Sei sulla pagina 1di 31

Operative Dictations:

NEUROSURGERY

Chaim B. Colen, M.D., Ph.D. 

COPYRIGHT © 2008

i
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

Colen Publishing, LLC


PO Box 35635
Grosse Pointe Woods, MI 48236
Author and Editor: Chaim B. Colen, M.D., Ph.D.
Editorial Assistant: Roxanne E. Colen, PA-C

COPYRIGHT © 2008 by Colen Publishing, LLC. This book, including all parts
thereof, is legally protected by copyright. Any use, exploitation, or
commercialization outside the narrow limits set by copyright legislation without
the author’s consent is illegal and liable to prosecution. This applies in particular
to photostat reproduction, copying, mimeographing or duplication of any kind,
translating, preparation of microfilms and electronic data processing and
storage.

Some of the product names, patents and registered designs referred to in this
book are in fact registered trademarks or proprietary names even though
specific reference to this fact is not always made in the text. Therefore, the
appearance of a name without designation as proprietary is not to be construed
as a representation by the publisher that it is in the public domain.

Printed in the United States of America

ISBN 10: 1-935345-03-6


ISBN 13: 978-1-935345-03-9

Note: Knowledge in medicine is constantly changing. The author has consulted


sources believed to be reliable in the effort to provide information that is
complete and in accord with the standards at the time of publication. However,
in view of the possibility of human error by the author in preparation of this work,
warrants that the information contained herein is in every respect accurate and
complete and that the author is not responsible for any errors or omissions or
for the results obtained from use of such information. The reader is advised to
confirm the information contained herein with other sources. This is especially
important in connection with new or infrequently used drugs. In such instances,
the product information sheet included in the package with each drug should be
reviewed.

Colen Publishing
“Infinite possibilities to
learning…”

www.colenpublishing.com
ii 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

CONTENTS 

Table of Contents 
CONTENTS ............................................................................................... iii 
CONTRIBUTORS ....................................................................................... vi 
DEDICATION ........................................................................................... vii 
PREFACE ................................................................................................ viii 
FORWARD ............................................................................................... ix 
OPERATIVE INSTRUMENTS ....................................................................... 1 
PERFORATOR DRILL BITS/ BURRS ...................................................... 2 
DURAL SEPARATORS .......................................................................... 2 
HOOKS ................................................................................................ 3 
HOOKS ................................................................................................ 3 
DISSECTORS ........................................................................................ 4 
KERRISSON RONGEUR ....................................................................... 4 
SCISSORS ............................................................................................ 4 
SCISSORS/ CLAMPS/ FORCEPS ........................................................... 5 
ELEVATORS ......................................................................................... 6 
ELEVATORS ......................................................................................... 6 
ELEVATORS ......................................................................................... 7 
SUCTION TIPS ..................................................................................... 7 
FORCEPS ............................................................................................. 8 
BAYONET FORCEPS ............................................................................ 8 
BAYONET FORCEPS ............................................................................ 9 
MICRO SCISSORS ................................................................................ 9 
MICRO SCISSORS .............................................................................. 10 
BIPOLAR BAYONET FORCEPS ........................................................... 10 
SPECULUMS ..................................................................................... 11 
RETRACTORS .................................................................................... 11 
NERVE ROOT RETRACTORS .............................................................. 12 
CRANIAL PROCEDURES ........................................................................... 14 
C RANIAL D ICTATIONS G UIDE  ...................................................................... 15 
BURR H OLE D RAINAGE FOR  ....................................................................... 17 
C HRONIC S UBDURAL H EMATOMA (SDH) E VACUATION  ................................ 17 
C RANIOTOMY FOR ..................................................................................... 20 
A CUTE S UBDURAL  H EMATOMA (SDH) E VACUATION  .................................... 20 
C RANIOTOMY FOR  .................................................................................... 23 
A CUTE E PIDURAL H EMATOMA (EDH) E VACUATION  ..................................... 23 
D ECOMPRESSIVE C RANIECTOMY FOR  .......................................................... 26 
I NTRACRANIAL H EMORRHAGE /STROKE /   T RAUMATIC  BRAIN I NJURY  ............... 26 
C RANIOPLASTY  ......................................................................................... 30 
iii
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

