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University of the

College of Social
Department of
Diliman, Quezon

Philippines
Sciences and Philosophy
Political Science
City

Political Science 196: Philippine Political Thought


First Semester, 2016-2017
Jan Robert R Go
Assistant Professor

Section WFX | PH 224


WF | 2:30-4:00 PM
Course Overview

Political Science 196: Philippine Political Thought introduces students to the


political and constitutional ideas of selected Filipino thinkers, which include heroes,
academics, politicians, and literary figures. The course surveys these ideas across time
periods from the Spanish colonization to contemporary Philippines. Thus, some texts are
in Filipino and in rare occasions Spanish.
This course is an elective under Area V (Political Theory and Methodology) Only students
in their final year or senior standing are allowed to take this course. It is also expected,
but not required, that students have taken and finished Political Science 11 and 14, as
well as Social Science 2. These courses will allow the students to have basic knowledge
of ideas, concepts and theories, which may be used in class. If the former is absent,
students can still enlist by asking the consent of the instructor. The course is worth 3.00
units.
Course Objectives
The course has three objectives. At the end of the semester, students are expected to be
able to:
(1) Identify, compare, and contrast the political and constitutional ideas of selected
Filipino thinkers;
(2) Familiarize oneself with the questions affecting and/or dealt with by the discipline of
political science in the Philippines; and
(3) Explain how these ideas and questions are relevant to various institutions,
movements, and processes found in contemporary Philippine society.
Course Format
The course is primarily a seminar-discussion class. Students are tasked to provide a
seminar1 on an assigned political thinker. Class discussions are primarily based on the
key text(s) and assigned reading materials for the session. The intent of this kind of
format is to elicit critical thinking, i.e., thinking on the basis of criteria, and creative
thinking, i.e., posing alternatives, among the students. By focusing on issues rather than
mere concepts and definitions, the course intends to develop inquiry-based learning. The
students direct and extensive participation is necessary for the success of the course.
Course Approaches
This course uses any of the three different approaches in studying political thought.
These are as follows:
(1) The first approach concerns the actual text, locus classicus, where the ideas of
thinkers have originated. In reading the actual texts, students will be able to have
direct appreciation of the ideas presented in the selection, and hopefully understand
the message sent by the thinkers.
(2) The second approach concerns the interpretations of the actual texts by various
scholars. While it is not necessary that students agree with the presentation and
interpretation of scholars, it is important for students to read how scholars of political
thought made sense of the ideas presented by the thinkers. This exercise also
exposes the students to the tradition of political thought.

1 Seminars are student-led discussions based on assigned reading materials. This is usually conducted at the
senior undergraduate and graduate levels (UP Faculty Manual 2003, 269).

(3) The third and last approach concerns the connection of the ideas to the contemporary
setting. With the help of students, the task is to explain the relevance (or nonrelevance) of the ideas forwarded by the thinkers. This also encourages students to
be more open and critical in analyzing and appreciating the ideas.
Course Evaluation and Requirements
Students will be graded based on their performance in class, active participation, and
submission of specific requirements. Note that grades are based on the quality of work
submitted by the student and do not seek to measure intellectual capacity. The following
are the requirements for this course, with explanation and corresponding points.
Long Essay Examinations (60 points per exam)
There will be two long essay examinations. The first long examination covers the first half
of the course. The second examination covers the second half of the course. Both exams
require essay responses. Generally, students should only follow a simple instruction:
answer the questions in a direct, concise, and comprehensive manner. No make-up
exams will be given to those who miss any of the exams unless the student has a valid
excuse, i.e. illness, and an official excuse slip.
Essay (60 points)
Each student will write an essay (approximately 2500-3000 words) addressing a chosen
issue on Philippine political thought. Students are advised to submit a topic prospectus
containing the question or issue to be address, as well as a working bibliography with
annotations of not less than five materials, on or before September 9 (Friday).
Students are also expected to consult with the instructor in the process of writing their
essays to make sure that their outputs are satisfactory. The essay shall be submitted one
week after the last day of classes, July 21 (Thursday). The instructor will provide
specific details in class. Late submissions will not be accepted and will receive zero
points.
Seminar Presentation (60 points)
Students will be grouped and assigned a political thinker to present in class. Students
should remember that this is NOT reporting, but a seminar. This means that aside from
the brief biographical notes and information, students are expected to discuss the
political ideas of each thinker by looking at the (1) issues and concerns the thinkers tried
to address in their respective works, (2) distinct political ideas proposed or contributions
to political thinking, and (3) an analysis. In addition to the actual presentation in class,
students are required to produce a handout of not more than four pages, containing the
topic outline, notes, and guide questions for class discussion. These should be submitted
ONE week before the schedule of presentation.
Creative Project (60 points)
Since Political Science 196 is seldom offered by the Department, very few are aware of
the course and its content. In order to spread awareness, the class may opt to form two
to three groups, or the entire class as one group, to satisfy this requirement. The projects
can be any of, but not limited to, the following: exhibit, posters, forum, and blogs. Other
details of this requirement will be explained in class.
Individual Participation in Class (60 points)
Each student is expected to actively participate in class activities and discussions. In
order to ensure smooth and interesting discussion, students should read the assigned
materials. Aside from the guide questions, questions from the class are expected in order
to initiate discussions. If you can ask questions, you can think. Mere recitation does not
guarantee points. As university students, you are expected to answer with substance and
sense.
Points per Requirement

