Sei sulla pagina 1di 30

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

XIV th INTERNATIONAL NUMISMATIC CONGRESS

GLASGOW 2009

Edited by Nicholas Holmes

PROCEEDINGS OF THE XIV t h INTERNATIONAL NUMISMATIC CONGRESS GLASGOW 2009 Edited by Nicholas Holmes GLASGOW

GLASGOW 2011

International Numismatic Council British Academy All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council ISBN
International Numismatic Council British Academy All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council ISBN

International Numismatic Council

International Numismatic Council British Academy All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council ISBN

British Academy

International Numismatic Council British Academy All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council ISBN

All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council

ISBN 978-1-907427-17-6

Distributed by Spink & Son Ltd, 69 Southampton Row, London WC1B 4ET Printed and bound in Malta by Gutenberg Press Ltd.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

XIV th INTERNATIONAL NUMISMATIC CONGRESS

GLASGOW 2009

I

CONTENTS

Preface

18

Editor’s note

19

Inaugural lecture

‘A foreigner’s view of the coinage of Scotland’, by Nicholas MAYHEW

23

Antiquity: Greek

I Delni (distribuzione, associazioni, valenza simbolica), by Pasquale APOLITO

35

Lessons from a (bronze) die study, by Donald T. ARIEL

42

Le monete incuse a leggenda Pal-Mol: una verica della documentazione disponibile, by Marta BARBATO

48

Up-to-date survey of the silver coinage of the Nabatean king Aretas IV, by Rachel BARKAY

52

Remarks on monetary circulation in the chora of Olbia Pontica – the case of Koshary, by Jarosław BODZEK

58

The ‘colts’ of Corinth revisited: a note on Corinthian drachms from Ravel’s Period V, by Lee L. BRICE

67

Not only art! The period of the ‘signing masters’ and ‘historical iconography’, by Maria CACCAMO CALTABIANO

73

Les monnaies préromaines de BB’T-BAB(B)A de Mauretanie, by Laurent CALLEGARIN & Abdelaziz EL KHAYARI

81

Mode iconograche e determinazioni delle cronologie nell’occidente ellenistico, by Benedetto CARROCCIO

89

La phase postarchaïque du monnayage de Massalia, by Jean-Albert CHEVILLON

97

A new thesis for Siglos and Dareikos, by Nicolas A. CORFÙ

105

Heroic cults in northern Sicily between numismatics and archaeology, by Antonio CRISÀ

114

La politica estera tolemaica e l’area del Mar Nero: l’iconograa numismatica come fonte storica, by Angela D’ARRIGO

123

2

CONTENTS

New light on the Larnaca hoard IGCH 1272, by Anne DESTROOPER- GEORGIADES

The coinage of the Scythian kings in the West Pontic area: iconography, by Dimitar DRAGANOV

The ‘royal archer’ and Apollo in the East: Greco-Persian iconography in the Seleukid Empire, by Kyle ERICKSON & Nicholas L. WRIGHT

. Retour sur les critères qui dénissent habituellement les ‘imitations’ Athéniennes, by Chr. FLAMENT

On the gold coinage of ancient Chersonese (46-133 AD), by N.A. FROLOVA

Propaganda on coins of Ptolemaic queens, by Agnieszka FULIŃSKA

Osservazioni sui rinvenimenti di monete dagli scavi archeologici dell’antica Caulonia, by Giorgia GARGANO

La circulation monétaire à Argos d’après les monnaies de fouille de l’ÉFA (École française d’Athènes), by Catherine GRANDJEAN

Silver denominations and standards of the Bosporan cities, by Jean HOURMOUZIADIS

Seleucid ‘eagles’ from Tyre and Sidon: preliminary results of a die-study, by Panagiotis P. IOSSIF

Archaic Greek coins east of the Tigris: evidence for circulation?, by J. KAGAN

Parion history from coins, by Vedat KELEŞ

Regional mythology: the meanings of satyrs on Greek coins, by Ann-Marie KNOBLAUCH

The chronology of the Hellenistic coins of Thessaloniki, Pella and Amphipolis, by Theodoros KOUREMPANAS

The coinage of Chios during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods, by Constantine LAGOS

Évidence numismatique de l’existence d’Antioche en Troade, by Dincer Savas LENGER

131

140

163

170

178

184

189

199

203

213

230

237

246

251

259

265

CONTENTS

3

Hallazgo de un conjunto monetal de Gadir en la necrópolis Feno-Púnica de los cuarteles de Varela, Cádiz, España, by Urbano LÓPEZ RUIZ & Ana María RUIZ TINOCO

Gold and silver weight standards in fourth-century Cyprus: a resume, by Evangeline MARKOU

Göttliche Herrscherin – herrschende Göttin? Frauenbildnisse auf hellenistischen Münzen, by Katharina MARTIN

Melkart-Herakles y sus distintas advocaciones en la Bética costera, by Elena MORENO PULIDO

Some remarks concerning the gold coins with the legend ‘ΚΟΣΩΝ’, by Lucian MUNTEANU

‘Une monnaie grecque inédite: un triobole d’Argos en Argolide’, by Eleni PAPAEFTHYMIOU

The coinage of the Paeonian kings Leon and Dropion, by Eftimija PAVLOVSKA

Le trésor des monnaies perses d’or trouvé à Argamum / Orgamé (Jurilovca, dép. de Tulcea, Roumanie), by E. PETAC, G. TALMAŢCHI & V. IONIŢĂ

The imitations of late Thasian tetradrachms: chronology, classication and dating, by Ilya S. PROKOPOV

Moneta e discorso politico: emissioni monetarie in Cirenaica tra il 321 e il 258 a.C., by Daniela Bessa PUCCINI

Tesoros sertorianos en España: problemas y nuevas perspectivas, by Isabel RODRÍGUEZ CASANOVA

‘Ninfa’ eponima grande dea? Caratteri e funzioni delle personicazioni cittadine, by Grazia SALAMONE

The coin nds from Hellenistic and Roman Berytas (fourth century BC – third century AD, by Ziad SAWAYA

Monetazione incusa magnogreca: destinazione e funzioni, by Rosa SCAVINO

Uso della moneta presso gli indigeni della Sicilia centro-meridionale, by Lavinia SOLE

La moneta di Sibari: struttura e metrologia, by Emanuela SPAGNOLI

269

280

285

293

304

310

319

331

337

350

357

365

376

382

393

405

4

CONTENTS

Le stephanophoroi prima delle stephanophoroi, by Marianna SPINELLI

Weight adjustment al marco in antiquity, and the Athenian decadrachm, by Clive STANNARD

The Magnesian hoard: a preliminary report, by Oğuz TEKIN

Zur Datierung und Deutung der Beizeichen auf Stateren von Górtyn, by Burkhard TRAEGER

Aspetti della circolazione monetaria in area basso adriatica, by Adriana TRAVAGLINI & Valeria Giulia CAMILLERI

La polisemia di Apollo attraverso il documento monetale, by Maria Daniela TRIFIRÒ

Thraco-Macedonian coins: the evidence from the hoards, by Alexandros R.A. TZAMALIS

The pattern of ndspots of coins of Damastion: a clue to its location, by Dubravka UJES MORGAN

The civic bronze coins of the Eleans: some preliminary remarks, by Franck WOJAN

The hoard of Cyzicenes from the settlement of Patraeus (Taman peninsula), by E.V. ZAKHAROV

Antiquity: Roman

The coinage of Diva Faustina I, by Martin BECKMANN

Coin nds from the Dutch province of North-Holland (Noord-Holland). Chronological and geographical distribution and function of Roman coins from the Dutch part of Barbaricum, by Paul BELIËN