OMMAYA  RESERVOIR P LACEMENT  .............................................................. 34 


T RANSSPHENOIDAL  H YPOPHYSECTOMY  ....................................................... 38 
C RANIOTOMY FOR  MCA   A NEURYSM C LIPPING  ............................................ 42 
STEREOTACTIC  FRAMELESS  ........................................................................ 48 
BURR H OLE C RANIOTOMY FOR B IOPSY  ....................................................... 48 
STEREOTACTIC C RANIOTOMY FOR  SUPRATENTORIAL B IOPSY  ......................... 52 
C RANIOTOMY FOR  .................................................................................... 56 
STEREOTACTIC T UMOR RESECTION WITH M APPING AND M ONITORING  .......... 56 
C RANIOTOMY WITH  ORBITAL  OSTEOTOMY  .................................................. 62 
P TERIONAL OSTEOPLASTIC C RANIOTOMY  .................................................... 68 
T RANSCORTICAL I NTRAVENTRICULAR T UMOR  RESECTION  ............................. 74 
C HIARI  D ECOMPRESSION  ........................................................................... 79 
STEREOTACTIC  SUBOCCIPITAL C RANIECTOMY  .............................................. 83 
RETROSIGMOID C RANIOTOMY T RANSCONDYLAR A PPROACH  ......................... 88 
G AMMA‐KNIFE  STEREOTACTIC R ADIOSURGERY  ............................................ 93 
FUNCTIONAL, EPILEPSY AND PAIN .......................................................... 96 
E PILEPSY  SURGERY S TAGE I:   L ONG T ERM  M ONITORING E LECTRODES 
P LACEMENT  ............................................................................................. 97 
E PILEPSY  SURGERY S TAGE II:  P RE M OTOR C ORTEX L ESION  R ESECTION  ........ 101 
STAGE II  E PILEPSY S URGERY :  T EMPORAL  L OBE L ESION  RESECTION  .............. 107 
M ICROVASCULAR D ECOMPRESSION  .......................................................... 114 
D EEP  BRAIN STIMULATOR  (DBS)  L EAD P LACEMENT  ................................... 118 
D EEP  BRAIN STIMULATOR  (DBS)  G ENERATOR P LACEMENT  ........................ 126 
RHIZOTOMY :  M EDIAL  F ACET  BRANCH  ....................................................... 129 
C ARPAL  T UNNEL RELEASE  ........................................................................ 132 
ULNAR N ERVE D ECOMPRESSION  .............................................................. 135 
P ERONEAL  N ERVE D ECOMPRESSION  ......................................................... 138 
SPINAL  C ORD STIMULATOR P LACEMENT  ................................................... 142 
V AGAL  N ERVE STIMULATOR I MPLANTATION  .............................................. 146 
SHUNTING PROCEDURES ...................................................................... 150 
VENTRICULO ‐P ERITONEAL  SHUNT P LACEMENT  .......................................... 151 
L UMBAR P ERITONEAL  SHUNT P LACEMENT  ................................................ 155 
T HIRD  VENTRICULOSTOMY ....................................................................... 158 
SPINAL PROCEDURES ............................................................................ 163 
SPINAL  D ICTATIONS  G UIDE  ...................................................................... 164 
A NTERIOR  C ERVICAL D ISCECTOMY AND F USION  ......................................... 165 
CERVICAL CORPECTOMY  ........................................................................... 174 
C ERVICAL L AMINECTOMY  W ITH L ATERAL  M ASS A RTHRODESIS  .................... 179 
C ERVICAL L AMINOPLASTY  ........................................................................ 184 
L AMINECTOMY FOR I NTRAMEDULLARY  SPINAL C ORD  T UMOR  ..................... 188 
L AMINECTOMY FOR EXCISION OF INTRADURAL EXTRAMEDULLARY SPINAL CORD 
TUMOR  .................................................................................................. 193 
L UMBAR H EMILAMINECTOMY M ICRODISCECTOMY  ..................................... 198 
L UMBAR L AMINECTOMY ‐   BILATERAL  ........................................................ 202 
M INIMALLY I NVASIVE :  L UMBAR L AMINECTOMY D ISCECTOMY  ..................... 206 

iv 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

P ERCUTANEOUS DISCECTOMY  .................................................................. 210 
P OSTERIOR L UMBAR I NTERBODY F USION  .................................................. 213 
REDO I NSTRUMENTATION  REMOVAL  ......................................................... 218 
T HORACIC  C ORPECTOMY :  L ATERAL  E XTRACAVITARY A PPROACH  .................. 224 
T HORACIC  C ORPECTOMY :  T RANSTHORACIC A PPROACH  .............................. 231 
X‐STOP  .................................................................................................. 236 
VASCULAR/ENDOVASCULAR ................................................................. 239 
PROCEDURES ....................................................................................... 239 
C AROTID E NDARTERECTOMY  .................................................................... 240 
C EREBRAL A NGIOGRAPHY  ........................................................................ 244 
C EREBRAL A NGIOGRAM WITH A NEURYSM  C OILING  .................................... 248 
C EREBRAL A NGIOGRAM WITH STENT ‐ ASSISTED A NEURYSM  C OILING  ............ 254 
C EREBRAL A NGIOGRAM WITH A RTERIO ‐VENOUS M ALFORMATION  (AVM)  
E MBOLIZATION  ....................................................................................... 260 
A NGIOGRAM WITH  C AROTID  BALLOON  A NGIOPLASTY AND S TENT P LACEMENT
 ............................................................................................................. 266 
MINOR PROCEDURES ........................................................................... 272 
A RTERIAL L INE  P LACEMENT  ..................................................................... 273 
L UMBAR  SPINAL P UNCTURE  ..................................................................... 275 
L UMBAR D RAIN  P LACEMENT  .................................................................... 278 
VENTRICULOSTOMY  P LACEMENT  .............................................................. 281 
VERTEBROPLASTY /K YPHOPLASTY  .............................................................. 284 
APPENDIX ............................................................................................ 288 
ABBREVIATIONS ................................................................................... 289 
 
    

v
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

CONTRIBUTORS 
 
FACULTY REVIEWERS
Alan Scarrow, M.D., J.D.
St. John's Clinic - Neurosurgery
1965 S. Fremont Ste. 130
Springfield, MO 65804
 
Gregory Przybylski, M.D.
Director of Neurosurgery
New Jersey Neuroscience Institute
JFK Medical Center, Edison, New Jersey

RESIDENTS
Raul Olivera, M.D.
Division of Neurosurgery
Department of Surgery
Saint Louis University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO 63110

Clemens M. Schirmer, M.D.


Department of Neurosurgery
Tufts New England Medical Center
Boston, MA
 
MEDICAL STUDENTS 
Alexandria Conley
Wayne State University
Detroit, MI

Christopher E. Lai
Wayne State University
Detroit, MI

Brett Justin Mollard


Wayne State University
Detroit, MI

Adam Robin
Wayne State University
Detroit, MI  

vi 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

DEDICATION 

I dedicate this effort to my ever-supportive wife Roxanne, daughter Emily and


son Joshua whose love, patience and encouragement allowed me to achieve
the completion of this book.

