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Republic of the Philippines

Western Mindanao State University


College of Teacher Education
Normal Road, Baliwasan, Zamboanga City

Semester Adopted: 1stSem.AY 20162017


Revision Status: 2nd Draft
Revision Date: November 11, 2014
Recommended By: Dr. Nolan Iglesia
Approved by: Dr. Ma. Carla A.

OUTCOMES-BASED EDUCATION (OBE) COURSE SYLLABUS IN ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSE (ESP)
2nd Semester, Academic Year 2014-2015

Vision
The Western Mindanao State University shall be the Center of Excellence and
leading institution in human resource development and research in the country
and the ASEAN region with international recognition.
Mission
To educate and produce well-trained, development-oriented and forward-looking
professional and technical manpower for the socio-economic, political and
technological development of the Philippines. It shall endeavor to expand the
frontiers of knowledge and its uses to society through research in technology, the
natural resources, physical and social sciences.
Program Objectives and its relationship to University Goals:
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES (PO)

GOALS

a. provide high quality teacher education that is responsive to education-for-all in


the nation and education-for-sustainable-development needs in the world.
b. realize the threefold institutional thrust of instruction, research and community
outreach in higher education;
c. hone students to the competencies and skills of a new breed of 21 st century
teachers, such as of information-media literacy-communication skills, civic
literacy, and global awareness, among others;
d. create an environment for transformational leadership among students who will
be imbued with energy, enthusiasm and passion for positive change in the
teaching profession; and
e. instill the value for lifelong learning among graduates who will not only desire to
become full fledge professionals but also molders and artists who blend the
natural qualities and strong desire to be the best in the profession.
GOALS

a). acquire a deep understanding on how to conduct proper analysis and assessment for further benefits in teaching
process
b).have a creativity in applying appropriate instructional methodologies by the help of authentic and semi-authentic
materials in the teaching process
c). have a competitive communication skill in a particular discipline.


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d). can demonstrate and practice the professional and ethical requirements of the teaching profession.

5. Course Description:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Course Code
Course Title
Pre-requisite
Credit

:
:
:
:

AS12 Ed Eng 131


English for Specific purpose
None
3 Units

English for Specific Purposes (ESP) is known as a learner-centered approach


to teaching English as a foreign or second language. It meets the needs of
(mostly) adult learners who need to learn a foreign language for use in their
specific fields, such as science, technology, medicine, leisure, and academic
learning. This course is recommended for students of teacher candidate
professionals who wish to learn how to design ESP courses and programs in
an area of specialization such as English for business, for Civil Engineering,
for Academic Purposes, and for health service purposes. In addition, they are
introduced to ESP instructional strategies, materials adaptation and
development, and evaluation.
6. Course Learning Outcomes and its Relationships to Program Educational Objectives

Course Learning Outcomes


At the end of the semester, the students are expected:
a) to acquire develop a deep understanding about the factors that led to the emergence of ESP and the forces, both theoretical
and applied, that have shaped its subsequent development.
b) to assist students develop needs assessments and genre analyses for specific groups of learners.

Program Objectives
a
b
c
d

c) to provide guidelines to adapt or create authentic ESP materials in a chosen professional or occupational area and to
evaluate critically, currently available materials, including technology-based ones.

d) to become knowledgeable about assessment procedures appropriate for ESP and apply this knowledge in developing
course and lesson evaluation plans in their professional or occupational area.

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e) to assist students in preparing a syllabus, lesson and assessment plan based upon their needs assessments and genre
analyses.

