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EXPATRIOT support GUIDE_____________________

Country Information ................................................................................................................................ 2


Prague Information ................................................................................................................................. 3
Banking ................................................................................................................................................... 4
Cost of living guide ................................................................................................................................. 7
Cultural adjustment............................................................................................................................... 10
Embassies & Consular support ............................................................................................................ 11
Healt & medical .................................................................................................................................... 13
Housing................................................................................................................................................. 16
Insurances ............................................................................................................................................ 20
Permits & Documentation ..................................................................................................................... 22
Recreation, sports/entertainment ......................................................................................................... 32
Safety.................................................................................................................................................... 33
Schooling .............................................................................................................................................. 34
Shopping............................................................................................................................................... 40
Tax ........................................................................................................................................................ 42
Transport .............................................................................................................................................. 44

3.1. Country Information______________________


Country Information
Capital Prague
Languages Czech & Slovak (minorities Polish, German, English (compulsory in
schools from 2005)
Government coalition (2010)
Formation Principality of Bohemia c.870, Czechoslovakia 1918, Czech Republic 1993
(EU member 2004)
Population 10.5 million
Unemployment 8% (Prague 4%)
Currency Czech Koruna (1GBP = 30CZK, 1 Euro = 25CZK approx)
Time Zone = +1 hour to UK, the same in mainland Europe i.e. Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin,
Warsaw, Rome
Driving Right side of the right (steering wheel on the left)
Phone (calling code) 00420
Climate Continental climate inland locked country, high 30s in the summer, minus 20s in
the winter (Prague slightly more moderate)
Extensive information at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czech_Republic .
Location of Czech Republic (green)
on the European continent (light green & grey)
in the European Union (light green)

3.2. Prague Information_______________________


Prague Information
Situated on the Vltava River in central Bohemia, Prague has been the political, cultural and
economic centre of the Czech state for more than 1,100 years. For many decades during the
Gothic and Renaissance eras, Prague was the permanent seat of two Holy Roman Emperors and
thus was also the capital of the Holy Roman Empire.
The city proper is home to about 1.3 million people, while its Metropolitan area is estimated to have
a population of over 1.9 million.
Since 1992, the extensive historic centre of Prague has been included in the UNESCO list of World
Heritage Sites, making the city one of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe, receiving
more than 4.1 million international visitors annually.
Extensive information at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prague

3.3. Need to know___________________________


Banking
WHEN COMING TO THE CZECH REPUBLIC A BANK ACCOUNT WILL BE NEEDED, CARDS &
OTHER ESSENTIALS TO FUNCTION NORMALLY ETC.
The Czech financial sector is extremely conservative when compared to international
benchmarks. Czechs have a very low debt level, higher deposits make local banks less dependent
on other sources of financing. Czech banks focus primarily on classic retail banking (loans and
deposits).
There are many banks operating in the Czech Republic, but the market is dominated by a small
number of foreign (primarily European) banks, including CSOB (KBC, Belgium), esk Spoitelna
S (Erste Bank, Austria), Komern banka KB (Socit Gnrale, France), and UniCredit Bank
(Unicredit Group, Italy). The market is fairly open and looks increasingly like that of other EU
countries.

KB KOMERN BANKA
www.kb.cz
The KB - Komercni Banka a.s.
Operating Hours:
Monday - Friday 9:00 am to 7:00 pm
Tel: +420 (2) 22453540

EXPAT Centrum, tpnsk 42, Praha 1, phone 955 534 131, email expat@kb.cz
EXPAT Centrum offers not only wide variety of products and services, but also highly professional
approach to your individual requests. In addition to this, EPC will bring you following advantages:
communication in English, French, German and other languages, selected contractual
documentation in English, extended opening hours and representative premises in a historic
building in the centre of Prague.

The Ceska Sporitelna bank ESK SPOITELNA


www.cs.cz
Operation Hours:
Monday,Thursday and Friday 9.00 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. and 13.30 p.m. to 18.00 pm
Tuesday and Wednesday 9.00 a.m. to 14.00 p.m.
Tel:+420251001776

The Expat Center offering:


Multi-lingual personal banking consultants able to communicate fluently in English, French or
German.
Specialized banking packages in one of these languages: English, French or German with courtesy
translations of all account opening forms and contracts.
Expat Center esk spoitelna, Rytsk 29, Praha 1, tel.: 224101630, fax: 224640884, e-mail:
expatcenter@csas.cz

SOB
www.csob.cz
Radlick 333/150, Praha 5
Tel.: +420 224 111 111
E-mail: Info@csob.cz

Company profile:
CSOB is a universal bank active in two national markets Czech Republic and Slovakia (through a
foreign branch). In Czech retail market, CSOB operates under two brands: CSOB and Postovni
sporitelna (Postal Savings Bank).

UNICREDIT BANK
www.unicreditbank.cz
Na Pkop 20
111 21 Praha
Opening hours: 8:30 - 17:00, Only on Wednesday to 18.00

Contacts:
Marek Rada (EN, GE) - 420 224 122 133
Nadzeya Biazkorsay (IT, EN, RU) - 420 224 122 161
Jana Kloukov (IT, EN) - 420 224 122 144
e-mail: icc@unicreditgroup.cz

International Clients Centre


At International Clients Centre you will find professional bankers with specialization in foreign
clients. They are fluent in English, Italian, German and Russian and are ready to offer you all the
products and services of UniCredit Bank. International Clients Centre is located in the very heart
th

of Prague, in incomparable interiors of a historic building from the 19 century. You will have at
your disposal not only first-rate services of multilingual bankers, but also the necessary comfort and
prestigious surroundings.

3.4. Need to know___________________________


Cost of living guide
ITS IMPORTANT TO LOCALIZE YOUR INCOME VS. EXPENDITURE & NOT MAKE DIRECT
COMPARISONS TO HOME COUNTRY ENVIRONMENTS AS THEY WILL NOT BE ON EQUAL
TERMS.

Cost of Living (http://www.expats.cz/prague/article/prague-relocation/cost-of-living/):

RESTAURANTS

CZK

EUR

GBP

USD

Hotdog from Wenceslas Sqare

50

1.92

1.68

2.68

Lunch for one in a pub

130

5.01

4.37

6.98

Dinner for two in a mid-range restaurant

570

22.99

19.18

30.62

Lunch for one in a sandwich bar

70

2.70

2.35

3.76

Combo meal at KFC or McDonald's

105

4.05

3.53

5.64

Coffee and Cake in Central Cafe

100

3.85

3.36

5.37

Domestic Beer (0.5 liter draught)

35

1.32

1.17

1.88

Imported Beer (0.33 liter bottle)

55

2.12

1.85

2.95

A shot of vodka (2 CL)

28

1.08

0.94

1.50

Coke/Pepsi (0.33 liter bottle)

35

1.32

1.17

1.88

Water (0.33 liter bottle)

33

1.27

1.11

1.77

THE SUPERMARKET

CZK

EUR

GBP

USD

Milk (1 liter)

18

0.69

0.61

0.96

Loaf of Fresh Bread

21

0.81

0.70

1.12

French Baguette

17

0.65

0.57

0.91

Eggs (6)

18

0.67

0.63

0.91

Cheese (100g)

23

0.88

0.77

1.23

Whole Chicken

55

2.12

1.85

2.95

1 kg Apples (Granny Smiths)

35

1.32

1.17

1.88

Water (1.5 liter bottle)

10

0.38

0.33

0.53

Bottle of Czech Wine

120

4.62

4.03

6.44

Domestic Beer (0.5 liter bottle)

11

0.42

0.37

0.59

Imported Beer (0.5 liter bottle)

23

0.88

0.77

1.23

Pack of Cigarettes (Marlboro)

82

3.16

2.76

4.40

Pack of Cigarettes - Czech Brand

63

2.43

2.12

3.38

TRANSPORTATION

CZK

EUR

GBP

USD

30 Minute Ticket

18

0.69

0.61

0.96

75 Minute Ticket

26

1.00

0.87

1.39

24-hour Pass

100

3.85

3.36

5.37

5 Day Pass

500

19.28

16.83

26.86

Month Pass

550

21.21

18.51

29.55

Month Pass, Child

130

5.01

4.37

6.98

Month Pass, Student

260

10.03

8.75

13.97

Month Pass, Senior

250

9.64

8.41

13.43

Annual Pass

4,750

185.25

159.94

255.30

Taxi (airport to center)