My Motto: If you love yourself, you will love your patient and your patient will
love you. Live, Love and leave a Legacy.
Chaim Benjoseph Colen M.D., Ph.D. 09/03/02

vii
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

PREFACE 
 
Concern  for  man  and  his  fate  must  always  form  the  chief 
interest  of  all  technical  endeavors…  Never  forget  this  in  the 
midst of your diagrams and equations. 
Albert Einstein 
Operative  dictations  are  an  essential  part  of  the  neurosurgical 
career. Excellent operative dictations can be likened to "Fidelio" the 
beautiful  Beethoven  masterpiece.  Each  word  must  flow  on  a 
musical  note;  translating  3‐dimensional  neuroanatomic  melodies 
into  a  verbalized  anatomic  clinico‐surgical  masterpiece.  On  the 
other hand, a poor operative dictation can be perceived as the lack 
of  clinico‐scientific  knowledge  or  poor  comprehension  of  the 
operation that was just performed. 

Operative  Dictations:  Neurosurgery  is  meant  to  provide  the  basic 


musical  notes  needed  to  come  closer  to  achieving  a  verbalized 
operative  "Beethoven  masterpiece".  It  provides  illustrations  of 
basic operative instruments and skeleton operative dictations with 
their  respective  CPT  codes;  to  assist  the  novice  surgeon  in 
becoming a verbally skilled surgeon. Practice makes perfect and by 
rehearsing  your  operation  in  a  well  structured,  systematic  and 
cohesive  fashion,  you  will  improve  your  operative  efficiency  and 
medico‐legal sustaining jargon; a prerogative in our day.

In no way is this book comprehensive enough to cover all operative 
dictations  performed  in  neurosurgery;  rather  it  is  meant  to  be  a 
basic  guide  to  allow  the  novice  surgeon  the  scaffolding  needed  to 
dictate a basic straight forward case. The most common cases are 
described in a consistent format, with bolded statements meant to 
reinforce  the  most  important  segments  from  the  medico‐legal 
standpoint. There are many times during our operative careers that 
we deviate from the norm; this uniqueness should be dictated on a 
per‐case‐basis. May this book benefit all residents and junior staff, 
with  the  ultimate  goal  of  improving  our  verbalized  legacy  of 
Neurosurgery. 
Chaim B. Colen 
2008 
 
viii 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

FORWARD 
 
Most  of  us  went  into  neurosurgery  because  we  had  a  passion  for 
clinical  tasks  of  our  profession  –  listening  to  patients,  thinking 
about how to help them, performing the surgery, and finding out if 
our efforts have helped them.  I am confident very few of us have a 
similar  passion  for  the  dictation,  documentation,  and  paperwork 
that  necessarily  accompany  those  more  pleasant  clinical  tasks.  
Nonetheless  accurately  recording  what  we  do  in  our  clinical  and 
surgical  work  is  not  just  a  good  medico‐legal  practice,  it’s  simply 
good medicine. 
 
In  this  book,  Dr.  Colen  has  made  the  task  of  documenting  our 
surgical  work  much  easier.    What  follows  are  detailed  operative 
notes and CPT coding for the typical surgical work we do involving 
spine,  tumor,  vascular,  functional,  and  stereotactic  procedures.  
This  will  allow  readers  to  take  these  templates,  modify  them  to 
their  own  unique  variations  for  an  individual  procedure,  and 
incorporate them into the patient’s medical record.  This should be 
particularly helpful to those who are new to the responsibilities of 
medical and surgical documentation. 
 
In  publishing  this  work,  Dr.  Colen  is  helping  us  as  neurosurgeons 
spend more time doing the things we love, and less time recording 
how we did them.  It is an admirable ambition. 
 
Alan M. Scarrow, M.D., J.D. 
Chairman, Section of Neurosurgery 
St. John’s Clinic 
Springfield, Missouri

ix
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

OPERATIVE INSTRUMENTS 
 

 
L'OPÉRATION DU TRÉPAN
 
 
Trepanation is one of the earliest cranial operations performed
by man. It was carried out   for both medical reasons and
mystical practices for a long time:
  evidence of trepanation has
been found in prehistoric human remains from Neolithic times
onwards. The above artwork is from an 18th century French
illustration of trepanation. People believed the practice would
cure epileptic seizures, migraines, and mental disorders. In
prehistoric times, trepanation was thought to cure diseases by
letting evil spirits escape. The bone that was trepanned was
kept by the prehistoric people and worn as charms to keep evil
spirits away.

Encyclopédie Ou Dictionnaire Raisonné Des Sciences, Des Arts Et Des Métiers, 1772

1
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

HOOKS

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1. Sachs dural hook


2. Cushing dural hook
3. Frazier dural hook
4. Lahey clinic dural hook
5. Strully dural twist hook
6. Dandy nerve hook
7. Adson dural hook

HOOKS

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1. Hoen nerve hook, straight


2. Hoen nerve hook, angled
3. Smithwick hook & dissector
4. Murphy ball hook
5. Cushing gasserian ganglion hook, blunt
6. Smithwick button hook, blunt
7. Davis nerve separator/spatula
3
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

DISSECTORS

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1. Penfield dissector, #1
2. Penfield dissector, #2
3. Penfield dissector, #3
4. Penfield dissector, #4
5. Penfield dissector, #5
6. Double dissector, sharp/blunt
7. Woodson elevator/spatula double end
8. Woodson separator/packer, double end

KERRISSON RONGEUR

1. Kerrisson rongeurSCISSORS

4
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

PTERIONAL OSTEOPLASTIC CRANIOTOMY 
 
DATE OF SURGERY:  
SURGEON: Dr. X  
ASSISTANT: Dr. Y  
PREOPERATIVE DIAGNOSIS: (Right/Left) clinoidal mass. 
POSTOPERATIVE DIAGNOSIS: (Right/Left) clinoidal 
(meningioma). 
 
