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OCTOBER 16, 2015 Check Small Business Out Our Week Pull Out TIMES Locally Owned &

OCTOBER 16, 2015

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Locally Owned & Operated

STRATHMORE

VOLUME 7 ISSUE 42

1 ST YEAR ANNIVERSARY EVENT!
1 ST YEAR
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Page 12

Page 12 Waste Week Page 25 Tough weekend Page 26 Warriors give thanks! Offering IV Sedation

Waste Week

Page 25

Page 12 Waste Week Page 25 Tough weekend Page 26 Warriors give thanks! Offering IV Sedation

Tough weekend

Page 26

Page 12 Waste Week Page 25 Tough weekend Page 26 Warriors give thanks! Offering IV Sedation

Warriors give thanks!

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Look on Page 4 for Town of Strathmore Municipal Notices

Contact Us Today!

403.934.5589

info@strathmoretimes.com

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

info@strathmoretimes.com www. StrathmoreTimes .com Disagreement between town and county leaves local business

Disagreement between town and county leaves local business with bill

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

A local businessman became the middleman be- tween the Town of Strathmore and the County of Wheatland, after the Strathmore Fire Department attended to a garbage truck fire on county property, for which he is now expected to foot the bill. On Feb. 23, Colin Huxted received a call from one of his drivers regarding a fire that started in the back of his garbage truck. After a few failed at- tempts to douse the fire with an extinguisher, the Strathmore Fire Department was dispatched when the Strathmore Rural Fire Department – operated by Wheatland County – was unable to attend. As a mutual aid agreement is currently nonexis- tent between the Town of Strathmore and the Coun- ty of Wheatland, the town sent an invoice to the county for over $7,000. However, upon reviewing the invoice on May 5, county council passed the buck to Huxted to claim the incident through his insurance, as the vehicle fire occurred on a Wheatland County road allow- ance and not Huxted’s property. Yet, Huxted refused to pay the bill, arguing that he pays fire tax for his properties in both the county and the town, and since the services only alluded to $7,353, it wasn’t enough to be covered by his insurance. “I only carry insurance if we have more than $10,000 claims, otherwise with 50 to 60 vehicles, you can never afford it,” said Huxted. “I donate to both those fire departments, and I helped them build those places and I’m not paying for some- thing like that. There’s Gray’s, there’s Rattray, there’s all kinds of companies like me that are working in the town and in the county. So are we covered or aren’t we?” Wheatland County did encourage Huxted to ad- dress the issue with the town as the responding de- partment, and to where the Strathmore-based busi- ness pays its business taxes. While the county agreed to send a representative to the town with Huxted, he felt the issue should be settled between the county and the town. “This is going to get political and it’s going to get messy because I shouldn’t be in the middle,” Huxted said. “The county told me that I had to take this up with the town and I said I will. But it doesn’t make sense that you guys aren’t playing well in the sandbox and I have to get involved. I have a busi- ness to run. I would’ve been better off to let my truck burn out there, nobody show up, and collect $100,000 for my truck.”

Continued on Page 5

Making a splash!! Seventy-seven athletes, including two locals, participated in Calgary’s Mountain Equip- ment Co-op’s

Making a splash!!

Seventy-seven athletes, including two locals, participated in Calgary’s Mountain Equip- ment Co-op’s first triathlon held in Strathmore on Oct. 10. For more coverage of the event see Page 28.

Miriam Ostermann Photo

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Page 2 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

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Page 2 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 3

Dance For Fun introduced to Strathmore

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

Strathmore has a non-profit ‘Dance For Fun’ group in town for young danc- ers who would like to participate in a fun-filled, no-pressure atmosphere. “We started it as a way to give kids an option to do a dance class but is com- pletely recreational,” said Shelly Neal, organizer. “We’ve only done it the one night and had great feedback.” Neal and her co-organizer Charlotte Ziehr thought of the idea when interest peaked in Strathmore and she took to social media to receive feedback. “I had posted on Facebook and said ‘ok what are my options’ and everyone said you should start something recre- ational,’ and someone said I’ll help you organize it’,” said Neal. Head instructor Shanice Halwa, who was involved in numerous productions at Strathmore High School, feels very

honoured to be teaching her passion to her young students who already have the willingness to learn. “I hope to teach the kids not only to dance, but to tell a story,” said Halwa. “And to learn how to move an audi- ence whether that’s laughing or bring- ing them to tears. My goal is to bring out every student’s full potential, and to show all the creativity we as a studio have to offer to the community.” The older group does work on more complex techniques but the goal is for all the groups to come together and work on team and individual skill sets. Classes that are offered are mini-bal- let, mini tap, musical theatre jazz, mini and senior hip-hop, cheer and lyrical ballet, and all the classes are for ages 5-9 and 10 and up. All sessions run on Thursdays at the Strathmore Civic Centre, going from 4- 8 p.m., and more information can be found on the Dance for Fun Strathmore Facebook page.

can be found on the Dance for Fun Strathmore Facebook page. Instructors Shanice Halwa (l) and

Instructors Shanice Halwa (l) and Alexis Jack- son offered an inexpensive alternative to non- competitive dance in Strathmore on Oct. 8 at the Strathmore Civic Centre.

Manny Everett Photo

Council looking for greater town involvement in Christmas parade

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

A request for increased in- volvement, effective support and promotion of the Christ- mas parade had town council spitballing on Oct. 7, eager to expand the magnitude and impact of the procession. Councillor Bob Sobol brought the request forward during the regular council meeting, that had all council members in favour. Along with sending letters out to the business commu- nity to encourage participa- tion either through a float or sponsorship, council agreed to donate $2,000 to the 2015 Christmas parade. “Since I’ve been on council we’ve had an annual Christ- mas parade,” said Sobol. “It’s an event that I think is looked forward to by a lot of our residents. I guess I sim- ply would like the town to get a little bit more involved in assisting the organizers who work hard at trying to get this organized. What I’m

trying to do is get some at- tention and some interest in the Christmas parade.” Sobol recalled a substan-

dard turnout last year, after the date was postponed for

a couple weeks, causing a

number of participants to be unavailable to participate. In order to provide incen-

tive, councillors talked about donating funds for prizes. “I like the idea, anything we can do to bring anoth- er event to the town,” said Councillor Pat Fule said dur- ing the meeting. “On the weekend you have the Light Up the Night, and I think it’s

a great idea. I’d like to see some sort of money come forward for prizes too.” Councillor Denise Peterson

also brought forward an idea

a resident had mentioned,

where instead of candy be- ing handed out by council- lors – as is practice with the Strathmore Stampede parade – councillors collect food donations for the food bank from residents, in exchange for a numbered ticket. The

ticket number will then be included in a draw for prizes. The idea was met with en- thusiasm among other coun- cil members. Letters destined for Strath-

more businesses were ex- pected to be sent out short- ly after last week’s council meeting. Council also en- couraged local businesses to donate prizes.

SMALL BUSINESS WEEK AWARDS EVENING Wednesday, October 21 Strathmore Curling Club 5:30 – 6:30 Network
SMALL
BUSINESS WEEK
AWARDS
EVENING
Wednesday, October 21
Strathmore Curling Club
5:30 – 6:30 Network & Cocktails
6:30 – 7:30 Dinner
7:30 – 8:30 Guest Speaker
Derek Fildebrandt, MLA Strathmore – Brooks
Presentation of Small Business Awards
Evening’s MC: Aleesha Gosling, Publisher Newsy Neighbour
Tickets: Members $30 | Non – Members $40
Sponsorship: Gold $200 | Silver $100 | Bronze $50
For more information:
www.strathmoredistrictchamber.com
– Events
info@strathmoredistrictchamber.com
403-901- 3175
Nightly: 8pm October 16 - 22, 2015 Hotel Transylvania 2 Matinees Saturday 2 pm Sunday
Nightly:
8pm
October 16 - 22, 2015
Hotel Transylvania 2
Matinees
Saturday 2 pm
Sunday 2 pm
Closed Sunday &
Monday
night
For Movie Listings call 403-934-3057
or go to www.joylandtheatre.com
The Bradford Exchange 128 - 2nd Avenue, Strathmore 403-934-6737 www.hiddensecretsstore.com
The Bradford Exchange
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Avenue, Strathmore 403-934-6737 www.hiddensecretsstore.com Q: Why is there a weekly “Ask a Funeral Director”

Q: Why is there a weekly “Ask a Funeral Director” article?

A:

The funeral industry is unlike any other. People have many questions about funerals but are often afraid of the answers or afraid of asking close relatives for fear of bringing up pain. This article was started to answer those questions. Many people have never dealt with a funeral before and are very misinformed about the industry. Television commercials will tell you most funerals cost $10,000 and online sources will tell you all funeral directors are con artists, both of which are false claims. We believe very strongly in the value of funerals and we also believe that every person who needs our services should be as prepared as possible. This article is intended to give proper information on a wide range of topics that apply to the funeral industry. If you have a question, please call us or email it to the address below.

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Page 4 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

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TOWN OF STRATHMORE NOTICE OF DEVELOPMENT PERMITS TOWN OF STRATHMORE NOTICE OF DEVELOPMENT PERMITS The
TOWN OF STRATHMORE
NOTICE OF DEVELOPMENT PERMITS
TOWN OF STRATHMORE
NOTICE OF DEVELOPMENT PERMITS
The following application(s) for development have been approved by the Town
of Strathmore, subject to the right of appeal to the Subdivision and Development
Appeal Board:
The following application(s) for development have been approved by the Town
of Strathmore, subject to the right of appeal to the Subdivision and Development
Appeal Board:
Application: 15HB-044
Application: 15D-248
Civic Address:
Legal Description:
Development:
1207 Strathcona Road
Lot 27, Block 13, Plan 0312183
Home Occupation: Personal Service: Aesthetics
Civic Address:
Legal Description:
Development:
The file(s) as noted above can be viewed at the Town Office during regular
business hours. The permit(s) will be issued following the lapse of the appeal
period.
Any person wishing to appeal this decision(s) must submit their appeal no later
than 4:30 pm on October 23, 2015. Appeals must be in writing, accompanied by the
$100.00 fee and submitted to the Secretary, Subdivision and Development Appeal
Board, Town of Strathmore, 680 Westchester Road, Strathmore AB T1P 1J1.
Date of Publication: October 9, 2015
Unit 207, 215-213 Third Avenue
Lots 34-40, Block 8, Plan 5894P
Discretionary Use – Central Business District within
the Downtown Overlay District: Athletic and
Recreational Facility, Indoor
The file(s) as noted above can be viewed at the Town Office during regular
business hours. The permit will be issued following the lapse of the appeal period.
Any person wishing to appeal this decision must submit their appeal no later
than 4:30 pm on October 29, 2015.
Appeals must be in writing, accompanied by the
$100.00 fee and submitted to the Secretary, Subdivision and Development Appeal
Board, Town of Strathmore, 680 Westchester Road, Strathmore AB T1P 1J1.
The next regular
Council Meeting
will be
October 21, 2015
Date of Publication:
October 16, 2015
COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS – OCTOBER 7, 2015
Council gave first reading to Bylaw #15-31 Land Use Bylaw Textual
Amendments.
Council will hold a Public Hearing for Bylaw #15-31 on November 4,
2015.
Council gave second, third and final reading to Bylaw #15-20 Land Use
Bylaw Amendment – Eating and Drinking Establishments.
Council gave first reading to Bylaw #15-29 Land Use Bylaw Amendment
– Protective Emergency Services.
Council will hold a Public Hearing for Bylaw #15-29 on November 4,
2015.
Council approved the payment of the CSMI partnership invoice for $15,
192.24, and that these funds come from the Joint Strathmore Stormwater
Fund currently held by the WID.
Council approved participation with WID in continued discussions on
Storm water management in alignment with Option 2. The CSMI Technical
Committee Partners would continue to work collaboratively to agree on
storm water policies and equitable agreements, and that Administration
would be authorized to enter into an MOU agreement with the WID.
Approval of a formal Regional Storm Water Management structure if
appropriate, would be approved by Council in the future.
Council agreed to bring this forward at the Fall Budget Workshop to
allocate operating and capital project funding for the next 3 years.
Council will carryover the 2nd Street Surface Overlay project to 2016
with the existing budget of $550,000.00 so that further investigation of the
road base, drainage and underground infrastructure be completed before
finalizing the scope of work and tender for completion in 2016.
Council approved the conditions of sale for the 2015 Public Auction,
to be conducted on December 14, 2015 at 10:00 AM by the Director of
Corporate Services for the Town of Strathmore as follows:
-
All land sold at public auction is sold subject to the terms of
the Municipal Government Act of Alberta 2000, Chapter M-26 and
amendments thereto.
-
Each parcel will be offered for sale, subject to a reserve bid and to the
reservations and conditions contained in the existing certificate of title.
-
The land is being offered for sale on an “as is, where is” and the
Town of Strathmore makes no representation and gives no warranty
whatsoever as to the adequacy of services, building conditions absence
or presence of environmental contamination. No bid will be accepted
where the bidder attempts to attach conditions precedent to the sale. No
terms or conditions will be considered other than those specified by the
Town of Strathmore.
-
The Town of Strathmore may, after the public auction, become the
owner of any property that is not sold at the public auction.
-
Terms: 10% deposit at the time of successful bid, and balance payable
within 30 days of the date of the public auction. Remittances must be in
the form of a certified cheque or bank draft.
-
Redemption may be offered by payment of all arrears.
Redemption may be effected by payment of all arrears of taxes,
penalties and costs at any time prior to the sale.
-
Council appointed Telissa Tebbutt and Jason Montgomery to the
Names Advisory Committee for a one year term ending October 31, 2016.
Council proclaimed October 7, 2015 as World Cerebral Palsy Day in
Strathmore.
Council approved a donation of $2000.00 to the Christmas Parade to be
held in 2015 with the funds to be drawn from the Financial Stabilization
Reserve.
Councillor Sobol was removed from the Alberta 55+ games committee
as the committee is no longer active.
TOWN INFORMATION
Don’t miss out on Town of Strathmore information. Follow us
on Facebook, Twitter, or at www.strathmore.ca to see updates
about road construction, events, pool schedule/closures,
Council Highlights and much, much more!
WINNER OF THE
2012 VENTURE MAGAZINE’S BEST SMALL COMMUNITY TO DO BUSINESS IN
TOWN OF
MAGAZINE’S BEST SMALL COMMUNITY TO DO BUSINESS IN TOWN OF www.strathmore.ca 680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB

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680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1 • 403-934-3133 • Office Hours: M - F
680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1 • 403-934-3133 • Office Hours: M - F

680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1

•
680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1 • 403-934-3133 • Office Hours: M - F 8:30

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680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1 • 403-934-3133 • Office Hours: M - F 8:30

Office Hours: M

- F 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 5

Rosebud group plans immediate and long- term support for Syrians

LAUREEN F. GUENTHER Times Contributor

A Rosebud group is responding to the crisis in Syria with a plan to fundraise

for Syrian civilian relief and support for groups that are sponsoring refugees. The group’s primary emphasis is on raising funds they’ll channel through the relief agency Medair, said Gregg Monteith, a member of the group called Rosebud for Syria. They’re emphasiz- ing relief, he said, because relief helps

a large number of people immediately. Relief has the additional benefit of stabilizing troubled regions, Monteith said. In Syria, the government is now bombing civilian areas controlled by rebels, but the extremists are mobile enough to scatter when they see bomb- ers coming. So civilians are the ones most terrorized and devastated by the bombs. “Out of that instability, people are go-

ing to the I.S. (Islamic State),” Monteith said, because IS recruits doctors and other helping professionals. “I.S. is saying, ‘Come to us. We’ll help you.’ And so you’re having Muslims who would not normally be radicalized or converted to extremism, saying, ‘They may be extremists, but these are the only ones who are helping our kids.’” That’s exactly the kind of instability extremists want to foster, he said. However, visible, demonstrated relief from outside agencies can give Syrian civilians somewhere else to go for help. “If we start supporting efforts in Jor- dan, then people can look to Jordan, and can say, ‘we can go there. This is

a safe place for us,’” Monteith said. “It’s also helping against the destabilization in the area that makes radical groups

like I.S. look

like they’re the only op-

tion.” Medair works in isolated, unstable regions where other agencies do not go, Monteith said. Because Medair has a proven track record, its teams can be in place to start work immediately af- ter a crisis. Perhaps most importantly, because it has a Grade A rating, private donations to Medair are matched mul- tiple times. “All the major sponsors – like the US government, the Canadian government, the UN, the EU, various countries – are pouring money into this place (Syria), but they’re not just giving it to any- body. It’s the ‘Grade A’ people who are winning these, because they’ve got the experience. They’re trusted,” Monteith said. “The potential for a dollar that we contribute to Medair is incredibly high because it will turn into four or five more dollars. Instead of just being dou- bled, it’s quadrupled or quintupled.” The members of Rosebud for Syria also believe in refugee sponsorship, Monteith said. They’re partnering with other groups, like Hope for Syria in Strathmore, to sponsor refugee families in larger centers that offer good em- ployment and housing opportunities. Rosebud for Syria is planning one or more fundraising events in Rosebud and Drumheller, in early November. Events will include drama and music, and will provide information about the needs in Syria and the group’s planned response. Monteith said they also hope to schedule a Skype conversation with Ben Paine, Medair’s International Re- lations Manager, who’ll be in Jordan where Medair is already working. For more information about Rosebud for Syria’s events, or to contact Gregg Monteith, see the Facebook page, Rose- bud for Syria.