600

23.14

20.20

32.25

Taxi (within center)

200

7.71

6.73

10.74

ACCOMODATION (Per Month)

CZK

EUR

GBP

USD

Room in Flatshare, Prague 1/2

7,000

270.06

235.71

376.32

Room in Flatshare, Outside Centre

6,000

231.48

202.02

322.51

Studio Flat, Prague 1/2

12,000

462.96

404.09

644.98

Studio Flat, Outsider Centre

9,000

347.19

303.04

483.70

Flat (1+1) in Prague 1/2

15,000

578.68

505.04

806.19

Flat (1+1) Outside Centre

13,500

520.84

454.66

725.43

Flat (2+1) in Prague 1/2

21,000

810.15

707.24

1128.53

Flat (2+1) Outside Centre

15,000

578.68

505.04

806.19

4 Star Hotel, Dbl Room (Per Night)

2,500

96.44

84.17

134.40

Hostel, Bed in Dorm (Per Night)

300

11.57

10.10

16.12

UTILITIES, ETC. (Monthly)

CZK

EUR

GBP

USD

Basic (Gas, Electricity, etc.)

2,800

108.02

94.29

150.48

Phone (Land Line)

600

23.14

20.20

32.25

Mobile Phone

800

30.86

26.94

42.99

Internet (ADSL)

500

19.28

16.83

26.86

Exchange rates:
1 USD = 18.60 CZK
1 GBP = 29.69 CZK
1 EUR = 25.92 CZK
NOTES: This is a rough guide to prices only and all prices are based on a median. Prices include
VAT (value added tax), which as of January 2010 is 20% full rate, or 10% reduced rate.
The supermarket visited was Interspa at Pankrac. Water was the Czech brand Mattoni, the
domestic beer was Gambrinus, and the imported beer Stella Artois. An inexpensive meal for one
was calculated at a main course (a schnizel or goulash), plus potatoes or dumplings, and two
beers. The meal for two at a mid-range restaurant included the soup of the day, main courses,
dessert and wine. For accommodation and utilities in particular prices are highly variable and
shopping around is advisable.

3.5. Need to know___________________________


Cultural adjustment
SIMILAR TO LEAVING HOME FOR THE 1ST TIME OR GOING ON AN EXTENDED OVERSEAS
EXPERIENCE THERES ALWAYS EXCITEMENT, ANXIETY & A SENSE OF ACHIEVEMENT
SUCCEEDING FOR MANY THE CHALLENGE IS A LARGE MOTIVATIONAL FACTOR
The Honeymoon stage has the sense of excitement, adventure & exploration which lasts for the
1st few months until experiencing the daily routine of day to day life.
Culture Shock happens to everyone, even experienced expats as the day to day issues can turn
to frustrations & a feeling of dependency on others occurs.
Adjustment in the longer term process of adapting to the culture. Learning the language (or in
part) can be a good boundary breaker & enabler of understanding local behaviour & social
patterns.
Mastery is functioning effectively in the new environment, quite often missing it when departed
again.

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3.6. Need to know___________________________


Embassies & Consular support
AS A FOREIGN PERSON WE NEED TO BE AWARE OF DIPLOMATIC SUPPORT SHOULD WE
EVER NEED IT.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland


Embassy of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Address:

Thunovsk 14, Prague 1, 118 00

Phone:

+420 257 402 111

Canada
Canadian Embassy
Address:

Muchova 6, Prague 6, 160 00

Phone:

+420 272 101 800

United States of America


Embassy of the United States of America
Address:

Trit 15, Prague 1, 118 01

Phone:

+420 257 530 663, +420 257 532 716

Australia
Consulate of the Commonwealth of Australia
Address:

Klimentsk 10, Prague 1, 110 00

Phone:

+420 296 578 350, +420 296 578 351

Contact person:

Petr Vodvka (honorrn konzul, tel.: 296 578 351)

Open hours:

9.00 1.00, 14.00 17.00

New Zealand
Consulate of New Zealand
Address:

Dykova 1156/19, 101 00 Praha 10-Vinohrady

Phone:

+420 602640730 (personal mobile)

Email:

david@nzconsul.cz

Contact person:

David Chirnside (honorrn konzul)

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Ireland
Embassy of Ireland
Address:

Trit 13, Prague 1, 118 00

Phone:

+420 257 530 061-4

Contact person:

J.E.p. Joseph Hayes (ambassador, Tel.: 257 530 061)

Open hours:

Mon Fri: 9.00 1.00 , 2.00 5.00

Belgium
Embassy of the Kingdom of Belgium
Address:

Valdtejnsk 6, Prague 1 - Mal Strana, 118 01

Phone:

+420 257 533 524, +420 257 533 283-7

Contact person:

J.E.p. Gustaaf Dierckx (velvyslanec, tel.: 257 533 750)

Open hours:

Mon Fri: 8.30 12.30, 14.00 17.00 (Friday till 16.00 only)

France
Embassy of the French Republic
Address:

Velkopevorsk nm. 2, P.O.Box 102, Prague 1, 118 00

Phone:

+420 251 171 711

Contact person:

J.E.p. Jo De Zorzi (ambassador)

Open hours:

Mon Fri: 9.00 1.00 , 3.00 6.30 Fri only 6.00

The Netherlands
Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Address:

Gotthardsk 6/27, Prague 6 - Bubene, 160 00

Phone:

+420 224 312 190

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3.7. Need to know___________________________


Healt & medical
EMERGENCY NUMBERS, HEALTH &
UNEXPECTED OCCUR, ESPECIALLY
COMMUNICATION ARE DIFFERENT.

MEDICAL ARE IMPORTANT SHOULD THE


IN A COUNTRY WHERE LANGUAGE &

Useful and important contacts:


Emergency call 112
Ambulance service phone 155
Police phone 158
Fire emergency phone 150
Municipal police phone 156
Emergency road service phone 1230, 1240
General information phone 221 714 444

MEDICAL CENTRES:
Medicover s.r.o.
Medicover clinic Prague 4
Lomnickho 1705/5
140 00 Praha 4
Medicover clinic Prague 8
Rubn Office Center
Sokolovsk 79/192
186 00 Prague 8
Mon-Fri: 7:30 16:00
+420 234 630 111

Customer service:

customer.service@medicover.cz

Medicover is a part of the Swedish owned Medicover international health group, with
operations in Poland, Romania, Hungary and Slovakia. In the Czech Republic Medicover is
the only company in the health provision industry operating on an international level and
having a network of branches all over the country. Medicover aims to keep the clients as
healthy as possible and to guarantee a high standard of health care in all our countries.

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Canadian Medical Care


a private out-patient health care center, which provides complex medical care to all those
who take their health seriously, demand higher quality, above-standard and most
importantly professional care.
Canadian Medical Care is a leading, well-established private outpatient medical clinic
providing high quality health care since 1995 to all foreign residents, visitors to Prague, and
Czech citizens who desire above-standard medical services.