PROCEDURES PERFORMED: 
1. Stereotactic (Right/Left) pterional osteoplastic 
craniotomy with resection of clinoidal/sphenoid wing 
mass. 
2. Intraoperative use of microscope for microdissection. 
3. Intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring with SSEPs 
and motor evoked potentials. 
 
  CPT Coding  
  61592 Orbitocranial zygomatic approach to middle cranial fossa 
  (cavernous sinus and carotid artery, clivus, basilar artery or petrous 
apex) including osteotomy of zygoma, craniotomy, extra or intradural 
  elevation of temporal lobe 
  61795 Stereotactic computer‐assisted volumetric (navigational) 
  procedure, intracranial or spinal (List separately in addition to 
  primary procedure) 
  69990 Microsurgical techniques, requiring use of operating 
  microscope (List separately in addition to code for primary 
  procedure) 
 
ANESTHESIA: GETA. 
ESTIMATED BLOOD LOSS: (XX) cc. 
FINDINGS: Frozen section was consistent with ___. 
DRAINS: (JP/Blake) drain.  
COMPLICATIONS: None. 
DISPOSITION: Stable to the PACU. 
 

68 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

INDICATIONS FOR THE PROCEDURE 
HISTORY:  (Mr./Ms.)  (Pt.  Name)  is  a  (Pt.  Age)  year  old 
(Male/Female)  who  presents  with  signs  and  symptoms 
consistent  with  a  clinoidal/sphenoid  wing  mass  (double 
vision,  blurry  vision,  cranial  nerve  palsy).  The  goal  of  the 
operation was optic and cranial nerve decompression. 
DIAGNOSTIC STUDIES: MRI brain showed ___.  
SURGICAL  RISKS:  The  patient  (family/N.O.K./P.O.A.)  was 
well apprised of all objectives, benefits, risks and potential 
complications  of  the  procedure,  including  but  not  limited 
to:  worsening  of  current  status,  the  possible  need  for 
further  procedures,  the  risk  of  infection,  headaches, CSF 
leak,  seizures,  hemorrhage,  stroke,  loss  of  language 
function, paralysis, coma and even death. Informed consent 
was  obtained  and  secured  in  the  chart  after  the  patient 
(family/N.O.K./P.O.A.)  voiced  understanding  of  these  risks 
and decided to proceed with the operation.  
 
DESCRIPTION OF THE PROCEDURE: 
The patient was transferred to the operating room. (He/She) 
was given preoperative prophylactic IV antibiotics. 
ANESTHESIA:  The  patient  was  sedated  and  intubated 
without difficulty by the anesthesia service. Eyes were taped 
shut after ointment was applied to prevent corneal abrasion. 
A  Bair  Hugger  was  placed  over  the  exposed  lower  body  to 
maintain control of core body temperature. A Foley catheter 
was inserted. 
POSITIONING:  A  Mayfield  head  clamp  was  applied.  The 
patient  was  positioned  supine  with  the  head  turned 
approximately (XX) degrees to the (Right/Left) with very mild 
extension.  All  pressure  points  were  carefully  padded.  The 
hair  was  clipped  over  the  area  where  (He/She)  was  to 
undergo  the  incision.  Pre‐prepping  was  done  with 
(chlorhexidine  solution,  alcohol).  The  electrophysiology 
monitoring  team  inserted  needles  in  their  proper  locations 
and  baseline  SSEPs  and  motor  evoked  potentials  were 
69
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

obtained.  Stereotactic  CT/MRI  was  done  on  the  morning  of 


the  surgery  and  the  images  were  transferred  to  the 
neuronavigational  system.  Next,  three‐dimensional  images 
were  reconstructed.  The  patient  underwent  co‐registration 
of  the  preoperative  stereotactic  CT/MRI  with  (His/Her) 
surface landmarks. Accuracy was within 2mm. 
Vital  structure  landmarks  including  the  (motor  area/speech 
area/superior  sagittal  sinus)  were  identified  and  mapped 
out. The planned craniotomy was outlined. 
OPERATIVE  TECHNIQUE:  The  patient  was  prepped  and 
draped in standard sterile fashion.  
IF FAT GRAFT WILL BE USED: The (Right/Left) lower abdomen 
was prepped and draped as well in standard sterile fashion. 
Local anesthesic was infiltrated along the line of planned and 
marked  skin  incision.  A  (Right/Left)  fronto‐temporal  (C‐
shaped, question mark) incision was opened sharply with a # 
(XX)  scalpel  blade  to  the  level  of  the  periosteum. 
Subcutaneous  dissection  was  performed  sharply  with 
Metzenbaum  scissors,  preserving  the  superficial  temporal 
artery  and  its  branches.  Interfascial  dissection  was 
completed along  the  superficial  temporalis  muscle  fascia  to 
preserve  the  frontalis  branch  of  the  facial  nerve.  The  skin 
flap was reflected anteriorly leaving the temporalis muscle in 
place. 
Osteoplastic  craniotomy  was  performed  by  leaving  the 
temporalis muscle and periosteum attached to the temporal 
bone.  
The  frontal  bone  periosteum  was  elevated  parallel  to  the 
orbital ridge approximately (X) cm superior to the ridge and 
followed along the orbital zygomatic arch. Care was taken to 
identify  and  preserve  the  supraorbital  nerve  at  the 
supraorbital  (notch/foramen).  Elevation  of  the  periosteum 
was  continued  along  the  zygomatic  arch  from  medial  to 
lateral.  
A small portion of the temporalis muscle was dissected from 
the supero‐anterior bone and the infero‐posterior bone. The 

