin entre el logaritmo de la altura total (HT) y del


dimetro (DAP) con respecto a la lnea de referencia HT = 100DAP.
Potencial de desarrollo: : rboles potenciales, : rboles del presente, +:
rboles del pasado, : rboles suprimidos. n: nmero de individuos.
Fase 6: rbol del presente (Figura 4-1, Figura 4-5C-E). Comprende los
tpicos individuos del presente, con alturas que pueden alcanzar 30 m o
ms, eventualmente hasta 40 m, con copas plenamente desarrolladas,
conformadas por numerosos complejos reiterados muy lignificados
creados mediante reiteraciones adaptativas parciales y totales. En estos
rboles, las reiteraciones adaptativas totales, localizadas principalmente
sobre los ejes A2 (Figura 4-6) y, en menor grado, sobre los ejes A1, son
grandes, vigorosas y conforman las reiteraciones arbreas. Tambin se
encuentran las reiteraciones arbustivas, de tamao ms reducido,
insertadas en los ejes de las previas reiteraciones arbreas. Por ltimo,
completando el gradiente desde el tronco principal hasta la periferia de la
copa, se encuentran las reiteraciones herbceas, todava ms pequeas,
65

junto con una proliferacin de ramitas prolpticas (ejes A3). A partir de


este momento el plan de organizacin polirquico se establece por
completo y domina en las fases siguientes, cuando la repeticin total de la
unidad arquitectnica constituye el mecanismo principal de construccin
de la copa.
Fase 7: transicin entre rbol del presente y rbol del pasado (Figura 4-1,
Figura 4-7A-B), considerados como individuos del pasado, con alturas en
igual rango que los de la fase anterior, caracterizados por la disminucin
progresiva del tamao y del vigor de las reiteraciones arbreas y
arbustivas. La aparicin de las reiteraciones herbceas se torna ms
frecuente, stas se localizan en la periferia de la copa, sobre los ejes A2, y
tambin sobre los A1 y el tronco. As mismo, se observa una tendencia
hacia la miniaturizacin en el tamao de las hojas, bastante acentuada en el
caso de O. platyspermum (Figura 4-4D-F) e I. tricornis.
Fase 8: rbol del pasado (Figura 4-1, Figura 4-7C-D). Comprende
individuos viejos, tpicos del pasado, con alturas entre 25-40 m, cuyas
copas estn conformadas bsicamente por numerosas reiteraciones
herbceas, muy pequeas, poco vigorosas, originadas a partir de los ejes
A2 ms lignificados e incluso del tronco (eje A1). Las reiteraciones
arbreas y arbustivas presentan poco vigor y seas claras de
fracturamiento que hacen evidente los procesos de desintegracin fsica de
la copa. En general, ocurre un debilitamiento progresivo de sta que hace
que el rbol se torne muy susceptible a la muerte por la fractura del tronco
(Londoo y Jimnez 1999). Precisamente por su gran vulnerabilidad a la
accin de agentes biofsicos, que pueden ocasionar una muerte sbita, los
individuos en esta fase son poco abundantes en el bosque.

66

Figura 4-4. Detalles arquitectnicos de ramas de Iryanthera tricornis,


Osteophloeum platyspermum y Virola pavonis. A-C, F-I: reiteraciones
parciales (fase 4 y siguientes). A: tenedor simple. B-C, F-I: ejes
dediferenciados en la parte proximal y media de la rama. D: eje A2 sin
ramificar (fase 2). E: rama con unidad arquitectnica completa (fase 3). I:
tenedor mltiple. ||: lmite de la unidad de crecimiento. A: eje reiterado.

67

Figura 4-5. rboles del presente de Iryanthera tricornis (It),


Osteophloeum platyspermum (Op) y Virola pavonis (Vp). A-B, F: rboles
potenciales en transicin a rboles del presente (fase 5). C-E: rboles del
presente (fase 6). +: eje muerto. Rp: reiteracin parcial. Rt: reiteracin
total.

Figura 4-6. Reiteracin total adaptativa (Rt) sobre eje A2 en rbol del
presente (fase 5).

68

Figura 4-7. rboles del pasado de Osteophloeum platyspermum. A-B:


rboles del presente en transicin a rboles del pasado (fase 7). C-D:
rboles del pasado (fase 8). +: eje muerto. Rt: reiteracin total.
Potencial de desarrollo en el bosque
El potencial de desarrollo de los rboles en el bosque fue definido con base
en las ocho fases de desarrollo, aplicando los conceptos tericos
arquitectnicos (Oldeman 1974; Hall et al. 1978; Oldeman 1990b). Los
rboles potenciales (Figura 4-2) estn constituidos por juveniles, con plena
capacidad para expandir y desarrollar su copa, y comprenden individuos
desde la fase 1 hasta la 4. Los rboles del presente (Figura 4-5) estn
conformados por adultos, con copas que han alcanzado su mxima
expansin o desarrollo, con reiteraciones arbreas y arbustivas vigorosas y
abundantes, y comprenden individuos de las fases 5 y 6. Los rboles del
pasado (Figura 4-7) estn conformados por individuos viejos, sin potencial
de desarrollo, caracterizados por copas debilitadas, fracturadas o daadas,
con abundantes reiteraciones herbceas, y comprenden rboles de las fases
7 y 8.

69

Figura 4-8. rboles suprimidos y con abundantes reiteraciones traumticas


de Iryanthera tricornis (It), Osteophloeum platyspermum (Op) y Virola
pavonis (Vp). A-B, D-E, G: rboles suprimidos. A-C, E-G: individuos con
abundantes reiteraciones traumticas totales. +: eje muerto. Rp: reiteracin
parcial. Rt: reiteracin total.

70

Por ltimo, los rboles suprimidos (Oldeman 1990b; Vester 1997)


conforman una categora aparte (Figura 4-8) y comprenden rboles con
caractersticas arquitectnicas similares a aquellas de los rboles del
pasado aunque no han atravesado por la fase de mxima expansin (o
rbol del presente); por tanto, estn excluidos de la secuencia de desarrollo
del rbol (Figura 4-1), y no estn asociados con fase alguna. stos ltimos
exhiben copas poco vigorosas, fracturadas, muy asimtricas, con poco
follaje, ramificacin incompleta y abundantes reiteraciones traumticas,
que sugieren un potencial de desarrollo muy limitado que claramente los
diferencia de los rboles juveniles de las fases iniciales del diagrama
arquitectnico.
Se encontr que los rboles potenciales, del presente y del pasado forman
grupos con respecto a la lnea de referencia HT = 100DAP, mientras los
rboles suprimidos se encontraron dispersos a lo largo de sta (Figura 4-3).
Por otro lado, del conjunto total de datos de las tres especies (n = 51), la
mayora de los individuos (86%, n = 44) se ubic en la parte superior de la
lnea y sobre ella, en ambos casos con el mismo nmero de individuos
(43%, n = 22); en el primero (HT > 100DAP), los rboles pertenecen en su
mayor parte a la categora de los potenciales (33%, n = 17) y, en menor
porcentaje, a la de los suprimidos (8%, n = 4). En el segundo caso (HT =
100DAP), de todos los rboles que se presentaron sobre la lnea, indicando
la relacin armnica del modelo, la mayor proporcin correspondi a los
rboles potenciales (20%, n = 10) seguidos por los del presente (14%, n =
7). Por ltimo, los individuos ubicados en la parte inferior de la lnea (HT
< 100DAP), estuvieron constituidos en mayor cantidad por los rboles del
pasado (6%, n = 3) y del presente (4%, n = 2). Adicionalmente, en la
Figura 4-3 se puede observar la representatividad del muestreo realizado
para cada especie.
Parmetros de copa
Los rboles potenciales y los suprimidos comprendieron individuos
localizados desde el sotobosque (HT 15 m) hasta el dosel (25 m < HT
35 m), encontrados con mayor frecuencia en el sotobosque, mientras que
los rboles del presente y del pasado estn ubicados principalmente en el
dosel, raramente en el subdosel (15 m < HT 25 m) o en posicin de
emergentes (HT > 35 m).
71

Considerando el conjunto total de datos de las tres especies, se observ


que para calidades de copa buenas (Figura 4-9A), los rboles potenciales y
del presente comprendieron mayor nmero de individuos (n = 15, n = 7,
respectivamente), pero para los primeros estas calidades de copa buenas
estuvieron asociadas principalmente con posiciones de copa deficientes (en
87% de los individuos, n = 13), mientras que en los rboles del presente
las calidades de copa buenas estuvieron asociadas mayormente con
posiciones de copa igualmente buenas (en 86% de los individuos, n = 6).
Como era de esperarse, los rboles del pasado tuvieron baja representacin
(n = 2) y no existieron suprimidos con calidades de copa buenas. Para la
calidad de copa regular (Figura 4-9B), los rboles potenciales
comprendieron mayor cantidad de individuos (n = 14) seguidos de los del
pasado (n = 4). De los primeros, al igual que en la calidad de copa buena,
la mayora estuvo asociada con posiciones de copa deficientes (el 64% de
los individuos, n = 9), mientras que todos los rboles del pasado se
asociaron con posiciones de copa buenas (100%, n = 4). Por ltimo, en la
calidad de copa deficiente (Figura 4-9C), la totalidad de los individuos
correspondi a los rboles suprimidos (100%, n = 4), con ausencia de
rboles potenciales, del presente y del pasado.
4.5

Discusin

Consideraciones sobre el muestreo


La identificacin del modelo arquitectnico de un rbol es difcil debido a
la gran variabilidad estructural de las plantas (delin 1991). Por tanto,
observar un slo individuo no es suficiente para comprender el
comportamiento general de una especie en un estado ontognico
determinado. As, para determinar con precisin el desarrollo
arquitectnico siempre es necesario observar el espectro completo de las
fases arquitectnicas exceptuando casos de extrema simplicidad el
cual se manifiesta en su totalidad nicamente cuando se considera el
crecimiento del individuo desde la germinacin hasta cuando el rbol
florece y se dispersan sus semillas. Sin embargo, ms all de esta fase, la
arquitectura del rbol contina cambiando conforme ste crece en tamao.
Entonces, la arquitectura normalmente no secompleta en el sentido que se
construye un edificio a partir de un plano que se termina, porque su
esencia es el cambio (Hall et al. 1978).
72

Figura 4-9. Distribucin de la posicin de copa (PC) por calidad de copa


(CC) y por potencial de desarrollo (PO: rboles potenciales, PR: rboles
del presente, PA: rboles del pasado, SU: rboles suprimidos), para
individuos de Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum platyspermum y Virola
pavonis. n: nmero de individuos en cada categora por potencial de
desarrollo.
El nmero de individuos de la muestra para analizar la arquitectura de una
especie depende de la complejidad y la variacin de sta (Barthlmy et al.
1991; delin 1991). Existen reportes desde 20 - 50, incluso hasta 100
individuos por especie (Sterck et al. 1991; Loup 1994; Vester 1997). En el
presente estudio, debido a la relativa sencillez del modelo arquitectnico
de Massart, fue suficiente seleccionar una muestra pequea por especie
(Tabla 4-1, Figura 4-3). Aunque las especies mejor representadas fueron I.
tricornis y O. platyspermum, la muestra de V. pavonis fue suficiente para
detectar los procesos ms importantes en la construccin de su copa y para
describir el esquema de su desarrollo.
Modelo y unidad arquitectnica
La evaluacin detallada de los caracteres morfolgicos y arquitectnicos
de los ejes, para cada especie, mostr una gran semejanza entre I. tricornis,
O. platyspermum y V. pavonis, las cuales exhiben el mismo modelo y
estn conformadas por igual tipo y nmero de rdenes de ejes en su unidad
arquitectnica (Tabla 4-2), al igual que otras Miristicceas previamente
estudiadas, como: V. michelii y V. surinamensis (Drnou 1994; Loubry
1994; Loup 1994).

73

La estructura inicial de un rbol juvenil o potencial, producto del patrn


inherente o gentico con el cual I. tricornis, O. platyspermum y V. pavonis
construyen su forma ms elemental, consiste en un individuo conformado
por los tres rdenes de ejes de la unidad arquitectnica (fase 3, Figura 42C-D). Cada categora de eje es morfolgica y funcionalmente diferente
(Tabla 4-2). El primer eje, con funcin de tronco, es orttropo el cual
origina y porta las ramas. stas, formadas por dos tipos de ejes
plagitropos (A2 y A3), sostienen el rea fotosinttica y reproductiva del
rbol, conformando el primer sistema de ramas. La forma inicial de
ramificacin o secuencia normal de diferenciacin de los ejes, desde la
germinacin de la semilla (fase 1) hasta que el rbol conforma su modelo
arquitectnico (fase 3, Figura 4-1), es la siguiente: el eje A1, o tronco,
produce los ejes A2 y, posteriormente, a su vez stos producen los ejes A3.
Procesos de reiteracin y plan de organizacin
Al igual que lo previamente reportado para V. michelii y V. surinamensis
(Barthlmy 1991; Barthlmy et al. 1991; Drnou 1994; Loubry 1994;
Loup 1994), en I. tricornis, O. platyspermum y V. pavonis tambin se
detectaron reiteraciones traumticas y adaptativas. Las dos clases de
reiteracin encontradas, traumticas y adaptativas, desempean papeles
fundamentales en la sobrevivencia y en la construccin de la copa de I.
tricornis, O. platyspermum y V. pavonis. Todas las reiteraciones aumentan
el nmero de ejes y, por consiguiente incrementan el nmero de rganos
que stos portan, para captar de una manera ms eficiente los recursos a su
alcance o para aprovechar incrementos energticos, entre los cuales el ms
frecuente consiste en una mayor iluminacin despus de la apertura de un
pequeo claro en el dosel.
En primer lugar, como mecanismo de respuesta a los daos sufridos en la
estructura vegetativa del rbol las reiteraciones traumticas se pueden
presentar en cualquier fase, y su localizacin dentro del rbol depende del
dao sufrido que condiciona la parte de la unidad arquitectnica que se
repite. Por ejemplo, en los rboles potenciales localizados en el
sotobosque, frecuentemente se observaron reiteraciones traumticas totales
sobre el eje A1, situacin que se detecta claramente cuando el meristema
terminal ha sido daado y luego es reemplazado por una yema lateral que
repite de nuevo el modelo completo, reiniciando y relevando el
74

crecimiento de todo el rbol (Figura 4-8A-C, E-G). En los individuos


juveniles las reiteraciones traumticas totales son fciles de identificar, lo
que no sucede en los rboles adultos debido a la mayor lignificacin de sus
ejes y a la altura mayor de los individuos. En el caso de las reiteraciones
traumticas parciales, la muerte del meristema terminal de los ejes de las
ramas trae como consecuencia, al igual que en los A1, el desarrollo de
yemas laterales que producen ejes con la misma arquitectura de la rama de
la cual se originaron. Estas reiteraciones parciales fueron frecuentes en los
individuos juveniles, principalmente en los ejes A2, mientras que en los
A3 fueron muy escasas.
Entre los rboles potenciales, ubicados dentro del sotobosque, las
reiteraciones traumticas son particularmente frecuentes, abundantes y
vigorosas; casi todos los individuos exhiben al menos una de ellas. Este
hecho sugiere que las reiteraciones traumticas son un mecanismo clave
que aumenta la probabilidad de sobrevivencia en el sotobosque, donde los
daos son frecuentes debido a los procesos de la dinmica del bosque,
tales como la cada rboles o de ramas (Londoo y Jimnez 1999). Por
otro lado, la excesiva presencia de reiteraciones traumticas, en unin con
copas asimtricas y poco vigorosas en ciertos individuos conforma los
rboles suprimidos (Figura 4-8A-B, D-E, G), que en su mayora han
estado soportando condiciones ambientales desfavorables por mucho
tiempo o que han sufrido daos grandes o sucesivos. Estos ltimos rboles
tienen muy poco potencial de desarrollo de su copa y, por tanto, pueden
eventualmente ser eliminados de la vegetacin.
En segundo lugar, a diferencia de las reiteraciones traumticas cuya
aparicin netamente oportunstica est asociada directamente con daos,
las reiteraciones adaptativas se manifiestan como un evento programado
que ocurre despus de un determinado umbral de diferenciacin durante la
vida del rbol (Barthlmy et al. 1991); i.e. stas aparecen en determinadas
fases arquitectnicas (fase 4-8) y pueden ser parciales o totales. Aunque
stas se desarrollan como un mecanismo inherente en la construccin del
rbol genticamente determinado tambin constituyen un mecanismo
de respuesta a cambios en la energa incidente (Oldeman 1974; de Castro
1980).

75

Todas las reiteraciones adaptativas permiten expandir la copa ms all de


los lmites impuestos por el modelo arquitectnico (Hall et al. 1978) y, en
el caso de las tres especies estudiadas, surgen despus de la fase 3. Primero
aparecen las parciales (Rp, Figura 4-2E-H) que se manifiestan como ejes
dediferenciados, localizados a lo largo de todo el eje A2, mediante las
cuales se insertan ejes supernumerarios (A2) entre los A2 y A3 iniciales
(Figura 4-4), dando siempre como resultado que los ejes ms diferenciados
estn en la periferia de las ramas, por lo cual han sido considerados como
la piel de la copa (Oldeman 1990b). La disposicin en abanico de las
reiteraciones adaptativas parciales permite aumentar el rea
fotosintticamente activa de la planta. Posteriormente, aparecen las
reiteraciones totales, tpicas de los rboles del presente y del pasado (fases
4-8 Figura 4-5, Figura 4-6, y Figura 4-7), que reproducen la unidad
arquitectnica completa (ejes A1, A2 y A3), cada una de las cuales
conforma una subcopa que interacta con las dems como un individuo
independiente dentro de la copa del rbol adulto, para aprovechar toda la
energa incidente en el dosel. Estas reiteraciones totales imprimen un
carcter marcado de complejidad y de rejuvenecimiento a la copa de los
rboles.
Despus de que se detect y public por primera vez el concepto de
reiteracin automtica en las plantas (delin 1984 citado por Bell 1993),
sta ha resultado ser el tipo ms frecuente pero tambin el ms difcil de
detectar (Oldeman 1990b; Bell 1993; Vester 1997). Aunque las
reiteraciones automticas han sido encontradas en otras especies, que
tambin crecen segn el modelo de Massart, como Agathis dammara (A.
B. Lambert) L. C. Richard (Araucariaceae) y Dipterocarpus costulatus V.
Sl. (Dipterocarpaceae) (Barthlmy et al. 1991), nunca han sido reportadas
en Miristicceas (Barthlmy et al. 1991; Loubry 1994; Loup 1994).
Como el desarrollo arquitectnico del rbol es un proceso continuo, cuyos
cambios son graduales y sin lmites abruptos, las fases slo son
abstracciones y pueden existir numerosos estados transicionales,
representados por aquellos individuos en los cuales se traslapan las
caractersticas de dos fases sucesivas, como ocurre con las fases 5 y 7.
Dependiendo del tipo de modelo arquitectnico y de la complejidad de las
especies estudiadas, los criterios empleados para definir las distintos
estados de desarrollo varan grandemente entre las especies (Barthlmy et
76

al. 1991; Sterck et al. 1991; Loup 1994; Vester 1997), pero hasta que no se
efecten las observaciones no es posible determinarlos con precisin. En
este trabajo para las fases iniciales (1-3) se consider la aparicin de los
distintos rdenes de ejes, mientras que para las dems (4-8) se tuvo en
cuenta la reiteracin adaptativa, modificando criterios previamente
empleados en otros estudios sobre arquitectura (Sterck et al. 1991). El plan
de crecimiento de las especies estudiadas puede considerarse en tres
perodos ontognicos del rbol (Oldeman 1990b; Sterck et al. 1991): el de
plntula (fase 1), el de crecimiento conforme al modelo arquitectnico
(fases 2-3, Figura 4-2B-D), y el de reiteracin. ste ltimo comprende
tanto la adaptacin programada mediante reiteracin adaptativa (fases 4-8,
Figura 4-2E-H, Figura 4-5 y Figura 4-7) como el ajuste oportunstico
mediante la reiteracin traumtica (en cualquier etapa de desarrollo desde
la fase 1 hasta la 8, Figura 4-8).
Luego del establecimiento inicial como plntula, durante el perodo
ontognico de crecimiento conforme al modelo, el arbolito comienza a
desarrollar los distintos rdenes de ejes hasta construir su unidad
arquitectnica completa, mediante la secuencia normal de diferenciacin
de los ejes: el eje A1 produce los ejes A2 y stos a su vez, los ejes A3.
Hasta ese momento existe un fuerte control apical del meristema del
tronco (eje A1), con subordinacin de los dems rdenes de ejes, y el plan
de organizacin del rbol es claramente jerrquico. Posteriormente, cuando
se inicia la reiteracin adaptativa (fase 4), se pierde la secuencia inicial de
diferenciacin de los ejes y el plan de organizacin del rbol cambia:
comienza a tornarse polirquico (fase 4 y siguientes). Entonces, los ejes
A2 empiezan a producir ejes dediferenciados (ejes A2 ,Figura 4-4) i e.
ejes que se desarrollan fuera de la secuencia normal de diferenciacin
en vez de generar los del orden siguiente (A3). La dediferenciacin
tambin puede ser vista como una inversin, o un retroceso, de la
produccin de nuevos ejes, la cual llega incluso a avanzar un orden ms,
hacia atrs, cuando se presentan las reiteraciones totales (ejes A1 Figura
4-1 y Figura 4-6) sobre los A2 anteriores, en lo que aqu se ha definido
como el umbral que marca el comienzo de la fase del rbol del presente
(fases 5 y 6). Desde este momento hasta la muerte del rbol, empiezan a
aparecer subcopas dentro de la copa del rbol, como individuos
independientes que compiten entre s (Rt, Figura 4-5 y Figura 4-7)
77

(Torquebiau 1979) citado por (Barthlmy 1991), semejantes a juveniles


injertados en las ramas ms viejas (Figura 4-6). Todas las reiteraciones
adaptativas totales encontradas en este estudio estuvieron directamente
insertadas en los ejes y no se detect ningn cambio en la orientacin de
los tenedores (reiteraciones adaptativas parciales) que posteriormente diera
origen a reiteraciones totales, a diferencia de lo reportado para V.
surinamensis (Barthlmy et al. 1991).
El modelo inicialmente construido (Figura 4-2B-H) ha desaparecido y se
observa cmo la copa est compuesta por una colonia de individuos
juveniles (Torquebiau 1979) citado por (Barthlmy 1991) de las fases 2, 3
y 4, unidos mediante las ramas ms lignificadas y los troncos de las
reiteraciones arbreas y arbustivas (Figura 4-5 y Figura 4-7), producto de
la repeticin total de la unidad arquitectnica, que imprimen a la copa un
carcter de rejuvenecimiento bastante acentuado. El meristema apical del
eje A1 pierde fuerza, y los troncos de las subcopas de las reiteraciones
adaptativas totales (ejes A1, Figura 4-1), tienen un nivel jerrquico
equivalente. El plan de organizacin polirquico se expresa
completamente. Durante las fases iniciales del desarrollo en el sotobosque,
cada individuo tiene un sistema radical y vascular independiente, para su
uso exclusivo. Por consiguiente, dentro de las cohortes de plntulas y de
juveniles, los individuos se identifican claramente. Adems, stos no han
alcanzado la madurez reproductiva. Por otra parte, dentro de la copa de los
rboles del presente, cada una de las reiteraciones totales puede ser vista
como un nuevo individuo que se origina desde la fase de plntula (fase 1)
y puede crecer, dependiendo de su posicin dentro de la copa, hasta
conformar las reiteraciones arbreas, arbustivas y herbceas. Considerando
el gradiente suelo-periferia de la copa, las reiteraciones totales van desde
las arbreas, que pueden llegar a exhibir una estructura similar a la de los
individuos de fase 5, hasta las herbceas, similares a los de fase 2. A
diferencia de los juveniles del sotobosque, las reiteraciones totales no
tienen un sistema radical ni vascular independiente y exclusivo, sino que
comparten los previamente construidos, que conforman el tronco y las
ramas ms lignificadas y las races del rbol. Las reiteracines adems,
tienen la capacidad de generar los ejes ms diferenciados y especializados
que portan las estructuras reproductivas. Entonces, el rbol puede ser visto
ya no como un solo individuo, sino como un conjunto de reiteraciones
78

(subcopas) unidas por un tronco que las levanta del suelo y las ubica en el
dosel, permitiendo el acceso directo a los recursos de iluminacin,
facilitando el transporte de polen y de semillas. Mediante la capacidad de
generar reiteraciones estas especies aumentan sus probabilidades de
sobrevivencia durante su desarrollo temprano en el sotobosque
(reiteraciones traumticas) y construyen sus copas durante las etapas
intermedias y finales (reiteraciones adaptativas). De esta manera, en las
tres Miristicceas estudiadas la reiteracin es un mecanismo fundamental
en el desarrollo de la copa, al igual que lo reportado para numerosas
especies (Barthlmy 1991; Barthlmy et al. 1991; Sterck et al. 1991;
Vester 1997).
Comparacin entre las tres especies
A pesar de la gran similitud arquitectnica entre las especies estudiadas,
existen pequeas diferencias entre ellas, al igual que al compararlas con
respecto a V. michelii y V. surinamensis (Drnou 1994; Loubry 1994;
Loup 1994). Por ejemplo, para las tres especies se encontr que la
plagiotropa de los ejes A2 es ms acentuada en los rboles potenciales que
en los del presente, tanto en la orientacin del eje que cambia de horizontal
a oblicua, como en la disposicin de las hojas, que pierden su arreglo en un
solo plano con simetra dorsiventral para obtener una posicin oblicua.
Esta caracterstica se observ mucho ms acentuada en V. pavonis que en
las otras especies. Igualmente se registr variacin en los ngulos
horizontales y verticales de la unin de los ejes. Tambin se observaron
cambios menores en el nmero de hojas que conforman las unidades de
crecimiento; as I. tricornis y V. pavonis generalmente presentaron de 5 a 7
hojas por unidad de crecimiento en los ejes A2 y A3, mientras que O.
platyspermum present de 7 a 8 hojas en los mismos ejes. Por
consiguiente, el nmero de hojas por unidad de crecimiento y la cantidad
de unidades de crecimiento por eje determinan la longitud de estos,
imprimiendo diferencias entre las especies.
Por otra parte, tambin se detectaron diferencias en la forma y la
disposicin de los complejos reiterados adaptativos parciales y totales. En
V. pavonis se encontraron tenedores muy similares a los reportados para V.
surinamensis (Barthlmy et al. 1991; Loubry 1994; Loup 1994), mientras
que en I. tricornis y O. platyspermum los complejos reiterados parciales
79

fueron menos conspicuos, y tendieron a localizarse mayormente en la parte


media y basal de los ejes A2. Adicionalmente el tamao cuando los
individuos alcanzan su unidad arquitectnica tambin vari. Por ejemplo,
los juveniles de I. tricornis la alcanzaron tempranamente (desde alturas ca.
de 1.5 m, Figura 4-2C-D), mientras que los de O. platyspermum con las
mismas dimensiones slo presentaron los ejes A1 y A2 (Figura 4-2B).
En las tres especies estudiadas, se detect una gran variacin foliar entre
los individuos juveniles y los adultos; el caso ms pronunciado ocurri en
O. platyspermum cuyas hojas cambian en tamao y forma al pasar de
juveniles a adultos (rboles del presente en el dosel) mientras que en I.
tricornis y, en menor grado, en V. pavonis, slo cambia el tamao de las
lminas. Esta modificacin morfolgica pocas veces se reporta aunque es
bastante comn entre las especies arbreas tropicales (Sanoja 1992; Vester
1997). Tambin se encontr una gran diferencia en el tamao de las hojas
segn su posicin dentro de la rama y dentro de las unidades de
crecimiento, de acuerdo con el estado de desarrollo de sta (joven o ms
madura). Las marcas de los lmites de las unidades de crecimiento de los
ejes son muy difciles de distinguir, tanto en las tres especies de este
estudio como en V. surinamensis (Loubry 1994). En el caso de las
estudiadas, esto se debe especialmente a que las hojas de tamao ms
reducido, criterio diagnstico importante para distinguir el crecimiento
rtmico del eje, son caducas. En los individuos de gran tamao es aun ms
difcil distinguir las marcas de las unidades de crecimiento, debido a la
lignificacin de los ejes.
Potencial de desarrollo en el bosque
Los rboles potenciales, del presente y del pasado tienen estrecha relacin
con las fases de desarrollo arquitectnico. As, el rbol potencial
representa la etapa juvenil (fases 1-4) el cual luego se convertir en rbol
del presente (fases 5 y 6) y finalmente, en rbol del pasado (fases 7 y 8).
Los rboles suprimidos exhiben caractersticas arquitectnicas similares a
los del pasado (copas poco vigorosas, asimtricas, fracturadas, con altas
probabilidades de muerte) que no han tenido las condiciones necesarias
para desarrollarse plenamente y conformar los rboles del presente, aunque
muestran tamaos y posiciones dentro del bosque similares a los juveniles.

80

Al ser individuos que no han seguido la secuencia normal de desarrollo,


estn excluidos del diagrama (Figura 4-1).
De otro lado, la dispersin de los datos de I. tricornis, O. platyspermum y
de las tres especies en conjunto con respecto a la lnea de referencia HT =
100DAP exhibe la tendencia tpica de los rboles que crecen dentro del
bosque (Hall et al. 1978). Los rboles ubicados sobre la lnea muestran la
relacin armnica entre su altura y 100DAP, mientras que aquellos
encontrados en la parte superior de sta (HT > 100DAP) corresponden a
los rboles potenciales, que evidencian los altos procesos de competencia
y la regeneracin del tronco por reiteracin. Tal es el caso de la mayora de
los individuos de V. pavonis en los cuales HT > 100DAP. Los rboles del
presente y del pasado, ubicados principalmente en la parte inferior de la
lnea (HT < 100DAP), deben su posicin a las abundantes reiteraciones
herbceas en su copa, que la tornan menos vigorosa, situacin claramente
observable en los individuos de O. platyspermum localizados en la parte
inferior de la lnea de referencia, que corresponden a los rboles del
presente y del pasado del diagrama arquitectnico (Figura 4-5 y Figura 47). Los rboles potenciales, que se encuentran por debajo de la lnea de
referencia (HT > 100DAP), corresponden a individuos cuyas copas han
sido daadas y presentan reiteraciones traumticas totales (Figura 4-8F),
similares a individuos juveniles que an no han alcanzado las dimensiones
necesarias para poder exhibir la relacin armnica del modelo.
Parmetros de copa
A pesar de que la mayora de los rboles potenciales est ubicada en
posiciones de copa deficientes stos presentaron calidades de copa buenas
y regulares, sugiriendo que las tres especies tienen gran capacidad para
adaptarse a las condiciones de sotobosque, como tambin se observ
mediante el anlisis de los procesos de reiteracin. Esta habilidad de
sobrevivencia en el sotobosque les permite continuar con el crecimiento
hasta alcanzar el dosel, cuando presentan posiciones de copa buenas
asociadas con calidades de copa igualmente buenas.
Al analizar los parmetros de copa y las condiciones medioambientales
registradas para los individuos de las tres especies en cada etapa de
desarrollo (potencial, del presente, del pasado y suprimidos; Figura 4-9),
de nuevo se observa una tendencia a responder positivamente frente a los
81

incrementos de luz y una adaptacin de las especies para vivir en el


sotobosque de estos ecosistemas, con dosel superior cerrado y densidades
altas. Las caractersticas del modelo de Massart, i.e. las ramas
plagitropas, la simetra radial (Hall et al. 1978), por un lado, unidas con
la capacidad de reiteracin traumtica y adaptativa, por el otro, son
aspectos que favorecen grandemente la sobrevivencia de los juveniles en
estos bosques, condicin sin la cual no se podra explicar su importancia ni
su permanencia en la composicin, la diversidad y la estructura de los
bosques de tierra firme en la regin de Araracuara (Duivenvoorden y Lips
1993; Londoo 1993; Londoo y lvarez 1997).
Investigaciones con nfasis en la diferencia entre la funcin esttica y
dinmica de la arquitectura del rbol (Vester 1997; Poorter y Werger
1999) han mostrado la disimilitud entre los adultos de las especies del
sotobosque y los juveniles de las del dosel. En las tres especies estudiadas,
la arquitectura juega un papel dinmico mediante el cual pueden
establecerse como especies del dosel. Como arbolitos del sotobosque
necesitan luz pero, al mismo tiempo, debido a sus caractersticas
arquitectnicas que les permiten sobrevivir en este ambiente pueden
adaptarse a las pobres condiciones lumnicas de este estrato. Durante sus
primeros estados de desarrollo estas especies presentan, como era de
esperarse segn los planteamientos de Poorter y Werger (1999), copas
estrechas y troncos delgados (Figura 4-2) con reducidos requerimientos de
biomasa por incremento en unidad de altura. Por tanto, invierten una
cantidad mayor de recursos en el crecimiento de sta, lo cual se refleja en
la cantidad de rboles encontrados en la parte superior y sobre la lnea HT
= 100DAP (Figura 4-3). As, logran permanecer a la sombra de sus
vecinos mientras continan con su desarrollo hasta alcanzar el dosel donde
se establecen completamente y conforman los rboles del presente.
Entonces logran su mximo desarrollo arquitectnico, y entran en un
estado de equilibrio dinmico (Hall et al. 1978), cuando invierten ms
energa en el crecimiento en dimetro que en el de la altura, situacin que
se refleja en la dispersin de los rboles del presente y del pasado con
respecto a HT = 100DAP (Figura 4-3).

82

Arquitectura y taxonoma
Al igual que la taxonoma, la arquitectura se apoya en el estudio de la
morfologa vegetal (Hall y Oldeman 1970; Hall et al. 1978). Algunos
botnicos pioneros de siglos pasados ya haban incluido conceptos
incipientes de la arquitectura en sus observaciones y descripciones (Spruce
1861) citado por (Madrin 1996). Hoy en da, la taxonoma y la
arquitectura mantienen enfoques independientes y permanecen
relativamente aisladas, con pocos trabajos que las consideran
simultneamente (e.g. Sanoja 1992). Aunque stas comparten una base
morfolgica, la arquitectura considera la planta desde la germinacin hasta
la muerte, y constituye una aproximacin dinmica con nfasis en los
procesos intrnsecos de crecimiento a travs del tiempo. Por el contrario, la
taxonoma considera la planta slo en un momento dado de su ciclo vital, y
tiene un enfoque esttico (Bell 1993; Madrin 1996). No obstante su
importancia (Hall et al. 1978; Barthlmy et al. 1991; Vester 1997), la
arquitectura comnmente se ha visto como un conjunto fijo de
caractersticas morfolgicas, y se ha confundido con la fisionoma o el
hbito de crecimiento de las especies (Hall et al. 1978; Bell 1993;
Madrin 1996; Vester 1997). Por otra parte, en las descripciones
taxonmicas, cada parte de la planta se observa aisladamente de las dems.
Por ejemplo, las hojas se describen detalladamente pero no se tiene en
cuenta dnde se insertan en la planta o el eje donde crecen, lo cual
precisamente origina y explica gran parte de la variacin en algunas
especies. En las tres especies estudiadas, cada unidad de crecimiento
comienza con la produccin de una lmina foliar de tamao muy reducido
(ca. 3.0-4.0 cm x 1.5-2 cm en V. pavonis), fuera del rango de tamao
registrado para la especie (Jimnez 2000). Entonces, al aislar las distintas
partes constitutivas de la planta se pierde la cohesin de la estructura
general de la misma. Por el contrario, la percepcin desde la arquitectura
es fundamentalmente integral puesto que sta concibe la planta como un
sistema en conjunto (Hall et al. 1978). Precisamente por su naturaleza
dinmica e integral, la arquitectura puede enriquecer y complementar los
estudios morfolgicos de la taxonoma.

83

4.6

Agradecimientos

Este artculo es parte del trabajo de grado de Jimnez, enmarcado dentro


del Proyecto de doctorado: "Dinmica del bosque: el caso de dos paisajes
en la Amazonia colombiana", en ejecucin por A. C. Londoo (esta
disertacin), financiado por la Fundacin Tropenbos y por el Instituto
Colombiano para el Avance de la Ciencia y la Tecnologa
COLCIENCIAS; Carlos Rodrguez y Rosa Myriam Daz dieron apoyo
logstico en la ejecucin del trabajo. La Comunidad Nonuya de Pea Roja,
especialmente el Consejo de Mayores (Abel y Sebastin Rodrguez, Elas
y Jos Moreno), brind hospitalidad y ayuda constante; el Instituto
Colombiano de Investigaciones Amaznicas (SINCHI) permiti el uso de
sus instalaciones en Araracuara; Dayron Crdenas apoy el trabajo en el
herbario Amaznico Colombiano (COAH), y lvaro Cogollo, en el del
Jardn Botnico Joaqun Antonio Uribe de Medelln (JAUM). Jorge
Ignacio del Valle (Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Medelln) y
Carlos Eduardo Surez facilitaron el procesamiento digital de las
imgenes, al igual que Esteban lvarez y Gustavo Caola (Interconexin
Elctrica S. A. ISA). Ricardo Callejas (Universidad de Antioquia)
colabor durante toda la investigacin, y revis versiones preliminares de
este artculo. Finalmente, esta publicacin se benefici de los comentarios
de dos evaluadores annimos.

84

5
Composicin florstica de dos
bosques (tierra firme y vrzea) en
la region de Araracuara,
Amazonia colombiana
Ana Catalina Londoo y Esteban lvarez
Caldasia 19(3) 431-463 (1997)

5.1

Introduccin

La Amazonia noroccidental ha sido ampliamente reconocida como una de


las regiones con mayor cantidad de especies de plantas leosas del mundo
(Gentry 1988a; Gentry y Ortiz 1993; Duivenvoorden 1994; Valencia et al.
1994). Pese a su apariencia homognea a primera vista, con grandes
extensiones boscosas, esta regin es bastante heterognea y ha sido
descrita como un mosaico a diferentes escalas espaciales de mltiples
habitats en interaccin (Pires y Prance 1985; Daly y Prance 1989; Prance
1990; Schultes y Raffauf 1990; Gentry 1991c; Tuomisto et al. 1995).
Dicha heterogeneidad es el resultado de procesos dinmicos
interdependientes de ndole climtica, geolgica, hidrolgica y biolgica,
que actan en escalas diferentes de tiempo y espacio (Bigarella y Ferreira
1985; Irion 1990; Salo y Rsnen 1990). La gran variacin intra-regional
en la composicin y diversidad florstica (Gentry 1988a) est relacionada
principalmente con cambios en las caractersticas ambientales (Salo et al.
1986; Gentry 1990b; Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993; Duivenvoorden 1994;
Tuomisto et al. 1995; Urrego 1997).
La informacin sobre composicin florstica de los bosques de la
Amazonia noroccidental proviene de dos tipos de estudios: los inventarios
florsticos tradicionales (flrulas) donde se colectan muestras botnicas
frtiles en reas extensas (Renner et al. 1990; Brako y Zarucchi 1993;
Snchez 1997) y los inventarios ecolgicos cuantitativos sobre pequeas
parcelas de rea conocida, donde se toman muestras botnicas de todos los
individuos presentes sin importar su estado reproductivo, en los cuales
adems se registra informacin sobre la importancia ecolgica de las
especies (Gentry 1988a; Gentry y Ortiz 1993; Duivenvoorden 1994;
Ruokolainen et al. 1994; Valencia et al. 1994; Tuomisto et al. 1995).
Al comparar la informacin proveniente de estos dos tipos de estudios es
notable que el elevado nmero de especies por unidad de rea es mucho
mayor en los inventarios ecolgicos que en los florsticos. Por ejemplo, en
la Amazonia ecuatoriana (71000 km2) se han registrado 3100 especies de
plantas con flores y se estima que deben existir al menos otras 1000
(Renner et al. 1990); esto implica que la cifra de ca. 1000 especies de
angiospermas (400 rboreas) encontradas en una parcela de 1 ha (Valencia
et al. 1994) representa aproximadamente un cuarto del total de plantas con
86

flores en dicha regin. Pero los datos sobre la riqueza de especies en


parcelas son sensibles al tamao, forma y distribucin de las mismas
(Korning et al. 1991), y cada tipo de inventario produce informacin con
caractersticas diferentes. Por tanto, la combinacin y comparacin de
datos obtenidos con distintos mtodos permite tener una idea ms
completa sobre la composicin florstica de una regin determinada.
En el territorio amaznico de Colombia se encuentran representados gran
parte de los paisajes que existen en la hylea, con la vegetacin asociada
(Domnguez 1987; Schultes y Raffauf 1990; Gentry 1991c), pero el
conocimiento sobre su flora es precario, tal vez ms que en otras partes de
la cuenca (Gentry 1991c). Para el Medio Caquet, una de las reas
florsticamente ms exploradas de la Amazonia colombiana, se estima que
se conoce menos de una quinta parte de su flora (Snchez 1997). Se cuenta
con tratamientos sistemticos (e.g. Galeano 1992; Martnez y Galeano
1994; Murillo y Franco 1995), listados de especies a nivel regional
(Snchez 1997), e inventarios en parcelas pequeas (0.1 ha) ampliamente
distribuidas (Duivenvoorden 1994; Urrego 1997), pero no de inventarios
en parcelas de mayor tamao y de carcter permanente, que permitan una
evaluacin continuada de la flora adems de otros procesos ecolgicos,
como la dinmica de la vegetacin [Captulo 6].
En este artculo se presenta un anlisis comparativo de la composicin
florstica de plantas vasculares terrestres en dos parcelas rectangulares de
1.8 ha cada una, establecidas en dos bosques maduros sin intervenciones
antrpicas recientes, localizados en: el Plano Sedimentario Terciario
(PST), o tierra firme, y la Llanura Aluvial con inundacin espordica del
ro Caquet (LAI), o vrzea (M1 y M2, respectivamente Figura 2-1); esta
ltima hace parte de la Llanura Aluvial del ro Caquet (Duivenvoorden y
Lips 1993). Se plantearon las siguientes preguntas: Existen diferencias
florsticas entre las dos reas de muestreo?, Cules semejanzas (o
diferencias) existen en relacin con otras regiones de la Amazonia y del
Neotrpico? Como parte del programa de la Fundacin TropenbosColombia en el rea del Medio Caquet (Araracuara) (TropenbosColombia 1994), esta investigacin se enfoc en los estudios detallados
sobre la estructura (lvarez 1993; Londoo 1993) y el funcionamiento de
estos bosques [Captulo 6].