Canadian Medical Care Prague 6, Veleslavnsk 1


+420 235 360 133
Mon, Wed, Fri: 8:00 18:00
Tue, Thu: 8:00 20:00
Sat: 9:00 12:00

Canadian Medical Care Prague 4, V Parku 2308/8


+420 272 913 593
Mon, Wed: 8:00 18:00
Tue, Thu, Fri: 8:00 16:30

Other important contacts:


Medical emergencies
Sololska 27, Prague 2. Tel: 224 266 150.
Konevova 205, Prague 3. Tel: 284 862 149

Doctor Prague Health Centre


Vodickova 28, 3rd entrance, 2nd floor, Prague 1.
Tel: 224 220 040 or 24hr service: 603 433 833.
www.doctor-prague.cz

Pharmacy 24 hours
Palackeho 5, Prague 1. Tel: 224 946 982.
Belgicka 37, Prague 2. Tel: 222 513 396.
Stefanikova 6, Prague 5. Tel: 257 320 918

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Dental emergencies
Palackeho 5, Prague 1
Tel: 224 946 981

European Dental Centre


Vaclavske namesti (Wenceslas Square) 33, Prague 1.
Tel: 224 228 984, 224 228 994

American Dental Associates:


V celnici 4, Prague 4.
Tel: 221 181 121, www.americandental.cz

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3.8. Need to know___________________________


Housing
AS WITH ANY TIME REGARDLESS OF HOME COUNTRY OR NOT THERE CAN BE ISSUES
WHEN FINDING A NEW DWELLINGS.

http://www.housingguideprague.com/searching.html
1. What you need to start, where to stay temporarily, how to organise it
In Prague there are a many solutions for staying somewhere temporarily till you find a good
apartment.
Remember you will stay in the flat for a year of your life or more so it is wise not to hurry to find
something fast and furious. Looking for a flat that way is not a bad approach though but it is not the
best.
See links for a complete list of Hostels, pensions, share rooms, cheap solutions but also if you can
afford it to stay for 10 to 15 days, hotels and small apartments and also some places for share a
couch.
Additionally AAA has some company appartments for short term use dependant on availablity.
Things to consider:
a. Map of Prague
b. Mobile phone, it is better when you come to Prague to buy a local number because it will come
cheaper in the end. Dont close a contract for a year because 10.000CZK needed for deposit. Just
buy a number and then buy credits, of course if you buy for a year you will be in a better calling
program and than means better prices.
Very good signal coverage for Czech Republic has T -mobile, O2 and Vodafone.
c. Digital Camera. It can be useful but is not needed so much. If your mobile has a built in digital
camera, even better.
d. Notepad or printed copies of check list

A.While looking for a flat you are going to hear many things, about the market, the flats, the
weather and of course prices
The word PRICE EQUALS TO THE WORD NEGOTIATE
Remember when you hear a price it is just the first price you can negotiate always for a better,
tell them something about a friend that stayed there before and paid less by 15% or improvise.
B.You can find small apartments to stay from Real Estate Agents that also have long term rentals.

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C.Dont waste your time and money. There are some Real Estate Agents that will support you with
tons of flats but most of them out of what you told them in the first meeting. Check by phone before
you visit the flats. Ask the REA: "Has Gas, has this has that e.g."
D. Dont go somewhere without checking by phone first.
E. When you have to go to some place to see a flat ask the Real Estate Agent if he/she will go with
a car and tell him if he/she can pick you up from somewhere. Usually the REA move by Public
Transportation but who knows you may have a free tour in Prague.
A database for apartments that you can refer to is www.czech-properties.cz.
This link has info about renting apartments and is free for everyone to see. It is in Czech and in
English.
It is a database the real estate agents use often among others.
Another source is the newspaper Annonce, announcement in English that has in the hobby section
apartments to rent in Czech of course

A.Looking for apartments alone and when there is a language gap there are possible problems of
misunderstandings. Trustworthiness is a serious matter for both parties because you dont know
who they are and vice versa.
Before you give money to someone try to find a translator or a Czech friend that can help you in
this. The contract must be translated and in English too.
Because is something occurs the Czech written contract prevails.

Check that the person you are talking to is the Landlord. He must show you a paper that he owns
this property. You can be easily ripped off otherwise.
2. Looking at apartments, asking the right questions, what is important
Viewing
Dont view accommodation alone it is better with a friend or family for some out of the box thinking.
Check, standard, disrepair, furniture in all rooms if you chosen the furniture apartment scenario. If
the scenario is unfurnished apartment then look for moisture in the floor or in the ceilings
Heating, what type? In all rooms? & estimated costs
Furniture What is included check hand over protocol
Security
Front door locks & bolts / window locks Speak to existing tenants of the building or if it is possible
to previews tenants of the flat.
Hand over protocol
You should compile an inventory (hand over protocol) that the landlord agrees with you with all the
things, even the smallest in the apartment, listing all fixtures and fittings including carpets &
curtains.

17

The inventory should be signed by the landlord and the tenant and the Real Estate Agent as the
middle company.
An agreement in writing should accompany the tenant from the landlord that gives a reasonable
timescale when repairs are to be rectified, but that will discuss them in the TIME TO SIGN section
thoroughly...
Additions to the property should be noted in the inventory throughout your tenancy.
Having an inventory saves problems when items go missing or are damaged at the end of the
contract.
Locations
Close to shops / pubs / takeaways, supermarkets.
Easily accessible by walking, cycling, bus service, metro.
Is it in a very busy road, because you might have problem with noise if it is in a major highway or a
24 hour traffic road.
Facilities
Bedroom Sufficient for all your belongings.
Facilities Sitting room, Microwave, Washing Machine, Telephone, Shower, Television, Heating,
Gas/Electricity/Oil.
Check them all if there are in working condition and if some of them have guarantee and check
when the guarantee finishes. Look especially the boiler, refrigerator, electrical equipment, TV,
cd/dvd etc.
Condition of Property
Disrepair problems e.g. damp, mould, leaks, bare wires etc Any redecoration or improvements
needed.
Furniture replacements.
Any sign of fleas, bed bugs, mouse droppings etc.
Safety
Check the Landlords Gas Safety & Electrical Safety Certificates are up to date! Window locks.

A. All the problems you find in the flat, it is not only for your future convenience but there also for
negotiating. If there are small solvable problems and you like the flat it is even better because you
can negotiate a better price.
B. Use the Real Estate Agent. Make him work for you. The bad, unprofessional real Estate Agent
here in Prague always take the side of the landlord, because there is a long term relationship.
Remind him the responsibilities, that his in the middle, and where there is a problem he must call
the landlord to solve it.
He knows the language, you dont. When you pay him the money for the finders fee in the receipt
he will give you make him write that this money is paid for finding a flat service and for solving
communication problems or other problems throughout the tenancy between you and the Landlord.

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C. It is very important thing the inventory of the flat. So afterwards the Landlords wont dare to ask
you extra money or keeping the double deposit for items lost or damaged. Remember if it is out of
the inventory it doesnt exist.and that means you dont have a problem.
When you look the flat, look carefully what is the condition of the walls. See if it newly painted or
not. If not then in the inventory write the condition of the walls, which are not painted or partial,
painted, or not fully painted.
D. Some streets of Prague, especially those out of the old town have too much traffic Noise.

Dont exaggerate looking for problems. Be serious.

19

3.9. Need to know___________________________


Insurances
WORKING IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC MEANS THERE WILL BE SOME MANDATORY
INSURANCE DEPENDANT ON WORKING IN A CONTRACTOR ROLE OR AS A PERMANENT
EMPLOYEE.
Compared to many other countries, basic health insurance in the Czech Republic is quite cheap.
As you shop for coverage you should take your employment status, residence status, and
citizenship (the Czech Republic now complies with EU laws on healthcare) into account.
Wherever you come from you should at least arrange coverage through the public healthcare
system, depending on your status. Under Czech law you must be covered by it if you have
permanent residence or are working for an employer that has a registered business address in the
Czech Republic. People working here on a self-employed basis, whether EU citizens or not, have
obligations, too.
Public Healthcare
Healthcare in the Czech Republic is paid for on the basis of contributions from your salary (if you
work for a Czech employer), and they are paid to a public health insurance company. If you are
self-employed you can choose which health insurance company you want to deal with.
Many employers and individuals have an arrangement with Veobecn zdravotn pojitovna esk
republiky (General Health Insurance Company of the Czech Republic) or VZP (www.vzp.cz) as its
normally referred to. Its the largest health insurance company in the country, and is accustomed to
dealing with foreigners.
Once you are registered in the system, you will be issued a card by your insurance company. You
should keep it with you at all times and produce it every time you go to hospital or see your doctor.
Public GPs have a contract with some of the health insurance companies, and when you sign up
for a local doctor you may find that he or she does not have a contract with the same company.
You should therefore check which insurance firm the doctor has an agreement with.
If you are working on a freelance basis and have permanent residence then you will pay your
contributions on an annual basis. If you are self-employed and have a long-term residence permit
you should arrange contractual insurance individually with a public health insurance company.
The situation for EU citizens changed when the Czech Republic became a member of the
European Union. These days, even if you only have temporary residence, which lasts five years;
you enjoy similar rights as Czech citizens, based on the principle of common healthcare provision
across the EU. This means that if you are working for an employer then the arrangements
described above still apply. If you are working on a freelance basis, e.g. as a translator, then you
still have to make monthly payments. Before, you had to take out contractual insurance (if you had
long-term residence) but now you have to make an arrangement with a health insurance company
yourself. Its also possible to set up insurance with a non-domestic healthcare company if you are

