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ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

VOL 1, FEBRUARY 2007

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Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS



EDITOR S NOTE ’







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ADOBE MAGAZINE RETURNS





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Adobe Magazine 2.0. How did we get here? Some of you may remember the original Adobe Magazine, née  5

Aldus Magazine, in print from 1989 until 2000. In 2004, we launched Proxy in response to the multitude of 
6


customer requests for a magazine that could both inspire and educate. Proxy met this need by focusing on 
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current design, industry trends, software tips and tutorials, and troubleshooting tips.  subscribe

Never miss an issue 8

of Adobe Magazine for




9
Our vision If you’re only interested in one others faded away, Josh and Plazm 

Creative Professionals.
Now, we’ve come full circle. With of these fields—or one particular continue to defy conventions. 
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this issue, we chose to redesign technique—you can quickly get the Plazm contributed the layouts for Sign Up Now
 11
Proxy and return to the name Adobe information you need and get back the cover and feature articles in this 

Magazine (which is why Proxy to work. We’ve also designed the issue. Thanks, guys. 
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hasn’t graced your inbox for some new Adobe Magazine to be easier 
print this issue 13
time). We’ve been busy retooling to read. And we’re now publishing So go ahead and dive in to your all- 

editions in French, German, and new Adobe Magazine—and don’t



Print 14
the magazine to be a source of 

inspiration and instruction not just English—with a mix of artists and forget to tell us what you think of  15

for designers in traditional media, stories from around the world. it. As always, we look forward to
mouth off

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but also for web and interactive hearing from you. 

 Tell us what you love, 17


designers, photographers, and New design frontiers—  what you despise, what
video pros. and beyond — Adobe Creative Team 18

inspires you, what puts
Underlying this issue is the pursuit 
you to sleep. 19
What’s in it for you of “Design Without Boundaries.” Our




The new Adobe Magazine feature articles explore the idea 


Rate This Issue 20

incorporates many of the of discovering frontiers and then  21

suggestions you sent us over the moving beyond them. 


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past two years. Many of you told 
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us you don’t have time to read the
magazine cover to cover. That’s Our feature articles explore the idea of discovering 

 24
why we’ve designed all articles in
the new Adobe Magazine to give
frontiers and then moving beyond them. 


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a quick shot of inspiration and 26




instruction. You’ll see innovation Our guest designer, Josh Berger of  27


in the fields of photography, Plazm magazine, epitomizes this 

publishing, interactive, and video, theme. Josh was part of the new- 

and you’ll get specific details on the school design magazine vanguard 



techniques and software features of the late 1990s that included 

used to create it. David Carson and Ray Gun. Where 










Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.
ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

WHEN TURNING
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PAGES BECOMES
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A TRIP
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By Peta Owens-Liston 21

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Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

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“We have full control over what we write Trash the template. Skew the grid. Ruffle some feathers among the
rule makers. Most importantly, keep your “viewership” coming back for
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about, how we lay out the story, and how more, seeking sensual stimulation and surprise as they journey through 15

carefully crafted pages. This seems to be the general mindset among 16

we juxtapose that story to typography designers of artsy niche magazines like Theme and Clear, two pioneering
publications that insist on doing things differently. They want print to
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and photography. It’s the kind of power be an experience, not just a good read.
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The evolution of design technology—available to anyone who has the


we exploit to our full advantage.” tools—mixed with an unwavering pursuit of creative freedom has given
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birth to these magazines, which resemble collectable artwork more than


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—Jiae Kim, co-founder, Theme magazine a series of glued pages. 22

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Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

Breaking Free Transforming Print to Web 1

On the pages of Theme magazine, high-brow and low-brow subjects While Lee and Kim can intuitively walk the path to creating a quality 2

interplay with one another like alternating beads on a necklace— print magazine, they’re now in the midst of stepping from one stone 3
skateboarding and lost language, fashion design and tattoos. This to the next to create an equally dynamic web-based version of Theme
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contemporary Asian culture quarterly centers each issue around a magazine. “It will be synergistic to the kind of stories we tell in the
theme like Skin, Performance, or Siblings. “It’s a mix of who we are,” magazine,” says Kim. “But the content we’re going to put online is 5

