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PEN SORT INSTRUMENT

ABSTRACT:

Miniaturized devices such as cameras and telephones are examples of now-


common technologies that just a few years ago most of us rarely encountered outside the
fictional world of thrillers. Miniaturized personal computers are the next logical step.

In the revolution of miniature computers in 2003 at ITU Telecom World


exhibition held in Geneva, the Tokyo-based NEC Corporation displayed a conceptual
prototype named as “PEN STYLE PERSONAL NETWORKING GADGET PACKAGE”
or P-ISM. This is the forthcoming computers you can carry within your pockets.

P-ISM is a gadget package including five functions: a pen-style cellular phone


with a handwriting data
input function, virtual keyboard, a very small projector, camera scanner, and personal ID
key with cashless pass function. . This "pen sort of instrument" produces both the monitor
as well as the keyboard on any flat surfaces from where you can carry out functions you
would normally do on your desktop computer.

Say, "GOOD-BYE LAPTOPS!"


&
Welcome
“PEN SORT INSTRUMENT”
.
INTRODUCTION

It seems too many of us these days that the pace of technological change is so
great that it outstrips our imaginations – just as soon as we can conceive of the next nifty
electronic gadget we had like to have, we find out that somebody has already built it.

Miniaturized devices such as cameras and telephones are examples of now-


common technologies that just a few years ago most of us rarely encountered outside the
fictional world of thrillers. Miniaturized personal computers are the next logical step, but
many readers might be surprised to learn that a plan for pc components housed in device
the size and shape of ballpoint pens (as shown above) was showcased by a major
electronics company over two years ago.

PEN SORT INSTRUMENT:

At the 2003 ITU Telecom World exhibition held in Geneva, the Tokyo-based
NEC Corporation displayed a conceptual prototype of what they dubbed a “pen-style
personal networking gadget package,” or P-ISM.

The P-ISM system was based on “low-cost electronic perception technology”


produced by the San Jose, California, firm of Canasta, developers of technologies such as
the “virtual keyboard”.
We’ve dubbed this item “partly true” because, as far as we know, no functional
prototype of P-ISM system was built or displayed. The items shown in these pictures
were more on the level of props created to show off a concept for something that might
be built.

How it works:

In the revolution of miniature computers, scientists have made great


developments with Bluetooth technology. This is the forthcoming computers you can
carry within your pockets. P-ISM is a gadget package including five functions: a pen-
style cellular phone with a handwriting data input function, virtual keyboard, a very small
projector, camera scanner, and personal ID key with cashless pass function. P-ISMs are
connected with one another through short-range wireless technology. The whole set is
also connected to the internet through the
cellular phone function. This personal gadget in a minimalistic pen style enables the
ultimate ubiquitous computing

This "pen sort of instrument" produces both the monitor as well as the keyboard
on any flat surfaces from where you can carry out functions you would normally do on
your desktop computer.

Working of Virtual keyboard:


Canesta Inc. will demonstrate a working model of its "virtual keyboard" today,
and said the technology will be rolled out by PDA manufacturers early next year.

Canesta first disclosed its "electronic perception technology" in March, and


identified the virtual keyboard as one aspect of the technology.

"Our basic premise is that machines are blind," said Jim Spare, vice-president of product
development at Canesta.

"You see all these new capabilities in portable devices," Spare added. "Microsoft Word
and Excel are in the latest PocketPC devices. These things are approaching the
capabilities of the PC…but users keep lugging their (laptops) around with them."

According to Spare, the virtual keyboard consists of three components: an infrared light
source; the pattern projector, which projects the image of a keyboard on a surface, similar
to a slide projector; and the sensor itself, which matches hand and finger movement with
the pattern displayed by the pattern projector.

Canesta's technology can identify finger movements precisely enough that the
device can measure a hand's typing movement. The sensor scans space 30 times per
second at more than one angle, thus allowing the sensor to distinguish a "y" from an "h",
two keys on a QWERTY keyboard that are almost vertically aligned.

The pattern projector can be set up any way that an OEM wants, Spare said,
although the device's default calibration projects an image at about 30 centimeters and a
50-degree angle. Canesta etches the pattern into the lens itself; the device projects the
image using diffractive optics. At a 121.5 mm focal distance, the keyboard's image
measures about 278 mm by 98 mm, Spare said.

"It's different than a mechanical keyboard," Spare said. "People that hunt and peck, they
do extremely well. Those people look at a key and press it. Touch typists have to learn
the new feel of typing on a flat surface." The chipset can

also be programmed to signal an audible "click" sound when a key is pressed.


Spare said he's learned to type 60 word per minute using the virtual keyboard, and has
seen one of the company's IT manage 80 wpm.

"I'm what you'd call a trained subject," Spare said. "I've used it for a while. People
typically use it for fifteen minutes and get the hang of it. It's not a full mechanical
keyboard, but it's way better than what people are used to with a mechanical device."

P-ISM:

It seems that information terminals are infinitely getting smaller. However, we will
continue to manipulate them with our hands for now.
We have visualized the connection between the latest technology and the human, in a
form of a pen. P-ISM is a gadget package including five functions: a pen-style cellular
phone with a handwriting data input function, virtual keyboard, a very small projector,
camera scanner, and personal ID key with cashless pass function. P-ISMs are connected
with one another through short-range wireless technology. The whole set is also
connected to the Internet through the cellular phone function. This personal gadget in a
minimalistic pen style enables the ultimate ubiquitous computing.

Advantages:
• You can carry within your pockets
• This "pen sort of instrument" produces both the monitor as well as the keyboard
on any flat surfaces
• Low-cost electronic perception technology.
• Supply ability is 10,000pcs

Disadvantages:

Low storage capacity

Conclusion:
The “pen sort of instrument” is the low-cost electronic perception technology.
You have just seen something that will replace your PC in the near future