20

an EU citizen, but this arrangement must comply with EU law on public healthcare, so you should
obviously confirm that it does before purchasing coverage.
Private Healthcare
Private insurance is of course an option too, and many expats are members of private schemes.
Many expats have arrangements with firms such as BUPA, through their employer, and they go to
private clinics that accept these and other private policies.
Depending on your situation, you may be obliged to make contributions to the Czech public
healthcare system also. This can be advantageous if you must go to a public hospital for
emergency treatment.
Health Insurance Providers:
BUPA International
www.health-insurance.cz
Mal tupartsk 7, Prague 1
+420 224 815 377
Alliance Partnership
www.al-pt.com
tpnsk 27, Prague 1
+420 222 101 400
AIG
www.aig.cz
V Celnici 1031/4, Prague 1
+420 234 108 311
Hamilton|Hudson
www.hamiltonhudson.com
Chopinova 2, Prague 2
+420 222 254 442
Pojiovna VZP
www.pvzp.cz
Jankovcova 1566/2b, Prague 7
+420 233 006 311
Uniqa
www.uniqa.cz
Evropsk 136, Prague 6
+420 225 393 111
VZP for Foreigners
www.vzpforforeigners.cz
Chopinova 2, Prague 2
+420 222 254 442

21

3.10. Need to know__________________________


Permits & Documentation
LONG-TERM VISAS:
D Visas over 90 days: Visa for stay over 90 days
D+C Visa: for stay over 90 days (type D) in the territory of the Czech Republic and also valid as
a uniform Schengen short-term visa (type C).
Other information:
Czech Republic joined Schengen on 21st Dec 2007
The Schengen States are a group of European countries which have signed an agreement to allow
free circulation of people within the territory of the member countries. The Schengen member
states are as follows:
Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg,
Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden.
On the 21st December 2007, the Schengen zone was joined by nine new countries:
Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia.
Please note: that the UK and Ireland are not a part of the Schengen agreement.
Temporary stay / permanent stay of EU citizens in the Czech Republic
EU Citizens are entitled to stay in the Czech Republic on the Temporary/Permanent basis without
any permits, irrespective of the purpose of the stay.
An EU citizen whose stay in the Czech Republic will exceed 30 days must register within 30 days
in his/her arrival to the Czech Republic with the Alien and Border Police.
If an EU citizen intends to stay in the Czech Republic for a period exceeding three months, he/she
will be entitled (but not obliged) to apply to the Alien and Border Police for a residence permit.
Residence permit can be a temporary residence permit (TRP) or permanent residence permit
(PRP). Applications for the permits shall be filed with The Alien and Border Police in the territory of
the Czech Republic.
Family Members of EU Citizens who require a visa
You can apply for a visa either in person at the Czech Embassy in London or by post. It takes
about one week (maximum 14 days) to obtain a visa. It is free of charge. It is also possible to apply
for a visa on arrival, at a border crossing point.
Embassy contact information:
Please contact the nearest Czech Republic embassy for information on what documentation you

22

may require to enter Czech Republic.


Disclaimer: The contents of these pages are provided as an information guide only, in good faith.
The use of this website is at the viewer/user's sole risk. While every effort is made in presenting upto-date and accurate information, no responsibility or liability is accepted by the owners to this
website for any errors, omissions, outdated or misleading information on these pages or any site to
which these pages connect or are linked.
Source & Copyright: The source of the above visa and immigration information and copyright
owner/s is the Ministerstvo zahraninch vc esk republiky - URL: www.mzv.cz
The viewer/user of this web page should use the above information as a guideline only, and should
always contact the above sources or the user's own government representatives for the most upto-date information at that moment in time, before making a final decision to travel to that country
or destination.
http://prague.tv/articles/relocation/czech-visas-and-residency-permits
information from the web site above:
Czech Visas and Residency Permits
A basic guide to the paperwork you'll need to enter -- and stay in -- the Czech Republic
SHORT-TERM STAYS
Citizens of European Union/European Economic Area Countries
If you're from a country in the European Union, or the countries Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or
Liechtenstein, you only require a valid passport, a diplomatic passport, or an ID card to enter and
stay in the Czech Republic.
You are entitled to work without work permits (povolen prce) and can buy property.
It is recommended, though not obligatory, that you obtain a temporary residency permit if you
intend to stay for more than 90 days. You can apply for the permit at the Foreigners' Police.
A temporary residency permit is advisable if you intend to work.
Citizens of Non-EU/EEA Countries
If you come from a so-called third state -- those that are neither the Czech Republic, another EU
nation or member of the EEA -- you're subject to different requirements, depending on the length
and purpose of your stay.
Citizens of the following countries do not require a visa to enter the Czech Republic for stays of up
to 90 days:
Argentina
Australia
Bolivia

23

Brazil
Brunei Darussalam
Canada
Chile
Costa Rica
Croatia
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Hong Kong
Israel
Japan
Macao
Malaysia
Mexico
Monaco
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
San Marino
Singapore
South Korea
Uruguay
USA
Venezuela
If you are from any other state, please check with the Czech authorities concerning your visa
requirements.
LONG-TERM RESIDENCY PERMITS
If you're from a third state and you intend to stay longer than 90 days, and/or you intend to work,
it's necessary to obtain a long-term residency permit (povolen k dlouhodobmu pobytu), which is
valid for one year from the date of issue.
For the permit you'll need:
A valid passport
A copy of your work permit, or your study agreement if you're studying
Proof of earnings (roughly 2,500 CZK per week)
Proof of accommodation

24

A clean Czech criminal record


Two photographs
For proof of accommodation you'll need either a signed and notarized statement from the owner
(potvrzen o ubytovn), which can be obtained from the Foreigners' Police, or you'll have to submit
the original or a notarized copy of the lease.
The application fee is 2,000 CZK and is paid in the form of a stamp duty (kolek). These are
available from any post office.
Documents not in Czech must be translated and notarized by a recognized translator. (Sorry, this
doesn't mean Czech friends.)
Applications for long-term residency permits must be filed no earlier than 90 days and no later than
14 days before the expiry of your current travel document.
This means that if you come to the Czech Republic without a visa, you can apply for the permit
immediately after entering the country, and no later than two weeks before the 90-day visa period
ends.
The process can take up to 180 days. In my case -- and this is only my experience -- approval took
about 60 days. Incorrect information will only lengthen the time, so be sure to provide all the correct
documents.
Hopefully, your employer will have someone help you. Even so, you'll have to apply in person -alone or alongside them -- and applications are accepted only from Czech embassies or
consulates abroad.
The Czech missions closest to the Czech Republic are:
Dresden, Germany (Erna-Berger-Strasse 1)
Vienna, Austria (Penzingerstrasse 11-13)
Bratislava, Slovakia (Hviezdoslavovo nmst 8)
EXTENDING LONG-TERM RESIDENCY PERMITS
This process is a bit simpler.
Applications must be made no earlier than 90 days, and no later than 14 days before the expiry of
your current permit.
When applying you'll need:

25

A valid passport
A clean Czech criminal record, no older than three months
A new work permit (work permits are only issued for 12-month periods and a new one must be
obtained for each new employment period)
Proof of accommodation
Applications for extensions can be made in the Czech Republic.
The fee is 1,000 CZK, again paid in the form of a stamp duty.
If you apply for an extension at the Foreigners' Police in Pankrc, the stamps can be purchased
from the small photo stall in the lobby. The stamps are not available from the police themselves.
PERMANENT RESIDENCY
You can apply for permanent residency if you:
Are the spouse of a Czech citizen
Have resided in the Czech Republic continuously for three years if you're an EU/EEA citizen or
five years if you're from a third state
One of the main advantages of having permanent residency is that you don't require a work permit
for employment, nor do you have to visit the Foreigners' Police every year to extend your long-term
residency.
When applying for permanent residency you'll require:
A valid passport
A copy of your marriage certificate -- translated into Czech and notarized, if it's in another
language -- or proof of continuous residency and employment for the prescribed period
Proof of accommodation
The cost of the application is 50 CZK, paid in the form of a stamp duty.
The permit is issued in the form of a small green book resembling a passport. Please note that this
is not a travel document. If you're traveling outside the Czech Republic, even within the European
Union, it's necessary to carry your passport.
It should also be noted that permanent residency in the Czech Republic is not the same as
citizenship. As far as non-Czech states are concerned, your actual citizenship counts in matters of

26

residency, lengths of stay, and the right to work.


