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ELECTRIC TRANSLATING DEVICE FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

45

FIG; I.

Filed June 5, 1955

2 Sheets-Sheet l

INVENTOR

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Jan. 7, 1936.

A. LESTi

ELECTRIC TRANSLATING DEVICE FOR MUSICAL IHSTRUEENTS

Filed June 5, 1935

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r26

28

36 37'

2 Sheets-Sheet 2

3a’

EWENTOR

M M

Patented Jan. 7, 1936‘

2,026,841

UNITE-D STATES

PATENT. OFFICE.‘

2,026,841 '

’ nrnc'rmo 'rnansmrmc nnvrcn FOB;

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT

Arnold 1mm,“ Angela? can’. '

Application June 5, 1935, Serial No.;25,100

14 Claims.

a REISSUED'

CR

10

My invention relates to an electricaltranslat

ing device for use with musical instruments which

are not suf?ciently loud when played in the nor

mal manner. This device translates the musical

vibrations into corresponding electrical values

and these are electrically ampli?ed and then

translated into corresponding sounds by a loud

speaker.

to steel

The invention is particularly adapted;

stringed musical instruments such as

the guitar.

7

detailed description, and more particularly in

the annexed claims, reference is had to the at

tached drawings for an illustrative‘ embodiment

of the invention‘wherein,

Fig. 1 is a plan view of aguitar with my in- >5 I

vvention applied thereto.

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Fig. 2 is a side view thereof;

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Fig. 3 is a plan view of the translating device

with top cover removed.

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An important object of my invention is to

provide an adequate electrical translating de

vice which is su?lciently small in size so that it

may be easily attached to the most effective part

15 of the. musical instrument or easily detached

from the same.

,

e

.

A further object of my invention is to provide

an adequate translating device which will faith

fully reproduce the musical tones of the instru

ment and not extraneous mechanical vibrations

which may exist in the body of the instrument

when it is played. I have found that this feature

is met by a translating device utilizing solenoid

means to produce electrical currents caused by

25 the vibrations of the steel strings of the musical

instrument; the said strings being permanently

magnetized beforehand adjacent to the sole

noidal pick-up device. In this connection, a fur

ther detailed object of my invention is to provide ‘

30 means of changing the relative intensities of the

35

40

45

bass and treble notes by

tioned solenoidal device into proper relation

with the magnetized portions of the steel strings. ‘

moving the above men

Another important object of my invention is to

provide, along with the above mentioned fea

tures, a translating device which is free from

pick-up action engendered by extraneouselec

trical and magnetic in?uences. These last men

tioned in?uences are found to produce extremely

objectionable noises. In the construction of my

invention I have found that two or more'sole

noids may operate together so that ‘each neu

tralizes. the effects of the other insofar as ex

traneous unwanted magnetic in?uences are con

cerned, but that their positions with respect

to the vibrating magnetic portions of the musical

instrument, causes an addition or summation

of ‘their respective translating currents.

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A further. detailed object of my invention is to

provide means for properly magnetizing the steel

vibrating members of the musical instrument

in a manner which will produce maximum ef

fects.

With the foregoing and other objects in view,

55

which will-be made manifest in the following

Fig. 4 is a sectional view through the line 4-4 m ‘

of-Fig. 3, and- showing also how :the device .is

held to the instrument at the sound hole.

Fig. 5 is a'sectional-view thrbug'h the line 5-5

of Fig. 3.

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.

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the translating device 15

showing an alternative method of fastening the

same to instruments without sound holes.

Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic view of the invention

illustrating four coils and cores, the method of .

magnetizing the steel strings, and the lines of 20'

magnetic force during the process of magnet

ization.

.

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Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic view of the invention

somewhat similar to Fig. 7, but showing the mag

netic lines of iorce surrounding the steel string 25>

after magnetization, an interfering stray ?eld,v

an ampli?er and loud speaker.

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,

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic view showing the

translating device with two coils and cores, the

‘lines of magnetic force surroundingv the steel 80

string after magnetization, an interfering stray

field, a switch held in the playing position, an

ampli?er and loud speaker.