70 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

high  speed  (electric/  pneumatic)  drill  was  utilized  to  make 


(XX)  craniotomy  burr  holes;  one  at  the  pterion  (“MacCarty 
keyhole”  ‐keyhole  burr  hole)  the  second  at  the  squamous 
temporal  and  the  third  at  the  superior  medial  frontal  bone 
(posterior  temporal).  The  dura  was  dissected  free 
underneath all burr holes. With the B1 bit and footplate, the 
burr  holes  were  interconnected  and  a  craniotomy 
completed.  The  osteoplastic  bone  flap  was  freed  from  the 
dura with #3 Penfields and was reflected anterolaterally still 
attached to its temporalis pedicle and held in place with fish‐
hooks.  The  dura  was  visualized  (intact/with  durotomy). 
Hemostasis  was  achieved  utilizing  a  combination  of  bipolar 
electrocautery  and  absorbable  gelatin  compressed  sponge 
(Gelfoam). The wound was irrigated until clear.  
The  dura  was  opened  in  a  (C‐shape,  S‐shape)  fashion. 
(Mannitol  25gm  IV  was  given  by  the  anesthesia  team). 
Several  (X)‐0  non‐absorbable  braided  polyamide  suture 
(Nurolon)  tacking  sutures  were  used  to  elevate  the  dura 
anteriorly.  
The Buddy halo was attached to the Mayfield headholder. At 
this point the operative microscope was draped with sterile 
drapes  and  brought  into  the  operative  field.  With 
microdissection  technique  the  Sylvian  fissure  was  opened 
and  the  dural  based  tumor  came  into  view.  Minimal  brain 
retraction  was  required.  Hemostasis  was  achieved  utilizing 
bipolar  electrocautery  and  absorbable  gelatin  compressed 
sponge  (Gelfoam).  [Absorbable  gelatin  compressed  sponge 
(Gelfoam)  was  neatly  tucked  circumferentially  around  the 
craniotomy just underneath the dura to prevent blood from 
reaching other areas of the brain.] 
The  (Right/Left)  optic  nerve  was  identified  and  the 
opticocarotid  cistern  opened  to  allow  CSF  egress  and  brain 
decompression. 
IDENTIFICATION  OF  STRUCTURES:  The  internal  carotid 
artery, optic nerve and third cranial nerve were identified.  

71
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

FINDINGS:  (intra/extracavernous  tumor  compression  of 


cranial  nerves,  arterial  constrictions  by  tumor).  The  lesion 
was noted to be (color, swelling, consistency, [well‐defined, 
ill‐defined] planes, dural attachments).  
WHAT  WAS  DONE:  Microdissection  with  tumor  resection, 
further  drilling  of  the  anterior  clinoid,  unroofing  the  third 
cranial  nerve,  decompression  of  the  superior  orbital  fissure 
contents, mobilizing the dura propria from the lateral wall of 
the  cavernous  sinus.  Tumor  extirpation  was  performed 
through  the  opticocarotid,  carotid–oculomotor,  and 
prechiasmatic  spaces.  Attention  was  paid  to  avoid  violating 
the  perforating  arteries  situated  in  the  opticocarotid 
triangle. 
A  nerve  hook  was  used  to  carefully  dissect  tumor  near  the 
optic  foramen.  [To  avoid  risk  of  devascularizing  the  optic 
nerve,  further  attempts  of  removing  this  tiny  bit  of  tumor 
were  abandoned].  Careful  bipolar  electrocautery  was  used 
to  achieve  hemostasis  on  all  dural  edges  and  the  dura  was 
stripped from the clinoid process and the medial most part 
of  the  sphenoid  wing.  The  wound  was  irrigated  until  clear. 
Verification of volumetric resection was performed with the 
neuronavigational probe. The tumor was sent to pathology. 
Having accomplished the goal of decompression of the optic 
nerve,  superior  orbital  fissure  and  cranial  nerves,  we 
proceeded with harvesting of a fat graft from the abdomen.  
IF  FAT  WILL  BE  USED:  An  incision  was  made  in  the 
anterior  (Right/Left)  lower  quandrant  part  of  the 
abdomen.  Fat  was  obtained  and  hemostasis  promptly 
achieved.  The  fascia  was  approximated  with  (X)‐0 
polyglactin synthetic absorbable suture (Vicryl). The skin 
was  then  closed  with  (nylon  suture,  skin‐glue,  steri‐
strips,  surgical  staples).  A  sterile  dressing  was  placed 
over the closed wound.  
The fat graft was placed between the inferior aspect of the 
optic  nerve,  the  carotid  artery  and  the  superior  orbital 
fissure. The optic nerve was gently separated in this fashion 