Tough bill to swallow

Continued from

Page 1

Late last year, the Town of Strathmore with- drew from the mutual aid agree- ment with Wheat- land County that ensured either department would come to the aid of the other when needed at no charge. While no new agree- ment has yet been agreed upon, Wheatland Coun- ty representatives assured that the municipality is providing fire pro- tection services to every resident and ratepayer within

Wheatland Coun- ty.

“ W h e a t l a n d County continues to work at secur- ing a mutual aid

agreement

Strathmore

Department,

with

the

Fire

as

in

In fact, if any of the Wheatland County Fire De- partments were asked to respond to a fire in the town of Strath- more, there would be no bill issues from Wheatland

time, before the issue is brought before council, they did mention it will most likely be scheduled for the Oct. 23 meet- ing.

have

place with all other surrounding fire departments,” said Wheatland County Reeve Glenn Koester. “Such an agree- ment would mean that we would help one another out at no charge.

County.”

Although

the

Town

of

Strath-

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e r e p s Carey Rose Debra Enslen Hayley Poirier we CRIME OF THE WEEK

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r e p s Carey Rose Debra Enslen Hayley Poirier we CRIME OF THE WEEK Strathmore
r e p s Carey Rose Debra Enslen Hayley Poirier we CRIME OF THE WEEK Strathmore

CRIME OF THE WEEK

Strathmore RCMP is currently attempting to increase public awareness in ways to keep property safe from crime. From September 1st to September 30, Strathmore RCMP dealt with the following actual crimes against property. Theft Under $5000 – 22 Theft of Bicycle – 2 Theft Under $5000 from MV – 11 Theft Over $5000– 3 Theft of Vehicles – 22 Break and Enter(Residence and Business) – 13

A good number of those incidents were the result

of leaving vehicle and residence doors unlocked. As a result, Strathmore RCMP conducted vehicle

door checks on random streets throughout the

detachment territory. In September, a total of 23 of 100 vehicles were found with unlocked doors. This amounts to 23% of vehicles that were increasingly susceptible to crime of opportunity. Strathmore RCMP would like to take the opportunity

to encourage residents to do their part in keeping

property safe. Keeping doors locked and valuables out of sight is an important step in reducing crime in our neighborhoods. In October, Strathmore RCMP will conduct a second set of vehicle door checks. Members are hopeful that numbers will be more favourable, and as a result, a lower total number of property crimes. As always, the public is encouraged to report any thefts or suspicious activity to the Strathmore RCMP or local Crimestoppers.

1-800-222-TIPS

(1-800-222-8477)

GET YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS IN! Call 403-934-5589

GET

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YOUR WEEKLY

HEALTH ADVICE

Gord Morck Pharmacist Capsule Comments
Gord Morck
Pharmacist
Capsule Comments
HEALTH ADVICE Gord Morck Pharmacist Capsule Comments Designing the flu shot each year can be quite

Designing the flu shot each year can be quite difficult and sometimes the result is less than perfect. Last year’s flu shot was one of those. This year the vaccine will be a better match for the circulating viruses. These vaccines are never 100% effective but even at 50-60%, thy give pretty good odds for not getting the flu. As pharmacists, we are often asked if it’s OK to get the flu shot when one has a cold. Colds and other minor illnesses do not affect the vaccine’s effectiveness. Just a reminder: it does take about two weeks for our bodies to develop antibodies against the flu. Advances in healthcare are slow and steady and we often forget what our ancestors had to deal with. For example, in the early 20th century, one in seven children died before the age of 2 and deaths during childbirth were quite common. Polio, smallpox and measles were the case of many child deaths. Today, these diseases has virtually disappeared. Ibuprofen is a pain-reliever and anti- inflammatory drug that is available without prescription. Health Canada has issued a warning of the increased risk of heart attack and stroke with high doses of ibuprofen. High doses means amounts over 1200 mg per day. Don’t hesitate to ask questions that will help you get the most out of your medications. Use the educational resources of our pharmacist staff.

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Page 6 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

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Council defers infrastructure project to 2016

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

A preliminary engineering investigation on 2nd Street, an overlay project that was originally bundled with the Lakeside Blvd. and 4th Ave. reconstruction projects, raised numerous concerns among town staff and required town council to con- sider carrying the project over into next year. Seven months ago, town council agreed to a $3 million agreement that included the construction on Lakeside Blvd., 4th Ave., and 2nd Street with Goldstar Trucking. All three proj- ects were included in the tender, although the 2nd Street over-

lay project was added as a provisional item. Upon the early stages of construction on Lakeside Blvd., Associated Engineering’s investigation on 2nd Street revealed issues surrounding drainage and the base structure that ex- perts were unable to ignore. “Early on in the execution of the contract we made a deci- sion to not include this section in the schedule for construc- tion in this current year,” said Strathmore’s Director of Engi- neering Gord Elenko. “Although we got a great tender price for the scope of work that we provided, I believe that there were some omissions within the scope that would consider- ably increase the cost or decrease the overall solution.” The decision to postpone the project, which was made on June 17, was based on possible scope changes, time needed to complete the other road projects, and shortened longevity of the proposed pavement design that was tendered. On Oct. 7, Elenko addressed local officials about the issues that are expected to shorten the longevity of the pavement surface overlay as designed and tendered. By requesting council to carry the project over into the 2016 budget, further investigation of the drainage, road base, and underground infrastructure can be completed before fi- nalizing the scope of work. Upon meeting finalization, town staff expects it will allow for the project to be tendered in projects approved for 2016. Town council unanimously approved the staff recommen- dation to carry over the 2nd Street surface overlay project to 2016, with the existing budget of $550,000, so that further investigation of the road base, drainage, and underground in- frastructure be completed before finalizing the scope of work and tender for completion in 2016.

Monkeying around!
Monkeying
around!

Carmen Erison (l) pre- sented Ember Stark with a monkey book bag at the Strathmore Municipal Library on Oct. 9, following a documentary on the monkey kingdom for the Friday Fun Film event.

Miriam Ostermann

Photo

for the Friday Fun Film event. Miriam Ostermann Photo Strathmore Lions Club 14 t h Annual
Strathmore Lions Club 14 t h Annual Christmas Party December 12, 2015 – Strathmore Civic

Strathmore Lions Club 14 th Annual Christmas Party

December 12, 2015 – Strathmore Civic Centre

Cocktails: 6:30 pm

Dinner: 7:00 pm Dance to Follow

Ham & Turkey Dinner $40.00 per person Adults 18 and over With ONE Free on a Table Booking of 8

Adults 18 and over With ONE Free on a Table Booking of 8 TICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGH

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October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 7

FAST in Action

SABRINA KOOISTRA Times Junior Contributor

For many of us, the complex issue of human rights is not something we are entirely focussed upon or aware of. For some, though, this is an ongoing battle that is faced daily, and has been one for hundreds, if not thousands of years. We can see this repeatedly in many

cultures’ histories; in times of breaching such as the Rwandan genocide, and in moments of great triumph, such as Can- ada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms. For many members of our younger and future generations, these events are mere stories from our textbooks, and amidst our whirl-wind culture and of- ten secular society, we may not realize that events similar in nature to those of our former years, are occurring at this moment, even in our own nation. On Oct. 8, a group of Grade 11 stu- dents attending Strathmore High School (SHS) were presented the opportunity

to express their views on human rights.

students connect with the experiences of others,” said Social Studies teacher Christine Magill. “The events go from being an event in the past, and trans-

form into the story of a real person with thoughts, feelings, and emotions. It helps create empathy and understand- ing that is often missed when we look

at events from the past”

The program that students at SHS participated in is called “Voices Into Action,” focussed on encouraging dis- cussion and thoughtfulness on related cases. It has made students aware of by- stander power. “I remember what it was like as a

child to feel bullied,” said Raber. “I also remember what it was like as a teen- ager to be made to feel different and ostracized because I was Jewish. If only one person decides to use their voice, taking themselves out of the bystand- er role to stick up for me, my guess is many more would have also, and then perhaps those scars would have not run so deep.” Human rights will continue to pose as

The students were questioned on issues

a

controversial and difficult topic, but

such as gender, homosexual, transgen-

if

we never deal with this issue, it will

der, and racial equality, disabled peo- ple’s issues, and the struggles of immi-

never go away. “In the words of Koffi Annan

knowl-

gration. “If high school students such as our- selves, are able to take part in the discus- sion of these global - impacting issues, like immigration, then it may become apparent that authority figures and/or people directly affected by immigration can more freely address these issues as well, shining more light upon this mat- ter,” said student Saryn Edwards. Organized by Fighting Anti-Semitism Together (FAST), the purpose of the program, according to Lisa Raber, is to provide accessible resources on human rights issues for educators to integrate into their curriculums. The idea was first introduced by a non-Jewish teacher who taught at a Jewish school. During a period of ex- treme animosity towards Jews, her stu- dents often came to school both de- pressed and unfocused. She knew that something needed to be done or this would continue to plague her students and their families. As a result of this, a group of Jewish and non-Jewish men and women came together to establish a program that would combat Anti-Semitism, which eventually branched out to include the matters of other collectives. Today, the trans-Canada, multi-racial- ly led, nonprofit’s program, “Choose Your Voice” has reached 2.4 million stu- dents, and is reaching out to more. One of the techniques that FAST has incorporated into its syllabus

is

the use of specific artifacts as well

as

modern-day issues and human rights

violations, to create a relatable and last- ing effect on the students who receive

the education. As the program has been incorporat- ed into the school’s curriculum, it has given teachers an opportunity to largely influence their student’s thoughts and actions. “The lessons we’ve been doing have

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Cherie Copithorne-Barnes
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Brian Perillat, Canfax
ZONE 3 INCLUDES:
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or call 1-800-463-6868 ( Elections Canada has all the information you need to be ready to

Page 8 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

Federal

election

2105

16, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com Federal election 2105 Andrew Kucy Independent Everyone should vote for me in this

Andrew Kucy

Independent Everyone should vote for me in this election because I am a resident of the riding (Langdon), my work background in- cludes extensive oil and gas experience, I volunteer in my local community, I am concerned about the environment and access to clean water for everyone, and I will make a great Member of Parliament and representa- tive of Bow River

based on my pre- vious actions and personality. Independent

MPs play a key role in any gov-

ernment setting, but especially

play a key role in any gov- ernment setting, but especially with minority governments. As an

with minority governments. As an in- dependent I can be the swing vote on close legislation instead of just another

hand in the air for one party or another. That key position will ensure I can suc- cessfully fight for the interests of Bow River residents and businesses while holding the large parties accountable to their commitments made before and during the election campaign.

I have acted positively and collabora-

tively with all the candidates I’m com- peting with for the position of your MP and I will bring that same attitude and energy with me to Ottawa on your behalf. I will bring new ideas and out of the box thinking to federal politics while maintaining my local connections and commitment to independence and local representation.

I will work to freeze corporate and

personal taxes at their current rates, in-

crease investments in water and other critical infrastructure in the riding, ex- pand our economy by promoting the safe design, construction and main- tenance of pipelines and oil-by-rail operations, reduce red tape for inter- provincial and international goods, and ensure balance between economic de- velopment and environmental protec- tion and conservation. I ask that each and every person vote in this election. Vote for a candidate you believe in as an individual and who will be a positive representative for Bow River. Vote for a MP who will actually impact and change legislation in your best interests. Vote FOR the candidate who stands firm for the val- ues and interests of the families, busi- nesses, and communities of Bow River. Vote for Andrew Kucy because I am in- dependent.

Why should the constituents of the Bow River Riding vote for you on Oct.

19?

Pass the Salt THE BLACK SPOT SLIDE ings, each moment that life gives you. I
Pass the Salt
THE BLACK SPOT SLIDE
ings, each moment that life gives you.
I received this reflection in an email the
other day…
One day a professor entered the class-
I don’t typically use something like this in
my reflection, but this one made me stop
and think, so I felt it was worth sharing. As
room and asked his students to prepare for
I listen to the news, as I stop and talk to
a surprise test. They waited anxiously at
people over a coffee, as I wander or drive
their desks for the test to begin. The pro-
fessor handed out the question paper, with
the text facing down as usual. Once he
handed them all out, he asked his students
to turn the page and begin. To everyone’s
surprise, there were no questions … just
around town, I realize how easy it is focus
on the little black dots.
The concerns over the economy … the
wondering over the outcome of elections
… the fears over increasing crime rates
… the lack of respect for others, and our
a black dot in the center of the page. The
professor seeing the expression on every-
one’s face, told them the following:
“I want you to write what you see there.”
The students confused, got started on the
inexplicable task.
properties … I could go on and on.
So I have been trying to look at the bigger
picture. We have an amazing abundance
of resources and community agencies that
support our community … FCSS, WFCSS,
Mental Health, Food Bank, Crisis Shelter,
At the end of the class, the professor took
all the answer papers and started reading
each one of them aloud in front of all the
students. All of them with no exceptions,
described the black dot, trying to explain
its position in the middle of the sheet,
etc. etc. etc. After all had been read, the
classroom silent, the professor began to
explain:
“I am not going to grade on you this, I just
wanted to give you something to think
about. No one wrote about the white part
of the paper. Everyone focused on the
black dot – and the same happens in our
lives. We have a white paper to observe
and enjoy, but we always focus on the dark
spots. Our life is a gift given to us by God,
with love and care, and we always have
reasons to celebrate – nature renewing
itself everyday, our friends around us,
the job that provides our livelihood, the
miracles we see everyday …
However we insist on focusing only on the
dark spots – the health issues that bother
us, the lack of money, the complicated
relationship with a family member, the
disappointment with a friend, etc.
The dark spots are very small compared to
everything we have in our lives, but they
are the ones that pollute our minds.
Take your eyes away from the black spots
in your life. Enjoy each one of your bless-
SYC, our churches, the Legion … just to
name a few.
We are blessed by protective services of
all forms, to watch over and maintain order
and safety in our community.
We have freedom, to worship, to live, to
grow, to learn, and to make choices.
To say nothing of the people striving to set
up and maintain businesses and resources
to make sure we have what we need right
here, not always needing to travel many
miles to get it.
It is so easy to get caught in the “black
spot” mentality. But the next time you feel
it happening to you, stop. Go for a walk.
Drive around for a few minutes. Take a
closer glance, not at the black spots, but
at the huge white palette behind it. Look
at the smiles, the compassion, the hope
to be seen on faces around us. Stop and
consider who, and what has been shared
with you, that has made you feel a little
better about things, and play it forward.
I believe we will all see much more white
space, and many fewer black spots, if we
only take the time to watch.
Psalm 126:3
The LORD has done great things with us, of
which we shall be glad. Thanks be to God.
Pastor Dawn Lord of All Lutheran Church BOW RIVER ALLIANCE CHURCH 105 Main St. Carseland
Pastor Dawn
Lord of All Lutheran Church
BOW RIVER ALLIANCE CHURCH
105 Main St. Carseland
403-934-9337
office@bowriveralliance.com
Sunday Worship: 10:30 am
www.bowriveralliance.com
RCCG PECULIAR PEOPLE ASSEMBLY
(1 PET. 2:9)
115A – 3rd Avenue, Strathmore
403-667-7832
HARVEST HEALING CENTRE CHURCH
102 Canal Gardens
403-901-0893 / 403-880-3171
Pastor: Elizabeth Karp
Worship Sundays 10:30 am
Healing Room Monday 7-9 pm
Now available at The Seed (our book nook)
Living Books and Products
phone: 403-619-9279
Come Join us for a spirit-filled time
of worship
Pastor: Dunmoye Lawal
Sunday Worship: 10:30 am
Thursday Bible Study: 7 pm
Friday (Prayer Meeting): 7 pm
www.rccgstrathmore.com
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC
Holy Cross Collegiate School Gym
709B - 2nd Street, Strathmore
403-934-2641
STRATHMORE FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
50 Maplewood Drive • 403-934-2225
Senior Pastor: Rev. Les Fischer
Youth Pastor: Kyle Lomenda
New Office Hours:
Pastor: Fr. Wojciech Jarzecki
Masses: Saturday 5 pm • Sunday 10 am
ST. MICHAEL & ALL
ANGELS ANGLICAN
“Becoming fully alive in Jesus Christ”
INTERIM WORSHIP LOCATION:
9 am - 4 pm • Tues - Wed - Thur
Worship Service: 10:30 am
Children’s Church & Nursery in Service
Extending Grace - igniting hope
www.strathmorefullgospel.com
245 Brent Blvd., Strathmore
(NORTH door) 403-934-3017
Pastor & Priest: Bryan Beveridge
Sunday Morning Worship 10:00 am
LORD OF ALL (NALC) LUTHERAN
112 Lakeside Blvd. • 403-934-2374
Pastor: Dawn Nelson
Worship Schedule
Thursday Evening 7:00 pm
Sunday Family 10:30 am
Christian Education
For All - Ages 3-103
Sunday at 9:30 am
Join us in Praising our Lord, Jesus Christ!
HOPE COMMUNITY
COVENANT CHURCH
245 Brent Blvd, Strathmore • 403-934-2424
Worship Service Sundays 10 am
Lead Pastor: Glenn Peterson
www.hope-community.ca
STRATHMORE SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
Meeting in the Lutheran Church
112 Lakeside Blvd. 403-983-0081
Pastor: Ghena Girleanu
Services held every Saturday
Sabbath School: 10 AM
Worship Service: 11 AM
www.strathmoreadventist.ca
STRATHMORE ALLIANCE
325 1 Ave • 403-934-3543
Corner of 1 Ave & Wheatland Trail
Transitional Pastor: Jim Hathaway
9:30 am Sunday School for All Ages
11:00 am Worship Service
www.strathmorealliance.com
STRATHMORE UNITED
Wheatland Trail & 3rd Avenue
403-934-3025
Rev. Pamela Scott
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Babysitting Provided
Wheel Chair Accessible
Loop system for the hearing impaired
Wheel Chair Accessible Loop system for the hearing impaired Fahed Khalid do not like or if