The key to the Varus defeat: the Roman coin nds from Kalkriese, by Frank BERGER

Monetary circulation in the Bosporan Kingdom in the Roman period c. rst - fourth century AD, by Line BJERG

The Roman coin hoards of the second century AD found on the territory of present-day Serbia: the reasons for their burial, by Bojana BORIĆ-BREŠKOVIĆ

417

427

436

441

447

461

473

487

497

500

509

514

527

533

538

CONTENTS

5

Die Münzprägung des Thessalischen Bundes von Marcus Aurelius bis Gallienus (161-268 n. Chr.), by Friedrich BURRER

The denarius in the rst century, by K. BUTCHER & M. PONTING

Coinage and coin circulation in Nicopolis of Epirus: a preliminary report, by Dario CALOMINO

La piazza porticata di Egnazia: la documentazione numismatica, by Raffaella CASSANO, Adriana TRAVAGLINI & Alessandro CRISPINO

Dallo scavo al museo: un ripostiglio monetale di età antonina del IV municipio

di Roma (Italia), by Francesca CECI

I rinvenimenti dal Tevere: la monetazione della Diva Faustina, by Alessia

CHIAPPINI

Analytical evidence for the organization of the Alexandrian mint during the Tetrarchy (III-IV centuries AD), by J.M.COMPANA, L. LEÓN-REINA, F.J. FORTES, L.M. CABALÍN, J.J. LASERNA, & M.A.G. ARANDA

L’Oriente Ligoriano: fonti, luoghi, mirabilia, by Arianna D’OTTONE

Le emissioni isiache: quale rapporto con il navigium Isidis?, by Sabrina DE

PACE

A centre of aes rude production in southern Etruria : La Castellina

(Civitavecchia, Roma), by Almudena DOMÍNGUEZ-ARRANZ & Jean GRAN-

AYMERICH

Perseus and Andromeda in Alexandria: explaining the popularity of the myth in the culture of the Roman Empire, by Melissa Barden DOWLING

Les fractions du nummus frappées à Rome et à Ostie sous le règne de Maxence (306-312 ap. J.C.), by V. DROST

Monuments on the move: architectural coin types and audience targeting in the Flavian and Trajanic periods, by Nathan T. ELKINS

‘The restoration of memory: Minucius and his monument’ by Jane DeRose

EVANS

La circulation monétaire à Lyon de la fondation de la colonie à la mort de Septime Sévère (43 av. – 211 apr. J.C.): premiers résultats, by Jonas FLUCK

545

557

569

576

580

592

595

605

613

621

629

635

645

657

662

6

CONTENTS

Le monnayage en orichalque romain: apport des expérimentations aux études numismatiques, by Arwen GAFFIERO, Arnaud SUSPÈNE, Florian TÉREYGEOL & Bernard GRATUZE

New coins of pre- and denarial system minted outside Italy, by Paz GARCÍA- BELLIDO

Les bronzes d’Octave à la proue et à la tête de bélier (RPC 533) attribués à Toulouse-Tolosa: nouvelles découvertes, by Vincent GENEVIÈVE

Crustumerium, Cisterna Grande (Rome, Italy): textile traces from a Roman coins hoard, by Maria Rita GIULIANI, Ida Anna RAPINESI, Francesco DI GENNARO, Daniela FERRO, Heli ARIMA, Ulla RAJANA & Francesca CECI

Deux médaillons d’Antonin le Pieux du territoire de Pautalia (Thrace), by Valentina GRIGOROVA-GENCHEVA

Mars and Venus on Roman imperial coinage in the time of Marcus Aurelius:

iconological considerations with special reference to the emperor’s correspondence with Marcus Cornelius Fronto, by Jürgen HAMER

The silver coins of Aegeae in the light of Hadrian’s eastern silver coinages, by F. HAYMANN

The coin-images of the later soldier-emperors and the creation of a Roman empire of late antiquity, by Ragnar HEDLUND

Coinage and currency in ancient Pompeii, by Richard HOBBS

Imitations in gold, by Helle W. HORSNÆS

Un geste de Caracalla sur une monnaie frappée à Pergame, by Antony HOSTEIN

New data on monetary circulation in northern Illyricum in the fth century, by Vujadin IVANIŠEVIĆ & Sonja STAMENKOVIĆ

Die augusteischen Münzmeisterprägungen: IIIviri monetales im Spannungsfeld zwischen Republik und Kaiserzeit, by Alexa KÜTER

Imperial representation during the reign of Valentinian III, by Aládar KUUN

The Nome coins: some remarks on the state of research, by Katarzyna LACH

Le monnayage de Brutus et Cassius après la mort de César, by Raphaëlle LAIGNOUX

668

676

686

696

709

715

720

726

732

742

749

757

765

772

780

785

CONTENTS

7

L’ultima emissione di Cesare Ottaviano: alcune considerazioni sulle recenti proposte cronologiche, by Fabiana LANNA

Claudius’s issue of silver drachmas in Alexandria: Serapis Anastole, by Barbara LICHOCKA

La chronologie des émissions monétaires de Claude II: ateliers de Milan et Siscia, by Jérôme MAIRAT

La circulation monétaire à Strasbourg (France) et sur le Rhin supérieur au premier siècle après J.-C., by Stéphane MARTIN

The double solidus of Magnentius, by Alenka MIŠKEC

A hoard of bronze coins of the third century BC found at Pratica di Mare

(Rome), by Maria Cristina MOLINARI

Un conjunto de plomos monetiformes de procendencia hispana de la colección antigua del Museo Arqueológico Nacional (Madrid), by Bartolomé MORA SERRANO

Monete e ritualitá funeraria in epoca romana imperiale: il sepolcreto dei Fadieni (Ferrara – Italia), by Anna Lina MORELLI

Il database Monete al femminile, by Anna Lina MORELLI & Erica FILIPPINI

La trouvaille monétaire de Bex-Sous-Vent (VD, Suisse): une nouvelle analyse, by Yves MUHLEMANN

Die Sammlung von Lokalmythen griechischer Städte des Ostens: ein Projekt der Kommission für alte Geschichte und Epigraphik, by Johannes NOLLÉ

Plomos monetiformes con leyenda ibérica Baitolo, hallados en la ciudad romana de Baetulo (Hispania Tarraconensis), by Pepita PADRÓS MARTÍ, Daniel VÁZQUEZ & Francesc ANTEQUERA

I denari serrati della repubblica romana: alcune considerazioni, by Andrea PANCOTTI & Patrizia CALABRIA

Monetary circulation in late antique Rome: a fth-century context coming from the N.E. slope of the Palatine Hill. A preliminary report, by Giacomo PARDINI

Securitas e suoi attributi: lo sviluppo di una iconograa, by Rossella PERA

Could the unofcial mint called ‘Atelier II’ be identied with the ofcinae of Châteaubleau (France)?, by Fabien PILON

794

800

809

816

822

828

839

846

856

864

872

878

888

893

901

906

8

CONTENTS

Coin nds from Elaiussa Sebaste (Cilicia Tracheia), by Annalisa POLOSA

El poblamiento romano en el área del Mar Menor (Ager Carthaginensis): una aproximación a partir de los recientes hallazgos numismáticos, by Alfredo PORRÚA MARTÍNEZ & Elvira NAVARRO SANTA-CRUZ

The presence of local deities on Roman Palestinian coins: reections on cultural and religious interaction between Romans and local elites, by Vagner Carvalheiro PORTO

The male couple: iconography and semantics, by Mariangela PUGLISI

Countermarks on the Republican and Augustan brass coins in the south-eastern Alps, by Andrej RANT

A stone thesaurus with a votive coin deposit found in the sanctuary of Campo

della Fiera, Orvieto (Volsinii), by Samuele RANUCCI

L’image du pouvoir impériale de Trajan et son évolution idéologique: étude des frappes monétaires aux types d’Hercule, Jupiter et Soleil, by Laurent RICCARDI