87

5.2

Ubicacin y acceso

Las reas de muestreo se localizan en la regin de Araracuara, Amazonia


colombiana, en la cuenca media del ro Caquet, en predios de la
comunidad indgena Nonuya (Figura 2-1). La vegetacin es boscosa con
poca o ninguna intervencin antrpica, y slo en los mrgenes del ro
Caquet se encuentran pequeas reas de cultivo de tumba y quema
(chagras y rastrojos) con vegetacin en distintos estados sucesionales. En
esta regin existen diferentes asociaciones vegetales y tipos de bosques
asociados con la fisiografa, las inundaciones y los suelos (Duivenvoorden
y Lips 1993, 1995; Urrego 1997).
El Medio Caquet, con temperatura promedia anual de 25.7C y
precipitacin promedio anual de 3059 mm (Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993),
se clasifica como bosque hmedo tropical (bh-T) (Holdridge 1982). El
rgimen de las lluvias es casi unimodal, con disminucin de la
precipitacin durante diciembre, enero y febrero (Figura 2-2), con ausencia
de una estacin seca, tpica de la Amazonia noroccidental (Salati 1985).
En la Amazonia colombiana PST cubre 90% de la superficie
(PRORADAM 1979). Tiene altitud promedia de 60 m sobre el nivel medio
del ro Caquet y se caracteriza por un alto grado de diseccin. En la
parcela de estudio los sedimentos son arenosos, con diseccin regular y
profunda, del Terciario Superior Amaznico (Hoorn 1994). En el sitio de
estudio se encontr erosin laminar activa (Alarcn 1990). Los suelos se
clasifican como Typic Kandiudults (SSS 1992) o Xanthic Ferralsols (FAO
1988; Duivenvoorden y Lips 1995) [Anexo 1, perfil 125].
La extensin de LAI es mucho menor comparada con PST, pero es
importante desde el punto de vista de su utilizacin actual y potencial,
como rea de cultivo (Botero 1984; Junk 1984), y como ecotono entre las
comunidades terrestres y acuticas (Rodrguez 1992). En la parcela de
inventario estn presentes los complejos de orillares del ro Caquet, con
topografa caracterizada por una serie continua de concavidades y
convexidades, con diferencia de altura que oscila entre 0.5 - 2 m. La zona
de estudio est sujeta a inundaciones espordicas por el ro Caquet (ca.
cada 10 aos; com. pers. pobladores locales), aunque algunas partes de la
misma son inundadas cada ao por una quebrada de aguas negras (obs.
pers.). Los principales procesos pedogenticos son el aporte continuo de
88

material orgnico de la vegetacin y el depsito peridico de sedimentos,


sales solubles y bases, como resultado de las inundaciones. Este rgimen
genera alta variedad de suelos dentro del rea de muestreo en comparacin
con la parcela de tierra firme. Los suelos de la vrzea se clasifican como
Typic Tropaquept, Typic Dystropept y Aquic Dystropept (Ordez 1990;
SSS 1992; Duivenvoorden y Lips 1995) [Anexo 1, perfil 126].
5.3

Materiales y mtodos

Mtodos de muestreo
Tanto en tierra firme como en la vrzea se estableci una parcela de 1.8 ha
(120 m x 150 m) donde se muestre la vegetacin vascular terrestre con
altura mayor que 0.5 m. Se consideraron 17 hbitos de crecimiento
diferentes agrupados en cinco categoras: arbrea, arbustiva, escandente
herbcea, escandente leosa y herbcea terrestre (Tabla 5-1). Los criterios
bsicos para definir los diferentes hbitos de crecimiento fueron: la
presencia o ausencia de tejido leoso, la dependencia o independencia del
soporte de otras plantas y, por ltimo, el tamao; se tom como lmite
arbitrario Ht = 3 m para separar las formas arbreas de las arbustivas
[Captulo 2].
Anlisis de los datos
En los bosques inventariados se identificaron las plantas hasta especie
taxonmica (Grant 1989); cuando esto no fue posible se emplearon
morfoespecies en la denominacin de los taxones. Para las familias de
plantas superiores se sigui el sistema de Cronquist (1981), excepto
Caesalpiniaceae, Fabaceae y Mimosaceae, agrupadas en Leguminosae para
facilitar la comparacin con otros estudios. Cecropiaceae se presenta
separada de Moraceae, Hippocrateaceae aparte de Celastraceae y
Mendonciaceae segregada de Acanthaceae. Para las Pteridophyta se sigui
a Mabberley (1990).
Durante la identificacin se consultaron las colecciones del Herbario
Amaznico (COAH), el Jardn Botnico de Nueva York (NY), el Jardn
Botnico de Missouri (MO), el Jardn Botnico de Kew (K), el Herbario
Nacional Colombiano, (COL), la Universidad de Antioquia (HUA) y el
Jardn Botnico Joaqun Antonio Uribe de Medelln (JAUM). A la fecha,
89

las exsicatas se encuentran depositadas en el Herbario Amaznico


(COAH), con algunos duplicados adicionales en los herbarios: COL, NY,
MO, JAUM, HUA, FMB.
Inicialmente se presenta la composicin florstica para los dos sitios (datos
combinados); luego establecemos comparaciones entre los sitios
inventariados (PST y LAI), y de stos en relacin con otras regiones de la
Amazonia y del Neotrpico. Para evaluar las similitudes se emple la
correlacin de rangos de Spearman (Statgraphics, versin 5.0).
Tabla 5-1. Composicin por hbitos de crecimiento para bosques de tierra
firme y vrzea (PST y LAI), ambos sitios (Comunes) y para el total de los
dos sitios (Datos Combinados). Se excluyen epfitas (sensu stricto) y
plantas con Ht < 50 cm.
Grupo1

Arbreo4

Arbustivo5

90

Hbito de
crecimiento,
cdigo
Arboles, A
Helechos
arbreos, FA
Palmas arbreas
monoestipitadas,
PAM
Palmas arbreas
cespitosas, PAC
Subtotal formas
arbreas
Arbustos, T
Palmas
arbustivas
acaules, PTU
Palmas
arbustivas
cescpitosas, PTC
Palmas
arbustivas
monoestipitadas,
PTM
Subtotal formas
arbustivas

PST

LAI

Comunes

Datos
combinados

No.2
469
1

%3
67.2
0.1

No.
308
1

%
60.3
0.2

No.
43
0

%
71.7
0.0

No.
734
2

%
63.9
0.2

0.6

0.8

0.0

0.7

0.1

0.6

1.7

0.3

475

68.1

316

61.8

44

73.3

747

65.0

45
1

6.4
0.1

34
1

6.7
0.2

1
0

1.7
0.0

78
2

6.8
0.2

0.3

0.2

0.0

0.3

1.1

0.4

0.0

10

0.9

56

8.0

38

7.4

1.7

93

8.1

Escandente
herbceo6

TOTAL

Escandente
herbceo, SH
Hemiepfitas
herbceas, SEH
Helechos
escandentes,
FSH
Subtotal formas
escandentes
herbceas
Escandentes
leosos, SL
Estranguladoras,
SZL
Hemiepfitas
leosas, SEL
Palmas
escandentes, PSL
Subtotal
escandentes
leosas
Helechos
terrestres, FH
Hierbas
terrestres, H
Subtotal hierbas
terrestres
Todos los hbitos

Escandente
leoso7

Herbceo
terrestre8

19

2.7

24

4.7

1.7

42

3.7

13

1.9

13

2.5

1.7

25

2.2

0.3

1.0

1.7

0.5

34

4.9

42

8.2

5.0

73

6.4

110

15.8

84

16.4

11

18.3

183

15.9

0.0

1.0

0.0

0.4

1.1

0.4

0.0

10

0.9

0.0

0.6

0.0

0.3

118

16.9

94

18.4

11

18.3

201

17.5

0.4

0.4

0.0

0.4

12

1.7

19

3.7

1.7

30

2.6

15

2.1

21

4.1

1.7

35

3.0

698

100

511

100

60

100

1149

100

Ver mtodos; Nmero de especies; Porcentaje del total de cada sitio; Plantas con

Ht > 3 m; 5Plantas con Ht 3 m; 6Trepadoras y hemiepfitas con tejido leoso;


7

Trepadoras y hemiepfitas sin tejido leoso; 8Plantas sin tejido leoso, no trepadoras,

que crecen directamente sobre el piso del bosque.

5.4

Resultados

Se colectaron 2846 muestras botnicas: 25% en estado frtil y 75% en


condicin estril. En total se encontraron 1149 especies, 347 gneros y 98
familias botnicas, incluyendo: seis familias de pteridofitas, una familia de
gimnospermas y 91 de angiospermas (81 dicotiledneas y 10
monocotiledneas). Identificamos hasta especie 60% del total de los

91

taxones encontrados, al 40% restante le asignamos morfoespecies y slo el


1.6% permaneci completamente indeterminado [Anexo 2].
Se encontraron 15 especies nuevas para la ciencia, entre las cuales se
destaca Pseudomonotes tropenbosii (Londoo et al. 1995) primer registro
de la familia Dipterocarpaceae para el pas y el segundo para el Neotrpico
[Captulo 3]. Se hicieron aportes al conocimiento de la flora local mediante
nuevos registros de distribucin de algunas especies, bien sea para el pas
o para la regin del Medio Caquet. Por ejemplo, entre las especies
registradas por primera vez para el pas estn: Huberodendron
swietenoides (Gleason) Ducke (com. per. Jos Luis Fernndez, COL),
Protium urophyllidium Daly (com. per. Douglas Daly, NY), Piper
nigribaccum C.DC. y Piper cililimbum Yuncker (com. pers. Ricardo
Callejas, HUA). Antes de ser registradas en este estudio, algunas de
especies previamente se haban considerado endmicas en Per (Brako y
Zarucchi 1993), como Vantanea spichigeri A. Gentry, Cybianthus
gigantophyllus Pipoly y Cybianthus resinosus Mez.
Dado el elevado nmero de ejemplares botnicos colectados estriles y el
estado de conocimiento de la flora de Araracuara, la composicin a nivel
de gnero debe considerarse preliminar; no obstante, se estima que no se
presentarn modificaciones mayores en la identificacin de familias.
Aunque una gran proporcin de los ejemplares tuvieron que ser asignados
a morfoespecies, stas pueden representar adecuadamente la composicin
de la flora a nivel local (Gentry 1992).
Al considerar todos los hbitos de crecimiento, Leguminosae sobresali
por su mayor nmero de especies con 128 (Fabaceae 68, Mimosaceae 38 y
Caesalpiniaceae 22) seguidas por Rubiaceae (64) y Lauraceae (63) (Figura
5-1A). En cuanto al nmero de gneros por familia (Figura 5-1B)
Leguminosae nuevamente ocup el primer lugar con 36 gneros (Fabaceae
18, Caesalpiniaceae 11 y Mimosaceae siete) mientras que el segundo y
tercer lugar lo ocuparon Rubiaceae (24) y Euphorbiaceae (17),
respectivamente. Entre los diez gneros ms importantes (Figura 5-1C)
hubo siete cuyas especies son exclusivamente arbreas (Pouteria, Inga,
Ocotea, Licania, Protium, Sloanea y Swartzia); los restantes, que incluyen
especies con hbitos no arbreos, fueron: Miconia (diez especies de

92

rboles, ocho arbustos y dos enredaderas), Philodendron (16 hemiepfitas


herbceas) y Machaerium (12 lianas y dos rboles).
Para los dos bosques combinados, las especies arbreas fueron las ms
abundantes (65% del total de taxones), seguidas de los escandentes en
sentido amplio (i e. incluyendo leosas y herbceas) que representaron
24%. El resto estuvo constituido por las formas arbustivas (8%) y las
herbceas terrestres (3%). Sin embargo, si en las formas herbceas se
incluyeran plantas terrestres y trepadoras, stas comprenderan 9% del
total de especies (Tabla 5-1).
Con referencia a las formas arbreas y escandentes leosas, la familia con
mayor cantidad de especies fue Leguminosae, con 104 (14%) y 29 (15%)
respectivamente; para las formas arbustivas predomin Rubiaceae (29
especies, 31%), mientras que entre las escandentes herbceas la familia
ms especiosa fue Araceae (28 especies, 35%). Por otra parte,
Marantaceae (siete especies, 20%) tuvo el mayor nmero de especies entre
las herbceas terrestres (Figura 5-2).
Comparacin entre los dos sitios
El total de familias presente fue similar en LAI (84) y en PST (80), con 66
comunes a los dos sitios. Adiantaceae, Asclepiadaceae, Asteraceae,
Commelinaceae, Costaceae, Cyperaceae, Dichapetalaceae, Gesneriaceae,
Heliconiaceae, Lytraceae, Polygonaceae, Polypodiaceae, Ranunculaceae,
Rutaceae, Theophrastacae, Trigoniaceae, Verbenaceae y Vitaceae se
encontraron slo en LAI, mientras que Caryocaraceae, Celastraceae,
Dennstaentiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Ericaceae, Gentianaceae,
Humiriaceae, Hymenophyllaceae, Linaceae, Mendonciaceae, Orchidaceae,
Rhizophoraceae, Styracaceae y Zamiaceae estuvieron presentes
nicamente en PST.

93

Figura 5-1. Composicin florstica de dos bosques en Araracuara (datos combinados de PST y LAI) para plantas
vasculares terrestres con Ht 50 cm (todos los hbitos). A: familias con mayor nmero de especies. B: familias con
mayor nmero de gneros. C: gneros con mayor nmero de especies. Ntese la diferencia entre las escalas de los
grficos.

94

Figura 5-2. Porcentaje de especies por familia para diferentes hbitos de


crecimiento de dos bosques en Araracuara (datos combinados de PST y
LAI), para plantas vasculares terrestres con Ht 50 cm. TOT: todos los
hbitos; AR: formas arbreas; SL: formas escandentes leososas; SH:
formas escandentes herbceas; T: formas arbustivas; H: formas herbceas
terrestres. Grupos de hbitos de crecimiento segn la Tabla 3.1.
Pteridophyta y Leguminosae agrupadas como una sola familia; Moraceae
sensu stricto.
Los hbitos arbreos y escandentes leosos incluyeron mayor cantidad de
familias que los dems. Las diez primeras familias con mayor nmero de
especies comprendieron el 58% de las especies entre los rboles y el 65%
entre los escandentes leosos. Por el contrario, entre las formas arbustivas,
las escandentes herbceas y las herbceas terrestres unas pocas familias
contribuyeron con un elevado porcentaje de las especies en cada hbito:
dos familias con casi 50% de las especies en arbustos y escandentes
95

herbceos, y tres familias con igual porcentaje entre las hierbas terrestres
(Figura 5-2).
Aunque la tercera parte (32 de 98) de las familias registradas en el estudio
se encontr exclusivamente en un sitio, el aporte de ellas en nmero de
especies fue bajo (7% y 4% del total de especies en LAI y PST,
respectivamente). Adems, las familias con mayor nmero de especies
fueron similares entre los dos sitios (Figura 5-3A); de las 20 ms
importantes en cada sitio 16 son compartidas, entre las cuales sobresalen
Leguminosae (72 especies en PST y 59 en LAI) y Rubiaceae (32 y 35
especies respectivamente). Por otra parte, entre las familias con mayor
importancia en PST que en LAI estn: Burseraceae (20 y cuatro especies
respectivamente) y Vochysiaceae (14 y una), mientras que Myrtaceae
(cuatro y 17) y Meliaceae (seis y 11) estuvieron mejor representadas en
LAI. Hubo una correlacin altamente significativa (rs = 0.649, p < 0.0001)
entre los dos sitios con respecto a la representacin de especies por
familia.
La cantidad de gneros hallada en cada sitio fue similar: 236 en PST y 235
en LAI. Las familas con mayor nmero de gneros (Figura 5-3B) fueron
Leguminosae (19 y 26 en PST y LAI respectivamente) y Rubiaceae (17 y
16), y Bignoniaceae, Annonaceae y Arecaceae estuvieron entre las seis
primeras. A pesar de las similitudes en cuanto a las familias con mayor
nmero de gneros, los gneros comunes (124) representron apenas 36%
del total. Los dos sitios presentaron una correlacin muy baja (rs = 0.2241,
p = 0.2722, n = 98 familias) con respecto al nmero de gneros por
familia.
Para los datos combinados, entre los 25 gneros con mayor nmero de
especies hubo 20 que estuvieron presentes en los dos sitios (Figura 5-1C y
Figura 5-3C) y se encontr una fuerte correlacin entre stos (rs = 0.6142,
p < 0.0001, n = 25 gneros). Pero entre los 15 gneros con mayor riqueza
de especies, en PST hubo mayor cantidad cuyos taxones son
exclusivamente arbreos y slo se encontraron tres que tienen especies de
otros hbitos: Miconia, Philodendron y Abuta. Por el contrario, en LAI
hubo una mayor cantidad de gneros con especies no arbreas como,
Anthurium, Machaerium, Faramea, Hirtella, Paullinia y Coussarea. Los

96

gneros ms importantes en PST tuvieron un mayor nmero de especies


que los equivalentes en LAI (Figura 5-3C).
El total de especies fue mayor en PST (698, 61%) que en LAI (511, 44%)
y slo 5% (60 especies) fue comn. Las formas arbreas y escandentes
leosas comprendieron la mayor cantidad de especies en ambos sitios; los
arbustos representaron una mayor proporcin en PST, mientras que en LAI
fueron los escandentes herbceos los que siguieron en importancia a las
lianas; y las hierbas ocuparon la ltima posicin en los dos sitios (Tabla 51). Al unir los escandentes, leosos y herbceos, la secuencia en orden
decreciente de importancia fue idntica en ambos sitios: formas arbreas,
escandentes, arbustivas y herbceas. Al agrupar los taxones herbceos,
trepadores y terrestres, en PST siguieron siendo la minora mientras que en
LAI esta posicin la ocuparon los arbustos. Aunque PST tuvo un nmero
ligeramente mayor de especies trepadoras su proporcin con respecto al
total fue menor que en LAI (Tabla 5-1).
En PST se hallaron 51 familias de rboles, y en LAI, 46. Entre las diez
familias con mayor nmero de especies, Leguminosae, Lauraceae,
Sapotaceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Annonaceae y Rubiaceae tuvieron
importancia comparable en ambos sitios (Figura 5-4), mientras que
Burseraceae (20 especies en PST y cuatro en LAI), Melastomataceae (14 y
cinco), Myrtaceae (cuatro y 16) y Meliaceae (seis y 11) tuvieron
representacin desigual en ambos bosques.

97

98

Figura 5-3 (al lado). Comparacin de la composicin florstica entre dos


bosques en Araracuara (PST y LAI) para plantas vasculares terrestres con
Ht 50 cm (todos los hbitos). A: familias con mayor nmero de especies;
B: familias con mayor nmero de gneros; C: gneros con mayor nmero
de especies. Ntese la diferencia entre las escalas de los grficos.
Se encontraron 27 familias (118 especies) de las lianas (formas
escandentes leosas) en PST y 31 familias (94 especies) en LAI. Entre las
diez familias con mayor nmero de especies hubo seis con importancia
comparable en ambos sitios (Figura 5-4); Leguminosae (15 especies en
PST y 12 en LAI) y Bignoniaceae (12 y 11) fueron las ms importantes en
ambos bosques. En tierra firme hubo mayor cantidad de Menispermaceae
(12 y tres), mientras que en la vrzea las Hippocrateaceae fueron ms
abundantes (dos y cinco). Con respecto a los escandentes herbceos, en
PST se encontraron 34 especies en 16 familias y en LAI, 42 especies en 14
familias; Araceae comprendi el mayor nmero de especies en cada uno
de los sitios (15 y 14, respectivamente). Se observ mayor cantidad de
helechos en LAI que en PST y, en este ltimo, mayor cantidad de
Melastomataceae trepadoras (Figura 5-4).
Para la vegetacin del sotobosque, entre los arbustos se encontraron 56
especies y 16 familias en la tierra firme; para el sitio inundable los valores
respectivos fueron 38 y 15. Las tres familias con mayor nmero de
especies fueron las mismas en ambos bosques: Rubiaceae, Arecaceae y
Melastomataceae, con la diferencia de que la primera comprendi una
mayor proporcin de especies en la vrzea que en la tierra firme, donde el
nmero de especies estuvo distribuido ms uniformemente entre las tres
familias (Figura 5-4). El componente herbceo del sotobosque estuvo
compuesto por mayor nmero de familias (12) y de especies (22) en el
sitio inundable que en la tierra firme (ocho y 15, respectivamente) con
predominancia de monocotiledneas en ambos bosques; Marantaceae
(cinco) y helechos (tres) tuvieron mayor cantidad de especies en PST
mientras que en LAI fueron Heliconiaceae (cinco) y Commelinaceae (tres)
las ms abundantes.

99

5.5

Discusin

Antes de comparar nuestros resultados con los de otros bosques es preciso


hacer algunas aclaraciones. Por una parte, nuestros datos provienen de
inventarios localizados en reas relativamente pequeas en comparacin
con las extensiones cubiertas por otras floras locales (e.g. Snchez 1997).
Esto implica que hay muchos hbitats (diversidad beta), con sus especies
tpicas, que no estn incluidos en nuestro estudio pero s en otros. En
segundo lugar, nuestros datos se colectaron en bosques "maduros", sin
indicios de intervenciones humanas recientes; por lo tanto, especies tpicas
de etapas tempranas de la sucesin en claros grandes, que incluyen muchos
taxones herbceos (terrestres y escandentes) estn subrepresentadas en
nuestra muestra. Finalmente, dada la abrumadora complejidad de los
bosques tropicales es imperativo delimitar la vegetacin que se considera
en cada estudio.
Algunos autores tienen en cuenta slo unas pocas familias o grupos de
taxones (Ruokolainen et al. 1994; Tuomisto 1994), otros limitan sus
estudios a hbitos especficos, como hierbas (Poulsen y Balslev 1991),
lianas (Paz-Mio et al. 1991), o hierbas y arbustos (Gentry y Emmons
1987), mientras que lo ms comn es delimitar la vegetacin por un
tamao arbitrario, como DAP 10 cm o DAP 2.5 cm (Gentry 1988a), o
por lmite de altura, como Ht 50 cm (Duivenvoorden 1994). Como
nuestros datos incluyen slo vegetacin terrestre con Ht 50 cm, las
hierbas de porte bajo y las epfitas sensu stricto no estn representadas
adecuadamente. Pero la Amazonia no es particularmente rica ni en plantas
herbceas ni en epfitas, como Centroamrica, el Norte de los Andes o el
Choc (Gentry 1986, 1988a, 1990a; Hammel 1990; Gentry 1991a).

Figura 5-4 (al lado). Porcentaje de especies por familia para diferentes
hbitos de crecimiento de dos bosques en Araracuara (PST y LAI), para
plantas vasculares terrestres con Ht 50 cm. TOT: todos los hbitos; AR:
formas arbreas; SL: formas escandentes leososas; SH: formas
escandentes herbceas; T: formas arbustivas; H: formas herbceas
terrestres. Categoras de los hbitos de crecimiento segn Tabla 5-1.
Pteridophyta y Leguminosae agrupadas como una sola familia; Moraceae
sensu stricto.
100

101

102

103

Figura 5-5 (pginas anteriores). Comparacin entre familias con mayor


nmero de especies en Araracuara y otros sitios en la Amazonia y el
Neotrpico. Familias: % del total por sitio. A, B y C este estudio: TOTAL:
datos combinados; PST: tierra firme; LAI: vrzea. D: Medio Caquet
(Snchez 1997); E: Medio Caquet (Duivenvoorden 1994); F: Reserva
Adolfo Ducke, Manaus, Brasil (Prance 1990); G: Cocha Cashu, Per
(Foster 1990); H): Barro Colorado, Panam (Foster y Hubbell 1990); I: La
Selva, Costa Rica (Hammel 1990); J: Amazonia Ecuador (Renner et al.
1990); K: Amazonia Per (Brako y Zarucchi 1993); L: Cuyabeno, Ecuador
(Paz-Mio et al. 1991; Poulsen y Balslev 1991; Valencia et al. 1994).

Tabla 5-2. Coeficientes de correlacin de Spearman para la comparacin


entre las 20 familias con mayor nmero de especies en la regin de
Araracuara con otros sitios en la Amazonia y el Neotrpico. La
contribucin de cada familia expresada en porcentaje con respecto al total
de cada sitio. Ver Figura 5-5 para la descripcin de los sitios y las fuentes
bibliogrficas. rs: coeficiente de correlacin de Spearman. p: probabilidad
de error. n: 20 familias. Niveles de significancia: *: significativo para p <
0.05; **: altamente significativo para p < 0.01.
SITIO
A) TOTAL
B) PST
C) LAI
D) MCSAN
E) MCDUI
F) DUCKE
G) MANU
H) BCI
I) SELVA
J) ECURE
K) PERU
L) ECUVA

104

TOTAL
rs
0.9802
0.6825
0.7317
0.7880
0.7425
0.2949
0.3929
0.5023
0.4127
0.5732
0.5317

p
0.0001**
0.0029**
0.0014**
0.0006**
0.0012**
0.1986
0.0868
0.0286*
0.0720
0.0125*
0.0205

PST
rs
0.9302
0.4805
0.5612
0.7366
0.7075
0.0886
0.2125
0.3136
0.2250
0.3565
0.5232

p
0.0001**
0.0362*
0.0144*
0.0013**
0.0020*
0.6993
0.3543
0.1716
0.3268
0.1202
0.0226*

LAI
rs
0.6825
0.4805
0.5239
0.6205
0.4082
0.5423
0.3596
0.3806
0.4525
0.4788
0.5655

p
0.0029**
0.0362*
0.0224*
0.0068**
0.0752
0.0181*
0.1170
0.0971
0.0486*
0.0369*
0.0137*

Cuando se considera la composicin de familias de los datos combinados


en comparacin con otros bosques neotropicales, incluyendo varios en
Amazonia y el Medio Caquet, la mayor similitud se encontr, como era
de esperarse, con los estudios anteriores en el Medio Caquet, siendo
mayor la semejanza con los datos del Medio Caquet (Duivenvoorden
1994), seguida por la flora de la Reserva Ducke, en Manaus (Prance 1990)
y luego por otro estudio florstico tambin en el Medio Caquet (Snchez
1997) (Figura 5-5, Tabla 5-2). La correlacin en la composicin para las
familias ms ricas en especies fue altamente significativa entre PST y el
Medio Caquet (Duivenvoorden 1994), y entre PST y la flora de Manaus
(Prance 1990), y significativa en comparacin con otros registros para el
Medio Caquet (Snchez 1997) y la Reserva Cuyabeno, Ecuador (PazMio et al. 1991; Poulsen y Balslev 1991; Valencia et al. 1994). Por su
parte, las correlaciones ms altas para LAI se presentaron nuevamente con
el Medio Caquet (Duivenvoorden 1994) seguidas en orden decreciente
por las floras de la Reserva Cuyabeno, Ecuador (Paz-Mio et al. 1991;
Poulsen y Balslev 1991; Valencia et al. 1994), la Reserva Man, Per
(Foster 1990), y otros datos del Medio Caquet (Snchez 1997) (Figura 55, Tabla 5-2).
De las 15 familias ms importantes en PST, LAI y los datos combinados
(Figura 5-5), seis se comparten con todos los otros estudios, y la
semejanza es ms estrecha con el Medio Caquet (Duivenvoorden 1994;
Snchez 1997). Entre las 15 familias ms importantes en la Reserva
Ducke, Amazonia central (Prance 1990) 11 son tambin las ms
importantes en las parcelas de Araracuara; ocho tienen una importancia
comparable en la Amazonia ecuatoria (Renner et al. 1990) y La Selva,
Costa Rica (Hammel 1990); entre estas familias hay siete comunes con la
Amazonia peruana (Brako y Zarucchi 1993) y la Reserva Man (Foster
1990), y slo seis se comparten con la isla de Barro Colorado, Panam
(Foster y Hubbell 1990). A pesar de que nuestro estudio se hizo en un rea
pequea, hay tendencias similares a las encontradas en otros bosques de
tierras bajas del Neotrpico, con marcadas semejanzas con la Amazonia
Central (Gentry 1988a, 1990a; Prance 1990; Ribeiro et al. 1994) (Figura 55, Tabla 5-2). Leguminosae se destaca como grupo dominante en nuestros
sitios de estudio y en otros neotropicales (Campbell et al. 1986; Gentry
1988a, 1990a, 1993; Duivenvoorden 1994; Valencia et al. 1994), lo cual
105

parece ser un patrn general. Sin embargo, se ha hecho pco nfasis de


ello en comparacin con el reconocimiento que tiene Dipterocarpaceae
como la familia dominante de los bosques del Sureste asitico (Whitmore
1975; Gentry 1988a).
Comparando nuestros datos con los gneros ms importantes en los
bosques de tierras bajas neotropicales (Gentry 1990a), de nuevo se
detectaron marcadas semejanzas con la regin de Manaus. Los gneros
ms importantes en este sitio (Gentry 1990a; Prance 1990; Ribeiro et al.
1994) y en el Medio Caquet (este estudio; Duivenvoorden 1994; Snchez
1997) son fundamentalmente arbreos e incluyen a Inga, Miconia,
Protium, Pouteria, Licania, Swartzia y Ocotea, principalmente. El elevado
nmero de especies en gneros como Pouteria, Inga y Ocotea sugiere que
sus centros de especiacin pueden ubicarse en la Amazonia central. Por
otra parte, la gran proporcin de especies arbreas y lianescentes
encontrada en nuestras parcelas (Figura 5-2; Tabla 5-1), concuerda con los
resultados de otras investigaciones en la Amazonia (Gentry 1982, 1988a,
1990a; Balslev y Renner 1990; Duivenvoorden 1994).
Algunos estudios realizados en Amazonia han encontrado diferencias en
las caractersticas de la vegetacin asociadas con los distintos tipos de
suelos. Por ejemplo, al comparar dos bosques de vrzea y tierra firme en
Ecuador se encontr que nicamente 18% del total de especies estuvieron
presentes en los dos sitios (Balslev et al. 1987). Por otra parte, en
inventarios de bosques de vrzea y tierra firme en el ro Xing (Par,
Brasil) en 3 ha de tierra firme 15% de las especies fueron compartidas
(Campbell et al. 1986), mientras que al considerar las especies de tierra
firme y las de vrzea, slo 5% estuvieron presentes en ambos sitios. Las
pocas especies compartidas entre bosques sobre sustratos diferentes parece
ser una generalidad en la Amazonia, donde existe gran cantidad de taxones
con especializacin edfica (Gentry 1988a, 1990b; Tuomisto et al. 1995).
En el Medio Caquet se han registrado variaciones en la composicin
florstica de los bosques relacionadas con las diferencias entre paisajes
fisiogrficos, principalmente en cuanto al factor edfico (drenaje,
disponibilidad de nutrientes, etc.) y las inundaciones (Duivenvoorden y
Lips 1993, 1995; Urrego 1997).

106

Existen evidencias de variaciones en la composicin florstica en relacin


con cambios en los sustratos edficos atribubles, en algunos casos, a
diferencias en la cantidad de nutrientes (Ashton 1990; Gentry 1990a,
1992) y al drenaje de los suelos (Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993)
principalmente. Al comparar la flora Neotropical, Chrysobalanaceae,
Lecythidaceae, Myristicaceae, Burseraceae y Bombacaceae se han
sealado como familias importantes en la composicin florstica de los
bosques de tierra firme, sobre suelos pobres en nutrientes de la Amazonia
central (Gentry 1990a). Sin embargo, en nuestro estudio slo Burseraceae
tuvo una distribucin muy desigual entre la tierra firme y la vrzea; esta
familia fue ms diversa y present un mayor nmero de individuos en el
primer sitio (suelos con muy bajos contenidos de nutrientes) en
comparacin con el segundo (suelos comparativamente ms ricos),
mientras que Myrtaceae y Meliaceae, consideradas familias importantes en
la composicin de sitios con suelos relativamente frtiles (Gentry 1990a),
en nuestro estudio tuvieron una mayor importancia en la vrzea.
Nuestros resultados concuerdan con los registros anteriores en cuanto a las
caractersticas distintivas de la flora asociada con sustratos edficos
diferentes, pero contradicen la afirmacin de que en la Amazonia
noroccidental existe una relacin positiva entre la diversidad y la cantidad
de nutrientes disponible en el suelo (Gentry 1988a). Se ha sugerido que las
variables que determinan los patrones de diversidad de los bosques
tropicales (en particular los del Medio Caquet) estn asociadas con la
hostilidad del hbitat inducida principalmente por inundaciones y por
concentraciones extremadamente bajas de nutrientes en el suelo
(Duivenvoorden 1996).
Contrario a los planteamientos previos (Huston 1980; Gentry 1988a;
Ashton 1990), la relacin entre diversidad y nutrientes del suelo es ms
compleja (Gentry 1992). El suelo puede estar relacionado con una
productividad mayor, lo que a su vez genera alta dinmica del bosque y
gran diversidad alfa de los rboles a nivel pantropical (Phillips et al. 1994).
En Araracuara, en las mismas parcelas del presente estudio [Captulo 6] se
ha encontrado que el bosque de la vrzea, con suelos menos pobres, tiene
una dinmica mayor que el de tierra firme, lo que confirma la relacin
entre altas tasas de productividad y niveles altos de nutrientes en el suelo
(Gentry 1988a). De hecho, en nuestra vrzea los rboles son de mayor
107

tamao que en la tierra firme, y presentan mayores tasas de crecimiento y


mortalidad [Captulo 6]; sin embargo, dada la mayor riqueza de especies
de PST este patrn no se ajusta a la hiptesis de la productividad (Phillips
et al. 1994), pero parece apoyar aquella de la hostilidad del hbitat
(Duivenvoorden 1996), extendindola a casos donde las inundaciones son
tan poco frecuentes como en nuestro estudio.
Un efecto de la alta dinmica del bosque en LAI vs. PST sobre las
diferencias observadas en la composicin florstica puede estar relacionado
con el papel que sta desempea al determinar condiciones ecolgicas
propicias para el establecimiento y desarrollo de especies con
determinados hbitos de crecimiento. Una mayor frecuencia de cada de
rboles ocasiona un dosel ms discontinuo, lo cual a su vez favorece el
crecimiento de lianas, enredaderas e hierbas (Gentry 1991b; Hegarty y
Caball 1991). Adicionalmente, los ciclos de inundacin espordica
afectan la distribucin de los taxones, debido a que las especies que crecen
en sitios inundables deben tener adaptaciones fisiolgicas particulares
(Junk 1990).
Consideraciones finales
En la Amazonia noroccidental, caracterizada por un mosaico edfico
complejo (Salo et al. 1986; Salo y Rsnen 1990; Tuomisto et al. 1995),
los bosques sobre distintos sustratos son ricos en especies, con pocos
taxones compartidos entre los distintos tipos de vegetacin (Balslev et al.
1987; Tuomisto et al. 1995). Ya que todos estos bosques tienen una
notable similitud en cuanto a composicin de familias y gneros, parece
probable que muchas especies restringidas a diferentes hbitats sean casos
tpicos de especiacin edfica (Gentry 1990b). No obstante, trabajos
recientes (Phillips et al. 1994), incluyendo algunos en Colombia
(Duivenvoorden 1996) sealan que la dinmica natural de la vegetacin es
un mecanismo clave en el mantenimiento de la heterogeneidad estructural
y la alta riqueza florstica de estos bosques [Captulo 6]. Estos indicios
generan una amplia gama de hiptesis que se pueden poner a prueba en
sitios donde se tenga informacin sobre la relacin entre paisaje y
diversidad (Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993; Urrego 1997), en combinacin
con resultados sobre el funcionamiento de los diferentes tipos de

108

ecosistemas (Duivenvoorden 1996) [see also Tobn 1999], como la regin


del Medio Caquet [Captulo 6].
Diferentes investigaciones han informado sobre la riqueza de especies
excepcionalmente alta con base en reas inventariadas relativamente
pequeas a travs de la Amazonia noroccidental (Balslev et al. 1987;
Gentry 1988a; Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993; Duivenvoorden 1994;
Valencia et al. 1994; Urrego 1997). Los hallazgos de la Amazonia
colombiana (Duivenvoorden 1994, Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993)
incluyendo el presente [Captulo 6], confirman que los patrones de alta
riqueza florstica en pequeas reas sean caractersticos de toda la
Amazonia noroccidental, y no una mera particularidad de ciertas reas
especficas como se haba registrado anteriormente (Gentry y Ortiz 1993).
El elevado nmero de especies encontrado en este estudio en apenas 3.6 ha
contrasta con la baja cantidad includa en los listados de especies del
Medio Caquet, como 2150 angiospermas en ca. 1 milln de ha (Snchez
1997), o cerca de 1200 especies de plantas vasculares en 10 parcelas de 0.1
ha en la misma regin (Duivenvoorden 1994). Esta misma situacin se
presenta en la Amazonia ecuatoriana, para los datos de flrulas (Renner et
al. 1990) y parcelas (Paz-Mio et al. 1991; Poulsen y Balslev 1991;
Valencia et al. 1994), y en la Amazonia peruana, donde se registraron ca.
de 7000 especies de plantas con flores en un rea de 500,000 km2 (Brako y
Zarucchi 1993) que contrasta con las 500 especies arbreas en parcelas
pequeas que cubren 0.75 ha (Ruokolainen et al. 1994; Tuomisto et al.
1995).
Lo anterior plantea varios interrogantes. Si los bosques de la Amazonia
noroccidental fueran homogneos entonces la interpretacin de estos
resultados sera que las especies estn muy regularmente distribudas, lo
cual es incorrecto, debido a que hay suficiente evidencia que demuestra la
heterogeneidad de la regin (Duivenvoorden y Lips 1993, 1995; Tuomisto
et al. 1995; Urrego 1997) y el carcter contagioso de las distribuciones de
numerosas especies en los bosques tropicales (Mabberley 1992; de Barros
1986). La explicacin alternativa se relaciona con los sesgos de la
informacin proveniente de las colecciones botnicas: regiones, hbitos y
familias poco colectadas en comparacin con otras bien documentadas

109

(Nelson et al. 1990; Tuomisto et al. 1995). Pero adems subyace el poco
conocimiento florstico de la regin, en particular de la parte colombiana.
Los resultados presentados en este estudio, incluyendo primeros registros
para el pas a nivel de familia y de especies previamente consideradas
endmicas en otros pases de Amazonia, ilustran claramente dos
situaciones. Primero, que an falta mucho por conocer con respecto a la
flora de esta regin y, segundo, que las colecciones botnicas intensivas,
restringidas a parcelas pequeas, son una herramienta importante en la
bsqueda de dicho conocimiento.
5.6

Agradecimientos

Queremos expresar nuestra gratitud a las personas de la comunidad


Nonuya de Pea Roja por permitir realizar este trabajo en su resguardo y
por su colaboracin. Se cont con apoyo financiero y logstico de las
fundaciones Tropenbos-Colombia y Jardn Botnico "Joaqun Antonio
Uribe" de Medelln, de la Universidades Nacional de Colombia seccional
Medelln, la Universidad de Antioquia, y de la Corporacin Colombiana
para la Amazonia, Araracuara. Por otra parte, los directores de los
herbarios COAH, JAUM, HUA, COL, NY, MO y K, especialmente,
Mauricio Snchez, Alvaro Cogollo, Ricardo Callejas y Brian Boom,
permitieron el trabajo de comparacin de especmenes botnicos. P.
Acevedo (US), R.C. Barneby (NY), H.T. Beck (NY), B. Boom (NY), R.
Callejas (HUA), A. Cogollo (JAUM), J. Cuatrecasas (US), D.C. Daly
(NY), L.J. Dorr (NY), S. Daz (COL), R.B. Faden (US), J.L. Fernndez
(COL), G. Galeano (COL), A.H. Gentry (MO), M.H. Grayum (MO), J.W.
Grimmes (NY), J.A. Kallunki (NY), M.L. Kawasaki (NY), R.L. Liesner
(MO), J.L. Luteyn (NY), J.M. MacDougal (MO), X. Martnez (COAH),
J.D. Mitchell (NY), S.A. Mori (NY), T. Morley (MIN), M.T. Murillo
(COL), M.H. Nee (NY), T.D. Pennington (K), J.J. Pipoly (MO), G.T.
Prance (K), W.D. Stevens (MO), B. Sthl (GB), M. Snchez (COAH),
W.W. Thomas (NY), I. Valdespino (NY), D.C. Wasshausen (US), H.H.
van der Werff (MO), J.J. Wurdack (US) y J.L. Zarucchi (MO) ayudaron en
la identificacin del material botnico. Versiones preliminares de este
artculo fueron revisadas y comentadas por Ricardo Callejas, lvaro
Cogollo, Ignacio del Valle, Roelof A.A. Oldeman, Juan G. Saldarriaga y
dos evaluadores annimos.
110

6
Forest dynamics in an upland
and a floodplain plot near Pea
Roja, Colombian Amazonia
Ana Catalina Londoo Vega

6.1

Introduction

Mortality, recruitment and growth of trees in natural conditions determine


the dynamics of tropical rain forest (Putz et al. 1983; Swaine and
Lieberman 1987; Swaine et al. 1987; Lieberman et al. 1990; Korning and
Balslev 1994; Manokaran and Swaine 1994; Phillips et al. 1994; Kenneth
1995; Condit 1998). These processes directly affect the nutrient cycling,
structure and composition of the forest. Measurements of their rates are
indispensable for understanding the functioning and productivity of the
forests (Chao et al. 2008). Long-term demographic data obtained through
repeated censuses of vegetation in permanent plots provide valuable
information for efficient management strategies, which seek a balance
between use and conservation of tropical forests (Manokaran and Swaine
1994; Condit 1998).
It is widely recognized that the Amazon rainforest belongs to the largest
and most diverse forests of the world. Marked gradients have been
detected in the diversity, biomass, wood density, productivity and
mortality of the forests in this region (Lewis et al. 2004a; ter Steege et al.
2006). Although mortality patterns are increasingly based on comparative
studies from wide areas (Lewis et al. 2004a), it is still needed to study the
local variation of the mechanisms that control tree death, particularly in the
highly variable environmental setting of Colombian Amazonia
(Duivenvoorden and Duque 2010). In addition, the information on the
Colombian fraction of permanent forest plots is quite low (Phillips et al.
2004).
Previous studies based on scattered permanent plots have shown that both
mortality and growth rates are lower in eastern Amazonian and higher in
western Amazonia (Chao et al. 2008). These trends are parallel to patterns
in wood density, species diversity, and species composition along geologic
gradients from poor soils in the Guiana Shield towards soils enriched with
sediments of Andean origin in upper Amazonia. Possibly the species
composition itself may be the determining factor in forest dynamics (Chao
et al. 2008).
In this chapter quantitative data are provided on mortality and recruitment
rates, and on the diameter increment of trees in an upland forest and a
112

floodplain forest located in the heart of Colombian Amazonia. The data


were obtained in two permanent plots near Araracuara and include the
information available to date on periods close to a decade (between 8.6-9.6
years) from relatively large plots (1.8 ha) in the Colombian Amazon.
Previously, only preliminary and fragmentary data were available in this
region (Londoo and Jimnez 1999). The plots were established in the late
eighties of the past century and are located in an upland unit with welldrained soils (upland or tierra firme plot) and in the floodplain of the
Caquet River (hereafter called floodplain or vrzea forest).
The primary objective of this chapter is to analyze the patterns in
mortality, recruitment and diameter increment in these two permanent
plots near Pea Roja.
6.2

Mortality and recruitment

Tree mortality is a complex process that controls the density of trees in the
forest (Carey et al. 1994; Manokaran and Swaine 1994). Tree death occurs
at different levels of intensity, space and time, reflecting endogenous
processes (e.g. aging) and exogenous disturbances, which involve the
severity, frequency, duration, timescale and interaction with the ecosystem
(Lugo and Scatena 1996). Normal or background mortality rates are
usually below 5% per year, and may range by several orders of magnitude.
This mortality tends to take place at local scales and often occurs gradually
(e.g. the slow death of one single tree) and tends to increase with tree
density (number of individuals per unit area) (Lewis et al. 2004b).
Contrary, catastrophic mortality (> 5% per year) takes place during
massive and often quite sudden events (e.g. by wind throw) (Nelson et al.
1994). These two kinds of mortality have a different effect on the
succession that follows death events (Swaine et al. 1987; Matelson et al.
1995; Lugo and Scatena 1996).
Usually it is difficult to determine the cause of death of an individual tree,
and often several causes act in combination (Lugo and Scatena 1996;
D'Angelo et al. 2004). To quantify tree mortality, types of death can be
defined based on direct field inspections of the remains of the tree after its
death (Gale and Barfod 1999). The type of death determines how the forest
canopy is opened (Hall et al. 1978; Hartshorn 1990b) and defines how the
forest responds regarding species composition (Denslow 1987), diversity
113

(Brnig and Huang 1990; Hartshorn 1990a) and forest structure (Hubbell
and Foster 1986; Swaine 1990). Different types of death create variation in
gaps (Clark 1990; Carey et al. 1994) and in the regeneration opportunities
for the forest (Hartshorn 1990a; Orians 1982; Negrelle 1995).

Figure 6-1. Types of tree death. Left: standing dead; middle: snapped
trunk; right: uprooted.
Three types of death are often distinguished (Fig. 6-1) to quantify forest
dynamics: uprooted tree, snapped trunk, and standing (or upright) death
(Rankin de Merona et al. 1990; Gale 1997; D'Angelo et al. 2004). For the
uprooted tree, the immediate causes of death are often physical (such as
strong wind, heavy rain, shallow soils, steep slope and the fall of trees
interconnected by lianas; D'Angelo et al. 2004), or sometimes biotic (root
rot). Death in snapped trunks is mainly attributed to attacks by fungi and
insects, the effect of which may depend on wood density (Putz et al.
1983). Standing or upright death is mostly due to senility, disease and
pathogen attack, along with shading by other trees (Oldeman 1990b). Light
and drought are the principal abiotic factors associated with upright death.
Recruitment is a manifestation of species fecundity, seed dispersal (Clark
et al. 1999) as well as growth and survival of juveniles in a population
(Swaine et al. 1987). Although in most reports on tropical forests
recruitment is closely linked to mortality, which leads to more or less
constant densities of trees with a certain size, the relationship between
these two opposing processes may be weak for short periods of time or at
small spatial scales (Swaine et al. 1987).

114

6.3

Methods

Study area and data collection


Details of the study area and design of the permanent plots are given in
Chapter 2. In each plot, all trees, tree ferns, palms and lianas with DBH
10 cm were numbered, tagged and mapped to the nearest 0.5 m. Standard
voucher collections were taken to identify species (Londoo and lvarez
1997). Subsequently, each tagged individual was measured for DBH to the
nearest 0.5 mm, at a standard height of 1.3 m above the soil, or above this
level in case of buttresses, silt roots or other irregularities at the trunk,
using a standard diameter tape. During the establishment of the plot a
subset of individuals was randomly chosen to measure the total height
(Ht), height of the trunk (Hb), and two perpendicular crown projections
(CD), both with a precision of 0.1 m, using a Blume-Leiss type
hypsometer and metrical tape, respectively. During the last census all
surviving individuals were measured for Ht, Hb CD, as well as other
crown indices, using a simplification of methods derived from Dawkins
(1958) and Dubois (1980). Following standard procedures, the position of
the measurement was marked by bright coloured ring (orange or yellow)
painted on the bark (Synnott 1979; Vallejo et al. 2005), also registering if
the trunks were alive but damaged, such as leaned or broken.
The establishment and first survey of the upland plot took place in
September 1989 (1 ha). The floodplain plot was set-up and surveyed in
September 1990 (1.8 ha). Initially, the upland plot had a size of 1 ha (100
m x 100 m). Extra area was added during September 1990 to obtain a total
plot size of 120 m x 150 m (1.8 ha). Therefore, the first measurement (recensus), which was carried out in September 1990, was done for 1.0 ha
only (the area installed one year earlier; Table 2-1). This implies that the
results of forest dynamics in both upland and floodplain plot are presented
regarding a plot size of 1.8 ha, except for the first measurement period of
the upland plot. In December 1993 (upland plot) and January 1994
(floodplain plot) re-censuses were done. Subsequent recensuses were done
in December 1997 (upland plot) and in April 1999 (floodplain plot).
Finally, in the upland plot an extra evaluation was done regarding
mortality and recruitment in March 1999. This yields a total survey period

115

of 9.58 years (115 months) in the upland plot and 8.58 years (103 months)
in the floodplain plot.
During the second and posterior censuses, all previously marked
individuals were checked and verified if they were or alive or dead. If alive
they were checked for damage, such as broken or leaning crown, or
leaning or broken trunks. If they were dead, the type of death was recorded
based on the observation of the type of debris or remains (Fig. 6-1), using
the following categories (Rankin de Merona et al. 1990; Gale 1997): A)
Standing of upright death. This occurred when the dead tree was still
standing without clear signs of having been broken or uprooted. In such
cases, the tree crown was still largely present in situ but fragments of
fallen branches were often observed lying around the dead trunk; B)
Snapped trunk. This occurred when a substantial stump of the trunk was
still standing whereas another part of trunk was found fragmented on the
forest floor. Usually these trunk fragments were oriented in a particular
direction, except when the tree suffered death at an event in which
participated several trees simultaneously; C) Uprooted. This mode of death
was recorded when the trunk was found lying on the forest floor with the
roots exposed and lifted; D) Decomposed. This mode of death was
recorded when trees had disappeared completely leaving no trace at all.
Such trunks were assumed to have died and completely decomposed; E)
Other. This mode referred to the few events in which fragments were
found in a decomposed state that could not be assigned to any of the
aforementioned types of death.
Following standard procedures (Synnott 1979, 1991; Condit 1998; Vallejo
et al. 2005) recruits were defined as those individuals that reached the
minimal surveying size of DBH = 10 cm after the former census. Recruits
were localized, numbered, tagged, mapped, identified, and measured
exactly as was done with the individuals during the initial inventory of the
plots. More information regarding sampling procedures is in Chapter 2.

