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3248 Copelin Avenue

The blueprints for the home on 3248 Copelin Avenue were


presented to William Plass, Jr. Esq. The Plass family moved into the
home built in 1898. Copelin Avenue was a cul de sac street with a
greenway down the center. It was nicknamed Millionaires Row
because there were 9 millionaires that lived on Copelin Avenue at
that time. The homeowners on Copelin wanted smaller homes with
less upkeep and spent more money on small details. The Plass
family owned a hardware store, and they included many new
hardware items into their home. This home included details such as
heating pipes connected to the boiler under the sidewalks to melt
the winter snow, electric lighting, indoor bathroom, and a unique
way to cool the home.
William Plass Sr. was born in Prussia Germany in 1835, took a
loyalty oath to the US in 1863, was a union soldier, and owned a
hardware store. His wife Dorothea Blumenthal Plass was born in
1843. They married at St. Marcus United Church of Christ on March
14, 1861. They had 5 children. Emele was born in 1864 and died in
1881 at the age of 17. William Plass Jr. was born in 1865. He was a
banker and died at 74 years old. Ada Plass was born in 1866. She
was a St. Louis School teacher at Grant Elementary, and died in
1957 at 91 years of age. Ormond was born in 1876. In 1935,
Ormond entered the St. Louis City Sanitarium and still resided there
as of the 1940 census. Ida Plass was born in 1879. She was a St.
Louis City school teacher at Lafayette School, and died in 1966 at
the age of 87. Dorothea Plass lived in the home with her four
children. None of the children ever married. Ada and Ida lived in
the home until Ida, the last family member, died in 1966. She left
the home to her neighbor on Geyer who had been her caregiver.
The home remained empty until the home was sold to Martin &
Mary Schriever. The Schrievers lived in the home during the
construction of highway 44, and continued to live and raise their
family on Copelin for 30 years, until selling to the current
homeowner. The current homeowner has lived in the home since
April 1998.

3248
Copelin Avenue

FOYER

HALF BATH
HALF BATH LIGHTING
The porcelain art deco wall sconce with the milk
glass globe are original to the home. The ceiling
chandelier is not original to the home.
ROOF MEDALLIONS
The copper roof
ornamentation pieces are
from the original copper
gutters of the home.
BOILER PARTS
Two parts of the original boiler are hanging
on the walls. The boiler doors can be seen
on the 3rd floor master bedroom wall.

BOILER INSPECTION CERTIFICATE


The boiler inspection certificate dates
January 15, 1951. It was issued to Ada and
Iola Plass, the last remaining family
members of the original homeowners.
Some of those boiler parts are hanging in
the half bath and master bedroom.
HEATING INSPECTION TAG &
MAILING ENVELOPE
The original boiler heating inspection label
and the envelope that it was mailed in
from 1951. The boiler was used by the
current homeowner until it started on fire.
The boiler was replaced, but the current
homeowner now uses forced heat and
cooling throughout the home.

FRONT DOOR
When the homeowner purchased the house,
the Front Door had plain glass, a missing lower
wood panel, and was painted white (including
the ornate door handle). The homeowner hired
Brian Derton to sandblast a window with a
design from the homeowner. American Plating
Company re-plated the door handle. The lower
panel is one single piece of carved wood carved
by an internationally known, local artisan originally from Russia, Boris Khechoyan. He carved
the chair for the Pope John Paull IIs visit to St.
Louis in 1999.
FIREPLACE MANTLE
The wood mantle , tile surround, and metal
surround are all original to the house. This is
one of six original fireplaces in the home.
NEWEL POST LIGHT
The newel post light is original to the house. It
is labeled Galatea. Galatea comes from
Greek Mythology. She was a statue carved of
ivory by Pygmalion of Cyprus which came to
life. Galatea was a sea nymph (often described
as the fairest of the 50 sea nymphs) as shown
by the water on the base of the newel post.
The patina was restored by St. Louis Antique
Lighting.

PORCH LIGHT
The front porch light is original to the house and is
a brass plated pull chain on a marble base.