The inow of Roman coins to the east-of-the-Vistula Mazovia (Mazowsze) and Podlachia (Podlasie), by Andrzej ROMANOWSKI

Numismatics and archaeology in Rome: the nds from the Basilica Hilariana, by Alessia ROVELLI

Communicating a consecratio: the deication coinage of Faustina I, by Clare

ROWAN

An alleged hoard of third-century Alexandrian tetradrachms, by Adriano SAVIO

& Alessandro CAVAGNA

Some notes on religious embodiments in the coinage of Roman Syria and Mesopotamia, by Philipp SCHWINGHAMMER

Roman provincial coins in the money circulation of the south-eastern Alpine area and western Pannonia, by Andrej ŠEMROV

Recenti rinvenimenti dal Tevere (1): introduzione, by Patrizia SERAFIN

Recenti rinvenimenti dal Tevere (2): la moneta di Vespasiano tra tradizione ed innovazione, by Alessandra SERRA

A hoard of denarii and early Roman Messene, by Kleanthis SIDIROPOULOS

911

916

926

933

941

954

964

973

983

991

999

1004

1013

1019

1020

1025

CONTENTS

9

La ‘corona radiata’ sui ritratti dei bronzi imperiali alessandrini, by Giovanni Maria STAFFIERI

The iconography of two groups of struck lead from Central Italy and Baetica in the second and rst centuries BC, by Clive STANNARD

Monete della zecca di Frentrum, Larinum e Pallanum, by Napoleone STELLUTI

Personalized victory on coins: the Year of the Four Emperors – Greek imperial issues, by Yannis STOYAS

Les monnaies d’or d’Auguste: l’apport des analyses élémentaires et le problème de l’atelier de Nîmes, by Arnaud SUSPÈNE, Maryse BLET-LEMARQUAND & Michel AMANDRY

The popularity of the enthroned type of Asclepius on Peloponnesian coins of imperial times, by Christina TSAGKALIA

Gold and silver rst tetrarchic issues from the mint of Alexandria, by D. Scott VANHORN

Note sulla circolazione monetaria in Etruria meridionale nel III secolo a.C., by Daniela WILLIAMS

Roman coins from the western part of West Balt territory, by Anna ZAPOLSKA

Antiquity: Celtic

La moneda ibérica del nordeste de la Hispania Citerior: consideraciones sobre su cronología y función, by Marta CAMPO

Les bronzes à la gueule de loup du Berry: essai de typochronologie, by Philippe CHARNOTET

Les imitations de l’obole de Marseille de LTD1/LTD2A (II e s. / I er s. av. J.C.) entre les massifs des Alpes et du Jura, by Anne GEISER

Le monnayage à la légende TOGIRIX: une nouvelle approche, by Anne GEISER & Julia GENECHESI

Trading with silver bullion during the third century BC: the hoard of Armuña de Tajuña, by Manuel GOZALBES, Gonzalo CORES & Pere Pau RIPOLLÈS

Données expérimentales sur la fabrication de quinaires gaulois fourrés, by Katherine GRUEL, Dominique LACOSTE, Carole FRARESSO, Michel PERNOT & François ALLIER

1037

1045

1056

1067

1073

1082

1092

1103

1115

1135

1142

1148

1155

1165

1173

10

CONTENTS

Pre-Roman coins from Sotin, by Mato ILKIĆ

Les monnaies gauloises trouvées à Paris, by Stéphane MARTIN

Die keltischen Münzen vom Oberleiserberg (Niederösterreich), by Jiři MILITKÝ

New coin nds from the two late Iron Age settlements of Altenburg (Germany) and Rheinau (Switzerland) – a military coin series on the German-Swiss border?, by Michael NICK

Le dépôt monétaire gaulois de Laniscat (Côtes-d’Armor): 547 monnaies de bas titre. Étude préliminaire, by Sylvia NIETO-PELLETIER, Bernard GRATUZE & Gérard AUBIN

Antiquity: general

La moneda en el mundo funerario-ritual de Gadir-Gades, by A. ARÉVALO GONZÁLEZ

Neues Licht auf eine alte Frage? Die Verwandschaft von Münzen und Gemmen, by Angela BERTHOLD

Tipi del cane e del lupo sulle monete del Mediterraneo antico, by Alessandra BOTTARI

Not all these things are easy to read, much less to understand: new approaches to reading images on ancient coins, by Geraldine CHIMIRRI-RUSSELL

The collection of ancient coins in the Ossoliński National Institute in Lvov (1828-1944), by Adam DEGLER

Preliminary notes on Phoenician and Punic coins kept in the Pushkin Museum, by S. KOVALENKO & L.I. MANFREDI

Greek coins from the National Historical Museum of Rio de Janeiro: SNG project, by Marici Martins MAGALHÃES

La catalogazione delle emissioni di Commodo nel Codice Ligoriano, by Rosa Maria NICOLAI

The sacred life of coins: cult fees, sacred law and numismatic evidence, by Isabelle A. PAFFORD

Anton Prokesch-Osten and the Greek coins of the coin collection at the Universalmuseum Joanneum in Graz, Austria, by Karl PEITLER

1182

1191

1198

1207

1218

1231

1240

1247

1254

1261

1266

1278

1292

1303

1310

CONTENTS

11

Monete ed anelli: cronologia, tipologie, fruitori, by Claudia PERASSI

Il volume 21 delle Antichitá Romane di Pirro Ligorio ‘Libri delle Medaglie da Cesare a Marco Aurelio Commodo’, by Patrizia SERAFIN

Greek and Roman coins in the collection of the Çorum Museum, by D. Özlem YALCIN

Mediaeval and modern western (mediaeval)

The exchanges in the city of London, 1344-1358, by Martin ALLEN

Fribourg en Nuithonie: faciès monétaire d’une petite ville au centre de l’Europe, by Anne-Francine AUBERSON

Die Pegauer Brakteatenprägung Abt Siegfrieds von Rekkin (1185-1223):

Kriterien zu deren chronologischer Einordnung, by Jan-Erik BECKER

Die recutting in the eleventh-century Polish coinage, by Mateusz BOGUCKI

Le retour à l’or au treizième siècle: le cas de Montpellier ( Marc BOMPAIRE & Pierre-Joan BERNARD

1244-1246

), by

Le monete a leggenda ΠAN e le emissioni arabo-bizantine. I dati dello scavo di Antinoupolis / El Sheikh Abada, by Daniele CASTRIZIO

Scavi di Privernum e Fossanova (Latina, Italia): monete tardoantiche, medioevale e moderne, by Francesca CECI & Margherita CANCELLIERI

La aportación de los hallazgos monetarios a ‘la crisis del siglo XIV’ en Cataluña, by Maria CLUA I MERCADAL

Norwegian bracteates during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, by Linn EIKJE

Donative pennies in Viking-age Scandinavia?, by Frédéric ELFVER

Carolingian capitularies as a source for the monetary history of the Frankish empire, by Hubert EMMERIG

Ulf Candidatus, by G. EMSØY

Münzen des Moskauer Grossfürstentums. Das Geld von Dmitrij Ivanowitsch Donskoj (1359-1389) (über die Veröffentlichung der ersten Ausgabe des ‘Korpus der russischen M ü nzen des 14-15. Jhs.’), by P. GAIDUKOV & I. GRISHIN

1323

1334

1344

1355

1360

1372

1382

1392

1401

1408

1411

1418

1426

1431

1436

1441

12

CONTENTS

Brakteatenprägungen in Mähren in der zweiten Hälfte des dreizehnten Jahrhunderts, by Dagmar GROSSMANNOVÁ