FAMILY MATTERS
As mentioned above, if you are married to a Czech citizen, you're entitled to apply for permanent
residency.
If you are married to an EU or EEA citizen and are a citizen of one of the third states, you will have
to apply for long-term residency permits for stays of over 90 days, and if you intend to work for the
following two reasons:
You are not a resident of another EU/EEA nation
Your spouse doesn't have special temporary residency in the Czech Republic
Permanent residency permits must be renewed every 10 years.
CONTACTING THE FOREIGNERS' POLICE
One of the more unpleasant aspects of staying in the Czech Republic is dealing with the
Foreigner's Police. Ask anyone who's been and theyll tell you about the lines, chaos and general
confusion.
EU/EEA citizens are expected to make the trip if they intend to stay for more than 30 days.
Registering with the Foreigners' Police should be done within 30 days of arrival.
Third state nationals are expected to register with the Foreigners' Police unless the place where
they are staying -- a hostel or a pension, for example -- keeps a ledger of foreigners.
The main office of the Foreigners' Police is at Olansk 2, Prague
3http://imseng.fsv.cuni.cz/prareas/studying-in-prague/residence-permit-and-visa

information from above: but this one is more about students!!!


Residence permit and visa
General information
Due to the Czech Republics membership in the EU and the Schengen, citizens of the European
Union (EU) countries (Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany,
Greece, Hungary, Italy, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland,
Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom), citizens of the European
Economic Area (EEA) countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) and citizens of Switzerland,
do not require any visa for any type of visit or stay in the Czech Republic. At the point of entry to
the CR, EU citizens need to present only a travel document at the request of the police. EU citizens
entering the territory of the Czech Republic/Schengen zone will be allowed to use their national ID
cards besides standard travel documents (e.g. ordinary passport, diplomatic passport, service
passport). The currently operative EU regulations provide for no necessary minimum period of

27

validity of travel documents or ID cards, neither do they stipulate that ID cards, used instead of
travel documents, must have a machine-readable zone.
Foreign nationals from outside the EU continue to need a visa. The residency visa for more than 90
days is valid for 1 year and allows the foreign citizen to travel repeatedly into and out of Czech
territory. The visa procedure and the residence of foreign nationals in the Czech Republic is
governed by the Act on the Residence of Aliens in the Territory of the Czech Republic (law no.
326/99, as amended), which came into effect on 1st January 2000. Under the terms of this law, it
is not possible for first-time visa applicants to apply for a student visa on the territory of the
Czech Republic, or even to pick up a visa they have previously applied for. Students
therefore must apply for (and obtain) a visa before their departure for the Czech Republic.
For more information, please visit Visa information.
Short-term visa applications procedures are within the competence of the diplomatic
missions of the Czech Republic abroad. This means that the diplomatic missions are
competent to issue airport visas, transit visas and visas for up to 90 days. Applications for
long-term visas (visas for over 90 days) are within the competence of the Czech Republic
Alien Police authorities. According to Section 51 (2) of the above Act, the issuance of visas is
discretionary. A refusal to issue a visa is final and without appeal.
Every applicant who has been refused a visa has the right to be informed orally about the
reasons for such refusal in terms of Section 56 of the above Act. At the applicants express
request, the information will be confirmed in writing. A refused applicant is entitled, at any
time, to lodge a new application accompanied by the required documents. He/she can do
so immediately after his/her previous application has been refused.
In accordance with Act No. 101/2000 to regulate the protection of personal data and to
amend certain acts as amended, the applicant's personal data provided in the visa
application are disclosed exclusively to the competent authorities of the Czech Republic for
the purpose of the decision to grant or refuse a visa.
Applicants have the right of access to the relevant personal data kept on them, including the right
to a correction of these personal data. Provided such personal data are inaccurate for the purpose
of their processing, applicants may require an explanation or rectification. If such a request is found
justified, the competent diplomatic mission will rectify the situation without delay. In the event the
competent diplomatic mission fails to comply with such request, the applicants have the right to
contact directly the Czech Republic Office for the Protection of Personal Data (ad pro ochranu
osobnch daj R). For more information please contact the officers of the visa section of the
competent diplomatic mission.
Contact: ad pro ochranu osobnch daj, Pplk. Sochora 27, CZ 170 00 PRAHA 7, Tel.: +420
234 665 354, Fax: +420 234 665 501, e-mail: posta@uoou.cz
Residence Permit
a) EU and EFTA Nationals
EU or EFTA students are legally obliged to register with the police in the place of their residence
on the territory of the EU within 30 days of their arrival in the country if their intended stay will be
longer than 30 days ( 93, Law no. 326/1999). To register, a student must first fill in two forms:

28

State Border Crossing Report (Hranin prvodka)


2. Registration Card
Both forms are available at the Immigration Police, and they will also be available at
registrastion.
When registering with the Immigration Police, students must present both completed forms, a travel
document, proof of health insurance (European Health Insurance Card) and 1 photograph.
The Czech Immigration Police has three branches in Prague. The branch where you should go to
register depends on the address where you are living in Prague.
1) Students who live in Prague 5 should go to Cizineck oddlen policie R (Czech Immigration
Police) Sdruen 1, Prague 4 Nusle. This can be reached by taking the Metro to "Pankrc"
station on line C, and then bus. No. 188 to Sdruen stop).
Office hours:
Monday: 7.30 - 17.00
Tuesday: 7.00 - 15.00
Wednesday: 7.30 - 17.00
Thursday: 7.00 - 15.00

2) Students who live in Prague 2, 4 and 10 should go to Cizineck oddlen policie R


Cignkova 2, Prague 4 Chodov. This can be reached by taking the Metro to "Chodov" station
on line C, and then bus No.154 to Na Jelenkch stop. You can also take this bus from "Ndra
Hostiva" stop.
Office hours:
Monday: 7.30 - 18.00
Tuesday: 7.00 - 18.00
Wednesday: 7.30 - 18.00
Thursday: 7.00 - 18.00

3) Students who live in Prague 1,3,6,7,8 and 9 should go to Cizineck oddlen policie R
Konvova 32, Prague 3. This can be reached by taking the Metro to "Florenc" station on lines B
and C and then bus No. 133, 207 to "ernnova" stop.
Office hours:
Monday: 7.30 - 18.00
Tuesday: 7.00 - 18.00
Wednesday: 7.30 - 18.00
Thursday: 7.00 - 18.00

Students are entitled (but not obliged) to apply for a short-term residence permit, either at the
Czech embassy in their home country or at an immigration police office in the CR (but the
Immigration Police recommend that students apply on the territory of the CR). Students who obtain
this short-term residence permit are issued with a special card (known as a European Card) which
officially states a short-term Czech address and can therefore be used for many transactions in