FOYER

KITCHEN

WALL SCONCE LIGHT


The wall sconce light is original to the house. It is a
torch with a Vaseline glass globe shaped as the flame.
It had a round globe on when the homeowner bought
the house. A correct style globe was purchased when
the light was restored by St. Louis Antique Lighting.
STEINWAY BABY GRAND PIANO
The rare Louis VX baby grand piano is
one of a small, select group of hand
carved and hand signed pianos created
by Steinway each year. John Steinways
signature appears inside the piano.
FRONT CARPET
RUNNER
The main staircase carpet runners are not
original to the home. They replace the original
carpet runners. The carpet runners are
custom sculpted wool and silk woven rugs
from Kusadasi, Turkey. After waiting for over
a year, they finally
arrived and were
installed with the new
carpet tread posts.

FOYER CHANDELIER
The foyer chandelier is original to the house. It
is an Art Nouveau style chandelier, and was
restored by St. Louis Antique Lighting.

KITCHEN LIGHTING
This chandelier is original
to the home, however it
was on a shorter rod and hung in the 3rd
floor attic (now master bedroom). The
homeowner added a longer rod and has
illuminated the light with reproduction
vintage carbon filament light bulbs.
The wall sconce is original to the home. It
is a porcelain art deco light and electrical
outlet with the milk glass globe from the
1920s.
FLOOR
The aged yellow pine floor is original to
the home. The filled in flooring comes
from the 3rd floor eaves. It shares the
story of the original walls of the former
butlers pantry (now the half bath), the
kitchen door, and the former radiator
placement. When the homeowner
purchased the home, the floor was
covered with black roofing paper, a
plywood subfloor, and harvest gold and
orange linoleum. The floors were restored
to their former glory.
COLORED GLASS BOTTLES
The colored glass is from Puerto Vallarta,
Mexico. Unfortunately this glass type is no
longer produced.
WINDOW TREATMENTS
The window treatments were made by the homeowner's mother.

LIVING ROOM
PORTIERE RODS, CLIPS, CURTAINS
The portiere rods, rings, and clips are original. The
rods and rings are brass and were polished. The clips
have been re-plated. The original portiere curtains
are saved. The new curtains were made by the
homeowners mother.

CHANDELIER, WALL SCONCES


The lighting set is original to the home. They were
restored by St. Louis Antique Lighting. As part of
the restoration, antique double etched globes
were purchased for the main chandelier. The wall
sconces were gas and electric.
FIREPLACE MANTLE, CLOCK
The living room fireplace mantle is original to
the home and displays the antique 1870
French Clock and Garnitures made of
marble, slate, and brass.

CARPETS
The rugs come from Kusadasi, Turkey. The
hanging rug is 100% silk. The floor rug is silk and
wool.

MASTER BEDROOM SUITE


The current homeowner finished the 3rd floor attic into a master
bedroom suite. The walk through closet was designed by Bruce
Owens at Newspace Closet Company in St. Louis. The Italian Silk
bedding is from Sallie Home Boutique in Ladue. The bedroom
displays many pictures and items from various travels of the
homeowner.
MASTER SUITE ARTWORK
The paintings are from
local artist, Sharon Spillar.
The hand died material
and framed quilt is from
artist, who learned the art
of cloth dying and quilting
from the Amish. The glass
work in the closet is from
Ohio artist, Brian Becher.

BOILER DOORS
The original cast iron boiler
doors have been bolted
above the bed as a unique
headboard. Other boiler
parts can be seen in the
half bathroom next to the
kitchen.

ANTIQUE CABINET & HUTCH


The antique cabinet has lived on
Copelin Avenue for many decades. It
was owned by the Pesapanes, who
lived at 3258 Copelin Avenue for 30
years. The cabinet & hutch was
purchased by the current
homeowner and moved two doors
East. The hutch showcases a
collection of fruit themed Limoge
that includes: plates, cider cups,
punch cups, chocolate pot, cups, &
saucers; sugar & creamer set; and
bowl.