says Jiae Kim, who founded Theme with husband John Lee. Although different than the print issue because the way people interact with this 6
both have design experience, their backgrounds diverge from there. Lee medium is different.” With new features like a blog collective, where 7
was a professional BMX racer and graffiti artist (read: low brow), while readers can contribute content and news, Theme online will be much
Kim delved into art, history, and literature (read: high brow). more than an interactive version of the print issue. It’ll be a complete 8

redesign specially tailored for a web readership. And it’s the kind of 9

“We started out with all the disadvantages,” says Kim. “We didn’t have challenge that thrills Lee and Kim. 10
a lot of money or financial backing.” But the creative freedom they had
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was much more valuable. And this unbounded imagination continues
to reign supreme today. “We have full control over what we write 12

about, how we lay out the story, and how we juxtapose that story to 13

typography and photography. It’s the kind of power we exploit to our 14


full advantage.”
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Here’s How They’re Doing It

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

Fear Not 10

Innovation in design comes naturally to Clear Creative Director Emin 11

Kadi and Editor Ivan Kalafatic. The lack of fear is prevalent in the many 12
“firsts” this fashion design magazine has pioneered, including the first
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to have a transparent cover (on every issue—hence the name­—see page
7 for example), magnetic paper, rice paper, and the first to produce 14

an entire issue in plastic. But these unique materials present equally 15


unique production challenges. “No matter how great of a printer you 16
find, chances are they won’t admit their inexperience in producing the
final product,” says Kadi. The solution? Lots of communication—and 17

teamwork. “The best thing to do is to get everyone to believe in the 18

project and rally around it.” 19

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For Kadi and Kalafatic, Clear is a changing environment that houses
what traditionalists may see as impossibilities in the design world. 21

Kadi says naivety—and a lack of exposure to the “right” and “wrong” 22


influences in the publishing world—has actually benefited them. “When 23
it’s virgin territory, you come up with new and refreshing designs,”
explains Kadi, who is also a fashion photographer. Five years ago, the 24

two of them “slapped” the magazine together in two weeks on a laptop 25

and then distributed it at a fashion show in New York. “We started very 26
intuitively,” agrees Kalafatic.
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Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

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Inhale This 20

While the magazine has gained sophistication—and a loyal readership—since that first issue, intuition 21
has continued to play a major role in its design. Take for instance the Volume IV, Issue 3 “smoke issue.” 22
While the editorial for this issue covered a wide range of subjects, the design was united by an ethereal
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and playful layer of “smoke.” It wafted across type. It swirled around photographs. It drifted through the
magazine, shifting its shape into surprising new forms as it moved. 24

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Here’s How He Did It

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

Forever Wet Clay 2


Designing in this new publishing art form is akin to sculpting 3
wet clay that never dries; it’s always morphing under the
tools and talents of the designer. Combine this with the fear 4

of stagnation and predictability, and you get designers who 5

never rest. As Kadi puts it, “We want the magazine to be a 6


journey for someone’s imagination.” And one that always
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remains undefined.
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Peta Owens-Liston develops marketing communications materials and


writes for numerous national magazines, including Time magazine.

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

CREATING
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MORE
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WORLD
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On nikeair.com, Big Spaceship created more than an interactive website.
They created interactive wonder. 17

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By Kimberly Grob 19

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Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

The Symphony. This was the internal name for the site that would eventually
become nikeair.com. And it describes the interactive experience perfectly. 1
Type in the url, and you’re greeted by two tough and beautiful athletic 2
specimens. Sure, they’re cooler and stronger than you, but perhaps that’s what
makes them so irresistible. With smooth video effects, they warm up to an 3

otherworldly, slightly urban groove. They beckon you to join them—to “Run on 4

Air” or “Ball on Air.” And join them you will. 5

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Once you choose a sport, your athlete sets off through an urban
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neighborhood— a composite of still photography and video—and jogs ever-
closer to your screen before flashing a knowing smile and landing in a jet- 8

black environment. One simple phrase commands you to participate in a 9

mysterious adventure: “Create More World. Use Your Keyboard.” From there, 10
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the true magic begins. 11
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View Site
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The Aha! Moment
A dramatic red sky. A flock of origami birds. Rays of light and floating leaves
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and puff flowers and scratches of graffiti and swirls of color and an elephant 22

floating in a bubble—yes, an elephant. Site visitors unlock this symphony of 23

surreal animations by choosing keys on their keyboards. “We wanted to create 24


a sense of wonder,” says Michael Lebowitz, the CEO at Big Spaceship. But 25
in an online world oversaturated with broadband content and total immersion
websites, that’s no easy task. Pulling it off requires a just-right melding of 26

cultural influences, bright ideas, creative disciplines, integrated branding and 27

cutting-edge technology. And that’s precisely what Big Spaceship brought


together for nikeair.com.