Monetisation in medieval Scandinavia, by Svein H. GULLBEKK

A mancus apparently marked on behalf of King Offa: genuine or fake?, by Wolfgang HAHN

Among farmers and city people: coin use in early medieval Denmark, c. 1000- 1250, by Gitte Tarnow INGVARDSON

Was pseudo-Byzantine coinage primarily of municipal origin?, by Charlie KARUKSTIS

Interpreting single nds in medieval England – the secondary lives of coins, by Richard KELLEHER

Byzantine coins from the area of Belarus, by Krystyna LAVYSH & Marcin WOŁOSZYN

Die früheste Darstellung des Richters auf einer mittelalterlicher Münze?, by Ivar LEIMUS

Coinage and money in the ‘years of insecurity’: the case of late Byzantine Chalkidiki (thirteenth - fourteenth century), by Vangelis MALADAKIS

Nota sulla circolazione monetaria tardoantica nel Lazio meridionale: i reperti di S. Ilario ad bivium, by Flavia MARANI

The money of the First Crusade: the evidence of a new parcel and its implications, by Michael MATZKE

Überlegungen zum ‘Habsburger Urbar’ als Quelle für Währungsgeschichte, by Samuel NUSSBAUM

Schilling Kennisbergisch slages of Grand Master Louis of Ehrlichshausen, by Borys PASZKIEWICZ

Un diner de Jaime I el conquistador en el Mar Menor: evidencias de presencia aragonesa en el Campo de Cartagena durante la Baja Edad Media, by Alfredo PORRÚA MARTÍNEZ & Alfonso ROBLES FERNÁNDEZ

L’atelier de faux-monnayeur de Rovray (VD, Suisse), by Carine RAEMY TOURNELLE

1452

1458

1464

1470

1477

1492

1500

1509

1517

1535

1542

1552

1557

1564

1570

CONTENTS

13

La ubicación de las casas de moneda en le Europa medieval. El caso del reino de León, by Antonio ROMA VALDÉS

New perspectives on Norwegian Viking-age hoards c. 1000: the Bore hoard revisited, by Elina SCREEN

The discovery of a hoard of coins dated to the fth and sixth centuries in Klapavice in the hinterland of ancient Salona, by Tomislav ŠEPAROVIĆ

A model for the analysis of coins lost in Norwegian churches, by Christian J.

SIMENSEN

A clippe from Femern, by Jørgen SØMOD

The convergence of coinages in the late medieval Low Countries, by Peter

SPUFFORD

A perplexing hoard of Lusignan coins from Polis, Cyprus, by Alan M. STAHL,

Gerald POIRIER & Nan YAO

OTTO / ODDO and ADELHEIDA / ATHALHET - onomatological aspects

of German coin types of the tenth and eleventh centuries, by Sebastian

STEINBACH

Bulles de plomb et les monnaies en Pologne au XII e siècle, by Stanislaw

SUCHODOLSKI

Palaeologian coin ndings of Kusadasi, Kadikalesi/Anaia and their reections. by Ceren ÜNAL

The hoard of Tetín (Czech Republic) in the light of currency conditions in thirteenth-century Bohemia, by Roman ZAORAL & Jiři MILITKÝ

The circulation of foreign coins in Poland in the fteenth century, by Michal

ZAWADZKI

Mediaeval and modern Western (modern)

Die neuzeitliche Münzstätte im Schloss Haldenstein bei Chur Gr, Schweiz, by Rahel C. ACKERMANN

The money box system for savings in Amsterdam, 1907-1935, by G.N. BORST

Four ducats coins of Franz Joseph I (1848-1916) of Austria: their use in jewellery and some hitherto unpublished imitations, by Aleksandar N. BRZIC

1580

1591

1597

1605

1614

1620

1625

1633

1640

1649

1664

1671

1679

1687

1693

14

CONTENTS

A king as Hercules in the modern Polish coinage, by Witold GARBAZCEWSKI

The monetary areas in Piedmont during the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries: a starting point for new investigations, by Luca GIANAZZA

Coin hoards in the United States, by John M. KLEEBERG

The transfer of minting techniques to Denmark in the nineteenth century, by Michael MÄRCHER

Patrimonio Numismático Iberoamericano: un proyecto del Museo Arqueológico Nacional, by Carmen MARCOS ALONSO & Paloma OTERO MORÁN

Moneda local durante la guerra civil española: billete emitido por el ayuntamiento de San Pedro del Pinatar, Murcia, by Federico MARTÍNEZ PASTOR & Alfredo PORRÚA MARTÍNEZ

Coins and monetary circulation in the Legnica-Brzeg duchy: rudimentary problems, by Robert PIEŃKOWSKI

Representaciones del café en el acervo de numismática del Museu Paulista - USP, by Angela Maria Gianeze RIBEIRO

Freiburg im Üechtland und die Münzreformen der französischen Könige (1689- 1726), by Nicole SCHACHER

La aparición de la marca de valor en la moneda valenciana, ¿1618 o 1640? Una nueva hipótesis de trabajo, by Juan Antonio SENDRA IBÁÑEZ

Devotion and coin-relics in early modern Italy, by Lucia TRAVAINI

The political context of the origin and the exportation of thaler-coins from Jáchymov (Joachimsthal) in the rst half of the sixteenth century, by Petr VOREL

The late sixteenth-century Russian forged kopecks, which were ascribed to the English Muscovy Company, by Serguei ZVEREV

Oriental and African coinages

The meaning of the character bao in the legends of Chinese cash coins, by Vladimir A. BELYAEV & Sergey V. SIDOROVICH

Three unpublished Indo-Sasanian coin hoards, Government Museum, Mathura, by Pratipal BHATIA

1704

1713

1719

1725

1734

1744

1748

1752

1758

1765

1774

1778

1783

1789

1796

CONTENTS

15

Oriental coins in the Capitoline Museums (Rome): further researches on Stanzani Collection history, by Arianna D’OTTONE

The king, the princes and the Raj, by Sanjay GARG

The rst evidence of a mint at Miknāsa: two unpublished Almoravid coins, a dirham and a dinar, of the year 494H/1100, by Tawq IBRAHIM

L’âge d’or de la numismatique en Chine: l’exemple du Catalogue des Monnaies Anciennes de Li Zuoxian, by Lyce JANKOWSKI

Numismatic research in Japan today: coins, paper monies and patterns of usage. Paper money in early modern Japan: economic and folkloristic aspects, by Keiichiro KATO

The gold reform of Ghazan Khan, by Judith KOLBAS

A study of medieval Chinese coins from Karur and Madurai in Tamil Nadu, by

KRISHNAMURTHY RAMASUBBAIYER

Latest contributions to the numismatic history of Central Asia (late eighteenth – nineteenth century), by Vladimir NASTICH

Silver fragments of unique Būyid and amdānid coins and their role in the Kelč hoard (Czech Republic), by Vlastimil NOVÁK

Numismatic evidence for the location of Saray, the capital of the Golden Horde, by A.V. PACHKALOV

Le regard des voyageurs sur les monnaies africaines du XVI e au XIX e siècles, by Josette RIVALLAIN

Les imitations des dirhems carrés almohades: apport des analyses élémentaires, by A. TEBOULBI, M. BOMPAIRE & M. BLET-LEMARQUAND

À propos du monnayage de Kiến Phúc (1883-1884), by François THIERRY

Glass jetons from Sicily: new nd evidence from the excavations at Monte Iato, by Christian WEISS

Medals

Joseph Kowarzik (1860-1911): ein Medailleur der Jahrhundertwende, by Kathleen ADLER

1807

1813

1821

1826

1832

1841

1847

1852

1862

1869

1874

1884

1890

1897

1907

16

CONTENTS

Numismatic memorials of breeding trotting horses (based on the collection of the numismatic department of the Hermitage), by L.I. DOBROVOLSKAYA