116

Figure 6-2. Synthesis of forest dynamics in profile diagrams for the upland
(tierra firme) and the floodplain (vrzea) plots in Pea Roja. Shown are
cross sections and projections on the soil surface. Upper diagram: upland
plot. The dotted lines indicate the trees in the back. Lower diagrams:
floodplain plot.
Data processing
The results are presented for each growth habit separately, and for the
whole forest, considering dicot trees (trees sensu stricto without palms or
lianas), palms and lianas. Tree palms do not have vascular cambium and
117

cannot show diameter increments. Therefore, for diameter increments or


growth (in basal area or biomass) we present results only for trees sensu
stricto. Species importance values were defined according to Curtis and
McIntosh (1951). Family importance values were calculated following
Mori et al. (1983). Both indiced were calculated applying biomass instead
of basal area.
In most demographic studies the fluxes out (mortality) and the fluxes in
(recruitment) are quantified to measure the population changes over time.
We applied a simple exponential model to calculate annual mortality ()
(Sheil et al. 1995) and extended the same calculation to recruitment ().
For mortality (), we used:
= [ln N0 ln (N0 Dt)] x 100 / t

(6-1)

where: = exponential mortality coefficient (in percentage per year; >


0); N0 = initial number of alive individuals in the inventory; Dt = number
of dead individuals during the interval of time t; t = time interval between
censuses in years. The same equation was used to calculate mortality for
basal area (BA) and biomass (w).
For recruitment (), we used a similar procedure considering an increase of
the initial population, so equation 6-1 becomes:
= [ln (N0 +Rt) ln (N0)] x 100 / t

(6-2)

where: = exponential recruitment coefficient (in percentage per year; >


0), and Rt = number of recruits during the interval of time t.
In quantifying mortality, only the losses of the initial population were
considered. Likewise, to calculate the exponential coefficient of
recruitment only the increment in individuals with respect to the initial
population was taken into account. Therefore, the calculation of
recruitment presented here differs from that used by Lewis et al. (2004a).
Three different variables of the vegetation were used to quantify mortality
and recruitment rates, and to evaluate the types of death: i) Density,
expressed as number or individuals (NI); ii) Basal area (BA, in m2) or the
area covered by the transversal section of the trunk; and iii) Biomass (W,
kg of dry matter), representing the above-ground biomass which was
estimated using regression models, locally defined for each forest type,
118

growth habit or form (Rodrguez 1991; lvarez 1993; Londoo and


lvarez 1993).
To calculate recruitment rates in terms of basal area and biomass
(Equation 6-3 and Equation 6-4), the final population was adjusted as the
sum of the original population plus the recruits, adding the increment
obtained during the lapse of time, either in basal area or biomass, as
follows:
AB = [ln (AB0 +RABt + ABt) ln (AB0)] x t / 100

(6-3)

where, AB = coefficient of exponential recruitment in basal area; AB0 =


basal area of the initial population (m2); RABt = basal area of the recruited
stems (m2); ABt = basal area increment or growth of the initial
population (m2).
Similarly, biomass recruitment or W was calculated based on dry, aerial
biomass changes of the initial population:
W = [ln (W0 +RWt + Wt) ln (W0)] x t / 100

(6-4)

where W = coefficient of exponential biomass recruitment; W0, = initial


biomass (Kg); RWt = biomass of the recruited stems (Kg); Wt = biomass
increment of the growth of initial population (Kg).
Annual diameter increment was calculated as follows:
ADI = DBH1 DBH0 / (t1 t0)

(6-5)

where ADI = annual diametric increment (cm per year), DBH0 = DBH at
the start of the time interval (t0), and DBH1 = DBH at the end period of the
time interval (t1). The time interval (t1 t0) is expressed in years. Records
of ADI < -0.2 cm per year and ADI > 4 cm per year were excluded as
these might be the result of measurement errors (Sheil et al. 1995; Chao et
al. 2008).
Finally, following standards methods (Oldeman et al. 2006), a drawing
was made of a forest transect of 10 m x 100 m in each plot. In these, all
plants with DBH 10 cm were included (trees, palms, lianas), taking into
account their spatial coordinates, DBH, total height, trunk height, and
crown size measured in two perpendicular directions.

119

Table 6-1. Summary of floristic composition and structure of the


vegetation with DBH 10 cm (1.8 ha), in the upland plot and the
floodplain plot at Pea Roja, Colombian Amazonia.
Upland (tierra firme)a
Species
Families
Density (individuals)
Basal area (m2)
Biomassb (ton)
Diameter (cm) (mean one SD)
Diameter (cm) (min max)
Total height (m) (mean one
SD)
Total height (m) (min max)
Annual growth DBH (cm per
year) (mean one SD)
Annual growth DBH (cm per
year) (min max)
Floodplain (vrzea)a
Species
Families
Density (individuals or stems)
Basal area (m2)
Biomassb (ton)
Diameter (cm) (mean)
Diameter (cm) (min max)
Total height (m) (mean)
Total height (m) (min max)
Annual growth DBH (cm per
year) (mean one SD)
Annual growth DBH (cm per
year) (min max)
a

Trees

Palms

Lianas

Total

257
40
1455
56.47
635.64c
19.2 11.24
10.0 87.4
20.2 5.3

2
1
30
0.44
2.00d
13.6 1.91
10.1 16.8
16.2 3.7

4
4
4
0.05
0.80e
12.3 0.90
11.1 13.2
27.2 4.7

263
44
1489
56.96
638.43
19.0 11.2
10.0 87.4
20.1 5.3

6.5 37.7
0.13 0.14

10.0 25.8 21.0 27.2 6.5 37.7

-0.13 0.13

182
40
1051
39.55
421.3f
18.94
10.0 90.2
16.0
1.0 40.7
0.22 0.31

3
1
104
1.59
7.59d
13.75
10.2 25.1
13.8
4.0 29.0

15
11
25
0.48
56.9e
14.49
10.0 38.0
27.5
16.0 35.0

200
45
1180
41.62
435.8
18.49
10.0 90.2
16.0
1.0 40.7

-0.18 2.53

Data from final inventories (TF 1997, VA 1999) bBiomass (Y, dry weight in kg),

calculated by regression (DBH in cm), as follows: cTrees Upland: ln(Y) = -1.6028 +


2.4242 * ln(DBH), r2 = 0.98 (Rodrguez 1991); dPalms Upland and Floodplain: ln(Y)
= -3.956 + 1.553 * ln(DBH2), r2 = 0.96 (lvarez 1993); eLianas Upland and
Floodplain: ln(Y) = 0.330 + 0.987 * ln(DBH2), r2 = 0.84 (lvarez 1993); fTrees
Floodplain: ln(Y) = -2.034 + 1.253 * ln(DBH2) r2 = 0.97, for trees with DBH between
10 cm and 130 cm (lvarez 1993). Biomass of strangling figs calculated as trees.

120

6.4

Results

Initial family composition and structure


A summary of the main aspects of forest composition and structure is
presented in Table 6-1 (Londoo 1993; Londoo and lvarez 1997). The
species richness was higher in the upland than in the floodplain plot. The
latter plot contained a slightly higher number of families. In the floodplain
forest palms and lianas were relatively abundant and diverse, and also
showed a comparatively high basal area. In the upland plot the density,
basal area and biomass of the dicotyledonous trees were comparatively
high.
The tree crowns of the largest trees were more connected to each other in
the upland plot than in the floodplain plot (Fig. 6-2). In the upland plot
crown diameters ranged between 0.6 m and 23.3 m, and showed an
average of 5.5 m. The thickest tree in this permanent plot had a DBH of
87.4 cm (measured above the buttresses) and belonged to Pseudomonotes
tropenbosii. In the immediate surroundings of the upland plot individuals
with DBH up to 100 cm were seen of this species. The tree height recorded
in upland plot varied between 6.5 m and 37.7 m. The largest trees (canopy
height > 35 m) belonged to Caryocar gracile, Erisma splendens,
Cariniana decandra, Pouteria CL-1017, Aspidosperma excelsum,
Eschweilera punctata, Monopteryx uaucu and Pseudomonotes tropenbosii.
The latter three species showed crown diameters between 11.6 and 23.3 m.
Trees from Cariniana decandra and Pseudomonotes tropenbosii were
found with the highest biomass (9.1 and 10.2 ton per tree, respectively).
In the floodplain plot, the thickest tree belonged to Parkia multijuga (DBH
= 90.2 cm). In the direct surroundings of the plot trees with a DBH up to
130 cm were observed (Londoo 1993). The crown diameter of the trees
varied between 0.30 m and 27.0 m (average of 5.5 m), and the largest
crown was from a tree of Hyeronima alchorneoides (27.6 m x 26.2 m) The
trees showed a height between 1.0 and 40.7 m; trees from Parkia
multijuga and Pseudolmedia laevis were highest (height > 40 m). The
heaviest trees showed a biomass of 8.0 and 9.3 ton per tree and belonged
to Campsiandra angustifolia and Parkia multijuga, respectively.

121

In trunk density, the diameter distributions showed an inverse-J shape,


which is characteristic for humid lowland forests of mixed species
composition (Fig. 6-3). In the floodplain plot the proportion of thin stems
(10 DBH < 20 cm) was slightly higher than in the upland plots, and this
tendency was also visible in the basal area and the biomass (Fig. 6-3 left).
Large trees (DBH 60 cm) were rare in both plots, and contribute
similarly in basal area and biomass.
Table 6-2. Trunk density (NI) and importance values (IVI) for the ten most
important species in the upland and floodplain plot during three censuses.
Upland
Pseudomonotes tropenbosii
Monopteryx uaucu
Eschweilera laevicarpa
Eschweilera punctata
Eschweilera ovalifolia
Eschweilera parvifolia
Scleronema micranthum
Aspidosperma excelsum
Erisma splendens
Brosimum rubescens
All species

1990
66
43
80
58
62
58
30
11
20
29
1504

NI
1993
69
43
78
58
61
59
31
10
20
29
1505

1997
70
44
79
57
60
58
32
10
20
28
1489

1990
8.44
5.07
4.50
4.07
3.58
3.15
2.27
2.00
1.84
1.81
100

IVI (%)
1993
8.66
5.13
4.40
4.10
3.55
3.21
2.34
1.98
1.85
1.82
100

1997
8.66
5.26
4.46
4.11
3.51
3.21
2.44
2.00
1.87
1.79
100

1990
170
75
28
29
31
19
13
32
23
37
1207

NI
1994
172
75
29
29
34
19
14
34
23
39
1268

1999
170
63
25
28
26
19
13
43
21
37
1180

1990
9.68
4.18
3.77
3.10
2.48
2.44
2.36
2.32
2.21
2.08
100

IVI (%)
1994
9.31
3.97
3.73
3.02
2.64
2.33
2.31
2.32
2.13
2.07
100

1999
9.66
3.75
3.37
3.05
2.32
2.48
1.94
2.93
2.11
2.18
100

Floodplain
Brownea macrophylla
Astrocaryum sciophilum
Hyeronima alchorneoides
Eschweilera andina
Inga EA-397
Campsiandra angustifolia
Sterculia apeibophylla
Zygia latifolia
Pachira insignis
Euterpe precatoria
All species

122

Figure 6-3. Diameter distribution regarding trunk density, basal area and
biomass at the 1990 census (diagrams left) and regarding the mortality
(over a cumulative census period of 8.6 y) in trunks, basal area and
biomass (diagrams right). Light-grey colums are from the upland plot and
dark-grey columns from the floodplain plot. The diameter class width is 10
cm (the centre of the class is indicated).
The ten most important species in the upland and floodplain plots are
listed in Table 6-2 (see also Appendix 3). Overall, the rankings of the
species based on their importance values did not change between the
various censuses (1990-1997 in the upland plot and 1990-1999 in the
floodplain plot) despite slight differences in species composition due to
tree mortality and recruitment. In the upland plot Lecythidaceae, Fabaceae,
123

Sapotaceae, Lauraceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Vochysiaceae, Burseraceae,


Apocynaceae, Chrysobalanaceae and Myristicaceae were the most
important families (Fig. 6-4; Appendix 4). In the floodplain plot, important
families were Caesalpiniaceae, Mimosaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae,
Sapotaceae, Lecythidaceae, Rubiaceae, Arecaceae, Annonaceae and
Chrysobalanaceae. In both plots, Leguminosae was most important if
Fabaceae, Mimosaceae and Caesalpiniaceae were combined into this
family.
Mortality
In the upland plot, for the cumulative period of 1990 to 1999 (8.6 y) 131
trees died (8.7% of the initial population), which corresponded to 15 dead
trunks per year on average (Table 6-3). Over that same time lapse, 191
trunks died in the floodplain plot (16% of the initial population),
corresponding to a mean of 22 dead individuals per year. Thus, if mortality
was based on the number of dying trunks, the upland plot yielded a rate
almost two times as low as recorded in the floodplain plot ( = 1.06 versus
= 2.0, respectively, over 8.6 y). In terms of basal area and biomass, the
discrepancies in mortality rates between the floodplain and upland plot
were even more pronounced. For both basal area and biomass negative
mortality rates were found, over certain time lapses. In these cases the
diameter increment of the living trunks yielded an increase in basal area
and biomass, which surpassed their loss through trunk death. This implied
that the forests showed a net increment in basal area and biomass over
these periods.
Most of the mortality affected relatively thin stems (Figure 6-3 right). For
the cumulative censuses period of 8.6 y, 73% of the dead trees in the
upland plot had DBH < 20 cm (for basal area this percentage was 35% and
for biomass 27%). In the floodplain plot these percentages were 73%,
29%, and 21%, respectively. Using basal area or biomass, mortality was
more evenly spread over the diameter classes, especially in the floodplain
plot. Large trees contributed substantially to the mortality rates calculated
for basal area and biomass.

124

Figure 6-4. Family importance index (%) in the upland (left) and
floodplain (right) plots. NI% = relative number of individuals; DI% =
relative number of species; W% = relative above-ground biomass. Data of
the 1990 census.
In the upland plot, for the total period of 8.6 y, most death individuals
were found in Burseraceae (22), followed by Fabaceae (13), Lecythidaceae
(13), Lauraceae (12) and Sapotaceae (10), together corresponding to 71%
of lost individuals, 77% of the species that had died, and 77% of the
biomass of all dead trunks. Dipterocarpaceae, which was only represented
by one species, contributed to 10% of the mortality in biomass. Species
that died often were Protium paniculatum (10 trees), Diplotropis martiusii
(7 trees), Eschweilera parvifolia (5 trees) and Protium hebetatum (5 trees).
In the same time lapse, in the floodplain plot a high mortality was found
among trunks from Arecaceae (27), Mimosaceae (21), Rubiaceae (16),
Euphorbiaceae (14) and Caesalpiniaceae (12). Together these represented
47% of the dead trunks, 70% of the species that had died, and 36% of the
biomass of all dead trunks. Astrocaryum sciophilum (16 palms), Brownea
125

macrophylla (10 trees) and Euterpe precatoria (8 palms) died abundantly.


In both plots most dead trees were from only one individual per species.
Table 6-3. Mortality and recruitment based on the measurement of
individuals (NI), basal area (BA) and biomass (W) in the upland and
floodplain plot at Pea Roja, Colombian Amazonia, for different periods
of time measured in 1.8 ha. Data from dicot trees, palms and lianas
combined; DBH 10 cm).
Upland
NI
(individuals)

BA (m2)

W (ton)

Floodplain
NI
(individuals)

126

Periods
Period (years of
census)
Initial NI

Interval-1
1990-1993
(3.3)
1504

Interval-2
1993-1999
(5.3)
1505

Total
1990-1999
(8.6)
1504

Dead NI
Recruited NI
Final NI
Mortality (% y-1)
Recruitment (% y-1)
Periods (years of
census)
Initial BA
Dead BA
Recruited BA
Final BA
Growth in BA
Mortality (% y-1)
Recruitment (% y-1)
Initial W
Dead W
Recruited W
Final W
Growth in W
Mortality (% y-1)
Recruitment (% y-1)
Periods (years of
census)
Initial NI

66
67
1505
1.35
1.31
1990-1993
(3.3)
55.524
1.960
0.568
55.878
1.745
0.12
1.22
615.42
19.97
3.87
621.54
22.21
-0.11
1.25
1990-1993
(3.3)
1207

65
49
1489
0.84
0.61
1993-1997
(4.0)
55.877
2.160
0.429
56.963
2.816
-0.29
1.41
621.54
22.08
2.94
638.43
36.04
-0.56
1.52
1993-1999
(5.3)
1185

131
116
1489
1.06
0.87
1990-1997
(7.3)
55.524
4.191
1.080
56.963
4.485
-0.07
1.30
615.42
42.94
7.51
638.43
57.30
-0.32
1.37
1990-1999
(8.6)
1207

Dead NI
Recruited NI
Final NI

83
61
1185

109
104
1180

191
164
1180

BA (m2)

W (ton)

Mortality (% y-1)
Recruitment (% y-1)
Initial BA
Dead BA
Recruited BA
Final BA
Growth in BA
Mortality (% y-1)
Recruitment (% y-1)
Initial W
Dead W
Recruited W
Final W
Growth in W
Mortality (% y-1)
Recruitment (% y-1)

2.14
1.48
40.598
4.192
0.573
39.653
2.674
1.14
2.31
423.77
49.35
4.88
410.41
31.12
1.32
2.45

1.84
1.60
39.653
3.055
1.077
41.622
3.947
-0.42
2.27
410.41
29.80
8.50
435.83
46.72
-0.77
2.40

2.01
1.48
40.598
7.113
1.974
41.622
6.162
0.28
2.13
423.77
77.68
16.70
435.83
73.05
0.13
2.24

Types of death
In the upland plot more trees died standing than in the floodplain plot
(Table 6-4). For the total census period (8.6 y) 29% of the trunks died
standing in the upland plot, and only 17% died as such in the floodplain
plot. Regarding death by uprooting (tree fall) the results were opposite: in
the upland plot only 10% of the trunks had died by uprooting (over 8.6 y)
whereas in the floodplain this proportion was two times higher. All these
differences between the two plots were more pronounced when mortality
was calculated for basal area and biomass. Death through snapping trunks
was the most common mode of death, in both plots. Remarkably, 17% of
the dead trunks had disappeared entirely in the floodplain plot after 8.6 y,
against only 2% in the upland plot.
Recruitment and growth
Both plots showed different degrees of recruitment during the total interval
(1990-1999) of 8.6 years (Table 6.3). In terms of individuals the
recruitment in the upland plot was 7.7% (with respect to initial density, for
stems 10 cm), representing a of 0.87% per year. In the floodplain plot
this recruitment was almost two times higher (13.6% representing a of
1.48% per year). A similar between-plot difference was found for
recruitment in terms of basal area (1.97 m2 and a AB of 1.30% per year in
127

the floodplain plot versus 1.08 m2 and a AB of 2.13% per year in the
upland plot) and biomass (16.7 ton and a W of 1.37% per year in the
floodplain plot versus 7.51 ton and a W of 2.24% per year in the upland
plot).
The average annual growth in terms of diameter increment was 0.13 cm
per year in the upland plot. In the floodplain plot is was almost twice as
high (0.22 cm per year)(Table 6-5). Thin trees showed a wider range in
diameter increments than thick trees (Fig. 6-5). In both plots, newly
recruited individuals showed higher mean and maximum diameter
increments. In the upland plot, sub-canopy individuals of 10-15 m height
showed the highest annual diameter increments. In the floodplain, this
happened with sub-canopy individuals of 15-20 m height. On average,
however, and in both forests, larger individuals showed a tendency of
faster annual growth in trunk diameter.
Of the most important species in the upland plot, Pseudomonotes
tropenbosii, Monopteryx uaucu, Aspidosperma excelsum and Scleronema
micranthum showed the highest average annual diameter increments.
These four species reached the upper canopy. In the floodplain plot, Inga
EA-397, Hyeronima alchorneoides, Sterculia apeibophylla and
Eschweilera andina were the fastest growing species on a yearly basis.
The first species reached the middle part of canopy, and the other three
were upper canopy species. The dominant species in this forest (Brownea
macrophylla) showed a mean annual diameter increment of 0.05, which
represented only 38% of the average of all trunks in the plot.

128

Table 6-4. Modes of death for different census periods in the two plots, in absolute values and in proportion to the first
census (three columns at the right). NI = number of trunks, BA = basal area, W = biomass.
Upland

1990-1993
NI BA (m2)
Uprooted
5
0.19
Snapped
32
0.96
Standing
27
0.79
Decomposed 2
0.03
Other
0
0
Total
66
2.0
1990-1994
NI BA (m2)
Uprooted
19
1.2
Snapped
39
2.6
Standing
13
0.2
Decomposed 12
0.2
Other
0
0
Total
83
4.2

W (ton)
1.8
9.7
8.2
0.2
0
20.0

1993-1997
NI BA (m2)
8
0.35
43 1.13
13 0.67
1
0.02
0
0
65 2.2

W (ton)
4.1
10.7
7.2
0.1
0
22.1

W (ton)
14.0
32.0
2.1
1.4
0
49.4

1994-1999
NI
BA (m2)
19
0.8
43
1.2
20
0.6
20
0.3
7
0.1
109 3.1

W (ton)
8.4
12.5
5.7
2.5
0.7
29.8

Floodplain

1997-1999
NI
BA (m2)
1
0.04
8
0.16
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
0.2

W (ton)
0.3
1.4
0
0
0
1.7

1990-1999
NI (%) BA (%)
10.0
13.1
59.3
52.3
28.6
33.7
2.1
1.0
0
0
100
100

W (%)
14.2
49.8
35.3
0.7
0
100

1990-1999
NI (%) BA (%)
19.8
27.9
42.7
53.3
17.2
11.2
16.7
6.3
3.7
1.2
100
100

W (%)
28.3
56.2
9.8
4.9
0.9
100

129

Table 6-5. Annual diameter increment (cm per year) for in the upland and
floodplain plots in Pea Roja (all data from individuals with DBH 10
cm, found in 1.8 ha).
Annual diameter increment (cm per year)
Maximum
Minimum
Mean one
SD
Upland (1990-1997)
Pseudomonotes tropenbosii
Monopteryx uaucu
Eschweilera laevicarpa
Eschweilera punctata
Eschweilera ovalifolia
Eschweilera parvifolia
Scleronema micranthum
Aspidosperma excelsum
Erisma splendens
Brosimum rubescens
All tree species
Floodplain (1990-1999)
Brownea macrophylla
Astrocaryum sciophilum
Hyeronima alchorneoides
Eschweilera andina
Inga EA-397
Campsiandra angustifolia
Sterculia apeibophylla
Zygia latifolia
Pachira insignis
Euterpe precatoria
All species

130

0.48
0.78
0.44
0.88
0.20
0.89
0.50
0.73
0.29
0.25
1.35

0.00
-0.01
-0.13
0.00
-0.01
-0.01
0.03
0.03
0.01
0.00
-0.13

0.20 0.13
0.19 0.19
0.06 0.07
0.11 0.13
0.06 0.5
0.09 0.13
0.15 0.11
0.18 0.23
0.12 0.08
0.09 0.08
0.13 0.14

0.82
0.74
1.57
1.17
2.07
0.48
0.83
0.79
0.67
0.53
2.53

-0.17
-0.07
0.00
-0.18
0.02
-0.05
0.01
-0.18
0.00
-0.11
-0.18

0.06 0.09
0.11 0.21
0.45 0.40
0.28 0.30
0.80 0.54
0.12 0.14
0.29 0.28
0.12 0.19
0.22 0.22
0.03 0.10
0.22 0.31

Fig. 6-5. Annual diameter increment (ADI) for different growth forms,
DBH classes and height classes (RA: Rasant (Ht 0, < 5 m); UN:
understorey (Ht 5 m, < 10 m); SC-L: subcanopy, low (Ht 10 m, < 15
m); SC-H: subcanopy, high (Ht 15 m, < 20 m); CA-L: canopy, low (Ht
20 m, < 25 m); CA-H: canopy, high (Ht 25 m, < 30 m); EM-L:
emergent, low (Ht 30 m, < 35 m); EM-H: (Ht 35 m, < 40 m); SE:
super emergent (Ht 40 m) in the upland plot (left) and floodplain plot
(right) in Pea Roja. Measurements periods were 1990-1997 for the upland
plot and 1990-1999 for the floodplain plot. The vertical bars denote the
maximum and minimum increments.
131

Table 6-6. Mortality rate () and recruitment rate () in tropical forests


(DBH 10 cm).
Locality
Pea Roja, upland (tierra firme)
(Amazonia, Colombia)1
Pea Roja, upland (tierra firme)
(Amazonia, Colombia)1
Pea Roja, upland (tierra firme)
(Amazonia, Colombia)1
Pea Roja, floodplain (vrzea)
(Amazonia, Colombia)1
Pea Roja, floodplain (vrzea)
(Amazonia, Colombia)1
Pea Roja, floodplain (vrzea)
(Amazonia, Colombia)1
Bosque andino Occidental
(Colombia)2
Magdalena tierra firme, Puerto
Nare (Colombia)2
Choc, flooded (Colombia)2
Magdalena, dry forest (Colombia)2
Aang, tierra firme (Amazonia,
Ecuador)3
Cuyabeno, tierra firme (Amazonia,
Ecuador)3
Cocha Cashu, (Amazonia, Per)4
Tambopata 2, llanura aluvial
(Amazonia, Per)5
Tambopata 3, llanura inundable
(Amazonia, Per)5
Tambopata 4, arcillas (Amazonia,
Per)
Tambopata 5, arena-arcilla
(Amazonia, Per)5
Manaus (Amazonia, Brasil)6
Manaus (Amazonia, Brasil)7
Gama galery forest (Cerrado,
Brasil)8
Reserva forestal Linhares (bosque
Atlntico, Brasil)9

132

Plot size t (y)


(ha)
1.8
3.3

(% y-1)

(% y-1)

1.35

1.31

1.8

5.3

0.84

0.61

1.8

8.6

1.06

0.87

1.8

3.3

2.14

1.48

1.8

5.3

1.84

1.60

1.8

8.4

2.01

1.48

2.6

2.70

2.40

2.85
2.70
1.98
1.78

4.9

2.33
1.93
1.88

2.5

1.04

3.09

0.9
0.95

10
7.75

1.77
1.84

0.81
2.83

7.75

2.85

2.37

11.67

1.97

1.96

7.75

2.70

2.25

5
16
3.2

5
17.2 - 19.5
6

1.15
3.67 0.7
3.5

0.87

2.5

15

1.26 - 3.55

2.7

San Carlos (Amazonia,


Venezuela)10
Bosques montanos (Venezuela)
Trunks
Bosques montanos (Venezuela)
Biomass11
Northwest Amazonia12
Northeast Amazonia12
Amazonia (mean 50 plots) interval
113
Amazonia (mean 50 plots) interval
213
La Selva, Parcela 1 (Costa Rica)14
La Selva, Parcela 2 (Costa Rica)14
La Selva, Parcela 3 (Costa Rica)14
Barro Colorado (Panam)15
Barro Colorado (Panam)15
1

10

1.18

4.25

10 - 29

1.67 0.67

4.25

10 - 29

1.81 1.10

1
0.5
0.42 - 9

~10
~10
6.4 0.7

2.34 0.31
1.21 0.53
1.50 0.19 1.59 0.19

0.42 - 9

6.4 0.7

2.06 0.25 1.77 0.22

4.4
4
4
50
50

13
13
13
3
5

1.80
2.01
2.24
3.4 0.3
2.6 0.2

1.33
1.67
1.80

This dissertation; 2lvarez et al. 2008; 3Korning and Balslev 1994; 4Gentry and

Terborgh 1990; 5Phillips et al. 1994 6Rankin de Merona et al. 1990; 7D'Angelo et al.
2004; 8Felfili 1995; 9Rolim et al. 1999; 10Uhl et al. 1988; 11Carey et al. 1994; 12Chao
et al. 2008; 13Lewis et al. 2004a; 14Lieberman et al. 1985; 15Condit et al. 1995

6.5

Discussion

Mortality and recruitment rates in the two plots


The annual rates of mortality and recruitment observed in the upland and
floodplain plots are within the range previously reported for tropical
forests, from the Neotropics as well as the Paleotropics (Lieberman et al.
1985; Uhl et al. 1988; Lieberman et al. 1990; Rankin de Merona et al.
1990; Carey et al. 1994; Korning and Balslev 1994; Manokaran and
Swaine 1994; Condit et al. 1995; Felfili 1995; Phillips 1998a; Rolim et al.
1999; D'Angelo et al. 2004; Lewis et al. 2004a; Phillips et al. 2004;
lvarez et al. 2008; Chao et al. 2008).
The density-based annual mortality rates of the upland plot were near the
lower limit reported for the northeast Amazonia (Phillips et al. 2004; Chao
et al. 2008; Table 6-6). The density-based annual mortality rates of the
floodplain plot were at the lower limit for the forests in northwestern
Amazonia (Phillips et al. 2004; Chao et al. 2008; Table 6-6). A similar
result was obtained for recruitment.
133

For both plots the mortality rate based on number of individuals was
higher than recruitment rate in all time lapses, indicating that mortality
preceded recruitment. However, the average of these mortality and
recruitment rates, which represent a measure of turnover, was lower in the
upland plot than in the floodplain plot (Fig. 6-6). Compared to other
Neotropical forests, the turnover in both plots was relatively low (Phillips
et al. 2004).
Reviewed by Phillips et al. (2004), mortality and recruitment rates in
Amazonia across 97 sites showed an average of ca. 2% per year. Higher
turnover rates were found in the northwestern Amazon compared to
eastern and central Amazonia, on rich soils compared to poor soils, and in
areas without marked seasonality in rainfall compared to areas where
climate showed a pronounced dry season. Phillips et al. (2004) further
reported that Pan-Amazonian averages for mortality (at 52 sites) increased
from 1.58 0.1 to 1.91 0.13% per year (corrected for census interval) for
two successive periods between 1976-2001. Also recruitment rates (57
sites) increased from 1.70 0.11 to 2.34 0.15% per year and turnover
rates (55 sites) from 1.65 0.09 to 2.11 0.12% per year, indicating that
the dynamics of these forests has increased over the years.
The mortality rates recorded in the plots near Pea Roja were below 5%,
and therefore corresponded to so-called background mortality (Lugo and
Scatena 1996). Catastrophic events, such as those reported in Peru (Foster
and Terborgh 1998), are not known from the study area at Pea Roja. For
most tropical forest trees the annual mortality ranges between 1% and 3%.
Higher rates were reported from El Verde in Puerto Rico (Crow 1980),
Barro Colorado Island in Panama (Hubbell and Foster 1990), and Aangu
in Ecuador (Korning and Balslev 1994). On Barro Colorado the high
mortality (3%) was attributed to a prolonged and severe dry season
weather event associated with the "El Nio" (Hubbell and Foster 1990).
Reports of mortality rates from before de 1983 drought in Barro Colorado
(Putz and Milton 1983) were much lower (1.83% and 1.06%). On the other
hand, low levels of mortality have been associated with soil substrates that
are low in nutrients (Rankin de Merona et al. 1990; Manokaran and
Swaine 1994, Phillips et al. 2004).

134

The increased mortality observed in the floodplain forest can be explained


by the combined effect of a poorly drained soil and periodic flooding. Both
factors may induce the formation of shallow root systems and increase the
odds of death for species not well adapted to flooding. In general,
mortality and recruitment rates vary due to multiple causes, such as the
calculation method (Carey et al. 1994) and the length of the interval
between censuses, as short periods cause more noise in the estimates
(Condit et al. 1995; Hall et al. 1998; Londoo and Jimnez 1999; Lewis et
al. 2004ab). The census date may be influenced by climate seasonality,
which in turn might affect mortality and recruitment events (Condit et al.
1996; Phillips et al. 2004). Also the size and shape of the permanent plots,
the bias of researchers to select high biomass forests and avoid large
clearings (Laurance et al. 1998; Phillips et al. 2004; Vallejo et al. 2005), or
activities related to plot establishment, measurements and botanical
collections (Phillips 1998b) may affect the information of mortality and
recruitment. The exponential models used to estimate the mortality and
recruitment rates depart from the assumption of a constant rate of
population increase or decrease over time (Sheil et al. 1995). This
represents a considerable simplification compared to the complex situation
in the forests in terms of different species temperaments (Table 6-5), and
the coexistence of populations with different life spans (Condit et al. 1995;
Sheil and May 1996; Rolim et al. 1999; Echeverri and Lpez 2000;
Alcaraz 2001).
Mortality rates are usually based on the death of individuals. However, the
rate thus obtained may not fully represent the impact of mortality on the
forest. Considering the intricate relationships between different ecosystem
components, and the complexity of the energy flows and biogeochemical
cycles, the death of some individuals should be considered as freeing space
and nutrients, as well as increased availability of light for the survivors
(Franklin et al. 1987). Mortality rates calculated using basal area and
biomass better illustrate the changes in the forest, since the death of one
large individual will release a far greater amount of resources (space,
nutrients, light) compared to the death of a thin individual of low biomass.
These mortality rates may become negative if the gain in basal area or
biomass (due to growth of surviving individuals) is higher than the net loss
over the period examined (accumulation phase according to Hall et al.
135

1978). In the floodplain plot, the mortality rates regarding basal area and
biomass were low (1.14% and 1.32%, respectively) during the initial
census period, and became negative in the second census period (-0.42%
and -0.77, respectively). This seemed to indicate a shift from a homeostatic
phase to an accumulation phase. Perhaps this was caused by a high
recruitment after the death of some large trees and the subsequent release
of space suitable for the accelerated growth of individuals of intermediate
sizes, as can be deduced from Fig. 6-3. This conclusion would also stem
with the shape of the upper canopy in the floodplain plot, which had a
more open and a more irregular surface than in the upland plot (Fig. 6-2).
Death modes
In the upland plot death by snapping and standing death was most
common. In the floodplain plot tree uprooting was relatively common.
These results suggest that the process of mortality in the upland plot
included events acting on smaller spatial scales, at more gradual pace and
at a lower frequency than in the floodplain plot. Death rates in the upland
plot seem to reflect more a mortality process caused by pathogens,
herbivores, senescence, competition for resources, or a combination
thereof, whereas in the floodplain plot weak rooting due to the poor soil
drainage seems to be more important.
Death by snapping is commonly found as the most frequent type of death
in tropical forests (Londoo and Jimnez 1999; Alcaraz 2001).
Occasionally, other death modes become more important, as in montane
forests of Venezuela (Carey et al. 1994), where standing death (64%) were
most common, followed by tree fall (17%), snapping (11%) and unknown
(11%). Differences in death mode have been associated to edge effects in
large plots. For instance, in central Amazonia (near Manaus) mortality
rates near forest edges (3.67 0.70% per year) were three times higher
than in the forest interior (1.05 0.22% per year). Here, tree death by
snapping was the most common type in edges and interior (34-36%), but
death by uprooting was more abundant in the edge whereas standing death
was more common towards the interior of the plot (D 'Angelo et al. 2004).
In eastern Ecuador, Gale and Barfod (1999) reported that 34% of tree
death was by uprooting, 35% by snapping, 15% by standing death, and
16% unclassified. In that study, the type of death differed between
136

dicotyledonous tree and palms (Iriartea deltoidea). Slope, altitude and the
presence of buttresses influenced death modes. Uprooting and snapping
occurred in a clumped pattern and was explained by steep terrain and high
rainfall. Standing death was randomly distributed over the plots.

Figure 6-6. Turnover rates calculated as the average of the mortality and
recruitment of the tropical forests, shown in Table 6-6. The dot is the
average and the length of the bar represents the difference between
mortality and recruitment rates.
Growth by diameter increment
Overall, the diameter increments in the two forest plots (0.13 cm per year
in the upland plot and 0.21 cm per year in the floodplain plot) were low
compared to those reported from other tropical forests (Taylor et al. 1996).
For example, 0.45 cm per year was measured in Venezuela (Veillon 1985);
0.5 cm per year in Puerto Rico (Crow and Weaver 1977); 0.44 cm per year
in Costa Rica (Lieberman and Lieberman 1985); 0.12 to 0.27 cm per year
in Malaysia (Nicholson quoted by Whitmore 1975); 0.39 to 0.78 cm per
year in so-called cativales in Colombia (Gonzlez 1994); 0.85-0.96 cm per
137

year in so-called guandal forest in Colombia (del Valle 1995). However, in


spite of the low growth values, the results from Pea Roja were consistent
with most other reports of tree growth in undisturbed tropical moist
lowland forests by showing a large variability in growth among species
and among individuals of the same species (Clark and Clark 1994, 1999;
Manokaran and Swaine 1994; Baker et al. 2003; Vester and Nararro 2007).
Soil fertility (Baker et al. 2003) and flooding (Keeland and Sharitz 1997)
have a strong impact on the variation in diameter increments of tropical
trees. Also the position of the tree crowns relative to the incoming
radiation influences tree growth. In forests of Quintana Roo (Yucatn,
Mxico) trees with well developed crowns showed diameter increments of
0.26 to 0.31 cm per year, whereas trees with crowns that were poorly
exposed to incoming light showed increments of only 0.10 to 0.21 cm per
year (Vester and Nararro 2007). The differences in annual diameter
increment between the upland and floodplain plot were in line with the
patterns that emerged from the litter fall and decomposition study (Lips
and Duivenvoorden 1996). In the upland plot tree growth, litter fall and
decomposition rates were slower than in the floodplain plot. It suggests
that accumulation of tree biomass as measured by girth increments is
associated to litter fall and to decomposition rates.
Intervals between censuses
In both upland and floodplain plots, the variation in mortality or
recruitment between the different measurement periods was small. Much
has been speculated on the effect of the length of the time interval in the
estimation of mortality rates and recruitment (Sheil 1996; Sheil and May
1996; Kubo et al. 2000; Phillips et al. 2004). Increasing the interval
between censuses improves the reliability of the estimate, but decreases
the precision by which one can describe the short-term events within the
period (Lieberman et al. 1985; Lewis et al. 2004b). When periods are long,
you may find that recruitment and mortality cancel each other out, if
recruitments die during the same period (Sheil and May 1996). Periods
that are too short, on the other hand may yield results that are not
representative for the forest as a whole (Londoo and Jimnez 1999). If
the plots are very large (Condit et al. 1995) there can be a long lapse of
time between the starting and ending date of one census (Kubo et al.
138

2000). Long periods of measurement improve the estimation of annual


mortality rates and recruitment, as these estimates contain more variation
of vegetation changes. However, with increasing inter-census periods it is
more difficult to accurately determine the mortality rates and the modes of
death. It is best to combine the analysis of mortality over short periods to
be aware of the causes of death, and over long periods to improve the
reliability of the rates (Lewis et al. 2004b).
6.6

Acknowledgements

The research has partially funded by Fundacin Tropenbos-Colombia, and


a loan of Instituto Colombiano para el Avance de la Ciencia y la
Tecnologa COLCIENCIAS to the author. In Tropenbos-Colombia the
successive directors Juan Guillermo Saldarriaga and Carlos Rodrguez
supported the project. The Nonuya Community in Pea Roja gave
permission to carry out field activities in their reserve, and provided
hospitality as well as constant help by sharing their traditional knowledge
of the forest. In Araracuara, the Instituto Colombiano de Investigaciones
Amaznicas (SINCHI) allowed using their facilties, and the successive
directors of the now called Herbario Amaznico Colombiano (COAH)
(Pablo Palacios, Mauricio Snchez, Diego Restrepo y Dairon Crdenas)
gave access to the herbarium. In Medelln, lvaro Cogollo provided
unconditional assistance and support at the Joaqun Antonio Uribe
Botanical Garden, and the Herbarium (JAUM). The establishment,
maintenance, and censuses in permanent plots were done with the help of
numerous volunteers, friends and colleagues. Special thanks to my
undergraduate students of Forest Engineering at the Universidad Nacional
de Colombia (sede Medelln): Edison Alcaraz, Eliana Jimnez, Sonia
Echeverri and Wilson Lpez. Jorge Ignacio del Valle (Universidad
Nacional de Colombia, sede Medelln), Ricardo Callejas (Universidad de
Antioquia), Roeloff Oldeman (Agricultural University of Wageningen)
and Joost F. Duivenvoorden (UvA) reviewed previous versions of this
chapter, and provided advice and guidance. Antoine Cleef (UvA), Henry
Hooghiemstra (UvA), and Roeloff Oldeman made possible the contact
between Colombian and Dutch institutions, and their help was crucial to
initiate, maintain and finish this long-term research. Ed de Bruijn kindly
helped with digitizing the profile of the upland transect.
139

140

7
Synthesis
Ana Catalina Londoo Vega

7.1

The dipterocarp species in the upland plot

The unexpected discovery of Pseudomonotes tropenbosii as the second


species of the dipterocarp family in the Neotropics illustrates the poor
knowledge of the flora of Colombian Amazonian up to the mid eighties of
the past century. Currently this situation has changed, not in the least
because of the continuing botanical inventories carried out by the Herbario
Amaznico of the SINCHI institute (http://www.sinchi.org.co/herbariov).
For example, the number of species registered in this herbarium increased
from less than 500 in 1985 to well over 6000 in 2009. The discovery of
Pseudomonotes tropenbosii was narrowly related to the establishment of
the permanent plots. Almost two years before the installment of the upland
plot, a sterile specimen of the species had been collected in a temporary
0.1-ha plot as part of the ecological mapping project (Brand et al. 1542,
collected on September 25 1986 in plot 51, located at the same site
approximately 250 m from the permanent plot; Joost Duivenvoorden,
personal communication; Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995;
http://www.sinchi.org.co/herbariov/detalle.php?=SID&ejemplar=6216).
This specimen remained unidentified at that time. However, as a
consequence of the repeated visits to the permanent plot the species was
eventually encountered in fertile condition and recognized as a member of
the Dipterocarpaceae family.
The dominance of Pseudomonotes tropenbosii in the upland plot is
intriguing. Local dominance of tree species in upper Amazonia tends to be
correlated with wide regional distributions (Pitman et al. 2001). Indeed,
the species has been spotted at other locations in the Middle Caquet area:
near Araracuara by Hans Vester (Londoo et al. 1995), corroborated by a
collection of Dairon Crdenas (7335,
http://www.sinchi.org.co/herbariov/detalle.php?=SID&ejemplar=26196).
Since the publication of Pseudomonotes tropenbosii, studies have
confirmed its taxonomic position. On the basis of wood anatomy, Morton
(1995) confirmed the close affinity of Pseudomonotes to the genera
Monotes (30 species in Africa and Madagascar) and Marquesia (three
species in Africa) of the subfamily Monotoideae. Subsequent phylogenic
analyses on the basis of rbcL sequences of 15 genera belonging to eight
families, including the rbcL sequence of Pseudomonotes (Morton et al.
142

1999) supported the placement of Pseudomonotes in the subfamily


Monotoideae of the Dipterocarpaceae. In one single most parsimonious
tree the monophyletic Dipterocarpaceae clade formed a clade sister to the
genus Sarcolaena (Sarcolaenaceae) while Monotes and Pseudomonotes
formed one group, which was sister to the monophyletic clade of
Pakaraimaea and the Asiatic dipterocarp species. Another molecular
analyses of the rbcL gene comprising 35 species from 20 genera
(excluding Pseudomonotes) confirmed the phylogenetic placement of
members of the Dipterocarpaceae, including Monotes and Pakaraimaea,
into a monophyletic group related to the Sarcolaenaceae and allied to
Malvales (Dayanandan et al. 1999).
7.2

Architectural analysis

Studies on forest architecture in Colombia are still scarce. Previous work


in the Colombian Amazonia focused on secondary forests, which are less
species rich and arguably less complex in structure than the forests in the
two permanent plots. Architectural analysis of the forest as a whole
depends on the presence of (woody) individuals in different stage of
development (Hall et al. 1978; delin 1991). Such situations are hard to
encounter in the old growth or mature forests, where contrary to
secondary forests most (woody) species are represented by only a few
individuals (Appendix 3). This high diversity has two consequences. First,
adequate architectural analyses by means of observations along transects
of all species requires extension of the transects to areas outside the
permanent plots, enhancing the chance that the forest changes in species
composition and structure, for example due to changing environmental
conditions. Secondly, transects to be used in the architectural analyses
likely contain quite different assemblages of species. One single transect,
or a low number of transects, may not give a balanced and representative
view on the structure and architectural development of the forest. In all
cases, substantial field efforts are required to render representative
information about the forest architecture in the plots that can be fruitfully
compared to plot variation in the demographic variables of mortality,
recruitment and growth.
The above considerations led to the selection of the three species of
Myristicaceae (Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum platyspermum and
143

Virola pavonis) as feasible subjects for a case study of architectural


analysis in old-growth forests. Myristicaceae is a family of trees, which
tend to occur in relatively large abundances, widespread in upper
Amazonia. The three selected species, which were represented by all
regeneration stages in the plots, shared several important architectural
characteristics. They showed a growth according to Massart's Model
(Hall et al. 1978), just as other species of Myristicacea (V. michelii and V.
surinamensis) (Drnou 1994; Loubry 1994; Loup 1994), during which
three orders of axes were reached. In early and mature stages of
development the three species shared plagiotropy and radial symmetry in
their branches, and showed capacity to reiterate adaptively and in response
to damage. Thus, the architectural analysis suggested that the growth plan
of these species would contribute to their ability to maintain healthy
populations in the forest, from the understory to the upper canopy.
Both architectural analysis and demographic analysis of forest in
permanent plots yield important information. Mortality and recruitment
represent simple binary responses of plant individuals to a dynamically
changing environment. However, plant responses are far more diverse, and
comprise gradual changes in growth and development, reproductive
performance, resource use efficiency, strength in competition with other
plants, and ability to cope with herbivores and pathogens. The importance
of architectural analysis lies in the large amount of information, which is
derived from observational studies on plant individuals in all stages of
structural development. The case-study of the three understory tree species
of Myristicaceae shows the large potential of architectural analysis to build
hypotheses why species might be adapted to particular conditions of forest
development, especially regarding abundant canopy or subcanopy species.
7.3

Composition and dynamics in an upland and a floodplain plots

Because the comparative study of the composition and dynamics of the


forests only included two plots, there were no means to generalize the
conclusions on the basis of statistical tests. However, the results can be
evaluated in the light of recently published paradigms of Amazonian forest
assemblage. Two of these (upper Amazonian forest-landscape patterns and
forest trends in Amazonia as a whole) are highlighted here.