CLASS SYSTEM OF THE HOUSE


Again you can notice the transoms in
the servant area transoms are plain
glass, while the homeowner area is etched glass. The door knobs in
the servant area are black porcelain, while the homeowner area has
brass. The half bathroom door (formerly the pantry door) and the
dining room door were swinging doors for the household staff.

BASEMENT

FOYER
PORTIERE RODS, CLIPS, CURTAINS
The portiere rods, rings, and clips are original. The
rods and rings are brass and were polished. The
clips have been re-plated. The original portiere
curtains are saved. The new curtains were made by
the homeowners mother.

TRANSOM ART GLASS WINDOWS


The front transom art glass window
is original to the house. It displays a
rare form of craftsmanship with the
barreled edged, beveled glass
window.
WALL STENCILING
The wall stenciling in the foyer was painted by
the homeowner. The Fleur de Le pattern is
the symbol of St. Louis.

(Basement Not On Tour)

BASEMENT TREASURES
Even the household bathroom was located in the servant area. The
maids toilet was located in the basement next to the mop sink. The
original toilet and mop sink still exist. Unfortunately, there is only a
hole remaining from the piping connecting the boiler heat to
underneath the sidewalks to melt the snow. The large exhaust fan
no longer exists. The 1898 version of air-conditioning was created
by opening all the windows, transom windows, pocket doors, and
basement door and turning on the exhaust fan to pull moving air
throughout the entire house.

RADIATORS
The radiators throughout the house are
original to the home. The ornate radiators
were from the American Radiator Company.
Note the ladys face in the center side of the
radiator. Most of the radiators have marble
shelving above them, making a wonderful
display for Waterford crystal and other Knick
knacks.

DINING ROOM
SERVANT BELLS
The mother of pearl and brass servant bells
would call the help from the kitchen and the
maids room. The maids room servant bell
still works.
DINING ROOM MANTLE & CLOCK
Here is another fireplace mantle that is
original to the home. The Oxford 8 day
strike wooden mantle clock was made by the
Waterbury Clock Company and dates to
December 24, 1898.

DINING ROOM CHANDELIER


The Vintage Mission Arts & Craft Slag Stained
Colored Glass Hanging Chandelier in the
dining room is original to the house

NEWEL POST LIGHT


This Newel Post Light is not original to the
home. Le Devoir par Rousseau translates
as The Duty from French philosopher Jean
Jacques Rousseau. The light also has the
marking of La Frontiere, which is a French
Canadian Newspaper Journal.

STAIRCASE TRUNK
The staircase steamer trunk was
restored by the homeowner. It was
completely spray painted white enamel
inside and out. Faux finishes and
Lincrusta wallpaper inside the trunk
have brought it back to life.

ANTIQUE WATER TOWER POSTCARDS


In the Servant Hallway, there is a large
number of framed antique postcards of the
water tower and the water tower park.

SERVANT HALL LIGHTING


The Art Deco Light in the
servant hallway is original
to the house. The ceiling
lights are not original, they
were purchased from a
local antique shop in St.
Louis.

SERVANT HALL CLOSETS


With closets being taxed,
the amount of closets in
this house showed the
wealth of the family.
SERVANT STAIRCASE
The servant staircase boasts
a display of some wooden
organ pipes.

MASTER BEDROOM SUITE

HISTORIC LINOLEUM
Various original linoleum patterns from the
home is displayed in the frames. Other frames share a couple of the
newspaper pages from 1928. Newspaper pages were placed on the
hardwood floor underneath the linoleum.
BATHROOM
The art glass in the shower was created
by John Schwaig. The bathroom boasts
a steam shower, heated floor, and built
in cabinetry. The bathroom was
designed to incorporate todays modern
conveniences yet maintains the homes
historic character.

TRAVEL ITEMS
The small blanket is from Tunisia.
The small pillow shams are from South
Africa.
The elephants are from Indonesia.
The hat on the bear is from Salzburg,
Austria.
The wooden shoes are from Amsterdam.
The glass tea glass holder is from Malta.

