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11 - 14 APRIL 2015

MANCHESTER
PREVIEW BROCHURE

TH

ANNUAL
INTERNATIONAL
IATEFL
CONFERENCE AND
EXHIBITION

THIS BROCHURE IS SPONSORED BY

Life Skills help to develop...


SOCIAL AND CREATIVE SKILLS

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING

AND TOLERANCE

LEARNING AUTONOMY AND

LEARNING STRATEGIES

THINKING SKILLS TO
EXPLAIN, INFER, CLASSIFY

NOTICE AND DISCOVER

INTERPERSONAL AND

COLLABORATIVE SKILLS

2 - 17

6. ACCOMMODATION
3, 4. BOOKING INFORMATION
4. CANCELLATION & INSURANCE
6. CAR PARKING
9. CATERING
9.CONFERENCE APP
7. CONFERENCE TIMETABLE
15-17. EVENING & DAYTIME EVENTS
2, 11.EXHIBITION INFORMATION
9, 60 & 61. HOW TO ... TRACK
10. IATEFL CONTACT DETAILS
9. INTERNET CENTRE
5. JOBS MARKET FAIR
5. MANCHESTER ONLINE
2, 67-68. PLENARY SPEAKERS
5, 12-14. SCHOLARSHIPS & WINNERS
10, 69. SIGNATURE EVENTS
8. SPONSORS
6. VENUE ADDRESS

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

18 - 25

18-25. PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS (PCES)

PROGRAMME INFORMATION

27 - 66

59. ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING


9, 60 & 61. HOW TO ... TRACK
62. IATEFL SIGS
63-66. IATEFL SIG DAYS
59. IATEFL SIG OPEN FORUMS
2, 67-68. PLENARY SPEAKERS
27-58. PREVIEW OF PRESENTATIONS
10, 69. SIGNATURE EVENTS
59. TRIBUTE SESSION

Visit www.iatefl.org to:


make your booking for the


conference and PCEs

join IATEFL to benefit from the


reduced members conference
fee (please allow 48 hours
for your membership to be
processed)

learn more about IATEFL

C O N T E N T S PA G E

GENERAL INFORMATION

PLENARY SPEAKERS
This year at the IATEFL Annual Conference there will be five stimulating plenary sessions. These
sessions will be presented by the following speakers:

Ann Cotton

Carol Ann Duffy

Joy Egbert

Donald Freeman

Harry Kuchah

Please refer to pages 67-68 for details of this years plenary speakers.
THE CONFERENCE
The Conference will bring together ELT professionals from around the world to discuss,
reflect on and develop their ideas. It offers many opportunities for professional contact and
development and is a great networking event. It involves a four-day programme of over 500
sessions, including forums, poster presentations, talks and workshops.
14 Pre-Conference Events (PCEs), organised by our Special Interest Groups, plus IATEFLs
Associates Day, will take place on Friday 10th April.
The IATEFL Conference and Exhibition is a four-day event that takes place in the UK every year.
This year it will take place in Manchester from Saturday 11th to Tuesday 14th April 2015.
THE ELT RESOURCES EXHIBITION
The ELT Resources Exhibition takes place throughout the conference (Saturday 11th to
Tuesday 14th April) and offers delegates the chance to view the latest ELT publications,
products and services available to them.
With a great mix of worldwide exhibitors showcasing a variety of teaching aids from course
providers, publishers, digital innovators and much more, the exhibition is free to all and
provides a vibrant and social atmosphere, which is not to be missed.
Do take time to visit and re-visit the exhibition stands during the conference.
Exhibition opening times
Saturday 0830-1730
Monday 0830-1730
Sunday
0830-1730 Tuesday
0830-1215

Bookings for the conference and/or a PCE should be made online at: www.iatefl.org/annualconference/manchester-2015
Please read the information in this brochure before going online.

GENERAL INFORMATION

IATEFLS 49TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE AND EXHIBITION


MANCHESTER CENTRAL, MANCHESTER, UK.

The city of Manchester is a metropolitan borough in North


West England, famous for its architecture, culture, music
scene as well as its scientific and engineering output.
It offers a range of fascinating museums & galleries which
celebrate its Roman history, rich industrial heritage, role
in the Industrial Revolution and the renowned Lowry
gallery.

BOOKING FOR CONFERENCE


Bookings for the Conference and/or a Pre-Conference Event (PCE) can only be made online.
Please read the information below before going online at www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/
manchester-2015.
Booking is open to anyone who wishes to attend the conference. Entrance to the exhibition
and jobs market fair is free to all and does not need to be booked. For conference attendance,
book early to take advantage of our early bird rate. The early bird rate applies if full payment is
received by 29th January 2015.
IATEFL
member

IATEFL
Student member*

Non-members

EARLY BIRD RATE:


(booking & full payment received on or
before 29th January 2015)

149

99

208

STANDARD RATE:
(booking & full payment received after 29th
January 2015)

195

113

250

**SINGLE DAY RATE:


(between 11th and 13th April)

85

52

102

HALF DAY RATE:


(Tuesday 14th April)

40

28

50

EARLY BIRD RATE:


(booking & full payment received on or
before 29th January 2015)

65

65

81

STANDARD RATE:
(booking & full payment received after 29th
January 2015)

78

78

93

CONFERENCE FEES

PCE FEES

* fees apply only to delegates with Student Membership of IATEFL


** Please note: if you are attending for two or three days and the full rate is cheaper, please
select the lower four-day rate when booking.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Manchester is historically known as the worlds first


industrialised city & the sixth largest city in the UK.

If you wish to join IATEFL in order to take advantage of the reduced members rate, please join
online at www.iatefl.org or email membership@iatefl.org for a membership form. Please do not
leave this until the last minute as it can take up to two working days for your membership to
become active. If you wish to book a place for a PCE, please note that places are limited so it is
advisable to book and pay as early as possible to avoid disappointment.
European funding might be possible to help with conference attendance costs. For details, visit
the Education and Training website at http://ec.europa.eu/education.
Delegates please make every effort not to leave your conference booking until the last minute as
the IATEFL Office will be fully committed to conference arrangements from March 2015. Unless
we receive your online booking by 18th March 2015, you will need to book on arrival at the venue.

