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CJs Gearbox

USAGE
The T-15 was used both in V8 and I6 full-size Jeeps (FSJs - trucks, Wagoneers and
Cherokees) and in V8 equipped CJs and Commandos. In FSJs, the T-15 was the
standard transmission behind the 350 Buick, AMC 258, and AMC 360 from 1969 to
1979. Some Wagoneers came with a column shift 3-speed as late as 1972;
according to the 1972 Jeep factory service manual, these are T-15s. In the CJs and
Commandos, the 72-75 304 V8 came only with the T-15, and was replaced by the
Tremac T-150 in 1976.
While the variants of the T-15 share the same internal gears, the overall length of
the transmission varied with application. This allowed for transmission positioning
according to the distance between the driver and the back of the engine. The
change in length was accomplished by using a specific input shaft and either a
matching bellhousing, or a standard bellhousing with a large aluminum spacer
between the bellhousing and the transmssion case. Later AMC vehicles had T-15s
with one of three lengths of input shafts; short (CJs and Commandos), middle (FSJs
with the 258 I6) and long (FSJs with the 360 V8).

Transmission

1st

2nd

3rd

T-15

3.00

1.83

1.00

PHOTOS

Drivers side view of T-15 transmission.

4th

5th

Rev
3.00

Back view of T-15 transmission.

Front view of T-15 transmission.

Passenger side view of T-15 transmission. The casting numbers on the T-15 are on
the passenger side near the top back.

Top view of T-15 transmission.

T-15 and T-90 transmission. Here's a top view of a T-90 and a T-15. The T-90 has an
adapter on the front for the Dauntless V6, the adapter was probably originally on a

T-86. The front of each transmission is even to show how much longer the T-15 is
compared to the T-90.

Description
The CJ-5 was produced from 1955 through 1983.

Drive Train
Engine
Many engine options have been offered for the CJ-5 over it's long production run. The
original engine offered in the CJ-5 was the "Hurricane" F-Head 134 I4. The first
optional engine offerred for the CJ-5 was the Perkins 192 I4 diesel followed by
the "Dauntless" Buick 225 V6. When AMC purchased Jeep from Kaiser, they soon
made the AMC 232, 258, and 304 available in the CJ-5. The last three years of
production, the GM 151 I4 was the standard engine.
Transmission
The T-90 3 speed was the standard transmission for the CJ-5 for many years. It's close
brother, the T-86 3 speed was used with CJ-5s with the Dauntless V6. The T14 replaced the T-90 and later the beefy T-15 was used with CJ-5 with the 304. The T98 was an optional 4 speed for the CJ-5 until 1971 when the T-18 became the optional
4 speed. In 1976, the T-150 became the 3 speed for the CJ-5. In 1980, the heavy duty
3 speeds and 4 speeds were no longer offered. The lighter duty SR-4, T-4, T-176,
and T-5 were used. The CJ-5 never came with an automatic from the factory.
Transfer Case
The CJ-5 used the Dana 18 from '55 until '71. In '72 they switched to the Dana 20.
From '80-'83 they used the Dana 300.
Front Axle
The CJ-5 was first offered with the Dana 25 until 1965. The Dana 27 replaced it and
was used until 1971. From 1972-1983, the Dana 30 was used in the CJ-5.
Rear Axle

The Dana 44 with two piece shafts was used in the CJ-5 until mid-1970. ADana
44 with one piece shafts replaced it after that until 1975. After 1976 theAMC 20 was
used.

Production Information
Serial Number Locations
For CJ-5s manufactured from 1955 through 1970, The vehicle serial number is
stamped on a metal plate located on the firewall, under the hood, on the passenger
side.
Contributors
Thanks to Kevin Mullin for serial number location information.
The T-150 was used in CJs from 1976 to 1979.

Transmission1st

2nd

T-150 2.99

1.00

1.75

3rd

4th

PHOTOS

Side view of T-150 transmission.

Back view of T-150 transmission.

5th
3.17

Rev

Front view of T-150 transmission.