72 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

from  the  parasellar  region  in  anticipation  of  potential 


stereotactic  radiosurgery  at  a  later  date.  The  field  was 
irrigated clear.  
The  dura  was  closed  in  a  water‐tight  fashion  with 
interrupted  (X)‐0  non‐absorbable  braided  polyamide  suture 
(Nurolon). The dural defect created at the orbital apex from 
removal  of  the  dura  from  the  anterior  clinoid  process  was 
covered with fat graft to prevent CSF leak. The bone flap was 
replaced  and  affixed  with  miniplates  and  screws. 
(Cranioplasty:  The  cranial  defect  was  reconstructed  using  a 
synthetic  cranioplasty  implant.)  The  wound  was  irrigated 
with  antibiotic  solution.  The  temporalis  muscle  was 
reapproximated  with  (X)‐0  polyglactin  synthetic  absorbable 
suture  (Vicryl)  and  secured  onto  the  bone  flap.  The  galea 
was  reapproximated  utilizing  inverted  interrupted  (X)‐0 
polyglactin synthetic absorbable suture (Vicryl). The skin was 
then  closed  with  (nylon  suture,  skin‐glue,  steri‐strips, 
surgical staples). A sterile head dressing was placed over the 
closed wound. 
 
All  needle  counts,  sponge  counts  and  instrument  counts 
were correct at the end of the case times two. The patient 
tolerated  the  procedure  well  and  was  transferred  to  the 
recovery room in stable condition. Dr. X was present during 
the critical portions of this case. 
   

73
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

 
FUNCTIONAL, EPILEPSY AND 
PAIN 
1. Epilepsy Surgery Stage I: Long Term Monitoring 
Electrodes Placement. 
2. Epilepsy Surgery Stage II: Premotor Cortex Lesion 
Resection. 
3. Epilepsy Surgery Stage II: Temporal Lobe Lesion 
Resection. 
4. Microvascular Decompression.  
5. Deep Brain Stimulator Lead Placement. 
6. Deep Brain Stimulator Generator Placement. 
7. Rhizotomy: Medial Facet Branch. 
8. Carpal Tunnel Release. 
9. Ulnar Nerve Decompression. 
10. Peroneal Nerve Lysis. 
11. Spinal Cord Stimulator Placement. 
12. Vagal Nerve Stimulator Implantation. 
   

96 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

SHUNTING PROCEDURES 
 
1. Ventricular Peritoneal Shunt Placement  
2. Lumbar Peritoneal Shunt Placement 
3. Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy 
   

150
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

SPINAL PROCEDURES 
Spinal Dictations Guide
1. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) 
2. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF) 
3. Cervical Corpectomy 
4. Cervical Laminectomy with Lateral Mass Arthrodesis 
5. Cervical Laminoplasty 
6. Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF) 
7. Laminectomy for Intramedullary Spinal Tumor 
8. Laminectomy for Excision of Intradural 
Extramedullary Spinal Tumor 
9. Lumbar Hemilaminectomy and Microdiscectomy 
10. Lumbar Laminectomy‐ Bilateral 
11. MIS Laminectomy 
12. Percutaneous Discectomy 
13. Posterolateral Interbody Fusion (PLIF) 
14. Redo Instrumentation Removal 
15. Thoracic Corpectomy Lateral Extracavitary 
Approach 
16. Thoracic Corpectomy Transthoracic Approach 
17. X‐Stop 
   

163
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

SPINAL DICTATIONS GUIDE 
 
In  Neurosurgery  there  are a lot  of  spinal  procedures  with  a 
lot of different codes. These codes are constantly changing. 
When using this section remember to keep in mind that you 
should  consult  an  official  CPT  book  for  accurate  coding  for 
purposes of reimbursement. 
 
Some  procedures  are  performed  with  electrophysiological 
monitoring (see Cervical Laminoplasty for example). The CPT 
coding is provided here for your quick review.
CPT Coding  
95929 Central motor evoked potential study (transcranial motor 
stimulation); lower limbs 
95928 Central motor evoked potential study (transcranial motor 
stimulation); upper limbs  
95926 Short‐latency somatosensory evoked potential study, 
stimulation of any/all peripheral nerves or skin sites, recording from 
the central nervous system; in lower limbs  
95925 Short‐latency somatosensory evoked potential study, 
stimulation of any/all peripheral nerves or skin sites, recording from 
the central nervous system; in upper limbs  

In  cases  where  fluoroscopic  guidance  is  used  during  the 


spinal procedure consider using the following CPT codes: 

CPT Coding  
20986 Computer‐assisted surgical navigational procedure for 
musculoskeletal procedures; with image guidance based on 
intraoperatively obtained images (eg, fluoroscopy, ultrasound) (List 
separately in addition to code for primary procedure) 
77002 Fluoroscopic guidance for needle placement (eg, biopsy, 
aspiration, injection, localization device)

In  cases  where  bone  marrow  aspirate  is  used  during  the 
spinal procedure consider using the following CPT code: 
CPT Coding  
38220 Bone marrow; aspiration only
164
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

ANTERIOR CERVICAL DISCECTOMY AND 
FUSION 
DATE OF SURGERY:  
SURGEON: Dr. X  
ASSISTANT: Dr. Y  
PREOPERATIVE DIAGNOSIS: C(LEVEL)‐C(LEVEL) radiculopathy 
and herniated cervical disc. 
POSTOPERATIVE DIAGNOSIS: C(LEVEL)‐C(LEVEL) 
radiculopathy and herniated cervical disc. 
 
PROCEDURE PERFORMED:  
1. C(LEVEL)‐C(LEVEL) anterior cervical discectomy with 
decompression of spinal cord and osteophytectomy. 
2. C(LEVEL)‐C(LEVEL) anterior interbody arthrodesis. 
3. C(LEVEL)‐C(LEVEL) insertion of interbody allograft. 
4. Microsurgical techniques, requiring use of operating 
microscope for discectomy and osteophytectomy. 
5. C(LEVEL)‐C(LEVEL) anterior plate and screws. 
6. Fluoroscopic guidance for localization and 
instrumentation. 
 