De retrato a arquetipo: anotaciones sobre la difusión de la egie de Juan VIII Paleólogo en la peninsula Ibérica, by Albert ESTRADA-RIUS

Titon du Tillet e le medaglie del Parnasse François, by Paola GIOVETTI

Bedrohung und Schutz der Erde: Positionen zur Umweltproblematik in der deutschen Medaillenkunst der Gegenwart, by Rainer GRUND

The rediscovery of the oldest private medal collection of the Netherlands, by Jan PELSDONK

Twentieth-century British campaign medals: a continuation of the nineteenth century?, by Phyllis STODDART and Keith SUGDEN

‘Shines with unblemished honour’: some thoughts on an early nineteenth- century medal, by Tuukka TALVIO

General numismatics

Dall’iconograa delle monete antiche all’ideologia della nazione future. Proiezioni della numismatica grecista di D’Annunzio sulla nuova monetazione Sabauda, by Giuseppe ALONZO

Didaktisch-methodische Aspekte der Numismatik in der Schule, by Szymon BERESKA

The Count of Caylus (1692-1765) and the study of ancient coins, by François de CALLATAŸ

Le monete di Lorenzo il Magnico in un manoscritto di Angelo Poliziano, by Fiorenzo CATALLI

Coinage and mapping, by Thomas FAUCHER

Classicism and coin collections in Brazil, by Maria Beatriz Borba FLORENZANO

A prosopography of the mint ofcials: the Eligivs database and its evolution, by Luca GIANAZZA

Elementary statistical methods in numismatic metrology, by Dagmar GROSSMANNOVÁ & Jan T. STEFAN

1920

1931

1937

1945

1959

1965

1978

1985

1993

1999

2004

2012

2017

2022

2027

CONTENTS

17

Les collections numismatiques du Musée archéologique de Dijon (France), by Jacques MEISSONNIER

Bank of Greece: the numismatic collections, by Eleni PAPAEFTHYMIOU

Foundation of the Hellenic World. A new private collection open to the public, by Eleni PAPAEFTHYMIOU

Re-discovering coins: publication of the numismatic collections in Bulgarian museums – a new project, by Evgeni PAUNOV, Ilya PROKOPOV & Svetoslava FILIPOVA

„Census of Ancient Coins Known in the Renaissance“, by Ulrike PETER

Le sel a servi de moyen d’échange, by J.A. SCHOONHEYT

The international numismatic library situation and the foundation of the International Numismatic Libraries’ Network (INLN), by Ans TER WOERDS

The Golden Fleece in Britain, by R.H. THOMPSON

Das Museum August Kestner in Hannover: Neues aus der Münzsammlung, by Simone VOGT

From the electrum to the Euro: a journey into the history of coins. A multimedia presentation by the Bank of Cyprus Cultural Foundation, by Eleni ZAPITI

Highlights from the Museum of the George and Nefeli Giabra Pierides Collection, donated by Clio and Solon Triantafyllides: coins and artefacts, by Eleni ZAPITI & Evangeline MARKOU

Index of Contributors

2036

2044

2046

2047

2058

2072

2082

2089

2100

2102

2112

2118

Άπόδοτε ον τνομίσματα Άθηναων Άθηναοις

RETOUR SUR LES CRITÈRES QUI DÉFINISSENT HABITUELLEMENT LES ‘IMITATIONS’ ATHÉNIENNES

CHR. FLAMENT *

Le numismate qui étudie les monnaies athéniennes d’époque classique se trouve tôt ou tard con- fronté au problème des ‘imitations’. On désigne de la sorte des pièces de bon poids et de bon aloi portant les types traditionnels d’Athènes, mais que l’on estime avoir été frappées en dehors et par d’autres autorités que celles de cette cité. Cette problématique s’est considérablement dévelop- pée et enrichie depuis la seconde moitié du siècle dernier sous l’impulsion de grands noms de la science numismatique comme E.S.G. Robinson 1 ou T.V. Buttrey. 2 Aujourd’hui, le nombre de monnaies identiées comme imitations dans nos médailliers et dans les trésors monétaires est à ce point considérable que l’on en viendrait à se demander si ce monnayage imitatif ne constituait pas, en réalité, l’un des plus importants de l’époque classique. Nous proposons de revenir ici sur le phénomène des imitations athéniennes, en insistant prin- cipalement sur les critères qui ont conduit les numismates à attribuer certaines ‘chouettes’ à des ateliers étrangers. Il s’agit d’un bilan, en quelque sorte, des études que nous avons menées sur le sujet 3 , mais aussi de nos travaux sur les exemplaires athéniens considérés comme ‘authentiques’, 4 car l’un et l’autre constituent, en réalité, les deux faces du même problème.

À l’origine des imitations

De manière incontestable, c’est l’étude du contenu de dépôts monétaires exhumés en Orient qui a conduit les numismates à identier certaines catégories de monnaies athéniennes comme imita- tions. 5 Dans ces trésors, en effet, les exemplaires aux types athéniens sont d’un style plutôt médio- cre et, qui plus est, portent pour la plupart les types du V e s. alors qu’ils gurent dans des dépôts généralement dissimulés au IV e s. Quoi de plus logique, dans ces conditions, que de considérer ces exemplaires comme des imitations de monnaies athéniennes du V e s. frappées au IV e s. dans les territoires où on les retrouve abondamment, c’est-à-dire principalement l’Égypte? L’hypothèse semblait d’autant plus probable que des monnaies imitant celles d’Athènes ont effectivement été frappées dans cette contrée, notamment des exemplaires qui portent en lieu en place de l’ethnique athénien les noms d’Artaxerxès III 6 ou des deux derniers satrapes d’Égypte, Sabakès et Mazakès. 7 Pourquoi de telles frappes? Depuis plus d’un demi-siècle l’explication qui prévaut demeure celle avancée par E.S.G. Robinson, 8 acceptée ensuite par bon nombre de numismates. 9 Selon lui, l’apparition des imitations athéniennes serait à mettre en relation avec le ralentissement, puis l’interruption des frappes de cette cité dans les dernières années de la guerre du Péloponnèse.

* Chargé de recherches F.R.S. – FNRS à l’Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgique).

1

2

Robinson 1937 et 1947. Buttrey 1982.

3 Flament 2001, 2003 et 2005.

4 Flament 2007a.

5 Cf. notamment Robinson 1937 sur les trésors d’Al Mina (IGCH 1487

et 1488) et Robinson 1947 sur celui de Tell el Maskhouta (IGCH 1649).

6 Mørkholm 1974.

7

8

Nicolet-Pierre 1979. Robinson 1937, p. 189.

9 Schlumberger 1953, p. 22 ; Kraay 1976, p. 205 ; Giovannini 1975, p. 195 ; Figueira 1998, p. 535.

RETOUR SUR LES CRITÈRES QUI DÉFINISSENT HABITUELLEMENT LES ‘IMITATIONS’ ATHÉNIENNES

Durant la seconde moitié du V e s., en effet, Athènes exporta ses chouettes en grandes quan- tités dans tout le bassin méditerranéen où, en raison de leur poids et de leur aloi irréprochables, elles s’imposèrent comme la monnaie de référence. À la n du siècle cependant, l’exportation s’interrompit, l’essentiel de la production monétaire étant alors consacré à l’effort de guerre, avant que les frappes ne s’interrompent suite à l’occupation de Décélie par l’armée spartiate à partir de 413. C’est pourquoi E.S.G. Robinson pensait que les utilisateurs étrangers frappèrent alors eux- mêmes les monnaies qui leur faisaient défaut en y apposant les types qui avaient depuis longtemps acquis la conance des usagers. Pourtant, des analyses menées en 2003 10 ont révélé que le métal des monnaies de style M ou B de T.V. Buttrey 11 n’était pas fondamentalement différent de celui des autres exemplaires athéniens jugés authentiques. Compte tenu de ces résultats, il convenait, primo, de s’interroger sur le bien- fondé des différents critères qui dénissent habituellement les imitations athéniennes et, secundo, de tenter de trouver des solutions alternatives aux problèmes que l’existence d’imitations antiques de monnaies athéniennes était censée résoudre.