LOCAL DELEGATES
The last 24 hours of the conference (from lunchtime Monday to Tuesday afternoon) we allow local
ESOL and EFL professionals, who live within 50 miles of Manchester and are unable to make the
whole conference, the opportunity to attend the conference and exhibition for the final 24 hours.
The Local Day provides the following opportunities:
A resources exhibition displaying the latest ELT materials
Access to the jobs market fair
The opportunity to attend presentations
The chance to attend an evening event on Monday night
Two stimulating plenary sessions on Tuesday
The opportunity to network with fellow ELT professionals from around the world
How to book: please book online at www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/manchester-2015. There
is a tick box under the Conference Fees for Local Delegate. Alternatively, you can book onsite
from 1300 on Monday 13th April. The fee for local delegates attending the last 24 hours of the
conference is 57.00.

REGISTRATION TIMES
The registration desk will be open from 0800 to 0945 on Friday 10th April for Pre-Conference Event (PCE)
delegates ONLY. The registration desk will be open at 1130 on Friday for conference-only delegates. Delegates
must collect their badge from the registration desk before they can attend a PCE or conference sessions, as
admission is strictly badge only. Delegates attending both a PCE and the conference, need only register once.

Pre-registered delegates

Registration opening times

On arrival please collect your badge, conference pack


and Conference Programme from the IATEFL registration
desk. The registration desk will be located at the Central
Foyer (through the main entrance) of Manchester Central.

PCE delegates only:

Onsite registration for new delegates

Friday 10 April 1130-1800


Saturday 11 April 0800-1730
Sunday 12 April
0800-1730
Monday 13 April
0800-1730
Tuesday 14 April 0800-1300

Onsite registrations are welcome. Please complete a


conference booking form and pay at the Payment Desk.
You will then receive a receipt, your badge, a conference
pack and the Conference Programme.

Friday 10 April

0800-0945

Conference delegates:

GENERAL INFORMATION

CANCELLATIONS AND INSURANCE


Cancellations of Conference and PCE bookings received before 1st March 2015 will incur
a 50% cancellation charge. Cancellations after this date will not be refunded. We strongly
recommend that delegates purchase insurance to cover any cancellations and losses that
may occur whilst they are away from home.

Working together with the British Council we are


proud to be able to make the conference accessible to
a large global community of teachers and educators,
both members and non-members, through
Manchester Online. Remote delegates will be able
to watch live video sessions and recorded highlights of the conference on the Manchester Online
website and access a wide range of multimedia resources including video, audio and PowerPoint
presentations of selected sessions and of course details on our exhibitors. Online delegates will also
be able to take part in discussion forums linked to the main conference themes and interact with
conference presenters via the website. Manchester Online will also feature video interviews with
conference presenters and onsite delegates who will share their thoughts and experiences with the
online community.
Coming to the conference in person isnt possible for all of our members, so we hope that Manchester Online
will be a very good alternative for those unable to attend and a resource for at least a year after the event.

IATEFL PATRON
Meet the Patron - Following the success of this innovation in
Harrogate, David Crystal will again be in attendance on the IATEFL
exhibition stand. Join him there on Saturday 11th and Monday 13th
during the lunch break for a chat or just to say hello.
David Crystal will also be holding a signature event on Tuesday 14th
April on A Question of Language with David Crystal. More details of
this exciting event are on page 69.

IATEFL JOBS MARKET FAIR


Now in its 6th year, the IATEFL Jobs Market Fair is a valuable forum for connecting employers
with talented ELT professionals from around the world. It demonstrates our commitment to
support our members in their own professional development, as well as our aim to extend our
reach and bring new members into the IATEFL community. Access to the Jobs Market Fair is free
of charge.
Jobseekers should visit www.iatefl.org to preview jobs online and apply for posts pre-conference.
Recruiters who would like to participate in the IATEFL Jobs Market Fair in Manchester can view
the package information on our website at www.iatefl.org or email jobsmarket@iatefl.org. There
are a range of opportunities for advertising roles online, on our Jobs Boards and interviewing
candidates during the conference.

CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIPS
Each year IATEFL offers a great range of conference scholarships
to enable teachers/trainers/ELT professionals the opportunity to
attend the IATEFL Annual Conference in the UK. IATEFL thanks all
of our scholarship sponsors for their generous support. Details on
our Manchester Conference scholarship winners, can be found on
pages 12-14.
To keep check on any incoming scholarships for 2016, please visit:
http://www.iatefl.org/scholarships/current-list-of-scholarships

GENERAL INFORMATION

BRITISH COUNCIL / IATEFL MANCHESTER ONLINE

For information on getting to Manchester and the venue as well as free local travel information,
please visit www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/manchester-2015.

VENUE ADDRESS
Manchester Central
Windmill Street, Manchester, M2 3GX, UK
CAR PARKING
The NCP (National Car Park) directly below
Manchester Central is open 24 hours a day. It
has 720 spaces. The height restriction for this car
park is 1.98m. For more information contact NCP:
Tel + 44 (0) 161 817 8900 or visit: www.ncp.co.uk.
The cost of parking at December 2014 are:
2 hours or less 6.10
Between 2 and 4 hours 9.50
Between 4 and 6 hours 10.50
Between 6 and 12 hours 14.50
Between 12 and 24 hours 18.40

ACCOMMODATION
Reservation Highway has arranged accommodation at various hotels in Manchester. There are
different price bands from which you can choose. To reserve accommodation at your preferred
hotel, we strongly recommend that you book as early as possible.
To book accommodation, please go to www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/manchester-2015.
Scroll down to Accommodation in Manchester where there is a link to book online. Alternatively,
you can go directly to the site at www.reservation-highway.co.uk/efl15.
If you have any queries, please email admin@reservation-highway.co.uk or telephone +44 (0)1423
525577. If you do not receive confirmation one week after making your booking, you are advised
to contact Reservation Highway at the above email address or telephone number.