144

The higher species richness in the upland plot compared to floodplain plot
and the low overlap in species composition between the two plots fitted
well into the general scheme of upper Amazonian forest-landscape
associations (Duivenvoorden and Duque 2010). These forest-landscape
associations have two explanations, which take place simultaneously but
which rely on principally different processes. The first explanation
emphasizes niche-filling mechanisms: species tend to show higher
abundances in those environments where they have a competitive
advantage over other species, for example because of species-specific
adaptations related to limited resource availability or to species-specific
abilities to overcome disturbances. This explanation tends to emphasize
the role of the environment in explaining differences in community
assemblage. During and shortly after the installment of the two plots it was
already known that they differed strongly in soils and decomposition of
organic matter. In the upland plot, soil nutrient availability and
decomposition rates were among the lowest levels for mesic upland sites
in Amazonia (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995). In sharp contrast, the soils
from the floodplain were less nutrient-poor and decomposition rates were
higher, because the parent material was much younger and enriched
through the occasional sedimentation during flooding by the Caquet
River. The results from the permanent plot study in this dissertation
suggest that the two forests also differ substantially regarding forest
dynamics (mortality, recruitment and modes of death). In the upland plot
the tree turnover was relatively slow (comparatively a low mortality and
recruitment) and trees tended to die in upright position yielding a low
spatial spread of canopy disturbances. In the floodplain plot trees died
quicker, grew faster, and tree uprooting was more common leading to
more widespread disturbances of the forest structure through the entire
plot. Clearly these differences agree with the between-plot differences in
decomposition rates and soil nutrient availability of the plots
(Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995). They also line up with results from
analyses of forest dynamics along gradients of soils and forest productivity
in the tropical forests worldwide (Malhi et al. 2006).
The second mechanism to explain the divergent between-plot patterns in
species richness and composition is by random walk processes modulated
through seed dispersal (Hubbell 2001). This explanation emphasizes that
145

forest communities are assembled by means of species immigrating from


surrounding species pools. Contrary to the upland plot that is located in the
Tertiary Sedimentary Plain, which is of Miocene to Pliocene age
(Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995), the floodplains of the Caquet River
originated in the Lateglacial and Holocene (van der Hammen et al.
1992ab). Given the long duration of the reproductive cycle of tree species
and the potentially slow migration rates of trees, it is not inconceivable
that time has been insufficient for many species to reach the floodplains,
explaining the lower species richness. The total species pool of the flora of
the Middle Caquet area includes several thousands of species (Snchez
1997), a number exceeding the number of species that can inhabit one
single plot. Therefore, random walk processes of species migration always
yield differences in species assemblages between any pair of plots,
potentially explaining the divergent species composition between the
upland and floodplain plot.
Regarding forest trends in Amazonia as a whole, recent publications drew
attention to a wide-scale trend of wood density (Baker et al. 2004),
biomass (Baker et al. 2004; Malhi et al. 2006), tree mortality (Phillips et
al. 2004) and tree species alpha diversity (ter Steege et al. 2006) along a
gradient from the (north)east (Surinam, Guyana) to upper Amazonia.
Because of the main geological configuration of Amazonia, where highly
weathered outcrops of the Guiana Shield are mostly found in the northeast
and less weathered basin infills along the Andes in the west, this trend can
be associated to a gradient in soil nutrient richness and productivity. This,
low diversity forests associated to low levels of forest dynamics (low
mortality, low productivity) are found in the northeast on very poor soils
developed on top of the highly weathered craton. On the other hand, high
diversity forests show higher mortality (and high wood productivity) and
are found on richer soils on geologically younger, less weathered
sediments along the Andes. How do the results of the two permanent plots
fit into this trend?
As far as the link between soil and forest dynamics is concerned the results
for the permanent plots corresponded well to the wide-scale Amazonian
trend: in the upland plot where soil nutrient availability and decomposition
rates were far below those in the floodplain plot, tree turnover was lower.
However regarding the mortality rates in the upland plot and the between146

plot diversity patterns the results of the permanent plots survey deviated
from the Pan-Amazonian trends. The tree mortality rates in the upland plot
were among the lowest recorded for Amazonian as a whole, and clearly far
lower than would be expected purely because of the location of this plot in
upper Amazonia. The species richness in the upland plot was higher than
that of the floodplain plot, even though its tree turnover was lower. This
suggests that particular conditions of occasional flooding and the presence
of poorly drained soils in Holocene to Lateglacial floodplains together
with the associated assemblage of tree species give rise to a high level of
forest dynamics relative to tree diversity. In general, the results from the
two permanent plots indicate that it is hazardous to apply insights based on
regional studies to local situations without proper knowledge of the local
physiography and terrain conditions.
7.4

Conclusions and recommendations

For two compelling reasons it is highly recommended to continue the


monitoring of the forests in the permanent plots near Pea Roja. The first
is that the upland plot represents the type locality of Pseudomonotes
tropenbosii. Adequate maintenance of the plot will help preserving the
habitat of this species, which represents one of the two species of
Dipterocarpaceae in the Neotropics. The second important reason is that
the two plots represent the oldest permanent plots in Colombian
Amazonia. Insights in forest dynamics yield crucial information regarding
the maintenance of forest diversity and the longer the time range in the
records the more reliable the information.
In addition, and parallel to the monitoring studies in the two permanent
plots, several lines of research need to be further developed to deepen our
insight how and why Amazonian forests vary regarding diversity and
species composition. Studies that experimentally test the link between seed
dispersal and species composition are highly needed. Likewise, the habitat
effect on plant diversity and species composition needs experimental
confirmation, for example by means of transplantation trials. In these
studies all relevant life-stages from different habits should be incorporated.

147

148

Literature

Achard, F., Eva, H. D., Stibig, H.-J., Mayaux, P., Gallego, J., Richards, T.
& Malingreau, J.-P. (2002) Determination of deforestation rates of
the world's humid tropical forests. Science, 297, 999-1002.
Alarcn, N. H. (1990) Levantamiento muy detallado de suelos en Villa
Azul. Colombia Amaznica, 4, 149-157.
Alcaraz, E. (2001) Evaluacin de la dinmica de un bosque de tierra firme
en la Amazonia colombiana (perodo 1994-1998). Tesis B.Sc.
(Ingeniera Forestal), Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede
Medelln, Medelln.
Alder, D. & Synnott, T. J. (1992) Permanent sample plot techniques for
mixed tropical forest. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
lvarez, E. (1993) Composicin florstica, diversidad, estructura y
biomasa de un bosque inundable en la Amazonia colombiana.
Tesis M.Sc. (Biologa), Universidad de Antioquia, Medelln.
lvarez, E., Cogollo, ., Melo, O., Rojas, E., Snchez, D., Velsquez, O.,
Sarria, E., Jimnez, E., Bentez, D., Velsquez, C., Serna, M.,
Londoo, A. C., Stevenson, P., Galeano, G., Peuela, M. C.,
Garca, F., Ramos, Y., Palacios, J. & Patio, S. (2008) Red de
parcelas permanentes para el monitoreo de los bosques nativos de
Colombia., pp. 56. Medelln.
Ashton, P. S. (1982) Dipterocarpaceae. Flora Malesiana, Ser. I, 9, 237552.
Ashton, P. S. (1990) Species richness in tropical forests. In: Tropical
forests: Botanical dynamics, speciation and diversity (eds L. B.
Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen & H. Balslev), pp. 239-251. Academic
Press, London.
Baker, T. R., Burslem, D. F. R. P. & Swaine, M. D. (2003) Associations
beween tree growth, soil fertility and water availability at local and
regional scales in Ghanian tropical rain forest. Journal of Tropical
Ecology, 19, 109-125.
Baker, T. R., Phillips, O. L., Malhi, Y., Almeida, S., Arroyo, L., Di Fiore,
A, Erwin, T., Higuchi, N., Killeen, T. J., Laurance, S. G.,
Laurance, W. F., Lewis, S. L., Monteagudo, A., Neill, D. A.,
Nez Vargas, P. Pitman, N. C. A., J., Silva, N. M. & Vsquez
Martnez, R. (2004) Increasing biomass in Amazonian forest plots.

150

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, London, Series B,


359, 353-365.
Bakker, J. P., Olff, H., Willems, J. H. & Zobel, M. (1996) Why do we
need permanent plots in the study of long-term vegetation
dynamics? Journal of Vegetation Science, 7, 147-156.
Balslev, H. & Renner, S. S. (1990) Diversity of East Ecuadorean lowland
forests. In: Tropical forests: Botanical dynamics, speciation and
diversity (eds L. B. Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen & H. Balslev), pp.
288-295 Academic Press, London.
Balslev, H., Luteyn, J., Ollgaard, B. & Holm-Nielsen, L. B. (1987)
Composition and structure of adjacent unflooded and flooded
forest in Amazonian Ecuador. Opera Botanica, 92, 37-57.
Bancroft, H. (1935) The wood anatomy of representative members of the
Monotoideae. American Journal of Botany, 22, 717-739.
Barthlmy, D. (1991) Levels of organization and repetion phenomena in
seed plants. Acta Biotheoretica, 39, 309-323.
Barthlmy, D., delin, C. & Hall, F. (1991) Canopy architecture. In:
Physiology of trees (ed. A. S. Raghavendra), pp. 1-20. John Wiley
& Sons, New York.
Bell, A. D. (1993) Plant form: An illustrated guide to flowering plant
morphology. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Bell, T. I. W. (1971) Management of the Trinidad Mora forests with
special reference to the Matura Forest Reserve. Forestry Division,
Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad.
Benavides, A. M. (2010) Distribution and succession of vascular epiphytes
in Colombian Amazonia. Ph.D. Thesis, Universiteit van
Amsterdam, Amsterdam.
Bennett, B. C. & Alarcn, R. (1994) Osteophloeum platyspermum and
Virola duckei (Myristicaceae): Newly reported as hallucinogens
from Amazonian Ecuador. Economic Botany, 48, 152-158.
Bigarella, J. J. & Ferreira, A. M. M. (1985) Amazonian geology and the
Pleistocene and the Cenozoic environments and paleoclimates. In:
Amazonia (eds G. T. Prance & T. Lovejoy), pp. 49-71. Pergamon
Press, Oxford.
Botero, P. J. (1984) Relacin fisiografa-suelos-aptitud de uso de la tierra
en la Amazonia colombiana. Revista CIAF, 9, 3-23.
151

Botero, P. J. (1999) Paisajes fisiogrficos de la Orinoquia-Amazonia


(ORAM) Colombia. Anlisis Geogrficos 27-28, Instituto
Geogrfico Agustn Codazzi, Bogot.
Brako, L. & Zarucchi, J. L. (1993) Catalogue of the flowering plants and
gymnosperms of Per. Missouri Botanical Garden, Saint Louis.
Brown, S. (1997) Estimating biomass and biomass change of tropical
forests: A primer. FAO, Rome.
Brown, S. (2002) Measuring carbon in forests: Current status and future
challenges. Environmental Pollution, 116, 363-372.
Brnig, E. F. & Huang, Y. W. (1990) Patterns of tree species diversity and
canopy structure and dynamics in humid tropical evergreen forests
on Borneo and in China. In: Tropical forests: Botanical dynamics,
speciation and diversity (eds L. B. Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen &
H. Balslev), pp. 75-88. Academic Press, London.
Caillez, F. (1980) Estimacin del volumen forestal y prediccin del
rendimiento, con referencia especial a los trpicos. FAO, Roma.
Campbell, D. G., Daly, D. C., Prance, G. T. & Maciel, U. N. (1986)
Quantitative ecological inventory of terra firme and vrzea tropical
forest on the ro Xing, Brazilian Amazon. Brittonia, 38, 369-393.
Campbell, P., Comiskey, J., Alonso, A., Dallmeier, F., Nuez, P., Beltran,
H., Baldeon, S., Nauray, W., de la Colina, R., Acurio, L. &
Udvardy, S. (2002) Modified Whittaker plots as an assessment and
monitoring tool for vegetation in a lowland tropical rainforest.
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 76, 19-41.
Canadell, J. G., Mooney, H. A., Baldocchi, D. D., Berry, J. A., Ehleringer,
J. R., Field, C. B., Gower, S. T., Hollinger, D. Y., Hunt, J. E.,
Jackson, R. B., Running, S. W., Shaver, G. R., Steffen, W.,
Trumbore, S. E., Valentini, R. & Bond, B. Y. (2000) Carbon
metabolism of the terrestrial biosphere: A multitechnique approach
for improved understanding. Ecosystems, 3, 115-130.
Carey, E. V., Brown, S., Gillespie, A. J. R. & Lugo, A. E. (1994) Tree
mortality in mature lowland tropical moist and tropical lower
montane moist forests of Venezuela. Biotropica, 26, 255-265.
Chao, K.-J., Phillips, O. L., Gloor, E., Monteagudo, A., Torres Lezama, A.
& Vsquez-Martnez, R. (2008) Growth and wood density predict
tree mortality in Amazon forests. Journal of Ecology, 96, 281-292.
152

Clark, D. A. & Clark, D. B. (1994) Climate induced annual variation in


canopy tree growth in a Costa Rican tropical rain forests. Journal
of Ecology, 82, 865-872.
Clark, D. A. & Clark, D. B. (1999) Assessing the growth of tropical rain
forest trees: issues for forest modelling and management.
Ecological Applications, 9, 981-997.
Clark, D. A., Piper, S. C., Keeling, C. D. & Clark, D. B. (2003) Tropical
rain forest tree growth and atmospheric carbon dynamics linked to
interannual temperature variation during 1984-2000. Proceedings
of National Academy of Science, 100, 5852-5857.
Clark, D. B. (1990) The role of disturbance in the regeneration of
Neotropical moist forests. Reproductive ecology of tropical forest
plants. (eds K. S. Bawa & M. Hadley), pp. 291-315. UNESCO and
the Parthenon Publishing Group, Paris.
Clark, J. S., Beckage, B., Camill, P., Cleveland, B., HilleRisLambers, J.,
Lichter, J., McLachlan, J., Mohan, J. & Wyckoff, P. (1999)
Interpreting recruitment limitation in forests. American Journal of
Botany, 86, 1-16.
Comiskey, J., Dallmeier, F. & Mistry, S. (1999) Protocolo de muestreo de
vegetacin para la Selva Maya. En: Monitoreo biolgico en la
Selva Maya (eds A. Carr & A. C. de Stoll), pp. 18-27. US Man and
the Biosphere, Tropical Ecosystem Directorate y Wildlife
Conservation Society, Guatemala.
Comte, L. (1993) Rythmes de croissance et structures spatiales priodiques
d'arbres tropicaux: Exemples de cinq espces de fort quatoriale.
Ph.D. Thesis, Universit Montpellier II, Sciencs et Techniques du
Languedoc, Montpellier.
Condit, R. (1998) Tropical forest census plots : methods and results for
Barro Colorado Island, Panama and a comparison with other plots.
Springer, Berlin.
Condit, R., Hubbell, S. P. & Foster, R. B. (1995) Mortality rates of 205
Neotropical tree and shrub species and their responses to severe
drought. Ecological Monographs, 65, 419-439.
Condit, R., Hubbell, S. P. & Foster, R. (1996) Changes in tree species
abundance in a Neotropical forest over eight years: Impact of
climate change. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 12, 231-256.
153

Cronquist, A. (1981) An integrated system of classification of flowering


plants. Columbia University Press, New York.
Crow, T. R. (1980) A rainforest chronicle: A 30-year record of change in
structure and composition at El Verde, Puerto Rico. Biotropica, 12,
42-45.
Crow, T. R. & Weaver, P. L. (1977) Tree growth in moist tropical forest of
Puerto Rico. Research Paper ITF-22, USDA Forest Service,
Institute of Tropical Forestry, Rio Pedras, Puerto Rico.
Curtis, H. T. & McIntosh, R. J. (1951) An upland forest continuum in the
praire-forest border region of Wisconsin. Ecology, 32, 476-496.
D'Angelo, S. A., Andrade, A. C. S., Laurance, S. G., Laurance, W. F. &
Mesquita, R. C. G. (2004) Inferred causes of tree mortality in
fragmented and intact Amazonian forests. Journal of Tropical
Ecology, 20, 243-246.
Dallmeier, F. (1992) Long-term monitoring of biological diversity in
tropical forest areas: Methods for establishment and inventory of
permanent plots. MAB Digest 11. UNESCO, Paris.
Daly, D. C. & Prance, G. T. (1989) Brazilian Amazon. In: Floristic
inventory of tropical countries (eds D. G. Campbell & H. D.
Hammond), pp. 401-426. New York Botanical Garden, New York.
Dawkins, H. C. (1958) The management of natural tropical high forest
with special reference to Uganda. Imperial Forest Institute,
University of Oxford, Oxford.
Dayanandan, S., Ashton, P. S., Williams, S. M. & Primack, R. B. (1999)
Phylogeny of the tropical tree family Dipterocarpaceae based on
nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast rbcL gene. American
Journal of Botany, 86, 1182-1190.
de Barros, P. L. C. (1986) Estudo fitosociolgico de una floresta tropical
mida no planalto de Curu-Una, Amaznia brasileira. Ph.D.
Thesis, Universidade Federal do Paran, Curitiba.
de Castro, A. (1980) Essai de classification des arbres tropicaux selon leur
capacit de riteration. Biotropica, 12, 187-194.
de Zeeuw, C. (1977) Pakaraimoideae, Dipterocarpacae of the Western
hemisphere. III. Stem anatomy. Taxon, 26, 368-380.

154

del Valle, J. I. (1979) Rendimiento y crecimiento de Cupressus lusitanica


en Antioquia, Colombia. Crnica Forestal y del Medio Ambiente,
1, 1-43.
del Valle, J. I. (1995) Evaluacin del crecimiento diamtrico de rboles de
humedales forestales del pacfico colombiano. Interciencia, 20,
273-282.
del Valle, J. I. (1996a) Los bosques de guandal del delta del ro Pata.
Revista de la Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Exactas Fsicas y
Naturales, 20, 475-489.
del Valle, J. I. (1996b) Prcticas tradicionales de produccin y
ordenamiento territorial. In: Renacientes del guandal: Grupos
negros de los ros Satinga y Sanquianga (eds J. I. del Valle & E.
Restrepo), pp. 443-473. Universidad Nacional de Colombia,
Bogot.
del Valle, J. I. (1998a) Compatibilizacin del crecimiento orgnico,
estructura poblacional y mortalidad: aplicacin para el rbol
tropical Otoba gracilipes. I Congreso Latinoamericano IUFRO. El
manejo sustentable de los recursos forestales: desafo del siglo
XXI. IUFRO, Valdivia, Chile.
del Valle, J. I. (1998b) Efectos del raleo en el crecimiento diamtrico de
los bosques de Campnosperma de Colombia. Crnica Forestal y
del Medio Ambiente, 13, 89-103.
del Valle, J. I. (1999) Mortalidad, sobrevivencia y vida media del rbol
tropical Campnosperma panamensis. Crnica Forestal y del Medio
Ambiente, 14, 5-18.
Denslow, J. S. (1987) Tropical rainforest gaps and tree species diversity.
Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 18, 431-451.
Domnguez, C. A. (1987) Colombia y la Panamazonia. En: Colombia
amaznica (eds M. Jimeno, S. Crdenas, A. M. Sierra, P. Leyva &
A. Guarnizo), pp. 31-50. Universidad Nacional de Colombia,
Fondo para la Proteccin del Medio Ambiente Jos Celestino
Mutis FEN, Bogot.
Drnou, C. (1994) Approche architecturale de la snescence des arbres: le
cas de quelques angiospermes tempres et tropicales. Ph.D.
Thesis, Universit Montpellier II, Sciencs et Techniques du
Languedoc, Montpellier.
155

Dubois, J. (1980) Curso multinacional de capacitacin en silvicultura y


manejo de bosques amaznicos. IICA, Medelln.
Duivenvoorden, J. F. (1994) Vascular plant species counts in the rain
forests of the middle Caquet area, Colombian Amazonia.
Biodiversity and Conservation, 3, 685-715.
Duivenvoorden, J. F. (1995) Tree species composition and rain forestenvironmental relationships in the middle Caquet area, Colombia,
NW Amazonia. Vegetatio, 120, 91-113.
Duivenvoorden, J. F. (1996) Patterns of tree species richness in rain forests
of the middle Caquet area, Colombia, NW Amazonia. Biotropica,
28, 142-158.
Duivenvoorden, J.F. & Duque. A.J. (2010) Composition and diversity of
northwestern Amazonian forests in a geoecological context. In:
Amazonia - Landscape and species evolution: a look in the past
(eds C. Hoorn & F. Wesselingh), pp. 360-372. Wiley-Blackwell,
Chichester.
Duivenvoorden, J. F. & Lips, J. M. (1990) Levantamiento ecolgico de la
cuenca del medio Caquet: Avance de investigacin para la
comisin evaluadora. Fundacin Tropenbos-Colombia.
Duivenvoorden, J. F. & Lips, J. M. (1993) Ecologa del paisaje del Medio
Caquet: Memoria explicativa de los mapas. Fundacin
Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Duivenvoorden, J. F. & Lips, J. M. (1995) A land-ecological study of
soils, vegetation, and plant diversity in Colombian Amazonia.
Tropenbos Foundation, Wageningen.
Duivenvoorden, J. F., Balslev, H., Cavalier, J., Grndez, C., Tuomisto, H.
& Valencia, R. (2001) Evaluacin de recursos vegetales no
maderables en la Amazonia noroccidental. Institute for
Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Universiteit van
Amsterdam, Amsterdam.
Duivenvoorden, J. F., Lips, J., Palacios, P. A. & Saldarriaga, J. G. (1988)
Levantamiento ecolgico de parte de la cuenca del medio Caquet
en la Amazonia colombiana. Colombia Amaznica, 3, 7-38.
Duque, A. (2004) Plant diversity scaled by growth forms along spatial and
environmental gradients: A study in the rain forest of NW
Amazonia. Tropenbos International, Wageningen.
156

Echeverri, A. (1993) Formas de crecimiento, produccin de hojas y


distribucin de palmas y Phenakospermun guianense (L. C. Rich.)
Enclicher ex Miquel (Strelitziaceae) en una cronosecuencia sobre
Terrazas Bajas del Ro Caquet en la Amazonia colombiana. Tesis
B.Sc. (Biologa), Universidad de Antioquia, Medelln.
Echeverri, A. (1997) Anlisis arquitectnico de Quercus humboldtii
(roble) en Antioquia, Colombia. Universidad de Antioquia,
COLCIENCIAS, Medelln.
Echeverri, S. V. & Lpez, E. W. (2000) Dinmica de un bosque de vrzea
en la Amazonia colombiana. Tesis B.Sc. (Ingeniera Forestal),
Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Medelln, Medelln.
delin, C. (1977) Image de l'architecture des conifres. Thse Spcialit
M.Sc., Universit Montpellier II, Sciencs et Techniques du
Languedoc, Montpellier.
delin, C. (1984) L'architecture monopodiale: L'exemple de quelques
arbres d'Asie tropicale. Ph.D. Thesis, Universit Montpellier II,
Sciencs et Techniques du Languedoc, Montpellier.
delin, C. (1991) Nouvelles donnes sur l'architecture des arbres
sympodiaux: Le concept de plan d'organisation. In: L'arbre:
Biologie et developpement (ed. C. delin), pp. 127-154. Institut de
Botanique, Universit Montpellier II, Montpellier.
Eden, M. J., McGregor, D. F. M. & Morelo, J. A. (1982) Geomorphology
of the Middle Caquet basin of Eastern Colombia. Zeistschrift fr
Geomorphologie, 26, 343-364.
Erdtman, G. (1952) An introduction to Palynology I. Pollen morphology
and plant taxonomy. Angiosperms. Almqvist and Wiksell,
Stockholm.
FAO (1988) FAO/UNESCO soil map of the world, revised legend, with
corrections. FAO, Rome.
FAO (2001) Global forest resource assessment: 2000 main report. FAO,
Rome.
Fearnside, P. M. & Laurance, W. F. (2003) Comment on 'Determination of
deforestation rates of the world's humid tropical forests'. Science,
299, 1015a.

157

Felfili, J. M. (1995) Growth, recruitment and mortality in the Gamma


gallery forest in Central Brazil, over a six -year period (19851991). Journal of Tropical Ecology, 11, 67-83.
Foster, R. B. (1990) The floristic composition of the ro Manu floodplain
forest. In: Four Neotropical rainforests. (ed A. H. Gentry), pp. 99111. Yale University Press, New Haven.
Foster, R. B. & Hubbell, S. P. (1990) The floristic composition of Barro
Colorado Island forest. In: Four Neotropical rainforests (ed. A. H.
Gentry), pp. 85-98. Yale University Press, New Haven.
Foster, M. J. and Terborgh, J. (1998) Impact of a rare storm event on an
Amazonian forest. Biotropica, 30, 470-474.
Franklin, J. F., Shugart, H. H. & Harmon, M. E. (1987) The death as an
ecological process. BioScience, 37, 550-556.
Gale, N. (1997) Modes of tree death in four tropical forests. Ph.D. Thesis,
University of Aarhus, Aarhus.
Gale, N. & Barfod, A. S. (1999) Canopy tree mode of death in a Western
Ecuadorian rain forest. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 15, 416-436.
Galeano, G. (1992) Las palmas de la regin de Araracuara. Fundacin
Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Gentry, A. H. (1982) Neotropical floristic diversity: Phyto-geographical
connections between Central and South America, Pleistocene
climatic fluctuations, or an accident of the Andean orogeny?
Annals of Missouri Botanical Garden 69, 557-593.
Gentry, A. H. (1986) Species richness and floristic composition of Choc
region plant communities. Caldasia, 15, 71-92.
Gentry, A. H. (1988a) Changes in plant community diversity and floristic
composition on environmental and geographical gradients. Annals
of the Missouri Botanical Garden, 75, 1-34.
Gentry, A. H. (1988b) Tree species richness of upper Amazonian forests.
Proceedings of National Academy of Science, 85, 156-159.
Gentry, A. H. (1990a) Floristic similarities and differences between
southern Central America and upper and central Amazonia. In:
Four Neotropical Rainforests (ed. A. H. Gentry), pp. 141-157. Yale
University Press, New Haven.

158

Gentry, A. H. (1990b) Speciation in tropical forests. In: Tropical Forests


(eds L. B. Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen & H. Balslev), pp. 113-134.
Academic Press, New York.
Gentry, A. H. (1991a) The distribution and evolution of climbing plants.
In: The biology of vines (eds F. E. Putz & H. A. Mooney), pp. 342. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Gentry, A. H. (1991b) La regin amaznica. In: Selva hmeda de
Colombia (eds G. Villegas & C. Hurtado), pp. 53-64. Villegas
Editores, Bogot.
Gentry, A. H. (1991c) La regin del Choc. In: Selva hmeda de
Colombia (eds G. Villegas & C. Hurtado), pp. 41-48. Villegas
Editores, Bogot.
Gentry, A. H. (1992) Tropical forest biodiversity: Distributional patterns
and their conservational significance. Oikos, 63, 19-28.
Gentry, A. H. (1993) Overview of the Peruvian flora. In: Catalogue of the
flowering plants and gymnosperms of Per (eds L. Brako & J. L.
Zarucchi), pp. xxix-xxxviii. Missouri Botanical Garden, Saint
Louis.
Gentry, A. H. & Emmons, L. H. (1987) Geographical variation in fertility,
phenology, and composition of the understory of Neotropical
forests. Biotropica, 19, 216-227.
Gentry, A. H. & Ortiz, R. (1993) Patrones de composicin florstica en la
Amazonia Peruana. In: Amazonia peruana: Vegetacin hmeda
tropical en el llano subandino (eds R. Kalliola, M. Puhakka & W.
Danjoy), pp. 155-166. Proyecto Amazonia, Universidad de Turku
(PAUT) & Oficina Nacional de Evaluacin de Recursos Naturales
(ONERN), Jyvskyl, Finlandia.
Gentry, A. H. & Terborgh, J. (1990) Composition and dynamics of the
Cocha Cashu "mature" floodplain forest. In: Four Neotropical
rainforests (ed. A. H. Gentry), pp. 542-564. Yale University Press,
New Haven.
Giannasi, D. E. & Niklas, K. J. (1977) Pakaraimoideae, Dipterocarpaceae
of the Western hemisphere. IV. Phytochemestry. Taxon, 26, 380385.
Gonzlez, H. (1994) Anlisis del crecimiento en condiciones naturales de
Prioria copaifera Grisebach por medio de modelos matemticos.
159

Tesis M.Sc (Silvicultura y Manejo de Bosques), Universidad


Nacional de Colombia sede Medelln Medelln.
Gonzlez, H. (1995) Anlisis del crecimiento diamtrico de Prioria
copaifera en condiciones naturales por medio de un modelo
matemtico determinstico. Crnica Forestal y del Medio
Ambiente, 10, 101-120.
Gonzlez, H., Gmez, H. D. & Arteaga, F. J. (1991) Aspectos estructurales
de un bosque de cativo en la regin del bajo Atrato, Colombia.
Revista de la Facultad Nacional de Agronoma (Medelln), 44, 350.
Gottwald, H. & Parameswaran, N. (1966) Das sekundare Xylem der
Familie Dipterocarpaceae. Botanische Jahrbcher fr Systematik,
Pflanzengeschichte und Pflanzengeographie, 85, 410-508.
Grant, V. (1989) Especiacin vegetal. Noriega Editores, Mxico.
Guerin, P. (1906) Cellules a mucilage des Dipterocarpacees. Bulletin de la
Socit Botanique de France, 53, 443-451.
Hall, P., Ashton, P. S., Condit, R., Manokaran, N. & Hubbell, S. P. (1998)
Signal and noise in sampling tropical forest structure and
dynamics. In: Forest biodiversity research, monitoring and
modelling: conceptual background and Old World case studies
(eds F. Dallmeier & J. Comiskey), pp. 63-77. UNESCO & The
Parthenon Group, Paris.
Hall, F. (1995) Canopy architecture in tropical trees: A pictorial
approach. In: Forest canopies (eds M. D. Lowman & N. M.
Nadkarni), pp. 27-44. Academic Press, San Diego.
Hall, F. & Oldeman, R. A. A. (1970) Essai sur l'architecture et la
dynamique de croissance des arbres tropicaux. Masson, Paris.
Hall, F., Oldeman, R. A. A. & Tomlinson, P. B. (1978) Tropical trees and
forests: An architectural analysis. Springer, Berlin.
Hammel, B. (1990) The distribution of diversity among families, genera,
and habit types in the La Selva flora. In: Four Neotropical
rainforests (ed. A. H. Gentry), pp. 75-84. Yale University Press,
New Haven.
Hartshorn, G. S. (1990a) Gap-phase dynamics and tropical tree species
richness. In: Tropical forests: Botanical dynamics, speciation and

160

diversity (eds L. B. Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen & H. Balslev), pp.


65-73. Academic Press, London.
Hartshorn, G. S. (1990b) An overview of Neotropical forest dynamics. In:
Four Neotropical rainforests (ed. A. H. Gentry), pp. 585-600. Yale
University Press, New Haven.
Hegarty, E. & Caball, G. (1991) Distribution and abundance of vines in
forest communities. In: The biology of vines (eds F. E. Putz & H.
A. Mooney), pp. 305-327. Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge.
Herben, T. (1996) Permanent plots as tools for plant community ecology.
Journal of Vegetation Science, 7, 195-202.
Herrera, M. M. (1994) La familia Myristicaceae: Posibilidades de uso
mltiple y sostenido en bosques hmedos tropicales de Colombia.
Tesis B.Sc. (Biologa), Universidad Nacional de Colombia,
Bogot.
Holdridge, L. R. (1982) Ecologa basada en zonas de vida. Instituto
Interamericano de Cooperacin para la Agricultura, IICA, San Jos
(Costa Rica).
Holdridge, L. R., Grenke, W. C., Hatheway, W. H., Liang, T. & Tosi, J. A.
(1971) Forest environments in tropical life zones: A pilot study.
Pergamon Press, Oxford.
Holmgren, M., Scheffer, M., Ezcurra, E., Gutirrez, J. R. & Mohren, G. M.
J. (2001) El Nio effects on the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 16, 89-94.
Hoorn, C. (1990) Evolucin de los ambientes sedimentarios durante el
Terciario y el Cuaternario en la Amazonia colombiana. Colombia
Amaznica, 4, 97-126.
Hoorn, C. (1994) Miocene palynostratigraphy and paleoenvironments of
Nortwestern Amazonia: Evidence for marine incursions and the
influence of Andean tectonics. Ph.D. Thesis, Universiteit van
Amsterdam, Amsterdam.
Hoorn, C. & Wesselingh, F. (eds) (2010) Amazonia - Landscape and
species evolution: a look in the past. Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester.
Houghton, J. T., Ding, Y., Griggs, D. J., Noguer, M., van der Linden, P. J.,
Dai, X., Maskell, K. & Jonhnson, C. A. (2001) The scientific basis.
IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Contribution
161

of Working Group 1 to the IPCC, third Assessment. Cambridge


University Press, Cambridge.
Hubbell, S. P. (2001) The unified neutral theory of biodiversity and
biogeography. Princeton University Press, Princeton.
Hubbell, S. P. (2004) Two decades of research on the BCI forest dynamics
plot. Tropical forest diversity and dynamism: Findings from a
large-scale plot network. (eds E. C. Losos & E. G. Leigh), pp. 830. Chicago University Press. 645 p., Chicago.
Hubbell, S. P. & Foster, R. B. (1986) Canopy gaps and the dynamics of a
Neotropical forest. In: Plant ecology (ed. M. J. Crawley), pp. 7795. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford.
Hubbell, S. P. & Foster, R. B. (1990) Structure, dynamics and equilibrium
status of old-growth forest on Barro Colorado Island. In: Four
Neotropical Forests (ed. A. H. Gentry), pp. 522-541. Yale
University Press, New Haven.
Huston, M. (1980) Soil nutrients and tree species richness in Costa-Rican
forests. Journal of Biogeography, 7, 147-157.
Irion, G. (1990) Quaternary geological history of the Amazon lowlands.
In: Tropical forests: Botanical dynamics, speciation and diversity
(eds L. B. Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen & H. Balslev), pp. 23-34.
Academic Press, London.
Jimnez, E. M. (2000) Arquitectura de tres especies de Myristicaceae en
dos bosques de la regin de Araracuara (Amazonia colombiana).
Tesis B.Sc. (Ingeniera Forestal), Universidad Nacional de
Colombia, Medelln.
Jonkers, W. B. J. (1987) Vegetation structure, logging damage and
silviculture in a tropical rain forest in Suriname. Agricultural
University of Wageningen, Wageningen.
Junk, W. J. (1984) Ecology of the vrzea, floodplain of Amazonian
whitewatter rivers. The Amazon: Limnology and landscape
ecology of a mighty tropical river and its basin. (ed H. Sioli), pp.
215-243. Junk Publishers, Dordrecht
Junk, W. J. (1990) Flood tolerance and tree distibution in central
Amazonian floodplains. In: Tropical forests: Botanical dynamics,
speciation and diversity (eds L. B. Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen &
H. Balslev), pp. 47-64. Academic Press, London.
162

Junk, W. J. & Furch, K. (1985) The physical and chemical properties of


Amazonian waters. In: Amazonia (eds G. T. Prance & T. Lovejoy),
pp. 3-17. Pergamon Press, Oxford.
Keeland, B. D. & Sharitz, R. R. (1997) The effects of water-level
fluctuations on weekly tree growth in a Southeastern USA Swamp.
American Journal of Botany, 84, 131-139.
Kenneth, L. (1995) Forest dynamics, differential mortality and variable
recruitment probabilities. Journal of Vegetation Science, 6, 191204.
Kppen, W. (1936) Das geographische System der Klimate. Handbuch der
Klimatologie. (eds W. Kppen & R. Geiger), pp. 1-44. Verlag
Gebrder Borntraeger, Berlin.
Korning, J. & Balslev, H. (1994) Growth and mortality of trees in
Amazonian tropical rain forests in Ecuador. Journal of Vegetation
Science, 4, 77-86.
Korning, J., Thomsen, K. & Ollgaard, B. (1991) Composition and
structure of a species rich Amazonian rain forest obtained by two
different sample methods. Nordic Journal of Botany, 11, 103-110.
Krebs, C. J. (1989) Ecological methodology. Harper & Row Publishers,
New York.
Kubo, T., Kohyama, T., Potts, M. D. & Ashton, P. S. (2000) Mortality rate
estimation when inter-census intervals vary. Journal of Tropical
Ecology, 16, 753-756.
la Rotta, C. (1982) Observaciones etnobotnicas de la comunidad
Andoque de la Amazonia colombiana. Colombia Amaznica, 1,
53-67.
la Rotta, C., Miraa, P., Miraa, M., Miraa, B., Miraa, M. & Yucuna, N.
(1989) Especies utilizadas por la comunidad Miraa: Estudio
etnobotnico. World Wildlife Fund, Fondo para la proteccin del
Medio Ambiente Jos Celestino Mutis FEN, Bogot.
Laurance, W. F., Ferreira, L. V., Rankin-de Moreno, J. M. & Hutchings,
R. (1998) Influence of plot shape on estimates of tree diversity and
community composition in central Amazonia. Biotropica, 30, 662665.
Laurance, W. F., Oliveira, A. A., Laurance, S. G., Condit, R., Nascimento,
H. E. M., Snchez-Thorin, A. C., Lovejoy, T., Andrade, A.,
163

D'Angelo, S., Ribeiro, J. & Dick, C. W. (2004) Pervasive alteration


of tree communities in undisturbed Amazonian forests. Nature,
428, 171-175.
Lema, . (1995) Dasometra: Algunas aproximaciones estadsticas a la
medicin forestal. Centro de Publicaciones Universidad Nacional
de Colombia sede Medelln, Medelln.
Lema, . (2002) Inventarios forestales: Estadstica y planificacin.
Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Medelln, Medelln.
Lewis, S. L., Phillips, O. L., Baker, P., Lloyd, J., Malhi, Y., Almeida, S.,
Higuchi, N., Laurance, W. F., Neill, D. A., Silva, J. N. M.,
Terborgh, J., Torres Lezama, A., Vsquez-Martnez, R., Brown, S.,
Chave, J., Kuebler, C., Nnez Vargas, P. & Vinceti, B. (2004a)
Concerted changes in tropical forest structure and dynamics:
evidence from 50 South American long-term plots. Philosophical
Transactions of the Royal Society, London, Series B, 359, 421436.
Lewis, S. L., Phillips, O. L., Sheil, D., Vincenti, B., Baker, T. R., Brown,
S., Graham, A. W., Higuchi, N., Hilbert, D. W., Laurance, W. F.,
Lejoly, J., Malhi, Y., Monteagudo, A., Nez Vargas, P., Sonk,
B., Supardi M.N., M., Terborgh, J. W. & Vsquez Martnez, R.
(2004b) Tropical forest tree mortality, recruitment and turnover
rates: calculation, interpretation and comparison when census
intervals vary. Journal of Ecology, 92, 929-944.
Lieberman, D., Hartshorn, G. S., Lieberman, M. & Peralta, R. (1990)
Forests dynamics at La Selva biological station. In: Four
Neotropical rainforests (ed. A. H. Gentry), pp. 509-521. Yale
University Press, New Heaven.
Lieberman, D., Lieberman, M., Peralta, R. & Hartshorn, G. S. (1985)
Mortality patterns and stand turnover rates in a wet tropical forest
in Costa Rica. Jounal of Ecology, 73, 915-924.
Lieberman, M. & Lieberman, D. (1985) Simulation of growth curves from
periodic increment data. Ecology, 66, 632-635.
Lips, J. M. & Duivenvoorden, J. F. (1994) Geomorphic and
lithostratigraphic evidence of Pleostocene climatic change in
Amazonia: new data from the Middle Caquet area, Colombia.
Geo-Eco-Trop, 16, 21-47.
164

Lips, J. M. & Duivenvoorden, J. F. (1996) Fine litter input to terrestrial


humus forms in Colombian Amazonia. Oecologia, 108, 138-150.
Londoo, A. C. (1993) Anlisis estructural de dos bosques asociados a
unidades fisiogrficas contrastantes en la regin de Araracuara
(Amazonia colombiana). Tesis B.Sc. (Ingeniera Forestal),
Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Medelln, Medelln.
Londoo, A. C. & lvarez, E. (1991) Resultados preliminares sobre la
estructura de bosques de tierra firme y de vrzea en Pea Roja.
Fundacin Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Londoo, A. C. & lvarez, E. (1993) Reporte preliminar biomasa.
Fundacin Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Londoo, A. C. & lvarez, E. (1997) Composicion florstica de dos
bosques (tierra firme y vrzea) en la region de Araracuara,
Amazonia colombiana. Caldasia, 19, 431-463.
Londoo, A. C. & Jimnez, E. M. (1999) Efecto del tiempo entre los
censos sobre la estimacin de las tasas anuales de mortalidad y de
reclutamiento de rboles (perodos de 1, 4 y 5 aos). Crnica
Forestal y del Medio Ambiente, 14, 41-57.
Londoo, A. C., lvarez, E., Forero, E. & Morton, C. (1995) A new genus
and species of Dipterocarpaceae from the Neotropics: I.
Introduction, taxonomy, ecology and distribution. Brittonia, 47,
225-236.
Losos, E. C. & Leigh, E. G. (2004) Forest dynamics and dynamism:
Findings from a network of large-scale tropical forest plots. The
University of Chicago Press, Chicago.
Loubry, D. (1994) Dterminisme du comportement phnologique des
arbes en fort tropicale humide de Guyane franaise (5 lat. N.).
Ph.D. Thesis, Universit de Paris VI. 2v., Paris.
Loup, C. (1994) Essai sur le determinisme de la variabilit architecturale
des arbres: Le cas de quelques espces tropicales. Ph.D. Thesis,
Universit Montpellier II, Montpellier.
Lugo, A. & Scatena, F. N. (1996) Background and catastrophic tree
mortality in tropical mois, wet, and rain forests. Biotropica, 28,
585-599.
Mabberley, D. J. (1990) The plant book: A portable dictionary of the
higher plants. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
165

Mabberley, D. J. (1992) Tropical rain forest ecology. Chapman and Hall,


New York.
Madrin, S. (1996) Richard Spruce's pioneering work on tree
architecture. In: Richard Spruce (1817-1893): botanist and
explorer (eds M. R. D. Seaward & S. M. D. FitzGerald), pp. 215226. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
Maguire, B. (1977) Pakaraimoideae, Dipterocarpaceae from the Western
hemisphere. I. Introduction. Taxon, 26, 341-342.
Maguire, B. & Ashton, P. S. (1977) Pakaraimoideae, Dipterocarpaceae
from the Western hemisphere. II. Systematic, geographic and
phyletic considerations. Taxon, 26, 343-368.
Magurran, A. (1988) Ecological diversity and its measurement. Princeton
University Press, Princeton.
Malhi, Y. & Phillips, O. L. (2004) Tropical forest and global atmospheric
change: a synthesis. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal
Society of London, Series B, 395, 549-555.
Malhi, Y., Phillips, O. L., Lloyd, J., Baker, T., Wright, J., Almeida, S.,
Arroyo, L., Frederiksen, T., Grace, J., Higuchi, N., Killeen, T.,
Laurance, W. F., Leao, C., Lewis, S., Meir, P., Monteagudo, A.,
Nez Vargas, P., Panfil, S., Patio, S., Pitman, N., Quesada, C.
A., Rudas, A., Salomo, R., Saleska, S., Silva, N., Silveira, M.,
Sombroek, W. G., Valencia, R., Vsquez Martines, R., Vieira, I. C.
G. & Vinceti, B. (2002) An international network to monitor the
structure, composition and dynamics of Amazonian forests
(Rainfor). Journal of Vegetation Science, 13, 439-450.
Malhi, Y., Wood, D., Baker, T. R., Wright, J., Phillips, O. L, Cochrane, T.,
Meir, P., Chave, J., Almeida, S., Arroyo, L., Higuchi, N., Killeen,
T. J., Laurance, S. G., Laurance, W. F., Lewis, S. L., Monteagudo,
A., Neill, D. A., Vargas, P. N., Pitman, N. C. A., Quesada, C. A.,
Salomao, R., Silva, J. N. M., Lezama, A. T., Terborgh, J.,
Martinez, R. V. & Vinceti, B. (2006) The regional variation of
aboveground live biomass in old-growth Amazonian forests.
Global Change Biology, 12, 1107-1138.
Manokaran, N. & Swaine, M. D. (1994) Population dynamics of trees in
Dipterocarp forests of Peninsular Malaysia. Malayan Forest
Records 40, Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur.
166

Martnez, X. & Galeano, G. (1994) Los platanillos del Medio Caquet: Las
Heliconias y el Phenakospermum. Fundacin TropenbosColombia, Bogot.
Matelson, T. J., Nadkarni, N. M. & Solano, R. (1995) Tree damage and
annual mortality in a montane forest in Monteverde, Costa Rica.
Biotropica, 27, 441-447.
Matteuci, S. D. & Colma, A. (1982) Metodologa para el estudio de la
vegetacin. Secretara de la Organizacin de los Estados
Americanos (OEA), Washington.
Maury, G., Muller, J. & Lugardon, B. (1975) Notes on the morphology
and fine structure of the exine of some pollen types in
Dipterocarpaceae. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 19,
241-289.
Mayle, F. E., Beerling, D. J., Gosling, W. J. & Bush, M. B. (2004)
Responses of Amazonian ecosystems to climatic and atmospheric
carbon dioxide changes since the Last Glacial Maximum.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series
B, 359, 499-514.
Missouri-Botanical-Garden (2001) WWW Tropicos. VAST (VAScular
Tropicos) nomenclatural database.
Mora, S. (ed.) (2003) Early inhabitants of the Amazonian tropical rain
forest: A study of human and environmental dynamics. Latin
American Archaeology Reports 3, University of Pittsburgh,
Pittsburgh.
Mora, S., Herrera, L. F., Cavelier, I. & Rodrguez, C. (1991). Plantas
cultivadas, suelos antrpicos y estabilidad: Informe preliminar
sobre la arqueologa de Araracuara, Amazonia colombiana. Latin
American Archaeology Reports 2, University of Pittsburgh,
Pittsburgh.
Mori, S. A., Boom, B. M., Carvalino, A. M. & dos Santos, T. S. (1983)
Ecological importance of Myrtaceae in an Eastern Brazilian wet
forest. Biotropica, 15, 68-70.
Morton, C. M. (1995) A new genus and species of Dipterocarpaceae form
the Neotropics. II. Stem anatomy. Brittonia, 47, 237-247.
Morton, C. M., Dayanandan, S. & Dissanayake, D. (1999) Phylogeny and
biosystematics of Pseudomonotes (Dipterocarpaceae) based on
167

molecular and morfological data. Plant Systematics and Evolution,


216, 197-205.
Murillo, J. C. & Franco, P. (1995) Las euforbiceas de la regin de
Araracuara. Fundacin Tropenbos Colombia, Bogot.
Negrelle, R. R. B. (1995) Sprouting after uprooting of canopy trees in the
Atlantic rain forest of Brazil. Biotropica, 27, 448-454.
Nelson, B. W., Ferreira, C. A. C., da Silva, M. F. & Kawasaki, M. L.
(1990) Endemism centers, refugia and botanial collection density
in Brazilian Amazonia. Nature, 345, 714-716.
Nelson, B. W., Kapos, V., Adams, J. B., Oliveira, W. J., Braun, O. P. G. &
do Amaral, I. L. (1994) Forest disturbance by large blowdowns in
the Brazilian Amazon. Ecology, 75, 853-858.
Nilsson, S. & Praglowski, J. (1992) Erdtman's handbook of palynology.
Munksgaard International Publishers, Copenhagen.
Oldeman, R. A. A. (1974) L'architecture de la fort Guyanaise. ORSTOM,
Paris.
Oldeman, R. A. A. (1990a) Forest ecosystems and their components: An
introduction. In: Forest components (eds R. A. A. Oldeman, P.
Schmidt & E. J. M. Arnolds), pp. 90-96. Wageningen Agricultural
University, Wageningen
Oldeman, R. A. A. (1990b) Forests: Elements of silvology. Springer,
Berlin.
Oldeman, R. A. A. & Hall, F. (1980) Sobre los ejes mixtos plagioorttropos en algunos rboles tropicales. Miscellaneous Papers, 19,
281-287.
Oldeman, R. A. A. & Teller, A. (1989) Unification of European forest
pattern research. Workshop on Forest Ecosystem Research
Network, FERN, European Science Foundation, ESF, 24-26 abril,
1989, Estrasburgo, Francia. Pudoc, Wageningen.
Oldeman, R. A. A., Vester, H. F. M., Londoo, A. C. & Callejas, R.
(2006) Gua para el estudio de la arquitectura arbrea.
Unpublished manuscript, Medelln.
Orians, G. H. (1982) The influence of tree-falls in tropical forests in the
species richness. Tropical Ecology, 23, 255-279.