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

Multimedia: The Expanded Definition 1


Lebowitz, a self-described “culture junkie,” believes that the term multimedia
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extends well beyond its current, technology-oriented definition. “We take in
everything,” he says, citing Big Spaceship’s collective obsession with music, 3

movies, and TV. “We’re young and living in Brooklyn and soaking it all up. 4

Today, I went to the Jewish Museum to see the History of Comics exhibit. I don’t 5
know how this will influence our work, but it’ll come in to play somewhere.” This 6
pop-culture addiction, combined with a company culture where an intern can
have as much voice as a CEO, creates a fertile breeding ground for dangerous
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ideas. And from this world where intellectual curiosity and creative freedom are 8

prized possessions, The Symphony was born. 9

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View Site 17

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Creating More Brand 20
As a companion to Wieden+Kennedy’s Nike Air TV spots, the site gets
the campaign right online—without regurgitating creative. While the main 21

message—More Air, More World—remains integral to the experience, Big 22

Spaceship interprets it differently for the web. “The idea that Nike Air helps 23

people to better understand their sport—and get more from it—was crucial 24
from a branding perspective,” says Lebowitz. “We used the ad campaign as a
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jumping-off point for exploring this idea. But Nike gave us the freedom to take
it in a more abstract direction.” And this freedom, says Lebowitz, ultimately 26

led to the site’s success. “When a client wants your creative thinking—not just 27

execution—they get great work.”

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

“When a client wants your creative 7

thinking—not just execution—they get 8

great work.” 9

—Michael Lebowitz, CEO, Big Spaceship 10


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Creative Convergence 12
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“The thing that excites me most about this site is that it’s truly 13
convergent,” says Lebowitz. “We used all our skills.” Broadcast 14
design, illustration, photography, and interactive design all come
together on nikeair.com. And the final piece is built to work across 15

multiple delivery platforms—from on-air broadcasts to web video 16

spots. 17

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In the end, of course, all this is transparent, and it’s not about design
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elements or delivery platforms. It’s about the experience. It’s about
a good run that leaves you high on endorphins for hours. It’s about 20

a game of hoops that feels so right it’s almost mind expanding. And 21

ultimately, it’s about a brand of running shoes that just might transform 22
you—if only for a moment. 23

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Kimberly Grob has worked as a magazine and marketing 27


writer for more than 15 years.

How’d They Do That?

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

Nature’s Lightroom 9

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By Stephen Trimble
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Photographers under the spell of Iceland’s golden light call the little country 12

“Nature’s Lightroom.” The island lures them with endless summer days, 13
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stunning volcanic landscapes, and a sprinkling of warm-hearted Icelanders— 14
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just 300,000 people in an area the size of Kentucky.
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In July 2006, 10 renowned photographers and four Adobe staffers visited 16


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Iceland on a dream assignment: shoot intensely for a week and road-test the 17
beta version of Adobe® Photoshop® Lightroom™, which gives professional
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photographers a single application for importing, managing, and presenting
large volumes of photographs. San Francisco photographer and writer Mikkel 19

Aaland created the Iceland project as a unique hook for his forthcoming 20

book, which features photographs and Photoshop Lightroom tutorials from 21


the Iceland adventure.
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Aaland worked with Adobe to select photographers for their professionalism, 23

diversity in style, and generous spirits. The team included landscape 24


photographers shooting classic large-format scenes, sports photographers, a 25
lifestyle specialist, a wedding photographer, and two shooters from Adobe.
“The cross-pollination was inspirational,” said landscape photographer 26

Michael Reichman. “We are so different and yet we all share a common 27

passion.”

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

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Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

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More Iceland, More Photoshop Lightroom

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

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Ansel Adams Award-winning photographer and writer Stephen Trimble recently published his 20th book:
The Process Lasting Light: 125 Years of Grand Canyon Photography.