INVITATION LETTERS FOR INTERNATIONAL DELEGATES


Delegates who require an invitation letter in order to make travel visa arrangements should
make a conference booking online at www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/manchester-2015.
Under the Personal Information section, tick the box invitation letter required and fill in
your passport number where indicated. Please ensure you have filled in your full name, postal
address, nationality, passport number, fax number (if you have one), and your email address in
the correct fields.

Please note that invitation letters are only for overseas delegates who require an invitation to
assist with their travel visa application.

GENERAL INFORMATION

GETTING TO MANCHESTER

FRIDAY 10TH APRIL PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS AND ASSOCIATES DAY


0800-0945
1000-1700
1000-1700
1130-1800

The registration desk is open for PCE delegates


(Conference delegates can register from 1130)
Associates Day takes place (invited representatives)
PCEs take place
The registration desk is open for conference delegates

SATURDAY 11TH - TUESDAY 14TH APRIL - THE FOUR-DAY CONFERENCE AND EXHIBITION
SATURDAY 11TH APRIL
From 0800

0900-1025

Register for the conference.


Exhibition and Internet Centre
open from 0830. You can also
attend a How to ... session from
0815 to 0845
Opening Announcements and
First Plenary Session by Donald
Freeman

1040-1125
1125-1200
1200-1305
1305-1405
1405-1635
1635-1710
1710-1825

Sessions
Coffee break
Sessions
Lunch break
Sessions
Coffee break
Sessions

1110-1145
1145-1300
1300-1420
1310-1410
1420-1635
1635-1710
1710-1815

Coffee break
Sessions
Lunch break
IATEFL AGM
Sessions
Coffee break
Sessions

1025-1055
1055-1130
1130-1235
1235-1335
1335-1605
1605-1640
1640-1830

Sessions
Coffee break
Sessions
Lunch break
Sessions
Coffee break
Sessions

1315-1415

Plenary Session by
Carol Ann Duffy
Closing address and a
free raffle
Book
signing
and
Conference
Farewell
Snacks

SUNDAY 12TH APRIL


From 0800

0900-1010
1025-1110

Register for the conference.


Exhibition and Internet Centre
open from 0830. You can also
attend a How to ... session from
0815 to 0845
Plenary Session by Joy Egbert
Sessions

MONDAY 13TH APRIL


From 0800

0900-1010

Register for the conference.


Exhibition and Internet Centre
open from 0830. You can also
attend a How to ... session from
0815 to 0845
Plenary Session by Ann Cotton

TUESDAY 14TH APRIL


From 0800

0900-1010
1025-1140
1140-1215
1215-1300

Register for the conference.


Exhibition and Internet Centre
open from 0830. You can also
attend a How to ... session from
0815 to 0845
Plenary Session by Harry Kuchah
Sessions
Coffee break
Sessions

1415-1430
1430

GENERAL INFORMATION

CONFERENCE DAY TIMES

The IATEFL 2015 conference is a fantastic platform to showcase your brand, products and
services to educators, researchers and students in the field of ELT. These packages are designed
to maximise the exposure and impact that your brand can make on our conference attendees.
We offer Platinum, Gold, Silver and Bronze packages as well as sponsorship of individual items.
The Harrogate conference in April 2014 was attended by delegates from 113 countries; 64% of
those delegates came from outside the UK. Sponsorship of the conference therefore represents
excellent value for money in terms of reaching a global audience.
IATEFL would like to thank the following key and general sponsors to-date for their commitment
and generous contribution to the success of the conference:

PLATINUM

PLATINUM

SILVER

BRONZE

BRONZE

BRONZE

BRONZE

BRONZE

GENERAL

GENERAL

Sponsorship opportunities are still available to suit every budget. For further details on
sponsorship, or if you wish to be considered for alternative conference sponsorships, please
visit www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/sponsorship or contact Glenda Smart, IATEFL
Executive Officer, at glenda@iatefl.org.

GENERAL INFORMATION

SPONSORS & SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

A complimentary tea/coffee will be served during the breaks.


During the lunch breaks there will be a variety of hot and cold food on sale.
Catering and bar facilities will be available throughout the day for delegates to purchase
snacks and drinks.
Alternatively take a stroll and enjoy the local cafs and restaurants located in the city, just a
few minutes walk away.

CONFERENCE APP
This is the fourth year of our conference app for iPhone/iPad and Android phone users. The free
app will be available in the spring of 2015 and it will allow delegates to:
browse and search the Conference Programme; select individual sessions and add them to a
conference planner; view a map of the conference venue and help you navigate the conference; see
what others are saying about the conference via an integrated Twitter channel; share your location
ideas and thoughts via a variety of social media connections; access the IATEFL Online site.

INTERNET CENTRE sponsored by Password English Language Testing


There will be an Internet Centre situated within the exhibition area. As well
as checking emails and browsing the web, the Internet Centre will be a great
place to play an active part in Manchester Online.

PROGRAMME INFORMATION
IMPORTANT PROGRAMME NOTE
This pre-conference brochure will be superseded by the official Conference Programme that
you will receive on arrival at the conference. The Conference Programme will be available
on the IATEFL website www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/manchester-2015 from late March.

HOW TO... SESSIONS


The How to... sessions are 30-minute practical talks that take place from 0815 to 0845
before the start of each main conference day. The How to... sessions are designed to give
delegates advice and tips on a range of specific topics and skills areas, such as presenting
at international conferences, writing for publication and professional development. The
How to... sessions on Saturday are specially designed to help new delegates make the
most of the conference. Please refer to pages 60-61 for this years sessions.

IATEFL SIG DAYS (SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP DAYS)


If you are interested in a particular SIG area, you have the opportunity to follow a track of selected
sessions throughout the day. One session in this track will be the SIGs Open Forum.
At a SIG Open Forum, delegates can find out more about the SIG, its events and its committee.
Each Special Interest Group has a SIG Day on one of the first three days of the conference five
SIG Days per day. Details, including which day each SIG Day is on, are shown on pages 63-66.

