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Notre Dame University (Louaize)

Faculty of Engineering
Department of Mechanical Engineering

MEN 376
Thermo/Fluid Laboratory
Fall 2015

Pressure Measurement

Group number: 2

Prepared by:
Micheline Saad ID: 20137186

Submitted to:
Wissam Daou

Date of experiment:
Friday, October 30, 2015

Date of submission:
Friday, November 20, 2015
Results

The results collected during experiment 1, which aims to measure gage pressure of a compressor
in 3 different ways, are shown in Table 1. The recorded or experimentally measured values are
shown in (mm) and the theoretical values gotten after applying some basic fluid equations are
shown in (Pa).
Experiment # 1: Gage pressure measurement
To record
To calculate
h in
Gauge
Inclined
Vertical tube
Gauge
pressure
tube
manometer
pressure
vertical tube
(mm)
manometer
pressure
(Pa)
manometer
(Pa)
reading (Pa)
(mm)
20
42
60
354.567
411.6
588
30
62
73
531.851
607.6
715.4
43
82
83
762.319
803.6
83.4
53
110
103
939.603
1078
1009.4
63
122
119
1116.887
1195.6
1166.2
78
142
123
1382.81
1391.6
1205.4
123
232
190
1950.337
2273.6
1862
It can be noticed that both recorded and calculated values are directly proportional. Meaning that,
To set
L (mm)

when the compressor is supplying minimum pressure, the inclined tube manometer, vertical tube
manometer and gauge pressure reveal lowest pressure, whether recorded or calculated. The
minimum gage pressure calculated are correspondingly 354.567 Pa, 411.6 Pa and 588 Pa. Their
recorded

Table 1: Gage pressure measurement

values in mm
are: 20, 42 and 60.Similarly, the highest calculated gage pressure are correspondingly 1950.337
Pa, 2273.6 Pa and 1862 Pa and their recorded values are: 123, 232 and 190 mm.
Experiment # 2: Bourdon tube calibration for increasing pressure
To set
To record
To calculate
Mass of dead weight
Pressure gage
Theoretical pressure
Error (%)
(Kg)
1

(KN/m2)

(KN/m2)

Table
for increasing
28 2: Bourdon tube calibration
28
0 pressure
1

2
56
62.28
10.08
3
90
93.4
3.64
4
112
124.57
10.09
5
140
155.71
10.09
6
170
186.85
9.017
The results of experiment 2, which aims to measure tube calibration for increasing pressure, are
shown in Table 2. It is obvious that when the dead weight mass is 1 Kg, the error % is 0. When
the mass changes, the error % increases to attain a maximum value of 10.09% for m = 4 or 5 Kg.
The highest gage pressure corresponds to m= 6kg. The corresponding measured gage pressure is
170 KN/m2 while the theoretical pressure is 186.85 KN/m2.

Discussion and Conclusion


In the first experiment, where the aim was to measure the different compressor pressures using 3
different ways, the results were not quite the same. This means that some errors occurred.
Some source of errors could be bad reading of the results since the readings are analogue and not
digital. Moreover, the effect of capillary action should be taken into consideration since it affects
the reading. In addition, dust may have clustered in the pipes leading to error in the readings.
Another source of error is that the pipes might not have been well entered into the orifice.
Regarding the second experiment, the results are expected and acceptable (error <12%). Usually
the theoretical results are greater than the experimental ones since the theoretical analysis does
not take into consideration the life factors. In addition, the aim of the result is calibration.
Calibration is making sure that the measured values are the same the known values. Following
the same reasoning, calibration aim is to make sure that the measured gage pressure is equal to
theoretical gage pressure at different dead mass weights. Hence, the apparatus is not well
calibrated.
2