Fahed Khalid

do not like or if I make promises and do not de- liver, I can be recalled from my position. This mean accountability in capital and bold letters and since none of the other parties have recall, they can make promises and if they do not deliver nothing can be done about it. The DAPC is a new federal party and I nor the

party leader are your typical politicians. Both are common grassroots people that work hard and pay taxes just like you. Stephen (Garvey, DAPC leader) has studied democratic law for over 17 years and the reason for starting the party was

to bring back democracy to the people and make

the political process efficient and effective rather than politicking and wasting taxpayer’s money needlessly, which is what you and me work hard for everyday and we pay. I share this thought and that is why I am working with Stephen and the party. I know this is a rural riding and live in the riding and I also understand urban ridings where big government is You have given everyone else a chance, some parties have been tried and tested multiple times over. Now give the DAPC a chance and we will get the job done and I look for your support this election.

Democratic Advancement Party of Canada

This is a new party which is clean, clear, and works for the common people. We are corruption free, have no strings attached, and are not tied to any corporations. We have strong fiscal responsibility and strong accountability aspects built into our constitution. We have recall built into our con-

stitution and mandatory community engagement.

We want to bring back democracy to the people

and change the current trend of the wasting of taxpayer’s money, which we all work so hard for, on non-issues, fraud, and unjustified luxurious spending that we have seen recently. Just to be clear on the scale we are conservative

with flexibility, as this is because if you view ev- erything through one lens you will mess some is- sues up. We are only other option for a conserva- tive party and the alternative for voting for the left wings par ties. We are clean, clear, and grassroots. Regarding recall, we are the only party that has recall. So if I vote a certain way the constituents

Rita Fromholt

So if I vote a certain way the constituents Rita Fromholt Green Party Greenhouse gas reduction

Green Party Greenhouse gas reduction While realistically I cannot ex- pect to win the election in this rid- ing, I hope that people will con- sider casting their ballot for myself as the Green Party candidate for a number of important reasons. A vote for the Green Party gives people who believe it is time to do politics differently, and who believe we can indeed have lasting eco-

nomic prosperity without causing irreparable damage to our natural environment, health and local communities, a political voice. It is much

more than a protest vote – it is a vote that sends

a message to other candidates and parties that

people want to be given a real alternative to how they are governed, and to be shown leadership towards the creation of a 21st century economy

not dependent on fossil fuels. The political status quo in Canada is changing, and the Green Party

is leading the way. I hope you will join us on this

exciting journey.

MEXICANSCRAMBLE Stix Restaurant & Lounge is Open 7 Days A Week! Sunday, October 18th 11am
MEXICANSCRAMBLE
Stix Restaurant &
Lounge is Open
7 Days A Week!
Sunday,
October 18th
11am Shotgun
Looking for great food and
excellent daily specials?
The Stix Restaurant
Mem $79 Non Mem $99
Includes: Power Cart, Driving
Range, 18 Holes, Meal & Prizes.
18 Hole Modified Scramble Format
& Lounge is open sun
up until sundown seven
days a week with great food
and awesome service.
We would love for you to join us!
Pro Shop Now Open 7 Days a Week All Day Long
403-934-2299
Visit our website:
Ext 1
strathmoregolfclub.com
www.strathmoregolfclub.com

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 9

Frans VandeStroet

Christian Heritage Party (CHP Canada)

9 Frans VandeStroet Christian Heritage Party (CHP Canada) To start with, I ask all eligible vot-

To start with, I ask all eligible vot- ers in Bow River riding to please go out and vote, period! We live in a free and democratic country and it is so easy to take our democratic privileg- es for granted. Looking at parts of the world that are in chaos, places like Syria and Iraq, we will all

Martin Shields

Conservative Party of Canada

we will all Martin Shields Conservative Party of Canada Our province is built on traditions, family

Our province is built on traditions, family roots and rural values. Our country is the best country in the world to raise our families and busi- nesses because of those values. I am proud to be an Albertan, a Canadian and your neigh- bor.

Lynn MacWilliam

NDP

a Canadian and your neigh- bor. Lynn MacWilliam NDP I have been a supporter of the

I have been a supporter of the NDP for decades. I strongly believe in Tom Mulcair and know that he will be a great Prime Minister. Tom and the NDP will work for or- dinary Canadians and families. The NDP will create good, mortgage-paying jobs; develop a national housing strategy so we have affordable, safe, secure housing for parents to raise their children and for seniors to live with dignity; develop a Phar- macare program so we purchase pharmaceuticals

agree that we are so blessed to live in a country like Canada. When you go out and vote, please vote your con- science and send a clear message to Ottawa. Vote for a party that wants to protect ALL people in Bow River, from the very youngest to the very oldest. You know where I am going. The Christian Heritage Party (CHP) wants to protect human rights from concep- tion to natural death. Currently 100,000 unborn ba- bies are killed in Canada every single year in the name of ‘choice.’

If I am elected as your Member of Parliament I will focus on keeping the economy strong and ensuring our agriculture industry is recognized for the vital role it plays in our communities. So why should you vote for me? As a Conserva- tive, I believe our government’s main mission is to create an economic climate that allows and encour- ages all Canadian families to flourish and prosper. An environment that protects our traditions and liberties from those who want to destroy them. To me a stable economy means good, well-paying jobs. It means a balanced budget. It means tax cuts,

more efficiently and at a lower cost; ensure $1million $15 a day childcare spaces; create an environment for investment in manufacturing and research and de- velopment; work with First Nations respectfully and on a nation-to-nation basis; meet our climate change commitments; and, restore Canada’s reputation in the world. We have a balanced plan, and will pay for it by raising corporate taxes to 17 per cent and closing tax loopholes, something most Canadians agree should happen. To find out more about Tom and the NDP’s plan for Canada, please go to www.ndp.ca/platform. I will assist constituents making their way through the government red tape. I will ensure that constituents

There is no legislation in Canada to regulate abor- tion and with that fact we are in dubious company of only two notorious human rights violators, China and North Korea. Quite embarrassing, to say the least, for a country that is so proud of its ‘Canadian val- ues.’ So on Oct. 19 please vote for a party that truly believes in our Canadian values, please vote for the only outspoken pro-life and pro-traditional-family federal party in Canada, vote CHP! Thank you very much for all your support before, during and after Election Day!

like the GST that was reduced from seven per cent to five per cent, and most recently the Family Tax Credit. Our community needs an MP with strong leader- ship skills and experience. Someone who can pull the right people to the table to solve issues. I know that you want the same things I want – success for our region, country and family. I hope I can rely on you to join with me now in the fight for a responsible government, a Conservative government. On Oct. 19th please vote for me, Martin Shields, your Conservative candidate in Bow River.

applying for federal government programs get the help they need; that seniors get the benefits they de- serve and veterans are not left behind. I will be open and transparent with their tax dollars I will listen to my constituents, be empathetic to their needs and concerns, assist them where possible and treat them with respect. This is why I believe the people of Bow River should vote for me. If you vote for me to be the Mem- ber of Parliament for Bow River, you can be sure that I will work hard for you. This election is very important. History is in the making. Please ensure that you take the time to vote. It is your democratic right to do so.

Liberal Party candidate William MacDonald Alexander was not available for comment as of press time.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN THE SANTA CLAUS PARADE THIS Y EAR? The Celebration
WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN
THE SANTA CLAUS PARADE
THIS Y EAR?
The Celebration of Lights Committee along with Aztec Real Estate will be hosting
TIMES
STRATHMORE
the Christmas Parade this year. We would like to build the Parade to be a fun event
each year for our community.
The Santa Claus Parade will be held on Saturday, November
28 starting at 5:00 pm. and follow a
parade route throughout downtown, then everyone can head to the Agricultural Grounds
for a Charity BBQ and entertainment will take place to precede the 8th ANNUAL
LIGHT UP THE NIGHT CELEBRATION.
Strathmore Lions Club
If you have a float, mascots, marching bands, horses,
please contact Tracey for registration forms.
CELEBRATION OF
LIGHTS
Tracey Rogers 403-934-5533 • aztecrealestateinc@gmail.com

Page 10 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

Regional storm water management approach

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

Proportional contributions required for infrastructure on a regional approach to resolve storm water issues left town council with ques- tions and unwilling to make a decision regarding the al-

location of operational funds until more information is brought forth during the Fall budget meeting. Council was introduced to three systems on Oct. 7, when representatives from the Western Irrigation Dis- trict (WID) and Alberta Wa- terSmart updated the local

Strathmore Legion Branch #10 NEWS By Irene Knappe, Secretary / PR / Membership • LADIES
Strathmore Legion Branch #10 NEWS
By Irene Knappe, Secretary / PR / Membership
• LADIES AUXILIARY BREAKFAST: Sunday, October 18th , from 9 - 11 a.m.
Come one, come all! We have lots of room and they have lots of food!
• LADIES AUXILIARY HARVEST DINNER: Saturday, October 24th
• Arrangements have been made that we sponsor a representative of SERVICE CANA-
DA OUTREACH PROGRAMS. Lisa Despas, Citizen Services Specialist, will be coming to
the Legion on Monday, October 26th, from 2 to 4 p.m. to present us with their Income
Security programs for Senior Citizens, which include:
 Canada Pension Plan
 Old Age Security Pension
 Retirement Pension
 Guaranteed Income Supplement
 Disability Benefit
 Survivor Benefits
 Death Benefit
 Old Age Security
 The Allowance and the Allowance for the Survivor
 Changes to the Old Age Security program
This presentation is open to anyone, Legion members, and the Public, who may have
questions they want answered. All we ask is that you call the Legion to reserve a spot
so that we can tell Ms. Despas about how many will be attending. Please do so as
soon as possible. Thank you!!
• Next General Meeting: Tuesday, October 27th, at 7:30 p.m.
• Next Executive Meeting: Tuesday, November 10th, at 7:00 p.m.
OUR POPPY CAMPAIGN BEGINS ON OCTOBER 30th , 2015. WE WILL HAVE VOLUNTEERS
AT THE FOLLOWING SUPPORTING STORES: WALMART, CO-OP, NO FRILLS AND CANADIAN
TIRE. THERE ARE ALSO MANY STORES AND SHOPS IN TOWN WHO SUPPORT THE LEGION
BY DISPLAYING POPPY BOXES. SHOW YOUR SUPPORT BY DONATING AND WEARING A
POPPY DONATIONS MADE LOCALLY STAY LOCAL BY HELPING VETERANS AND THEIR LOVED
ONES. THANK YOU FOR YOUR GENEROUS SUPPORT!!! LEST WE FORGET.
We need your continued support! Come join us at the Legion! BE A VOLUNTEER!!
For further information, please call the Legion at 403.934.5119
further information, please call the Legion at 403.934.5119 Thought for the Week ~ To give up
Thought for the Week ~ To give up human anciety is to receive divine assurance.
Thought for
the Week
~
To give up
human
anciety is to
receive divine
assurance.
Phyllis Trible
anciety is to receive divine assurance. Phyllis Trible officials on the process of the Cooperative Storm
anciety is to receive divine assurance. Phyllis Trible officials on the process of the Cooperative Storm
anciety is to receive divine assurance. Phyllis Trible officials on the process of the Cooperative Storm

officials on the process of the Cooperative Storm Water Man- agement Initiative (CSMI). With the current phase of the initia- tive now completed, the infra- structure necessary is based on forecasted new development areas within the municipalities over the next 25 years. As Strathmore is one of five municipalities involved in the project, the three regional storm water system proposals, which were based on the technical water balance results, were sub- stantially weighted to an urban growth area as compared to a rural growth area. As a result, farmland within Wheatland County contains limited devel- opable area and therefore leaves Strathmore dealing with a larger monetary contribution as was observed in system 2. “This is such a huge issue and it’s mind boggling,” said Council- lor Denise Peterson. “My under- standing is that we might be pay- ing considerably more than our share just based on use of water in and out versus the amount of storm water that’s produced.” Upon completion of the Tech- nical Water Balance and Gover- nance Structure analysis, System 1 recommended that Rockyview County, Calgary, Chestermere, and Wheatland County absorb the costs of an estimated infra- structure price tag of $86.1 mil- lion where storm water flows through Weed Lake, Hartell Coullee, and Serviceberry Creek at no financial burden to Strath-

more.

System 2 includes, for Wheat-

land County and Strathmore

storm water to flow to Service-

berry Creek but requires Strath-

more to pay for 90 per cent.

System 3, on the other hand,

would have the storm water from those two municipalities flow into Eagle Lake – an option that

would have Strathmore absorb

100 per cent of the cost, requires

a lot of work on existing issues,

was the least developed in terms

of technical work, and a solution which would prove difficult. The estimated infrastructure costs for System 2 and System 3 were $4.7 million over 25 years. According to Gord Elenko, director of engineering for the Town of Strathmore, the costs were included in the revised 2015 Off-Site Levies bylaw, with costs estimated from the delivery points at the municipal bound- aries, and do not include infra- structure or costs required with- in the municipal boundaries, or ongoing operating costs of CSMI work. While Elenko was unable to provide a dollar amount for op- erational costs –which is depen- dent on the type of infrastruc- ture – he assured council that the town will be able to recoup 100 per cent of the $4.7 million through off-site levies. “CSMI is 100 per cent based on our growth estimate for the developable land that we put in for acreage and that’s how we calculated the levy,” said Elenko. “The CSMI project is intended outside of the boundaries of the town, so there still will be storm water infrastructure costs within the town boundaries and we also have accounted for those within the levy bylaw.” The regional approach, which was initiated by the WID in 2011, launched the CSMI project in 2012. The completed techni- cal water balance study and po- tential Governance proposals valued at $258,270 was covered by funding from the five munici- palities – Strathmore, Calgary, Chestermere, Rockyview County and Wheatland County - WID, and the Calgary Regional Part- nership. However, council ap- proved the payment of an out- standing balance of $15,191 that each partner will be invoiced in the fall. Council also approved the rec- ommendation to participate with WID in continued discussions on storm water management in

alignment with Option 2, which suggests the partners work col- laboratively, but may work indi- vidually with the WID on solu- tions specific to Strathmore. However, when Council was asked to agree in principle to allocate funding for CSMI, with funding limited to no more than $10,000 a year, and a $100,000 boost in 2016 for a storm water engineering design, while re- ferring the decision to allocate operating and capital project funding for the next three years to the Fall budget workshop for final approval, some councillors took issue with the request. Councillor Bob Sobol didn’t agree with voting on a dollar amount in principle when coun- cil can change their mind at the time a decision is required, while Councillor Peterson also disagreed with the motion, ar- guing a lack of information and possible new legislation in the future. “I have a great deal of prob- lems approving things into the future even if it’s near future, where I don’t have the whole picture in front of me and where I can’t possibly know how new legislation is going to impact it because there is new legislation coming,” said Peterson. “I think … it’s really clear this council is committed to this project and we look forward to hearing more from you in terms of the plan- ning and in terms of the overall budget, and I think that WID can rest assured that we are in for the long haul.” After the presentation by WID’s General Manager Erwin Braun, council also discussed water quality, the importance of the partnership, and provincial government funding. In the end, council moved to refer the decision to allocate op- erating capital funding for the next three years regarding CSMI funding to the Fall budget work- shop and to be brought before open council.