GENERAL INFORMATION

CATERING sponsored by ETS TOEFL

The signature events are hosted by major ELT institutions and publishers. They are designed to
showcase expertise and throw light on state-of-the-art thinking in a key area which is relevant
to the particular institution or publisher. The signature events provide a unique opportunity for
delegates to find out about upcoming trends, learn about new areas of research, and engage with
well-known, international experts in exciting and often controversial topics. The signature events
vary in format and include talks, panel discussions and debates.
There will be five signature events during the conference. Please refer to page 69 for details of
these sessions by:
Pearson (Saturday)
British Council (Saturday)
Cambridge English (Sunday)
ELT Journal (Monday)
IATEFL Patron (Tuesday)

ELT CONVERSATION
This session is an in-depth conversation in which two speakers discuss and explore issues
surrounding a key topic in ELT. They will address key questions from the point of view of their own
knowledge, experience, convictions and doubts. There will also be an opportunity for delegates
to express their views and pose questions from the floor.

IATEFL CONTACT DETAILS

IATEFL
2 & 3 The Foundry
Seager Road
Faversham
Kent, ME13 7FD
UK
Tel: +44(0)1795 591414
Fax: +44(0)1795 538951
Email: generalenquiries@iatefl.org
www.iatefl.org
Registered as a Company in
England and Wales 2531041.
Registered as a Charity 1090853

10

GENERAL INFORMATION

SIGNATURE EVENTS

IATEFL & Special Interest Groups

Helbling Languages

IATEFL Associates

IELTS

IATEFL Scholarships

International Books
International House London

Advance Consulting for Education

Knowledge Transmission

Bell Educational Services

Language World Co.Ltd

Black Cat Cideb Publishing

Macmillan Education

Bournemouth English Book Centre - BEBC

MM Publications

British Council

National Geographic Learning/Cengage

British Study Centres

NILE

Cambridge English

Oxford University Press

Collins

Pearson

ELI Publishing Ltd

Pilgrims

English 360

Target English

English Language Bookshop

telc language tests

English UK

Trinity College London

ETS TOFEL

University of Derby Online Learning

Express Publishing

University of Exeter

Garnet Education

Yellow House English Ltd

Global ELT

THE ELT RESOURCES EXHIBITION


A complimentary tea/coffee will be served during the breaks. During the lunch breaks
there will be a variety of hot and cold food on sale.
Catering and bar facilities will be available throughout the day for delegates to
purchase snacks and drinks.
Ample seating in the exhibition - great for networking and meeting old and new friends.
Come and meet David Crystal (IATEFL Patron) at the IATEFL stand on Saturday 11th
April and Monday 13th April during the lunch breaks.

GENERAL INFORMATION

LIST OF ELT RESOURCES EXHIBITORS

11

IATEFL has a Scholarship Working Party (SWP) whose job it is to raise scholarship funds,
create new scholarships, publicise the existence of the current scholarships to teachers
worldwide, and select scholarship winners. The SWP also works to improve the conference
experience for scholarship winners and applicants.
To these ends there will be a scholarship stand in the exhibition and someone from the
SWP will be there at the coffee breaks and lunch breaks to answer questions and receive
generous offers of sponsorship for future scholarships, so whether you are a current or
past scholar, a potential applicant, or a potential sponsor, do come along for a chat.
THIS YEARS SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS ARE...

12

Africa Scholarship

Africa Scholarship

Africa Scholarship

Abdourahmane Fall
Senegal

Charles Karoro Muhirwe


Rwanda

Mouna Jemai
Tunisia

IATEFL BESIG Facilitators


Scholarship

IATEFL BESIG Facilitators


Scholarship

IATEFL Bill Lee Scholarship

Evelina Miscin
Croatia

Olena Korol
Ukraine

Agnieszka Dudzik
Poland

Cambridge English: English


Teacher Scholarship

Cambridge English: John


Trim Scholarship

Cambridge English: Dr Peter


Hargreaves Scholarship

Tien Minh Mai


Vietnam

Alison Salm
Iraq

Phat Thuan Quynh Tran


Vietnam

IATEFL SCHOLARSHIPS

IATEFL SCHOLARSHIPS

Exam English Online


Teaching Scholarship

IATEFL Gill Sturtridge FirstTime Speaker Scholarship

Pinar Yeni Palabiyik


Turkey

Jaime Miller-Rap
USA

Nasy Inthisone Pfanner


Austria

IATEFL Gillian Porter


Ladousse Scholarship

IELTS Morgan Terry Memorial


Scholarship

International House Brita Haycraft


Better Spoken English Scholarship

Ushakiran Wagle
Nepal

Cristina Peralejo
Canada

Anastasiia Shamrai
Ukraine

International House Global


Reach Scholarship

International House Global


Reach Scholarship

International House John Haycraft


Classroom Exploration Scholarship

Umesh Shrestha
Nepal

Anastasia Reva
Russian Federation

Olja Milosevic
Serbia

International House John Haycraft


Classroom Exploration Scholarship

International House Training


and Development Scholarship

IATEFL Latin America


Scholarship

Katie Moran
France

Ruwaida Abu-Rass
Israel

Andres Cuenca
Uruguay

visit: www.iatefl.org/scholarships/scholarships-overview-and-faqs

IATEFL SCHOLARSHIPS

Eastbourne School of English


- Graham Smith Scholarship

13

IATEFL Learning Technologies


SIG Diana Eastment Scholarship

IATEFL Learning Technologies


SIG Travel Scholarship

Cari Freer
Turkey

Liliana Simn
Argentina

Monica Veado
Brazil

One Dragon Scholarship

Onestopenglish Creativity in
the Classroom Scholarship

Pilgrims Scholarship

Shu Li
China

Aysen Deger
Turkey

Patricia Salguero
Peru

IATEFL Ray Tongue Scholarship

Regent Scholarship

IATEFL Teacher Development SIG


Michael Berman Scholarship

Kirti Kapur
India

Sagun Shrestha
Nepal

Deepthi Sashidhar
India

Trinity College London Language


Examinations Scholarship

Trinity College London Teacher


Trainer Scholarship

Saeede Haghi
Iran

Alexey Korenev
Russian Federation

visit: www.iatefl.org/scholarships/scholarships-overview-and-faqs

14

IATEFL SCHOLARSHIPS

IATEFL Leadership and


Management SIG Scholarship

EVENING EVENTS
FRIDAY 10TH APRIL
Welcome Reception at 1800hrs
We are delighted to hold a Welcome Reception to offer delegates a warm welcome to
Manchester. IATEFL President, Carol Read, will welcome you to the conference and the Lord
Mayor of Manchester will welcome you to the city. Entry is by conference badge only, so please
register at our registration desk first.