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

Creative Persuasion:
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The Rise of Branded Entertainment In late summer 2006, Ohio-based creative cooperative leftchannel was pulling in 14

a respectable 200 hits per day on its website. Then the studio’s latest short film, 15

By Leta Baker an abstract 35-second piece titled “Blissful,” was released to Motionographer.com. 16
Leftchannel.com received more than 12,000 hits. A portal in Spain picked up the 17
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piece. And site visits soared past 100,000. 18
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The brand takes a backseat. 20
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“Product placement in a film like ‘Austin Powers,’ sure, that’s a form of branded
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entertainment,” says Rainer Ziehm of leftchannel. But there’s also an entirely
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different caliber of work bearing the branded entertainment name, one far more
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sophisticated—and entertaining. Creative short films produced by forward-thinking
companies (and in some cases, their customers) are popping up all over the web. And 24

the brands being promoted have a surprisingly understated presence. 25

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“Branded entertainment is a way for marketers to take the high road, to rise above 27

the rabble of commercials and appear to be patrons of the arts,” says Justin Cone,
editor of Motionographer.com. “If the branding becomes too visible, the whole thing
backfires and the brand looks like an evil puppeteer.”

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

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A phenomenon is born. 15

Before the Internet, it wasn’t easy for a video to find its audience. That’s 16

because only one path led to wide distribution: the expensive and limited 17
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broadcast/cable industry. While the online revolution opened the door for 18
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all types of niche broadcasters, or “narrowcasters,” bandwidth limitations 19


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Preview Clip
marred the viewer experience—videos sputtered and stalled, if they could be 20
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downloaded at all. Getting the content to would-be viewers posed an even 21
greater challenge. With no easy hosting options, gaining access to a broad
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audience meant making capital investments in technology infrastructure.
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Today, all that has changed. Broadband has crossed the threshold of critical 24

mass. The Flash Player is ubiquitous, making it easy to deliver smooth video 25

content to viewers everywhere. And sites like YouTube have brought those 26

videos to the world, providing easy—and free—broadcast opportunities. The end 27

result? A thoroughly engaging, utterly postmodern medium for consumers—and


a completely new way for companies to extend their brands.

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

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Insidious? Or ingenious?
The concept behind SinisterBeauty.co.uk and the related TV ads portrayed the Audi RS4 as a 2

menacing spider consuming competitors. As a viral extension of that campaign, Audi commissioned 3

comic illustrator Frazer Irving to create a 12-page mini comic book to be distributed in bars and clubs. 4

The result was “Beneath,” the story of an evil scientist driven insane by his attempts to extract a 5

patient’s terrible secret, which is tied to the ominous RS4 spider. In the 11th hour, Audi decided to scan 6
the comic and make it available online. 7

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The company turned to Goodtechnology, where lead creative developer Ben Lunt persuaded them to
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let him create a full-blown animated short. Lunt’s test for creating branded entertainment? “Even if all
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overt branding is removed from the finished piece, it should still have meaning. It needs to have a life
outside of the product or company it’s advertising.” 11

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“‘Beneath’ was always going to be fairly niche,” says Lunt, “We wanted it to be a riddle for viewers to 13

solve. We hoped to generate buzz as people worked out the story, thereby amplifying the viral effect. 14
It wasn’t heavily promoted, just some word-of-mouth and blog postings.” In the first month alone, the Watch “Beneath” Clip 15
“Beneath” micro-site received 15,000 views—and 25 percent of people who watched it downloaded it 16
to their PSP or iPod.
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One car. Six teams. Three weeks.
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In the spring of 2006, leftchannel received a call from agency Rubin Postaer and Associates. A new
Honda Civic was launching. Six teams had been chosen to promote the car—and a lifestyle—in unique 20
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60-second shorts online. Each team was given one word to drive its concept. Leftchannel’s was 21

“Unleashed.” 22

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Leftchannel’s ultimate film integrated camera paths, contrasting static and moving elements, and 24
post-processing to transport viewers across plains, through alleyways, over an ocean and beyond. 25
“Our goal was to create an ethereal world in which an unseen force travels—enlightening individuals
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until they reach a timeless and serene reality,” says Nate Reese of leftchannel. “Unleashed” proved
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enlightening to audiences as well: Within two weeks of launching online, it received 83,000 hits.
Watch “Unleashed” Clip