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,

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Referring to the drawings wherein similar

characters,‘ represent similar parts throughout, 35

l is the body of a guitar and

2 the ?ngering

board. Characterv 3 represents the sound hole

at which is held the translating device designated

generally by I. 1 represents generally the steel

strings which are vibrated during the act of 40

playing. Translating device 6_ is held to the

- guitar by spring 24. The small spring 8 around

the cable 9, where it enters the translating de

vice 6, safeguards '9 from excessive wear at that

point. In Fig. 3 the coils I0 and H,

having iron‘45

cores #2 and I3, are shown'connected to insulated >

leads l4 and I! and their center connection l6

being connected to the case I1, made 01' mag

netic material. A shielding, 18 around leads I‘

and I5 constitutes a return lead, also connected 50

to the

case II. The windings in coils Ill and II

are in opposite directions, as can be seen from

the direction of the ends I9, 20, 2|, 22. The

case l1, made of magnetic material, aids in the

pick-up action by reducing the magnetic re-‘55

2,026,841

3

16, 11, leading to a source of potential to produce

?eld excitation.

'

In the playing position shown in Fig. 9, if the

steel string 1 vibrates, the surrounding magnetic

?eld 18, 19 will also vibrate inducing currents in

the coils 58, 59, while being insensitive to the stray

field 80, as above mentioned. The currents are

applied to the input 68, 69, ll, of the ampli?er 61,

which ampli?es them, and from the output 8], 82,

10 of the ampli?er they are connected to the loud

‘ca

speaker 15, which translates the ampli?ed cur

rents into sounds.

Various changes may be made in my invention,

by those skilled in the art, without departing from

the spirit thereof as set forth in the drawings,

speci?cation and claims.

I claim:

.

l. The combination, in steel stringed musical

containing the solenoids within, means for send

ing a direct current through the solenoids to pro

duce a series of magnetized genes in each steel

string with'opposite magnetic polarity for adja

cent zones whereby strong vibrating currents 5

are induced in the solenoids from their cumula

tive effects when the strings are vibrating, but

minimizing the in?uence of stray magnetic ?elds,

means for disconnecting the direct current, an

ampli?er to increase the amplitude 01' ‘the vibrat-

1‘)

ing currents, and a loud speaker to translate the

ampli?edcurrents into sounds.

6. The combination, in steel stringed musical

instruments, of a plurality of an even number

of insulated wire coils having cores made of mag- 15

netic material, a case also made of magnetic ma

terial having an open top and a closed bottom

and containing the wire coils within, means for

 

instruments, of a plurality of wire coils, iron cores

fastening the case to the musicalinstrument be

20

contained within the said coils each having a face

low the strings with the topside facing the 20

of equal distance to the strings, means for send

strings, a source of direct current, a switch to

ing a direct current through the coils to produce

connect the coils to the source of direct current

a series of magnetized zones, in each steel string,

to produce a series of magnetic zones in each

with reversed magnetic polarity for adjacent

steel string whereby, when the strings vibrate,

25

zones whereby induced currents are established

currents are induced in the coils and reinforced”

in the coils when the strings are vibrated, means

by their cumulative action while neutralizing stray

for disconnecting the direct current, means for

magnetic in?uences, ‘means on the said switch

amplifying the induced currents and or translat

to disconnect the coils'from the source of direct

ing them into sounds.

current and to connect the same to an ampli?er

30

2. The combination, in steel stringed musical

to amplify the currents, and a loud speaker to S0

instruments of a plurality of wire coils spaced

translate the ampli?ed currents into sounds.

in consecutive order and each having iron cores,

means for sending a direct current through the

coils to produce magnetic ?elds of opposite

35

polarity in adjacent‘coils and magnetizing the

strings therewith, whereby induced currents are

established in the coils when the strings are

vibrating.

3. The combination, in steel stringed musical

40

instruments, of a plurality of insulated wire coils

each having iron cores, a case made of magnetic

material having an open top and a closed bottom

and containing the wire coils within, bent sides

on the case to hold a non-magnetic top cover, a

45

spring having two free ends and a midsection

fastened to the outer bottom of the case and

adapted to hold the same to the musical instru-.

ment at the sound hole, means for utilizing the

said wire coils to produce a series of magnetized

50

zones in each string whereby currents are induced

in the coils when the strings are vibrating, an

ampli?er to increase the amplitude of the cur

rents and a loud speaker to translate the ampli

?ed currents into sounds.