168

Ordez, N. (1990) Estudio detallado de suelos: Plano aluvial del ro


Caquet, sitio de monitoreo nmero 2. Fundacin TropenbosColombia, Bogot.
Orrego, S. A., del Valle, J. I. & Moreno, F. H. (2003) Medicin de la
captura de carbono en ecosistemas forestales tropicales de
Colombia: Contribuciones para la mitigacin del cambio climtico.
Departamento de Ciencias Forestales, Universidad Nacional de
Colombia sede Medelln, Centro Andino para la Economa en el
Medio Ambiente, Bogot.
Padoch, C., Ayres, J. M., Pinedo-Vsquez, M. & Henderson, A. (1999)
Vrzea: Diversity, development, and conservation of Amazonias
whitewater floodplains. Advances in Economic Botany 13. New
York Botanical Garden, Bronx.
Parrado, A. (2005) Fruit availability and seed dispersal in tierra firme rain
forests of Colombian Amazonia. Tropenbos Foundation,
Wageningen
Paz-Mio, G., Balslev, H. & Valencia, R. (1991) Aspectos etnobotnicos
de las lianas utilizadas por los indgenas Siona-Secoya del
Ecuador. In: Las plantas y el hombre (ed. M. H. B. P. Ros), pp.
105-118. Ediciones Abya-Yala, Quito.
Philip, M. S. (1994) Measuring trees and forests. Centre for Agricultural
and Bioscience (CAB) International, Cambridge.
Phillips, O. L. (1998a). Increasing tree turnover in tropical forests as
measured in permanent plots. In: Forest biodiversity research,
monitoring and modeling: conceptual background and old world
cases (eds F. Dallmeier & J. A. Comiskey), pp. 221-245. Man and
the Biosphere Series 20, Unesco and the Parthenon Group, Paris.
Phillips, O. L. (1998b). Tree mortality and collecting botanical vouchers in
tropical forests. Biotropica, 30, 298-305.
Phillips, O. L. & Baker, T. (2002) Field manual for plot establishment and
re-measurement. Rainfor, Amazon Forest Inventory Network,
Leeds.
Phillips, O. L., Baker, T. R., Arroyo, L., Higuchi, N., Killeen, T. J.,
Laurance, W. F., Lewis, S. L., Lloyd, J., Malhi, Y., Monteagudo,
A., Neill, D. A., Nez-Vargas, P., Silva, J. N. S., Terborgh, J.,
Comiskey, J. A., Czimcsik, C. I., Di Fiore, A., Erwin, T., Kuebler,
169

C., Laurance, S. G., Nascimento, H. E. M., Olivier, J., Palacios,


W., Patio, S., PItman, N. C. A., Quesada, C. A., Saldias, M.,
Torres Lezama, A. & Vinceti, B. (2004) Pattern and process in
Amazon tree turnover, 1976-2001. Philosophical Transactions of
the Royal Society of London, Series B, 359, 381-407.
Phillips, O. L., Hall, P., Gentry, A. H., Sawyer, S. A. & Vsquez, R.
(1994) Dynamics and species richness of tropical rain forests.
Proceedings of National Academy of Science, 91, 2805-2809.
Phillips, O. L., Malhi, Y., Higuchi, N., Laurance, W. F., Nez, P.,
Vsquez, M., Laurance, S., Ferreira, L., Stern, M., Brown, S. &
Grace, J. (1998) Changes in the carbon balance of tropical forest:
Evidence from long-term plots. Science, 282, 439-442.
Pielou, E. C. (1975) Ecological diversity. John Wiley & Sons, New York.
Pires, J. M. & Prance, G. T. (1985) The vegetation types of the brazilian
amazon. In: Amazonia (eds G. T. Prance & T. E. Lovejoy), pp.
109-145. Pergamon Press, Oxford.
Pitman, N. C. A., Terborgh, J. W., Silman, M. S., Nez V., P., Neill, D.
A., Cern, C. E., Palacios, W. A. & Aulestias, M. (2001)
Dominance and distribution of tree species in upper Amazonian
Terra Firme forests. Ecology, 82, 2102-2117.
Poorter, L. & Werger, M. J. A. (1999) Light environment, sapling
architecture, and leaf display in six rain forest tree species.
American Journal of Botany, 86, 1464-1473.
Poulsen, A. & Balslev, H. (1991) Abundance and cover of ground herbs in
an Amazonian rain forest. Journal of Vegetation Science, 2, 315322.
Prance, G. T. (1980) A teminologia dos tipos florestais amaznicas
sujeitas a inundao. Acta Amaznica, 10, 341-349.
Prance, G. T. (1990) The floristic composition of the forest of Central
Amazonian Brazil. In: Four Neotropical rainforests (ed. A.
Gentry), pp. 112-140. Yale University Press, New Haven.
PRORADAM (1979) La Amazonia colombiana y sus recursos: Proyecto
radargramtrico del Amazonas, PRORADAM. Instituto
Geogrfico Agustn Codazzi, Bogot.
Putz, F. E., Coley, P. D., Lu, K., Montalvo, A. & Aiello, A. (1983)
Uprooting and snapping of trees: structural determinants and
170

ecological consequences. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 13,


1011-1020.
Putz, F. E. & Milton, K. (1983) Tree mortality rates on Barro Colorado
Island. In: The ecology of tropical forest: Seasonal rythms and
long-term changes (eds E. G. Leigh, A. S. Rand & D. M.
Windsor), pp. 95-108. Smithsonian Institution, Washington.
Quiones, M. (2002) Polarimetric data for tropical forest monitoring:
Studies at the Colombian Amazon. Tropenbos Foundation,
Wageningen
Rankin de Merona, J. M., Hutchings, R. W. & Lovejoy, T. E. (1990) Tree
mortality and recruitment over a five-year period in undisturbed
rainforest of the Central Amazon. In: Four Neotropical rainforests
(ed. A. H. Gentry), pp. 573-584. Yale University Press, New
Haven.
Rees, M., Condit, R., Crawley, M., Pacala, S. & Tilman, D. (2001) LongTerm studies of vegetation dynamics. Science, 293, 650-655.
Renner, S. S., Balslev, H. & Holm-Nielsen, L. B. (1990) Flowering plants
of Amazonian Ecuador: A checklist. Aarhus University Press,
Aarhus.
Ribeiro, J. E. L. S., Nelson, B. W., da Silva, M. F., Martins, L. S. S. &
Hopkins, M. (1994) Reserva florestal Ducke: Diversidade e
composiao da flora vascular. Acta Amaznica, 24, 19-30.
Richards, P. W. (1952) The tropical rain forest: An ecological study.
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Ros, S. (1996) Estudio de la arquitectura de la comunidad de Prioria
copaifera Grisebach (Caesalpiniaceae), en un bosque inundable de
la regin del Bajo Atrato, Choc, Colombia. Tesis B.Sc.
(Biologa), Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogot,
Bogot.
Rodrigues, W. A. (1982) Flora do Estado de Gois: Coleao Rizzo.
Myristicaceae. Universidad Federal de Gois, Brasil.
Rodrguez, C. A. (1992) Bagres, malleros y cuerderos en el bajo ro
Caquet. Fundacin Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Rodrguez, C. A. (1999) Arponeros de la trampa del sol: Sustentabilidad
de la pesca comercial en le medio ro Caquet. Fundacin
Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
171

Rodrguez, L. V. A. (1991) Biomasa y reserva de nutrientes en un


ecosistema de tierra firme en la regin de Araracuara. Fundacin
Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Rolim, S. G., Do Couto, H. T. Z. & De Jesus, R. M. (1999) Mortalidade e
recrutamento da rvores na Floresta Atlntica em Linhares (ES).
Scientia Forestalis, 55, 49-69.
Rudas, A. & Prieto, A. (2005). Flrula del Parque Nacional Natural
Amacayacu, Amazonas, Colombia. Monographs in Systematic
Botany from the Missouri Botanical. Garden, 99, 1-655.
Ruokolainen, K., Tuomisto, H., Rios, R., Torres, A. & Garca, M. (1994)
Comparacin florstica de doce parcelas en bosque de tierra firme
en la Amazonia peruana. Acta Amaznica, 24, 31-48.
Salati, E. (1985) The climatology and hydrology of Amazonia. Amazonia.
(eds G. T. Prance & T. Lovejoy), pp. 18-48. Pergamon Press. 442
p. , Oxford.
Salo, J. & Rsnen, M. (1990) Hierarchy of landscape patterns in western
Amazon. In: Tropical forests: Botanical dynamics, speciation and
diversity (eds L. B. Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen & H. Balslev), pp.
35-45. Academic Press, London.
Salo, J., Kalliola, R., Hkkinen, I., Mkinen, Y., Niemel, P., Puhakka, M.
& Coley, P. D. (1986) River dynamics and the diversity of
Amazon lowland forest. Nature, 322, 254-258.
Snchez, M. (1997) Catlogo preliminar comentado de la flora del Medio
Caquet (Amazonia colombiana). Fundacin TropenbosColombia, Bogot.
Snchez, M. (2005) Use of tropical rain forest biodiversity by indigenous
communities in Northwestern Amazonia. Ph.D. Thesis,
Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam.
Snchez, M. & Miraa, P. (1991) Utilizacin de la vegetacin arbrea en
el Medio Caquet: 1. El rbol dentro de las cunidades de la tierra,
un recurso para la comunidad Miraa. Colombia Amaznica, 5,
69-98.
Sanoja, E. (1992) Essai d'application de l'architecture vgtale a la
systmatique: l'exemple de la famille des Vochisiaceae. Ph.D.
Thesis, Universit Montpellier II, Montpellier.

172

Schultes, R. E. & Raffauf, R. F. (1990) The healing forest: Medicinal and


toxic plants of the Northwest Amazonia. Dioscorides Press,
Portland.
Sheil, D. (1996) Evaluating turnover rates in tropical forests. Science, 268,
894.
Sheil, D., Burslem, D. F. R. P. & Alder, D. (1995) The interpretation and
misinterpretation of mortality rate measures. Journal of Ecology,
83, 331-333.
Sheil, D., Jennings, S. & Savill, P. (2000) Long-term permanent plot
observations of vegetation dynamics in Budongo, a Ugandan rain
forest. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 16, 765-800.
Sheil, D. & May, R. M. (1996) Mortality and recruitment rate evaluations
in heterogeneous tropical forests. Journal of Ecology, 84, 91-100.
Silver, W. L., Ostertag, R. & Lugo, A. E. (2000) The potential for Carbon
sequestration through reforestation of tropical agricultural and
pasture lands. Restoration Ecology, 8, 394-407.
Smith, A. C. (1938a) The American species of Myristicaceae. Brittonia, 2,
393-510.
Smith, A. C. (1938b) Flora of Per. Botanical Series Field Museum of
Natural History, 13, 766-784.
Spruce, R. (1861) On the mode of branching of some Amazon trees.
Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society, Botany, 5, 3-14.
SSS (1987) Soil Survey Staff: Key to soil taxonomy. Cornell University
Press, Ithaca.
SSS (1992) Soil Survey Staff: Key to soil taxonomy. Blacksburg Press,
Virginia.
Sterck, F. J., van der Zandt, G. J. A. W. & Oldeman, R. A. A. (1991)
Architectural development of Faidherbia albida (Del.) A. Chev.
Physiologie des arbres et arbustes en zones arides et semi-arides.
Groupe d'etude de l'arbre, Paris.
Swaine, M. D. (1990) Population dynamics of tree species in tropical
forests. In: Tropical forests: Botanical dynamics, speciation and
diversity (eds L. B. Holm-Nielsen, I. C. Nielsen & H. Balslev), pp.
101-110. Academic Press, London.
Swaine, M. D. & Lieberman, D. (1987) Note on the calculation of
mortality rates. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 3, ii-iii.
173

Swaine, M. D., Lieberman, D. & Putz, F. E. (1987) The dynamics of tree


populations in tropical forests: a review. Journal of Tropical
Ecology, 3, 359-366.
Synnott, T. J. (1979) A manual of permanent plot procedure for tropical
rain forests. Commonwealth Forestry Institute, University of
Oxford, Oxford.
Synnott, T. J. (1991) Manual de procedimientos de parcelas permanents
para el bosque hmedo tropical. Instituto Tecnolgico de Costa
Rica, Cartago (Costa Rica).
Taylor, D. M., Hamilton, A. C., Whyatt, J. D., Mucunguzi, P. & BukenyaZiraba, R. (1996) Stand dynamics in Mpanga research forest
reserve, Uganda 1968-1993. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 12, 583597.
Tllez, P. (2003) Simulacin del ciclo hidrolgico en tres tipos de uso del
suelo de la Amazonia colombiana. Tesis M.Sc., Universidad
Nacional de Colombia sede Bogot, Bogot.
ter Steege, H., Pitman, N. C. A., Phillips, O. L., Chave, J., Sabatier, D.,
Duque, A., Molino, J.-F., Prvost, M.-F., Spichiger, R.,
Castellanos, H., von Hildebrand, P. & Vsquez, R. (2006)
Continental-scale patterns of canopy tree composition and function
across Amazonia. Nature, 443, 444-447.
ter Steege, H., Pitman, N., Sabatier, D., Castellanos, H., Van Der Hout, P.,
Daly, D. C., Silveira, M., Phillips, O., Vasquez, R., Van Andel, T.,
Duivenvoorden, J., Adalardo de Oliveira, A., Ek, R., Lilwah, R.,
Thomas, R., Van Essen, J., Baider, C., Mori, S., Terborgh, J.,
Nuez, P., Mogolln, H. & Morawetz, W. (2003) A spatial model
of tree -diversity and tree density for the Amazon. Biodiversity
and Conservation, 12, 2255-2277.
Tobn, C. (1999) Monitoring and modelling hydrological fluxes in support
of nutrient cycling studies in Amazonian rain forest ecosystems.
Tropenbos Foundation, Wageningen.
Tobn, C., Sevink, J. & Verstraten, J. M. (2004a) Litterflow chemistry and
nutrient uptake from the forest floor in Northwest Amazonian
forest ecosystems. Biogeochemistry, 69, 315-339.

174

Tobn, C., Sevink, J. & Verstraten, J. M. (2004b) Solute fluxes in


throughfall and stemflow in four forest ecosystems in Northwest
Amazonia. Biogeochemistry, 70, 1-25.
Torquebiau, E. (1979) The reiteration of the architectural model: a
demographic approach to the tree. Universit Montpellier II,
Montpellier.
Tropenbos-Colombia, F. (1990) Levantamiento topogrfico de las reas de
monitoreo de tierra firme y vrzea, en Pea Roja. Fundacin
Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Tropenbos-Colombia, F. (1994) Multi-annual Programme (1994-1999),
draft for discussion. Tropenbos-Colombia Foundation, Bogot.
Tschinkel, H. (1972) Growth, site factors and nutritional status of
Cupressus lusitanica Mill. (ciprs) plantations in the highlands of
Colombia. Ph.D. Thesis, Universidad de Hamburgo, Hamburgo.
Tuomisto, H. (1994) Ecological variation in the rain forests of Peruvian
Amazonia: Integrating fern distriburion patterns with satellite
imagery. Ph.D. Thesis University of Turku, Turku.
Tuomisto, H., Ruokolainen, K., Kalliola, R., Linna, A., Danjoy, W. &
Rodrguez, Z. (1995) Dissecting Amazonian biodiversity. Science
269, 63-66.
Uhl, C., Clark, D. B., Dezzeo, N. & Maquirino, P. (1988) Vegetation
dynamics in Amazonian treefall gaps. Ecology, 69, 751-763.
Urrego, L. E. (1991) Sucesin holocnica de un bosque de Mauritia
flexuosa L. f. en el valle del ro Caquet, Amazonia colombiana.
Colombia Amaznica, 5, 99-118.
Urrego, L. E. (1997) Los bosques inundables del Medio Caquet,
Amazonia colombiana: caracterizacin y sucesin. Fundacin
Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Urrego, L. E. & Snchez, M. (1997) Apuntes a la utilizacin y
productividad potencial de la biodiversidad de los bosques
inundables del Medio Caquet. In: Los bosques inundables del
Medio Caquet: Caracterizacin y sucesin (ed. L. E. Urrego), pp.
257-271. Fundacin Tropenbos-Colombia, Bogot.
Valencia, R., Balslev, H. & Paz-Mio, G. (1994) High tree alpha-diversity
in Amazonian Ecuador. Biodiversity and Conservation, 3, 21-28.

175

Vallejo, M. I., Londoo, A. C., Lpez, R., Galeano, G., lvarez, E. &
Devia, W. (2005) Establecimiento de parcelas permanentes en
bosques de Colombia. Instituto de Investigacin de Recursos
Biolgicos Alexander von Humboldt, Bogot.
van der Hammen, T. & Cleef, A. M. (1992) Holocene changes of rainfall
and river discharge in Northern South America and the El Nio
phenomenon. Erdkunde, 46, 252-256.
van der Hammen, T., Duivenvoorden, J. F., Lips, J. M., Urrego, L. E. &
Espejo, N. (1992a) Late Quaternary of the middle Caquet River
area (Colombian Amazonia). Journal of Quaternary Science, 7, 4555.
van der Hammen, T., Urrego, L. E., Espejo, N., Duivenvoorden, J. F. &
Lips, J. M. (1992b) Late-glacial and Holocene sedimentation and
fluctuations of river water level in the Caquet River area
(Colombian Amazonia). Journal of Quaternary Science, 7, 57-67.
van Dulmen, A. (2001) Pollination and phenology of flowers in the canopy
of two contrasting rain forest types in Amazonia, Colombia. Plant
Ecology, 153, 73-85.
Veillon, J. M. (1978) Architecture of the new Caledonian species of
Araucaria. In: Tropical trees as living systems (eds P. B.
Tomlinson & M. H. Zimmerman), pp. 233-246. Cambridge
University Press, Cambridge.
Veillon, J. P. (1985) El crecimiento de algunos bosques naturales de
Venezuela en relaci6n con los parmetros del medioambiente.
Revista Forestal Venezolana, 29, 5-121.
Vester, H. F. M. (1997) The trees and the forest: the role of tree
architecture in canopy development; a case study in secondary
forests (Araracuara, Colombia). Ph.D. Thesis, Universiteit van
Amsterdam, Amsterdam.
Vester, H. F. M & Navarro, M. A. (2007) Fichas ecolgicas, rboles
maderables de Quintana Roo. Conacyt, Conabio and Ecosur,
Chetumal.
Vester, H. F. M. & Saldarriaga, J. G. (1993) Algunas caractersticas
estructurales, arquitectnicas y florsticas de la sucesin secundaria
sobre Terrazas Bajas en la regin de Araracuara (Colombia).

176

Revista de la Facultad Nacional de Agronoma (Medelln), 46, 1545.


Vogt, K. A., Vogt, D. I. & Bloomfield, J. (1998) Analysis of some direct
and indirect methods for estimating root biomass and production of
forests at an ecosystem level. Plant and Soil, 200, 71-89.
Watson, R. T., Noble, I. R., Bolin, B., Ravindranath, N. H., Verardo, D. J.
& Dokken, D. J. (2000) IPCC Special Report, Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge.
Whitmore, T. C. (1975) Tropical rain forests of the far East. Clarendon
Press, Oxford.

177

178

Resumen, Summary, and


Samenvatting
Ana Catalina Londoo Vega

Resumen
En la dcada de los aos ochenta del siglo pasado, se establecieron dos
parcelas permanentes en bosques maduros cerca de Araracuara, en la parte
central de la Amazonia colombiana. Las parcelas se instalaron en dos
unidades de paisaje contrastantes: tierra firme y llanura de inundacin del
ro Caquet. El objetivo general de esta tesis es proporcionar
conocimientos bsicos sobre la estructura, la composicin de especies y la
dinmica del bosque de estas dos parcelas permanentes. Las parcelas se
instalaron en la comunidad Nonuya de Pea Roja, a unos 70 km aguas
abajo de Araracuara. En el rea la precipitacin media anual es de
aproximadamente 3000 mm anuales, sin perodo seco. La parcela de tierra
firme se estableci en una unidad de paisaje perteneciente al Plano
Sedimentario Terciario, donde los suelos son Ultisoles muy pobres. La
otra parcela fue localizada en la Llanura de Inundacin Espordica del ro
Caquet, que se caracteriza por unas depresiones poco profundas
alternadas con barras de cauce convexas, de hasta 2 m de altura. Los
suelos son Inceptisoles moderadamente bien drenados. El rea final de
ambas parcelas fue de 1,8 ha.
El Captulo 3 describe Pseudomonotes tropenbosii Londoo et al. Este
nuevo taxn es la segunda aparicin reportada de un miembro de la familia
Dipterocarpaceae en el Neotrpico. La nueva entidad se diferencia del
resto de este familia por la ausencia de tricomas fasciculados y spalos
visiblemente aliformes (llegando a 10-16 cm de longitud) y un vulo por
lculo con placentacin casi basal (sub-basal). La especie apareci como
uno de los rboles dominantes en la parcela de tierra firme. Estudios
posteriores (anatoma de la madera y la filogenia molecular) han
confirmado su posicin taxonmica en la subfamilia Monotoideae de la
familia Dipterocarpaceae.
El Captulo 4 trata sobre el anlisis arquitectnico llevado a cabo en tres
especies de Myristicaceae (Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum
platyspermum y Virola pavonis). Las tres especies mostraron un
crecimiento de acuerdo con el modelo de Massart, al igual que otras
especies de Myristicaceae (V. michelii y V. surinamensis), en el cual se
presentan tres rdenes de ejes. Las reiteraciones juegan un papel
preponderante en el desarrollo de stas tres especies. El anlisis de la
180

arquitectura sugiri que el plan de crecimiento de estas especies contribuye


a su capacidad para mantener poblaciones saludables en el subdosel. El
estudio del caso de las tres especies de rboles de Myristicaceae muestra el
gran potencial del anlisis de la arquitectura para construir hiptesis de por
qu las especies pueden adaptarse a las condiciones particulares del
desarrollo forestal, especialmente en relacin con la abundancia de
especies del subdosel (o dosel).
Se encontr un total de 1149 especies, 347 gneros y 98 familias en las dos
parcelas permanentes (Captulo 5). Las especies arborescentes constituyen
el 65% del total en ambos sitios, las trepadoras (leosas y herbceas)
contribuyeron con el 24%, el 8% las de arbustos y las hierbas terrestres
con el 3%. El nmero de especies fue mayor en la parcela de tierra firme
(698) que en la parcela de la planicie de inundacin (511), pero el nmero
de gneros fue bastante similar (236 en tierra firme y 235 en la parcela de
la llanura de inundacin), mientras que el nmero de familias fue
ligeramente mayor en la parcela de la planicie de inundacin (84, frente a
80 familias en la parcela de tierra firme). Entre las parcelas el 67% de las
familias fueron compartidas, el 36% de los gneros, pero slo el 5% de las
especies. En total, la flora en las parcelas mostr una fuerte afinidad con la
flora registrada en el centro de la Amazonia, cerca de Manaos (Brasil).
La mortalidad en la parcela de tierra firme fue casi dos veces ms baja que
en la parcela de la planicie de inundacin ( = 1,06 frente a = 2.0,
respectivamente, durante 8,6 aos) (Captulo 6). En trminos del rea basal
y la biomasa, las discrepancias en las tasas de mortalidad entre las parcelas
de la llanura de inundacin y de tierra firme fueron an ms pronunciadas.
Los rboles grandes contribuyeron sustancialmente a las tasas de
mortalidad calculadas para el rea basal y la biomasa. Para el perodo del
censo total (8,6 aos) el 29% de los troncos muri de pie en la parcela de
tierra firme, mientras que slo el 17% muri como tal en la parcela de
inundacin. En cuanto a la muerte por desenraizamiento los resultados
fueron opuestos: en la parcela de tierra firme slo el 10% de los troncos
haban muerto desenraizados (en 8,6 aos), mientras que en la llanura de
inundacin, esta proporcin fue dos veces mayor. En cuanto al
reclutamiento, ste fue casi dos veces menor en la parcela de tierra firme
que en la parcela de la planicie de inundacin ( = 0,87%, frente a =
1,48% por ao, respectivamente, durante de 8,6 aos). Se encontraron
181

diferencias similares entre las parcelas para el reclutamiento en trminos


del rea basal y la biomasa. El crecimiento medio anual medido como
incremento en dimetro fue casi dos veces mayor en la parcela de la
planicie de inundacin (0,21 cm por ao) en comparacin con la parcela de
tierra firme (0,13 cm por ao). Las tasas anuales de mortalidad con base en
la densidad de la parcela de tierra firme estuvieron cerca del lmite inferior
reportado para el Noreste de la Amazonia. Las tasas anuales de mortalidad
con base en la densidad de la parcela de la planicie de inundacin se
hallaron en el lmite inferior de los bosques en el Noroeste de la
Amazonia. Para ambas parcelas la tasa de mortalidad en funcin del
nmero de individuos fue superior a la tasa de reclutamiento, lo que indica
que en este caso, la mortalidad precede al reclutamiento. No obstante,
durante el perodo total se observ un incremento neto en el rea basal y en
la biomasa en ambas parcelas. El promedio entre las tasas de mortalidad y
el reclutamiento, que representa una medida de la tasa de renovacin, fue
menor en la parcela de tierra firme que en la parcela de inundacin. En
comparacin con otros bosques neotropicales,la tasa de renovacin en
ambas parcelas fue relativamente baja.
El descubrimiento de Pseudomonotes tropenbosii en la parcela de tierra
firme ilustra los importantes progresos en los inventarios florsticos en la
Amazonia colombiana desde mediados de los aos ochenta del siglo
pasado (Captulo 7). Su posicin taxonmica ha sido confirmada con base
en la anatoma de la madera y el anlisis filogentico. El anlisis
arquitectnico de las tres especies de Myristicaceae sugiri que el plan de
crecimiento de estas especies contribuye a su capacidad para mantener
poblaciones saludables en el subdosel. El anlisis arquitectnico por medio
de observaciones en transectos complementa los estudios demogrficos de
la dinmica del bosque en las parcelas permanentes. La mayor riqueza de
especies en la parcela de tierra firme en comparacin con la parcela de la
llanura de inundacin y la baja superposicin en la composicin de
especies entre las dos parcelas encaja bien en el rgimen general de las
asociaciones entre el bosque y el paisaje en la alta Amazonia. En general,
estos patrones se explican en trminos del ensamblaje del nicho o de los
procesos aleatorios. En la parcela de tierra firme, donde la disponibilidad
de nutrientes del suelo y las tasas de descomposicin fueron muy
inferiores a los de la parcela llanura de inundacin, la rotacin de los
182

rboles fue menor. Esto corresponde a los patrones que se encuentran en la


Amazonia en su conjunto. Sin embargo, las tasas de mortalidad de los
rboles en la parcela de tierra firme estuvieron entre las ms bajas
registradas en la Amazonia en su conjunto, y claramente muy por debajo
de lo esperado debido nicamente a la ubicacin de esta parcela en la alta
Amazonia. A pesar de sus bajos niveles de rotacin arbrea, la riqueza de
especies en la parcela de tierra firme fue superior a la de la parcela de la
llanura de inundacin. Por lo tanto, los resultados de las dos parcelas
permanentes indican que es arriesgado aplicar los conocimientos basados
en estudios regionales a las situaciones locales sin el conocimiento
adecuado de la fisiografa y de las condiciones locales del terreno. Se
recomienda continuar con el monitoreo de los bosques en las parcelas
permanentes, cerca de Pea Roja, porque la parcela de tierra firme
representa la localidad tipo de Pseudomonotes tropenbosii y adems
porque las dos parcelas representan las parcelas permanentes ms antiguas
en la Amazonia colombiana.
Summary
In the late eighties of the past century, two permanent plots were
established in old-growth or mature forests near Araracuara, in the central
part of Colombian Amazonia. The plots were installed in two contrasting
land units: upland and floodplain. The overall aim of this dissertation is to
provide basic knowledge about the structure, species composition, and
forest dynamics of these two permanent forest plots. The plots were
installed in the Nonuya community of Pea Roja, about 70 km
downstream from Araracuara. In the area the mean annual rainfall is
approximately 3000 mm per year, and a dry season is lacking. The upland
plot was established on a land unit belonging to the Tertiary sedimentary
plain. The soils were very poor Ultisols. The floodplain plot was set-up in
a rarely inundated floodplain of the Caquet River, characterized by
shallow basins alternating with convex river bars, up to 2 m high. Soils
here vary from poorly to moderately well-drained Inceptisols. Both plots
had a final size of 1.8 ha.
Chapter 3 accounts of the description of Pseudomonotes tropenbosii
Londoo et al. This new taxon is the second reported occurrence of a
member of the family Dipterocarpaceae in the Neotropics. The new entity
183

differs from the rest of this family in the absence of fasciculate trichomes
and in having sepals conspicuously aliform (reaching 10-16 cm in length)
and one ovule per locule with nearly basal (sub-basal) placentation. The
species appeared as one of the dominant trees in the upland plot.
Subsequent studies (wood anatomy and molecular phylogeny) confirmed
its taxonomic position in the subfamily Monotoideae of the family
Dipterocarpaceae.
Chapter 4 reports on an architectural analysis, which was carried out for
three species of Myristicaceae (Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum
platyspermum and Virola pavonis). The three species showed a growth
according to Massart's Model, just as other species of Myristicaceae (V.
michelii and V. surinamensis), during which three orders of axes were
reached. Reiterations are important in the growth and development of the
three species. The architectural analysis suggested that the growth plan of
these species would contribute to their ability to maintain healthy
populations in the subcanopy forest. The case-study of the three subcanopy
tree species of Myristicaceae shows the large potential of architectural
analysis to build hypotheses why species might be adapted to particular
conditions of forest development, especially regarding abundant
subcanopy (or canopy) species.
A total of 1149 species, 347 genera and 98 families were found in the two
plots (Chapter 5). Arborescent species comprised 65% of the total at both
sites; climbers (woody and herbaceous) contributed 24%, shrubs 8% and
terrestrial herbs 3%. The number of species was larger in the upland plot
(698) than in the floodplain plot (511), but the number of genera was quite
similar (236 in the upland and 235 in the floodplain plot), whereas the
number of families was slightly higher in the floodplain plot (84,
compared to 80 families in the upland plot). Between the plots 67% of the
families were shared, 36% of the genera, and only 5% of the species. In
total, the floristics in the plots showed a strong affinity to the flora
recorded in central Amazonia, near Manaus.
The mortality in the upland plot was almost twice as low as in the
floodplain plot ( = 1.06 versus = 2.0, respectively, over 8.6 y)(Chapter
6). In terms of basal area and biomass, the discrepancies in mortality rates
between the floodplain and upland plot were even more pronounced. Large
184

trees contributed substantially to the mortality rates calculated for basal


area and biomass. For the total census period (8.6 y) 29% of the trunks
died standing in the upland plot, and only 17% died as such in the
floodplain plot. Regarding death by uprooting (tree fall) the results were
opposite: in the upland plot only 10% of the trunks had died by uprooting
(over 8.6 y) whereas in the floodplain this proportion was two times
higher. In terms of individuals the recruitment in the upland plot was
almost two times lower than in the floodplain plot ( = 0.87% against =
1.48% per year, respectively, over 8.6 y). Similar between-plot differences
were found for recruitment in terms of basal area and biomass. The
average annual growth in terms of diameter increment was 0.13 cm per
year in the upland plot. In the floodplain plot is was almost twice as high
(0.22 cm per year). The density-based annual mortality rates of the upland
plot were near the lower limit reported for the northeast Amazonia. The
density-based annual mortality rates of the floodplain plot were at the
lower limit for the forests in northwestern Amazonia. For both plots the
mortality rate based on number of individuals was higher than recruitment
rate, indicating that mortality preceded recruitment. The average of the
mortality and recruitment rates, which represent a measure of turnover,
was lower in the upland plot than in the floodplain plot. Compared to other
Neotropical forests, the turnover in both plots was relatively low.
The discovery of Pseudomonotes tropenbosii in the upland plot illustrates
the strong progress in floristic inventories in Colombian Amazonia since
the mid-eighties of the past century (Chapter 7). On the basis of wood
anatomy and phylogenic analyses its taxonomic position has been
confirmed. The architectural analysis of the three species of Myristicaceae
suggested that the growth plan of these species would contribute to their
ability to maintain healthy populations in the forest subcanopy.
Architectural analyses by means of observations along transects
complements demographic studies of forest dynamics in permanent plots.
The higher species richness in the upland plot compared to floodplain plot
and the low overlap in species composition between the two plots fitted
well into the general scheme of upper Amazonian forest-landscape
associations. In general these patterns are explained in terms of niche
assembly or random walk processes. In the upland plot where soil nutrient
availability and decomposition rates were far below those in the floodplain
185

plot, tree turnover was lower. This corresponds to patterns found in


Amazonia as a whole. However, the tree mortality rates in the upland plot
were among the lowest recorded for Amazonian as a whole, and clearly far
lower than would be expected purely because of the location of this plot in
upper Amazonia. Despite its low levels of tree turnover, the species
richness in the upland plot was higher than that of the floodplain plot.
Therefore the results from the two permanent plots indicate that it is
hazardous to apply insights based on regional studies to local situations
without proper knowledge of the local physiography and terrain
conditions. It is highly recommended to continue the monitoring of the
forests in the permanent plots near Pea Roja, because the upland plot
represents the type locality of Pseudomonotes tropenbosii because the two
plots represent the oldest permanent plots in Colombian Amazonia.
Samenvatting
Aan het eind van de tachtiger jaren van de vorige eeuw werden er twee
permanente proefvlakken opgezet in zogeheten old-growth bossen bij
Araracuara, in het centrale deel van het Colombiaanse Amazonegebied. De
proefvlakken werden gesitueerd in twee contrasterende landeenheden:
buiten de overstromingsvlakte van de rivieren (hoogland perceel) and in
een dergelijke overstromingsvlakte (alluviaal perceel). Het doel van dit
proefschrift is basisinformatie te geven over de structuur, de
soortsamenstelling en de dynamiek van het bos in deze twee proefvlakken.
De percelen werden opgezet in de gemeenschap van de Nonuya indianen
te Pea Roja, ongeveer 70 km stroomafwaarts van Araracuara. In dit
gebied valt er jaarlijks gemiddeld ongeveer 3000 mm regen, en is er geen
sprake van een droog seizoen. Het hoogland perceel ligt in een
landeenheid behorende tot een formatie genaamd Tertiaire Sedimentaire
Vlakte. De bodems hier zijn zeer arme Ultisols. Het andere proefvlak ligt
in de alluviale vlakte van de Caquet Rivier, in een deel waar de
overstromingsfrequentie laag is. Het terrein hier bestaat uit ondiepe laagtes
afgewisseld met tot 2 m hoge ruggen. De bodems variren van slecht tot
redelijk goed gedraineerde Inceptisols. Beide proefvlakken kregen een
uiteindelijke omvang van 1.8 ha.
Hoofdstuk 3 geeft een beschrijving van Pseudomonotes tropenbosii
Londoo et al. Deze nieuwe soort is de tweede melding van een lid van de
186

familie Dipterocarpaceae in de Neotropen. Dit nieuwe taxon verschilt van


de rest van de Dipterocarpaceae wat betreft de afwezigheid van fasciculate
trichomen, de opvallend aliforme kelkbladen (tot 10-16 cm in lengte) en de
aanwezigheid van n eicel per locule met een bijna basale (sub-basale)
placentatie. De soort kwam voor als n van de dominante bomen in het
hoogland plot. Latere studies (houtanatomie en moleculaire phylogenie)
bevestigden de taxonomische positie binnen de subfamilie Monotoideae
van de familie Dipterocarpaceae.
Hoofdstuk 4 doet verslag van een architectuuranalyse, die werd uitgevoerd
van drie Myristicaceae soorten (Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum
platyspermum en Virola pavonis). De drie soorten vertoonden een groei
volgens Massart's Model, net als andere Myristicaceae soorten (V. michelii
en V. surinamensis), waarbij drie asorders werden bereikt. Reteraties
bepaalden sterk de groei en ontwikkeling van de drie soorten. De
architectuuranalyse suggereert dat het groeiplan van deze soorten bijdraagt
aan hun vermogen om gezonde populaties erop na te houden in het bos
direct onder het hoogste kronendak. De studie van de drie Myristicaceae
soorten toont het grote potentieel van de architectuuranalyse om
hypothesen te ontwikkelen waarom soorten zijn aangepast aan de
specifieke omstandigheden van bosontwikkeling, met name wat betreft
soorten die in hoge dichtheden voorkomen.
In totaal 1149 soorten, 347 geslachten en 98 families werden aangetroffen
in de twee percelen (Hoofdstuk 5). Boomvormige soorten droegen 65% bij
van het totaal op beide locaties; klimmers (houtige en kruidachtige)
droegen 24% bij, struiken 8% en terrestrische kruiden 3%. Het aantal
soorten was groter in het hoogland perceel (698) dan in het alluviale
perceel (511), maar het aantal geslachten was vergelijkbaar (236 in het
hoogland en 235 in het alluviale perceel). Het aantal families was
enigszins hoger in het alluviale perceel (84, vergeleken met 80 families in
het hoogland perceel). De beide proefvlakken hadden 67% van de families
gemeen, 36% van de geslachten, en slechts 5% van de soorten. In zijn
totaliteit vertoonde de flora in de percelen een sterke affiniteit met de flora
waargenomen in het centrum van het Amazonegebied, in de buurt van
Manaus.

187

De sterfte in het hoogland perceel was bijna twee keer zo laag als in het
alluviale perceel (respectievelijk = 1.06 en = 2.0, in 8,6 jaar)
(Hoofdstuk 6). In termen van stamoppervlak en biomassa waren de
verschillen in sterftecijfers tussen de twee proefvlakken nog meer
uitgesproken. Grote bomen droegen aanzienlijk bij aan de sterftecijfers
berekend voor stamoppervlak en biomassa. Voor de totale periode (8,6
jaar) stierf 29% van de stammen in staande positie in het hoogland perceel,
en slechts 17% op een dergelijk wijze in het alluviale perceel. Wat betreft
dood door ontworteling waren de resultaten tegenovergesteld: in het
hoogland perceel stierf slechts 10% van de stammen door ontworteling (in
8,6 jaar), terwijl in het alluviale proefvlak dit percentage twee keer hoger
was. In termen van dichtheid was de aanwinst in het hoogland perceel
bijna twee keer lager dan in het alluviale perceel (respectievelijk =
0,87% en = 1,48% per jaar, in 8,6 jaar). Vergelijkbare verschillen tussen
de percelen werden gevonden voor de aanwinst in termen van
stamoppervlak en biomassa.
De gemiddelde jaarlijkse groei in stamomvang was 0,13 cm per jaar in het
hoogland perceel. In het alluviale perceel was deze groei bijna tweemaal
zo hoog (0,21 cm per jaar). De jaarlijkse sterfte, op basis van de dichtheid,
van het hoogland perceel lag in de buurt van de onderste waarden
gerapporteerd voor het noordoostelijk deel van Amazonegebied. De
jaarlijkse sterfte, op basis van de dichtheid, van het alluviale perceel was
dicht bij de ondergrens gemeld voor de bossen in het noordwesten van het
Amazonegebied. Voor beide percelen gold dat deze sterfte hoger was dan
aanwinst, hetgeen betekent dat de sterfte voorafgaat aan de aanwinst. Het
gemiddelde van de sterfte- en aanwinstsnelheden, die een maat vormen
voor de bosomvorming, was lager in het hoogland perceel dan in het
alluviale perceel. Vergeleken met andere neotropische bossen was deze
bosomvorming in beide percelen relatief laag.
De ontdekking van Pseudomonotes tropenbosii in het hoogland proefvlak
illustreert de grote vooruitgang in floristische inventarisaties in het
Colombiaanse Amazonegebied sinds het midden van de jaren tachtig van
de vorige eeuw (Hoofdstuk 7). Op basis van houtanatomie en
fylogenetische analyses is de taxonomische positie van de soort bevestigd.
De architectuuranalyse van de drie Myristicaceae soorten suggereerde dat
het groeiplan van deze soorten bijdraagt aan hun vermogen om gezonde
188

populaties erop na te houden in het bos direct onder het hoogste


kronendak. Architectuuranalyses door middel van waarnemingen langs
transecten zijn een aanvulling op demografische studies van bosdynamiek
in permanente percelen. De hogere soortenrijkdom in het hoogland perceel
ten opzichte van het alluviale perceel en de lage overlap in
soortsamenstelling tussen de twee percelen passen goed in het algemene
schema van de bos-landschap relaties in de bovenste deel van het
Amazonebekken. In het algemeen worden deze patronen verklaard door
aan te nemen dat soorten een ecologische nis innemen of dat
soortsamenstelling een gevolg is van willekeurige verspreiding. In het
hooglandperceel, waar de beschikbaarheid van voedingsstoffen in de
bodem en de afbraaksnelheid waren veel lager waren dan in het alluviale
perceel, was de bosomvorming lager. Dit komt overeen met patronen
gevonden in het Amazonegebied als geheel. Echter, de sterftecijfers in het
hoogland perceel behoorden tot de laagste waarden gemeten voor het
Amazonebekken als geheel, en waren duidelijk veel lager dan verwacht
zou kunnen worden op basis van de ligging van dit perceel in de bovenste
deel van het Amazonebekken. Ondanks deze lage graad van
bosomvorming was de soortenrijkdom in het hoogland perceel hoger dan
die van het alluviale proefvlak. Daarom geven de resultaten van de twee
permanente percelen aan dat het gevaarlijk is om inzichten van regionale
studies toe te passen in plaatselijke situaties, zonder een adequate kennis
van de lokale fysiografie en terreinomstandigheden. Om twee redenen is
het ten zeerste aanbevolen om door te gaan met de waarnemingen in de
permanente percelen nabij Pea Roja: het hoogland proefvlak is de
typelokatie van Pseudomonotes tropenbosii en de twee percelen
vertegenwoordigen de oudste permanente proefvlakken in het
Colombiaanse Amazonegebied.