CPT Coding  
  20931 Allograft for spine surgery only; structural (List separately 
  in addition to code for primary procedure)  
  22845 Anterior instrumentation; 2 to 3 vertebral segments (List 
  separately in addition to code for primary procedure)  
  22851 Application of intervertebral biomechanical device(s) (eg, 
  synthetic cage(s), threaded bone dowel(s), methylmethacrylate) 
  to vertebral defect or interspace (List separately in addition to 
  code for primary procedure)  
22554 Arthrodesis, anterior interbody technique, including 
 
minimal discectomy to prepare interspace (other than for 
  decompression); cervical below C2  
  63075 Discectomy, anterior, with decompression of spinal cord 
  and/or nerve root(s), including osteophytectomy; cervical, single 
  interspace  
 
165
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

 
  CPT Coding (Cont.)  
  69990 Microsurgical techniques, requiring use of operating 
  microscope (List separately in addition to code for primary 
procedure) 
 
77002 Fluoroscopic guidance for needle placement (eg, biopsy, 
  aspiration, injection, localization device)
 
ANESTHESIA: GETA. 
ESTIMATED BLOOD LOSS: (XX) cc. 
FINDINGS: 
DRAINS: (JP/Blake) drain. 
COMPLICATIONS: None. 
DISPOSITION: Stable to the PACU 
 
INDICATIONS FOR THE PROCEDURE Mr./Ms. (Pt. Name) is a 
(Pt.  Age)  year  old  (Male/Female)  who  presents  with  signs, 
symptoms  and  radiographic  evidence  of  (Right/Left)  neck 
pain  radiating  into  (His/Her)  (Right/Left)  arm  in  a  C(LEVEL) 
dermatomal pattern.  
DIAGNOSTIC STUDY: MRI cervical spine showed___. 
(He/She)  had  failed  conservative  treatment  (physical 
therapy,  pain  medication,  epidural  steroids)  and  (His/Her) 
symptoms  continued  to  progress.  Given  the  progression  of 
the  symptoms,  it  was  decided  to  proceed  with  the 
decompression  of  the  herniated  disc  and  osteophyte 
complex at C(LEVEL).  
SURGICAL RISKS: The patient (family/ N.O.K./ P.O.A.) were 
apprised  of  all  objectives,  benefits,  risks  and  potential 
complications  of  the  procedure,  including  but  not  limited 
to:  worsening  of  current  status,  the  possible  need  for 
further  procedures,  the  risk  of  infection,  headaches, CSF 
leak,  possible  spinal  cord  injury  resulting  in  paralysis, 
infection,  neck  hematoma  and  hoarseness  of  voice,  injury 
to  major  vessels  causing  hemorrhage,  stroke,  loss  of 
language function, coma and even death. Informed consent 
was  obtained  and  secured  in  the  chart  after  the  patient 

166
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

(family/  N.O.K./  P.O.A.)  voiced  understanding  of  these  risks 


and decided to proceed with the operation.  
 
DESCRIPTION OF THE PROCEDURE 
The patient was transferred to the operating room. (He/She) 
was given preoperative prophylactic IV antibiotics. 
ANESTHESIA:  The  patient  was  sedated  and  intubated 
without difficulty by the anesthesia service. Eyes were taped 
shut after ointment was applied to prevent corneal abrasion. 
A  Bair  Hugger  was  placed  over  the  lower  body  to  maintain 
control  of  core  body  temperature.  A  Foley  catheter  was 
inserted. 
POSITIONING: The patient was placed in the supine position 
with  a  gel  roll  underneath  (His/Her)  head.  All  pressure 
points were carefully padded.  
OPERATIVE TECHNIQUE: The skin was prepped and draped in 
the  standard  surgical  fashion  and  the  area  marked  with  a 
marking  pen  utilizing  standard  landmarks  such  as  midline 
and cricoid cartilage.  
A  transverse  neck  incision  was  performed  opposite  the 
C(LEVEL)‐C(LEVEL)  level  using  a  #  (XX)  scalpel  blade  after 
infiltration  with  (XX)  %  Marcaine  with  epinephrine.  The 
incision  was  deepened  through  platysma  muscle  and  the 
edges  undermined  using  sharp  dissection.  Hemostasis  was 
obtained utilizing Bovie electrocautery as well as the bipolar 
forceps.  Further  blunt  and  sharp  dissection  was  carried 
down  in  the  plane  medial  to  the  omohyoid  muscle.  Blunt 
dissection was performed medial to the carotid sheath down 
to the anterior longitudinal ligament in front of the spine. 
The  C‐arm  fluoroscopy  unit  was  draped  with  sterile  drapes 
and  brought  into  the  operative  field.  The  level  of  C(LEVEL)‐
C(LEVEL)  was  confirmed  by  placing  a  marker  needle  and 
fluoroscopic  x‐ray.  The  longus  coli  muscle  was  undermined 
with  monopolar  electrocautery  on  either  side  until  the 
uncovertebral  joints  were  exposed.  Self‐retaining  retractors 

167
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

VASCULAR/ENDOVASCULAR 
PROCEDURES 
1. Carotid Endarterectomy 
2. Cerebral Angiography 
3. Cerebral Angiogram with Aneurysm Coiling 
4. Cerebral Angiogram with Stent‐assisted Aneurysm 
Coiling 
5. Cerebral Angiogram with AVM embolization 
6. Angiogram with Carotid Balloon Angioplasty and 
Stent 
Placement

239
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY
DATE OF PROCEDURE: 
RADIOLOGIST/SURGEON: Dr. X 
ASSISTANT: Dr. Y 
PREOPERATIVE DIAGNOSIS: (Subarachnoid hemorrhage, 
carotid stenosis).  
POSTOPERATIVE DIAGNOSIS: (Subarachnoid hemorrhage, 
carotid stenosis). 
 