Bringing Black and White to Life

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

Excuses, excuses.
Waiting for the right project? An unlimited budget? A client who shares your vision? All nice to
have. But in a day when Converse.com is showing dozens of short films created by anyone with the
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inspiration, the opportunities are yours to lose.
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“Voices that normally would have been marginalized by the prohibitive costs of traditional animation 3
and filmmaking can now be commissioned to do work that would otherwise never be seen,” says 4
Cone.
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Of course, the rise of branded entertainment comes on the heels of increased campaign tracking 6
and testing. And while counting a short film’s traffic online is fairly easy, understanding its effect on 7
sales can be quite difficult—especially since branded entertainment is often a small part of a larger
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marketing strategy.
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One thing’s for sure: Companies like Audi and Honda are creating lasting impressions—and actively 10
searching for ways to turn the good vibes into solid revenue. When that happens, you can expect
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many more films like “Beneath” and “Unleashed” to grace your computer, PDA, and cell phone
screens. You’ll also have more justification for getting your hesitant clients to jump on the branded 12

entertainment bandwagon. 13

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Leta Baker has been a marketing and advertising copywriter for almost a decade.
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Watch Clip

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

FONT & FUNCTION Adobe Arabic


Sample
“Tim Holloway’s
at text sizes, and beautiful and
elegant at display sizes.
Resources
Thomas Phinney’s
1

3
the art and craft of type design design brief from Type Blog
Darka
2006 TDC Winners Exude
4
Adobe was to do an Arabic design The world of type
that would work well for general “Gabriel Martinez according to Thomas.
Style and Function
5
Sample
business usage, including forms Meave’s newest 6
and memos, and also perform well type design is a blackletter display Adobe Type Showroom
BY HAVALAH GHOLDSTON
both in print and on screen in PDF. typeface with a Victorian gothic More than 2,200 typefaces 7
“Typefaces are like furniture,” says Thomas Phinney, product manager, He’s succeeded remarkably well, aesthetic. Despite my passion to browse. 8
Fonts & Global Typography at Adobe. “Making either is a craft, making an Arabic typeface in two for classic text faces, I also have
combining elements of both art and science. Each has both a critical weights, which seems to me to a weakness for well-conceived, Type Directors Club
9

functional component as well as an aesthetic one.” be simultaneously traditional and unusual display faces such as Darka. Offering broad typography 10

The winners of the 2006 Type modern.” Like a German black forest cake, education and worldwide 11
Directors Club typography Darka is probably best enjoyed in type competitions.
12
competition illustrate this blend Calouste moderation, but it is certainly tasty!”
of craftsmanship, beauty, and “For people who ATypI 13
Sample
usefulness. And Phinney has his aren’t into type, text SWEEPY Worldwide organization 14
picks for the best of the bunch. typefaces such as Miguel Sousa’s “There are a zillion dedicated to type and
Sample 15
Here, he shares his typographic Calouste may seem less exciting script faces out there, typography.
perspective—informed by years of than some of the other TDC but some rise above the crowd. 16

type development experience—as winners. But to most typographers, That’s certainly the case for this Havalah Gholdston has
17
he explores and analyzes some of a well-crafted text typeface is semi-connecting calligraphic script written for daily newspapers,
the winning designs. the most difficult pinnacle of that Michael Clark created for P22. A magazines, websites 18

type design. I see in Calouste a member of the new breed of script and blogs. 19
remarkable level of craftsmanship fonts, it illustrates what can be
20
and subtlety for a designer’s first accomplished at the conjunction
typeface.” of type design, calligraphy, and font 21
21

production technology. Sweepy is 22


Garamond Premier Pro also the lighter-weight companion
23
“This typeface reflects to the memorably-named Pooper
Sample
more than a decade Black.” 24

of work and refinement by Robert 25


Slimbach, one of the world’s BEAUTY AND UTILITY
26
most gifted type designers. It’s a Competitions like the Type Directors
completely fresh take on the same Club Awards continue to raise the 27
general theme as Adobe Garamond standards for typography—and
(created in 1989), and a revival this year’s winners have pushed
much closer to Claude Garamond’s the boundaries of innovation to
original designs from the 1540s. new heights, creating both works
He’s achieved a real masterwork, of pure art and purposeful clothing
which is functional and classic for words.

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

SCOOP
EXCITING NEWS FROM THE PROPELLeR HEADS AT ADOBE
1

HELLO, MAC USERS.