POLSC 196

Course Grading Scale

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First Semester 2016-2017

Requireme
nts
Examination
s
Essay
Presentation
Project
Participation
Total

Points

Grade

120

%
Score
96-100

60
60
60
60
360

91-95
86-90
81-85
76-80
72-75

1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25

1.00

%
Score
68-71

Grade

64-68
60-63
50-59
00-49

2.75
3.00
4.00
5.00

2.50

Course Texts
There is no single reference material or textbook to be used in this course. Students must
go to the libraries (Social Science Section, Asian Center, Arts and Letters, Law, and
NCPAG, among others) to acquire copies of the assigned readings. Some original texts
are available for download online, e.g. Rizal, Bonifacio, Jacinto, and some of Mabinis
works. While the instructor may provide some materials, it is not his responsibility to
procure reading materials for the students.
Topic Sequence, Reading List2, and Schedule
I
Week 1

Introduction
Course Introduction
The Nature of Political Thought
Vincent, Andrew. 2004. The Nature of Political Theory. Oxford: Oxford
University Press. Chapter 1: An Eclectic Subject. [To be provided by the
instructor]

Week 2

II

History of Political Science in the Philippines


Agpalo, Remigio. 1998. Political Science in the Philippines 1880-1998: A
History of the Discipline for the Centenary of the First Philippine Republic.
Philippine Social Sciences Review 55 (14): 172.
Early Filipino Thinkers (4)

Week 3

Jose P. Rizal
Rizal, Jose P. Filipinas Dentro Cien Aos (Philippines A Century Hence) [In
Spanish, with English translation]
Schumacher, John. 1991. The Making of a Nation: Essays on NineteenthCentury Filipino Nationalism. Quezon City: Ateneo Press. Chapter 2: Rizal
in the Context of Nineteenth-Century Philippines.

Week 4

Andres Bonifacio
Bonfacio, Andres. Ang Dapat Mabatid ng mga Tagalog. [In Filipino]
Bonfacio, Andres. Pag-ibig sa Tinubuang Lupa. [In Filipino]

Week 5

Emilio Jacinto
Agpalo, Remigio. The Political Philosophy of Emilio Jacinto, in Adventures in
Political Science, 6375.
Jacinto, Emilio. Liwanag at Dilim. [In Filipino]

2 The reading materials indicated in this outline are not exhaustive. The instructor may provide additional
materials as needed. Likewise, students are requested to help in the accumulation of references for the
different topics identified herein.

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First Semester 2016-2017

Week 6

III

Apolinario Mabini
Mabini, Apolinario. La Revolucin Filipina (The Philippine Revolution) [In
Spanish, with English translation]
Majul, Cesar Adib. The Political and Constitutional Ideas of the Philippine
Revolution. Chapter 2: 36-42 (Mabinis Concept of Man and Society);
Chapter 3: 43-46, 55-58; Chapter 4; Chapter 8.
Filipino Political Scientists

Week 7

Maximo M. Kalaw
Agpalo, Remigio. 1992. The Political Science of Dr. Maximo M. Kalaw. In
Politics, Science and Democracy, edited by Natalia Morales. Quezon City:
UP Department of Political Science.
Kalaw, Maximo. 1948. Philippine Government: Its Development, Organization,
and Activities. Published by the author, Manila. Chapters I, XIII, XXIII, XXIV,
and XXV.

Week 8

Ricardo Pascual
Pascual, Ricardo. 1952. Partyless Democracy: A Blueprint for Political
Reconstruction of Post-War Philippines. Quezon City: University of the
Philippines Press, Quezon City. Chapters III, VII, VIII, XVI, XVII, and XX.

Week 9

Onofre D. Corpuz
Corpuz, Onofre D. 1957. The Bureaucracy in the Philippines. Manila: UP
Institute of Public Administration. Chapters I, III, VII, IX, and XI.

Week
10

Pedro L. Baldoria
Baldoria, Pedro. 1957. Geopolitics and the Philippines; A Preface to Philippine
Strategy in International Politics. Quezon City: University of the Philippines.
Preface (1-6); Changing Map of Asia (7-12); Geopolitics and Why? (1314); Political Geography of the Philippines (15-25); and Foundations of
Philippine Foreign Relations (111-113).