SATURDAY 11TH APRIL


Pecha Kucha (sponsored by IELTS)
Originating from the word chitchat, a Japanese term describing the sound of conversation,
we again offer you a Pecha Kucha evening. By now you should know the format: each speaker
is allowed a slideshow of 20 images, each shown for 20 seconds, giving a total presentation
time of six minutes and forty seconds before the next speaker is up, keeping presentations
concise and fast-paced. Extending a warm vote of thanks to our sponsor, IELTS, the event will
be facilitated by Bita Rezaei and features several new speakers. It promises to be as exciting
as ever so dont miss it!
International Music Fest
See your fellow IATEFL members in a different light at the International Music Fest when we
get together and speak the universal language of music! Bring world music and traditional
songs from your culture and in your language. (Please no CDs or classroom songs which are
better in the main conference.) Adrian Underhill, Chaz Pugliese and Bethany Cagnol will host
the evening. Come and enjoy IATEFLs hidden talent and network through music!
British Council-hosted evening
A British Council-hosted evening in The Town Hall, Albert Square
Join the British Council for an enjoyable evening in an iconic landmark in Manchester
the Town Hall. Regarded as one of the finest examples of Neo-Gothic architecture in the
UK, it is one of the most important Grade 1 listed buildings in England.
Come to the event to meet with friends old and new, and relax after a busy day at
the conference. The event will be an excellent opportunity to enjoy exclusive access to
grand rooms, such as the Great Hall, which is decorated with murals by Ford Maddox
Brown. Food and drink will be served throughout the evening.
In the heart of the city, the Town Hall is just a four-minute walk from the
conference centre.
Find out more about this exquisite venue at: www.manchester.gov.uk/townhall/

EVENING & DAYTIME EVENTS

A programme of events will be arranged for delegates during the evenings of the conference
week. Details, times and venues will be in the Conference Programme (handed to delegates
at the conference and available online from early March) and on the conference app (we will
let delegates know when its ready). Preliminary details are:

15

International Word Fest


Hosted by Rakesh Bhanot and Chris Lima

Come
share
words
sing a song
recite a poem
read aloud some prose
in English or another language
or, just sit and enjoy listening to others.

Individual or joint performances welcome. Contributions can be between 1 and 5 minutes.


Chris is a teacher, a teacher trainer and a researcher. Her areas of interest are in the role
of literature in English language education and the use of new technologies in teaching and
learning. She is the Coordinator of the IATEFL Literature, Media & Cultural Studies SIG.
Rakesh started teaching English in 1972 and is now a freelance teacher trainer. In his spare
time he writes haikus (sic).
Mrs Hoovers Singlish
Next to marrying a native speaker and, lets face it, not everyone is in a
position to do that the fastest way to improve your fluency in English is
to sing it! Britains number one hostmother for overseas students returns
to IATEFL with a masterclass on how to gladden students hearts with the
gift of song.
Mrs Joyce Hoover is widely acknowledged (by the Hove Hanging Basket and Loose Cover
Society) to be the world-renowned expert on hospitality and learning by doing. And all
that without ever venturing into a classroom. Shes made it a lifelong principle never to
compromise her firm beliefs about language acquisition by actually acquiring one herself.
And now, for one night only, the woman who put the hospital into hospitality, demonstrates
her theory and practice of Singlish and her conviction that the class that sings together,
clings together!
My life will never be the same after this enlightening talk given by Mrs Hoover.
It was amusing to the point of having tears coming to my eyes she is magical, hilarious and
absolutely unmissable! Elisabete Thess (reviewing Mrs Hoovers appearance at IATEFL 2011)
Truly the Best of British, and the highlight of our social programme much enjoyed by our
overseas and UK delegates alike. Professor Roger Moore, INTERSPEECH
Hilarious a must see! Ken Wilson

The Fair List UK


Come and learn about The Fair List, the award for excellence of gender balance in plenary and
keynote speakers and panelists at UK, ELT conferences and events. In the past year we were
shortlisted for an ELTON award and held our first webinar, so come along and help us to celebrate
these achievements. Come along too to find out who is on the list for the year 2014 and cheer
them as they get their playful certificates. Each year we have a fun awarenessraising activity too that might surprise (in a good way!) To find out more about
The Fair List, please take a look at www.thefairlist.org. There you will find
loads of ideas for conference organizers, speakers and also for participants
interested in gender parity in UK, ELT events. All delegates welcome!

16

EVENING & DAYTIME EVENTS

SUNDAY 12TH APRIL

International Quiz (sponsored by ETS)


Back for yet another year: bigger, better and this year very, very different. A multimedia
extravaganza under the new management of Victoria Boobyer & Gavin Dudeney... its the
IATEFL International Quiz. Youll need a global team with diverse interests and knowledge, a
sense of humour and a desire to meet new people, have some fun, network and work together
to score more points than any other team. Music, fun... a drink or two and the chance to be
crowned quiz champions of Manchester 2015.
Extensive Reading Foundation Reception and Awards Ceremony
The event is hosted by Catherine Walter, who will present the 2014 Language Learner
Literature Awards. Come and meet the award-winning authors over drinks and nibbles, and
enjoy a display of all the finalist books. The first 200 attendees will receive a free copy of one
of the winning books. Sponsored by the British Council, Cambridge English, Compass Media,
ELI Publishing, Helbling Languages, IATEFL, Macmillan Education, National Geographic/
Cengage Learning, Oxford University Press and Pearson Education.