171

Le style médiocre

Considérons, dans un premier temps, le critère d’identication qui apparaît sans conteste comme le plus subjectif: le style des monnaies. À beaucoup, en effet, le style des monnaies athéniennes des dépôts orientaux a paru bien trop médiocre pour qu’ils se résolvent à les attribuer à l’atelier athénien auquel on ne prête, nalement, que les plus beaux exemplaires. Pourtant, l’examen char- actéroscopique joint à l’étude stylistique démontre qu’au sein de l’atelier athénien se côtoyaient des graveurs au talent très inégal ; 12 les exemplaires rassemblés dans la Fig. 1 démontrent, en effet qu’il est possible d’établir par le biais de liaisons de coins et d’identités de style une continuité entre un ‘bel’ exemplaire athénien et un autre considéré comme une imitation grossière. Le droit du premier exemplaire (n° 1) a été employé avec un autre revers (n° 2) dont les principales carac- téristiques sont le plumage du ventre peu étendu, le sommet de la cuisse orné de trois globules très prononcés ainsi que les serres gurées au moyen de deux traits parallèles. Cette manière de graver est caractéristique de bon nombre de revers d’exemplaires identiés comme imitations, notam- ment ceux correspondant au groupe M de T.V. Buttrey (n° 3). Parmi ces monnaies, on relèvera un spécimen (n° 4) qui a été frappé avec le même coin de revers qu’un exemplaire au style grossier issu du trésor d’Al Mina (n° 5); la boucle est ainsi bouclée.

10 Flament / Marchetti 2004 ; Flament / Lateano / Demortier 2008 ; Flament 2007b. 11 Buttrey 1982. 12 Cf. à ce propos Flament 2007a, pp. 61-117 pour l’étude de l’organisation des émissions de la phase dite ‘standardisée’.

172

CHR. FLAMENT

172 CHR. FLAMENT Fig. 1. avr. 1963, n° 367; n° 3 = Robinson 1947, pl. 5,

Fig. 1.

avr. 1963, n° 367; n° 3 = Robinson 1947, pl. 5, n° 12; n° 4 = Lentini / Garraffo 1995, n°18; n° 5 = Robinson 1937, pl. 9, 5.

N° 1 = Vente n° 137 K. Kress, 21 nov. 1966, n° 213; n° 2 = Vente n° 125 K. Kress, 17

Sur base de cette continuité, faut-il ranger l’ensemble de ces pièces dans la catégorie des imita- tions? On grossirait ainsi le rang des frappes imitatives mais, surtout, les numismates perdraient alors le critère le plus évident dans le repérage des imitations, puisqu’un style correct ne serait plus en rien un gage d’authenticité. Mais ne serait-il pas préférable de considérer, à l’inverse, qu’il s’agit-là d’authentiques monnaies athéniennes? C’est d’ailleurs vers cette solution que nous pous- sent d’autres parallèles stylistiques, impliquant cette fois les monnaies en argent fourré au cuivre émises dans les dernières années de la guerre du Péloponnèse. Ces pièces, elles aussi, présentent de nombreuses afnités stylistiques avec les monnaies habituellement identiées comme imita- tions. Il suft de mettre côte à côte le droit d’une ‘imitation’ issue du trésor de Mit Rahinah 13 et celui d’une drachme fourrée provenant du fameux trésor du Pirée (IGCH 46) 14 (Fig. 2) pour se rendre compte qu’elles sont probablement de la même main.

Fig. 2.

qu’elles sont probablement de la même main. Fig. 2. À g.: Jones / Jones Milward 1988,
qu’elles sont probablement de la même main. Fig. 2. À g.: Jones / Jones Milward 1988,

À g.: Jones / Jones Milward 1988, n° 3; à dr.: Kroll 1996, n° 41.

Même constat pour cette monnaie retrouvée lors des fouilles américaines de l’agora identiée comme une imitation 15 et ce rare tétradrachme fourré (cf. Fig. 3).

13 Jones / Jones Milward 1988, pp. 105-16. 14 Kroll 1996, pp. 139-46.

15 Kroll 1993, p. 7.

RETOUR SUR LES CRITÈRES QUI DÉFINISSENT HABITUELLEMENT LES ‘IMITATIONS’ ATHÉNIENNES

HABITUELLEMENT LES ‘IMITATIONS’ ATHÉNIENNES Fig. 3. À g.: Kroll 1993, n° 8f; à dr.: Kroll 1996,

Fig. 3.

À g.: Kroll 1993, n° 8f; à dr.: Kroll 1996, n 2.

173

On relèvera encore que, d’une manière générale, le revers des drachmes fourrées (Fig. 4) suit le même modèle que celui que nous avons précédemment décrit en détails, caractérisé par le bec descendant le long du corps, les trois globules très apparents et la guration des serres au moyen de deux traits parallèles. Dès lors, si l’on maintient que les exemplaires habituellement identiés comme tels sont bien des imitations, on se voit, ipso facto, condamné à ranger également dans cette catégorie les monnaies fourrées qui constituent pratiquement les seuls repères dont on dispose pour le monnayage athénien du V e s.

Fig. 4. Kroll 1996, n° 51 (x2).

athénien du V e s. Fig. 4. Kroll 1996, n° 51 (x2). En revanche, s’il s’agissait

En revanche, s’il s’agissait d’authentiques monnaies de la n du V e s., s’étonnera-t-on de les voir massivement représentées dans les dépôts dissimulés en Sicile vers la n du siècle? On retrouve notam- ment des monnaies du style M et B dans un trésor exhumé lors de fouilles régulières à Naxos en 1985, 16 et qui fut probablement dissimulé au moment de la destruction de la ville en 402. 17 Leur présence dans un dépôt de cette date nous forcerait dès lors à admettre, si l’on s’en tient à l’explication traditionnelle, que le début des frappes imitatives avait suivi de très près la cessation de l’exploitation des mines au Laurion. De surcroît, on peut également s’interroger sur les raisons de la présence aussi massive en Sicile, à cette époque, de monnaies attribuées à l’Égypte. Mais là n’est pas le seul problème: si ces monnaies sont des imitations, qu’est-il advenu alors des sommes considérables – les comptes des tréso- riers d’Athéna 18 et le témoignage de Thucydide 19 font état de plusieurs centaines de talents – investies par Athènes dans l’expédition sicilienne de 415-413? Nous nous trouvons donc face à un véritable paradoxe: les trésors siciliens de la n du V e s.-début du IV e s. renfermeraient des imitations égyptiennes dont on peine à expliquer la présence, tandis que les monnaies athéniennes de l’expédition sicilienne n’auraient, elles, laissé aucune trace dans les dépôts siciliens. La solution la plus logique et la plus éco- nome n’est-elle pas plutôt de considérer ces exemplaires dont le style est tout à fait conforme à ce qui se faisait à Athènes à la n du V e s. – ainsi que le montrent les parallèles avec les exemplaires fourrés d’IGCH 46 – comme les monnaies importées par les troupes athéniennes entre 415 et 413?

16 Lentini / Garraffo 1995. 17 Cf. Flament 2003, p . 3. 18 Principalement IG I³ 370.

19 Cf. Thucydide, VI, 31, 1-5. Pour une analyse de ces documents et une étude du nancement de l’expédition sicilienne on se reportera à Flament 2008, pp. 160-78.