4
CIAO, BELLA:
Adobe®
MEET ADOBE® CREATIVE SUITE®
5

SOUNDBOOTH™
PRODUCTION STUDIO.
6
IS MAC-HAPPY, TOO. 7

8
On January • Native Photoshop file support in then view comments mapped to On October 26, 2006, Adobe
4, Adobe Adobe After Effects, Adobe the timeline. extended its Mac reach even 9
announced that Premiere Pro, Adobe Encore DVD, further with a preview release 10
it will release the and Adobe Illustrator. It all adds up to a faster, more of its dual-platform audio tool,
11
next version of • Shared compositions and flexible workflow for editing, Adobe Soundbooth. Designed
Adobe Creative timelines between Adobe After motion graphics, effects, sound for creative professionals 12
Suite Production Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro. design, and DVD authoring— without audio expertise, Adobe
13
Studio software for both the • Common effects in Adobe After whether on a Mac or a Windows Soundbooth delivers focused tools
Macintosh and Windows platforms. Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro. computer. “From individual creatives for accomplishing everyday audio 14

“Our customers told us they wanted • Copy-and-paste and drag-and- and videographers to high-end tasks. 15
the ability to use Production Studio drop compatibility among production studios, everyone will
16
on either a Macintosh or Windows software components. find new efficiencies in the next
computer. And we’re excited to release,” says Guerard. “This is a huge 17
be able to give them that choice,” Add Dynamic Link to the mix, step forward for our customers.” 18
says Jim Guerard, vice president, and Mac users can substantially
Dynamic Media Organization, at decrease rendering delays. That’s 19

Adobe. because this exclusive Adobe 20


Production Studio feature makes it
21
Hello, time-saving possible to use Adobe After Effects
integration. Goodbye, compositions in Adobe Premiere 22
22

intermediate rendering. Pro and Adobe Encore DVD projects 23


With the next version of Production with no intermediate rendering.
24
Studio available on the Mac as well Get the Adobe Soundbooth
as Windows, Mac users will now be preview for either the Intel Mac or
“This is a huge step forward
25

able to take their productivity to the Windows platform.


next level, thanks to the enhanced
for our customers.” 26

27
integration among Production Download
Studio components. Make a change Client reviews are easier and faster
in one application, for instance, and too. Using the Clip Notes feature,
it’s automatically reflected in the videographers and filmmakers can
other software components. With embed video into a PDF file, email
this integrated workflow, Mac users the file to the client to review with
will enjoy: timecode-specific comments, and

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

RAMP UP Font of
Knowledge
Adobe Labs
WE’RE ALWAYS THINKING UP SOMETHING NEW
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Buzz News that excites us right now Wisdom and resources


to fuel your work
Experience and evaluate
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our latest innovations,
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Visit Adobe Labs 9

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Adobe Photoshop Lightroom is coming soon. The Creative Mind 12


Watch Clip
See how designers are
Visit Adobe Labs to download the free beta —and discover a single 13
breaking the boundaries
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of photographs.
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Step inside the 16
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Art Directors Invitational More Events to Get
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April 25-28, 2007 SXSW Interactive Creative Suite 2 How 25


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Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

DOWNLOAD 1

get ’em now— 4

they’re all free 5


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Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

SPOTLIGHT 1

3
our favorite tool du jour from the wide world of design
how to use it
connect to the third
4

When Dave Winslow needed to create a variety of presentation elements for Motorola’s TalkAbout product,
dimension with
5
he combined the power of his Adobe tools with Strata 3D CX. In this simple example, we’ll show you how
strata 3d cx
6
Dave got the job done.
7

Want a 3D tool that works with your current design To create the TalkAbout, The model was then ready 8
process? Check out Strata 3D CX. Dave first created the for the surface graphics
9
outline elements in and textures. Dave was
Why we love it Adobe Illustrator. also able to import the 10
With Strata 3D CX, you can: native layered Adobe 11
• Import Adobe Illustrator Photoshop file directly
12
outlines, then push them into the into Strata 3D CX. If
third dimension. any changes needed 13
to be made, Dave just made 14
• Link Adobe Photoshop layered Next, Dave created the them in Adobe Photoshop
files to texture and decal your Adobe Photoshop layers for and the 3D model updated 15
3D surfaces. the surface graphics and automatically. 16
textures that he needed.
• Output images, animations and 17
even Flash files for inclusion in
page layout, PDF, video, and He imported the Adobe Once the model was 18

web-based projects. Illustrator profiles into Strata 3D created, Dave was 19


CX and brought them into the able to reuse the
20
third dimension using Strata’s object to develop
powerful modeling tools. packaging, print, 21
web, and even point-
22
of-purchase display
marketing. 23