29

which official proof of Czech address is necessary (opening a bank account, purchase of a mobile
phone on a contract, getting any temporary job etc.) A short-term residence permit is issued for
different periods depending on the purpose of the stay. Please note, however, it can take up to 180
days for applications to be processed (60 days if applying in Prague). We therefore do not
recommend this for students who are staying in Prague less than two semesters.
To apply for a residence permit, students will need:
1. A travel document
2. A document confirming the purpose of the stay (acceptance letter in Czech and English
versions)
3. 2 photographs
4. Certificate of health insurance (translated into Czech)
5. Declaration by the student that he/she will not apply for welfare benefits (in Czech and English
versions)
6. A housing voucher from your dorm, or other document to confirm the address of your
accommodation (if living in private housing).
7. Completed application form for short-term residence on the territory of the CR (purple form)
With the exception of travel documents, registry data, and photographs, documents must be no
more than 180 days old, and all foreign-language documents must be officially translated into
Czech. Registration and short-term residence permits are free of charge.
Please note, however, that under current Czech legislation, a student residence permit does NOT
automatically give you the right to work in the Czech Republic. If you do want to undertake paid
work of any kind, regular or casual, you must apply for a separate work permit!
Residents of Switzerland, Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein are treated in the same way as
EU residents.
b) Nationals of countries OUTSIDE the EU and EFTA
Students who are NOT nationals of the EU or EFTA, and who wish to study in the Czech Republic
for a period longer than 90 days, are legally required to have a visa. Students affected by this rule
should already have obtained a visa before they arrived in the Czech Republic (if you have not,
please come and talk to us).
In addition, all students who arrive on a student visa are legally obliged to register with the
Immigration Police upon arrival. In theory, you should register within 3 days of arrival; in practice,
the police will sometimes tolerate a small delay.
To register with the police, you will need the following documents:
1. Passport
2. State Border Crossing Report (Hranin prvodka): you should already have filled in one of these
at the border, but if not, there will be a supply available at registration
3. Registration Card: available at registration
4. Health insurance valid for the Czech Republic
5. Proof of entering the Czech Republic ("entrance" stamp in your passport)
Students can register on the same addresses like students from EU and EFTA Nationals.

30

NOTE: if you have a short-term visa (under 90 days), the rules are slightly different. Please
talk to the International Office of the Faculty of Social Sciences.

31

3.11. Need to know__________________________


Recreation, sports/entertainment
The Czech Republic has a vast amount of outdoors activities from canoeing,, climbing & hiking
(lots of castles & historic sites) skiing, horse riding, biking etc this makes up for the only negative in
not having a beach.
Dependant on your sporting interests (other than pub sports/watching) theres also many clubs
available (also connections through expat communities) i.e. cricket, soccer, rugby, tennis, golf as
traditional Anglo sports
Entertainment links:
prague information for tourists and expats:
www.allpraha.com
http://www.expats.cz/
http://www.prague-life.com/
night clubs:
http://www.marys.cz/prague_guide/clubs/
what is going on in prague:
http://www.praguewelcome.cz/en/
expat blog:
http://www.expat-blog.com/en/destination/europe/czech-republic/
restaurants at prague:
http://www.pragueexperience.com/events/events.asp

32

3.12. Need to know__________________________


Safety
The Czech Republic generally has a low rate of crime. However, street crime such as pickpocketing and occasional mugging is a problem, especially in major tourist areas in Prague and on
public transportation. Incidents of violent crime, while still relatively infrequent, are becoming more
common in Prague.
Travelers should also be aware of the reported use of rohypnol, and other tranquilizing drugs in the
Czech Republic. Caution should be used when accepting drinks from strangers at bars or clubs.
Travelers should exercise caution and awareness while riding trains, trams or metro, where most
crime occurs. Keep a copy of your passport in a safe place separate from the passport itself.
Visitors should be alert to the potential for overcharging by taxis, particularly in areas frequented by
tourists. Radio-dispatched taxis are often much more reliable. It is also advisable to set the price in
advance.
If you need the police, dial 158. Ambulance: 155. Fire: 150

33

3.13. Need to know__________________________


Schooling
This is orientated towards both parents being expats, for mixed marriages (1 partner being Czech),
local schools are a recommendation based on cost factor
(http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/education/eurydice/documents/eurybase/national_summary_sheets/047
_CZ_EN.pdf)
The British International School, Prague
The British International School of Prague was founded in 1992 to

Address

serve the Czech and international communities in Prague. The school,

Podolsk 54, 147 00,

recognized by the Czech Ministry of Education, endorsed by the

Prague, 4, Czech

Foreign and Commonwealth office of the United Kingdom and

Republic

registered by the Department for Education and Skills of Great Britain,

Tel: (+420) 2 4143 1151

is an independent English medium, multinational day school. It

Fax: (+420) 2 4143 2264

currently provides a British education for children aged 18 months to

mainoffice@podoli.bisp.cz

19 years.

www.bisp.cz

Children in the primary school of The British International School,


Prague and up to year 9, aged 14, follow the English National

School Summary:

Curriculum which is adapted to meet the needs of the international

National, IB, UK curricula.

student body. Students in years 10 and 11 prepare for the

IGCSE, IB exams.

International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE)

472 students, 2-19 yrs.

followed by the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma in years 12


and 13.
Classes throughout the The British International School, Prague are small which allows for
carefully planned individual programmes of study where needed. All instruction is in English with
extensive support for children for whom English is not their first language. All the teaching staff are
highly qualified and experienced graduate teachers, trained in the United Kingdom, with the
relevant experience of the English National Curriculum, IGCSE and IB programmes. All the
language teachers are specialist native speakers. Junior and secondary children who are fluent in
English also study French, German and Czech. In addition Czech native speakers are prepared for
Czech examinations as required by the Czech Ministry of Education.
The academic year is comprised of three terms and runs from September to the end of June. The
school day starts at 08:30 and finishes at 15:00. There is a wide range of extra curricular activities
for all children during and after school.
The The British International School, Prague is located at four sites; Nursery and Primary schools
are situated in the residential areas in the southeast, as well as the northwest of Prague. The
Grammar School is presently located in Jinonice in the west of the city. Attached to both primary
schools are highly regarded pre-nursery and nursery classes which provide English-style
kindergartens.

34

Parents and prospective pupils are invited to the school to discuss the educational programme with
the administrative and teaching staff.
The English College in Prague
The English College in Prague provides a broad and balanced education in

Address

English for children between the ages of 13 and 19, 80% of whom are Czech

Sokolovsk 320,

nationals and the remainder English-speaking expatriates, drawn from 25

Vysocany, 190

nationalities. The College opened in September 1994 with over a hundred

00, Prague, 9,

pupils and will grow to a maximum of 320, probably in September 2002.

Czech Republic

The English College in Prague has been accepted as part of the Czech

Tel: (+420) 2 838

educational network as a six-year Gymnzium and pupils are prepared for the

93113

International General Certificate of Education, the International Baccalaureate

Fax: (+420) 2 838

and Czech Maturita.

90118
office@englcoll.cz

The teaching staff at The English College in Prague is an experienced

www.englcoll.cz

graduate body of men and women, drawn from English-speaking countries


worldwide as well as from the Czech Republic. Classes contain no more than

School

25 pupils in the IGCSE years and between 12 and 18 in the IB years.

Summary:

All pupils take part in a wide range of extra-curricular activities, which includes

National, IB, UK

music, art, drama, debating, physical education and visits to the theatre. The

curricula.

pastoral organization of the College encourages a positive relationship

IGCSE, IB

between pupils and members of staff and between the different nationalities.

exams.
303 students, 13-

The English College in Prague building used by the English College was

19 yrs.

initially constructed as a school in 1889 and was completely re-furbished and


re-equipped during 1994, in 1996 and again in 2000, when an extension was
added.
All pupils at The English College in Prague are charged fees, but sponsors in both the United
Kingdom and the Czech Republic have established a Bursary Fund, enabling reduced-fee places
to be available for Czech pupils. Up to 50 pupils are admitted each year at 13+. Entry at other ages
is dependent upon vacancies being available. Interviews for prospective pupils and their parents
begin in October each year and the Entrance and Scholarship Examination is held in April.

35

The English International School, Prague


The English International School of Prague is a co-educational day-school for

Address

children of all races, creeds and backgrounds. It was established in 1995 by

Na Okruhu 395,

Nord Anglia Education Ltd and has sister schools in the UK, Moscow, Warsaw,

142 00, Prague,

Bratislava, Kiev, Berlin and Budapest

4, Czech

The English International School, Prague offers the English National

Republic

Curriculum, enriched to make it appropriate for the international environment.