7. Course Content
Evidence of
Outcomes
Course Objectives, Topics,
Desired Student
(Assessment of
Time Allotment
Learning Outcomes
Learning
Outcomes)
Topic 1: WMSU VMGO, Classroom Policies, Course Overview, Course Requirements, Grading System (3 hours)
1. Discuss the VMGO of the
1.1 Student can be
University, classroom policies, aware of and
Having them a dialogue
They were able to
scope of the course, course
appreciative of the
conversation with their
introduce themselves
requirements and grading
Universitys VMGO,
partner.
and familiarize the
system.
classroom policies,
VMGO
course overview,
requirements and
grading system.
Evidence of
Outcome-Based (OBA)
Outcomes
Course Objectives, Topics,
Desired Student
Activities
(Assessment of
(Teaching & Learning
Time Allotment
Learning Outcomes
Learning
Activities)
Outcomes)
Topic 2: Definition and origins of ESP (3 hours)
Outcome-Based (OBA)
Activities
(Teaching & Learning
Activities)

Course
Objectiv
es

Progra
m
Outcom
es

a,b,c,d

A,b,c,d

Course
Objectiv
es

Progra
m
Outcom
es

Values
Integration

Value of
appreciation

Values
Integration

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2.1 Discuss the definition of


English for Specific Purpose
(ESP)

2.2 The origins of ESP:

2.1 students can define


ESP in concise manner.

2.2 Identifying historical


and theoretical
perspectives of ESP.

-the demands of New World,


-a revolution in linguistics,
-and focus on the learner
Topic 3: types and characteristics of ESP (6 hours)
3.1 Types and Characteristics
3.1 Similarities and
of ESP
differences between ESP
1. English as a
and GE (General
restricted
language;
English) on English
2. English for academic
Language Teaching (ELT)
and
3.2 The historical
development of ESP
occupational
- Contributions of ESP to
purposes;
the field.
3. English with
specific topics.
.

Individual participation in
class discussion and
group presentation using
a rubric to assess quality
of participation.

Group Activity (Brain


Storming)

Can organize ideas


using
Semantic webbing

Level of performance
identified through
rubrics

A,b,c,d

A,b,c,d

Value of
cooperation

3.2 Characteristics of ESP:


1. Absolute
characteristic
2. Variable
characteristic
Topic 4 : The role of ESP teacher and learner (3 hours)

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4.1The development of ESP

4.1 student can


elaborate the
emergence of ESP

4.2The role of ESP teacher


4.3The role of ESP learners

Course Objectives, Topics,


Time Allotment

4.2 Students can


distinguish the
difference between an
ESP teacher and EGP
teacher

Desired Student
Learning Outcomes

Topic 5: ESP as an approach not a product (3 hours)


5.1 ESP as an approach:
5.1 student can explain
-learner-centered approach
the reason why ESP is
-language-centered approach
an approach not a
-skills centered approach
product
-learning-centered approach

Students participation in
question-and-answer
activity facilitated by
teacher.

Outcome-Based (OBA)
Activities
(Teaching & Learning
Activities)

Group activity:
Make a certain situation
with the application of a
particular discipline

Role playing on actual


situation inside an
ESP class.

Evidence of
Outcomes
(Assessment of
Learning
Outcomes)

Group presentation
assessment along
selected criteria for
feasibility of learning
delivery situation.

A,b,c,d

A,b,c,d

Course
Objectiv
es

Progra
m
Outcom
es

a, b, c,
d

a, b, c,
d

cooperation

Values
Integration

Value of
cooperation and
unity

Topic 6: Needs Analysis (6 hours)

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6.1 Needs Analysis

6.1 Identifying as
completely as possible a
real group of English
language learners.
6.2 Give and receive
feedback on each
others target
population.

Design a needs
analysis plan for your
target population that
you would carry out.
Making Lesson Plan

a, b, c,
d

a, b, c,
d

Value of
cooperation and
collaboration

a, b, c,
d

a, b, c,
d

Value of
cooperation

Course
Objectiv
es

Progra
m
Outcom
es

6.3Discussing issues
related to the design of
needs analysis tools for
your specific group of
learners.
Topic 7: Genre analysis ( 3
hours)
Genre Analysis

Defining what genre is and


operationally identifying
different types of genre.