189

190

Appendices

Appendix 1
This appendix contains the descriptions and laboratory analyses of soil
profiles 125 and 126 taken from Duivenvoorden and Lips (1995). Methods
of analyses and sampling procedures are described in Duivenvoorden and
Lips (1995). Mapping units refer to the legend of the landscape ecological
map of the Middle Caquet Basin (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993).
Profile number: 125
Mapping unit: Sv
Soil classification: clayey, kaolinitic, isohyperthermic typic Kandiudult (SSS 1992),
xanthic Ferralsol (FAO 1988)
Date of examination: February 19 and October 25 1990
Authors: J.M. Lips & J.F. Duivenvoorden
Location: 875 m from the left bank of the Caquet River in front of the Island
Sumaeta, Amazonas, Colombia (039'S, 7205'W)
Elevation: approx. 200 m a.s.l.
Landform: sedimentary Tertiary plain; physiographic position: shoulder straight
slope; surrounding topography: steeply dissected; microtopography: none
Slope: sloping (6); exposition: 222 (SW)
Vegetation: high forest of high biomass, of the Swarzia schomburgkii-Clathrotropis
macrocarpa community
Climate: Afi (3060 mm/year, 25.7C)
General information on the soil
Parent material: Tertiary fluvial deposits, with a cover of Pleistocene? fluvial deposits
Drainage class: well drained (4)
Moisture conditions in profile: moist throughout
Depth of groundwater: not encountered
Presence of surface stones and rock outcrops: none
Evidence of erosion: none
Human influence: none
Description of the individual soil horizons
L

9.78-8.00 cm. 90% leaf, 10% branch; cover 75%; loose to non compact
matted structure; loose consistency; leafy character; abrupt broken
boundary to:

8.00-3.95 cm. 38% leaf, 2% branch, 50% root, 10% fine material; reddish
to dark brown (5-7.5YR4/4) dry; irregular structure; resilient consistency;
fibrous character; abundant roots 5 mm, common roots 6-10 mm; very
few roots >10 mm, random orientation; gradual wavy to irregular boundary
to:

3.95-0 cm. 5% leaf, 42% fine material, 53% root; reddish to dark brown (57.5YR4/4) dry; granular structure; friable consistency; greasy character;
abundant roots 5 mm, common roots 6-10 mm; few roots >10 mm,
random orientation; gradual wavy to irregular boundary to:

192

0-8 cm. Brown (7.5YR4/4) moist loam; weak medium granular; very
friable moist, slightly sticky and slightly plastic wet; common very fine and
fine, frequent medium and coarse roots; clear wavy boundary to:

AB

8-30 cm. Brown (10-7.5YR4/6) moist clayloam; moderate medium


subangular blocky; very friable moist, slightly sticky and slightly plastic
wet; common very fine, fine, medium and coarse roots; common faunal
activity (channels filled with A material); common charcoal fragments;
gradual smooth boundary to:

Bt11

30-70 cm. Bright brown (7.5YR5/6) moist clay; moderate medium and
coarse subangular blocky; friable moist, slightly sticky and slightly plastic
wet; few very fine, fine and medium, very few coarse roots; few faunal
activity; diffuse smooth boundary to:

Bt12

70-160+ cm. Bright brown (7.5YR5/7) moist clay; moderate medium and
coarse subangular blocky; friable moist, slightly sticky and slightly plastic
wet; few very fine, fine and medium, very few coarse roots

Remarks: many coarse angular quartz sand particles present throughout the profile;
data part of Bt12 derived from augering; H horizon discontinuous
Analyses profile 125
horizon

depth

A
AB
Bt11
Bt12 (80-100)
Bt12 (130-160)

cm
0-8
8-30
30-70
70-160+
70-160+

texture
sand silt clay
%
72 10 18
46 14 40
42 8 50
42 10 48
42 10 48

horizon

A
AB
Bt11
Bt12
Bt12
horizon

L
F
H

necromass
meansd

pH (1:1)
H20 KCl
3.7
4.2
4.6
4.7
4.9

C
%
1.97
0.42
0.13
-

exchange properties
Na acidity bases CEC7 ECEC
cmol(+)/kg soil

Ca

Mg

0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2

0.2 0.2 0.3


0.2 0.04 0.1
0.2 0.1 0.3
0.2 0.03 0.1
0.2 0.04 0.1

2.0
1.7
1.1
1.0
0.9

0.9
0.5
0.8
0.5
0.5

15.3
8.5
6.0
4.8
4.4

2.9
2.2
1.9
1.5
1.4

bulk
density
g/ml
0.8
1.2
1.3
1.3
-

P
avail.
mg/kg
1
1
1
1
1

CECc ECECc
cmol(+)/kg
clay
10.3 3.4
14.1 4.4
10.2 3.5
9.4
3.1
8.9
3.0

BS
%
6
6
13
11
12

totals
LOI
HNO3-H2O2 digestion
Ca Mg K Na
P
N
mg/kg
%
934 617 833 22 145 15664 98
269
112 127 392 68 166 14977 67
199
39 82 150 42 124 11299 46

HF-H2SO4 digestion
Ca Mg K Na
P

g/m2
2000
21600 134 184 488
11700 79 162 243

87
98

193

Profile number: 126


Mapping unit: Ec
Higher catagory classification: fine loamy, mixed, isohyperthermic oxyaquic
Dystropept (SSS 1992), dystric Cambisol (FAO 1988)
Date of examination: February 20 and October 24 1990
Authors: J.M. Lips & J.F. Duivenvoorden
Location: 100 m from the right bank of the Caquet River, 2.25 km up stream of the
Island Sumaeta, Amazonas, Colombia (037'S, 7207'W)
Elevation: approx. 155 m a.s.l.
Landform: rarely inundaded flood plain of the Caquet River; physiographic position:
concave part; surrounding topography: almost flat; microtopography: shallow
depressions
Slope: flat (0); exposition: none
Vegetation: high forest of intermediate biomass of the Brownea grandiceps-Iriartea
ventricosa community
Climate: Afi (3060 mm/year, 25.7C)
General information on the soil
Parent material: Holocene alluvial deposits of the Caquet River
Drainage class: imperfectly to moderately well drained (2-3)
Moisture conditions in profile: moist throughout
Depth of groundwater: not encountered
Presence of surface stones and rock outcrops: none
Evidence of erosion: none
Human influence: none
Description of the individual soil horizons
L

4.45-2.20 cm. 90% leaf, 10% branch<2% fruit; cover 60%; single particle
structure; loose consistency; leafy character; abrupt broken boundary to:

2.20-0 cm. 80% leaf, 10% branch, 10% root, <2% fruit; brown (107.5YR4/4) dry; single particle to compact matted structure; loose
consistency; leafy character; common roots 5 mm, no roots 6-10 mm; no
roots >10 mm, random orientation; common faunal activity (worm
droppings); clear irregular boundary to:

Ah

0-2 cm. Brown (10YR4/4) moist silty loam; moderate fine and medium
crumb; very friable moist, slightly sticky and slightly plastic wet; common
very fine, fine, medium and coarse roots; common faunal activity; clear
wavy boundary to:

AB

2-22 cm. Yellowish brown (10YR5/6) moist silty clay loam; moderate
medium subangular blocky; very friable moist, slightly sticky and slightly
plastic wet; common very fine and fine, few medium and coarse roots;
common faunal activity; few charcoal fragments; gradual smooth boundary
to:

Bw1

22-45 cm. Yellowish brown (10YR5/6) moist silty clay; moderate medium
subangular blocky; friable to firm moist, slightly sticky and plastic wet;
very few very fine, fine, medium and coarse roots; gradual smooth
boundary to:

194

Bw2

45-75 cm. Yellowish brown (10YR5/6) moist silty clay loam, with
common medium distinct diffuse bright brown (7.5YR5/6) and few
medium distinct diffuse orange grey mottles; moderate medium and coarse
subangular blocky; friable moist, slightly sticky and slightly plastic wet;
very few small soft Fe/Mn nodules; very few very fine, fine, medium and
coarse roots; gradual smooth boundary to:

Bwg

75-155+ cm. Yellowish brown (10YR6/3) moist silty clay loam, with
common medium distinct clear bright brown (7.5YR5/6) and yellowish
brown (10YR5/6) mottles; moderate medium and coarse subangular
blocky; friable moist, slightly sticky and slightly plastic wet; few small and
large soft Fe/Mn nodules; very few very fine, fine, medium and coarse
roots

Remarks: sand size mica fragments visible throughout the profile; data part of B22
derived from augering
Analyses profile 126
horizon

depth

Ah
AB
Bw1
Bw2
Bwg (80-95)
Bwg (140-155)

cm
0-2
2-22
22-45
45-75
75-155+
75-155+

texture
sand silt clay
%
24 46 30
16 44 40
12 38 50
24 36 40
26 40 34
14 36 50

horizon

Ah
AB
Bw1
Bw2
Bwg
Bwg
horizon

L
F

necromass
meansd

pH (1:1)
H20 KCl
3.9
3.9
4.2
4.6
4.7
5.1

C
%
3.26
0.34
0.20
-

exchange properties
Na acidity bases CEC7 ECEC
cmol(+)/kg soil

Ca

Mg

3.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
3.2

3.6 0.4 0.2


0.2 0.1 0.2
0.2 0.1 0.2
0.2 0.4 0.7
0.2 0.01 0.01
3.2 0.2 0.2

2.8
4.3
6.5
5.8
6.1
5.5

7.4
0.7
0.7
1.5
0.4
6.8

23.8
13.7
14.1
13.3
16.2
15.7

10.2
5.0
7.2
7.3
6.5
12.3

bulk
density
g/ml
0.5
1.3
1.4
1.4
1.4
-

P
avail.
mg/kg
4
1
1
1
1
2

CECc ECECc
cmol(+)/kg
clay
34.1 18.0
30.7 11.2
26.5 13.8
32.6 18.0
47.2 19.0
31.2 24.5

BS
%
31
5
5
11
3
43

totals
LOI
HNO3-H2O2 digestion
Ca Mg K Na
P
N
mg/kg
%
g/m2
3500
11496 2760 2569 42 424 18059 90
9500 8120 2384 4627 683 724
7184 2097 1864 68 463 18541 69
HF-H2SO4 digestion
Ca Mg K Na
P

195

Appendix 2
Listado de plantas vasculares en parcelas permanentes en bosques del
Plano Sedimentario Terciario (PST, tierra firme) y de la Llanura Aluvial
con Inundacin Espordica del ro Caquet (LAI, vrzea) en Pea Roja,
Amazonia colombiana. Publicado en Caldasia 19(3) 431-463 (1997).
Se incluyen plantas vasculares con altura total mayor o igual que 50 cm.
Para cada especie se indica: su nombre; su hbito de crecimiento (ver
abajo); la localidad donde se encontr (L: Llanura Aluvial con inundacin
espordica del ro Caquet; P: Plano Sedimentario Terciario); y una
muestra botnica de referencia (colectores: EA: Esteban lvarez; CL: Ana
Catalina Londoo).
Formas de crecimiento: rboles (A), arbustos (T), escandentes herbceos
(SH), escandentes leosos (SL), estranguladoras (SZL), helechos arbreos
(FA), helechos escandentes (FSH), helechos terrestres (FH), hemiepfitas
herbceas (SEH), hemiepfitas leosas (SEL), hierbas terrestres (H),
palmas arbreas cespitosas (PAC), palmas arbreas monoestipitadas
(PAM), palmas arbustivas acaules (PTU), palmas arbustivas cescpitosas
(PTC), palmas arbustivas monoestipitadas (PTM), palmas escandentes
(PSL).
En los bosques inventariados se identificaron las plantas hasta el nivel de
especie taxonmica (Grant 1989); cuando esto no fue posible se emplearon
morfoespecies en la denominacin de los taxones. Para las familias de
plantas superiores se sigui el sistema de Cronquist (1981), con excepcin
de Caesalpiniaceae, Fabaceae y Mimosaceae, que fueron agrupadas en
Leguminosae en la presentacin de resultados para facilitar la comparacin
con otros estudios. Cecropiaceae se presenta separada de Moraceae,
Hippocrateaceae aparte de Celastraceae y Mendonciaceae segregada de
Acanthaceae. Para las Pteridophyta se emple la nomenclatura de familias
de Mabberley (1990).
ACANTHACEAE: Aphelandra aurantiaca (Scheidweiler) Lindley.; H;
L; CL 1578. Justicia chlorostachya; H; L; EA 258. J. sp. 1; H; P; EA
1046.
ADIANTACEAE: Adiantum latifolium Lam.; FH; L; EA 561.

196

ANACARDIACEAE: Spondias sp. 1; A; LAI; EA 756. Tapirira


guianensis Aublet; A; L; EA 111. T. retusa Ducke; A; L; EA 406.
Thyrsodium sp. 1; A; L; EA A230. T. sp. 2; A; P; CL 961.
ANNONACEAE: Anaxagorea dolichocarpa Sprague & Sandwith; A; L;
EA 606. A. rufa Timmerman; A; P; CL 864. Annona aff. dolichophylla R.
E. Fries; A; L; EA 741. A. excellens R. E. Fries; A; P; CL 1352. A.
hypoglauca C. Martius; A; L; EA 810. A. sp. 2; A; L; EA 14. Annonaceae
sp. 1; A; L; EA 585. A. sp. 2; A; P; EA 1049. Annonaceae? sp. 3; SL; L;
EA 766. Bocageopsis multiflora (C. Martius) R. E. Fries; A; P; CL 1190.
Duguetia asterotricha Diels; A; L; EA 228. D. latifolia R. E. Fries; A; L;
EA 584. D. odorata (Diels) J. F. Macbride; A; L, P; CL 1600. D. sp. 1; A;
L, P; EA 571. D. spixiana C. Martius; A; L; CL 1573. Guatteria aff.
acutissima R. E. Fries; A; P; CL 344. G. aff. ferruginea A. St. Hilaire; A;
P; CL 971. G. aff. villosisima A. St. Hilaire; A; L; EA 527. G. atra
Sandwith; A; L; EA 465. G. cf. amazonica R. E. Fries; A; L; EA 9. G.
foliosa Benth.; A; P; CL 1094. G. guianensis (Aublet) R. E. Fries; A; P;
EA 1099. G. megalophylla Diels; A; L, P; EA-758. G. punticulata R. E.
Fries; A; P; CL 1371. G. sp. 1; A; P; CL 474. G. sp. 2; A; P; CL 518. G.
sp. 3; A; P; EA 828. Guatteriella tomentosa R. E. Fries; A; P; EA 1100.
Malmea dielsiana Safford ex R. E. Fries; A; L; EA 630. Oxandra euneura
Diels; A; L, P; CL 1637. O. mediocris Diels; A; L; EA 204. O. polyantha
R. E. Fries; A; L; EA 710. O. sp. 1; A; P; CL 56. O. xylopioides Diels; A;
L; EA 396. Pseudoxandra aff. pacifica P. Maas; A; L; EA 534. Rollinia
cuspidata C. Martius; A; L; EA 681. R. edulis Triana & Planchon; A; L;
EA 523. Unonopsis sp. 1; A; P; EA 796. U. stipitata Diels; A; P; EA-55.
Xylopia aff. benthamii R. E. Fries; A; P; CL 1423. X. excellens R. E. Fries;
A; L; EA 410. X. parvifolia Diels; A; P; CL 709. X. sericea A. St. Hilaire;
A; P; CL 1232.
APOCYNACEAE: Apocynaceae sp. 1; SL; L; CL 1641. Aspidosperma
aff. megalocarpon Muell. Arg.; A; P; CL 1147. A. cf. desmanthum
Bentham & Muell. Arg.; A; P; CL 1301. A. cf. schultesii Woodson; A; L,
P; EA 295. A. excelsum Bentham; A; P; CL 1231. A. marcgravianum
Woodson; A; L; EA 86. A. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1001. A. sp. 2; A; P; EA 180. A.
sp. 3; A; P; CL 1277. A. sp. 4; A; L; EA 83. A. sp. 5; A; L; EA 447. A. sp.
6; A; L; EA 411. Couma macrocarpa Barbosa Rodrigues; A; P; CL A9.
Forsteronia sp. 1; A; P; CL 926. Lacmellea aff. oblongata Markgraf; A; L;
197

EA 531. L. cf. arborescens (Muell. Arg.) Markgraf; A; P; CL 1143. L. cf.


gracilis (Muell. Arg.) Markgraf; A; L; CL 1615. L. foxii (Stapf) Markgraf;
A; P; CL 838. L. sp. 1; A; P; EA 875. L. sp. 2; A; P; CL 1305. L. sp. 3; A;
P; EA 49. Macoubea aff. witotorum R. Schultes; A; P; CL 850. Malouetia
aff. killipii Woodson; A; L; EA 739. M. aff. peruviana Woodson; A; L;
EA 706. M. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1377. M. sp. 2; A; P; CL 1509. Mandevilla sp.
1; SL; P; CL 259. M. sp. 2; SL; P; EA 1181. Mesechites cf. bicorniculata
(Rusby) Woodson; SL; P; EA 1175. Mesechites? sp. 1; SL; P; CL 1395.
Odontadenia macrantha (Roemer & Schultes) Markgraf; SL; L; EA 804.
O. sp. 1; SL; L; EA 1210. O. sp. 2; SL; P; CL 1388. O. sp. 3; SL; P; EA
1130. Parahancornia cf. peruviana Monachino; A; P; CL 1156. Prestonia
sp. 1; SH; L; EA 815. P. sp. 2; SH; L; EA 376. Tabernaemontana aff.
macrocalyx Muell. Arg.; T; P; CL 215. T. cf. tetrastachys Kunth; T; P; CL
724. T. sp. 1; T; L; EA 694. T. sp. 2; A; P; CL 1347.
ARACEAE: Anthurium aff. atropurpureum R. Schultes & Maguire; SEH;
L; EA 677. A. aff. gracile (Rudge) Schott; SEH; L; EA 1200. A. cf.
pentaphyllum (Aublet) G. Don; SEH; L; EA 545. A. cf. polyschistum R.
Schultes & Idrobo; SEH; P; EA 701. A. clavigerum Poeppig & Endlicher;
SEH; L; EA 620. A. sp. 1; SEH; L; EA 678. A. sp. 2; SEH; L; CL 1525. A.
sp. 3; SEH; L; EA 593. Araceae sp. 1; SH; L; EA 292. A. sp. 4; SH; P; EA
1079. A. sp. 5; SH; P; CL 566. Dieffenbachia sp. 1; H; L; CL 1566.
Heteropsis cf. macrophylla Kunth; SL; P; CL 168. H. cf. oblongifolia
Kunth; SL; L, P; CL 1146. H. cf. spruceana Schott; SL; P; CL 158. H.
jenmanii Oliver; SL; L, P; EA 1098. H. sp. 1; SL; P; CL 307. H. sp. 2; SL;
P; CL 804. Monstera sp. 1; SEH; L; CL 1595. Philodendron aff.
fragantissimum (Hooker) G. Don; SEH; P; EA 1078. P. cf. longistilum K.
Krause; SEH; P; CL 630. P. chanchamayense Engler; SEH; L; EA 321. P.
insigne Schott; SEH; P; EA 1034. P. pteropus C. Martius ex Schott; SEH;
L; EA 604. P. sp. 01; SEH; P; CL 1028. P. sp. 02; SEH; L; CL 1633. P.
sp. 03; SEH; P; EA 1059. P. sp. 04; SEH; L, P; EA 609. P. sp. 05; SEH; P;
CL 1508. P. sp. 06; SEH; L; EA 581. P. sp. 07; SEH; P; CL 250. P. sp. 08;
SEH; P; CL 666. P. sp. 09; SEH; P; CL 360. P. sp. 10; SEH; P; CL 477. P.
sp. 11; SEH; P; EA 1077.
ARALIACEAE: Dendropanax aff. cuneatus (DC.) Decaisne & Planchon;
A; P; CL 968. D. sp. 1; SZL; L; EA 657.

198

ARECACEAE: Astrocaryum aculeatum G. Meyer; PAM; L; A.


gynacanthum C. Martius; PAC; L; CL 1650. A. sciophilum (Miquel) Pulle;
PAM; L; EA 615. Bactris balanophora Spruce; PTM; P; CL 689. B. hirta
C. Martius; PTM; P; CL 848. B. humilis (Wallace) Burret; PTM; P; CL
1471. B. killipii Burret; PTM; P; CL 965. B. monticola Barbosa Rodrigues;
PAC; L, P; CL 1601. B. simplicifrons C. Martius; PTM; P; EA 1191.
Chamaedorea pauciflora C. Martius; PTM; L; EA 554. Desmoncus
polyacanthos C. Martius; PSL; L; EA 307. D. pumilus Trail; PSL; L; EA
603. D. setosus C. Martius; PSL; L; EA 902. Euterpe precatoria C.
Martius; PAM; L; EA 622. Geonoma macrostachys C. Martius; PTU; L;
CL 1563. G. multiflora C. Martius; PTM; P; CL 783. G. piscicauda
Dammer; PTM; P; CL 1016. G. poeppigiana C. Martius; PTM; L; EA 565.
G. pycnostachys C. Martius; PTC; L; CL 1603. Iriartea deltoidea R. & P.;
PAM; L; EA 266. Iriartella setigera (C. Martius) H. A. Wendland; PTC;
P; CL-876. Lepidocaryum tenue C. Martius; PTC; P; CL 1518.
Oenocarpus bacaba C. Martius; PAM; P; CL 1381. O. bataua C. Martius;
PAM; P; O. mapora Karsten; PAC; L; EA 621. Orbignya polysticha
Burret; PTU; P; CL 1379. Pholidostachys synanthera (C. Martius) H.
Moore; PTM; P; CL 1380. Socratea exorrhiza (C. Martius) H. A.
Wendland; PAM; P; CL 1378. Wettinia augusta Poeppig & Endlicher;
PAM; P; CL 878.
ASCLEPIADACEAE: Cynanchum (Mellichampia) sp. nov. aff. C.
riometense Sundell; SH; L; EA 807.
ASPLENIACEAE: Lomagramma guianensis (Aublet) Ching; FSH; L;
EA 207. Lomariopsis japurensis J. Sm.; FSH; L; EA 327. L. sp. 1; FSH; L;
EA 233. Polybotrya sp. 1; FSH; P; CL 112.
ASTERACEAE: Mikania vaupesensis W. Holmes & McDaniel; SL; L;
EA 1247. Mikania? sp. 1; SL; L; EA 1225. Piptocarpha poeppigiana
(DC.) Baker; SL; L; EA 110.
BIGNONIACEAE: Arrabidaea aff. oligantha Bureau & Schumann; SL;
P; CL 366. A. bilabiata (Sprague) Sandwith; SL; L; EA 698. A. covallim
(Vaq.) Sandwith; SL; L; EA 1214. A. sp. 1; SL; P; CL 614. Bignoniaceae
sp. 1; SL; L; EA 1205. B. sp. 2; SL; P; EA 1159. Callichlamys latifolia
(Richard) Schumann; SL; L; EA 1212. Cydista aequinoctialis (L.) Miers;
SL; L; EA 812. Distictella sp. nov. aff. D. parkeri DC.; SL; P; CL 1136.
Distictis pulverulenta (Sandwith) A. Gentry; SL; P; CL 1187. Jacaranda
199

macrocarpa Bureau & Schumann ex Schumann; A; P; CL 1067. J.


obtusifolia Humboldt & Bonpland ssp. obtusifolia; A; P; CL 323.
Martinella obovata (H. B. K.) Bureau & Schumann; SL; P; CL A16.
Memora cladotricha Sandwith; SL; L, P; EA 617. M. pseudopatula A.
Gentry; SL; L; EA 768. Memora? sp. 1; SL; L; EA 236. Paragonia
pyramidata (Richard) Bureau.; SL; L; CL 1608. P. sp. 1; SL; P; CL 526.
Pleonotoma jasminifolia (H. B. K.) Miers; SL; P; CL 205. Potamoganos
sp. 1; SL; P; CL 124. Schelegelia sp. 1; SL; L; EA 1237. Tenaecium
jaroba Swartz; SL; L; EA 918. Tynanthus aff. goudotianus (Bureau)
Sandwith; SL; P; CL 1449. T. panurensis (Bureau) Sandwith; SL; P; CL
625.
BOMBACACEAE: Huberodendron swietenioides (Gleason) Ducke; A;
P; CL 1200. Matisia cf. bracteolosa Ducke; A; L; EA 473. M. lasiocalyx
Schumann; A; L; CL 1616. Pachira aquatica Aublet; A; L; EA 731.
Scleronema micranthum (Ducke) Ducke; A; P; CL 1329. S. praecox
Ducke; A; P; CL 1191.
BORAGINACEAE: Boraginaceae? sp. 1; SL; L; EA 1217. Cordia
nodosa Lamarck; A; P; EA 1177. C. sp. 1; A; L; EA 232. C. sp. 2; A; P;
CL 1515.
BURSERACEAE: Burseraceae sp. 1; A; L; EA 427. Dacryodes
chimatensis Steyermark & Maguire; A; P; CL 901. D. cuspidata
(Cuatrecasas) Daly; A; L; EA 653. D. nitens Cuatrecasas; A; P; CL 769.
D. sclerophylla Cuatrecasas; A; P; EA 878. D. sp. nov. 1; A; P; CL 1166.
D. sp. nov. 2; A; P; CL 735. Protium aff. rubrum Cuatrecasas; A; P; CL
1372. P. altsonii Sandwith; A; P; CL 1302. P. apiculatum Swart; A; P; EA
880. P. aracouchini (Aublet) Marchand; A; P; CL 1486. P. cf.
polybotryum (Turczaninow) Engler; A; P; CL 1218. P. elegans Engler; A;
P; EA 1017. P. gallosum Daly, ined.; A; P; CL 1073. P. hebetatum Daly;
A; P; CL-1666. P. krukovii Swart; A; L; EA 704. P. nodulosum Swart; A;
L, P; CL 1544. P. paniculatum Engler ex C. Martius ssp. paniculatum; A;
P; CL 1202. P. sp. 1; A; P; CL 139. P. sp. nov. aff. P. gallosum Daly,
ined.; A; P; CL 1230. P. subserratum (Engler) Engler; A; P; CL 908. P.
urophyllidium Daly, ined.; A; P; CL 1700. Trattinnickia glaziovii Swart;
A; P; CL 1116.
CAESALPINIACEAE: Bauhinia guianensis Aublet; SL; P; CL 1414. B.
sp. 1; SL; P; CL 1516. B. sp. 2; SL; P; CL 1140. Brownea latifolia Jacq.;
200

A; L; CL 1554. Caesalpiniaceae sp. 1; A; P; CL 764. C. sp. 2; A; P; CL


1288. Campsiandra angustifolia Spruce ex Bentham; A; L; EA 922.
Cynometra cf. marginata Bentham; A; L; EA 412. Heterostemon
conjugatus Bentham; A; L; EA 511. Hymenaea oblongifolia Huber; A; L;
CL 1548. Macrolobium acaciaefolium (Bentham) Bentham; A; L; CL
1570; EA 1248. Sclerolobium sp. 1; A; P; CL 54. Senna macrophylla
(Kunth) H. Irwin ssp. gigantifolia (Britton & Killip) H. Irwin & Barneby;
A; L; EA 6; EA 675. Tachigali cf. paniculata Aublet; A; P; CL 1086. T.
sp. 1; A; P; CL 768. T. sp. 2; A; P; CL 445. T. sp. 3; A; P; CL 918. T. sp.
4; A; P; EA 191. T. sp. 5; A; P; CL 1141. T. sp. 6; A; P; CL 817. T. sp. 7;
A; P; CL 989. Vatairea guianensis Aublet; A; L; EA 716.
CARYOCARACEAE: Anthodiscus cf. amazonicus Gleason & A. C.
Smith; A; P; EA 881. Caryocar glabrum (Aublet) Persoon; A; P; CL 822.
C. gracile Wittm.; A; P; CL 975.
CECROPIACEAE: Cecropia cf. membranacea Trcul; A; P; EA 800. C.
discolor Cuatrecasas; A; L; EA 422. Coussapoa aff. martiana Miquel;
SZL; L; EA 94. Pourouma aff. acuminata C. Martius ex Miquel; A; P; CL
352. P. aff. minor Benoist; A; P; EA 1149. P. aff. tomentosa Miquel ssp.
tomentosa; A; P; CL 1510. P. cucura Standley & Cuatrecasas; A; L; EA
724. P. myrmecophila Ducke; A; P; CL 832. P. sp. 1; A; P; EA 1165. P.
sp. 2; A; P; CL 1455. P. sp. 3; A; L; EA 598.
CELASTRACEAE: Celastraceae sp. 1; T; P; CL 1026. Cheiloclinium sp.
1; SL; P; CL 1362. Peritassa sp. 1; SL; P; CL 1107.
CHRYSOBALANACEAE: Chrysobalanaceae sp. 1; A; P; EA 196. C. sp.
2; A; P; EA 827. Couepia cf. guianensis Aublet; A; P; CL 1010. C.
chrysocalyx (Poeppig) Bentham & Hooker f.; A; P; EA 100. C. krukovii
Standley.; A; P; CL 881. C. sp. 1; A; L; EA 72. C. sp. 2; A; P; CL 1321.
Hirtella aff. brachystachya Spruce ex Hooker f.; A; P; EA 900. H. aff.
davisii Sandwith; A; L; EA 392. H. aff. hispidula Miquel; A; L; EA 753.
H. aff. latifolia Prance; A; L; EA 645. H. aff. macrophylla Bentham ex
Hooker f.; A; L; EA 108. H. aff. obidensis Ducke; A; P; CL 409. H. aff.
pilosissima C. Martius & Zuccarini; A; L; EA 740. H. aff. shultesii Prance;
A; P; CL 442. H. aff. ulei Pilg.; A; P; CL 1421. H. guianiae Spruce &
Hooker f.; A; L; CL 1618. H. triandra Swartz; T; P; CL 1027. Licania aff.
alba (Bernoulli) Cuatrecasas; A; P; CL 1198. L. aff. arachnoidea
Fanshawe & Maguire; A; L; EA 914. L. aff. canescens Benoist; A; P; CL
201

397. L. aff. cruegeriana Urb.; A; P; CL 175. L. aff. hypoleuca Bentham;


A; P; CL 885. L. aff. kunthiana Hooker f.; A; P; CL 1412. L. aff.
leucosepala Grisebach; A; P; EA 170. L. aff. macrocarpa Cuatrecasas; A;
P; CL 1505. L. aff. oblongifolia Standley; A; L; EA 472. L. aff. octandra
(Hoffmannsegg ex Roemer & Schultes) Kuntze; A; P; CL 1386. L. aff.
triandra C. Martius & Hooker f.; A; L; EA 423. L. aff. vaupesana Killip &
Cuatrecasas; A; L; EA 747. L. apetala (E. Meyer) Fritchs; A; P; CL 1261.
L. cf. harlingii Prance; A; L, P; EA 357. L. heteromorpha Bentham; A; P;
CL 1252. L. reticulata Prance; A; L; EA 446. L. sp. 2; A; P; CL 557. L. sp.
3; A; L; EA 647. L. sp. 4; A; L; EA 654. L. sp. 5; A; P; CL 522. L. sp. 6;
A; P; CL 1149.
CLUSIACEAE: Calophyllum? sp. 1; A; P; EA 1032. Caraipa aff.
grandifolia C. Martius; A; L; EA 112. Clusia (Cruvopsis) alvarezii Pipoly,
sp. nov. ined.; SEL; L; EA 116. C. aff. lineata (Bentham) Planchon &
Triana; SEL; L; EA 765. C. aff. nigrolineata P. F. Stevens; SEL; P; CL
974. C. columnaris Engler; SEL; P; CL 1125. C. gandichandii Choisy ex
Planchon & Triana; SEL; P; EA 877. C. grammadenioides Pipoly, sp.
nov. ined.; SEL; P; CL 1150. C. myriandra Planchon & Triana; SEL; P;
CL 1046. C. penduliflora Engler; SEL; P; CL 1667. C. viscida Engler;
SEL; P; CL 824. Garcinia macrophylla C. Martius; A; L; EA 347. G. sp.
1; A; L; EA 688. G. sp. 2; A; L, P; EA 755. G. spruceana (Engler)
Hammel; A; L; EA 728. Lorostemon sp. 2; A; P; CL 952; CL 1670.
Moronobea? Platonia?; A; P; CL 1303. Quapoya longipes (Ducke)
Maguire; SL; P; CL 1090. Q. peruviana (Poeppig) Kuntze; SL; P; CL 835.
Rheedia acuminata (R. & P.) Planchon & Triana; A; P; CL 1684.
Symphonia globulifera L. f.; A; L; EA 89. Tovomita aff. krukovii Smith;
A; L; EA 683. T. aff. weddelliana Triana & Planchon; A; P; CL 1448. T.
cf. brevistaminea Engler; A; P; CL 188. T. pyrifolia Smith; A; L; EA 103.
T. schomburgkii Planchon & Triana; A; P; CL 577. T. sp. 1; A; P; CL 829.
T. sp. 2; A; P; CL 727. T. sp. 3; A; P; CL 447. T. sp. 4; A; L, P; CL 1451.
T. speciosa Ducke; A; L; EA 506. Tovomita? sp. 5; A; P; CL 665. Vismia
angusta Miquel; A; L; EA 633. V. sp. 1; A; L; EA 605. V. sp. 2; A; L; EA
927.
COMBRETACEAE: Buchenavia amazonica Al-Mayah & Stace; A; L, P;
CL 1547. B. parvifolia Ducke; A; P; EA 841. Terminalia aff. amazonica
(J. F. Gmelin) Exell; A; L; EA 635. T. aff. brasiliensis Eichler; A; P; CL
202

1304. T. aff. dichotoma G. Meyer; A; L; CL 1575. T. aff. oblonga (R. &


P.) Steudel; A; P; EA 790. T. sp. 2; A; L; CL 1531.
COMMELINACEAE: Commelinaceae sp. 1; H; L; EA 1249.
Dichorisandra ulei J. F. Macbride; H; L; EA 101. Floscopa peruviana
Hasskarl ex C. B. Clarke; H; L; EA 923.
CONNARACEAE: Connarus aff. erianthus Bentham ex Baker; A; P; CL
301. C. aff. fasciculatus (DC.) Planchon; A; P; CL 856. C. sp. 1; T; P; EA
848. C. sp. 2; T; L; EA 231. Pseudoconnarus cf. rhynchosioides
(Standley) Prance; SL; P; CL 258. P. macrophyllus (Poeppig) Radlkofer;
SL; P; CL 349. Rourea aff. crysomalla; SL; P; EA 1143. R. aff. cuspidata
Bentham ex Baker; SL; L; EA 74. R. cf. camptoneura Radlkofer; SL; P;
EA 1038. R. sp. 1; T; P; CL 598. R. sp. 2; A; P; CL 223. R. sp. 3; SL; L;
EA 1229.
CONVOLVULACEAE: Convolvulaceae sp. 1; SL; P; EA 1036. C. sp. 2;
SL; P; CL 551. Convolvulaceae? sp. 3; SL; L, P; EA 607. C. sp. 4; SL; L;
EA 1235. C. sp. 5; SL; P; EA 1152. Dicranostyles aff. longifolia Ducke;
SL; P; EA 1093. D. sp. 1; SL; P; CL 1189. Evolvulus sp. 1; SH; P; CL 200.
Maripa cf. peruviana van Ooststroom; SL; P; CL 959. M. sp. 1; SL; P; EA
876. M. sp. 2; SL; P; CL 1334. Maripa? sp. 3; SL; P; CL 459.
COSTACEAE: Costus scaber R. & P.; H; L; CL 1561.
CUCURBITACEAE: Cayaponia coriacea Cogniaux; SH; L; EA 824. C.
oppositifolia Harms; SH; L, P; EA 586. Gurania eriantha (Poeppig &
Endlicher) Cogniaux; SH; L; CL 1597. G. sp. 1; SH; P; EA 1169. G.
spinulosa (Poeppig & Endlicher) Cogniaux; SH; P; CL 1695. Psiguria
triphylla (Miquel) C. Jeffrey; SH; L; EA 1207.
CYATHEACEAE: Cyatheaceae sp. 1; FA; L; EA 367. Sphaeropteris
macrosora (Baker) Windisch; FA; P; CL 490.
CYCLANTHACEAE: Asplundia cf. vaupesiana Harling; SH; P; CL 695.
A. sp. 1; SH; P; CL 105. Cyclanthaceae sp. 1; SH; P; CL 647. C. sp. 2; SH;
L; EA 696. Cyclanthus bipartitus Poiteau; H; L; EA 556. Thoracocarpus
aff. bisectus (Vell. Conc.) Harling; SH; L; EA 685.
CYPERACEAE: Calyptrocarya? Scleria?; H; L; EA 570.
DENNSTAEDTIACEAE: Lindsaea aff. coarctata Kramer; FH; P; CL
325. L. lancea (L.) Bedd.; FH; P; EA 1106.

203

DICHAPETALACEAE: Tapura amazonica Poeppig & Endlicher; A; L;


EA 107. T. cf. capitulifera Spruce ex Baillon; A; L; EA 750. T. peruviana
K. Krause; A; L; CL 1559.
DILLENIACEAE: Doliocarpus aff. confertus Rusby; SL; L, P; EA 663.
D. cf. multiflorus Standley; SL; L; EA 921.
DIPTEROCARPACEAE: Pseudomonotes tropenbosii Londoo,
lvarez, Forero & Morton, gnero y sp. nov.; A; P; CL 1698.
EBENACEAE: Diospyros aff. glomerata Spruce; A; P; CL 954. D.
opacifolia J. F. Macbride; A; L, P; EA 552. D. peruviana Hiern; A; L; EA
757. D. sp. 1; A; P; EA 1074.
ELAEOCARPACEAE: Sloanea aff. floribunda Spruce & Bentham; A;
P; CL 1487. S. aff. obtusa (Spligt.) Schumann; A; P; CL 1254. S. aff.
robusta Uittien; A; P; CL 722. S. cf. brevipes Bentham; A; P; CL 1364. S.
cf. fragans Rusby; A; L; EA 529. S. grandiflora Smith; A; P; CL 116. S.
parviflora Planchon ex Bentham; A; L; EA 749. S. sp. 1; A; P; CL 833. S.
sp. 2; A; P; CL-1075; CL 1678. S. sp. 3; A; P; EA 162. S. sp. 4; A; P; CL
1392. S. sp. 5; A; P; CL 1172. S. sp. 6; A; L; EA 751. S. sp. 7; A; P; EA
1174. S. yapacanae Steyermark; A; P; CL 1357.
ERICACEAE: Satyria panurensis (Bentham ex Meissner) Bentham &
Hooker f.; SEL; P; CL 900.
ERYTHROXYLACEAE: Erythroxylon gracilipes Peyritsch; T; L; CL
1564. E. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1145.
EUPHORBIACEAE: Acalypha aff. mapirensis Pax; A; L; EA 712.
Alchornea aff. discolor Poeppig; A; P; CL 1343. A. aff. glandulosa
Poeppig; A; L; EA 636. A. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1282. Alchorneopsis aff.
floribunda (Bentham) Muell. Arg.; A; P; EA 1156. Amanoa cf. guianensis
Aubl.; A; P; EA 128. Conceveiba guianensis Aublet; A; L; EA 413.
Croton monachinos Baehni; A; L; EA 637. Dalechampia aff.
parvibracteata Landj.; SL; L; EA 826. Dodecastigma amazonicum Ducke;
A; L; CL 1551. Drypetes amazonica Ducke; A; L; EA 466. Hevea cf.
guianensis Aublet; A; P; EA 842. H. cf. pauciflora (Spruce ex Bentham)
Muell. Arg.; A; P; CL 713. H. sp. 1; A; P; CL 697. H. sp. 2; A; P; CL
1691. Hyeronima aff. alchorneoides Allemo.; A; L; EA 385. Mabea aff.
macbridei I. M. Johnston; A; L; EA 325. M. aff. occidentalis Bentham; A;
P; CL 1694. M. cf. caudata Pax & Hoffmann; A; L, P; CL 1582.
Maprounea guianensis Aublet; A; P; CL 1459. Margaritaria nobilis L. f.;
204

A; L; EA 687. Omphalea diandra L.; SL; L; EA 656. Sapium marmieri


Huber; A; L; EA 505. Senefeldera karsteniana Pax. & Hoffm.; A; P; CL
1135.
FABACEAE: Andira sp. 1; A; L; EA 33. Clathrotropis macrocarpa
Ducke; A; L, P; CL 1353. Clathrotropis sp. 1; A; L; EA 209. Clitoria sp.
1; SL; P; CL 1211. C. sp. 2; SL; L; EA 572. Dalbergia sp. 1; A; L; EA
597. Dioclea aff. dictyoneura Diels; SL; P; EA 1127. D. aff. glabra
Bentham; SL; P; EA 1146. Diplotropis martiusii Bentham; A; P; EA 840.
D. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1274. Dipteryx aff. cordata (Ducke) Cowan; A; P; CL
970. D. cf. nudipes Tul; A; L; EA 407. D. polyphylla Huber; A; P; CL 882.
D. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1457. Fabaceae sp. 1; SL; L; EA 336. F. sp. 2; A; P; CL
1417. F. sp. 3; A; P; EA 1164. F. sp. 4; A; P; EA 163. F. sp. 5; A; L; EA
625. F. sp. 6; SL; P; EA 1170. F. sp. 7; A; L; EA 746. Lonchocarpus aff.
latifolius H. B. K.; A; L; EA 22. L. aff. pterocarpus DC.; SL; L; EA 764.
L. cf. nicou (Aublet) DC.; A; L; EA 345. L. sp. 1; A; L; EA 738.
Machaerium aff. arboreum Bentham; A; L; EA 736. M. aff. frondosus C.
Martius; SL; P; EA 1154. M. aff. macrophyllum Bentham; SL; P; CL1521. M. aff. madeirense Pittier; SL; P; EA 1142. M. aff. paraense Ducke;
SL; L; EA 660. M. cf. oblongifolium Vog.; SL; L; EA 1209. M. inundatum
(C. Martius ex Bentham) Ducke; SL; L; EA 97. M. multifoliolatum Ducke;
SL; P; CL 1466. M. sp. 1; SL; P; CL 575. M. sp. 2; A; P; CL 1234. M. sp.
3; SL; L; EA 1245. M. sp. 4; SL; P; EA 1129. M. sp. 5; SL; L; EA 1227.
M. sp. 6; SL; L; EA 727. Mucuna sp. 1; SL; L; EA 320. Muellera sp. 1;
SL; P; CL 595. Myrocarpus aff. frondosus Fr. Allem.; SL; P; CL 1126.
Ormosia aff. coccinea (Aublet) Jackson; A; L; EA 522. O. aff. lehmanii;
A; P; CL 1393. O. macrophylla Bentham; A; P; CL 1355. O. sp. 1; A; L;
EA 748. Poecilanthe sp. 1; SL; L; EA 361. Pterocarpus aff. amazonum (C.
Martius ex Bentham) Amshoff; A; L; EA 658. P. aff. draco L.; A; L; EA
729. P. sp. 1; A; L; EA 648. P. sp. 2; A; P; EA 1024. Swartzia aff.
amplifolia Harms; A; P; CL-1708. S. aff. benthamiana Miquel; A; P; CL
1493. S. aff. brachyrachys Harms; A; P; EA 861. S. aff. cardiosperma
Spruce ex Bentham; A; L, P; EA 722. S. aff. parvifolia Schery; A; P; CL
1021. S. aff. polyphylla DC.; A; P; CL 1237. S. aff. pycta Bentham; A; P;
CL 645. S. aff. simplex (Swartz) Sprengel; A; L; EA 351. S. arborescens
(Aublet) Pittier; A; L; EA 487. S. cf. racemosa Bentham; A; L; EA 730. S.
laevicarpa Amshoff; A; L, P; EA 707. S. lamellata Ducke; A; P; CL 1262.
205

S. schomburgkii Bentham; A; P; CL 811. S. sp. 1; A; L; EA 700. S. sp. 2;


A; P; CL 163. Taralea aff. opositifolia Aublet; A; L; EA 628. Zollernia?
sp. 1; A; L; EA 579.
FLACOURTIACEAE: Carpotroche amazonica C. Martius ex Eichler;
A; P; CL 953; CL 1676. Casearia aff. fasciculata (R. & P.) Sleumer; A; L;
EA 486. C. aff. oblongifolia Camb.; A; P; EA 179. C. aff. suaveolens
(Poeppigg) Bentham; A; P; CL 1291. C. cf. decandra Jacquin; A; L, P; CL
1590. Flacourtiaceae sp. 1; A; L; EA 530. Mayna aff. odorata Aublet; T;
L; CL 1568. Ryania speciosa M. Vahl.; A; L; EA 689.
GENTIANACEAE: Tachia occidentalis Maguire & Weaver; T; P; CL
1683.
GESNERIACEAE: Kohleria cf. hirsuta Regel; H; L; EA 912.
HELICONIACEAE: Heliconia acuminata A. Richard; H; L; EA 248. H.
lasiorachis L. Andersson; H; L; EA 91. H. shumanniana Loesener; H; L;
EA 602. H. sp. 1; H; L; EA 555. H. stricta Huber; H; L; CL 1585.
HIPPOCRATEACEAE: Hippocrateaceae sp. 1; T; P; CL 184. H. sp. 2;
SL; P; CL 618. H. sp. 3; SL; L; EA 1204. Salacia aff. macrantha A. C.
Smith; SL; L; EA 538. S. cf. impressifolia (Miers) A. C. Smith; A; L; EA
643. S. gigantea Loesener; SL; L; EA 96. S. insignis A. C. Smith; SL; L;
EA 1223. S. sp. 2; SL; P; EA 1065. Salacia? sp. 1; SL; L; EA 752.
HUMIRIACEAE: Humiria aff. balsaminifera Aublet; A; P; CL 1472.
Humiriaceae? sp. 1; A; P; CL 484. Sacoglottis aff. amazonica C. Martius;
A; P; EA 157. Sacoglottis? Schistostemon?; A; P; EA 146. Vantanea cf.
peruviana J. F. Macbride; A; P; EA;1182. Vantanea sp. 1; A; P; CL 542.
V. spichigeri A. Gentry; A; P; CL 1133.
HYMENOPHYLLACEAE: Trichomanes ankersii Hook. & Grev; FSH;
P; CL 642.
ICACINACEAE: Calatola sp. 1; A; L; CL 1543. Casimirella aff. ampla
(Miers) R. Howard; SL; L; EA A536. Citronella sp. 1; SL; L; EA 818.
Dendrobangia boliviana Rusby; A; P; EA 854. Discophora guianenesis
Miers; A; P; EA 1008. Icacinaceae sp. 1; A; P; CL 394. Leretia cf. cordata
Vell. Conc.; SL; L; EA 1234. L. sp. 1; SL; L; EA 212. L. sp. 2; SL; P; EA
1145.
INDETERMINADOS: Indeterminado sp. 01; A; P; CL 136. I. sp. 02; SL;
L; EA 1206. I. sp. 03; A; P; CL 672. I. sp. 04; A; L; EA 237. I. sp. 05; SL;
P; CL 239. I. sp. 06; SL; L; EA 763. I. sp. 07; SL; L; EA 1231. I. sp. 08;
206

A; P; EA 871. I. sp. 09; A; P; CL 663. I. sp. 10; A; P; CL 256. I. sp. 11;