Wheatland 4-H district back for new season

MICHELLE LALONDE Wheatland District 4-H

Wheatland District 4-H held their annual record book marking competition on Wednesday, Sept. 23. There was a great variety of books and all of them were very well done. The winners for Market Beef are: Sr. - Jourdyn Sammons, Int.- Erin Slemko and Jr. - Jason Slemko all from Hussar 4-H Beef club. Female Beef was Jack Sherman of Rockyford 4-H Beef club. The winners for Horse books were Sr. - Sarah Wolfs of Strathmore Rusty Spurs winning two classes for level 4-7, and jumping, Sr.- Julie Malmberg level 1-3, Int. - Olivia McLean and Jr. - Megan McCreadie all 3 members from Arrowwood River Wranglers. The Dog Agility winners are Sr. - Natasha Russell, Jr. - Aliera Cheroff both from Crowfoot 4-H Multi club. Archery went to int. - Layne Neal. Outdoor Pursuits went to Int. - Kendal Russell, C.O.P (sew- ing) Int.- Kaitlyn Stewart, all three from the Crow- foot 4-H Multi club. We would like to thank Bonnie from Rockyford,

Multi club. We would like to thank Bonnie from Rockyford, Lorelei from Hussar, Vicki from Rusty
Multi club. We would like to thank Bonnie from Rockyford, Lorelei from Hussar, Vicki from Rusty

Lorelei from Hussar, Vicki from Rusty Spurs. Lara, Kathy and Shelly for Crowfoot 4-H Multi Club. Sherry and Lorelei from Arrowwood for volunteer- ing their time to mark books. Wheatland District had their first general meet- ing Wednesday, Oct 14. Please remember that all clubs must be in attendance for all the meetings. No Junior council was at this meeting.

I would like to welcome Margo Comstock as the

new Co-Key Leader. Margo will be joining me af- ter retiring from Crowfoot 4-H Multi club’s General Leader. We also have three amazing young ladies joining us as District Key Members. Kaitlyn Stewart and Sonia Pagenkopf from the Crowfoot 4-H Multi club, Jourdyn Sammons from the Hussar 4-H beef club. These 4-Her’s are very keen and willing to come out to your club, they can speak on how to complete a record book, public speaking, demon- strations and so much more.

I look forward to another great 4-H year. If you have any questions concerning what proj- ects the clubs in Wheatland offer please feel free to

contact me at wheatland4-hdistrict@shaw.ca.

the clubs in Wheatland offer please feel free to contact me at wheatland4-hdistrict@shaw.ca. www. StrathmoreTimes .com

www. StrathmoreTimes .com

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 11

TPP trade deal a big winner for Alberta and Canada

DEREK FILDEBRANDT Strathmore-Brooks MLA and the Wildrose Shadow Minister of Finance

On Oct. 4, twelve countries – including Canada –

came to a final agreement on the historic Trans-Pa- cific Partnership (TPP) trade deal. This agreement

is of huge consequence for Alberta’s economy and

consumers, and is overwhelmingly positive for our province. This agreement will give Canadian exporters hugely expanded access to the markets of Austra- lia, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam, representing 800 million people and a gross domestic product (GDP) of $28.5 trillion. This will build upon the trade agreements that Canada already has in place with 51 different countries. Alberta alone already exports nearly $98 billion a year to TPP countries with current trade barriers in place. With Canada’s signature on this agreement, almost all remaining tariff trade barriers will be eliminated, allowing that figure to grow consider- ably. The agreement will allow duty-free access to this massive market place for the vast majority of our industrial goods, minerals, forestry products, and agri-food products, including wheat, beef, pork, and barley. Many of the products on this list are key pillars of our economy right here in Strathmore- Brooks. Any place named Wheatland County is sure to benefit from increased wheat exports. In Japan, feed wheat will now be duty and quota-free. Food wheat tariffs will be reduced by 45 per cent and we will have access to 53,000 tonnes of export space. Canada is one of the largest agricultural produc- ers and exporters in the world. With almost half of Canada’s total agricultural production being ex- ported, the potential for growth in the sector lies in its ability to expand into markets abroad. Japan has long blocked our beef exports into that market. With this agreement, tariffs on Canadian beef into that country will drop from 38.5 per cent on chilled or frozen beef to nine per cent. Tariffs of up to 50 per cent on processed beef will be elimi- nated outright. Similar numbers apply for other countries and countless products. The benefit to Alberta’s export-driven economy will be profoundly positive. Alberta’s consumers will also benefit substan-

tially. In trade deals, politicians often pretend that allowing imports into our own market is somehow

a net loss; that allowing more competition in our

market is somehow bad for consumers. In fact, the biggest winners from free trade are the consumers who now have more choice and competition for their business. A concession in the TPP is the “compensation”

that taxpayers will pay out to industries that will now be open to more competition. This includes $1 billion to the auto industry where we will now be allowed to purchase some non-North American vehicles at a cheaper price, and where the costs of inputs to North American vehicles could also come down. Add to this $4.3 billion in “compensation” to the dairy industry, where import quotas will only be opened by 3.25 per cent. This is because dairy is

a heavily regulated industry in Canada, with strict quotas on supply, and the government has deemed

it necessary to smooth this transition.

The TPP will secure new market access opportu- nities for Canadian dairy, poultry and egg exports. Dairy, poultry and egg producers and processors will benefit over time from increased duty-free ac- cess to the United States and all other TPP coun- tries. This will include complete tariff elimination on some specialty cheeses, including several arti- sanal cheeses, entering the United States. More im- portantly, if these payments are the price of Canada securing access to a $28.5 trillion market to export to, then it is well worth the cost. The TPP has been negotiated for seven years, and timing of the conclusion of negotiations were out of our federal government’s control, as it involved 11 other countries. Since we are currently in the middle of a federal election, Canada has not yet officially implemented the deal. Our participation in this trade agreement appears to be contingent on the results of the Oct. 19 federal election. Of the federal parties, the Conservatives support it, the NDP are strongly opposed, and the Liberals are currently refusing to make any comment on it. It is irresponsible for parties to threaten to tear up such an economically important agreement just because it was negotiated by another party. Beyond the economic consequences, the diplomatic fallout would be considerable. But that’s all federal politics, and both the NDP and Liberals don’t exactly have a long tradition of representing Alberta’s best interests. What about Al- berta’s own government?

Virtually every sector of Alberta’s economy stands to gain from the TPP, yet our own NDP government has remained silent on it. Alberta’s government is playing politics by refusing to support a deal in our own best interests, ostensibly to avoid embarrass- ing Thomas Mulcair. Just as Alberta’s government has refused to table a budget until after the federal election is over, Alberta’s interests are continuing to take a back seat to the federal NDP’s political interests. Alberta’s economy is hurting badly. Allowing our non-oil sectors to export their products to a larger world market is just the kind of thing that can get us back on track and diversify our economy. Al- berta’s government should recognize this and do what’s best for Alberta.

Pregnancy Care Centre donates maternity and baby clothing

JENN PAGE Program Coordinator

The Strathmore Pregnancy Care Centre has been gathering and sorting maternity and baby clothing donations. Families can access these resources by coming in for a simple intake assessment. This intake will help us determine any additional challenges that the woman, and her family, may be facing. Once the intake is completed, the clothing room can be accessed on a monthly basis and the client may choose from a wide variety of items. All of these items are free of charge. We provide maternity clothing throughout the duration of a pregnancy. Some of the available

items are pants, shirts, dresses, shoes, nursing bras, sleep wear, and some toiletries. Access to these items is free for all pregnant women in need of material help. We also provide baby clothing for children up to the age of two. Some of the items available are sleepers, onesies, shoes, receiving blankets, knit- ted or quilted blankets, bibs, clothes, jackets, socks, diapers, baby wipes, soothers, and more. If you, or someone you know, could benefit from this support please call or email to book an ap- pointment. We also accept walk-in appointments. If you would be interested in volunteering to help out in our clothing room, or have clothing to donate, please contact the Strathmore Coordinator, Jennifer Page.

TIMES

STRATHMORE

   

Mario Prusina Publisher / Editor Miriam Ostermann Associate Editor

Justin Seward Reporter

Rose Hamrlik Advertising

Kristina Bezic Office Manager

Manny Everett Office Manager

Alissa Jensen Production

Jody Schneider Production Manager

Contributors : Doug Taylor, Sharon McLeay, John Godsman, Kevin Link, Wendi Tashlikowich, Laureen F. Guenther

123 2nd Avenue, Strathmore, Alberta T1P 1K1 • 403.934.5589

Strathmore Times is published every Friday by Strathmore Times Inc. and is distributed by Canada Post to Strathmore, Carseland, Cheadle, Cluny, Gleichen, Hussar, Indus, Langdon, Lyalta, Namaka, Nightingale, Rockyford, Rosebud, Speargrass and Standard. We also have various pickup locations throughout our coverage area. Our 11,500 issues are printed by Star Press Inc., Wainwright, Alberta. The content in the Strathmore Times is copyright and reproduction without the proper written consent of the Strathmore Times is strictly prohibited.

The Times welcomes letters to the editor for publication. All submissions must be signed and a phone number included for verification purposes. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, legal considerations and taste. Please try and keep your letters under 400 words to ensure that it will appear as close to its original form as possible.

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www.StrathmoreTimes.com
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Page 12 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

Page 12 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015 GOOD HEALTH ISN’T CONTAGIOUS. INFLUENZA IS. CHANCES

GOOD HEALTH

ISN’T CONTAGIOUS.

INFLUENZA IS.

16, 2015 GOOD HEALTH ISN’T CONTAGIOUS. INFLUENZA IS. CHANCES ARE YOU WILL BE EXPOSED TO INFLUENZA

CHANCES ARE YOU WILL BE EXPOSED TO INFLUENZA THIS SEASON.

Protect Yourself. Protect Others. Get Immunized.

th .
th .

Upcoming Immunization Clinics in Your Area

DATE:

TIME:

15102KA 1

LOCATION:

Strathmore
Strathmore
in Your Area DATE: TIME: 15102KA 1 LOCATION: Strathmore Lomond Rockyford Arrowwood Standard #whychanceit? |
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Rockyford
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15102KA 1 LOCATION: Strathmore Lomond Rockyford Arrowwood Standard #whychanceit? | www.ahs.ca/influenza | Call
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#whychanceit? | www.ahs.ca/influenza | Call Health Link 811

| www.ahs.ca/influenza | Call Health Link 811 15 102DD 0 Restore your wetlands. Cash in on
| www.ahs.ca/influenza | Call Health Link 811 15 102DD 0 Restore your wetlands. Cash in on
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15

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Restore your wetlands.

Cash in on a slough of benefits!

Restoring drained wetlands not only adds value to your land, it puts cash in your wallet. Talk with Ducks Unlimited Canada about wetland restoration and financial compensation incentives that are now available.

financial compensation incentives that are now available. Your area DUC conservation specialist is: Warren Robb TEL
financial compensation incentives that are now available. Your area DUC conservation specialist is: Warren Robb TEL

Your area DUC conservation specialist is:

Warren Robb

TEL

403-461-5204

EMAIL

w_robb@ducks.ca

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

EMAIL w_robb@ducks.ca www.StrathmoreTimes.com Linda Nelson (l-r), REXcycle and Lindsay Huxted are amazed

Linda Nelson (l-r), REXcycle and Lindsay Huxted are amazed with the quality of H&H Huxted’s compost- ing result. The recycle yard had numerous new initiatives planned in conjunctions with Waste Reduction Week that runs from Oct. 19 to Oct. 25.

Miriam Ostermann

Photo

Huxted plans new initiatives for Waste Reduction Week

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

A year ago H&H Huxted Enterpris- es worked around the clock to tackle cleanliness and safety issues on their then recently acquired recycle yard; changes that now allow the company to hit the ground running to implement numerous projects as Waste Reduction Week quickly approaches. While Huxted has introduced various initiatives, including the ambitious goal to turn part of the area into a class 1 composting site – an objective achieved just before the Strathmore Alberta 55 Plus Summer Games in July – the ex- istence of Waste Reduction Week from Oct. 19 to Oct. 25 is providing an op- portunity to educate Strathmore resi- dents and inch closer to their goal of turning Strathmore into the town with the least amount of waste province- wide. “We’re shooting for Strathmore to be the place that has the least amount of waste in Alberta because there’s no rea- son why we can’t be,” said Colin Huxt- ed, owner of H&H Huxted Enterprises. “We’re nicely just getting back to helping Mother Earth. We’ve been abus- ing Mother Earth for years, and pushing the stuff in the landfills and letting the stuff leach out into the oceans. Now it’s time to start taking that stuff out and doing it properly.” As the composting site recently re- ceived its class 1 status, Huxted will make an announcement to inform the community about being able to com-

post organics and bio-solids. Although the site was only able to accept yard scraps, trees, and grass under the class 2 previously, residents can now drop off their kitchen scraps to be compos- ted into reusable and nutrient-rich ma- terials. However, the recycle yard is expand- ing their horizons even further by ap- proaching facilities within the town, such as the aquatic centre, the Strath- more Family Centre, and senior lodges to provide education on proper recy- cling practices while donating some of their REXcycle bins. Additionally, Huxt- ed is planning on approached local res- taurants as well. Having collected over 2,000 lbs of food scraps to be compos- ted from the Strathmore Alberta 55 Plus Summer Games to be composted, he is aware of the benefits of keeping the materials, that make up 30 to 40 per cent - out of the landfills. The initiatives will also include a place for residents to drop off their old cell phones that currently end up in the garbage, and possibly an area to drop off expired car seats. However, the company expects Strathmore to exercise greater recycling practices within a year’s time. Huxted said he is in the process of ordering biodegradable cornstarch bags and composting bins he envisions will be- come a staple in every resident’s home. Eight composting piles are currently cooking on the property at tempera- tures around 70 degrees Celsius. Waste Reduction Week runs Oct. 19 until Oct.

25.

STRATHMORE UNITED CHURCH

 

39th Year!

 

Baby & Kids Clothes

 

Ladies

THRIFT SALE
THRIFT
SALE

Slacks

Kids to 6x

Blouses

25

¢

White

50

¢

 

Elephant Items

& Household

 

Articles

Individually

Mens

Priced

Purses

Pants

   

October 22, 23 & 24

Shirts

 

Shoes

50

¢

50

¢

 

Donations

 

Welcome

 
 

Thursday 9 am - 8 pm Friday 9 am - 8 pm

 

Drop off articles at the United Church after Oct. 18

 

DOLLAR BAG DAY Saturday 9 am - 1pm

934-3118 • 934-3264

Suits

Dresses

Coats

 

Books

CDs

Toys

RECYCLE • SHARE • SAVE

 

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 13

DUC wetland restoration project

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

Ducks Unlimited Canada’s (DUC) lat- est objective to restore historical wet- land is presenting itself as a golden goose for Wheatland County farmers who could turn their dried sloughs profitable once again. With 70 per cent, or approximately 6,500 to 10,000 acres, of wetlands lost province-wide each year, DUC is resort- ing to a new more cost-effective ap- proach to regain nearly 1,380 acres of wetlands in Alberta. The provincial government’s Water- shed Resiliency and Restoration Pro- gram (WRRP) recently provided ad- ditional funding to the organization, to offer farmers in southern Alberta compensation for restoring historical- ly drained wetlands on their property back to its natural state. Through the additional funds, DUC launched their 10-year lease program that will allow DUC to return the area to a wetland without landowners drain- ing the area or cultivating through it. In turn, farmers retain ownership, man- age the area, may restrict access, and continue to use the area for haying and grazing while being compensated at fair market value for the restored wet- land area. “A lot of the time farmers fight with these wetlands year after year trying to make it produce,” said Warren Robb, conservation program specialist for DUC. “A lot of these lands are saline basins or are partially drained that they can’t farm anyways. What we’re trying to say is ‘we’re not wanting to take produc- tivity away from you, but if you have something that you no longer farm or every year you have to fight with, if we can pay you enough money would you want to restore those?’” Owing to the WRRP funding, DUC estimated roughly 558 hectares will be restored within three years. The restoration of wetlands not only provides a more reasonably priced op- tion, but also requires less maintenance. “Those basins held water for thou- sands and thousands of years,” said Robb. “So to go back and put dirt back where it was originally is less work than putting in a structure and having an engineer come in.” In addition to the appealing mone- tary incentive, the landowners may also reap the rewards through the various benefits accompanying the wetlands, experts said. Wetlands help with the absorption of excess water in dryer years, buffer soil erosion, act as filters to improve water quality, and release water during times of drought – an issue that is faced by many farmers over the summer. Furthermore, they slow the release of water into surrounding streams and rivers, provide a water source for live- stock and serve as a habitat for wildlife and waterfowl. According to DUC, the land that was formerly considered un- productive now adds a higher return on investment on land.