Tel: (+420) 2
619 12368

All children learn some Czech and a second foreign language is introduced in

Fax: (+420) 2

Year 3. Music, art and drama figure significantly in the school day, and many

619 10074

children take the opportunity to learn a musical instrument in school. All

eisp@volny.cz

teaching is undertaken in English. A limited number of places in the EAL

www.eisp.cz

programme is available for children entering with no English.


Most of the teaching staff at The English International School, Prague are

School

graduates of British universities, with recent experience of teaching the

Summary:

National Curriculum Early Learning Goals, the Literacy and Numeracy

Founded 1995

Strategies. They form an enthusiastic and professional team and expect high

over 200

standards of themselves and of the pupils in their care.

students, aged
18 months - 16

The Early Years Unit is a few minutes' drive away in Libus. It is a wellequipped, purpose-built facility with a good science laboratory, large ICT suite,
library, spacious classrooms and a newly refurbished playground. A new multipurpose hall was completed in the Autumn of 1999. Pupils also swim, and have
the use of tennis courts and a large sports field five minutes' walk from the
school, during the summer months.
The English International School, Prague is in southern Prague and operates a

years
(IGSCEs offered,
plan to launch
the IB
programme in
September
2007)..

bus service for KS1 to KS3. The school day is from 08:45-15:30 in the Main
School, and from 09:00-15:15 in the Early Years Department. Parents are
always welcomed in school and educational success is seen as the product of a partnership
between school and home.
The English International School, Prague aims to develop articulate and autonomous people who
care for and respect others and who are prepared to set themselves high standards. Preparation at
Year 8 for entry into the prestigious English College if Prague is undertaken by all children with
academic merit.

36

International School of Prague


Founded in 1948 to offer an education in English to children of the diplomatic

Address

community, the International School of Prague has evolved into a thriving

Nebusick 700,

institution for students from over 60 countries. Today ISP offers a complete,

164 00, Prague,

balanced and integrated program of studies for boys and girls aged 3-19.

6, Czech

Located in one of Europe's most beautiful cities, International School of Prague

Republic

tries to take full advantage of Prague's heritage as a gateway between East

Tel: (+420) 220

and West and to provide students with an understanding of the rich culture and

384 111

history of the Czech people. Instruction in the Czech language is offered as

Fax: (+420) 220

well as instruction in German, French and Spanish as part of ISP's goal of

384 555

training students to become productive and responsible citizens of the world.

ispmail@isp.cz
www.isp.cz

A non-profit, non-sectarian institution governed by a nine-member board of


trustees, International School of Prague provides an education based on

School

Anglo/American educational principles and methods, enriched by an

Summary:

international perspective. The school offers the International Baccalaureate

International, IB,

Diploma program. Because International School of Prague is committed to

US curricula.

continuous improvement, it is accredited jointly by the European Council of

SAT, IB exams.

International Schools and the Middle States Association of Colleges and

658 students, 3-

Schools.

19 yrs.

In 1997 the three sections of International School of Prague moved into a


modern, purpose-built facility in Nebusice. The new campus now houses the
Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and Upper divisions in four connecting wings. The school
includes three computer and four science laboratories, a cafeteria, a theater, two playgrounds, four
outdoor tennis courts, four basketball courts (two inside, two outside), two gymnasia and a library.
In addition to the academic program, International School of Prague offers a variety of after-school
activities for all age groups, such as dance, girl/boy scouts, creative writing, photography, Model
United Nations, drama and music clubs, ceramics, figure drawing, and many more. ISP students
can also engage in numerous sports such as volleyball, basketball, soccer, swimming, tennis, to
mention but a few, and participate in tournaments organized by the Central and Eastern European
Schools Association (CEESA) and the Sports Council of International Schools (SCIS).
Located at the outskirts of Prague, the school is surrounded by green, rolling hills. It is accessible
by public transportation and is about 20 minutes from the center by bus and metro.
From August 2001 International School of Prague has a satellite campus in Olomouc, a fast
growing university town southeast of Prague.

37

The International School of Olomouc (TISOL)


International School of Prague
INTRODUCTION

School

The International School of Olomouc (TISOL) was established in August 2001

Summary:

by the International School of Prague (ISP) and LG Philips in response to a

Founded 2002

need for an International School for expatriate children in the Olomouc area.

Currently 26

TISOL is a satellite campus of the ISP, (which is accredited by the Council of

students, aged 4

International Schools), but operates as an independent campus. TISOL began

- 14 International

its first school year with 14 students, and has grown steadily in response to

curriculum -

economic growth and investment in the region. Currently there are 26 students

satellite Campus

from 7 countries, in four classes with seven members of staff (4 teachers and

of the Interational

3 auxiliary). TISOL accepts students from the ages of 4 to 14.

School of Prague,
7 staff (2 Expats

CURRICULUM

+ 5 Czech)

TISOL offers a comprehensive international curriculum based upon the

Funded by LG

curriculum of the ISP. English, mathematics, science, social studies, music, art

Philips

and PE are included. There is a very heavy emphasis on the development of


all aspects of English language skills. All lessons are taught in English apart

Address

from Czech, which is taught to all students from grade 3 onwards. German,

Rooseveltova

Dutch and French are also available to students who wish to extend their

101 Olomouc

language repertoire.

Czech republic
http://www.tisol.cz

STAFF
The Principal and senior English teacher are both native English speakers
(Australian and English), while the rest of the staff are Czech. All Czech staff are fluent in English.
FACILITIES
The school is within easy walking distance of the city centre and operates independently within the
grounds of a Czech elementary school. Facilities include classrooms, a library/computer room, an
extensive outside play area and a gym (the play areas and the gym are shared with the Czech
school).
SCHOOL YEAR AND SCHOOL DAY
The school year begins in mid August and finishes in June. There are 180 teaching days, which
include 3 school camps. Teaching hours are 08:30 14:30 with 2 x 45 min breaks.
EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY
The international mix of students allows exploration of our many cultures through school activities
and scheduled events involving the whole school community. TISOL is characterized by the close
relationships that build up between students and staff.
We strongly believe that a positive environment allows students to develop confidence, maturity,
independence and a strong sense of responsibility. We pride ourselves on being able to provide

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individual attention and support at a level unmatched by most schools. We believe in nurturing and
teaching the whole child, not just in teaching subjects.
Riverside School, Prague
Riverside School, Prague is an independent non-profit day school for

Address

students between the ages of three and eighteen years. The school

Roztock 9/43, 160 00,

is based on a Christian Foundation and is dedicated to offering a

Prague, Sedlec, 6, Czech

programme that incorporates modern teaching methods and biblical

Republic

values.

Tel: (+420) 2 3332 2396

Riverside School, Prague opened in 1994 in a modernized building

Fax: (+420) 2 243 25765

and is situated in a scenic riverside location in a quiet section of

director@riversideschool.cz

Prague 6. The school grounds are self-contained and include an all-

www.riversideschool.cz

weather surface and play activities. Each classroom is well


resourced with computers and a range of educational resources to

School Summary:

meet international curricular requirements. The academic

US, UK curricula, IGCSE.

programme has as its basis the English National Curriculum adapted

166 students, 3-18 yrs

to an international student body. The primary school has a well


resourced library and science laboratory, A variety of teaching
methods are adopted in all classes and a strong emphasis is placed
on practical work and investigative learning. Christian values permeate the life and work of the
school.
In September 2001 the Riverside School, Prague combined with another international school in
Prague to offer high school education to the age of 18 years. The teachers at Riverside School are
qualified, experienced professionals primarily from the UK and US. The maximum class size is 18
students. The school believes in the importance of partnership between the home and the school.
Parental involvement is actively encouraged. The school has a strong parent teacher association.
Parent teacher consultations are held each term and written reports are given in December and
June. The Riverside School, Prague is a close-knit school community with a strong family
atmosphere. The school day is from 08:30 until 15:00 with the opportunity for children to participate
in after school activities. Children between the ages of three and four years attend from 08:30 to
12:00. Scholarships are available to students whose families demonstrate special need.