Transmission Jeep Parts
Wrangler TJ & YJ, CJ5, CJ7, CJ8 Scrambler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, Borg-Warner
For your Transmission Rebuild needs Morris 4x4 Center has it all from Gears, Bearings, Shafts and Seals. So whether you
have a Wrangler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, CJ or a Vintage CJ we have what you need to get your Transmission back
together with quality Transmission Jeep Parts all at Discount prices.

New Venture NV3550


Transmission Parts

Aisin AX4 & AX5 Transmission


Parts

Aisin AX15 Transmission Parts

The NV3550 Transmission is a 5


speed Manual found in 2000 thru
2004 Wrangler TJ's, Cherokee XJ's
and Liberty KJ's, used with the
4.0 Liter I6 Engine.

The Aisin AX4 and AX5 are found in


1982-2002 Jeep Wrangler YJ's and
TJ's. AX4 4-speed Manual used with
2.5 L I4 Engine only while the AX5 5speed manual is used with 2.5 L I4,
2.1 L I4 diesel, and 2.8 L V6 Engines.

New Venture NV3550


Transmission Parts

Aisin AX4 & AX5 Transmission


Parts

Aisin AX15 Transmission Parts

Peugeot BA 10/5 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Warner T5 Transmission
Parts

Borg-Warner T4 Transmission
Parts

The Peugeot BA 10/5


Transmission is a five-speed,
overdriven, light-duty, transmission

The Borg-Warner T5
Transmissions are found in 1982 to
1986 Jeep CJ models. They are

Found in 1982 to 1986 Jeep CJ


models, the Borg-Warner T4
Transmissions are light-duty

Found in 1987-1999 Wrangler YJ &


TJ's, Cherokee XJ, Grand Cherokee
ZJ, and the Comanche MJ, the Aisin
AX15 is a 5 speed Manual
Transmission.

Jeep part used by AMC Jeep from


1987 - Mid-1989 in the YJ Wrangler,
XJ Cherokee and MJ Comanche with
the AMC 258 I6.

light-duty transmissions found behind


the AMC 150 (2.5L) I4 and the AMC
258 I6 (4.2L) Engines.

transmissions found used with the


AMC 150 (2.5L) I4 and the AMC 258
I6 (4.2L) Engines.

Peugeot BA 10/5 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Warner T5 Transmission
Parts

Borg-Warner T4 Transmission
Parts

Tremec T176 & T177


Transmission Parts

Borg-Warner T150
Transmission Parts

Borg-Waner SR4 Transmission


Parts

The Tremec T176 & T177


Transmissions were the optional
four-speed transmissions found in
1980 to 1986 Jeep CJ.

The Borg-Warner T150


Transmission was the three-speed
transmission found in 1976 to 1979
Jeep CJ5, CJ7, CJ8 Scrambler,
Cherokee SJ & Wagoneer.

The Borg Warner SR4


Transmission was a standard shift,
four-speed transmission found in
1980 to 1981 Jeep CJ models. It is a
light-duty transmission found behind
the 151 Iron Duke I4 and the AMC
258 I6.

Tremec T176 & T177


Transmission Parts

Borg-Warner T150
Transmission Parts

Borg-Waner SR4 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Warner T18 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Warner T15 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Waner T14 Transmission


Parts

The Borg-Warner T18 was a 4speed, heavy-duty truck transmission


designed for and used in 1/2, 3/4 and
1+ ton trucks. The T18 Gear was
made for 1966 to 1984 Jeep CJ5,
CJ7, CJ8 Scrambler.

The Borg-Warner T15 is a mediumto-heavy-duty, three-speed


transmission Jeep part, introduced in
1971-1975 Jeep CJ, Cherokee and
Wagoneer models.

The Borg-Warner T14 is a lighterduty, three-speed transmission,


introduced in the 1967-1975 CJ5,
Cherokee SJ & Wagoneer.