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Over 4,200 landowners are already partnering with DUC to achieve wet- land restoration and conservation, with 1,961 projects already completed within Alberta. The organization, which has 75 years of experience in wetland conservation, has raised $1,288,116 within Wheatland County over the years. Besides the lease program, Ducks Unlimited Canada also has a Revolving Land Purchase Pro- gram, where DUC purchases the land from landowners, and takes on restora- tion of wetland and upland habitat and registration of a conservation easement on the land title. DUC will then sell the land back to the local agricultural community with the assurance that natural ecosystems and valuable wetland function are main- tained. While the wetland restoration projects have been underway through- out Alberta, the funding from the WRRP has significantly increased DUC’s pres- ence in southern Alberta. Farmers in Wheatland County were asked how much compensation they expect in order to restore the wetlands in their area, and DUC has already ap- proached close to 100 landowners with much feedback in return. Those interested in participating can contact Warren Robb at 403-461-5204.

Martin SHIELDS Your Conservative Candidate reminds you of the upcoming FEDERAL ELECTION Polls will be
Martin SHIELDS
Your Conservative Candidate
reminds you of the upcoming
FEDERAL ELECTION
Polls will be open:
Monday, October 19th
7:30 a.m.— 7:30 p.m.
Your voter information card tells you the location of your nearest polling place
Need a Ride? Call 403 -793-1252 and a
volunteer will pick you up!
Get in touch with Martin!
www.martininbowriver.com
@MartinBowRiver
Authorized by the Official Agent of Martin Shields
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Page 14 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

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REALTY HORIZON “Our family serving your family!” Our office is located at 122 2nd Ave.

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serving your family!” Our office is located at 122 2nd Ave. Strathmore, Alberta Fax: 403 934-2742

www.nancystairs.com

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

403 934-2742 www.nancystairs.com www.StrathmoreTimes.com Celebrating milestones Rosemary and Bob Comstock celebrated

Celebrating

milestones

Rosemary and Bob Comstock celebrated their 60th wedding an- niversary at the Roy- al Canadian Legion branch #10 in Strath- more on Oct. 10. The celebration included an Elvis impersonator and had everyone dressed up to look like they were living in 1955.

Miriam Ostermann Photo

Community Coat Program Underway

With the approach of colder weather the Strathmore & Wheatland County Christmas Hamper Society as the charity behind the Community Coat Program has announced this years program is underway.

The program is run with the cooperation of the Strathmore FCSS staff and the coat racks are located in the lobby of the Lambert Building (the library building) at 85 Lakeside Blvd.

With the kickoff of the program the Society is now asking the local residents to check their closets and storage to donate any new or gently used winter coats, boots, toques and gloves.

Anyone in need of those items and living in Strathmore or the Wheatland County are welcome to look and help themselves to whatever fits their or their family’s needs. We would however ask that

you only take what you actually require, please don’t take an armful.

This very valuable community program will run from now until Mid-March or whenever the weather turns warmer.

THE STRATHMORE & WHEATLAND

COUNTY CHRISTMAS HAMPER SOCIETY
COUNTY CHRISTMAS HAMPER
SOCIETY

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 15

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Page 16 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

TIMES • October 16, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com Matthew Dirks (l-r), Kip, Isaac, Joshua, Heather, and Lauryn

Matthew Dirks (l-r), Kip, Isaac, Joshua, Heather, and Lauryn were among 12 families across Canada to take part in the Life Changing Train for Heroes from Sept. 28 to Oct. 2. The col- laboration between Rocky Mountaineer and the Starlight Chil- dren’s Foundation provide children living with a chronic illness and their families to travel on the Rocky Mountaineer train from Vancouver to Lake Louise while taking part in numerous activi- ties.

Photo Courtesy of Rocky Mountaineer

Strathmore family receives an unexpected surprise

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

Having been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at a young age, Lauryn Dirks’ chronic illness poses numerous stumbling blocks for the

12-year-old.

However, while the disease pos- es some drawbacks, it also pro- duces opportunities not readily available to other kids her age – opportunities her family of six is not likely to forget. For the past three years, Rocky Mountaineer and the Starlight Chil- dren’s Foundation Canada have been honouring those living with chronic illness and their families with a weeklong train-ride through the Rocky Mountains, through

their initiative Life Changing Train for Heroes. This year two out of the 12 families who boarded the train live in Strathmore. “We just knew it was a great op- portunity for families to come to- gether and interact with other chil- dren who have serious or chronic illness and spend quality time with each other,” said Hilary Strath, communication specialist with Rocky Mountaineer. “Lauryn (is) a perfect example of this. They’re just so humble, none of them felt that they needed or deserved this more than anyone else and that’s sort of what the Life Changing Train for Heroes is all about. I’m not going to say they’re unsung, but they are heroes that don’t know they are, and they

don’t even see that they need this. But they’ve all come away with it so hon- oured that they’ve been on it.” Nearly 50 individuals travelled to- gether from Sept. 28 to Oct. 2, starting out in Vancouver, B.C. and embarking on a five-day journey through the Cana- dian Rockies aboard the famed Rocky Mountaineer train. Owing to the partnership of the non- profit Starlight Children’s Foundation and Rocky Mountaineer, families were left in awe by special activities that in- cluded music lessons, gondola rides, popcorn parties, campfires, star gazing with an astronomer, and on-train cook- ing classes. For Dirks, seeing the British Colum- bia landscape through the train win- dows turned out to be her highlight of the trip, when the train took the fami- lies to Kamloops for an overnight stay and later to Lake Louise for the final destination. However, while the Dirks family was left amazed by the entertainment and activities offered, it was the quality time the family, which also consists of nine- year-old triplet boys, was able to share. “We’re a family of six, so even just the opportunity for a large family like ours to go on a holiday like this is un- believable, because we all got to go,” said Lauryn’s mother Heather Dirks. “It seriously was the most amazing week of our lives, and I’m not exaggerating. It just felt like we were in a dream. We got so much time together as a family and just doing fun things that we all enjoyed. We met some amazing people from around the country who have trouble with illnesses as well, and just came home feeling excited and grateful to live in this beautiful country.” The Starlight Children’s Foundation, which is committed to providing sup- port programs, grant wishes, and help for families in and out of hospitals, se- lected the participating families from across Canada based on whether they had been on an escape trip with the foundation before and depending on if they were deserving of the trip, Strath said. Each year the decade-long charitable partnership also results in 15 families taking part in the Sea to Sky climb from Vancouver to Whistler, B.C. As such, the organizations once again worked together for this year’s Life Changing Train for Heroes in its third consecu- tive year. Also on board was 12-year-old Strath- more resident Danielle Leys and her family, who were unavailable for com- ment. While the trip provided an unexpect- ed treat for the Dirks family, the foun- dation has aided the family in provid- ing encouragement over the years, and creating connections between different families and kids facing various chal- lenges. “Lauryn works really hard to stay healthy and we all work hard as her family to keep her healthy,” said Heath- er Dirks. “It’s not a curable disease and she’s going to have it for the rest of her life. She does everything that every oth- er 12-year-old can do, it just requires a lot more time, thought, and effort. The Starlight Children’s Foundation and the Rocky Mountaineer give you a boost and encourage you to keep going. They just really get it, that it’s something you live with 24/7 and bringing the families together is really cool and we’re really thankful. We’re spoiled now.”

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October 2015 A Special Supplement to STRATHMORE TIMES
October 2015
A Special Supplement to
STRATHMORE
TIMES

Ideas to grow your business

Supplement to STRATHMORE TIMES Ideas to grow your business Getting a startup off the ground is

Getting a startup off the ground is a considerable and rewarding achievement. But once a business has achieved a certain level of success, business owners often find themselves wondering what to do next. Growing a business may not prove as challenging as turning it from a startup into a successful enterprise, but business owners often agonize over the best way to grow their businesses. The following are a few ideas to grow your business so you can build on your initial success. • Open a new location. Physical expansion is often the first idea that comes into business owners’ minds when they are thinking about how to grow their businesses. But physical expansion is not always the best way to grow a business. Before deciding to open a second location, consider consumer trends to determine if your company has staying power, and economic trends to determine if the economy is healthy enough to support both your initial location and any additional locations you plan to open. Another thing to consider before opening a new location is your management style. If that style is very hands-on, then who will manage your new location, or your existing one if you plan to oversee things at the new store? Physical expansion can be good for business, but it’s often most successful when business owners have a solid management team already in place, which allows owners to spend time at both locations. • Diversify your offerings. The Small Business Administration notes that diversifying is a strong growth strategy, providing multiple streams of income that can help business owners survive the slower months when sales tend to dip. Businesses known for a particular product may want to offer complementary products or services or import or export others’ products. Startups often credit loyal customer bases when citing their

reasons for surviving their first few years, and such customer bases already trust your brand. Expanding that brand to include complementary products or services is a logical next step to grow your business and build on the credibility you worked so hard to achieve with your customer base.

• Develop an app. Many of today’s successful startups had Web sites

even before they opened the doors to their more traditional brick-and- mortar stores. While a strong Web presence is essential for many of today’s

businesses, business owners can now go one step further and create their own smartphone or tablet app. Such apps can allow customers to peruse your offerings, place orders on-the-go and perform a host of other tasks related to your business without using a computer. An app can introduce your business to a whole new crop of potential customers, whether they live around the corner from your store or halfway around the globe.

Upon introducing the app, expect some technical glitches and solicit user responses so you can quickly update the app and make it more user- friendly if need be.

• Form an alliance with other businesses. Rather than diversifying

their product offerings, some business owners have found it’s easier and more profitable to form an alliance with other businesses who already sell complementary products. Such an alliance can be good for both businesses, as each can expand its customer base without the kind of effort it takes to open a new location or the cost of producing new products. Other businesses already have lists of prospective customers who may need your products, and vice versa. Alliances can be the most effective and quickest ways to grow a business, not to mention the least expensive and time-consuming.

How shopping locally can help you and your community

How shopping locally can help you and your community Today’s consumers have more shopping options at

Today’s consumers have more shopping options at their disposal than they did in years past. Though the Internet may put the world at one’s fingertips, more and more shoppers are discovering that buying locally makes for a superior shopping experience. The benefits associated with shopping locally are many, and the following are just a few reasons why shoppers may want to look no further than their own communities when planning their next shopping excursions. Keeps money in the local economy Locally-owned businesses often put a larger share of their revenue back into their communities. Small business owners may be more inclined to employ local residents, giving more people in the community solid employment. Business owners may reach out and support other neighborhood efforts, such as fundraising initiatives for charities and schools. By shopping at local stores, you have a hand in supporting these efforts as well. Help establish local pride Independent shops contribute to the fabric of a community and what makes it special and unique. Tourists and other visitors will be much more inclined to remember a local shop rather than a big chain in a particular neighborhood. When travelers want to get a feel for a community, they seek out small, local stores that are much more likely to stock a high percentage of locally-sourced goods.

Save money When factoring in travel time and the cost of fuel, shopping locally makes more sense than driving to a faraway mall. In addition, repeat customers who establish a rapport with a local business owner may find that such owners are more inclined to price match or work with loyal customers to find lower prices through suppliers. Diversify your home and lifestyle Shoppers who prefer more unique styles may find local businesses cater to their needs better than large chain stores. Larger retailers offer the same products to customers regardless of where those customers live, so a person in California may be decorating his or her home with the same furnishings as a person in North Carolina. But local shops tend to produce more unique items that are not available nationwide. Promote entrepreneurship Small businesses are an essential element to the country’s economic growth. By shopping locally, consumers are showing their support for this important segment of the national economy. Attract other businesses Private and public sector businesses tend to gravitate around anchor stores. Should a local store be successful, banks, restaurants, salons, and other businesses may move in as well. Shopping locally benefits consumers in various ways, many of which contribute to a healthy local economy.

Did You Know?

Many people begin their holiday shopping around the end of summer, when retailers first begin to roll out new clothing lines and mark down existing items to make way for new inventory. Beginning holiday shop- ping near the end of summer or the beginning of fall may seem a little early, but early shoppers often find that starting earlier affords them more time to find the right gifts at the right prices. Early shoppers can compari- son shop without the specter of the fast-approaching holiday hanging over their heads, and comparison shopping helps consumers feel more confident that they are getting the best deals possible. Starting early with regard to holiday shopping also allows shop- pers avoid the financial crunch that shoppers who wait until the holiday season begins often feel. Spreading out spending over several months as opposed to the handful of weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas is a great way for shoppers to avoid buying too many gifts on credit, which can make for a penny-pinching start to the new year when bills come due in early- to mid-January.

Black Friday deals are a top draw for shoppers looking to save money and get a jump-start on holiday shopping. In a survey from the International Council of Shopping Centers, more than 34 percent of respondents indicated they plan to shop on Black Friday. However, many others are just as eager to begin shopping even earlier. In recent years, some stores have begun to open their doors to shoppers on Thanksgiving evening. The consulting firm Deloitte LLP found that 26 percent of American shoppers plan to shop online on Thanksgiving.

Page 18 Ó SMALL BUSINESS 2015 Ï Strathmore Times

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Strathmore Times Ó SMALL BUSINESS 2015 Ï Page 19

Strathmore Times Ó SMALL BUSINESS 2015 Ï Page 19 Communities can celebrate local businesses Owning a

Communities can celebrate local businesses

2015 Ï Page 19 Communities can celebrate local businesses Owning a business is the goal of

Owning a business is the goal of many would-be entrepreneurs. Being your own boss has certain perks, including making your own hours and not having to report to anyone but yourself. But owning a business is a lot of work, especially for new business owners trying to get their businesses off the ground. According to Bloomberg, eight out of 10 entrepreneurs who start businesses fail within 18 months

of opening their doors. The Small Business Association indicates the numbers are not so dire, saying 30 percent of new businesses fail in the first two years of operation; 50 percent during the first five years; and 66 percent during the first 10. Local businesses face an uphill battle to survive, but there are many things residents can do to support these valuable additions to their communities.

• Shop locally. Shopping locally not

only supports local businesses, but it also contributes to the local economy. Shopping locally keeps money in the community, which can benefit everyone. Shopping locally

produces a trickle-down effect, as local businesses that are thriving may patronize other local businesses, and so on. This, in turn, helps grow other businesses in the community, making it a nicer place to live and work.

• Spread the word. Word-of-mouth

advertising is effective. A respected member of the community who shares a good experience with a local business may propel others to patronize the business. Speak up when you feel a business owner has provided an exceptional level of service. Recommend

a company to friends and neighbors. You also

may want to review a business via online rating websites such as Yelp or Angie’s List. • Attend grand openings. Each community

is unique, and often the vibe of a community

is defined by the businesses that call that community home. Attend grand openings to show you are invested in the quality and vitality of your community. When others see a business doing well, they may be more inclined to shop there as well. • Apply for work. Another way to support a local business is to work for one. Small local businesses employ millions of people across the country, and many foster great working environments. In addition, small businesses are known for their customer service, and employees often become experts in their products and services because of the hands-on experience they gain while working for small businesses. Supporting and celebrating local businesses can instill a sense of community pride and benefit the local economy in a myriad of ways.

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Page 20 Ó SMALL BUSINESS 2015 Ï Strathmore Times

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SKATE ORTHOTICS, WHAT! By Brent Moreau, CPed, RMT. Well it’s that time of the year
SKATE ORTHOTICS, WHAT!
By Brent Moreau, CPed, RMT.
Well it’s that time of the year again, with the chill in the air thoughts of hockey begin to excite us for the
season as we make plans for recreational and competitive hockey.
I read an article from Lisa Walters, CCPed about the advantage of using custom built orthotics in
hockey skates.
She indicated that if you have the following issues while you’re playing hockey or after playing, then
custom orthotics in your skates will benefit you:
Chronic Knee Pain
Low Back Pain
Repeated Groin pulls
Struggling to hold either an outside or inside edge
Weak crossovers
• Difficulty turning in one direction
Why?
The blades of a hockey skate are placed where the manufacturer believes the center of gravity should
pass through the blade to the ice. However, often times proper foot mechanics essential to distributing
the force more evenly are not aligned in a neutral position, therefore not allowing our body to perform
to optimal levels in the skate we wear.
Using custom orthotics will allow the foot to work in the skate in the most proficient positon allowing our
body to work in the most efficient and effective way. These will also lead to a decrease in “hot spots”,
and an increase in stride length and performance.
I played a few games each week recreationally, and gave it a try – being a Certified Pedorthist as well.
To my surprise I immediately notice a drastic change in lower back fatigue – it’s GONE, decreased foot
soreness, and increased agility.
Listen if you’re interested come by our clinic, Active Solutions for Health in Strathmore, we can talk
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You’ll notice the difference verses the Off the Shelf (OTS) products you have been using.
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(1)Orthotics in Hockey Skates, Lisa Walters, BPHE, ATTH, PTS, CFC, CSCS
Phone: 403-983-3675 Fax: 403-983-3678 121 2nd Ave, Strathmore
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October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 21

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 21 Canada through songs Michael Mitchell brought his
Canada through songs
Canada through songs

Michael Mitchell brought his Canada Is For Kids tour to Brentwood Elementary School on Oct. 7 for the school’s 35th anniversary celebration. Mitchell sang songs related to this country and asked students to share their ideas about what it means to be Canadian.