174

CHR. FLAMENT

Problèmes liés à la circulation monétaire

Avec les trésors siciliens, nous avons déjà abordé les problèmes liés à la circulation des monnaies athéniennes. Rappelons que l’un des éléments qui a incontestablement conduit à identier une cer- taine catégorie de monnaies comme imitations, outre leur style, est qu’elles étaient principalement retrouvées dans les territoires orientaux. Nous venons de voir cependant que cette image doit être nuancée, puisqu’elles sont également bien représentées en terres siciliennes. De plus, des trou- vailles plus récemment publiées montrent que de tels exemplaires ont également abondamment circulé en Attique, notamment les trésors retrouvés au Pirée (CH V.15) 20 ou à Ano Voula. 21 D’où la question qu’il faut se poser: aurait-on d’emblée considéré ces monnaies comme des imitations si elles étaient d’abord apparues sur le territoire athénien? Qui plus est, les deux trésors que l’on vient de mentionner comportaient un nombre important de drachmes qui sont sans conteste l’œuvre des graveurs des styles M et B. 22 Or, s’il s’agissait effectivement d’imitations, la présence de ces petites dénominations sur le sol athénien serait remarquable, puisque les pièces de petit module n’étaient pas habituellement exportées loin de leur lieu d’émission. Par ailleurs, il faut également se demander, puisque l’aire de circulation des petites dénominations était limitée, comment les imitateurs étrangers s’étaient procuré les modèles athéniens. Or, on peut sans conteste rattacher au style M des monnaies divisionnaires, jusqu’à l’hémiobole (Fig. 5) qui est l’une des plus petites dénominations d’argent frappée au V e s. à Athènes.

d’argent frappée au V e s. à Athènes. Fig. 5. Hirsch, vente 187 (19-23 septembre 1995),

Fig. 5.

Hirsch, vente 187 (19-23 septembre 1995), n° 347 (X3).

Mais, plus fondamentalement encore, il faut se demander quelle aurait été l’utilité, pour les émetteurs, de produire de petites dénominations, puisque les États étrangers habituellement iden- tiés comme tels – principalement la Perse et l’Égypte – étaient demeurés étrangers à l’économie monétaire durant pratiquement toute l’époque classique: les pièces n’y étaient pas acceptées comme ‘numéraire’, mais uniquement pour leur valeur métallique 23 et étaient probablement pesées lors de chaque transaction. La tradition des transactions conclues en argent pesé s’était d’ailleurs perpétuée durant toute l’époque classique, 24 situation que ne modiera apparemment pas immédi- atement la chute de l’empire achéménide. 25 D’ailleurs, les trésors orientaux mêlent des monnaies issues d’ateliers multiples 26 et d’étalons très différents, ce qui contraste avec la composition rela- tivement uniforme des trouvailles grecques. 27 Une telle diversité traduit, à l’évidence, des règles de thésaurisation différentes: aucune considération d’ordre métrologique ou politique n’incitait,

20 Oeconomides 1999, pp. 17-20.

21 Oeconomides 2006.

22 Oeconomides 1999, pl. 3, n os 15, 17-20, 26, 28-29 ; idem 2006, pl. 6, n° 28.

23 Figueira 1998, p. 31.

24 Le Rider 2001, pp. 169-70.

25 Naster 1983 avait judicieusement souligné que le salaire des travailleurs

de Persépolis resta très longtemps exprimé en métal pesé et non en monnaies. 26 Voir par exemple Zagazig (IGCH 1645): quatre-vingt-quatre monnaies de vingt-trois ateliers différents ; Fayoum (IGCH 1646): quinze monnaies de onze ateliers; Naucratis (IGCH 1647): quinze monnaies de quinze ateliers; Égypte (CH II.57): dix-sept monnaies de quatorze ou quinze ateliers. 27 Cf. à ce propos Flament 2008, pp. 6-10.

RETOUR SUR LES CRITÈRES QUI DÉFINISSENT HABITUELLEMENT LES ‘IMITATIONS’ ATHÉNIENNES

175

en effet, les thésauriseurs à privilégier l’un ou l’autre monnayage, puisque seule la valeur métal- lique des pièces importait. Sans doute étaient-elles pesées lors de chaque transaction et, au besoin, découpées pour atteindre le poids exigé, d’où l’état fragmentaire de nombreux exemplaires. Ce type particulier d’économie peut d’ailleurs expliquer pourquoi les monnaies athéniennes retrouvées dans les trésors orientaux du IV e s. portent les types du V e s. En effet, dans une économie où la monnaie était uniquement acceptée pour sa valeur métallique, la durée de vie d’une pièce s’en voyait considérablement allongée, puisqu’elle n’y circulait pratiquement pas. De plus, son aspect extérieur ou le fait qu’elle avait encore ou non cours légal importaient peu à l’utilisateur étranger. Dès lors, compte tenu de l’éloignement du lieu de frappe et de l’usage particulier qui était fait de la monnaie dans ces contrées, qu’il existe un décalage important entre l’émission et l’enfouissement des exemplaires athéniens tombe pratiquement sous le sens. C’est donc l’usage ‘non-monétaire’ de la monnaie dans les territoires orientaux qui explique l’écart entre la date d’émission et la date d’enfouissement des chouettes; on ne peut donc plus tirer parti de cette anomalie pour attribuer certains exemplaires athéniens du V e s. à des ateliers étrangers. À ce stade de l’enquête, il reste encore à expliquer la présence massive de monnaies athé- niennes dans les dépôts orientaux. Il faut, pour ce faire, reconsidérer beaucoup plus largement la diffusion de la monnaie athénienne en ne se limitant pas au témoignage des seuls trésors qui renvoient manifestement une image tronquée de la circulation monétaire. Selon eux, en effet, la monnaie athénienne n’aurait pratiquement pas circulé dans les territoires qui ont constitué l’archè athénienne: on n’y relève, en effet, qu’un nombre tout à fait insigniant de dépôts contenant des chouettes. 28 Or, il est indéniable que les monnaies athéniennes ont très massivement circulé dans ces territoires, comme en témoignent notamment le décret par lequel Athènes voulut imposer à ses sujets l’usage de sa seule monnaie (IG I³ 1453) 29 ou les stèles de l’aparchè. 30 Dès lors, il faut con- clure que plusieurs phénomènes ont manifestement dû en occulter la présence. On peut penser ain- si qu’une partie a dû être refondue ou surfrappée par les alliés. 31 Mais, à notre sens, le fait d’avoir retrouvé si peu de monnaies athéniennes chez les membres de la Ligue de Délos s’explique par leur rapatriement massif, chaque année, à Athènes. C’est sans aucun doute la ‘scalité impériale’ qui contribuait le plus massivement au retour du numéraire: si l’on en croit Thucydide, 32 en effet, pas moins de 600 talents (soit plus de 15,5 tonnes) étaient versés chaque année aux hégèmones par le biais du tribut ou d’autres revenus impériaux. À cela s’ajoutaient encore les exemplaires qui revenaient chaque année dans les caisses de la cité par le simple jeu des relations commerciales ou par l’intermédiaire des taxes – nombreuses également – versées par les négociants étrangers dans l’exercice de leurs activités. 33 Dans un tel schéma, l’abondance des chouettes dans les trésors exhumés hors des territoires placés sous l’égide athénienne, loin de constituer un paradoxe, illustre en réalité, en négatif, l’efcacité des mécanismes de retour de la monnaie athénienne. Dès lors, les dépôts des régions extérieures à l’économie monétaire et au système scal athénien dresseraient un panorama beaucoup plus dèle des devises athéniennes disponibles dans la circulation moné- taire que les trésors exhumés des régions de l’archè. En dénitive, il semble que bon nombre d’exemplaires habituellement considérés comme des imitations sont en réalité d’authentiques monnaies athéniennes. Les attribuer à des ateliers étrang-

28 Ibidem, p. 10. 29 Cf. à ce propos Figueira 1998 qu’il faut compléter à présent par Figueira 2006. 30 Flament 2008, pp. 259-61. 31 La campagne d’analyse menée conjointement par l’Institut Max Planck d’Heidelberg et le Department of Geology and Mineralogy d’Oxford a démontré, en effet, que l’argent du Laurion avait servi à frapper

des monnaies de Corinthe, d’Égine, de Samos, de Salamine, de Carie, de Zancle: cf. Gale et al. 1980. 32 Thucydide, II, 13.3-5. 33 Pébarthe 1999, p. 142 et suiv. a démontré que les Athéniens favorisaient très nettement la perception des taxes au Pirée en n’imposant pas les produits qui sortaient des autres emporia en direction d’Athènes. Voir à ce propos IG I³ 40, l. 52-57 et IG II² 1128.