LIVING ROOM
WALL & CEILING STENCILING
In 2012, the walls and ceilings were stenciled by
local artist, Ryan Marshall. The upper wall
design was a historic design found by the
homeowner, and the lower wall design was
created by the artist. The ceiling medallion and
end corner design is patterned based upon the
scrollwork of the foyer fireplace mantle.
Marshalls signature can be found in the bottom
corner of the living room entrance by the chaise
lounge.
PAINTING
The oil on canvas painting,
Spring on the Thames was
painted by English painter
Edward Henry Boddington
(1836-1905). He followed
his father, who was also a
famous painter. Boddington
specialized in painting
scenes of the Thames and
views of the Welsch countryside.
ART GLASS WINDOWS
The front transom art glass
windows are original to the
house. They display a rare
form of craftsmanship with
the barreled edged,
beveled glass window. If
you look at the beveling:
one side is a smooth bevel,
while the other side of the bevel is wavy.

MAIN STAIRCASE
COAT CLOSET & ANTIQUE PLUG IN
Under the stairs, there is a door to the coat
closet. To the right of the door, is a round
outlet for a plug in light bulb. Note that the
light bulb prongs are horizontal rather than
parallel vertical prongs. Early lighting was not
standardized.
STAIRCASE
STAINED GLASS
The rounded bay of stained glass is
original to the house. The windows are
not flat, the window frames and stained
glass are curved.

MAIDS ROOM
BLUEPRINTS
Some copies of the original
hand drawn blueprints on
linens are displayed in
frames in the maids room.
The current homeowner
has the complete set of
blueprints, including
optional blueprint ideas
that the homeowners did
not choose.

MORE CLOSETS
More closets in the maids room meant the original homeowner had
money. Back in 1898 there was a tax on closets. Only wealthy
people had closets in their home.
MARBLE
There used the be a maids sink in front
of the corner marble piece. Only a lead
pipe remained when the current
homeowner purchased the home.

STAIRCASE CEILING
The staircase ceiling was painted by local artist, Mark Sova in 2010.
The homeowner was fortunate to find this artist between restoring
the Kansas State Capital and painting 2nd Presbyterian Church in St.
Louis. The design was inspired by Bradbury & Bradbury wallpaper.
See if you can spot the hidden K in the rounded medallion end
above the stained glass. Marc Sovas signature can be seen in the
right corner at the top of the stairs.

2nd FLOOR BATHROOM


BATHROOM LIGHTING
The ceiling light (under the newly added tin
ceiling) is original to the home. Above the door,
notice another unique light switch for a light bulb
with electrical plugins that were horizontal rather
than parallel as early lighting
was not standardized.
BATHROOM FIXTURES
The claw foot tub is original to
the house. The sink is not
original to the house, it comes
from next door, 3252 Copelin
Avenue. The marble behind
and underneath the toilet is
original to the home.
WATERTOWER PICTURES
The homeowner took
pictures of the three
remaining water towers in
St. Louis. Above the toilet is
the framed poster from the
centennial re-dedication of
the Compton Water Tower
on April 17/18, 1999.

TOWEL RODS
The white porcelain towel
rods with the nickel plated
holders are original the home.

DINING ROOM
WALL STENCILING
The wall stenciling in the dining room was
painted by the homeowner. The Pineapple
pattern is the symbol of hospitality, and the
common table prayer is stenciled above the
rounded bay windows.

WINDOW TREATMENTS
The dining room window treatments
were made by the homeowners mother.
CRYSTAL & CHINA
The Limoge punch bowl accents the two sets
of china. The crystal in the china cabinet
displays the Curraghmore Waterford crystal.
Other Waterford crystal can be seen in the
Foyer, Living Room, and Dining Room.

PAINTINGS
The dining room paintings are oil on canvas. They are both entitled,
Figure Scene. They were painted by an English painter named
Samuel Baldwin (1843-1858).