SL; P; CL 1253. I. sp. 12; SL; P; CL 863. I. sp. 13; A; P; CL 110. I. sp. 14;
SL; P; EA-1161. Leguminosae sp. 1; SL; P; CL 1394. L. sp. 2; SL; P; CL
1333. Pteridophyta sp. 1; FH; P; EA 1052. P. sp. 2; FH; L; EA 547.
LAURACEAE: Aniba aff. guianensis Aublet; A; L; EA 920. A. cf.
hostmanniana (Nees) Mez; A; P; CL 94. A. cf. williamsii O. Schmidt; A;
P; CL 1475. Aniba puchury minor (C. Martius) Mez; A; P; EA 859. A. sp.
1; A; P; CL 20. A. sp. 2; A; P; CL 1080. A. sp. 3; A; P; CL 1659. A. sp. 4;
A; P; CL 478. Beilschmiedia aff. brasiliensis (Kostermans) Kostermans;
A; P; CL 941. Caryodaphnopsis? sp. 1; A; P; EA 906. Endlicheria cf.
verticilata Mez; A; L; EA 13. E. krukovii (A. C. Smith) Kostermans; A; L;
EA 482. E. sericea Nees; A; P; EA 830. E. sp. 2; A; P; CL 920. E. sp. nov.
1; A; P; CL 1495. E. sprucei (Meissner) Mez; A; P; EA 1150. E. williamsii
O. Schmidt; A; L; EA 662. Endlicheria? Ocotea?; A; P; CL 944.
Lauraceae sp. 1; A; L; EA 562. L. sp. 2; A; P; EA 851. L. sp. 3; A; L; EA
402. L. sp. 4; A; L, P; CL 1646. L. sp. 5; A; P; EA A1035. Lauraceae? sp.
6; A; P; CL 314. L. sp. 7; A; P; EA 1084. Licaria guianensis Aublet; A; P;
CL 1032. L. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1350. Mezilaurus itauba (Meissner) Taubert
ex Mez; A; P; CL 1092. Nectandra aff. cuspidata Nees; A; P; EA 1030. N.
aff. pisi Miquel; A; L; CL 1571; EA 1243. N. sp. 1; A; L; EA 509. N. sp.
2; A; P; CL 146. N. sp. 3; A; L; EA 718. N. sp. 4; A; P; CL 406. Ocotea
aciphylla (Nees) Mez; A; P; EA-853. O. aff. cernua (Nees) Mez; A; P; CL
1244. O. aff. neblinae Allen; A; P; CL 1281. O. amazonica (Meissner)
Mez; A; L, P; CL 1213. O. argyrophylla Ducke; A; P; CL 1242. O.
cymbarum H. B. K.; A; P; CL 814. O. leucoxylon (Swartz) de Lanessan;
A; P; CL 1280. O. sp. 01; A; P; CL 1440. O. sp. 02; A; L; EA 283. O. sp.
03; A; P; CL 310. O. sp. 04; A; P; EA 193. O. sp. 05; A; P; CL 601. O. sp.
06; A; P; CL 1522. O. sp. 07; A; P; EA 866. O. sp. 08; A; P; CL 443. O.
sp. 09; A; L; EA 461. O. sp. 10; A; L, P; EA 481. O. sp. 11; A; P; CL
1044; CL 1336. O. sp. 12; A; P; CL 1082. O. sp. 13; A; P; EA;855. O. sp.
14; A; P; CL 921. O. sp. 15; A; P; CL 1259. O. sp. 16; A; P; CL 545.
Ocotea? Endlicheria?; A; P; CL 64. Rhodostemonodaphne sp. 1; A; P; CL
1300. R. sp. 2; A; L, P; EA 126. R. sp. 4; A; P; EA 198. R. sp. 5; A; P; EA
1082. R. sp. 6; A; P; CL 945.
LECYTHIDACEAE: Cariniana decandra Ducke; A; P; CL 1365.
Couratari guianensis Aublet; A; L; EA A458. Eschweilera bracteosa
207

(Poeppig ex Berg) Miers; A; P; CL 841. E. cf. alata A. C. Smith; A; P; CL


581. E. cf. albiflora (A. DC.) Miers; A; L; CL 1649. E. cf. andina (Rusby)
J. F. Macbride; A; L, P; EA 897. E. cf. laevicarpa S. Mori; A; P; CL 1709.
E. itayensis Knuth; A; L; EA 477. E. juruensis Knuth; A; L; EA 1101. E.
punctata S. Mori; A; P; CL 815. E. sp. 2; A; P; CL 977. E. sp. nov. 1; A;
P; CL-1671. E. tessmannii Knuth; A; P; CL 996; CL-1269. Grias sp. 1; A;
L; CL 1535. Gustavia aff. augusta L.; A; L; EA 592. G. poeppigiana
Berg; A; L; EA 479.
LINACEAE: Roucheria humiriifolia Planchon; A; P; EA 1120. R.
punctata (Ducke) Ducke; A; P; CL 1323.
LOGANIACEAE: Potalia amara Aublet; T; P; CL 805. Strychnos aff.
solerederi Gilg; SL; P; CL 453. S. cf. erichsonii Schomburgk ex Progel;
SL; L; EA 229. S. medeola Sagot. & Prog.; SL; P; CL 675. S. sp. 1; SL; L;
CL 1577. S. subcordata Spruce ex Bentham; SL; P; EA 1167.
LYTHRACEAE: Adenaria floribunda H. B. K.; T; L; EA 119.
MALPIGHIACEAE: Byrsonima arthopoda Adr. Jussieu; A; L; CL 1529.
B. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1436. Diplopterys? sp. 1; SL; P; CL 226. Hiraea sp. 1;
SL; L; EA 329. H. sp. 2; SL; P; CL 554. Malpighiaceae sp. 1; A; P; CL
318. M. sp. 2; SL; P; CL 343. M. sp. 3; SL; P; EA 1160. Mascagnia aff.
macrodisca (Triana & Planchon) Niedenzu; SL; L; EA 300. M. cf.
ovatifolia (H. B. K.) Grisebach; SL; P; CL 1273. Mascagnia? sp. 1; SL; L;
EA 37. M. sp. 2; SL; L; EA 1238. Stigmaphyllon? sp. 1; SL; L, P; CL 345.
MARANTACEAE: Calathea lanata Petersen; H; L; CL 1604; CL 1607.
C. sp. 1; H; L; EA 611. Ischnosiphon cf. arouma (Aublet) Koernicke; SH;
L; EA 247. Maranta sp. 1; H; P; CL 153. Marantaceae sp. 1; H; P; CL
573. M. sp. 2; H; P; EA A1095. M. sp. 3; H; P; EA 1105. Monotagma sp.
1; H; P; CL 362.
MARCGRAVIACEAE: Marcgravia sp. 1; SL; P; CL 662. M. sp. 2; SL;
P; CL 197. M. sp. 3; SL; L; CL 1555. M. sp. 4; SL; L; EA 1104. Norantea
guianensis Aublet; SL; P; CL 1043. Souroubea cf. guianensis Aublet; SL;
P; CL 1397.
MELASTOMATACEAE: Adelobotrys cf. spruceana Cogniaux; SH; L;
CL 1594. Adelobotrys? sp. 1; SH; P; CL 1338. Clidemia bernardii
Wurdack; T; P; CL 781. Graffenrieda patens Triana; SL; P; CL 782; CL
844. Graffenrieda? sp. 1; SL; P; CL 580. Leandra candelabrum (J. F.
Macbride) Wurdack; SH; P; CL 567. L. glandulifera (Triana) Cogniaux;
208

T; P; CL 791. L. rhodopogon (DC.) Cogniaux; T; P; CL 851. Maieta cf.


poeppigii C. Martius ex Cogniaux; H; P; CL-845. Melastomataceae sp. 1;
A; P; EA 1180. M. sp. 2; A; P; CL 450. M. sp. 3; SH; P; CL 653. Miconia
aff. aplostachya (Bonpland) DC.; T; P; CL 574. M. aff. centrodesma
Naudin; A; P; CL 385. M. aff. minutiflora (Bonpland) DC.; A; P; EA
1153. M. affinis DC.; T; L; EA 518. M. biglandulosa Gleason; A; P; CL
949. M. carassana Cogniaux; T; P; CL 372. M. cf. longifolia (Aublet)
DC.; T; L; EA 98. M. cf. splendens (Swartz) Grisebach; A; P; CL 1220. M.
eleagnoides Cogniaux; A; L, P; EA 395. M. phanerostila Pilger; A; P; CL
887. M. poeppigii Triana; A; P; EA 834. M. serrulata (DC.) Naudin; A; L;
CL 1576. M. sp. 1; SH; P; CL 479. M. sp. 2; T; P; CL 635. M. sp. 3; A; P;
CL 998. M. sp. 4; T; P; CL 481. M. sp. Sect. Laceraria; T; P; CL 795.
Miconia? Clidemia?; SH; P; EA 1060. Miconia? sp. 2; A; P; EA 1123. M.
sp. 3; T; L; EA 591. Mouriri aff. myrtifolia Spruce ex Triana; A; L; EA
735. M. aff. nigra (DC.) Morley; A; P; EA 894. M. aff. vernicosa Naudin;
A; P; EA 59. M. cauliflora C. Martius ex DC.; A; P; CL 1363. M. sp. 2; A;
L; EA 117. M. sp. 4; A; L; EA A541. Myrmidone macrosperma (C.
Martius) C. Martius; T; P; CL-335; CL 690. Tococa sp. 1; T; P; CL 859. T.
sp. 2; T; P; CL 668.
MELIACEAE: Cedrela odorata L.; A; L; EA 88. Guarea cf. pubescens
(Richard) Adr. Jussieu.; A; P; EA 1057. G. grandiflora DC.; A; L; EA 81.
G. kunthiana Adr. Jussieu; A; L; CL 1541. G. macrophylla M. Vahl; A; L,
P; EA 105. G. purusana C. DC.; A; L; CL 1610. G. sp. 1; A; P; CL 770.
G. trunciflora C. DC.; A; P; EA 784. Trichilia cf. purusana C. DC.; A; L;
EA 332. T. micrantha Bentham; A; P; EA 1116. T. quadrijuga Kunth; A;
L; EA 495. T. sp. 1; A; L; CL 1539. T. sp. 2; A; P; EA 137. T. sp. 3; A; L;
EA 302. T. sp. 4; A; L; EA 28. T. sp. 5; A; L; EA 669.
MENDONCIACEAE: Mendoncia sp. 1; SL; P; CL 888.
MENISPERMACEAE: Abuta grandifolia (C. Martius) Sandwith; SL; P;
CL 1409. A. imene (C. Martius) Eichler; SL; P; CL 1342. A. obovata
Diels; SL; P; CL 1275. A. pahni (C. Martius) Krukoff & Barneby; SL; L,
P; CL 1391. Abuta? sp. 1; SL; P; CL 167. A. sp. 2; SL; L; EA 575. A. sp.
3; SL; P; CL 1299. A. sp. 4; SL; P; CL 92. Menispermaceae sp. 1; SL; P;
CL 1161. Odontocarya sp. Sect. Somphoxylon; SL; P; CL 837.
Sciadotecnia cf. toxifera Krukoff & A. C. Smith; SL; L; EA 77.

209

Telitoxicum krukovii Moldenke; SL; P; CL 725. T. sp. 1; SL; P; CL 546. T.


sp. 2; SL; P; EA 1136.
MIMOSACEAE: Abarema sp. 1; A; P; CL 1361. A. sp. 2; A; P; EA 145.
Acacia cf. altiscandens Ducke; SL; L; EA 536. Inga aff. punctata
Willdenow; A; L; EA 439. I. aff. ruizana G. Don.; A; P; CL 1411. I. cf.
brachyrachis Harms /cf. capitata Desvaux; A; P; CL 1420. I. cf.
cordatoalata Ducke; A; L; CL 1574. I. cf. gracifolia Ducke; A; P; EA
1043. I. cf. peltadenia Harms; A; P; EA 802. I. cf. pezizifera Bentham; A;
P; CL 1287. I. cf. pruriensis Poeppig; A; P; CL 930. I. sp. 01; A; P; EA
194. I. sp. 02; A; P; EA 1125. I. sp. 03; A; P; CL 1438. I. sp. 04; A; L; EA
381. I. sp. 05; A; L; CL 1639. I. sp. 06; A; P; EA 1086. I. sp. 07; A; L; EA
281. I. sp. 08; A; P; CL 193. I. sp. 09; A; L; EA 640. I. sp. 10; A; L; CL
1640. I. sp. 11; A; L; EA 397. I. sp. 12; A; L; EA 512. I. sp. 13; A; L; CL
1629. I. sp. 14; A; P; CL 1445. I. sp. 15; A; L; EA 457. I. stipulacea G.
Don; A; L; EA 526. Marmaroxylon racemosum (Ducke) Killip; A; P; EA
1121. Parkia aff. reticulata Ducke; A; P; CL 1673. P. cf. panurensis
Bentham; A; P; CL 604. P. igneiflora Ducke; A; P; EA 1133. P. multijuga
Bentham; A; L; EA 383. Pithecellobium auriculatum Bentham; A; P; CL
1498. P. claviflorum Bentham; A; P; CL 842. P. sp. 1; A; P; EA 785. P.
sp. nov. aff. P. leucophyllum Benth.; A; P; CL 1160. Zygia inequalis
(Humboldt & Bonpland ex Willdenow) Pittier; A; L; EA 627. Z. latifolia
(L.) Fawcett & Rendle; A; L; EA 476.
MONIMIACEAE: Mollinedia sp. 1; A; L; EA 114. M. sp. 2; SL; P; CL
398; CL 777. M. sp. 3; T; L; EA 140. Siparuna aff. guianensis Aublet; A;
P; CL 1427.
MORACEAE: Brosimum cf. alicastrum Swartz ssp. bolivarense (Pittier)
C. C. Berg; A; L; EA 421. B. guianense (Aublet) Huber; A; L; EA 109. B.
lactescens (S. Moore) C. C. Berg; A; L; EA 95. B. parinarioides Ducke
ssp. parinarioides; A; P; CL 710. B. rubescens Taubert; A; P; CL 1251. B.
sp. 1; A; P; CL 550. B. utile (H. B. K.) Pittier; A; P; CL 1088. Clarisia cf.
ilicifolia (Spreng.) Lany & Ross.; A; L; EA 459. Ficus cf. maxima Miller;
SZL; L; EA 430. F. cf. pertusa L. f.; SZL; L; EA 508. F. cf. yoponensis
Desvaux; SZL; L; EA 462. F. sp. 1; A; L; EA 1246. Helicostylis cf.
pedunculata; A; P; CL 594. H. heterotricha Ducke; A; P; CL 1186. H.
scabra (J. F. Macbride) C. C. Berg; A; P; CL 1258. H. tomentosa (Poeppig
& Endlicher) J. F. Macbride; A; P; EA 53. Naucleopsis cf. caloneura
210

(Huber) Ducke; A; L, P; EA 849. N. cf. glabra Spruce ex Pittier; A; L; EA


211. Perebea aff. longepedunculata C. C. Berg.; A; L, P; EA 339. P. cf.
xanthochyma Karsten; A; L; EA 417. Pseudolmedia cf. laevis (R. & P.) J.
F. Macbride; A; P; EA 404. P. laevigata Trcul; A; P; CL 1326. Sorocea
hirtella Mildbraed; A; L, P; EA 120. S. muriculata Miquel; A; L, P; CL
1679.
MYRISTICACEAE: Compsoneura capitellata (A. DC.) Warburg; A; P;
CL 909. C. cf. ulei Warburg; A; L, P; CL 947. Iryanthera crassifolia A. C.
Smith; A; L; CL 1542. I. elliptica Ducke; A; P; CL 1069. I. juruensis
Warburg; A; L, P; CL 1550. I. paraensis Huber; A; P; CL 1693. I. sp. 1;
A; L; EA 1102. I. tricornis Ducke; A; P; CL 1229. I. ulei Warburg; A; P;
CL 1537. Osteophloeum platyspermum (A. DC.) Warburg; A; P; CL 1042.
Virola aff. multinervia Ducke; A; P; EA 125. V. calophylla Warburg; A;
L, P; EA 668. V. calophylloidea Markgraf; A; P; CL 1194. V. cf. obovata
Ducke; A; L; EA 354. V. cf. surinamensis (Rolander) Warburg; A; L; EA
661. V. cuspidata (Bentham) Warburg; A; L, P; CL 355. V. duckei A. C.
Smith; A; L; EA 418. V. elongata (Benth.) Warb.; A; P; CL 1181. V.
loretensis A. C. Smith; A; L; EA 642. V. marlenei W. Rodrigues; T; P; CL
800. V. pavonis (A. DC.) A. C. Smith; A; P; EA 102. V. sp. 2; A; P; CL
178. V. sp. 3; A; P; CL 206.
MYRSINACEAE: Cybianthus amaralae Pipoly, sp. nov. ined.; SL; P; CL
119. C. gigantophyllus Pipoly; A; P; CL 84. C. guianensis (A. DC.)
Miquel ssp. pseudoincacoreus; A; P; CL 1680; EA 1119. C. longifolius
Miquel; T; L; EA 684. C. poeppigii Mez; T; L; EA 230. C. resinosus Mez
s.l.; A; L; EA 521. Myrsinaceae sp. 1; SL; P; CL 159. Stylogyne lasseri
(Lundell) Pipoly; A; L; EA 580. S. sp. 1; A; L; EA 276.
MYRTACEAE: Calyptranthes aff. bipennis O. Berg.; A; L; EA 369. C.
aff. lanceolata O. Berg.; A; L; EA 490. C. aff. paniculata R. & P.; A; L;
CL 1627. C. aff. speciosa Sagot; A; L; EA 665. Calyptranthes? sp. 1; A;
L; EA 334. Eugenia aff. feijoi O. Berg.; A; L; EA 73; EA 433. E. cf.
lambertiana DC.; A; L, P; EA 520. E. sp. 1; A; L; EA 27. Eugenia? sp. 2;
A; L; EA 761. E. sp. 3; A; L; EA 1232. Marlierea aff. spruceana O. Berg.;
A; L; EA 679. Myrcia cf. magna Legraud; A; L; EA 432. Myrcia? sp. 2;
A; L; EA 310. M. sp. 3; A; P; CL 1477. M. sp. 6; A; L; EA 271. Myrtaceae
sp. 2; A; L; EA 213. M. sp. 3; A; P; EA 1014. M. sp. 4; A; P; CL 32. M.
sp. 5; A; L; EA 909. Psidium sp. 1; T; L; EA 118.
211

NYCTAGINACEAE: Guapira sp. 1; A; L; EA 619. G. sp. 2; A; L; CL


1652. G. sp. 3; T; L; CL 1560. G. sp. 4; A; L, P; EA 85. G. sp. 5; A; P; EA
143. G. sp. 6; A; P; CL 489. Neea aff. divaricata Poeppig & Endlicher; A;
L, P; CL 1520. N. aff. floribunda Poeppig & Endlicher; A; L; CL 1532. N.
sp. 1; A; P; EA 152. N. sp. 2; A; P; CL 1196. N. sp. 3; A; P; EA 1054. N.
sp. 4; A; P; EA 127. N. sp. 5; A; P; CL 1655. N. sp. 6; A; P; CL 87. N.
virens Poeppig ex Heimerl; T; L; CL 1645.
OCHNACEAE: Ouratea aff. polyantha (Triana & Planchon) Engler; A;
L; EA 711. O. aff. weberbaueri Sleumer; A; P; CL 1483. O. cf. amplifolia
Sleumer; A; P; CL 351. O. cf. pendula Engler; A; L; EA 513.
OLACACEAE: Dulacia macrophylla (Bentham) O. Kuntze; A; P; EA 7.
Heisteria barbata Cuatrecasas; A; P; CL 53. H. cf. acuminata (Humboldt
& Bonpland) Engler; A; L; EA 299. H. cf. densifrons Engler; A; L; EA
463. H. duckei Sleumer; A; P; EA 904. H. latifolia Standley; A; L; EA 35.
H. sp. 1; SL; P; EA 1161. Minquartia guianensis Aublet; A; L, P; EA 492.
ORCHIDACEAE: Elleanthus sp. 1; H; P; CL 660.
PASSIFLORACEAE: Dilkea acuminata Masters; SL; L; EA 759. D.
parviflora Killip; SL; P; CL 1176. Passiflora quadriglandulosa
Rodschield; SL; L; EA 808. P. spinosa (Poeppig & Endlicher) Masters;
SL; L; EA 618. P. variolata Poeppig & Endlicher; SL; P; CL 891.
PIPERACEAE: Peperomia sp. 1; SH; L; CL 1526. Piper cf. javariense
Yuncker; T; L; EA 616. P. cililimbum Yuncker; T; P; CL 272. P.
curvistilum C. DC.; T; P; EA 1055. P. hispidum Swartz s.l.; T; L; EA 567.
P. nigribaccum C. DC.; T; P; CL 1443. P. nigrispicum C. DC.; SH; P; EA
1137. P. sp. 1; T; P; CL 387. P. sp. 2; T; P; EA 1091. P. subfalcatum
Yuncker; T; P; CL 77.
POACEAE: Pariana cf. stenolema Tutin; H; L, P; CL 1557. P. sp. 1; H;
P; CL 521. Pharus latifolius L.; H; L; EA 691.
POLYGALACEAE: Moutabea aff. guianensis Aubl.; SL; L, P; EA 664.
M. sp. 1; SL; P; CL 1204. Securidaca? sp. 1; SL; L; EA 273.
POLYGONACEAE: Coccoloba cf. mollis Casaretto; A; L; EA 494. C.
lucidula Bentham; SL; L; EA 1208. C. sp. 1; SL; L; EA 223. C. sp. 2; SL;
L; EA 254. Triplaris cf. pyramidalis Jacquin; A; L; EA 289.
POLYPODIACEAE: Campyloneurum repens Aublet; FSH; L; EA 582.

212

QUIINACEAE: Lacunaria sp. 1; T; P; EA 1096. Quiina leptoclada


Tulasne; A; P; CL 1398. Q. longifolia Spruce; A; P; EA 1090. Q.
macrophylla Tulasne; A; L; EA 29.
RANUNCULACEAE: Ranunculaceae? sp. 1; SH; L; EA 816.
RHAMNACEAE: Ampelozizyphus amazonicus Ducke; SL; P; CL 1317.
Rhamnaceae? sp. 1; A; P; CL 333. R. sp. 2; SL; L; EA 769.
RHIZOPHORACEAE: Anisophyllea sp. 1; A; P; CL 1012.
Sterigmapetalum cf. colombianum Monachino; A; P; CL 1018; CL-1270.
S. cf. obovatum Kuhlmann; A; P; EA 879.
RUBIACEAE: Alibertia cf. hadrantha Standley; A; L; EA 391. A. cf.
stenantha Standley; A; L; EA 641. A. hispida Ducke; A; P; CL 1106. A.
latifolia (Bentham) Schumann; T; L; CL 1609. A. sp. 1; A; L; EA 709.
Amaioua sp. 1; A; P; CL 1053. Bathysa cf. obovata Schumann ex
Standley; A; L; EA 24. Borojoa cf. duckei Steyerm.; A; P; CL 966. B.
sorbilis (Ducke) Cuatr.; A; L; EA 104. Calycophyllum spruceanum
(Bentham) Hooker f. ex Schumann; A; P; CL A1. Cephaelis aff.
iodotricha (Muell. Arg.) Standley; H; P; CL 797. Chiococca sp. 1; A; L;
EA 908. Chomelia cf. barbellata Standley; SL; L; EA 507. Coussarea
brevicaulis Krause; A; L; CL 1581. C. flava Poeppig; T; P; CL 956. C.
hirticalyx Standley; A; L; EA 10. C. macrophylla Muell. Arg.; A; L; CL
1572. C. paniculata (M. Vahl) Standley; A; L, P; CL 1621. C. sp. 1; T; P;
EA 133. C. sp. 2; T; L; EA 12. Duroia hirsuta (Poeppig) Schumann; A; L,
P; CL 1602. D. saccifera (C. Martius ex Roemer & Schultes) Hooker f. ex
Schumann; A; P; CL 1209. D. sp. 1; T; P; EA 1051. Elaeagia cf. maguirei
Standl.; A; P; CL 620. Elaeagia? sp. 1; A; P; CL 1513. Faramea aff.
sessilifolia (H. B. K.) DC.; A; L; CL 1614. F. capillipes Muell. Arg.; T; L;
CL 1565; EA-90. F. multiflora A. Richard; A; L; CL 1562; EA-79. F. sp.
1; T; L; EA 362. F. sp. 2; T; P; EA 1048. F. sp. 3; A; L; EA 471.
Faramea? sp. 4; T; L; CL 1624. Ferdinandusa chlorantha (Weddell)
Standley; A; P; CL 1100. Isertia rosea Spruce ex Schumann; A; L; CL
1591. Ixora cf. ulei Krause; T; L; EA 577. Ladenbergia amazonensis
Ducke; A; P; CL 890. Pagamea cf. coriacea Spruce & Bentham; A; P; CL
1306. P. cf. macrophylla Spruce & Bentham; A; P; EA 65. P. sp. 1; T; L;
EA 809. Palicourea corymbifera (Muell. Arg.) Standley; T; P; CL 1025.
P. sp. 1; T; P; CL 374. Posoqueria sp. 1; A; L; EA 384. Psychotria
borjensis H. B. K.; T; L; CL 1617. P. campyloneura Muell. Arg.; T; L; CL
213

1635. P. cf. poeppigiana Muell. Arg.; T; L, P; CL 1524. P. cf. prunifolia


(H. B. K.) Steryermark; T; L; EA 767. P. loretensis Standley; T; L; EA614. P. podocephala (Muell. Arg.) Standley; T; P; CL 1685. P. sp. 1; SH;
P; CL 659. P. stenostachya Standley; T; P; CL 337; CL 924. Remijia
amazonica Schumann; T; P; CL 828. Rubiaceae sp. 1; A; P; EA 1009. R.
sp. 2; T; L; EA 200. R. sp. 3; A; P; EA 1157. R. sp. 4; T; P; CL 736.
Rudgea cornifolia (Roemer & Schultes) Standley; T; L; EA 612. R. duidae
(Standley) Steyermarkk; T; P; CL 610; CL-946. R. loretensis Standley; T;
L; EA 682. R. sessiliflora Standley; T; L; CL 1593. R. sp. 1; T; P; CL 180.
R. sp. 2; T; P; CL 619. Simira rubescens (Bentham) Bremekamp ex
Steyermark; A; L; EA 910. Warszewiczia coccinea (M. Vahl) Klotzsch; A;
L; EA 390. W. schwackei Schumann; A; P; EA 901.
RUTACEAE: Rutaceae? sp. 1; A; L; EA 540. R. sp. 2; T; L; EA 315.
SAPINDACEAE: Cupania hispida Radlkofer; A; P; EA 50. C. sp. 1; A;
L; EA 485. Enourea capreolata Aublet; SL; L, P; EA 290. Matayba cf.
elegans Radlkofer; A; L; EA 408. M. purgans (Poeppig) Radlkofer; A; P;
EA 124. Paullinia acutangula (R. & P.) Persoon; SL; L; EA 915. P.
bracteosa Radlkofer; SL; L; EA 285. P. cf. caloptera Radlkofer; SL; P;
EA 1039. P. cf. carpopoda Lamb; SL; P; CL 115. P. cf. ternata Radlkofer;
SL; L; EA 559. P. ingifolia Richard; SL; P; EA 1140. P. microneura
Cuatrecasas; SL; L, P; EA 287. P. rugosa Bentham ex Radlkofer ssp.
rugosa; SL; L; EA 813. P. serjaniifolia Triana & Planchon; SL; L, P; EA
673. Paullinia? sp. 1; SL; P; EA 1070. Talisia aff. grandifolia
Cuatrecasas; A; P; EA 1148. T. cf. cerasina (Bentham) Radlkofer; A; L, P;
CL 702. T. cf. clathrata Radlkofer; A; L; EA 260. T. eximia Kramer; A; L;
CL 1580. T. guianensis Aubl.; A; P; CL 1418. T. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1243.
SAPOTACEAE: Chrysophyllum aff. manaosense (Aubrville)
Pennington; A; L; EA 469. C. cf. superbum Pennington; A; P; CL 999. C.
prieurii A. DC.; A; P; CL 1152. C. sanguinolentum (Pierre) Baehni; A; P;
CL 958. Ecclinusa lanceolata (C. Martius & Eichler) Pierre; A; L; EA
496. Manilkara bidentata (A. DC.) Chevalier; A; L; EA 733. M. sp. 2; A;
P; CL 300. Micropholis cf. cylindrocarpa (Poeppig) Pierre; A; P; CL 407.
M. cf. egensis (A. DC.) Pierre; A; L; EA 449. M. cf. madeirensis (Baehni)
Aubrville; A; P; CL 1015. M. cf. melinoniana Pierre; A; P; EA 867. M.
guyanensis (A. DC.) Pierre; A; P; CL 1175. M. guyanensis (A. DC.) Pierre
ssp. duckeana (Baehni) Pennington; A; P; CL 923; CL 1060; CL 1283. M.
214

venulosa (C. Martius & & Eichler) Pierre; A; L; EA 629. Pouteria Sect.
Franchetella sp. 1; A; P; CL 766. P. Sect. Rivicoa sp. 1; A; P; CL 1155. P.
aff. laviegata (C. Martius) Radlkofer; A; L; EA 666. P. aff. ucuqui Pires &
Schultes; A; L, P; EA 652. P. baehniana Monachino; A; L; EA 435. P.
campanulata Baehni; A; P; EA 896. P. cf. cladantha Sandwith; A; L; EA
428. P. cf. maguirei (Aubrville) Pennington; A; P; CL-1668. P. cf.
multiflora (A. DC.) Eyma; A; P; CL 726. P. cf. oblanceolata Pires; A; P;
CL 237. P. cf. trilocularis Cronquist; A; P; EA 1118. P. cf. williamii
(Aubrville & Pellegrin) Pennington; A; P; EA 864. P. cuspidata (A. DC.)
Baehni; A; L, P; EA 113. P. guianensis Aublet; A; P; EA 852. P. sp. 01;
A; L; EA 708. P. sp. 02; A; P; EA 122. P. sp. 03; A; P; EA 1007. P. sp.
04; A; P; CL 721. P. sp. 05; A; L; EA 15. P. sp. 06; A; P; EA 1111. P. sp.
07; A; P; EA 149. P. sp. 08; A; P; CL 509. P. sp. 09; A; P; CL 340. P. sp.
10; A; P; CL 173. P. sp. 11; A; P; CL 1480. P. sp. 12; A; P; CL 495. P. sp.
13; A; P; CL 1473. P. sp. 14; A; P; CL 916. P. sp. 15; A; P; EA 62. P. sp.
16; A; P; EA 835. P. sp. 17; A; P; EA 1113. P. sp. 19; A; P; EA 1147. P.
sp. 20; A; P; EA 847. P. sp. 21; A; L; EA 659. P. sp. 22; A; L; EA 401. P.
sp. 23; A; L; CL 1628. P. sp. 24; A; P; EA 1029. P. sp. 25; A; P; CL 1003.
P. sp. 26; A; P; EA 183. P. sp. nov. 1; A; P; CL 1017. P. sp. nov. 2; A; P;
EA 862. P. torta (C. Martius) Radlkofer; A; L, P; CL 981; EA 386. P.
vernicosa Pennington; A; P; CL 1335. Pradosia cochlearia (Lecom.)
Pennington ssp. praealta (Ducke) Pennington; A; P; CL 1272. Sapotaceae
sp. 1; A; L; EA 699. S. sp. 2; A; P; CL 584. S. sp. 3; A; P; EA 1035.
SIMAROUBACEAE: Picramnia aff. sellowii Planchon ssp. spruceana
(Engler) Pirani; A; P; CL 1598. P. sp. 1; T; P; EA 1053. P. sp. 2; A; L; CL
1638. P. sp. 3; A; P; CL 5. P. sp. 4; A; P; CL 561. P. sp. nov. aff. P.
caracasana Engler; A; L; EA 1228. Simaba aff. polyphylla (Cavalcante)
W. Thomas; A; P; CL 590. S. guianensis Aubl. ssp. ecaudata (Cronquist)
Cavalcante; A; P; CL 1293. Simarouba amara Aublet; A; L, P; CL 1071.
SMILACACEAE: Smilax aequatorialis A. DC.; SH; L; EA 650. S. sp. 1;
SH; L; EA 1236. S. sp. 2; SH; L; EA 564. S. sp. 3; SH; P; CL 393. S. sp. 4;
SH; P; EA 1062.
SOLANACEAE: Cestrum? sp. 1; T; P; CL 288. Solanum sp. 1; SH; L;
EA 371. S. sp. 2; SH; L; EA 693. S. sp. 3; SH; L; EA 1226. Solanum?
Lycianthes?; SH; L; EA 250.

215

STERCULIACEAE: Herrania cf. nitida (Poeppig) R. Schultes; A; L; EA


1201. Sterculia aff. apeibophylla Ducke; A; L; CL 1613. S. aff. parviflora
(Ducke) E. Taylor; A; L; EA 374. S. sp. 1; A; L; EA 475. Theobroma
cacao L.; A; L; EA 284. T. obovatum Klotzsch ex Bernoulli; A; L; CL
1579. T. subincanum C. Martius; A; L, P; CL 830.
STYRACACEAE: Styracaceae? sp. 1; T; P; CL 130.
THEOPHRASTACEAE: Clavija weberbaueri Mez; T; L; CL 1592; EA
87.
TILIACEAE: Apeiba aspera Aublet s.l.; A; L; EA 92. Luehea cymulosa
Spruce ex Bentham; A; L; EA 911. Lueheopsis shultesii Cuatrecasas; A; P;
CL 1171. Mollia lepidota Spruce ex Bentham; A; L; EA 742.
TRIGONIACEAE: Trigoniaceae? sp. 1; SL; L; EA 358.
URTICACEAE: Urticaceae? sp. 1; SH; P; CL 589. U. sp. 2; SH; L; EA
820.
VERBENACEAE: Vitex cf. klugii Moldenke; A; L; EA 438.
VIOLACEAE: Corynostylis arborea (L.) S. F. Blake; SL; L; EA 811; EA
817. Gloeospermum sphaerocarpum Triana & Planchon; A; L; EA 916.
Leonia cymosa C. Martius; A; P; CL 1696. Leonia glycycarpa Ruiz Lpez
& Pavn; A; L; CL 1567. Rinorea lindeniana (Tulasne) Kuntze; A; L; EA
725. R. neglecta Sandwith; A; L; CL 1612. R. racemosa (C. Martius)
Kuntze; A; P; CL 871.
VITACEAE: Cissus erosa Richard; SH; L; EA 288. C. sicyoides L.; SH;
L; EA 819.
VOCHYSIACEAE: Erisma bicolor Ducke; A; P; CL 1429. E. cf.
splendens Stafleu; A; P; CL 1368. E. laurifolium Warming; A; P; CL
1692. E. sp. 1; A; P; CL 1476. E. sp. 3; A; P; CL 33. E. sp. 4; A; P; CL
1470. Qualea aff. ignens Warming; A; L; EA 713. Q. paraensis Ducke; A;
P; CL 1159. Q. sp. 1; A; P; EA 1172. Vochysia aff. lomatophylla Standley;
A; P; CL 756. V. aff. punctata Spruce ex Warming; A; P; EA 1018. V.
angustifolia Ducke; A; P; CL 1697. V. cf. floribunda C. Martius; A; P; CL
512. V. cf. pachyantha; A; P; EA 1028. V. venulosa Warming; A; P; CL
1115.
ZAMIACEAE: 1164 Zamia sp. 1; H; P; CL 510.

216

Appendix 3
Indice de valor de importancia (IVI en %) para vegetacin con DBH 10
cm, en 1.8 ha en bosques de tierra firme y de vrzea. Inventario incial
(1990). HCR: hbito de crecimiento: A: rboles; PAM: palmas arbreas;
SL: lianas; SZL: estranguladoras. NI: densidad relativa (%) del nmero de
individuos. FR: frecuencia relativa (%). W: biomasa area seca relativa
(%). Se muestran las especies en secuencia alfabtica.
Tierra firme, inventario inicial (ao 1990).
ESPECIE
Abarema adenophora (Ducke)
Barneby & J.W.Grimes
Abarema EA-785
Abarema leucophylla (Spruce ex
Benth.) Barneby & J.W.Grimes
Abuta CL-1161
Aiouea CL-1336
Alchornea discolor Poepp.
Alchornea floribunda (Benth.)
Muell. Arg.
Amaioua CL-1053
Aniba CL-1080
Aniba CL-1659
Aniba CL-2749
Aniba puchury-minor (Mart.) Mez
Aniba williamsii O. C. Schmidt
Annona excellens R. E. Fries
Anthodiscus obovatus Benth.
Aspidosperma CL-1001
Aspidosperma CL-1277
Aspidosperma desmanthum Benth.
ex Mll.Arg.
Aspidosperma EA-180
Aspidosperma excelsum Benth.
Aspidosperma schultesii Woodson
Beilschmiedia aff. brasiliensis
(Kortz.) Kortz.
Bignoniaceae NI-1493
Bocageopsis canescens (Spruce ex

HCR NI

NI%

FR%

W%

IVI%

A
A

2
1

0.133
0.066

0.143
0.072

0.039
0.079

0.105
0.072

A
SL
A
A

9
1
12
3

0.598
0.066
0.798
0.199

0.645
0.072
0.717
0.215

0.462
0.024
0.527
0.307

0.568
0.054
0.681
0.241

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

1
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1

0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.399
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066

0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.430
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072

0.074
0.010
0.057
0.026
0.012
0.131
0.012
0.011
0.225
0.012
0.011

0.071
0.050
0.065
0.055
0.050
0.320
0.050
0.050
0.121
0.050
0.050

A
A
A
A

1
2
11
11

0.066
0.133
0.731
0.731

0.072
0.143
0.789
0.789

0.010
0.263
4.465
0.977

0.049
0.180
1.995
0.832

A
SL
A

2
1
2

0.133
0.066
0.133

0.143
0.072
0.143

0.069
0.029
0.043

0.115
0.056
0.106

217

ESPECIE
Benth.) R. E. Fries
Bocageopsis multiflora (Mart.) R.
E. Fries
Brosimum longifolium Ducke
Brosimum rubescens Tauber
Brosimum utile (Kunth) Pittier
Buchenavia parvifolia Ducke
Caesalpiniaceae CL-1288
Cariniana decandra Ducke
Caryocar glabrum (Aubl.) Pers.
Caryocar gracile Wittm.
Caryodaphnopsis CL-2520
Caryodaphnopsis EA-906
Casearia oblongifolia Cambess.
Casearia singularis Eichler
Cecropia membranacea Trcul
Chrysobalanaceae EA-827
Chrysophyllum prieurii A. DC.
Chrysophyllum sanguinolentum
(Pierre) Baehni
Chrysophyllum superbum
T.D.Penn.
Clathrotropis macrocarpa Ducke
Compsoneura capitellata (A. DC.)
Warb.
Conceveiba latifolia Benth.
Couepia bracteosa Benth.
Couepia chrysocalyx (Poepp. &
Endl.) Benth. ex Hook. f.
Couepia CL-1321
Couepia CL-2750
Couepia guianensis Aubl.
Dacryodes chimatensis Steyerm. &
Mag.
Dacryodes CL-1166
Dacryodes nitens Cuatrec.
Dacryodes sclerophylla Cuatrec.
Dendrobangia boliviana Rusby
Dendropanax tessmannii (Harms)
Harms
Dicranostyles sericea Gleason

218

HCR NI

NI%

FR%

W%

IVI%

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

1
1
29
16
1
9
11
3
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

0.066
0.066
1.928
1.064
0.066
0.598
0.731
0.199
0.665
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066

0.072
0.072
1.864
1.147
0.072
0.645
0.789
0.215
0.717
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072

0.022
0.021
1.634
1.176
0.039
0.488
1.750
0.079
1.318
0.181
0.035
0.016
0.035
0.011
0.009
0.022

0.053
0.053
1.809
1.129
0.059
0.577
1.090
0.164
0.900
0.106
0.058
0.052
0.058
0.050
0.049
0.053

19

1.263

1.362

0.966

1.197

A
A

2
14

0.133
0.931

0.143
1.004

0.021
0.264

0.099
0.733

A
A
A

17
1
1

1.130
0.066
0.066

1.147
0.072
0.072

0.297
0.014
0.115

0.858
0.051
0.084

A
A
A
A

2
7
1
1

0.133
0.465
0.066
0.066

0.143
0.502
0.072
0.072

0.072
0.652
0.133
0.010

0.116
0.540
0.090
0.049

A
A
A
A
A

3
3
4
4
2

0.199
0.199
0.266
0.266
0.133

0.215
0.215
0.287
0.287
0.143

0.096
0.093
0.112
0.068
0.108

0.170
0.169
0.222
0.207
0.128

A
SL

4
1

0.266
0.066

0.287
0.072

0.066
0.030

0.206
0.056

ESPECIE
Diplotropis martiusii Benth.
Dipteryx cordata (Ducke) Cowan
Dipteryx polyphylla Huber
Drypetes CL-2707
Duroia saccifera (Mart.ex Roem. &
Schult.) Hook.f. ex Schum.
Elaeoluma glabrescens (Mart. &
Eichler) Aubrv.
Endlicheria sericea (Nees) Mez
Erisma bicolor Ducke
Erisma laurifolium Spruce ex
Warm.
Erisma splendens Slafleu
Erythroxylon CL-1145
Eschweilera andina (Rusby)
Macbride
Eschweilera bracteosa (Poepp. &
Berg.) Miers
Eschweilera laevicarpa S. A. Mori
Eschweilera ovalifolia (DC.) Nied.
Eschweilera parvifolia Mart. ex
DC.
Eschweilera punctata Mori
Eschweilera tessmannii R. Knuth
Euphorbiaceae NA-1265
Fabaceae CL-1121
Fabaceae EA-789
Ferdinandusa chlorantha (Wedd.)
Standl.
Guarea trunciflora C. DC.
Guatteria foliosa Benth.
Guatteria punticulata R. E. Fries
Guatteriella tomentosa R. E. Fries
Heisteria duckei Sleumer
Helicostylis heterotricha Ducke
Helicostylis scabra (Macbr.) C. C.
Berg
Hevea benthamiana Muell. Arg.
Hevea guianensis Aublet
Hevea pauciflora (Spruce ex
Benth.) Muell. Arg.

HCR
A
A
A
A

NI
20
5
3
1

NI%
1.330
0.332
0.199
0.066

FR%
1.219
0.358
0.215
0.072

W%
0.953
0.163
0.426
0.009

IVI%
1.167
0.285
0.280
0.049

0.199

0.215

0.038

0.151

A
A
A

1
10
2

0.066
0.665
0.133

0.072
0.717
0.143

0.010
0.217
0.051

0.049
0.533
0.109

A
A
A

24
20
1

1.596
1.330
0.066

1.649
1.434
0.072

1.157
2.770
0.029

1.467
1.844
0.056

0.066

0.072

0.012

0.050

A
A
A

6
80
62

0.399
5.319
4.122

0.358
4.588
3.943

0.125
3.588
2.687

0.294
4.498
3.584

A
A
A
A
A
A

58
58
1
1
1
1

3.856
3.856
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066

3.799
3.369
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072

1.781
4.997
0.028
0.010
0.011
0.012

3.145
4.074
0.056
0.049
0.050
0.050

A
A
A
A
A
A
A

1
1
2
3
2
2
4

0.066
0.066
0.133
0.199
0.133
0.133
0.266

0.072
0.072
0.143
0.215
0.143
0.143
0.287

0.011
0.020
0.227
0.116
0.023
0.025
0.141

0.050
0.053
0.168
0.177
0.100
0.100
0.231

A
A
A

6
11
4

0.399
0.731
0.266

0.430
0.789
0.287

0.200
0.262
0.102

0.343
0.594
0.218

22

1.463

1.434

0.559

1.152

219

ESPECIE
Hirtella brachystachya Spruce &
Hook f.
Huberodendron swietenioides
(Gleason) Ducke
Indet NA-1392
Indet NA-953
Inga brachyrhachis Harms
Inga EA-194
Inga gracilior Sprague
Inga pezizifera Benth.
Iryanthera elliptica Ducke
Iryanthera juruensis Warb.
Iryanthera polyneura Ducke
Iryanthera tricornis Ducke
Iryanthera ulei Warb.
Jacaranda macrocarpa Bureau &
K.Schum. ex K.Schum.
Kotchubaea CL-966
Lacmellea arborescens (Muell.
Arg.) Markgr.
Lacmellea CL-1049
Lacmellea foxii (Stapf) Markgraf
Lacmellea ramosissima (Muell.
Arg.) Markgr.
Ladenbergia amazonensis Ducke
Lauraceae EA-851
Licania apetala (E. Meyer) Fritchs
Licania canescens Benoist
Licania CL-1149
Licania CL-1198
Licania EA-872
Licania heteromorpha Benth.
Licania hypoleuca Benth.
Licania kunthiana Hook. f.
Licania octandra (Hoffmanns. ex
Roem. & Schult.) Kuntze
Licania reticulata Prance
Licaria CL-1310
Licaria guianensis Aubl.
Lueheopsis shultesii Cuatr.
Machaerium CL-1234

220

HCR NI

NI%

FR%

W%

IVI%

0.199

0.215

0.052

0.155

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

1
1
1
1
2
1
5
5
1
1
13
20

0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.133
0.066
0.332
0.332
0.066
0.066
0.864
1.330

0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.143
0.072
0.358
0.358
0.072
0.072
0.932
1.362

0.056
0.013
0.426
0.026
0.045
0.027
0.101
0.190
0.009
0.014
0.421
0.286

0.065
0.050
0.188
0.055
0.107
0.055
0.264
0.294
0.049
0.051
0.739
0.993

A
A

9
6

0.598
0.399

0.645
0.358

0.091
0.138

0.445
0.298

A
A
A

2
7
3

0.133
0.465
0.199

0.143
0.502
0.215

0.038
0.091
0.040

0.105
0.353
0.152

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

1
1
3
12
1
4
9
1
5
1
1

0.066
0.066
0.199
0.798
0.066
0.266
0.598
0.066
0.332
0.066
0.066

0.072
0.072
0.215
0.860
0.072
0.287
0.645
0.072
0.358
0.072
0.072

0.012
0.196
0.221
0.322
0.012
0.269
0.753
0.010
0.245
0.042
0.009

0.050
0.112
0.212
0.660
0.050
0.274
0.665
0.049
0.312
0.060
0.049

A
A
A
A
A
A

1
1
2
2
1
1

0.066
0.066
0.133
0.133
0.066
0.066

0.072
0.072
0.143
0.143
0.072
0.072

0.010
0.041
0.091
0.074
0.022
0.012

0.050
0.060
0.122
0.117
0.053
0.050

ESPECIE
Macoubea guianensis Aubl.
Malouetia CL-1377
Matayba purgans Poepp. & Endlch.
Mezilaurus itauba (Meissn.) Taub.
& Mez
Miconia chrysophylla (Rich.) Urb.
Miconia CL-2476
Miconia CL-2752
Miconia phaeophylla Triana
Miconia poeppigii Triana
Miconia pubipetala Miq.
Micropholis guyanensis (A. DC.)
Pierre
Micropholis madeirensis (Baehni)
Aubr.
Micropholis melinoniana Pierre
Minquartia guianensis Aublet
Monopteryx uaucu Spruce ex
Benth.
Moronobea coccinea Aubl.
Mouriri nigra (DC.) Morley
Mouriri vernicosa Naudin
Naucleopsis caloneura (Hub.)
Ducke
Nectandra cuspidata Nees & Mart.
Nectandra purpurea (Ruiz & Pav.)
Mez
Neea CL-1196
Neea CL-1289
Neea CL-701
Neea divaricata Poepp. & Endl.
Neea macrophylla Poepp. ex Endl.
Ocotea aciphylla (Nees) Mez
Ocotea amazonica (Meissn.) Mez
Ocotea argyrophylla Ducke
Ocotea CL-1259
Ocotea CL-1356
Ocotea CL-1522
Ocotea CL-902
Ocotea cymbarum Kunth
Ocotea EA-193

HCR
A
A
A

NI
2
2
1

NI%
0.133
0.133
0.066

FR%
0.143
0.143
0.072

W%
0.021
0.065
0.090

IVI%
0.099
0.114
0.076

A
A
A
A
A
A
A

4
1
1
1
2
1
8

0.266
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.133
0.066
0.532

0.287
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.143
0.072
0.573

0.574
0.032
0.031
0.012
0.022
0.023
0.198

0.376
0.057
0.056
0.050
0.100
0.054
0.434

11

0.731

0.789

0.335

0.618

A
A
A

1
4
1

0.066
0.266
0.066

0.072
0.287
0.072

0.017
0.222
0.011

0.052
0.258
0.050

A
A
A
A

43
2
1
3

2.859
0.133
0.066
0.199

2.007
0.143
0.072
0.215

10.333
0.042
0.014
0.191

5.066
0.106
0.051
0.202

A
A

1
1

0.066
0.066

0.072
0.072

0.011
0.028

0.050
0.055

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

13
1
1
1
3
1
16
3
1
2
1
5
1
8
1

0.864
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.199
0.066
1.064
0.199
0.066
0.133
0.066
0.332
0.066
0.532
0.066

0.932
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.215
0.072
1.004
0.215
0.072
0.143
0.072
0.358
0.072
0.573
0.072

0.242
0.023
0.013
0.023
0.038
0.035
0.429
0.279
0.013
0.067
0.032
0.190
0.009
0.395
0.018

0.680
0.054
0.050
0.054
0.151
0.058
0.832
0.231
0.050
0.114
0.057
0.294
0.049
0.500
0.052

221

ESPECIE
Ocotea floribunda (Sw.) Mez
Ocotea myriantha (Meisn.) Mez.
Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.
Oenocarpus bataua Mart.
Osteophloeum platyspermum
(Spruce ex A.DC.) Warb.
Pagamea plicata Spruce ex Benth.
Parahancornia peruviana Monach.
Parkia panurensis Benth. &
H.C.Hopkins
Parkia reticulata Ducke
Picramnia sellowii Planch.
Pourouma CL-1455
Pouteria arcuata T. D. Penn.
Pouteria campanulata Baehni
Pouteria CL-1003
Pouteria CL-1017
Pouteria CL-1070
Pouteria CL-1155
Pouteria CL-742
Pouteria EA-1111
Pouteria EA-183
Pouteria EA-835
Pouteria EA-847
Pouteria EA-862
Pouteria glauca T.D.Penn.
Pouteria guianensis Aubl.
Pouteria maguirei (Aubrv.)
T.D.Penn.
Pouteria trilocularis Cronquist
Pouteria ucuqui Pires & Schultes
Pouteria vernicosa Pennington
Pouteria williamii (Aubrv. &
Pelligr.) Penn.
Pradosia cochlearia (Lecom.) Penn.
ssp. praealta (Ducke) Penn.
Protium altsonii Sandw.
Protium apiculatum Swart
Protium gallosum Daly
Protium hebetatum Daly
Protium paniculatum Engl.