Sharing our Stories


Come and tell a story or just listen!
An evening event of storytelling hosted by storytellers David Heathfield and Andrew Wright.
People from around the world attending the IATEFL Conference and from the Manchester
story club, Word of Mouth, tell stories from their cultures and traditions and from their own
lives and experiences. David and Andrew offer a framework and encouragement for this to
happen and contribute a few stories themselves.
This is a wonderful opportunity for visitors to Manchester to meet local people and to hear
their stories and for local Manchester people to hear stories from around the world.

DAYTIME EVENTS
Following the success of previous years we are offering a similar format for the tours in
Manchester, including the popular walking tours.
We are hoping to offer a coach excursion to Quarry Bank; an 18th Century cotton mill which
is home to Europes largest working waterwheel and offers fantastic opportunities to get a
taste of British life during the Industrial Revolution. The Greg family were instrumental in the
development of Quarry Bank and IATEFL Past President, Peter Grundy, who grew up in Quarry
Bank, is also a direct descendent of the Greg family.
We hope that he may be able to join us on this tour and give his own entertaining insights and
experiences.
Further details on all of the tours will be released shortly and will be available to purchase
before the conference via our online shop.

EVENING & DAYTIME EVENTS

MONDAY 13TH APRIL

17

Pre-Conference Events (PCEs), organised by all 15 IATEFL Special Interest Groups (SIGs), will be
held on Friday 10th April specifically for delegates who wish to concentrate on a particular topic.
PCEs are planned as professional development days and participants will receive a certificate of
attendance.
Delegates who wish to attend a PCE can book online at:
www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/manchester-2015. The online booking form has been designed
for delegates who wish to attend a PCE, the main conference, or both.
Please note that PCEs are full-day events (1000-1700) so delegates can therefore only book one
PCE. We recommend that delegates book and pay early for a PCE as there are limited places
available. Places will not be confirmed until full payment is received. A sandwich lunch is provided
for PCE delegates.

PCE FEES

IATEFL Member

Non-member

Early Bird rate:


(booking & full payment received on or before
29th January 2015)

65

81

Standard rate:
(booking & full payment received after 29th
January 2015)

78

93

THE PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS ARE:


BUSINESS ENGLISH AND TESTING, EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT JOINT PCE - Testing more than
just English What do we need to know and how can we test in the best way for our purposes?
ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES AND BALEAP JOINT PCE - Employability and transferability
in EAP and ESP
ES(O)L - Challenges, issues and developments in ES(O)L teaching and learning
GLOBAL ISSUES - Debate, discussion, dialogue: triggers for change
LEADERSHIP & MANAGEMENT - People management for the academic manager
LEARNER AUTONOMY - Language learner autonomy getting started
LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES - Technology in action
LITERATURE, MEDIA & CULTURAL STUDIES - 101 ways of teaching a poem: Bringing poetry into
language teaching
MATERIALS WRITING - The material writers essential toolkit
PRONUNCIATION - Practical pronunciation teaching
RESEARCH - Developing as a researcher
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT - Challenges and Rewards - getting to
the heart of the matter with exploratory practice
TEACHER TRAINING & EDUCATION - Exploring Trainee and
Trainer Beliefs and Practices

18

YOUNG LEARNERS AND TEENAGERS Learner first teens

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS (PCES)


FRIDAY 10TH APRIL 2015

BUSINESS ENGLISH SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP AND TESTING, EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT
SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP JOINT PCE
Testing more than just English What do we need to know and how can we test in the best way for
our purposes?
Testing is becoming an increasingly important area of language teaching, including the teaching
of specialised English. It is often assumed that teachers of Business English, for example,
automatically know how to set, score and run tests, but this is in fact not always the case. The joint
PCE offered by BESIG and TEASIG will focus on the testing of more than just language and cover
general principles of test setting, constructing tests for different purposes, and dealing with the
issues of testing knowledge, skills and intercultural competence.
The PCE presenters will deal with, among other things, the following questions: What do teachers
need to know about testing in order to set valid and reliable tests? Are teachers always the best testsetters and testers? What is the main purpose of tests? How can tests be useful and valid? How can
we test more than just language and should we do this? What are the differences between oral and
written tests? The PCE will end with a panel discussion where delegates will have the opportunity to
ask questions, raise issues and deal with any open issues. The speakers are international experts
who will share their expertise and experience.
Speakers:
Rudi Camerer, elc - European Language Competence, Frankfurt & Sarbrucken, Germany Testing
intercultural competence
Barry OSullivan, British Council, UK Principles of testing
JoAnn Salvisberg; Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts School of Business, Switzerland
Testing oral skills
Ivana Vidakovic, Cambridge English Language Assessment, UK Workplace English
Cambridge English are generously sponsoring the event.
ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP AND BALEAP JOINT PCE
Employability and transferability in EAP and ESP
Employability is a major focus in almost all government policies all over the world. As a result, all
education providers including vocational and higher education institutions are expected to ensure
that their curricula meet employability skills needs in the industry. However, employability may
mean different things in different contexts. In the current global job market, communication skills
is considered one of the key employability skills and thus the ability to use English language in
employment is a necessity given the global status of the language.
In this context, it is important to explore what role English language proficiency (academic or
occupational) plays in employability and how students transfer such proficiency from EAP and ESP
to their employment. Addressing this theme of Employability and transferability in EAP and ESP, the
IATEFL ESP SIG is organizing its next Pre-Conference Event jointly with BALEAP.
The PCE aims to explore some key questions in the field such as How important is ESP for new
employees or is more general EFL skills all that employers are looking for? How can universities
who need to develop students EAP help students to transfer their language skills to English for
Occupational/Professional Purposes?
We expect that our PCE theme will bring together a diverse range of researchers and practitioners in
professional and academic English to share their views and practices which are applicable to other
EAP and ESP contexts.