FRONT BEDROOM

SITTING ROOM
The Front Sitting Room was originally a bedroom. It
was unusual for a house to have so many closets in
1898 as homes were charged a tax for closets. The
closets are very shallow. With the exception of the
door handles, the hardware is original and was
restored by the homeowner.
FIREPLACE MANTLE
The fireplace mantle in this room is
made from a more rare and exotic
wood, Birds Eye Maple. The mantle is
in a more delicate, French style. The
metal fireplace screen is identical to
the one in the opposite red floral room
next door.

STEAMER TRUNK
The steamer trunk belonged to the homeowners mother who used
this to pack for college. The fur and horns are from the
homeowners African Safari.
SITTING ROOM LIGHTING
The chandelier and wall sconce in the
front sitting room are not original to the
home and were purchased at local
antique shops in St. Louis. The Tiffany
Lamp is rather rare as it has a three
dimensional shape in the fish of the
lamp shade.

FIREPLACE MANTLE
The fireplace mantle in this room is
original to the home, and has a metal
surround that is identical from the
front sitting room. Dont miss a closer
view to look at the Cherub Band Tile.

RUSSIAN SANTA COLLECTION


Why wait for Christmas: The mantles
showcases the homeowners hand
carved and hand painted Russian
Santa Collection.
BEDROOM LIGHTING
The chandelier in the front bedroom is not
original to the home. The homeowner found the
chandelier on the top of trash in a neighborhood
dumpster while walking the dog. The homeowner
figured that it would be worth spending money to
have repaired, but brought it home and it was in
100% working order. The wall sconce above the
bed is original to the home.
LAQUER BOX COLLECTION
The curio cabinet contains the homeowners
Russian lacquer box collection. The collection
includes four stlyes of lacquer boxes: the
Fedoskino style, which are replications of
famous Russian paintings; the Kholui and
Palekh styles, that display Pushkin fairy tales;
and the Mstera floral style. Some of the
lacquer boxes incorporate mother-of-pearl,
while others incorporate abalone shells.

TV ROOM
The Television Room was originally the
master bedroom. The current homeowner
renovated the 3rd floor attic into a master
bedroom suite, leaving this room for the
television room.
TELEVISION ROOM FIREPLACE MANTLE
The television room mantle is original to the
home. The custom Murano Glass Vase and
Candlesticks on the top of the mantle are
from Murano, Italy. The glass Murano fish
tank is also from Murano, Italy.
CEILING STENCILING
The ceiling was stenciled by local artists, Ryan
Marshall. The design was created based
from the wood applique on the television
room mantle.
TELEVISION ROOM LIGHTING
The television room chandelier came from
Portland Place. The former homeowners
found a painter mixing paint in the globe.
He told them, Nobody saves these old things
anymore. Fortunately they did save old
things. The current homeowner had it
restored from St. Louis Antique Lighting, who
also created the wall sconces to match.
CLASS SYSTEM
The door to the servant area has a brass knob
on the homeowner side and a black porcelain
knob on the servant side.

STAIRCASE LIGHTING
The staircase lighting is
original to the home. The
ceiling light is example of
an early dimmer switch.
With two separate
switches you can turn one
light, two lights, or all three lights on
for varied lighting moods. The ceiling
light bulbs are changed from the 3rd
floor by raising the carpet and lifting
up tongue and groove boards. The
wall sconce was gas and electric. The
wall plate is brass on marble. The wall plate contains an electrical
outlet and can illuminate the Staircase ceiling light, Galatea, and the
foyer chandelier.
CLASS SYSTEM OF THE HOUSE
From the top of the steps, look toward
the back of the house. At the end is the
Maids Room, the bathroom, and the
servant staircase, and storage closet.
Notice the transoms: in the servant area
they are plain glass, while the family area
is etched glass. The door knobs in the
servant area are black porcelain, while
the homeowner area has brass. Indoor
plumbing was new in 1898, so an indoor
bathroom was placed in the servant area.
Even though the home was built with
servant quarters, the family never had a
maid or any servant staff.