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25
25

Get strata 3d cx 26
Visit the Adobe Store
to learn more and buy. 27

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

ABOUT THIS ISSUE 1

feedback GUEST DESIGNERS 4

rate this issue Plazm 5

Editorial: Please rate each magazine section on the following scale: Claim to fame: Magazine publishers, “grunge” type godfathers, 6
++(Very useful or interesting to me) to --(Not useful or interesting to me) designers to the stars.
7
Ramp Up Announcements and events in the creative pro world Inspired by: People who work to make the world a better place.
8
Cover story When Turning Pages Becomes a Trip Listening to: Peaches, Willie Nelson, Cat Power, Sleater-Kinney, Melodium,
9
Features Creating More World Melvins, Sonic Youth, Dead Moon, Beck, King.

Nature’s Lightroom 10
Eating: Fish tacos.
Creative Persuasion: the rise of branded entertainment 11
Downloads Free downloads from Adobe Studio Exchange
Font & Function 2006 Type Directors Club winners ABOUT THE COVER 12

Scoop Exciting news from Adobe To create our smoke-infused cover, Plazm found inspiration from the 13

How’d they do that? Instructional sections within cover and feature articles technique described by Clear’s Emin Kadi in this issue’s cover story, When 14
Spotlight Strata 3D CX Turning Pages Becomes A Trip. “We used the technique as a starting point
15
for our design,” says Art Director Joshua Berger. “And then we took it to a new
place.” 16

17
Design and navigation: Please rate our overall design and navigation on the following scale:
++(Very engaging and/or easy to use) to --(Not engaging and/or difficult to use) FEATURED ARTISTS 18

New magazine design


This issue’s creative ideas, inspirational art, and 19
practical techniques have been provided by:
Magazine navigation 20
Readability • Jiae Kim and Jon Lee, Theme magazine
21
• Emin Kadi and Editor Ivan Kalafatic, Clear magazine
• Michael Lebowitz, Big Spaceship 22

• Mikkel Aaland, photographer


send a letter to the editor • Angela Drury, photographer
23

What did you love or despise about this issue? What else would you like to see in this magazine? • Martin Sundberg, photographer 24
Write your letter below: • Peter Krogh, photographer 25
• Richard Morgenstein, photographer
26
26
• Rainer Ziehm, leftchannel
• Ben Lunt, Goodtechnology 27

Submit
Want to be a featured
artist in this magazine? Send Us Your Work!

Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.


Adobe Magazine would like to thank the design team at Plazm for their contributions to this issue. ADOBE MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE PROFESSIONALS

Plazm is a visionary design


studio that also publishes an
eclectic design and culture
magazine. The 28th issue of Plazm
Magazine is available now and 1
features Milton Glaser, Peaches,
Marlene McCarty, Reza Abedini, 2
Dave Thomas of Pere Ubu, and 3
Raymond Pettibon. The magazine
has picked up some awards along 4
the way, and a complete catalog
is in the permanent collection of 5

the SFMOMA. You can find back 6


copies on the Plazm website.
7
Plazm Design started doing
commercial work in 1996 as 8

a way to pay for its Plazm 9


Magazine habit. Since then,
Plazm has had the pleasure to 10
work with lots of great companies
around the world, like Nike, 11

MTV, Lucasfilm, and ESPN. 12


Plazm works with excellent
community organizations, too, 13
like PICA (the Portland Institute
for Contemporary Art) and the 14

Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls. 15

Plazm is also into making 16


books—the latest one, ESPN’s
Ultimate Highlight Reel, was 17

written and designed for ESPN. 18

Visit our website for more 19


information.
20

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22

23

24

25

26

27
27

Adobe, the Adobe logo, After Effects, Arabic, Audition, Creative Suite, Dreamweaver, Encore, Fireworks, Flash, Garamond Premier Pro, GoLive, Illustrator, InDesign, Lightroom, Photoshop, Premiere Pro, Production Studio, and Soundbooth
are either registered trade­marks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated, in the United States and/or other countries. Mac and Macintosh are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the United States and other countries.
Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Copyright © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.

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