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

PRELIMINARY DETAILS OF THE PCEs

19

We will look at how ESOL practitioners can meet some of the challenges involved with teaching ESOL
classes at different levels in community, further education and vocational classes. Furthermore,
we will discuss how we can best teach the skills of Speaking, Listening, Reading and Writing that
migrants and refugees need. We will also look at how we as ESOL practitioners can make learning a
positive educational experience for students, some of whom may never have been in an educational
environment before.
Once more we will explore some of the didactic and practical issues that we face as teachers
both in the UK and abroad; and the challenges that we face trying to meet the latest government
requirements in ESOL provision.
There will be a mixture of short talks, seminars and workshops where we will work collaboratively
with each other exploring some of the issues which most affect us and our learners.
We know from past feedback how much participants have enjoyed being able to meet new colleagues
from other institutions and share best practices, which is why during the lunch and refreshment
breaks you will have the opportunity to meet our speakers so that you can exchange your views with
each other.
We do hope that you will be able to join us for our Pre-Conference Event day.
GLOBAL ISSUES SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE
Debate, discussion, dialogue: triggers for change
Facilitators: Scott Thornbury & Margit Szesztay
The day will be a series of workshops focusing on how to get the most out of oral interaction with EFL
groups in secondary school classrooms, higher education seminars and adult education contexts.
Our main focus will be on ways of making English language teaching intellectually challenging and
personally engaging. We will be looking at discussion triggers that wake up minds and create an urge
to exchange ideas, express views, and come to appreciate a richness of perspectives. We will explore
the way debate, discussion and dialogue can lead us to question taken-for-granted assumptions and
can help us to think creatively and compassionately. The triggers for talk will include video clips, TED
talks, short articles, poems and taboo topics related to politics, religion and sex.
In addition to triggers for talk, we will consider the role of the teacher as discussion leader, debate
organizer and dialogue facilitator. What can we do if one or two people dominate a discussion? What
if students respond with apathy and the discussion falls flat? What should we do with shy, introvert
students who are reluctant to speak? What if there is conflict among group members? What if some
of our students express views that are intolerant and hurtful to others? How can we create a culture of
open-mindedness and high-quality listening? These will be some of the key issues to be addressed.
Join us and together we will explore ways of making classroom interaction more meaningful,
engaging and intellectually stimulating. We will also reflect on the way engaging in group dialogue
can widen horizons, raise awareness of global issues and motivate us to take action.

20

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

ES(O)L SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE


Challenges, issues and developments in ES(O)l teaching and learning

People management: managing challenging situations, groups and individuals


Managing challenging people and situations are some of the most difficult tasks and responsibilities
of the academic manager. This PCE will look at some important aspects of people and conflict
management through the discussion of case studies.
Under the guidance of facilitators, groups will be invited to come up with solutions to challenging
situations.
Individuals will have the chance to:
Reflect on their own performance in managing challenging situations;
Listen to the ideas and best practices of other managers;
Learn from the suggestions of the seminar facilitators.
The overall aim of the day will be to build up a set of best practices to take away which will help
academic managers improve their people management skills.
The PCE will be facilitated by Andy Hockley, Jenny Johnson, Loraine Kennedy, George Pickering and
Josh Round.
We hope to see you there!
LEARNER AUTONOMY SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE
Language learner autonomy getting started
The question of how to get started seems to be one of the most pressing issues when trying to
implement principles of language learner autonomy (LLA). Therefore, this years Pre-conference
Event (PCE) will focus on various areas and concerns relevant to getting started - from primary
school to university level. During the day, we will particularly, though not exclusively, deal with the
following topics:



Developing language learner autonomy with young learners


Getting learners who have been educated in a traditional way actively involved in their own
learning.
Preparing student teachers and in-service teachers for developing learner autonomy.
Evaluating and assessing how to get started at all levels.

These topics, which will be addressed in various forms of presentation (e.g. plenaries, poster
presentations, workshops), will partly also be supported by research data.
We are happy to welcome as our first plenary speaker Annamaria Pinter. In her plenary, From
passive objects of research to active co-researchers: children developing autonomous skills. she
will share with us her experience and valuable insight into working with young learners. The second
plenary will be given by Leni Dam and Lienhard Legenhausen and carries the title Preparing
teachers for developing language learner autonomy some examples from in- and pre-service
teacher training.
As in previous years, we are hoping for an interactive day where the speakers inputs along with the
participants exchange of ideas, experiences, and views will ensure a successful outcome. Looking
forward to seeing you in Manchester!

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

LEADERSHIP & MANAGEMENT SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE


People management for the academic manager

21

As we continue our journey into the new millennium, social media is abuzz with the sounds of
educators declaring their love for technology in teaching. Alongside their growing assertions that
technology brings teaching to life and learners need technology to engage in the task, the range
of technology available and the opportunities it affords for the modification and redefinition of how
we teach, also seems to be growing day by day. However, although these rapid developments should
indeed be embraced and celebrated, in order for teachers to understand the whats, hows and whys
of the available technology, it needs to be exemplified; a lack of lucidity leaves even the most tech
savvy teacher feeling overwhelmed and bewildered.
This years LT SIG Pre-Conference Event aims to shed a very practical light on the wealth of
information on using technology in language learning that we encounter daily. Real teachers will
show what they do in their classes, and present case studies showcasing technology in action.
The morning comprises three of our plenary speakers, Agnes Kukluska-Hulme, Liliana Simon, and
James Thomas, putting forward their ideas and experiences on a range of technology related topics.
Their talks will guide and inform participants in areas such as mobile and blended learning, and
error tagging software. The afternoon offers the LT SIGs first technology showcase event. Through
a series of mini-demonstrations aimed at all levels, experienced teachers will show practical
examples of how they are using technology with their learners. You will be invited to try out the tools
being presented and to judge their value for yourselves.
Regardless of your level of experience with technology, the days practical showcase promises
to be a unique learning, sharing and networking experience for all. This PCE will be held offsite at
Manchester University, a 15-20 minute walk from the conference venue.
Were looking forward to seeing you there!
LITERATURE, MEDIA & CULTURAL STUDIES SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE
101 ways of teaching a poem: Bringing poetry into language teaching