Week
11

Remigio E. Agpalo
Agpalo, Remigio. The Organic-Hierarchical Paradigm and Politics in the
Philippines, in Adventures in Political Science, 163194.

TBA
IV

Midterm Examinations
Filipino Politicians and Ideologues

Week
12

Jose P. Laurel
Agpalo, Remigio. 1965. The Political Philosophy of Dr. Jose P. Laurel. Asian
Studies Journal 3 (2): 163-192.
Laurel, Jose P. 1949. Moral and Political Orientation. Manila: Jose P. Laurel.

Week
13

Claro M. Recto
Arcellana, Emerenciana Y. The Social and Political Thought of Claro M. Recto.
Quezon City: National Research Council of the Philippines, 1981.
Recto, Claro M. Recto Reader: Excerpts from the Speeches of Claro M. Recto.
Edited by Renato Constantino. Manila: Recto Memorial Foundation, 1965.
Part One: Nationalism (3-29), Part Four: Democracy and Civil Liberties
(115-129), Part Six: Philippine Politics (142-161).

Week
14

Ferdinand E. Marcos
Marcos, Ferdinand. 1974. The Democratic Revolution in the Philippines.
Published by the Author. Chapters 3, 4, 6, 10, and 11.

Week

Pura Villanueva-Kalaw

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First Semester 2016-2017

15

Week
16
TBA
July 21

Katigbak, Maria Kalaw. 1983. Legacy: Pura Villanueva Kalaw, Her Times, Life,
and Works, 1886-1954. Makati: Filipinas Foundation. La mission social de
la mujer Filipina (69-70); Un Episodio (A Teresa Perez del Rio) (72-74);
Rizal y la mujer filipina (76-77); The Lecture of Miss Villanueva (79-81).
[In Spanish]
Jose Ma. Sison
Guerrero, Amado (pseudonym of Sison). 1970. Philippine Society and
Revolution. Chapter 2 and 3.
Final Examination
Submission of Essay
Other Information on the Course and its Handling

Attendance
Attendance will be checked regularly. Students who incurred more than three unexcused
absences (following University rules) and those who wish to discontinue the course for
various reasons are required to drop the course formally (or to file for LOA, as the case
may be). Failure to drop formally will result in a grade of 5.00. Those who dropped or
filed for LOA must also make sure that they inform the instructor of the intent/action.
Honesty and Truthfulness
Students caught plagiarizing their term paper and other documents, and
falsifying/tampering with documents will automatically be given a grade of 5.00. The
instructor, through the Department of Political Science, will also bring the case to the
Student Disciplinary Council of the University for appropriate sanctions.
Mobile Phones and Gadgets
As much as possible, cellular phones must be turned off during the class. Use of gadgets
and other electronic equipment is prohibited. Anyone caught texting or even holding his
or her phone/gadget during the class would be asked to leave the classroom and
considered absent. Recording of class proceedings is also prohibited.
Consultation
Please notify the instructor ahead of time, preferably before the day you wish to have the
consultation to make sure that the instructor is available and that no other students have
filled in the time slot during regular consultation hours. You may also consult with the
instructor via email if there is no need to conduct it personally. A consultation day will be
set before the end of the semester.
Corresponding email:jrgo1@up.edu.ph (Please avoid sending messages via Facebook.)
Office Address:
Room 325, Silangang Palma (CSSP Faculty Centre)
Consultation Hours: TTh, 1-5PM

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First Semester 2016-2017

Grading Rubric for the Term Paper and Essays*


Compone
Excellent
Very Good
Satisfactory
nts of
(1.00-1.50)
(1.50-2.00)
(2.00-2.50)
the
Paper
Ideas
Excels in responding A solid paper,
Adequate but
(30)
to assignment.
responding
weaker and less
Interesting,
appropriately to
effective, possibly
demonstrates
assignment. Clearly
responding less
sophistication of
states a
well to assignment.
thought. Central
thesis/central idea,
Presents central
idea/thesis is
but may have
idea in general
clearly
minor lapses in
terms, often
communicated,
development.
depending on
worth developing;
Begins to
platitudes or
limited enough to
acknowledge the
clichs. Usually
be manageable.
complexity of
does not
Paper recognizes
central idea and
acknowledge other
some complexity of
the possibility of
views. Shows basic
its thesis: may
other points of
comprehension of
acknowledge its
view. Shows careful
sources, perhaps
contradictions,
reading of sources,
with lapses in
qualifications, or
but may not
understanding. If it
limits and follow
evaluate them
defines terms,
out their logical
critically. Attempts
often depends on
implications.
to define terms, not
dictionary
Understands and
always
definitions.
critically evaluates
successfully.
its sources,
appropriately limits
and defines terms

Poor
(2.50-3.00)

Unacceptable
(5.00)

Does not have a


clear central idea
or does not
respond
appropriately to
the assignment.
Thesis may be too
vague or obvious
to be developed
effectively. Paper
may
misunderstand
sources.