OTHER SCHOOLS:
CHRISTIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PRAGUE: http://www.cisprague.org/

UNIVERSITIES:
UNYP- UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK IN PRAGUE: http://www.unyp.cz/
ANGLO-AMERICAN UNIVERSITY: http://www.aauni.edu/
CHARLES UNIVERSITY IN PRAGUE: http://www.cuni.cz/

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3.14. Need to know__________________________


Shopping
Prague is vibrant & modern with excellent shopping opportunities.
The range of shops and stores is broad.
Usual opening hours are from 9 a.m. till 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. on weekdays. Grocery stores usually open
earlier. Department stores and shopping malls are open also on weekday evenings and at
weekends.
Many other stores are open at weekends, especially in the historic city centre, where shops
carrying the most famous and demanded goods of Czech production are located glass,
porcelain, ceramics, Czech garnets, wooden toys, marionettes, and handicraft products.
On 1 January and 25-26 December, all shops and services are generally closed; only some are
closed during the rest of the holiday season. It is possible to pay with credit cards in most shops,
a list of which is usually posted at the main entrance.
On important holidays, such as Christmas and Easter, fairs with folklore, art, and handicraft
products are held in the Old Town and Wenceslas Squares and elsewhere in the city, often
accompanied by rich cultural programmes.
Luxury brands in Pask street presentation of the largest boulevard in Prague, where you
can buy world-renowned brands (Celvin Clain, Burberry, Christian Dior, Gucci, Dunhill, Escada..)
List of the most popular shopping centers in Prague:
Arkdy Pankrc

Prague 4 - Pankrc

Bl labu shopping centre

Prague 1 - Nov Msto

CENTRUM CERNY MOST

Prague 9 - ern Most

CENTRUM CHODOV

Prague 4 - Chodov

Debenhans

Prague 1 - Nov Msto

EUROPARK SHOPPING CENTER

Prague 10 - trboholy

GALERIE FNIX

Prague 9 - Vysoany

Koruna Palace

Prague 1 - Nov Msto

Letany Shopping Centre

Prague 9 - Letany

Shopping Centre EDEN

Prague 10 - Vrovice

Shopping Centre ZLICIN

Prague 5 - Zlin

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Shopping Galery MYSLBEK

Prague 1 - Nov Msto

Shopping Centre NOVY SMICHOV

Prague 5 - Smchov

KOTVA

Prague 1 - Nov Msto

Palace FLORA

Prague 3 - Vinohrady

PALLADIUM

Prague 1 - Nov Msto

PASAZ ERNA RE

Prague 1 - Nov Msto

Slovansk dm

Prague 1 - Nov Msto

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3.15. Need to know__________________________


Tax
Working in the Czech Republic may require tax dependant on length of stay in the country
Czech Republic Taxation of Individuals
The czech income tax rate for individual's income in 2010 is flat, a 15% rate.
An individual pays tax on his income as a wage earner or as a self-employed person. Tax for an
individual who meets the criteria of a "permanent resident" of the Czech Republic is calculated on
his income earned inside the Republic and abroad. A foreign resident who is employed in the
Czech Republic pays tax only on income earned in the Republic.
An employer is bound to deduct, immediately on a monthly basis, the requisite tax from employees
salaries. A self-employed person must prepay taxes that will be offset on making an annual tax
return. The advances are determined on the basis of the previous year's tax return. In the case of a
new business, the prepayments are calculated on the basis of estimates made by the owner of the
business.
Czech Republic Reporting Dates
The tax year in the Czech Republic is the calendar year ending on December 31.
If your income is derived solely from a salary, you are not bound to file a yearly return. In all other
cases, the annual return must be submitted by March 31 (3 months after the end of the tax year).
If you are represented by an authorized Czech tax advisor, you may make an application to submit
the return by June 30.
A delay in submitting an annual return will entail fines, in most cases, of 10% of the tax payable.
Fines are imposed even after tax has been prepaid.
Czech Republic Corporate Tax
Czech Republic Corporate tax in 2010 is 19%.
A tax of 15% is imposed on dividends paid by Czech corporations.
Dividend paid between 2 Czech companies is subject to certain terms.
Income from interest is deemed ordinary income and as such is taxed at 19%.

Czech Republic Capital Gains


In general, capital gains in the Czech Republic are taxed as income for companies and
individuals.

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Capital gains from sale of shares by a company owning 10% or more is entitled to
participation exemption under certain terms.
For an individual, gain from sale of main private dwelling, held for at least 2 years is tax
exempt. Or,when not used as main residence, if held for more than 5 years.

Czech Republic Deduction of Tax at Source

Czech Republic Social Security:


Mandatory social and health insurance payments are:
Employer 34 % (9 % health insurance, 25 % social insurance)
Employee 11 % (4,5 % health insurance, 6,5 % social insurance)
Self employed pay mandatory 42.7% for social security and health insurance.
Czech Republic Other Deductions
Tax is duducted at source from the following payments to non-residents:
Dividends-15%.
Royalties-15%.
Interest-15%.

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3.16. Need to know__________________________


Transport
Prague has an excellent transport infrastructure.
Metro
The Prague Metro network consists of 3 lines designated by letters and differentiated in colour:
Green colour (Depo Hostivar station - Dejvicka station) - line A
Yellow colour (Cerny most station - Zlicin station) - line B
Red colour (Letnany station - Haje station) - line C
Changing stations are Muzeum (lines A and C), Mustek (lines A and B), Florenc (lines B and C).

Metro operates daily from 5 a.m. to 12 p.m., on Fridays and Saturdays ca one hour longer. The
time interval between train departures is approximately 2-3 minutes during the workday rush hours
and 4-10 minutes during off-peak hours.
Trams
Daytime operation is from 4:30 a.m. to midnight, on Fridays and Saturdays ca one hour longer.
Night operation is provided by tram numbers 51 to 59 in 30 minutes intervals. The
central interchange station for night lines is Lazarska stop. Tram schedules are located at
individual stops.

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Buses
The daytime and night operation of buses is similar to tram operation. Night service is provided by
bus numbers 501 to 513. Bus schedules are located at individual stops.
Fares
Transfer ticket 26 Kc
Discounted (children 10 to 15 years) 13 Kc
the ticket is valid for the underground, trams, buses and the funicular for 75 minutes after marking.
Ticket with limited transfer options 18 Kc
Discounted (children 10 to 15 years) 9 Kc
the ticket is valid for 20 minutes after marking and does not allow changing of lines.
Tourist Tickets
for 24 hours 100 Kc, children (10 - 15 years) 50 Kc
for 3 days (72 hours) 330 Kc (+ 1 child 10 to 15 free of charge)
for 5 days (120 hours) 500 Kc (+ 1 child 10 to 15 free of charge)
These tickets are valid for all means of the city transport and allow changes. The ticket is valid from
the moment of its marking. These tickets can be bought in the Information Centres of the Prague
Public Transport Company.
Taxi
In an effort to improve taxi service in Prague, the Prague City Council has introduced the fair place
taxi concept. Those who want to use taxis in Prague can get one at taxi stands bearing this
designation. These places guarantee reliable and quality service at rates firmly set by the City
Council. Moreover, the majorities of reliable taxi companies have call centres and use yellow cars.
If order a taxi from them, you can be sure of reliable service.
NAME OF OBJECT

CITY

CONTACT

Airport Cars

Prague 6

420 220 113 892

Autokomplex MAT, s.r.o.

Prague 4 - Kamk

420 244 911 111

City taxi, s.r.o.

Prague 4 - Brank

420 257 257 257

ECO TAXI

Prague

420 241 710 412

Halotaxi

Prague 3 - Vinohrady

420 244 114 411

Modr Andl, s.r.o.

Prague 9 - akovice

420 737 222 333

Profesional taxi, s.r.o.

Prague 4 - Modany

420 261 314 111

Speed Cars

Prague 5 - Smchov

420 224 234 234

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Taxi-Praha, s.r.o.

Prague 5 - Smchov

420 222 111 000

TAXI-MOTO

Prague 1 - Mal Strana

420 725 322 322

TICK TACK

Prague 4 - Chodov

420 721 300 300

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