Borg-Warner T18 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Warner T15 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Waner T14 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Waner T98 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Waner T90 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Warner T84 Transmission


Parts

The Borg Warner T98 used in Jeep


models from 1955 to 1972. Because
of it's low first gear, length, durability
and easy adaptability, it is very
popular with rock crawlers and
anyone wanting a good dependable
transmission.

The Borg-Warner T90 transmission


was one of the most common
transmissions found in 1946 to 1971
Jeeps. Because of its long
production span, it is nearly
legendary.

The Borg-Warner T84 was only used


in the 1941-1945 Willys MB and Ford
GPW of WWII fame, it is a light duty
3 speed transmission with a casting
number of T84.

Borg-Waner T98 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Waner T90 Transmission


Parts

Borg-Warner T84 Transmission


Parts

Automatic Transmission Parts


Daimler NSG370 6-Speed
Transmission Parts
The Daimler NSG370 transmission
was introduced in 2005 as the first
six-speed to ever equip a Jeep. NSG
is an acronym for the German
"Neues Schaltgetriebe"; literally
meaning "new switching
transmission" or "new manual
shifting transmission".

We also have a wide range


of Automatic Transmission Jeep
parts for your A-500, A-518, AW4,
TF6, 42RE or 45RFE Jeep
Transmission.

Borg-Warner T150 Transmission

The Borg-Warner T150 transmission was the three-speed transmission found in 1976 to 1979 Jeeps. It is a
good transmission when well maintained and has often
been adapted to V8 and V6 power.
Rated at medium-duty, the T150 is stronger than its
compact size may suggest. Though it only holds a
candle to the truck style four-speeds' strengths and
capabilities, the T150 is frequently retained in CJ Jeeps
when married to mild GM V6 and V8 power. It is
regarded as the second strongest of all the Jeep threespeeds, second to the Jeep T15.
For the big-gears crowd, it is popularly replaced with
the Ford T18 and Ford NP435 transmissions, since they
share a similar bellhousing bolt pattern and compact
installations.
Features
The T150 is a top loaded, top shifting transmission. The
T150 is fully synchronized in the second and third
gears. All gears are helically cut.
Identification
The T150 transmission is 9" long and features a cast
iron top cover that is retained by eight bolts and a
main case of cast iron.
The Jeep T150 has a
1-3/8" x 6 spline
output shaft for
mounting the transfer
case input gear. The
transmission has a 7-1/2" input shaft (stick-out length) with 1-1/16" x
10 splines and a neoprene front seal and cast iron bearing retainer. The
pilot tip is ~17mm.
The T150 features a conventional "H" shift pattern, with reverse being
towards the driver and up.
Typical casting numbers found on the T150 are 2603983 or 2603347.
Transfer Case Compatability
The Jeep T150 was factory-married only to the Jeep Dana Spicer Model
20 transfer case.
Of interesting note, the T150 transmission was the subject of a recall in
the late 1970's, for its rear seal being installed backwards. This seal
should face spring-side towards the front of the transmission.
It may be possible to bolt a T150 to a Jeep Dana 18 transfer case, but
this transmission uses a uniquely machined transfer case input gear
with a seal journal. This transfer case gear does not interchange with any Model 18.
The Jeep Dana 300 is not compatible with the T150.
Bellhousing Adaptability
GM

Buick V6, Chevrolet Small Block V6 and V8 conversions to the T150 are done with steady frequency and
success.
AMC Jeep
As the T150 was married to the Jeep AMC engines, it is OEM compatible with them.
Ford
The T150 has a front bolt pattern is the symmetrical Ford "butterfly" pattern; roughly 8-1/2" wide by 65/16" tall. It is sometimes married to Ford V8 power, as discussed here.
Rebuilding the T150
The T150 is simple and enjoyable to rebuild. Many shadetree mechanics do very outstanding rebuilds if
they have access to a press, snap ring pliers and bearing pullers. Many choose to do a full rebuild during
the adaptation process, and our instruction guides feature all the details, diagrams, pics and tricks
required to do professional level work.