Justin Seward Photo

about what it means to be Canadian. Justin Seward Photo Career path options Students from Strath-
about what it means to be Canadian. Justin Seward Photo Career path options Students from Strath-
Career path options
Career path
options

Students from Strath- more and Wheatland County had the op- portunity to explore the many university booths for their post secondary options at Strathmore High School on Oct. 7.

Justin Seward Photos

Two properties heading to 2015 public auction

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

Following a lack of follow-through on tax arrears payments by two Strath- more properties, town council failed to see another option but provide ap- proval for the conditions of sale for the two items to be auctioned in the 2015 Public Auction. Owners of the properties located on 603 Willow Drive and 514 Hillview Gate entered into a tax arrear agree- ment to supply the homeowner greater opportunity to catch up on their ar- rears amounts – money that is owed and should’ve been paid earlier. On Oct. 7 council was aware that the payments were not maintained and amounts escalated to $7,900 and

$1,100.

“The property tax arrears agreement works well in most cases but not in all cases,” said Mel Tiede, director of cor- porate services for the town of Strath- more. “In both cases some payments were made, however, additional taxes and penalties for the 2014-2015 year were added to the account balance. The ar- rears have not totally been paid. The staff recommendation requested council to approve conditions that in- cluded redemption may be offered by payment of all arrears, that each par- cel will be offered for sale, subject to a reserve bid and to the reservations and conditions contained in the exist- ing certificate of title, and that after the public auction the town of Strathmore may become the owner of any property that is not sold at the public auction. However, according to Dwight Stan-

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ford, the chief administrative officer for the Town of Strathmore, mortgage companies will usually intervene and pay the amount owed to protect their interests. “We’re not worried at all, we’re sure both mortgage companies will send us

a cheque before the sale,” said Stanford. “In all the time I’ve been here in Strathmore, we’ve never had one go to

a tax sale because as soon as we get

ready to go to the tax sale, the mort- gage company always paid it off. Oth- erwise they lose their money.” Councillor Rocky Blokland ques- tioned Tiede on the absence of the mortgage companies thus far. However, Tiede replied that most mortgage com- panies will only pay once council sets a sale date, and the lack of action should

not be seen as a reflection on the com-

panies’ level of interest in the situation. According to Stanford, numerous at- tempts were made and letters sent to collect the payments over the last few years. He added that the town encoun- ters a few situations similar to this each year. “There’s been a lot of efforts made to collect these debts and at this point this

is the town’s only option to go forward

with this,” said Councillor Bob Sobol.

“I don’t want to make it look like we’re

a bunch of bad guys. We don’t have a

choice in this matter. These are public funds that are owed and our director

is doing what he must to get them col-

lected.” The 2015 public auction will be con- ducted on Dec. 14, 2015.

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Page 22 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

A heartfelt thank you to all who made the 3rd Annual Arts and Sounds festival a success!

who made the 3rd Annual Arts and Sounds festival a success! www.StrathmoreTimes.com A very sweet season

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

A very sweet season for Rosebud beekeepers

LAUREEN F. GUENTHER Times Contributor

The honeybees of Rosebud produced a bumper crop of honey this year. “The harvest was the best I’ve seen in almost 20 years,” e-mailed beekeep- er John Moerschbacher, who reintro- duced beekeeping in Rosebud when he moved to the area three years ago. Yet early this summer, he said, it didn’t look like the harvest would be good at all. “My expectations about the honey harvest back in June were not too op- timistic,” he said. “We’d had very little snow last winter and hardly any rain in April and May. Without moisture, flow- ers will not (excrete) nectar to draw pollinators.” Thankfully, that changed. “The July showers came, and in Au- gust as well,” he said. “Days of rain interspersed with good 25-35 degree heat is the perfect recipe for good nec- tar flow.” As a result, Moerschbacher wrote, all of Rosebud’s beekeepers – more than a dozen of them – had an excellent har- vest this year. Now, as we enjoy another warm fall, they hope to avoid a repeat of the kind of disaster Kelsey Krogman and Jordan Cutbill experienced last fall. They lost entire hives of previously-healthy bees in October, probably because a nearby field had been sprayed at mid-day, the time when bees feed. The bees likely died on the plants. “Spraying is occurring now in the fields where canola is re-blooming,” Moerschbacher said. “Farmers will

is re-blooming,” Moerschbacher said. “Farmers will Rosebud beekeeper Paul Zacharias opened a hive, while his

Rosebud beekeeper Paul Zacharias opened a hive, while his wife Heather prepared to smoke the bees, to quiet them while he extracts honey.

Photo Courtesy of Andrew Cooper

spray or (use) Round-Up in order to rid fields of volunteer vegetation that would use up nutrients needed for the coming year. Unfortunately, they are still doing this in mid-day when polli- nators (i.e. honeybees) are most active on the blooms.” He’s discussed these concerns with local farmers and a representative of the Canola Council, but says it may take time to spread the message. “I have a feeling that most farmers don’t realize that pollinators are easily killed by spraying with anything,” he said, “not just with chemicals that are technically pesticides.” He said many indigenous pollinators, like bumblebees and leafcutter bees, are even more affected by spraying than honeybees are. Meanwhile, as a result of the bum- per crop, all of Rosebud’s beekeepers – more than a dozen of them – have a good supply of honey available. For in- formation about Rosebud honey, go to rosebudvalley.wordpress.com or e-mail Jordan Cutbill (jordancutbill@me.com).

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October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 23

Rosebud School of the Arts celebrates student achievement

LAUREEN F. GUENTHER Times Contributor

Rosebud School of the Arts celebrat- ed another year of accomplishments at the 2015 ROSAs (Recognizing Out- standing Student Achievement), Sept. 27, with an afternoon ceremony and six-course banquet. Four students graduated as Fellows of Rosebud School of the Arts (FRSAs) after four years of study. Seven stu- dents earned two-year diplomas and ten students received one-year cer-

tificates. More than forty scholarships, worth $52,000, were also given out. Paul Muir, Education Director, wel- comed the FRSAs into full membership in Rosebud School of the Arts (RSA) guild, affirming that they’re now peers with their instructors. He reminded them there’d be a rare full eclipse of

a supermoon that evening, and joked

that, to confirm the event was especial- ly for graduates of Rosebud, it would glow red, like a rose. Pastor Phil Wright from Edmonton challenged the graduates, referring to King Nebuchadnezzar who forced his artisans to build a statue in his glory. Wright cautioned the new FRSAs they too may be pressured to use their tal- ents to feed others’ power, but he en- couraged them to speak to people for their benefit instead. He wished them love deeper than fear, redemption greater than vision, and reconciliation

greater than envy, and a particular soli- darity with “the least of these.” Each FRSA graduate was also hon- ored with a slide show and a person- alized speech from her faculty advi- sor. The music group Three Roses and

a Thorn, who joined in 1999 to sing

Oktoberfest comes to Standard

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

Standard is bringing back Oktober-

fest as a part of a fundraiser for the East Wheatland School that is expected

to meet completion in September 2016.

“There hasn’t been an Oktoberfest done in the community for quite a while,” said Sherri Skidbstad, organizer

of the Oct. 30 event. “We’re hoping if it goes well that we could make it an an- nual event and get the alumni and past graduates back.” There will be no shortage of enter- tainment and festivities throughout the evening, with the Tim Hortons Brier staple the Chevelles music, while beer kegs and steins will be in full swing for people to enjoy. “We’re looking forward to high en- ergy, a lot of fun and excitement,” said Skibstad. The event had 350 tickets and rough-

ly

half of them have sold. The deadline

to

purchase your tickets will be Oct. 26

dinner music in the Mercan- tile but disbanded in 2001, reunited especially for this year’s ROSAs, singing at both ceremony and banquet. After the ROSAs, I heard from each new FRSA. Jenny Daigle said personal growth was the greatest highlight of her time in Rosebud. “Your mentors are also your friends, are also your

teachers,” she said, and they all played a role in helping her grow. “It was intense and tax- ing but the fact that I went through it, it gave me strength. Now I feel like I have the strength to do any- thing.” Daigle is acting in Vancou- ver with a company called Small Wonders. In Decem- ber, she’ll work in the Cal- gary area, bringing theatre to local schools. Her long- term interests include stage combat and lighting. Naomi Esau emailed that

a highlight of her Rosebud time was “the feeling of home and family,” and the one-on-one mentorship ex- perience most helped her grow. “I was always surrounded by people I admired and who also treated me as an equal,” she said. “I grew as

a performer and a person

from that one-on-one men- torship.” Esau is Assistant Stage Manager for Calgary Shake- speare Company’s Romeo and Juliet. She recently danced in New Blood and will act at Heritage Park’s Ghouls’ Night Out. She plans to pursue acting and stage management roles across Canada. For Alysa Glenn, it was most important to find what she values as an artist. “I aspire to create art that empowers healing and con- nection,” she wrote. Her greatest victory was produc-

ing her final project, based on experience with depres- sion and anxiety. “I was able to turn a very

Tickets are $50, which includes a meal and a dance. For those interested in just the dance, tickets are $25, with proceeds going to the bleachers in the new school. Oktoberfest will take place on Oct. 30 at the Standard Community Hall with the doors opening at 5:30 p.m. and the dance will be from 8 p.m. until midnight. People can contact Lisa Armstrong at armstronggilr@gmail.com or on her cell at 403-934-1647 or at home 403- 787-2339 for tickets.

cell at 403-934-1647 or at home 403- 787-2339 for tickets. Rosebud School of the Arts wel-

Rosebud School of the Arts wel- comed four graduating students into the ROSA guild. Naomi Esau (l-r), Brynn Linsey, Jenny Daigle and Alysa Glenn.

Laureen F. Guenther Photo

difficult, confusing and dark time of my life into a piece of art that has touched other people’s lives,” she said. She’s preparing to per- form that show in venues throughout Alberta. “My hope is to facilitate

the space for others to talk about their own struggles with mental illness and shine another small light into that vast darkness,” she said. Brynn Linsey e-mailed that performing in The Lion, the Witch and the Ward- robe was the greatest high- light. Through performing

in Chickens and in Miracle Worker, she said, “I learned a great deal about what it is to be not only a performer but a person at work and in the world.” She said Morris Ertman, artistic director, had a great impact on her growth. Lin- sey hopes to move to Toron- to, but “I mostly am waiting to see where the world takes me,” she wrote, “and to start bushwhacking in whatever direction will help me get better at what I do.” Meanwhile, Rosebud School of the Arts continues the 2015-2016 school year with 12 new students, and an enrolment of 30. They ex- pect to graduate another five FRSAs into the guild next September.

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STRATHMORE LIONS CLUB Box 2171, Strathmore, Alberta T1P 1K2 Celebrating 77 years of service! WINE&CHEESE
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Celebrating 77 years of service!
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As you know we have come to the end of another
beautiful summer. It’s been a very busy time for everyone.
The Strathmore Lions Club would like to thank the commu-
nity for their support over the past 77 years. We appreciate
the time and dedication the volunteers gave us throughout
those many years. Without the donations and support of the
community we would not be able to provide our services as
thoroughly as we do year after, year.
At this time, we are inviting all to join us for free evening
on us November 19th 2015, 6:30 pm to 10:00 pm
for an open house at the Strathmore Golf Course .
We would also like to invite anyone interested in
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GARDEN CLUB’S - OCTOBER A.G.M.

On Wednesday, October 7th at The Public Library the Strathmore Country. Garden Club had their Annual General Meeting at 7pm. Lots of planning for different refreshing new ideas for garden projects were discussed as well as key roles that had to be filled. The positions of President, Vice President, Secretary, Historian, and Treasurer were filled tonight to keep the club going. The new President - Linda Pekrul, Vice President - Christine Wright, Secretary -Theresa Zerr, Historian - Kathy Guichon and Treasurer - Susan Wrigley. Thank you ladies for stepping up and keeping The Garden Club alive. If you are interested in Projects coming up for November and would like information about the club call Linda Pekrul at 403-901-0017. Happy Harvesting!

Page 24 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

RAT in the system

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

Alberta prides itself on being rat free, but our virtual space is another matter. RAT’s (Remote Administration Tools) are used with your consent by system providers to sense out problems with your hardware/software; but more of- ten than not, they are used without your consent by criminals who sneak a RAT Trojan into a personal device, along with that new free app that was just downloaded. Paul Davis is an IT Tech with 26 years’ experience. He is a social net- working safety consultant, who has been interviewed by major networks, and works with law enforcement and security agencies across Canada. He has seen the many ways people open doors in their technology for crimi-

nals to virtually waltz in and ruin their lives. He said criminals can access your lap- top, tablets and phone devices through Xbox, Skype, e-mail, unsecured Wi-Fi sites, Facebook, Instagram and many of the other social networking sites. They use the data to scam or sell you stuff, stalk, target family members for kidnapping or sexual purposes, steal money, steal identity information and sometimes spread inaccurate informa- tion, or sell confidential information over the web. Davis said many people do not place passwords to open their phones or tablets, yet 56 per cent of people will lose or misplace their phones. Over 600 cellphones were left on Ed- monton buses last year and Davis said last year 120,000 phones were lost or misplaced on airlines. The forgotten

iPad on airplanes is also becoming a regular occurrence. Staffs note that people will grab their phones, but leave the iPad or tablet behind. Using a similar or simple password for all your tech devices also sets tech criminals up to gain access to your information. Storing those passwords on the device only makes it easier for criminals to figure out all your ac- counts, once they hack in. “The lazier you are, the easier you make it for hackers,” said Davis. He said to use at least a six char- acter, unique, complex password for each account and change passwords every three months. He said back up the password log on a stick, place it away from the device in a secure loca- tion, or better yet, record all passwords in a book that is secured away from the computer. Davis wants users to consider keep- ing addresses, birthdates and confi- dential information off profile sites and don’t post your whereabouts on

Facebook. Criminals can use your lo- cation and track your GPS functions to know where you are and monitor your daily habits. Davis has informa- tion available on how to safely turn these off. For e-mails and Twitter he suggests safety and embarrassment can be elim- inated with the simple tip of thinking before you send or post. “Write, take your hands off the key- board, proof it twice and then post,” said Davis. Too many people include emotions into their online correspondence and hit the send button, before they realize what they have sent. He also advises ignoring texts that are meant to intimidate, bully, or gain an emotional response. It only intensi- fies the situation and can escalate to unforeseen actions in real life situa- tions. The effect of Twitter comments and Facebook posts leading to self- destructive teen behaviour is just one example of how words can kill.