PROCEDURES PERFORMED:  
 1. Bilateral (vessel) angiogram‐cervical. 
 2. Bilateral (vessel) angiogram‐cerebral. 
 3. Rotational 3D (Right/Left) (vessel) angiogram. 
 4. Bilateral vertebral artery angiogram‐bilateral.  
 5. (Right/Left) common femoral artery angiogram. 
 6. Deployment of a (X)‐French Angio‐Seal within the right 
femoral artery. 
 
  CPT Coding  
  75676 Angiography, carotid, cervical, unilateral, radiological 
  supervision and interpretation 
75671 Angiography, carotid, cerebral, bilateral, radiological 
  supervision and interpretation 
  75685 Angiography, vertebral, cervical, and /or intracranial, 
  radiological supervision and interpretation 
  75774 Angiography, selective, each additional vessel studied after 
  basic examination, radiological supervision and interpretation (List 
  separately in addition to code for primary procedure) 
 
ANESTHESIA: IV sedation with local anesthesia.  
ESTIMATED BLOOD LOSS: (XX) cc. 
FLUORO TIME: (XX) minutes and (XX) seconds.  
CONTRAST: Intravenous contrast agent (XX) cc.  
FINDINGS:  

244
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

1. Report AVM, aneurysm remnants if clipped, vessel 
stenosis. 
2. Report arterial, capillary, and venous opacification on all 
angiographic runs. 
COMPLICATIONS: None. 
DISPOSITION: Stable to the PACU. 
  
INDICATIONS FOR THE PROCEDURE 
HISTORY:  (Mr./Ms.)  (Pt.  Name)  is  a  (Pt.  Age)  year  old 
(Male/Female)  with  signs,  symptoms  and  radiographic 
evidence  of  (Right/Left)  [(Acom,  Pcom,  MCA,  Basilar  tip) 
aneurysm] or [carotid artery stenosis]. 
DIAGNOSTIC STUDY: MRI/CT/CTA/MRA brain showed ___. 
PROCEDURE RISKS: The patient (family/N.O.K./P.O.A.) was 
well apprised of all objectives, benefits, risks and potential 
complications  of  the  procedure,  including  but  not  limited 
to:  worsening  of  current  status,  the  possible  need  for 
further  procedures,  the  risk  of  infection,  seizures, 
hemorrhage,  stroke,  loss  of  language  function,  paralysis, 
coma and even death. Informed consent was obtained and 
secured in the chart after the patient (family/N.O.K./P.O.A.) 
voiced understanding of these risks and decided to proceed 
with the procedure. 
 
DESCRIPTION OF THE PROCEDURE 
The  patient  was  transferred  to  the  angiography  suite. 
(He/She) was given preoperative prophylactic IV antibiotics. 
ANESTHESIA:  The  patient  was  given  IV  sedation  by  the 
anesthesia team. 
POSITIONING: The patient was placed in the supine position 
on  the  angio  table.  The  groins  were  prepped  and  draped 
bilaterally in the usual sterile fashion. 
TECHNIQUE:  The  pulse  of  the  common  femoral  artery  was 
felt  on  the  (Right/Left)  groin  and  the  overlying  skin  was 
infiltrated  with  (XX)  %  lidocaine.  A  stiff  micropuncture  set 
was utilized to gain access to the vessel. Pulsatile bright red 
245
 
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

MINOR PROCEDURES 
1. Arterial Line Placement 
2. Lumbar Spinal Puncture 
3. Lumbar Drain Placement 
4. Ventriculostomy Placement 
5. Vertebroplasty/ Kyphoplasty 
   

272
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

APPENDIX 
Hydrogel dural sealant (DuraSeal) 
Oxidized cellulose absorbable hemostat (Surgicel) 
Synthetic cotton absorbant sponge (Cottonoid) 
Polyglactin synthetic absorbable suture (Vicryl) 
Non‐absorbable braided polyamide suture (Nurolon) 
Absorbable gelatin compressed sponge (Gelfoam) 
Microfibrillar collagen hemostat (Avitene) 
Poliglecaprone 25 (Monocryl)
Adhesive skin closure (Steri‐Strips) 
Synthetic non‐absorbable polypropylene suture (Prolene)

288
Operative Dictation: Neurosurgery

ABBREVIATIONS 
 
ACA = Anterior cerebral artery 
Acom = Anterior communicating artery 
AP = Anterior‐Posterior 
BMP = Bone morphogenic protein 
C = Cervical 
CSF = Cerebrospinal fluid 
CT = Computed tomography 
CT = Computed tomographic angiography 
CUSA = cavitron ultrasonic aspirator 
GETA = General endotracheal anesthesia 
L = Lumbar 
MEP = Motor‐evoked potentials 
MCA = Middle cerebral artery 
MRA = Magnetic resonance angiography 
MRI = Magnetic resonance imaging 
NOK = Next of kin 
PCA = Posterior cerebral artery 
Pcom = Posterior communicating artery 
POA = Power of attorney 
S = Sacral 
SSEP = Somotosensory‐evoked potentials 
T = Thoracic 

289