Borg-Warner T14 Transmission


The Borg-Warner T14 is a lighter-duty, three-speed transmission,
introduced in the 1967 CJ5 and C101, and was offered in Jeeps up
through 1975. The T14 was found only behind the Buick V6 engine
until 1972, when it was provided as the base transmission for
the AMC 232 and 258 I6 engines.

When filling your T150 with


gear oil, we recommend that
you select a conventional
mineral oil or a para-synthetic
in lieu of a full synthetic oil.
Properly assembled manual
gearboxes do not have the
thermal strains seen by
combustion engines or hypoid
gears. Synthetic fluid in these
gearboxes, while not harmful,
is probably an economic
waste.
Hypoid gear oil is sulphurized
higher than transmission oil
and can be mildly corrosive to
the non-ferrous alloys used
for synchros, bushings and
thrust washers in these
transmissions.
An 80W-90, API-GL5 or MT-1
rated fluid is very good. Some
claim faster shifts from using
a 50W engine oil in their
transmission and we do not
consider this to be
contraindicated unless you
operate your vehicle in a very
warm environment.

Features
The
The

T14 is a top loaded, top shifting


transmission using a cane shift lever.
T14 is fully synchronized in all forward

gears and all gears are helically cut. It uses sliding clutch collars in lieu of sliding gears as found in other,
earlier Borg Warner three speeds.

Identification
The T14 transmission is 8-11/16" long and features a cast
iron top cover that is retained by six bolts. The main case is
of cast iron. The case itself has two protruding bosses as
provisions for side-shifting actuators, however, no known
Jeep side-shift applications are known.
All T14 transmissions have a 1-3/16" x 10 spline output
shaft for mounting the transfer case input gear (or overdrive
barrel gear). The T14 was the only Jeep transmission to
feature this distinctive spline configuration.
The T14 may have the following casting numbers: T14,
T14AA or 1302 and these are typically found on the
passenger's side.
Jeeps also had a T86 transmission available with the Buick V6
from 1966-1969. It was similar in form and appearance, but
its casting numbers will differentiate it from the T14
There are two versions of the T14 to note, depending on its
year and mating engine. All early Buick V6T14's used a
different input shaft/gear than the laterAMC 232 & 258 T14's.
The T14 and T15 are similar in designation, and visually
somewhat similar. However, the T14 did use a three-bolt
front bearing retainer whereas the T15 used a four-bolt front bearing retainer.
Transfer Case Compatability
The Jeep T14 was factory-married to the Jeep Dana Spicer Model 18 transfer case, and only the large (4")
input bore versions.
T14 was available attached to the Jeep Dana Spicer Model 20 transfer case in the 1972-1975 Jeeps.
The T14 always used a 10-spline transfer case input gear. An informative chart of these gears can be found
here. Care should be taken when ordering adapters for transmissions replacing these 10-spline gearboxes.
Engine Compatibility and Adaptability
The earlier T14 had a 1-1/8" x 10 spline input shaft (or "clutch shaft") and its pilot tip is ~19/32" in
diameter. Later AMC era T14's had the same spline configuration, but the pilot tip increased in size to
~3/4" in diameter.
GM
The T14 used a standard Buick bellhousing from 1967-1970. It used a factory bellhousing adapter in cast
iron during these years and a special input bearing retainer. It is also possible to adapt the T14 to a variety
of GM bellhousings with our T14 adapter assembly.
While it is mechanically possible to marry many GM bellhousings to this adapter, stronger upgrade engines
can be overwhelming to the T14, as it is a lighter-duty gearbox.
In 1971, AMC cast a special Buick bellhousing that was deeper, and machined to match the T14's native
front bolt pattern. This unique bellhousing also used a special cable clutch release.
AMC 232 & 258
The 1972-1975 Jeeps with the AMC I6 had its own, dedicated bellhousing to the T14. This was a deeper
bellhousing (~9") than the standard AMC bellhousings that would be released in 1976.