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FORD .COM THE ALL NEW 403-934-2100 OCTOBER 16, 2015 SPORTS Students seek sponsors for golf tourney

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Students seek sponsors for golf tourney JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter It was a tough weekend
Students seek
sponsors for
golf tourney
JUSTIN SEWARD
Times Reporter
It was a tough weekend for the local Junior B team as they lost three
games in four nights.
Doug Taylor Photos
Kings inconsistent
against tough opponents
JUSTIN SEWARD
Times Reporter
The Wheatland Kings have played an awful lot of
hockey in the last week and were exhausted after
playing three game in four nights this past weekend;
it showed with the inconsistent play that would ulti-
mately cost them.
The team was shelled 6-0 by Three Hills on Oct. 9,
9-3 at home to the Cochrane Generals the following
day and 5-4 in overtime to Coaldale on Thanksgiving
Day.
Co-coach Emilio Fuoco still thinks the players are not
quite clicking at the same pace just yet.
“It’s a little bit of the veterans trying to understand
how I’d like to get them to play,” said Fouco.
“It’s a little bit different than they are used to. The
young guys are trying to get used to the speed and the
strength. The maturity between a 17 and 20-year-old is
huge and right now it’s not one particular thing, it’s a
matter of getting their feet set underneath them.”
Fouco added he’d rather use the bundle of games
now as learning tool as opposed to later in the sea-
son when the points become a little more crucial, and
thinks it was a combination of things that led to defeats.
“It’s an emotional game,” said Fuoco. “If a couple of
bounces don’t go our way, sometimes it’s a snowball
down the hill and you’ve got this monster avalanche
which should’ve never happened. We’re a much better
hockey club than the scores indicated.”
Ryan Grasdahl, Jacen Bracko and Lucas Jones scored
against Cochrane.
It was Bracko, Chris Williams, Blake Bishop and
Brooked Pretty Youngman who scored in the overtime
loss to Coaldale.
The Kings will be back in action on Oct. 17 as they
will be in Stettler at 7:30 p.m., and will be back at home
to host the Red Deer Vipers on Oct. 18 at 7 p.m.
Standard School’s Grade 9 class is step-
ping up to help fundraise for the new
East Wheatland School by hosting the EN-
CANA-Play for a Reason Golf Tournament
that’s now actively looking for sponsors.
The class sent out approximately 400
letters to different businesses last week
explaining the benefits and responsibili-
ties when sponsoring an event.
“We’re trying to teach the kids to take
some ownership and pride in their new
school,” said Greg Lendvay, co-organizer
with his students.
Sponsorship is $500 a hole and as a
main sponsor, ENCANA invested $5,000.
Students will have the opportunity to ex-
press their appreciation for the support of
their new K-12 school.
“We’ll have Grade 9’s on every hole and
they’ll be shaking the golfer’s hands and
say ‘thank you’ for sponsoring our new
school … and doing some golf talk too,”
said Lendvay.
He added that they have already started
searching for local sponsors, but continue
to encourage the students to broaden their
horizons and go everywhere possible for
silent auction items and sponsors.
“We’ve started with some of the locals,”
said Lendvay. “We’ve kind of gone a bit
bigger than that. A lot of our parents and
their parents do business or work for
places outside of Standard that wouldn’t
normally get involved in donating to the
school that we’re trying to get to. A lot of
agriculture kids, their parents, spend a lot
of money at John Deere and Case, they’re
bringing back money to the school.”
Sponsors who sign up before Oct. 30
will get special recognition when the play-
er packages are sent out. Lendvay expects
a half a dozen to meet the deadline and is
hopeful 144 golfers will come out to par-
ticipate. Registration is open until the day
of the tournament.
The students are still looking for hole
sponsors, cart sponsors, two food hole
sponsors and two major silent auction
items.
The fee is $250 per golfer. For more
information, contact Lendvay at 403-934-
5121 ext. 5433.
The tournament will take place on June
7, 2016 at Speargrass Golf Course.
Next Home Game
PLAYER OF
NEXT HOME GAME
THE GAME
Sunday, October 18 • 8:00 pm
vs Red Deer Vipers
Quaid McBean
Friday, October 16
OCTOBER 10 VS
Strathmore Family Centre - Gold Arena
8:00 pm
vs CAC Gregg Distributors
LLOYD
Tyler Petrie
Strathmore Times
Friday, Oct 9
Ryan
Grasdahl
Saturday, Oct 10
Kristian
Ayoungman
Monday, Oct 12
Brady
Hoover
OCTOBER 11 VS
Strathmore Family Centre
PLAYER OF THE GAME
CAC
Come Cheer on Your Strathmore Wheatland Kings!
Come Watch Some Great Hockey!
Strathmore Times

Page 26 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

TIMES • October 16, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com The Wheatland Warriors (l) kept their winning streak in tact
TIMES • October 16, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com The Wheatland Warriors (l) kept their winning streak in tact
TIMES • October 16, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com The Wheatland Warriors (l) kept their winning streak in tact

The Wheatland Warriors (l) kept their winning streak in tact as they beat the Medicine Hat Hounds 6-2 at the Strathmore Family Centre on Oct. 11. The Wheatland Chiefs played their home opener on Oct. 10 but were ousted 2-1 by the CNHA Blazers.

Justin Seward and Miriam Ostermann Photos

Warriors keep streak alive; Chiefs edged in home opener

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The Wheatland Warriors improved to 5-1 on the season with a pair of wins over the Thanksgiving weekend. The local double-A bantam team was able to beat the Taber Golden Suns 4-3 last Friday on the road and ousted the Medicine Hat Hounds at home 6-2 on Sunday afternoon, extending their win- ning streak to three games. Head coach Cody Brown liked what he saw from his club, coming back from a 2-0 deficit early against Taber, and felt as though the players are start- ing to connect. “They’re practicing more now, they’re starting to gel a bit,” said Brown. “That’s making a big difference for sure, get- ting to know each other a little more. There’s still a lot of things to work on, but that’ll come with time.” Anson McMaster, Stran Backfat Red- crow, Max Schafer and Kyle Bray scored in Taber. However, in the second game, Brown thought there were areas that needed to be improved upon, despite having a solid goal output. “I think today coming off a pretty sizeable win the first time we played

them this year, maybe went in thinking things were going to come a little easy,” said Brown. “Probably a little compla- cent in some areas, but just have to work through it.” He added it was tough to focus at times during the game and that may have contributed to them staying back from the play a bit. As a result, a lot of the basic plays went on the back burner. Brandon Kasdorf led the game with a hat trick, while Schafer, Bray and Ben Slemp scored one each in the victory. The Warriors will host Taber at 2 p.m. in Hussar on Oct. 18. Chiefs struggle The Wheatland Chiefs did not have luck on their side as they were edged 2-1 in their home opener on Oct. 10 by the CNHA Blazers and then tied the Okotoks Oilers Black 2-2 the following afternoon. Assistant coach Keenan Desmet thought the local double-A midget players did what the coaches asked of them but they needed to bear down on their chances more. “Saturday, I thought we played a hard game,” said Desmet. “We tried all 60 minutes. We had lots of jump and lots of speed, but we kind of got snake bit-

Strathmore AIM Society would like to thank Chinook Financial

for another year of partnership in our annual

Chinook Financial Tight & Bright Family Fun Run.

The following entrants came in first in our three divisions:

10 km – Melissa Schayes • 5 km – Farrah Roberts 2 km – Adam Jacobs

We also wish to thank the following Strathmore Businesses and Individuals for the overwhelming support of donations & prizes for the runners.

Strathmore Legion

Strathmore AG Society

Safeblu

Action Insurance/Heather Roberts

Blossoms

ATB Financial

Alice & Leonard Le Cerf

Boston Pizza (staff)

Co-op Grocery Store

Travel Lodge

Wheatland County Inn

Taco Time

Dairy Queen/Orange Julius

Tim Hortons (Esso)

Dairy Queen

Sobeys

Lammles

Napa Auto Parts

Roadhouse Restaurant

Napa Auto Pro

Atco Gas

Studio 86

Original Joes

Shoppers Drug Mart

Value Drug Mart

PRO Water

Queens Nail & Spa

Rockies Bakery

Walmart

Strathmore Veterinary

Strathmore Motor Products

Valley Dental

Valley Medical

Gregory, Harriman & Associates

Strathmore Times

Waldo’s Imaging

Strathmore Physical Therapy

Ok Tire (General Manager)

Southern Septic

Coldwell Agencies Ltd

Target Fitness

Booster Juice

Strathmore Physicians Group

Strathmore Florists

Sevick Veterinary

Rebel Sports

Marlin Travel

Simply Holistic

Optimum Wellness

CIBC

OK Tire (Business Manager)

Strathmore Golf Club

Don Derraugh

Randy Grill

Sue Andrews

Kathy Bruce

Jaqueline Murdoch

Krista Andrews

James Bolton

Cate Wadford

Sylvia Walker

Corinne & Ryan Tongs

Brandi & Jason Bobee

Robert & Meredith Goertz

Joshua & Ardis Foat

Marissa Ray

Heather Spyker

Katherine Lauzon

Brian Armstrong

Patricia Caponcro

Tami DeSimone

Joe Geill & Hazel Mitchell

Wendy Lussier

We raised $4000 this will enhance programs supporting adults with disabilities in the Strathmore area.

supporting adults with disabilities in the Strathmore area. ten this weekend. Other than that, in the

ten this weekend. Other than that, in the full two games, the coaches were pretty impressed of everybody show- ing up.” He added that going from shellack- ing Cranbrook a week prior to playing

a top team in the league proved to be

difficult for timing on plays and said it’s early in the year. Kody Hammond scored against the Blazers while Hammond and Lucas Muenchrath scored in the tie against Okotoks.

The Chiefs will be back on home ice against the Red Deer Elks at 2 p.m. on Oct. 17 and against the Lethbridge Hurricanes at 4:15 p.m. on Oct. 18. Braves back on ice After a bye for the Thanksgiving weekend, the Wheatland Braves are back in action on Oct. 16 (7:30 p.m.) in Hussar against Lethbridge. The local double-A peewee team will then travel to Okotoks the following day to battle the Oilers Green at 3:45 p.m.

Josephson making Trinity a strong program

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

Strathmore High School alumnus Ben Josephson’s volleyball passion started 20 years ago when he came to the school in Grade 11 and tried out for the team with limited experience in the sport. Since then, the athlete has become instrumental in making the Trinity Western men’s volleyball team com- petitive. “I went out and tried out for the high school team just to meet other kids and Randy Moncks was the coach and he asked who was a setter and a bunch of short guys put up their hand. I figured

I got a shot,” said Josephson. After graduating in 1997 from SHS, his strong quality of being a quiet lead- er with his play on the court earned him the chance to play five years with Trinity Western. Upon his completion of playing, he became assistant coach for a year and now is in his ninth season as head coach, where he won back-to-back national titles in 2011 and 2012. He has stuck with placing an emphasis on making sure the players have com- munication on the court to succeed as players. “Obviously it’s a fun game,” said Jo- sephson. “But it’s a really great game for learning how to be with others. One thing I made a bunch of notes on is you can’t win a match by yourself. You can’t win a point by yourself … so that ability to communicate, stay to- gether through tough times … we have some great lessons to learn. How do we manage our emotions, focus when things aren’t going smoothly? What we’re teaching is volleyball concepts and as they mature we’re trying to help them apply that off the court.” Whether it’s spending six hours with the team in the gym or spending time with his two kids and wife, volleyball will always be a part of his life as he referred to it as his ‘dream-job.’ “When I’m tired of these boys I go to my little boys and play some more, it’s a good life,” he said. “It stinks when you lose. And this is the worst part of coaching is how to manage through poor performances.” Josephson also got to coach against

poor performances.” Josephson also got to coach against Strathmore Spartans volleyball alumnus Ben Josephson is

Strathmore Spartans volleyball alumnus Ben Josephson is thriving being a head coach of the Trinity Western University Spartans and the team has seen numerous successes under his guid- ance.

Justin Seward Photo

his former club coaches versus Mount Royal University’s mens team in an ex- hibition match earlier this month in Strathmore. His former coach, Randy Moncks, thinks what Josephson is doing with the Trinity Western program has stemmed from his sharp volleyball sense and adaptability to the sport. “It was through a series of other events that he ended up starting,” said Moncks. “My setter, who I really focused on stopped coming to school and was asked to leave, and Ben stepped in. In his Grade 12 year, he just blossomed and a very hard worker, his volleyball IQ was great and he was just all off sudden blossoming into one of the better athletes we’ve had at Strathmore High School.” Moncks thought it was a great sur- prise that Trinity Western had taken Josephson, but he turned out to be a worthy pick as he was recognized as a first-team all-star in Canada West and the first in any sport in Spartans athlet- ics. On a coaching level, he thinks the recruitment Josephson had done has played a big part in the program’s suc- cess. “For us, we’re very proud of what had happened there,” said Moncks.

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 27

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 27 The newly formed Zone 2 U14 AA

The newly formed Zone 2 U14 AA Blaze ringette team consists of five communities including five Strathmore girls and they are enjoying competing against other elite teams in the age group while working hard on their skills.

Photo Courtesy of Candice Harmes

Ringette player enjoying competitiveness of AA level

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

For the first time at the double-A lev- el, the Zone 2 Blaze will field a U14 and U16 team comprised of players from Strathmore, Indus, Chestermere, Airdrie and Cochrane, and for U14 head coach Chad Gillies it’s all about preparing the girls for the tough com- petition they will face. “With starting out in Zone 2 as a double-A program it’s more of a devel- opment year, so they can develop their skills, so they can be at this level again next year,” said Gillies. “There’s a lot of good competition with Calgary and the north teams of course. It’s been good for all the as- sociations to come together. I think it helps the associations work better to- gether to develop this program.” Gillies thinks this was a team in the making for a few years because of Rin- gette Alberta’s push for rural areas to develop into double-A programs, and to Gillies it does not matter what the score is, as long as the girls get better. “We’re trying it this year, which is good for the girls,” said Gillies. “I told the girls we’re going to have some hard games (and) some good games. I told them not to worry about the scoreboard, the wins don’t mean a lot right now.” He has been impressed with the girls’ ability to listen to what they are told and their keenness to soak in whatever is taught to them. “At this age, they’re like a sponge,” he said.“They will soak in anything that you give them. At this level, they are here to play and eager to learn new things. I learned on the weekend (the St. Albert tournament) that a lot them are afraid to make mistakes and I told them ‘don’t worry about making mis- takes,’ and play like in practices and they have been.” First-year Strathmore player Macken- zie Duggan has taken it all in stride and thinks there is a lot of improvement to be had to keep up with the pace at this level compared to the lower levels. “It’s a much faster game, there’s way more skating back and forth,” said Duggan. “It’s just the skill level is that much higher and you definitely have to move your feet faster and be more intense than if I was playing A or B.” She added probably best things about being on this squad is having

four other local players on the team that she knows and getting to meet other ones from the zones to gain fa- miliarity. “It’s fun meeting the other girls and we’re already so close already,” said

Duggan. “And it’s good to have Strath- more too, it’s more comfortable than

if there wasn’t any Strathmore girls at

all.” Elizabeth Proust, who tried out for double-A last year and knew what to

expect this time around, is looking for- ward to the challenge of keeping up the intensity that is needed to succeed

at this level. “I want to make it big in ringette,”

said Proust. “It’s good to be on high paced teams. You have to be fast to pick up the rings, skate hard and avoid

have to be fast to pick up the rings, skate hard and avoid The Strathmore Spartan

The Strathmore Spartan high school cross country team won the zone banner by two points in Sundre on Oct. 6 and will send 11 athletes to provincials on Oct. 17 in Grande Prairie.

Justin Seward Photo

Spartans bring home zone banner

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The Strathmore High School Spar- tans showcased great athleticism and runners beating their personal best to win the zone banner by mere two

points on Oct. 6 in Sundre for the sec- ond time in three years. Out of the 42 runners participating, the junior girls and intermediate boys showed tremendous strides. As a result, six runners total from those categories will be going to pro- vincials. “Snake Hill was a diffi- cult hill and technical

ones we had some issues with, just inexperience mostly, all of them im- proved their times. I think we cracked the Top 30, which for the intermediate boys team that is still learning … not bad in a race of about 70.” The Spartans saw more success sto-

ries throughout the day as senior girls Maria Fanning, Ann Smeyers, Kate Sch- ramm and Cassie Regier carried the team with the right mindset to con- quering the hilly course. “We won the category because of the placement of all of our runners,” said Sonsteby. “For example, Kate Schramm, one of our Grade 12 runners, she was at the point where she was able to put up for us and helped us win this banner. She shaved six minutes off her time in

a race … aiming for a 23-24 minute

run at four kilometres and from our Foothills meet she dropped six min- utes. That’s incredible. We only won the banner by two points. Every run- ner with better times count.” Sonsteby added that seeing Fanning, who is a multi-sport athlete at the school, conquer Scar Hill at the end of the race and use her hill-running abil- ity to her advantage was a pleasant surprise. “You don’t advise kids to go up hills aggressively,” said Sonsteby. “You ad- vise them to get up them and make up

times on the flats and downs, that’s just

a normal strategy for flatlanders like

us. This was her hill, it ended with a very technical hill called Scar Hill and coming into that, you’re yelling at Ma- ria. This is where she charges out and gobbles up some time and positions.” Smeyers was another one that was able to go in extremely confident and knowing she could get up the hills strongly and was also able to take ad- vantage of the flats and downs by blitz- ing her way through them.

Sonsteby added that he wants the 11 runners going to provincials to enjoy the experience and run the best they can – if someone makes the Top 30, it’s a bonus. The provincials will take place in Grande Prairie on Oct. 17. Meanwhile, Kevin Mertz’s junior high team took 48 runners to the zone meet and placed second.