4. The combination, in steel stringed musical

instruments, of two solenoids each adapted to

produce electrical currents from the in?uence oi.’

vibrating magnetic ‘?elds, means for sending a

direct current through the solenoids to magnetize

60 adjacent portions of the steel strings in opposite

st

magnetic polarity whereby strong electrical cur

rents are produced from the cumulative e?ects

of the solenoids when these currents are induced

from the vibrations of the magnetized strings

65 but minimizing the e?ects of stray magnetic ?elds

from the neutralizing e?ects of the solenoids, an

ampli?er to amplify the currents and a loud

speaker to translate the ampli?ed currents into

sounds;

/

.

70 5. The combination, in steel stringed musical‘

instruments, of a plurality ‘of solenoids with

means cooperating therewith adapting the same

to produce electrical currents from the in?uence

of vibrating adjacent magnetic members,‘ a case

made of magnetic material open on one side and

7. ‘Hie-combination, with steel stringed mu

sical instruments, oil a series of insulated wire

coils spaced in consecutive order and each hav

ing iron cores with faces equidistant to each steel 35

string, an ampli?er having triodes grid input, a

source of direct current, a switch having a ?rst

position to connect the direct currentto the wire

coils and- simultaneously shunt the triodes grid‘

input producing a series of magnetized zones in 40 each steel string, a second position of the switch

to disconnect the ?rst position connections, and

simultaneously connect the wire coils to the tri~

odes grid input thereby sending vibrating cur

rents, induced in the coils when the strings are 45

vibrated, through the ampli?er which boosts the

' same, and a loud speaker to translate the boosted

currents into sounds.

8. The method of electrically increasing the

volume of steel stringed musical instruments, 50

which consists in utilizing a plurality of electro

magnets to magnetize steel strings into magnetic

zones of opposing polarity for adjacent zones, uti

lizing the same coils to produce electrical cur

rents when the strings are vibrated, amplifying 55

the said currents and translating them into

sounds.

.

9. The method of reducing noise when elec

trically amplifying the volume of steel stringed '

musical instruments which consists in utilizing a to

series or wire coils with adjacent coils connected

in opposite polarity. utilizing the coils to mag

netize portions of the steel strings into magnetic

zones, and‘ utilizing the same coils toproduce

currents when the strings are vibrated.

65

tensities of the bass and treble notes when elec

10. The method 0! adjusting the relative in

trically amplifying the sounds of steel stringed

musical instruments which consists in utilizing

a series of coils tomagnetize portions or the steel 70

strings, adjusting the relative positions of the

coils with respect to the magnetic portions to ob-v

tain the desired relative intensities,’ and

utiliz

- ing the coils to produce currents when the strings

are Evibrated.

%

11. The combination, in.v steel

We

instruments,secutively on ofonea seriesside ofoithewirees,coils ~cores‘ 1

con

tsined within each coil and each bovine s iece

substantially equidistant to each steel string end

adapted to msgnetize the strings when the coils

are energized by a. momentary direct current

wherebycurrents are induced in. the coils when

' the strings are vibrated.

12. The combinetiony in. steel stringed nice!

1 instruments, of a pity

of wire coils each

spaced consecutively, cores contained Within. each

'coil each having a face substantially equidistant

to each steel string and adapted to "en-I

15 each steel string ,into a series of magnetic zones

of reversed polarity for adjacent zones end cor

responding ‘to the polarity or the coils when the‘

said coils are momentarily energized by e, direct

current whereby currents ere established in the

coils when the strings are vibrated; _

13. The combination, in steel stringed musical

' instruments, or a. plurality of electromegnets,

means for sending e momentary direct-current

eechsteelits thestringandintoelect eticeonessnets to of reversed

polarity for odjscent zones whereby cumulative

‘ currents are induced in the eiectrognets when

the strings we vibrated.»

.

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.

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5

14. The .comhition, in steel'strihsed musicsl '

insentsconsecutivelyofona onepluralityside ofof wirethe steelcoilsstrings.

- cores contained within the coils eech hevins'e

fece substsntielly of equal distance to each steello

string, e case rm

e02

etic material having.

en omn top'end a, closed bottom and conng . '

the coils within, bent sides on the case to hold

non-meti'c top coven'e spring hsving ‘two

free ends and s mid-section fastened to the outer '15

bottom of the case and adopted to hold the same

to the musics] instrument, and means for send

ing s momentary direct current through the coils

to metize each steel string whereby currents 20

are induced in the coils when the strings are

vibrated.

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*

ARNOLD LESTI.