CHR. FLAMENT

ers reviendrait, en effet, à ranger pratiquement l’ensemble des émissions de la n du V e s. dans la catégorie des imitations, tant sont nombreux les liens stylistiques qui les unissent aux exemplaires de l’expédition sicilienne de 413-415 et aux monnaies de fortune émises à la n de la guerre du Péloponnèse. Notre propos ne doit cependant pas être mal interprété: il vise à démontrer, non pas que les imitations de monnaies athéniennes n’ont jamais existé – le décret de Nicophon 34 en apporterait d’ailleurs un démenti agrant – mais qu’il fut bien plus restreint qu’on ne le prétend aujourd’hui et que la plupart des problèmes numismatiques qui en avaient suggéré l’existence peuvent être résolus autrement et de manière, semble-t-il, beaucoup plus vraisemblable.

176

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Buttrey, T.V. (1982), ‘Pharaonic imitations of Athenian tetradrachms’, dans Hackens, T. / Weiler, R. (éd.), Proceedings of the 9 th International Congress of Numismatics, Berne, September 1979, t. I, Louvain-la-Neuve-Luxembourg, pp. 137-40.

Figueira, T. (1998), The Power of Money. Coinage and Politics in the Athenian Empire, Philadelphie.

Figueira, T. (2006), Reconsidering the Athenian Coinage Decree, AIIN 52, pp. 9-44.

Flament, C. (2001), ‘À propos des styles d’imitations athéniennes dénis par T.V. Buttrey’, RBN 147, pp. 39-50.

Flament, C (2003), ‘Imitations athéniennes ou monnaies authentiques? Nouvelles considéra- tions sur quelques chouettes athéniennes habituellement identiées comme imitations’, RBN 149, pp. 1-10.

Flament, C. (2005), ‘Un trésor de tétradrachmes athéniens dispersés suivi de considérations rela- tives au classement, à la frappe et à l’attribution des chouettes à des ateliers étrangers’, RBN 151, pp. 29-38.

Flament, C (2007a), Le monnayage en argent d’Athènes. De l’époque archaïque à l’époque hellé- nistique (c. 550 – c. 40 av. J.-C.), Louvain-la-Neuve (Études numismatiques, 1).

Flament, C. (2007b), ‘L’argent des chouettes. Bilan de l’application des méthodes de laboratoire au monnayage athénien tirant parti de nouvelles analyses réalisées au moyen de la méthode PIXE’, RBN 153, pp. 9-30.

Flament, C. (2008), Une économie monétarisée: Athènes à l’époque classique (440-338). Contri- bution à l’étude du phénomène monétaire en Grèce ancienne, Louvain-Namur-Paris-Dudley, (Collection d’Études classiques 22).

Flament, C. / Lateano, O. / Demortier, G. (2008), ‘Quantitative analysis of Athenian coinage by PIXE’, dans Facorellis, Y. / Zacharias, N. / Polikreti, K. (éd.), Proceedings of the 4 th Symposium of the Hellenic Society of Archaeometry. National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, 28-31 May 2003 (BAR International Series 1746), Oxford, pp. 445-50.

Flament, C. / Marchetti, P. (2004), ‘Analysis of ancient coins’, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B, 226, pp. 179-84.

RETOUR SUR LES CRITÈRES QUI DÉFINISSENT HABITUELLEMENT LES ‘IMITATIONS’ ATHÉNIENNES

177

Gale, N.H. et al. (1980), ‘Mineral and geographical silver sources of Archaic Greek coinage’, dans Metcalf, D.M. / Oddy, W.A. (éd.), Metallurgy in Numismatics vol. 1 (Royal Numismatic Society. Special Publication 13), pp. 3-49.

Giovannini, A. (1975), ‘Athenian currency in the late fth and early fourth century BC’, GRBS 16, pp. 185-95.

Jones, M. / Jones Milward, A. (1988), ‘The Apis House project at Mit Rahinah. Preliminary report of the sixth season, 1986’, JARCE 25, pp. 105-16.

Kraay, C.M. (1976), Archaic and Classical Greek Coins, Londres.

Kroll, J.H. (1993), The Athenian Agora. Results of Excavations Conducted by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, vol. 26, The Greek coins, Princeton.

Kroll, J.H. (1996), ‘The Piraeus 1902 hoard of plated drachms and tetradrachms’, dans Χαρακτρ. Αφιρωμα στη Μντω Οικονομδου, Athènes, pp. 139-46.

Lentini, M.C. / Garraffo, S. (1995), Il tresoretto di Naxos (1985). Dall’isolato urbano C4, casa 1-2, Studi e Materiali n°4, Rome.

Le Rider, G. (2001), La naissance de la monnaie. Pratiques monétaires de l’Orient ancien, Col- lection Histoire, Paris.

Mørkholm, O. (1974), ‘A coin of Artaxerxes III’, NC 7 14, pp. 1-4.

Naster, P. (1983), ‘Were the labourers of Persepolis paid by means of coined money?’, dans Co- laert, M. / Hackens, T. (éd.), Scripta Nummaria. Contributions à la méthodologie numismatique (Numismatica Lovaniensia, 6), Wetteren, pp. 273-77.

Nicolet-Pierre, H. (1979), ‘Les monnaies des deux derniers satrapes d’Égypte avant la conquête d’Alexandre’, dans Mørkholm. O. / Waggoner, N. (éd.), Greek Numismatics and Archaeology:

Essays in Honor of Margaret Thompson, Wetteren, pp. 221-30.

Oeconomides, M. (1999), ‘Contribution à l’étude du monnayage athénien à l’époque classique: le trésor trouvé au Pirée en 1977’, RBN 145, pp. 17-20.

Oeconomides, M. (2005), ‘Contribution à l’étude du monnayage athénien à l’époque classique (suite): le trésor trouvé à Ano Voula en 1979’, RN 162, pp. 73-76.

Pébarthe, C. (1999), ‘Thasos, l’empire d’Athènes et les emporia de Thrace’, ZPE 126, pp. 131-54.

Rhodes, P.J. / Osborne, R. (2003), Greek Historical Inscriptions 404-323 BC, Oxford.

Robinson, E.S.G. (1937), ‘Coins from the excavations at El-Mina (1936)’, NC 5 17, pp. 182-90.

Robinson, E.S.G. (1947), ‘The Tell El-Maskhuta hoard of Athenian tetradrachms’, NC 6 7, pp. 115-21.

Schlumberger, D. (1953), ‘L’argent grec dans l’empire perse achéménide’, dans Curiel, R. / Schlumberger, D. (éd.), Trésors monétaires de l’Afghanistan, Paris, pp. 1-64.

Stroud, R.S. (1974), ‘An Athenian law on silver coinage’, Hesperia 43/2, pp. 157-88.