222

HCR
A
A
PAM
PAM

NI
1
6
7
24

NI%
0.066
0.399
0.465
1.596

FR%
0.072
0.358
0.502
1.434

W%
0.009
0.540
0.061
0.271

IVI%
0.049
0.432
0.343
1.100

A
A
A

6
1
1

0.399
0.066
0.066

0.430
0.072
0.072

0.286
0.013
0.016

0.372
0.050
0.051

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

5
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
7
6
1
6

0.332
0.066
0.133
0.066
0.066
0.199
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.133
0.066
0.066
0.133
0.133
0.465
0.399
0.066
0.399

0.358
0.072
0.143
0.072
0.072
0.215
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.143
0.072
0.072
0.143
0.143
0.502
0.430
0.072
0.430

0.647
0.109
0.292
0.020
0.255
0.077
0.017
0.746
0.010
0.232
0.011
0.012
0.034
0.029
0.183
0.377
0.042
0.487

0.446
0.082
0.190
0.053
0.131
0.164
0.052
0.295
0.049
0.169
0.050
0.050
0.104
0.102
0.383
0.402
0.060
0.439

A
A
A
A

11
4
1
4

0.731
0.266
0.066
0.266

0.717
0.287
0.072
0.287

0.218
0.053
0.013
0.314

0.556
0.202
0.050
0.289

26

1.729

1.649

0.467

1.281

A
A
A
A
A
A

1
2
4
8
22
23

0.066
0.133
0.266
0.532
1.463
1.529

0.072
0.143
0.287
0.573
1.362
1.577

0.035
0.046
0.182
0.180
0.497
0.551

0.058
0.107
0.245
0.428
1.107
1.219

ESPECIE
Protium polybotryum (Turcz.)
Engl.
Protium rubrum Cuatrec.
Protium subserratum (Engl.) Engl.
Protium urophyllidium Daly
Pseudolmedia laevigata Trc.
Pseudolmedia laevis (R. & P.)
Macbr.
Pseudomonotes tropenbosii
Londoo et al.
Qualea EA-1172
Qualea paraensis Ducke
Remijia pedunculata (H.Karst.)
Flueck.
Rhodostemonodaphne CL-1300
Rhodostemonodaphne EA-198
Roucheria columbiana Hallier f.
Roucheria humiriifolia (Planch.)
Benth.
Saccoglottis CL-2454
Scleronema micranthum (Ducke)
Ducke
Scleronema praecox Ducke
Senefeldera karsteniana Pax. &
Hoffm.
Simaba guianensis Aubl.
Simarouba amara Aublet
Sloanea brevipes Benth.
Sloanea CL-1075
Sloanea CL-886
Sloanea NA-1256
Sloanea NA-1423
Sloanea NA-427
Sloanea NA-635
Sloanea obtusa (Splitg.) K. Schum.
Sloanea steyermarkii Earle Sm.
Sterigmapetalum colombianum
Monachino
Sterigmapetalum obovatum
Kuhlmann
Strychnos peckii B.L.Rob.

HCR NI

NI%

FR%

W%

IVI%

A
A
A
A
A

2
11
1
1
13

0.133
0.731
0.066
0.066
0.864

0.143
0.645
0.072
0.072
0.932

0.032
0.889
0.146
0.015
0.285

0.103
0.755
0.095
0.051
0.694

0.066

0.072

0.010

0.049

A
A
A

66
2
10

4.388
0.133
0.665

3.943
0.143
0.717

16.992
0.634
1.203

8.441
0.304
0.862

A
A
A
A

5
2
3
5

0.332
0.133
0.199
0.332

0.358
0.143
0.215
0.358

0.099
0.034
0.267
0.079

0.263
0.103
0.227
0.256

A
A

2
1

0.133
0.066

0.143
0.072

0.052
0.102

0.110
0.080

A
A

30
1

1.995
0.066

2.151
0.072

2.665
0.014

2.270
0.051

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

12
3
1
5
4
2
1
1
1
1
3
4

0.798
0.199
0.066
0.332
0.266
0.133
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.066
0.199
0.266

0.717
0.215
0.072
0.287
0.287
0.143
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.072
0.215
0.287

0.144
0.054
0.190
0.071
0.267
0.042
0.224
0.009
0.018
0.010
0.197
0.158

0.553
0.156
0.109
0.230
0.273
0.106
0.121
0.049
0.052
0.049
0.204
0.237

15

0.997

1.075

0.773

0.949

A
SL

16
1

1.064
0.066

1.075
0.072

0.766
0.029

0.968
0.056

223

ESPECIE
Swartzia brachyrachys Harms
Swartzia lamellata Ducke
Swartzia parvifolia Schery
Swartzia schomburgkii Benth.
Swartzia vaupesiana R. S. Cowan
Tachigali CL-1141
Tachigali CL-2734
Tachigali CL-918
Tachigali paniculata Aubl.
Talisia cerasina (Benth.) Radlk.
Terminalia brasiliensis Eichl.
Terminalia oblonga (R. & P.)
Steudel
Tovomita CL-829
Trattinnickia glaziovii Swart
Trichilia micrantha Bentham
Unonopsis CL-1399
Unonopsis guatterioides (A. DC.)
R. E. Fries
Vantanea peruviana J.F.Macbr.
Vantanea spichigeri Gentry
Virola calophylla (Spruce) Warb.
Virola elongata (Benth.) Warb.
Virola multinervia Ducke
Virola pavonis (A. DC.) A. C.
Smith
Vochysia punctata Spruce &
Warm.
Vochysia venulosa Warm.
Warszewiczia schwackei K.
Schum.
Xylopia calophylla R. E. Fries
Xylopia multiflora R. E. Fries
Xylopia parvifolia Diels
Zygia claviflora (Benth.) Barneby
& J.W.Grimes
Zygia racemosa (Ducke) Barneby
& J.W.Grimes
Total general

224

HCR
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

NI
2
2
1
10
1
11
2
6
6
2
1

NI%
0.133
0.133
0.066
0.665
0.066
0.731
0.133
0.399
0.399
0.133
0.066

FR%
0.143
0.143
0.072
0.717
0.072
0.645
0.072
0.430
0.430
0.143
0.072

W%
0.031
0.218
0.063
2.511
0.010
0.883
0.196
0.088
0.688
0.064
0.025

IVI%
0.103
0.165
0.067
1.297
0.049
0.753
0.134
0.306
0.506
0.114
0.054

A
A
A
A
A

1
4
1
1
1

0.066
0.266
0.066
0.066
0.066

0.072
0.287
0.072
0.072
0.072

0.009
0.170
0.040
0.020
0.017

0.049
0.241
0.059
0.053
0.052

A
A
A
A
A
A

1
13
5
3
17
1

0.066
0.864
0.332
0.199
1.130
0.066

0.072
0.789
0.358
0.215
1.219
0.072

0.041
0.890
0.298
0.032
0.258
0.134

0.060
0.848
0.330
0.149
0.869
0.091

0.465

0.430

0.110

0.335

A
A

2
22

0.133
1.463

0.143
1.505

0.028
1.779

0.102
1.582

A
A
A
A

1
1
2
1

0.066
0.066
0.133
0.066

0.072
0.072
0.143
0.072

0.012
0.041
0.189
0.038

0.050
0.060
0.155
0.059

0.399

0.358

0.073

0.277

5
0.332
1504 100

0.358
100

0.174
100

0.288
100

Vrzea. inventario inicial (ao 1990).


ESPECIE
Alchornea latifolia Sw.
Alchornea schomburgkii Klotzsch
Alibertia EA-709
Alibertia hadrantha Standl.
Alibertia stenantha Standl.
Anaxagorea dolichocarpa Spr. &
Sandw.
Andira EA-33
Annona dolichophylla R. E. Fries
Apeiba aspera Aublet s.l.
rbol NA-268
rbol NA-349-A
rbol NA-394-A
Aspidosperma darienense Woodson ex
Dwyer
Aspidosperma EA-447
Aspidosperma EA-83
Aspidosperma marcgravianum Woods
Astrocaryum aculeatum Meyer
Astrocaryum sciophilum (Mique) Pulle
Bauhinia guianensis Aubl.
Bejuco NA-468
Brosimum alicastrum Swart
Brosimum guianense (Aubl.) Huber
Brosimum lactescens (S. Moore) C. C.
Berg
Brownea macrophylla Linden ex Mast.
Buchenavia amazonia Alwan & Stace
Burseraceae EA-427
Byrsonima SVE-24
Callichlamys latifolia (L. Rich.) K.
Schum.
Calyptranthes speciosa Sagot
Campsiandra angustifolia Spruce ex
Benth.
Cecropia ficifolia Warb. ex Snethl.
Cedrela odorata L.
Chrysophyllum manaosense (Aub.)
T.D. Pennington

HCR
A
A
A
A
A
A

NI
2
6
2
17
3
1

NI%
0.166
0.497
0.166
1.408
0.249
0.083

FR%
0.095
0.571
0.190
1.429
0.286
0.095

W%
0.076
0.252
0.282
1.717
0.178
0.014

IVI%
0.112
0.440
0.213
1.518
0.237
0.064

A
A
A
A
A
A
A

3
1
11
1
1
1
7

0.249
0.083
0.911
0.083
0.083
0.083
0.580

0.286
0.095
0.952
0.095
0.095
0.095
0.476

0.857
0.015
2.413
0.075
0.050
0.027
0.672

0.464
0.064
1.426
0.084
0.076
0.068
0.576

A
A
A
PAM
PAM
SL
SL
A
A
A

3
1
1
5
75
1
4
2
6
1

0.249
0.083
0.083
0.414
6.214
0.083
0.331
0.166
0.497
0.083

0.286
0.095
0.095
0.476
5.238
0.095
0.381
0.190
0.571
0.095

0.154
0.141
0.108
0.330
1.081
0.168
0.243
0.084
0.398
0.046

0.230
0.106
0.095
0.407
4.178
0.115
0.318
0.147
0.489
0.075

A
A
A
A
SL

170
1
1
1
2

14.085
0.083
0.083
0.083
0.166

9.714
0.095
0.095
0.095
0.190

5.231
0.024
0.015
0.054
0.083

9.677
0.067
0.064
0.077
0.146

A
A

4
19

0.331
1.574

0.381 0.080 0.264


0.667 5.072 2.438

A
A
A

3
1
3

0.249
0.083
0.249

0.286 0.170 0.235


0.095 0.347 0.175
0.286 0.218 0.251

225

ESPECIE
Compsoneura sprucei (A.DC.) Warb.
Conceveiba guianensis Aubl.
Couepia EA-72
Coussapoa villosa Poepp. & Endl.
Coussarea hirticalyx Standl.
Coussarea macrophylla Muell. Arg.
Coussarea paniculata (Vahl) Standl.
Croton bilocularis J. Murillo
Croton cuneatus Klotzch.
Cynometra marginata Benth.
Dacryodes cuspidata (Cuatrec.) Daly
Dendropanax EA-657
Diospyros peruviana Hiern.
Dipteryx nudipes Tul
Doliocarpus dentatus (Aublet) Standley
Drypetes amazonica Ducke
Drypetes ampelocerifolia Grndez &
Vsquez
Duguetia odorata (Diels) Macbride
Duguetia spixiana Mart.
Endlicheria krukovii A. C. Smith
Endlicheria williamsii O. C. Schmidt
Eschweilera andina (Rusby) Macbride
Eschweilera bracteosa (Poepp. &
Berg.) Miers
Eschweilera itayensis R. Knuth
Eugenia EA-433
Euterpe precatoria Mart.
Fabaceae EA-625
Faramea multiflora A. Rich.
Faramea parvibractea Steyerm.
Ficus cf. maxima P. Miller
Ficus cf. yaponensis Dugand
Garcinia CL-915
Garcinia EA-688
Garcinia spruceana (Engler) Hammel
Guapira EA-456
Guarea grandiflora DC.
Guarea purusana C. DC.
Guatteria atra Sandw.

226

HCR
A
A
A
SZL
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
SZL
A
A
SL
A
A

NI
1
7
6
1
1
8
7
1
1
11
1
2
3
1
2
7
2

NI%
0.083
0.580
0.497
0.083
0.083
0.663
0.580
0.083
0.083
0.911
0.083
0.166
0.249
0.083
0.166
0.580
0.166

FR%
0.095
0.667
0.571
0.095
0.095
0.762
0.476
0.095
0.095
0.952
0.095
0.190
0.286
0.095
0.190
0.667
0.190

W%
0.014
0.417
0.865
0.019
0.024
0.154
0.192
0.139
0.154
1.127
0.038
0.267
0.095
0.104
0.190
0.180
0.040

IVI%
0.064
0.554
0.644
0.066
0.067
0.526
0.416
0.106
0.111
0.997
0.072
0.208
0.210
0.094
0.182
0.476
0.132

A
A
A
A
A
A

6
1
7
1
29
2

0.497
0.083
0.580
0.083
2.403
0.166

0.571
0.095
0.667
0.095
2.667
0.190

0.196
0.026
0.237
0.017
4.245
1.627

0.422
0.068
0.494
0.065
3.105
0.661

A
A
PAM
A
A
A
A
SZL
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

12
17
37
1
1
5
1
1
1
8
1
1
6
10
1

0.994
1.408
3.065
0.083
0.083
0.414
0.083
0.083
0.083
0.663
0.083
0.083
0.497
0.829
0.083

1.048
1.524
2.667
0.095
0.095
0.476
0.095
0.095
0.095
0.762
0.095
0.095
0.571
0.952
0.095

3.727
0.746
0.508
0.014
0.024
0.193
0.025
0.026
0.014
0.469
0.033
0.020
0.262
0.848
0.062

1.923
1.226
2.080
0.064
0.068
0.361
0.068
0.068
0.064
0.631
0.070
0.066
0.443
0.876
0.080

ESPECIE
Guatteria megalophylla Diels
Gustavia poeppigiana Berg
Heisteria cf. densifrons Engl.
Hirtella davisii Sandw.
Hirtella hispidula Miq.
Hirtella latifolia Prance
Hirtella pilosissima Mart. & Zucc.
Hyeronima alchorneoides Allemo
Hymenaea oblongifolia Huber
Inga EA-381
Inga EA-397
Inga EA-439
Inga EA-457
Inga EA-640
Inga fastuosa (Jacq.) Willd.
Iriartea deltoidea R. & P.
Iryanthera juruensis Warb.
Iryanthera ulei Warb.
Isertia rosea Spruce & K. Schum.
Klarobelia cauliflora Chatrou
Lacmellea gracilis (Muell. Arg.)
Markgraf
Lauraceae EA-402
Leonia crassa L. B. Sm. & A.
Fernndez
Licania arachnoidea Fanshaw &
Maguire
Licania EA-647
Licania EA-654
Licania oblongifolia Standl.
Licania reticulata Prance
Licania triandra Mart. & Hook. f.
Licania vaupesana Killip. & Cuatr.
Lonchocarpus EA-738
Lorostemon bombaciflorum Ducke
Mabea occidentalis Benth.
Machaerium arboreum Benth.
Machaerium EA-727
Machaerium inundatum (Mart.) Ducke
Machaerium paraense Ducke
Macoubea sprucei (Muell. Arg.)

HCR
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
PAM
A
A
A
A
A

NI
11
1
5
1
1
1
1
28
1
1
31
3
1
8
2
2
1
9
1
1
2

NI%
0.911
0.083
0.414
0.083
0.083
0.083
0.083
2.320
0.083
0.083
2.568
0.249
0.083
0.663
0.166
0.166
0.083
0.746
0.083
0.083
0.166

FR%
1.048
0.095
0.476
0.095
0.095
0.095
0.095
2.571
0.095
0.095
2.286
0.286
0.095
0.762
0.190
0.190
0.095
0.762
0.095
0.095
0.190

W%
1.742
0.018
0.210
0.048
0.025
0.018
0.025
6.431
0.031
0.055
2.599
0.058
0.024
0.905
0.047
0.138
0.073
0.177
0.016
0.033
0.050

A
A

1
3

0.083
0.249

0.095 0.037 0.072


0.286 0.181 0.238

10

0.829

0.857 0.587 0.758

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
SL
SL
SL
A

4
1
3
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
7

0.331
0.083
0.249
0.166
0.331
0.083
0.083
0.083
0.083
0.166
0.249
0.083
0.083
0.580

0.381
0.095
0.286
0.190
0.381
0.095
0.095
0.095
0.095
0.190
0.286
0.095
0.095
0.381

0.228
0.022
0.105
0.159
0.183
0.031
0.069
0.036
0.018
0.106
0.102
0.065
0.069
0.244

IVI%
1.234
0.065
0.367
0.075
0.068
0.065
0.068
3.774
0.070
0.078
2.484
0.197
0.067
0.776
0.134
0.165
0.084
0.562
0.065
0.070
0.136

0.314
0.067
0.213
0.172
0.299
0.070
0.082
0.071
0.065
0.154
0.212
0.081
0.082
0.402

227

ESPECIE
Markgr.
Malouetia tamaquarina (Aubl.) A.DC.
Manilkara bidentata (A. DC.) Chev.
Margaritaria nobilis L. f.
Matayba elegans Radlk.
Matisia cf. bracteolosa Ducke
Miconia eleagnoides Cogn.
Micropholis egensis (A. DC.) Pierre
Micropholis venulosa (Mart. & Eichl.)
Pierre
Minquartia guianensis Aublet
Mollia lepidota Spruce
Mouriri myrtifolia Spruce ex Triana
Myrcia cf. magna Legraud
Nectandra EA-452
Nectandra EA-718
Neea divaricata Poepp. & Endl.
Neea floribunda Poepp. & Endl.
Ocotea amazonica (Meissn.) Mez
Ocotea EA-461
Ocotea EA-481
Omphalea diandra L.
Ormosia EA-748
Ouratea kananariensis Sastre
Oxandra polyantha R. E. Fries
Oxandra xylopioides Diels
Pachira insignis (Sw.) Sw. ex Savigny
Parkia multijuga Benth.
Perebea cf. xanthochyma Karsten
Picramnia sellowii Planch.
Posoqueria EA-384
Pourouma cucura Standley & Cuatr.
Pouteria baehniana Monachino
Pouteria cladantha Sandw.
Pouteria EA-401
Pouteria EA-659
Pouteria EA-708
Pouteria laviegata (Mart.) Radlk.
Pouteria NA-80
Pouteria torta (Mart.) Radlk.

228

HCR NI

NI%

FR%

W%

IVI%

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

4
3
13
20
1
5
2
3

0.331
0.249
1.077
1.657
0.083
0.414
0.166
0.249

0.381
0.286
1.238
1.810
0.095
0.476
0.190
0.286

0.177
0.913
0.657
0.960
0.027
0.138
0.239
0.227

0.296
0.482
0.991
1.476
0.068
0.343
0.198
0.254

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
SL
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

1
1
1
8
2
1
13
2
5
6
2
1
1
2
1
9
23
9
2
5
13
2
25
3
4
1
1
1
1
29

0.083
0.083
0.083
0.663
0.166
0.083
1.077
0.166
0.414
0.497
0.166
0.083
0.083
0.166
0.083
0.746
1.906
0.746
0.166
0.414
1.077
0.166
2.071
0.249
0.331
0.083
0.083
0.083
0.083
2.403

0.095
0.095
0.095
0.762
0.190
0.095
1.238
0.190
0.381
0.571
0.190
0.095
0.095
0.190
0.095
0.857
2.095
0.857
0.190
0.381
1.238
0.190
2.095
0.286
0.381
0.095
0.095
0.095
0.095
2.571

0.049
0.199
0.034
0.162
0.243
0.019
2.563
0.052
0.123
0.142
0.055
0.065
0.019
0.030
0.027
0.923
2.619
2.646
0.061
0.132
0.286
0.073
0.771
0.133
0.184
0.068
0.206
0.055
0.034
1.199

0.076
0.126
0.071
0.529
0.200
0.066
1.626
0.136
0.306
0.404
0.137
0.081
0.066
0.129
0.069
0.842
2.207
1.416
0.139
0.309
0.867
0.143
1.646
0.222
0.299
0.082
0.128
0.078
0.071
2.058

ESPECIE
Pouteria ucuqui Pires & Schultes
Protium krukovii Swart
Protium nodulosum Swart
Pseudolmedia laevis (R. & P.) Macbr.
Pterocarpus amazonicus Huber
Pterocarpus draco L.
Pterocarpus EA-648
Qualea ingens Warm.
Richeria grandis Vahl
Rinorea lindeniana (Tulasne) O.
Kuntze
Rollinia edulis Tr. & Pl.
Salacia EA-752
Salacia impressifolia A. C. Smith
Sciadotecnia toxifera Kruk & Sm.
Simarouba amara Aublet
Sloanea parviflora Planch. & Benth.
Sorocea hirtella Mildbr.
Spondias EA-756
Sterculia apeibophylla Ducke
Sterculia EA-476
Sterigmapetalum colombianum
Monachino
Swartzia cardiosperma Spruce &
Benth.
Swartzia laevicarpa Amsh.
Swartzia racemosa Benth.
Symphonia globulifera L. f.
Tapirira retusa Ducke
Tapura amazonica Poepp.
Tapura capitulifera Spruce ex Baill.
Taralea opositifolia Aubl.
Terminalia EA-635
Theobroma obovatum Klotzsch &
Bernoulli
Theobroma subincanum Martius
Tovomita pyrifolia A. C. Smith
Trichilia EA-669
Triplaris americana L.
Vatairea guianensis Aubl.
Virola calophylla Warb.

HCR
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

NI
1
3
4
9
3
6
1
6
1
2

NI%
0.083
0.249
0.331
0.746
0.249
0.497
0.083
0.497
0.083
0.166

FR%
0.095
0.286
0.381
0.762
0.286
0.571
0.095
0.571
0.095
0.190

W%
0.077
0.155
0.111
2.645
1.279
0.198
0.067
0.733
0.064
0.091

IVI%
0.085
0.230
0.274
1.384
0.604
0.422
0.082
0.600
0.081
0.149

A
SL
A
SL
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

1
1
3
1
4
8
2
1
13
6
6

0.083
0.083
0.249
0.083
0.331
0.663
0.166
0.083
1.077
0.497
0.497

0.095
0.095
0.286
0.095
0.381
0.762
0.190
0.095
1.238
0.476
0.571

0.056
0.036
0.055
0.041
1.165
0.431
0.033
0.107
4.779
0.365
0.148

0.078
0.071
0.196
0.073
0.626
0.618
0.130
0.095
2.365
0.446
0.406

0.331

0.381 0.190 0.301

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

2
17
1
3
1
1
1
5
12

0.166
1.408
0.083
0.249
0.083
0.083
0.083
0.414
0.994

0.190
1.429
0.095
0.286
0.095
0.095
0.095
0.476
1.143

0.048
1.991
3.126
0.296
0.024
0.225
0.042
1.674
0.336

0.135
1.610
1.101
0.277
0.067
0.134
0.073
0.855
0.824

A
A
A
A
A
A

4
1
1
2
11
19

0.331
0.083
0.083
0.166
0.911
1.574

0.286
0.095
0.095
0.190
1.048
1.524

0.279
0.015
0.017
0.048
1.795
1.897

0.299
0.065
0.065
0.135
1.251
1.665

229

ESPECIE
Virola duckei A. C. Smith
Virola loretensis A. C. Smith
Virola surinamensis Warb.
Vismia macrophylla Kunth
Vitex klugii Moldenke
Warszewiczia coccinea (Vahl) Kl.
Xylopia excellens R. E. Fries
Zygia inequalis (Willd.) Pitt.
Zygia latifolia (L.) Fawc. & Rendle
Total general

230

HCR
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

NI
2
15
1
8
1
14
6
6
32
1207

NI%
0.166
1.243
0.083
0.663
0.083
1.160
0.497
0.497
2.651
100

FR%
0.190
1.333
0.095
0.667
0.095
1.238
0.571
0.571
2.762
100

W%
0.135
0.784
0.523
0.541
1.058
0.290
0.165
0.845
1.535
100

IVI%
0.164
1.120
0.234
0.623
0.412
0.896
0.411
0.638
2.316
100

Appendix 4
Indice de valor de importancia de familia (IVF%) (Mori et al. 1983), para
parcelas permanentes de 1.8 ha y vegetacin con DBH 10 cm, en
bosques de tierra firme y de vrzea en Pea Roja. NI: nmero de
individuos. W%: dominancia relativa medida en biomasa area seca. S:
nmero de especies. DI%: diversidad relativa (en %). Se muestra
secuencia alfabtica de familias (Mabberley 1990). Fabaceae sensu stricto,
Moraceae aparte de Cecropiaceae.
Tierra firme, inventario inicial (ao 1990).
FAMILIA
ANNONACEAE
APOCYNACEAE
ARALIACEAE
ARECACEAE
BIGNONIACEAE
BOMBACACEAE
BURSERACEAE
CAESALPINIACEAE
CARYOCARACEAE
CECROPIACEAE
CHRYSOBALANACEAE
CLUSIACEAE
COMBRETACEAE
CONVOLVULACEAE
DIPTEROCARPACEAE
ELAEOCARPACEAE
ERYTHROXYLACEAE
EUPHORBIACEAE
FABACEAE
FLACOURTIACEAE
HUGONIACEAE
HUMIRIACEAE
ICACINACEAE
INDET
LAURACEAE
LECYTHIDACEAE
LOGANIACEAE
MELASTOMATACEAE

NI
17
45
4
31
10
32
89
32
14
2
52
6
3
1
66
22
1
56
106
2
7
19
2
2
111
277
1
18

NI%
1.130
2.992
0.266
2.061
0.665
2.128
5.918
2.128
0.931
0.133
3.457
0.399
0.199
0.066
4.388
1.463
0.066
3.723
7.048
0.133
0.465
1.263
0.133
0.133
7.380
18.418
0.066
1.197

W%
0.767
6.023
0.066
0.332
0.120
2.735
2.947
2.147
1.622
0.031
2.754
0.212
0.074
0.030
16.992
0.997
0.029
1.480
15.203
0.052
0.131
1.291
0.108
0.439
4.779
14.968
0.029
0.522

S
11
13
1
2
2
3
14
4
3
2
17
2
3
1
1
9
1
9
14
2
2
3
1
2
29
8
1
8

DI%
4.264
5.039
0.388
0.775
0.775
1.163
5.426
1.550
1.163
0.775
6.589
0.775
1.163
0.388
0.388
3.488
0.388
3.488
5.426
0.775
0.775
1.163
0.388
0.775
11.240
3.101
0.388
3.101

IVF%
2.054
4.685
0.240
1.056
0.520
2.008
4.763
1.942
1.238
0.313
4.267
0.462
0.479
0.161
7.256
1.983
0.161
2.897
9.226
0.320
0.457
1.239
0.209
0.449
7.800
12.162
0.161
1.607

231

MELIACEAE
MENISPERMACEAE
MIMOSACEAE
MORACEAE
MYRISTICACEAE
NYCTAGINACEAE
OLACACEAE
RHIZOPHORACEAE
RUBIACEAE
SAPINDACEAE
SAPOTACEAE
SIMAROUBACEAE
TILIACEAE
VOCHYSIACEAE
Total general

2
1
38
71
91
7
3
31
19
3
121
6
1
82
1504

0.133
0.066
2.527
4.721
6.051
0.465
0.199
2.061
1.263
0.199
8.045
0.399
0.066
5.452
100

0.040
0.024
1.781
3.478
2.038
0.132
0.036
1.539
0.518
0.154
5.203
0.537
0.022
7.622
100

2
1
11
8
11
5
2
2
8
2
27
3
1
7
258

0.775
0.388
4.264
3.101
4.264
1.938
0.775
0.775
3.101
0.775
10.465
1.163
0.388
2.713
100

0.316
0.159
2.857
3.766
4.118
0.845
0.337
1.459
1.627
0.376
7.904
0.699
0.159
5.263
100

Vrzea, inventario inicial (ao 1990).


FAMILIA
ANACARDIACEAE
ANNONACEAE
APOCYNACEAE
ARALIACEAE
ARECACEAE
BIGNONIACEAE
BOMBACACEAE
BURSERACEAE
CAESALPINIACEAE
CECROPIACEAE
CHRYSOBALANACEAE
CLUSIACEAE
COMBRETACEAE
DICHAPETALACEAE
DILLENIACEAE
EBENACEAE
ELAEOCARPACEAE
EUPHORBIACEAE
FABACEAE
HIPPOCRATEACEAE
INDET
LAURACEAE
LECYTHIDACEAE

232

NI
4
39
25
2
119
2
24
9
213
6
35
21
6
2
2
3
8
70
48
4
7
25
44

NI%
0.331
3.231
2.071
0.166
9.859
0.166
1.988
0.746
17.647
0.497
2.900
1.740
0.497
0.166
0.166
0.249
0.663
5.800
3.977
0.331
0.580
2.071
3.645

W%
0.403
3.259
1.547
0.267
2.057
0.083
2.646
0.319
13.424
0.262
2.297
4.234
1.698
0.249
0.190
0.095
0.431
8.492
5.219
0.091
0.394
0.873
9.617

S
2
11
7
1
4
1
2
4
6
4
12
7
2
2
1
1
1
12
16
2
4
8
4

DI%
1.031
5.670
3.608
0.515
2.062
0.515
1.031
2.062
3.093
2.062
6.186
3.608
1.031
1.031
0.515
0.515
0.515
6.186
8.247
1.031
2.062
4.124
2.062

IVF%
0.588
4.053
2.409
0.316
4.659
0.255
1.888
1.042
11.388
0.940
3.794
3.194
1.075
0.482
0.290
0.286
0.536
6.826
5.815
0.484
1.012
2.356
5.108

MALPIGHIACEAE
MELASTOMATACEAE
MELIACEAE
MENISPERMACEAE
MIMOSACEAE
MORACEAE
MYRISTICACEAE
MYRTACEAE
NYCTAGINACEAE
OCHNACEAE
OLACACEAE
POLYGONACEAE
RHIZOPHORACEAE
RUBIACEAE
SAPINDACEAE
SAPOTACEAE
SIMAROUBACEAE
STERCULIACEAE
TILIACEAE
VERBENACEAE
VIOLACEAE
VOCHYSIACEAE
Total general

1
6
18
1
93
24
48
29
16
2
6
2
6
72
20
77
9
35
12
1
5
6
1207

0.083
0.497
1.491
0.083
7.705
1.988
3.977
2.403
1.326
0.166
0.497
0.166
0.497
5.965
1.657
6.379
0.746
2.900
0.994
0.083
0.414
0.497
100

0.054
0.172
1.474
0.041
8.713
3.317
3.603
0.987
2.635
0.030
0.258
0.048
0.148
3.358
0.960
4.325
1.297
5.759
2.612
1.058
0.272
0.733
100

1
2
4
1
9
8
7
3
3
1
2
1
1
11
1
13
2
4
2
1
2
1
194

0.515
1.031
2.062
0.515
4.639
4.124
3.608
1.546
1.546
0.515
1.031
0.515
0.515
5.670
0.515
6.701
1.031
2.062
1.031
0.515
1.031
0.515
100

0.217
0.567
1.676
0.213
7.019
3.143
3.729
1.645
1.836
0.237
0.595
0.243
0.387
4.998
1.044
5.802
1.024
3.574
1.546
0.552
0.572
0.582
100

233

234

Agradecimientos

La investigacin tuvo financiacin de la Fundacin Tropenbos


Internacional (Colombia), un crdito del Instituto Colombiano para el
Avance de la Ciencia y la Tecnologa COLCIENCIAS, una beca de
NUFFIC (Holanda), y el Instituto IBED de la Universiteit van Amsterdam
(Holanda). En Tropenbos Colombia los directores Dr. Juan Guillermo
Saldarriaga y Dr. Carlos Rodrguez apoyaron el plan acadmico. Los
Mayores de la comunidad indgena Nonuya del Resguardo Pea Roja
(Abel y Sebastin Rodrguez, Elas y Jos Moreno) dieron permiso para
trabajar en su resguardo; durante los aos de estada en Pea Roja pude
entablar profundas relaciones de amistad. Gracias a todos por la
hospitalidad, la proteccin y la asistencia constante. Prcticamente todos
los hombres y mujeres mayores de 15 aos de la comunidad trabajaron
como auxiliares remunerados en este proyecto. El SINCHI, Instituto
Colombiano de Investigaciones Amaznicas (antes Corporacin
Araracuara) puso a disposicin las instalaciones en Araracuara, brind
soporte logstico y permiti el uso del Herbario Amaznico Colombiano
(COAH), donde se depositaron todas las colecciones botnicas (ca. 4000
nmeros de coleccin). Durante la identificacin se cont con la
colaboracin de los sucesivos directores del herbario: Pablo Palacio,
Mauricio Snchez, Diego Restrepo y especialmente de Dairon Crdenas.
En Medelln, lvaro Cogollo dio asistencia en el Jardn Botnico Joaqun
Antonio Uribe proporcionando acceso al herbario JAUM. Ramiro
Fonnegra (Herbario HUA de la Universidad de Antioquia, Medelln,
UdeA) colabor con la descripcin palinolgica de Pseudomonotes.
En la selva, durante el establecimiento, mantenimiento, censo y
remedicin de las parcelas permanentes cont con la ayuda parcial de
amigos y profesionales experimentados. Gracias a: Olga Luca Serna,
Esteban lvarez, Alberto lvarez, Gabriel Jaime Garca, Gloria Arango,
David Crdoba y Carlos Echeverry, as como a mis alumnos de Ingeniera
Forestal (Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Medellin): Edisson
Alcaraz, Eliana Jimnez, David Emilio Restrepo, Sonia Echeverry y
Wilson Lpez, de quienes aprend mucho durante mi poca de enseanza.
En Colombia, los docentes universitarios: Jorge Ignacio del Valle
(Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Medelln), Ricardo Callejas
(Universidad de Antioquia), Gloria Galeano (Instituto de Ciencias
Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia en Bogot) revisaron
236

borradores parciales y compartieron generosamente sus puntos de vista y


experiencias sobre selvas, flora e investigacin botnica. En Holanda, los
Profesores Dr. Antoine Cleef (UvA), Dr. Henry Hooghiemstra (UvA) y
Dr. R.A.A. Oldeman (WAU) fueron puentes entre las instituciones
holandesas y colombianas, y permitieron que este trabajo iniciara y se
llevara a cabo. El Dr. Joost F. Duivenvoorden (UvA) dio su apoyo durante
la fase final, lo que fue crucial para terminar este programa acadmico. La
Dra. Dunia Urrego (Florida Institute of Technology, USA) comparti su
experiencia en investigacin en las selvas amaznicas. Especiales
agradecimientos a los coautores que colaboraron en los captulos 3, 4 y 5
de esta disertacin.
En Medelln, Bogot, Araracuara y Amsterdam afianc relaciones con
colegas y amigos, y agradezco especialmente la amistad incondicional de
la Dra. Mara Victoria Arbelez y del Dr. Hans Vester. En Amsterdam fui
miembro del grupo paleo-ecologa y ecologa del paisaje del Instituto
IBED, de la Facultad de Ciencias. All, cont con la amable ayuda del
personal administrativo, en especial de las seoras Jodi dos Santos, Betty
Bijl, Ada Hoogendorp y Dini, en la biblioteca. Frank Bakker y Saskia
Aldershof fueron mi familia holandesa, con cario y generosidad me
abrieron de par en par las puertas de su casa y su familia. Compart
grandes momentos con mis amigos: Hans y Esperanza, Mara Victoria
Arbelez, Arthur van Dulmen, Michael Wille, Raymond Young, Hanneke
Bos, Ana Esperanza Franco, Marteen El Ratn, Raquel y Antonia San
Juan, Mnica, Israel da Silva, Daniella Simao, Jaime Gonzlez y Eliana
Jimnez. Por ltimo, los dos pilares que me sostuvieron en los momentos
ms difciles cuando a menudo quice renunciar fueron mi padre y mi
esposo. Gracias a ellos por la generosidad, el amor y la infinita paciencia,
sobre todo en mis ausencias durante los largos viajes a la selva o al
exterior.

237

238

Curriculum vitae

Ana Catalina Londoo Vega naci en Medelln, Colombia en 1962.


Culmin sus estudios de Ingeniera Forestal en la Universidad Nacional de
Colombia, sede Medelln, en 1993, con la tesis: Anlisis estructural de dos
bosques asociados a unidades fisiogrficas contrastantes en la regin de
Araracuara, Amazonia colombiana. Ha estado vinculada con investigacin
en parcelas permanentes desde 1988 con apoyo de la Fundacin Tropenbos
Internacional (Colombia). Estableci en 1989 y en 1990 las parcelas
permanentes donde colect los datos de esta disertacin. Las colecciones
botnicas de dichas parcelas fueron identificadas en los herbarios del
Jardn Botnico de Nueva York, del Jardn Botnico de Missouri y de los
Reales Jardines Botnicos de Kew. Fue Docente Adscrita al Departamento
de Ciencias Forestales de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede
Medelln (1997 - 2001), cuando dirigi tesis de 4 estudiantes de pregrado
del programa de Ingeniera Forestal, y dict dos cursos terico-prcticos
en Araracuara. Desde enero de 2000 fue miembro del grupo sobre Parcelas
Permanentes, luego de asistir al Taller sobre Estudios Ecolgicos a Largo
Plazo, convocado por el Instituto Alexander von Humboldt, cuyas
actividades se recogen en el libro Establecimiento de parcelas permanentes
en bosques de Colombia (primer volumen de la serie: Mtodos para
estudios ecolgicos a largo plazo, Vallejo et al. 2005). Desde su creacin
en 2000 ha sido miembro de la Red Bosco (Bosques y Cambio Climtico
en Colombia) para el establecimiento y monitoreo de parcelas permanentes
en Colombia. Ha asistido y participado en numerosos eventos divulgativos
cientficos, como: conferencias, congresos, simposios y talleres, en
Colombia, Holanda, Alemania, Francia y Estados Unidos. Su
investigacin involucra distintos aspectos sobre ecologa tropical con
nfasis en la Amazonia abarcando aspectos sobre: flora, diversidad,
estructura, dinmica, arquitectura, etnobotnica y conservacin del bosque
hmedo tropical. Ha sido becaria de NUFFIC (en Holanda), la Fundacin
Tropenbos Internacional (en Colombia - Holanda) y COLCIENCIAS (en
Colombia - Holanda). Ha recibido distinciones en Colombia por la calidad
de sus investigaciones.
Correo electrnico: ana.catalina.londono.vega@gmail.com

240

Publicaciones
Londoo, A.C., lvarez, E., Forero, E. & Morton, C. M. (1995) A new
genus and species of Dipterocarpaceae from the Neotropics. I.
Introduction, taxonomy, ecology and distribution. Brittonia, 47(3),
225-236.
lvarez, E. & Londoo, A. C. (1995) La etnobotnica cuantitativa: una
herramienta para la valoracin econmica de la biodiversidad (con
nfasis en la Amazonia). Crnica Forestal y del Medio Ambiente,
10, 163-191.
lvarez, E. & Londoo, A. C. (1996) Importancia ecolgica y
etnobotnica de las lianas en un bosque inundable de la Amazonia
colombiana. Cespedesia, 21(67), 373-390.
Londono, A.C. & lvarez, E. (1997) Composicin florstica de dos
bosques (tierra firme y vrzea) en la regin de Araracuara,
Amazonia colombiana. Caldasia, 19(3), 431-463.
Londoo, A.C. & Jimnez, E. (1999) Efecto del tiempo entre los censos
sobre la estimacin de las tasas anuales de mortalidad y de
reclutamiento de rboles (perodos de 1, 4 y 5 aos). Crnica
Forestal y del Medio Ambiente, 14, 41-57.
Jimnez, E., A.C. Londoo & H.F.M. Vester (2002) Descripcin de la
arquitectura de Iryanthera tricornis, Osteophloeum platyspermum
y Virola pavonis (Myristicaceae). Caldasia, 24(1), 65-94.
Vallejo, M. I., Londoo, A. C., Lpez, R., Galeano, G., lvarez, E. &
Devia, W. (2005) Establecimiento de parcelas permanentes en
bosques de Colombia. Mtodos para estudios ecolgicos a largo
plazo, 1. Instituto de Investigacin de Recursos Biolgicos
Alexander von Humboldt, Bogot. 309 pp.
Sin publicar
Alvarez, E., Cogollo, A. A., Melo, O., Rojas, E., Snchez, D., Velsquez,
O., Sarria, E., Jimnez, E., Benitez, D., Velsquez, C., Serna, M.,
Londoo, A. C., Stevenson, P., Galeano, G., Peuela, M. C.,
Garca, F., Ramos, Y., Palacios, J. & Patio, S. Red de parcelas
permanentes para el monitoreo de los bosques nativos de
colombia. Unpublished Paper.

241

Resmenes (Presentaciones en Simposios y Congresos)


Parra, G. (ed.) (1996) Memorias del I Congreso Colombiano de
Etnobiologa. Biopacfico & INCIVA. Cespedesia, 21(67), 373390.
Kattan, G. y otros (organizadores) (1997) I Congreso de Biologa de la
Conservacin y III Simposio sobre Biodiversidad y Conservacin
de Ecosistemas de Montaa. Programa y resmenes. Instituto
Alexander von Humboldt, pp. 32, 33, 56, 57.
Rangel, J. O., Aguirre, J. & Andrade, M. G. (eds) (2002) Resmenes: VIII
Congreso Latinoamericano y II Congreso Colombiano de
Botnica. Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de
Colombia, Asociacin Latinoamericana de Botnica y Asociacin
Colombiana de Botnica, pp. 44, 233, 477, 548 y 550.
Ramrez, B. R. et al. (eds) (2004) Resmenes III Congreso colombiano de
botnica. Popayn, Universidad del Cauca. pp. 110, 97, 108, 231.
Supervisin de tesis de pregrado (Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede
Medelln, programas acadmicos de Agronoma e Ingeniera Forestal).
Orozco, C. M. (1997) Plantas tiles en cestera y sus estrategias de
aprovechamiento en la comunidad Ember /~ep~era/ de
Jaidukam, Ituango (Antioquia). Trabajo de grado. Ingeniero
Agrnomo (A. C. Londoo, asesora).
Jimnez, E. M. (2002) Arquitectura de tres especies de Myristicaceae en la
regin de Araracura, Amazonia colombiana. Trabajo de grado,
Ingeniera Forestal. (A. C. Londoo, directora).
Echeverri, S. V. & Lpez. E. W. (2000) Dinmica de un bosque de vrzea
en la Amazonia colombiana. Trabajo de grado, Ingeniera Forestal.
(A. C. Londoo, asesora en campo).
Alcaraz, E. (2001) Evaluacin de la dinmica de un bosque de tierra firme
en la Amazonia colombiana, perodo 1993 - 1997. Trabajo de
grado, Ingeniera Forestal. (A. C. Londoo, asesora).

242

243

Interessi correlati