Light Cayley Bos- and Foat Up the out o r e NIGHT e n t
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28
Strathmore & District Agricultural Grounds
Strathmore Lions Club
CELEBRATION OF
LIGHTS
We are presently looking for Sponsors who would like to be involved
in this special event or the Family New Year’s Party.
Do you have a Mascot? We invite businesses with a mascot
to come down and mingle with the
families during the evening, hand out coupons and promote your business as well.
Volunteers always needed to help put up the lights and decorations,
take part in the evening, directing traffic, handing out candy canes
and coupons for the Kids. Work bees are scheduled for Saturday and
Sundays commencing in October 10th at the Ag. Grounds.
For more information or to get Involved please give us a call.
Rose Hamrlik
Work - 403-934-5589 • Cell - 403-934-8191
PLEASE JOIN US AND HAVE SOME FUN.
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Proudly sponsored by
STRATHMORE

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Jewlyn round the Strath- m contin- g of ros - ter. TIMES at times,” said coach

at times,” said coach Paul Sonsteby. “Our junior girls and interme- diate boys categories were dom- i n a t e d again. Our ju- n i o r

boys were t h e

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Page 28 • Strathmore TIMES • October 16, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

TIMES • October 16, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com Valley Medical Clinic 231 - 2nd Ave, Strathmore Dr. Joseph

Valley Medical Clinic

231 - 2nd Ave, Strathmore

Dr. Joseph Dr. Chatha

Family Physicians

Now Accepting New Patients 403 934-4444 Valley Medical Clinic

In Association With

Dr. Fanning

Dr. Lobay

Dr. Clarke

Dr. Sader

Dr. Manocha

Dr. Kahlon

Valley Medical Clinic

231 - 2nd Ave, Strathmore

NEW EXPANDED WALK IN HOURS

THURSDAYS

9am - 12pm Starting Sept 17, 2015

Mondays 5-8pm Wednesdays 9-12pm

Will Continue

403 934-4444 Valley Medical Clinic

9-12pm Will Continue 403 934-4444 Valley Medical Clinic Mountain Equipment Co-op held their first triathlon in
9-12pm Will Continue 403 934-4444 Valley Medical Clinic Mountain Equipment Co-op held their first triathlon in
9-12pm Will Continue 403 934-4444 Valley Medical Clinic Mountain Equipment Co-op held their first triathlon in
9-12pm Will Continue 403 934-4444 Valley Medical Clinic Mountain Equipment Co-op held their first triathlon in
9-12pm Will Continue 403 934-4444 Valley Medical Clinic Mountain Equipment Co-op held their first triathlon in

Mountain Equipment Co-op held their first triathlon in Strathmore on Oct. 10. A total of 77 participants competed in the event that involved swimming laps, biking against strong winds, and finish- ing the triathlon off with a run.

Miriam Ostermann Photos

MEC holds first triathlon in Strathmore

MIRIAM OSTERMANN Times Associate Editor

A total of 77 athletes jumped into the pool, ped- alled against strong winds, and hit the pavement, after less red tape and the town’s involvement made Strath- more the ideal location for Calgary’s Mountain Equip-

ment Co-op’s (MEC) first tri- athlon. The outdoor-recreation- gear-and-clothing-goods co- operative, which organized running and bike races for the past three years, ven- tured into unchartered wa- ters when the vision to offer an inexpensive triathlon in the area blossomed. While Calgary proved counterproductive by de- manding large fees associ- ated with pool rentals and road closures, Strathmore’s walking trail, accessible roads, and the town’s will- ingness to work with the organization allowed for the event to take place on Oct.

10.

“Our whole reason for putting this on was to keep the price and cost low so ev- eryone can participate and Strathmore was really ac-

commodating for that and willing to work with us,” said Tara McFadden, event coor- dinator. “I really hope our numbers go up for next year. We didn’t really recover our own costs, we actually spent money to put this event on. But it’s really great to see so many people participate.” While the MEC Calgary Sprint Triathlon kept costs low by not offering t-shirts or participation medals, ex- penses accrued through ad- vertising, rentals, and certi- fied flaggers. With only 10 volunteers, MEC also en- listed the help of 15 of their staff members. MEC’s family-friendly ap- proach and the low $35 en- try fee encouraged stay-at- home father of three Chris Green to participate in his first triathlon. Enduring a six-week train- ing schedule, Green shed 10 lbs before the start of the race. “I started off at 237 lbs and then I started the race at 227 lbs, just the train- ing alone changed my life,” Green said. “I used to be re- ally fit before the kids. Then with the kids, everything fell off the wagon. So I thought

this might be a fast way to get back into shape. And it totally worked.” The event attracted ath- letes of all skill levels. While Green began training just over a month ago, other ath- letes have been training for most of the year. For former Strathmore resident, Darren Heyner, who’s been partici- pating in triathlons for 18 years, Oct. 10 marks a day for competing. Last year on the day, he qualified and participated in the Ironman World Champi- onships in Hawaii and this year he returned to Strath- more to win first place in MEC’s event. While he fol- lowed a six-month-training plan with 10 workouts a week for his ironman com- petitions, he said having the event in his hometown gave him an advantage. “I’ve done races on this loop and so you know, on

the way out to use it all up because you know it’s going to be windy and uphill on the way back,” Heyner said, who also took part in the Tri-Smore event, together with his daughter Samantha, in Strathmore earlier this year. “I originally grew up as a runner, and I find if you do all three sports, you don’t get hurt as much.” Although MEC faced a snow storm for their trail run at Nose Hill in Calgary the week prior, the weather turned warm for the triath- lon last week – despite some strong winds. Even though the organiza- tion will not be making up their costs – as was original- ly expected – the team was optimistic about bringing the event back next August with hopes of attracting more athletes to participate.

Bisons offensively challenged in first road contests

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The CFR Bisons went on their first road trip of the season and did not get the results they had looked for as they lost by identical 4-1 scores to the Lloydminster Bobcats and CAC Gregg Dis- tributors last weekend. Assistant coach Mike Lan- gen said the team put forth a strong effort in both games but weren’t able to score as often as they would’ve liked. However, the experience awarded the chance for play- ers to bond. “It’s good to get the team to bond on the road early,” said Langen. “The scores were not quite where we want them to be in both games. We were competitive and competed.” According to Langen, he liked how the team commu- nicated around each other to recover from a bad start and kept the games tight the rest

of the way. “The game against Lloyd, three goals in the first 12 minutes, our guys rallied back and it was a 1-1 hock- ey game for the rest of the game,” said Langen. “The nerves probably played a part of it, the travel played a part in it. It was just an eye opener for everybody, once we were there.” Langen did say puck move- ment became better as they got adjusted to the smaller rinks, especially in the game against CAC. However, he said if execu- tion was followed through they would have been in- volved in more of the game. Kyle Gordon got the lone goal in Lloydminster while Gary Haden notched one against CAC. The team will have a re- match against CAC at the Strathmore Family Centre on Oct. 16 at 8 p.m. and will be in Medicine Hat on Oct. 17 at 2:15 p.m.

Mortgage Matters by Strathmore’s Mortgage Specialist

Mortgages versus credit cards – are you at your limit?

Most people who own a home have a credit card. You need it for all kinds of major purchases: a new TV, building a new deck, maybe even new appliances or better yet, a much needed, well-deserved, yes you earned it, kind of vacation. Everyone knows that the best thing you can do is pay off the credit card every month. So a few months have gone by and that credit card balance is still there. Now wait a minute, something else happened to you and your life and that credit card balance is still there. Time has slipped by and you have been carrying a $15,000 balance on your credit card at 21 per cent interest for months now. No big deal, ‘I will just keep making the minimum payments.’ Yes you must make the minimum payments - but it will not get paid off this way. It’s not entirely your fault. You make the some money, have the same expenses, live the same lifestyle, and the lottery is just not working the way it used to. If you own your own home, consider refinancing. If you are able to to pay off all these credit lines and debts owing – how would that make you feel. If you have a mortgage of $300,000 and you are able to add $15,000 to it and pay it all off at 3 per cent, the savings can be huge and the impact to your life can be substantial in two key ways. First your going to save money in what you pay in interest. The second and most commonly overlooked piece to this is that you will reduce your overall payments as well. So not only will you be saving money you will free up more cash which you can use in any number of ways including paying off your mortgage faster. Do yourself a favour, review your credit card statements. Go back as far as you have to – to the first month when you started carrying a balance over zero. If that was more than three months ago or your credit card is at its limit, give me a call – you’ll be glad you did.

at its limit, give me a call – you’ll be glad you did. Asad Mahmood, B.Sc,

Asad Mahmood, B.Sc, B.A.

Strathmores Mortgage Specialist

403 681-8845

October 16, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 29

Spartans get first win, playoffs in reach

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The Strathmore Spartans high school football team got the mon- key off their back with a big offen- sive output to beat Drumheller 38- 21 on Oct. 8 to give themselves a chance at the postseason. “It was our first regular season win in an extremely competitive league,” said head coach Travis Gorski. “It did feel good to get the monkey off our back, but that be- ing said it’s not like we’ve been out of the other games. It felt good to be able to finish, maintain a lead throughout the game and actually finish the game.” Gorski added that they have had the lead in all of their previous games and came out on the losing

end because of penalties and men- tal errors, but this time were able to overcome those lapses against Drumheller. “Anytime they focused in on a particular receiver, we were able to go to a different one,” he said. “I thought our offense spread the ball around multiple targets and they all did their job and really at- tacked their defense, trying to de- fend against an offense that tries to give it to multiple threats is ex- tremely difficult.” Quarterback Kobe Holloway thought it was a relief to see the offense finally clicking and making plays, and found that throwing the ball was a vital component in the win. “They wanted us to run the ball,” said Holloway.

“We got to exploit them in the air with a couple of bombs. We had a really good practice the day before the game and everyone came out with positive attitudes and they just showed up to play.” Cornerback Isaac Wegner thought the defense were confident all game long and able to pick up Drumhell- er’s offensive tendencies. “Our team really watched the ball the entire play, every play just to make sure they didn’t get more than a few yards a carry,” said Wegner. “They have some strong running backs and we shut them down for the most part.” On Oct. 16, the Spartans will play Medicine Hat High School at home and if they win, they will get into the playoffs. Kick-off is set for 3:30 p.m.

Hawks fetch gold The Holy Cross Collegiate Hawks junior-A girls volleyball team opened their tournament

Hawks fetch gold

The Holy Cross Collegiate Hawks junior-A girls volleyball team opened their tournament season with a gold medal

win at Clearwater Academy in Calgary on Sept. 25 and 26. The girls won the championship in straight sets (25-21

and 25-16).

Photo Courtesy of Gwen Moncayo

 

What’s Happening

a free weekly

     

special events

community

calendar

Adult Drop In Volleyball Drop in adult volleyball. Wednesday nights 7:30-9:30 at Crowther Junior High School. Contact info 403-934-4963. AL-ANON: Are you concerned or affected by someone’s drinking? Strathmore New Hope Al-anon Fam- ily Group can help. Meetings every Thursday at 8:00pm @ Lord of All Lutheran Church. 112 Lakeside Bou- levard. (Entrance at back) For more information call our 24 hour help line at 403-266-5850. Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings Strathmore – open meetings MON- DAY 8:00 P.M. at Hope Community Church, call 403-901-9666 or 403- 901-4570. Strathmore Full Gospel Church -TUESDAYS at 8:00P.M., call 403-901-6816. THURSDAYS 8:00P.M. at Full Gospel Church, call 403-361-9396. SUNDAY 2:00 P.M. at Strathmore United Church, call 403- 934-9570. If drinking is a problem, please come to a meeting or call any of the numbers just to talk. Alcoholics Anonymous Langdon Meeting 8:00pm Friday nights. 23 Center Street North Langdon. Con- tact Karen 403-612-2622. Cheadle Lions Club Drop off your pennies or change off at the Civic Centre. “All proceeds raised goes toward local projects.” Chestermere and area Children (& Families) with Type 1 Diabetes Our Goal is to create a group of ma- ture, responsible members where we open our own homes as Safe Places for Diabetic Children to go to if ever in Diabetic Distress. Join the Face- book group for more information. Come Fly With Us 903 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Sqn. meet Wednesdays at 6:30pm at the blue building and Quonset on the Ag grounds. Boys & Girls between 12 & 19 years welcome. Call Tammy

HIV Edmonton

Strathmore Baptist Church Meeting Sundays @ 11am and Thursdays @ 7pm, Call Pastor David Blankenship for info 403-390-4431.

Strathmore Country Gardens Club Meetings at least once per month. For more information visit www.strath-

Strathmore Lions Club

 

Providing support, education and ad- vocacy for those infected with, affect- ed by or at risk of HIV and AIDS for

years. Go to www.hivedmonton.

25

Meets the first and third Thursdays at the Strathmore Civic Centre at 6:45 pm. Strathmore Musical Arts Society Love music and musicians and have a special soft spot for the Blues? Be a part of this group. Call 403-934-4196 or 403-680-7721 to get on our phone or email list, and notifications about meetings and upcoming events. Strathmore Parent & Tot Playgroup Meets every Tuesday at 9:30 - 11:30

Happy Gang Garage & Bake Sale on Oct

16

10-5 & Oct 17 10-4.

Children’s Wish Foundation Annual Jelly Bean Dance, Friday October 16th from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Strathmore Civic Centre. Children Grade 6 and under welcome, Grade 2 and under must be with an adult. Halloween costumes optional.

com or call toll free 1.877.388.5742. HAPPY GANG 55+ Society

85

Lakeside Blvd. Phone; 403 934 2676.

morecountrygardensclub.webs.com or phone Linda Pekrul 403-901-0017. Strathmore & District Agricultural Society

Our Fall & Winter Activities are as fol-

lows; Mornings-Mon/ Wed/ Fri Pool 9 am , Yoga,10 am, Tues/Thurs Walking

10

am. Afternoons- Mon, Line Danc-

www.Strathmorestampede.com, sags@ telus.net. Office 403.934.5811, Fax 403.901.0299, Facebook: Strathmore Stampede Twitter: Strathmore Rodeo Strathmore & District Chamber of Commerce Meets the second Thursday of the month @ 7:00 p.m. All members wel-

come. www.strathmoredistrictcham- ber.com for meeting location. For more information call 403-901-3175. Strathmore District Health Services Auxiliary Meetings are held the fourth Monday of the month @ 1:30 pm (excluding July & August). Lower level Confer- ence Room at the Strathmore Hos- pital. New members welcome. For more info please call 403-934-4436 Strathmore Elks Lodge #491 Meets 3rd Tuesday at the Strathmore Curling Club 6:30 pm. Steak Supper at 7 pm. New Members welcome. Call Greg 403-888-6155. Strathmore Full Gospel Church We’re a Pentecostal bible-based fam- ily church that has something for all ages. Call 934-2225 or visit www. strathmorefullgospel.com Strathmore Fun Runners Car Club Meets the first Wednesday of the month. New members welcome! Please call Todd at 403-934-0558 or Shawn at 403-901-9303 for info. Strathmore FASD Parent Support Group At the Strathmore United Church. For more info call Pam @652-4776. Strathmore Homeschool Families Any Strathmore and area familes that are homeschooling are invited to join our Yahoo Group. www.groups.ya- hoo.com/group/strathmorehsfams Strathmore Hand in Hand Parent Link FREE programming to kids 0-6 and their caregivers! Check the Town of Strathmore website Communi- ty Events section for programs and times. Located at 421-2nd St, across from Paragon Pharmacy. 690-1237. Strathmore Library •Get Your Game On @ Strathmore Library (1-4pm) Held the every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month, 7-9pm.

The 14th Annual Strathmore Rural Firefighters’ Association Roaring 20’s Ladies Night Fundraiser at the Strathmore Civic Centre on October 17th, 2015. Looking for donations! Contact Ninette Maga 403-934- 9439. There will be raffles, silent auctions, door prizes, centrepieces, etc. Tix available at ProWater and Lil’ Hoots.

Royal Canadian Legion Branch #10 Ladies Auxiliary Harvest Dinner on Saturday October 24. Cocktails at 6:00pm and dinner at 6:30. For tickets call Barb 403-813- 2889, Legion 403-934-5119.

ing 1:30, Tues, Rummikube & Whist 1:30, Wed. Bridge 1:00, Mah Jong 1:30, Thurs. Canasta 1:30, Fri, Crib 1:30. Hall Rentals Call Christine 403-901-1574. The Healing Rooms at Harvest Healing Centre Church is open every Monday from 7-9 PM for prayer and healing. The Healing Room at Harvest Healing Centre Church, 102 Canal Road Strathmore. For info call 403-901-0893 or 401-800-3171. Join us for Spirit filled prayer and healing every Monday Night. Hope Bridges Society for Creative & Continued Learning Advocating for, and bringing together adult citizens of all abilities for mean- ingful relationships, friendships, & op- portunities through the Arts. Board Meetings are monthly TBD. Public invited. Please contact Wanda at 403- 983-3640, or 403-901-5081 (Cell) for further information, events or to be added to friends/contact.There are many other workshops including knitting, crocheting, photography tips and zentangle. Visit our website:

am. in the Strathmore United Church

Basement.