Rebuilding the T14


The T14 is quite easy and enjoyable to rebuild. Many shadetree
mechanics do very outstanding rebuilds if they have access to a
press, snap ring pliers and bearing pullers.
We welcome you to contact us for T14 master rebuild kits and
components.
Summary
The T14 offered decent service in lighter Jeeps. The T14 was
replaced in Jeeps by the T150 transmission in 1976.
Sources
- The Novak archives and our customer's input
- Jeep Technical Service Manuals
- Jeeptech.com & Terry Howe

When filling your T14 with


gear oil, we recommend that
you select a conventional
mineral oil or a para-synthetic
in lieu of a full synthetic oil.
Properly assembled manual
gearboxes do not have the
thermal strains seen by
combustion engines or hypoid
gears. Synthetic fluid in these
gearboxes, while not harmful,
is probably an economic
waste.
Hypoid gear oil is sulphurized
higher than transmission oil
and can be mildly corrosive to
the non-ferrous alloys used
for synchros, bushings and
thrust washers in these
transmissions.
An 80W-90, API-GL5 or MT-1
rated fluid is very good. Some
claim faster shifts from using
a 50W engine oil in their
transmission and we do not
consider this to be
contraindicated unless you
operate your vehicle in a very
warm environment.

The Novak Guide to the

Dana Spicer Model 300 Transfer Case


The Dana 300 is found in 1980-1986 Jeep vehicles. It is one of the most respected transfer cases and is
regarded as the gold standard by casual Jeepers up through the enthusiasts. While only provided in 1/4
Ton rated Jeeps, its strength surpasses this duty.
History
The Dana 300 contains the culmination of what Dana learned about
transfer cases since building the 300's predecessors - theDana
18 since 1941 and then the Dana 20 since 1962.
Design work of the 300 began by 1977. It was to be similar in size,
duty and ease of manufacture to the popular Dana 20. It featured the
same center-to-center distance between gears as the 18 & 20 and
featured a direct drive rear output. Different from these forebearers
were the rear or low set of gears, which were helically cut, in lieu of the straight cut gears. While not any
stronger than straight cut gears, they allowed the transfer case to run quieter in its low range.
Identification
The Dana 300 is a cast iron transfer case, having a passenger-side front output and a centered rear
output. It has a round, six-bolt front mounting face. It has a smoother case design with fewer cast-in
bosses for mounting features.

Instead of having a transmission mainshaft-mounted input gear like previous Dana's, the 300's input gear
rides on its own, bearing mounted input shaft. This shaft (in factory
dress) always has 23 female splines. The helical input gear itself is
mounted on 30 splines.

Should I change from a Dana


20 to a Dana 300?
We get this question a lot. There
is probably no significant
strength advantage to the 300. It
does feature a lower range
gearset than the 20. However,
the Dana 20 is typically shorter,
allowing for better driveshaft
angles. Additionally, transmission
interface differences make the
upgrade challenging, unless a
later, 300 compatible
transmission is also swapped in.
This, however, is not desirable as
these later transmissions were
usually weaker than the previous
versions available with the 20.

The IH Scout version of the Dana 300, built only in 1980 - IH's last
year in the light truck market - has the same "backwards Texas"
bolt pattern and transmission mounted input gear as did the Dana
20 found in previous IH vehicles.
The 300 weighs in at 85 lbs. and is about 16" wide. It is factory
clocked to 23 degrees down.
Features
This transfer case is compact, light, durable, simple to build and
capable. It features dual modes (2wd + 4wd) and dual ranges (Hi +
Lo). The high range is direct drive (1:1) and the low range is 2.62:1.
The length of the 1980 Dana 300 is ~10-1/2", as measured from the
front input face to the rear yoke face. The later version is ~11-5/8"
long.