Topic 8: ESP in relation to different goals (3hours)


7.2 ESP in relation to different
goals:
Can differentiate the
-Teachers goals
- Syllabus goals
- Students goals

Course Objectives, Topics,


Time Allotment

difference/s the 3 goals.

Desired Student
Learning Outcomes

Group activity

Identifying what the


learner needs lacks and
wants.

Outcome-Based (OBA)
Activities
(Teaching & Learning
Activities)

Could explain and


elaborate what genre
analysis is, if asked.

Graded presentation
with criteria for
innovation, feasibility
and group cohesion,
and individual
participation.
Evidence of
Outcomes
(Assessment of
Learning
Outcomes)

Values
Integration

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Topic 8: Instructional approaches in ESP (6 hours)


8.1 Instructional approaches in
8.1 Students can
ESP
identify what particular
instructional approaches
should be used in a
particular discipline

Group presentation:
Applying the instructional
approaches in actual
teaching of ESP

Topic 9: Issues involved in ESP materials development (6 hours)


9.1
9.1
Issues involved in ESP materials
Discussing factors
development
involved in the
identification of ESP
materials.
Topic 10:
ESP course design
(6 hours)
10.1.
ESP course design

Student can discuss how


the results of your
needs analysis help
setting the parameters
of your ESP course
design. Give and receive
feedback.

Discussing issues related


to planning,
conceptualizing,
developing, implementing
and evaluating of ESP
programs

Topic 11: Discussing student evaluation methods. (6 hours)


11.1
Student will learn how
Discussing issues related
to do the evaluation
to how technology can
Discussing student evaluation
method
evaluation
enhance teaching ESP,
methods.
methods.
and important points to
consider when integrating
Technology as a resource for
technology into classroom
ESP or use of technology in ESP
practice.
class

Rating of students
summative concepts
written on the board,
after period of quiet
reflection writing.

Group and individual


rating of products.

Rating of students
summative concepts
written on the board,
after period of quiet
reflection writing.

Evaluation and rating


of internet sourcing
and summaries.

a, b, c,
d

a, b, c,
d

Value of work
ethics

a, b, c,
d

a, b, c,
d

Value of creativity

a, b, c,
d

a, b, c,
d

Value of
internalization

a, b, c,
d

a, b, c,
d

Value of giving
importance to the
ideas of others

Assessment and
evaluation of
students individual
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sample of technology
use in teaching.

TOTAL: 54 hours

8.Course Evaluation
Course Requirements:
1
2
3
4

Attendance
Face-to-Face Class Participation
Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Class Participation
Logbook accompanied by a portfolio of the actual materials that can be compiled such as: simulations, CDs, transparencies, pictures, posters,
poems, anecdotes, articles, notes, cartoons, strip drawings (comic stripts), diagrams, sketches, charts, graphs, graphic organizers, websites titles
of movies, kits, pageants, puppets, community resources (with addresses, contact persons, contact numbers).

Grading System:

1. Class discussions 15%


2. Assignments 10%
3. Presentations 15%
4. Mid-semester Test 25%
5. Final Test 35%
Schedule of Examination:
Midterm
Final
Classes End

References:
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Anthony, L. (1997). ESP: What does it mean? ON CUE. http://interserver.miyazaki-med.ac.jp/~cue/pc/anthony.htm Retrieved April 6, 2000, from the World
Wide Web. Basturkmen, Helen (2006). Ideas and Options in English for Specific Purposes: ESL & Applied Linguistics Professional Series. London : Lawrence
Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
T., Dudley-Evans, & St John, M. (1998). Developments in ESP: A multi-disciplinary approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
T., Hutchinson, & Waters, A. (1987). English for Specific Purposes: A learning-centered approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Prepared by:

Noted by:

SHELLAMAE C. SEGA
Faculty

Recommending Approval

MARIA MICHELLE A. HELAR


Department Chair

Dean, College of Teacher Education

Approved By:

MA. CARLA A. OCHOTORENA, Ph.D


Vice President for Academic Affairs

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