Does not respond to


the assignment,
lacks a thesis or
central idea, and
may neglect to use
sources where
necessary.

Organiza
tion and
coherenc
e (25)

Uses a logical
Shows a logical
May list ideas or
May have random
structure
progression of
arrange them
organization,
appropriate to
ideas and uses
randomly rather
lacking internal
paper's subject,
fairly sophisticated
than using any
paragraph
purpose, audience,
transitional
evident logical
coherence and
thesis, and
devices; e.g., may
structure. May use
using few or
disciplinary field.
move from least to
transitions, but
inappropriate
Sophisticated
more important
they are likely to be
transitions.
transitional
idea. Some logical
sequential (first,
Paragraphs may
sentences often
links may be faulty,
second, third)
lack topic
develop one idea
but each paragraph
rather than logicsentences or main
from the previous
clearly relates to
based. While each
ideas, or may be
one or identify their
paper's central
paragraph may
too general or too
logical relations. It
idea.
relate to central
specific to be
guides the reader
idea, logic is not
effective.
through the chain
always clear.
Paragraphs may
of reasoning or
Paragraphs have
not all relate to
progression of
topic sentences but
paper's thesis.
ideas.
may be overly
general, and
arrangement of
sentences within
paragraphs may
lack coherence.

No appreciable
organization; lacks
transitions and
coherence.

Support
(20)

Uses evidence
appropriately and
effectively,
providing sufficient
evidence and
explanation to
convince.

Begins to offer
Often uses
reasons to support
generalizations to
its points, perhaps
support its points.
using varied kinds
May use examples,
of evidence. Begins
but they may be
to interpret the
obvious or not
evidence and
relevant. Often
explain
depends on
connections
unsupported
between evidence
opinion or personal
and main ideas. Its
experience, or
examples bear
assumes that
some relevance.
evidence speaks
for itself and needs
no application to
the point being
discussed. Often
have lapses in
logic.

Depends on clichs
or overgeneralizations for
support, or offers
little evidence of
any kind. May be
personal narrative
rather than essay,
or summary rather
than analysis.

Uses irrelevant
details or lacks
supporting
evidence entirely.
May be unduly
brief.

Style
(15)

Chooses words for


their precise
meaning and uses
an appropriate
level of specificity.
Sentence style fits

Generally uses
words accurately
and effectively, but
may sometimes be
too general.
Sentences

May be too vague


and abstract, or
very personal and
specific. Usually
contains several
awkward or

Usually contains
many awkward
sentences, misuses
words, employs
inappropriate
language.

POLSC 196

Uses relatively
vague and general
words, may use
some inappropriate
language.
Sentence structure

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First Semester 2016-2017

Compone
nts of
the
Paper

Mechanic
s (10)

Excellent
(1.00-1.50)

Satisfactory
(2.00-2.50)

Poor
(2.50-3.00)

generally clear,
well structured,
and focused,
though some may
be awkward or
ineffective.

is generally correct,
but sentences may
be wordy,
unfocused,
repetitive, or
confusing.

ungrammatical
sentences;
sentence structure
is simple or
monotonous.

Almost entirely free


May contain a few
of spelling,
errors, which may
punctuation, and
annoy the reader
grammatical errors.
but not impede
understanding.

Usually contains
several mechanical
errors, which may
temporarily
confuse the reader
but not impede the
overall
understanding.

Usually contains
either many
mechanical errors
or a few important
errors that block
the reader's
understanding and
ability to see
connections
between thoughts.

paper's audience
and purpose.
Sentences are
varied, yet clearly
structured and
carefully focused,
not long and
rambling.

Very Good
(1.50-2.00)

Unacceptable
(5.00)

Usually contains so
many mechanical
errors that it is
impossible for the
reader to follow the
thinking from
sentence to
sentence.

*Modeled after the rubric used in the UC Davis English Department Composition Program.

Grade Rubric for Individual Student Participation in Class*


Points
00

Level of
Participation
Not Participating

Description

Attends class but does not respond to instructor's questions or


comments on the ideas of his/her classmate.
01 - 20
Low-Level
Attends class, rarely responds to instructor's questions, and
occasionally comments during discussion.
21 - 35
Medium-Level
Attends class, responds occasionally to instructor's questions and offers
periodic comments in discussions.
36 - 50
Active
Attends class, consistently responds to instructor's questions and
stimulates comments in the discussions.
51 - 60
High-Level
Attends class, responds to instructor's questions and engage in
discussions in a way that advances the class's understanding of the
reading materials.
*Modeled after the rubric for participation used by Gladstone A. Cuarteros.

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