Gear shifting between ranges and modes in the 300 is handled differently than the previous Dana boxes,
which used a sliding gear and a sliding clutch. The 300 uses sliding clutch rings for both.
The front input flange for Jeep versions is round and uses six 3/8" mounting bolts through to the
transmission flange. The front and rear output yoke is a 1310. The output shafts are 26 splines for both
front and rear outputs.
The 300 has a standard, factory single-stick shifter. There is an interlock pin between the shifter rails.
Removal of this interlock allows for the added function of
2wd/Low and front-wheel-drive High or Low to the 300 - if you
have the "twin-stick" version of the 300.

The Model 300 is found in these


vehicles:

Versions
Jeep Model 300

1980 to 1986: CJ5, CJ7 & CJ8

There are two essential versions of the Jeep 300. The 1980
version had a shorter (about 3-1/2") rear output housing

1980 IH Scout

assembly. These cases may have a Jeep number #5361332 or


the tailhousing may have a casting number of #C300-19-2.

The 1981 and later versions had a longer output assembly (about 5-1/2") to house the larger, eccentric
style speedometer driven gear and its driving gear, integrated into the output shaft itself.
Strength
We are often asked our opinions about the strength of the Dana 300.
The known fuses of the 300 include its output shaft, which can fail under extreme duty or momentary
shock load. The 300 can also, though far rarer, have teeth blown off it's rear gearset. Broken cases or
other components are only very rarely seen.
The 300 uses all helically cut gears. It uses a large 1.25" intermediate shaft. The Dana 300 is strong
enough from the factory to handle even the most potent engines and situations. An engineering analysis
and years of combined experience shows that the rear set of gears (the Low output gears) are unbalanced
and weaker in their strength with the front set. However, breakage of these teeth is relatively rare.
Upgrade output shafts (typically 32 spline) are available to remedy the shaft breakage problem.
It is nearly remarkable how much power this compact transfer case can transmit and sustain. It is not
uncommon to see them handling Big Block grade power and deep, compound gearing.

Rebuilding
A benchtop rebuild of a Dana 300 is doable and possibly even enjoyable by an experienced technician.
Parts are readily available both new and salvaged, along with standard rebuild kits that address the
common wear points.
Our parts, which include a specially
hardened intermediate shaft, are
always available and kits have been
configured to address the wear points
and upgrade where possible.
Components
Many components remain available.
Ask us if you require something for
your 300, not seen in our catalog.
Transmission Compatibility &
Adaptability
The Jeep 300 is found behind these factory transmissions, left:

SR4, 1980-1981 CJ

T4, 1982-1986 CJ

T5, 1982-1986 CJ

T176, 1980-1986 CJ

TF999, 1985-1986

Adaptation to better transmissions is often less costly than rebuilding the


weaker Jeep gearboxes and provides serious performance and strength
upgrades. The Model 300 adapts very well to several popular
transmissions. Integrated clocking, innovative mounting features of
Novak adapters is standard. These conversion transmissions include:

SM420

Manuals

SM465

T18

NP435

Automatics

TH350

TH400

TH700R4 / Early
4L60-E

4L60-E (later)

Speedometer Gears
1981-1986 Dana 300 speedometer gears are interchangeable to
correct for tire size and axle ratio changes. See this page to learn
more about this.
Conclusion
The Dana 300 is among the best transfer cases ever built. Their
strength, ease of service, compact design and excellent parts
support make them a top choice in many Jeeps. The Dana 300 was
the last of the cast iron, gear-driven transfer cases to be found in a
factory Jeep.

When filling your 300 with


gear oil, we recommend that
you select a conventional
mineral oil or a para-synthetic
in lieu of a full synthetic oil.
Properly assembled manual
gearboxes do not have the
thermal strains seen by
combustion engines or hypoid
gears. Synthetic fluid in these
gearboxes, while not harmful,
is probably an economic
waste.
Hypoid gear oil is sulphurized
higher than transmission oil
and can be mildly corrosive to
the non-ferrous alloys used
for thrust washers in these
transmissions.
An 80W-90, API-GL5 or MT-1
rated fluid is very good.

The 300 is amazingly strong, but its original


rear output shaft is can be broken under
high-loads and is excessively long.
The #300RX output assembly is Novak's
answer to these problems.