Poetry offers an alternative language and discourse, often engaging learners emotions; encourages
language awareness and enhanced language memorization contexts. (Byram, M. and Hu, A., 2013,
p. 539-40)
The day will offer participants a series of 30-minute workshops on using poetry in English language
teaching. The presenters will propose activities designed to be used in various teaching contexts and
which can be adapted to a wide variety of language levels, from primary school learners to language
and literature students in higher education.
This is going to be a very dynamic, fun-packed day that we hope will motivate teachers to bring
poetry into their teaching practice and also suggest to participants who already work with poems
new ways of using them for language learning. Each workshop will focus on one poem-one activity
allowing participants to go back to their classroom with some ideas about how to further explore
poetry in ELT.
Conducting the workshops will be speakers with vast experience in the field of literature and
language teaching, including some of the LMCS SIG committee members and leading names in ELT.
Confirmed speakers:


Jeremy Harmer
Carol Read
Claudia Ferradas

Alan Pulverness
Amos Paran
Alan Maley

Chris Lima
Hania Bociek
Carel Burghout

Please come and join us for the LMCS PCE Manchester 2015!
Reference: Byram, M. and Hu, A. (eds), 2013. Routledge Enyclopedia of Language Teaching and Learning. 2nd Ed. London: Routledge.

22

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE


Technology in action

No matter how much experience you have as a materials writer, no matter whether youre writing for
print or for digital, there are certain core skills that every writer needs to master.
Can you write an effective multiple choice question? Can you write audio and video scripts that sound
authentic? Can you write a great artwork brief and make your pictures pay their way? Can you use
technology to make your writing better and more efficient? Can you write activities for video? Can
you use corpus tools? Can you handle the challenge of writing ESP material? Can you take content
that you know works in your classroom and make it work in a coursebook?
In this highly interactive PCE, MaWSIG will be running a series of short workshops from Sue Kay,
Ben Goldstein, Ceri Jones, Nick Tims, John Hughes, Kieran Donaghy, Anna Whitcher, Julie Moore,
Evan Frendo and Christien Lee. Attendees will have the chance to work with these leading materials
writers to learn, to ask questions, and to share expertise. Whether youre an experienced writer, or a
teacher taking your first steps into the field, therell be something here for you.
PRONUNCIATION SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE
Practical pronunciation teaching
Pronunciation matters. All the grammar and vocabulary in the world wont help you if no one can
understand what you are saying. Most teachers realise this but many lack the tools and perhaps
confidence to do pronunciation justice. This PCE addresses the day-to-day issues of pronunciation
teaching from different perspectives, all firmly anchored in the classroom setting. If you are an
experienced instructor, you will refresh your teaching and be encouraged to share your knowledge
and views. If you are new to the profession or ideas presented, the PCE will offer you a snapshot of
best practice as demonstrated by experts in the field.
Sessions:

Maximising pronunciation practice through blended learning


This presentation describes online tools and Apps adopted to complement face-to-face instruction
and to increase the time students spend practising pronunciation and fluency.
Sophie Farag (The American University in Cairo)
How to identify pronunciation priorities in the multilingual classroom
For teachers of multilingual groups, it can be tricky to identify which pronunciation features to focus
on in class. Where to begin when the students all have different needs?
Laura Patsko (St George International)
Flipping intonation! Making focus on practice practical
Flipped learning is a pedagogical approach which allows the teacher to spend more classroom
time on practical work. Here, we show how it can be used to address one of the trickiest areas of
pronunciation in ELT: intonation.
Jane Setter (University of Reading)
Articulatory settings - a practical demonstration
I will give participants the opportunity of seeing for themselves how the use of articulatory setting
helps students reach good pronunciation easily and well. I will do so using French.
Roslyn Young (Pronunciation Science Ltd)
IDEAS for teaching pronunciation
In this session we explore numerous practical IDEAS for teaching the pronunciation of English
to (young) adults, going beyond listen-and-repeat into far more creative areas for pronunciation
teaching.
Robin Walker (englishglobalcommunication)
PCE updates can be found on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pronsig/460534014066126

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

MATERIALS WRITING SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE


The materials writers essential toolkit

23

A participant-centred day with input and invited commentary from Sue Garton, David Nunan and
Cynthia White
What does it mean to develop as a researcher? Whether you are a student, a teacher, an academic
or another kind of professional, and wherever you are in your research journey near the beginning
or further along the road this event will offer a valuable opportunity to step back, reflect and learn
from others and share your experiences in a collegial, informal and friendly atmosphere.
Following the format of our very successful 2014 Pre-conference Event, the 2015 event will offer
a combination of poster presentations, group discussions, panel discussion and expert-led input
centring on areas of particular concern and interest to participants. Based on the many excellent
proposals for posters that have been submitted, we have structured the day around three main
themes, which will be explored in the posters, in impulses from our guest speakers and in group
discussions:


A researchers journey: Challenges, issues and strategies


Specific methods and specific challenges
Identities, roles, relationships and contexts in research

This innovative pre-conference event will appeal to all those involved and/or interested in research
in EFL/ESL contexts. It will both raise questions and provide multiple insights with regard to specific
methods as well as how we develop as researchers and combine multiple roles and identities (such
as teacher and researcher identities) in our various work contexts. With over 25 poster presentations
and inputs from world-renowned scholars, this promises an exciting event and we hope you will join
us for our Research SIG PCE day.
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE
Challenges and Rewards - getting to the heart of the matter with exploratory practice
To be a teacher is to be rewarded. Rewarded by our students and their accomplishments.
To be a teacher is to be challenged. Challenged by things that do not work as we had hoped.
This question of reward and challenge is one which we would like to explore with you during our
PCE in Manchester. A number of speakers, from different perspectives and spaces, will join us to
share the challenges they have faced in their classrooms and the experiments they undertook in an
attempt to find solutions and hopefully rewards.
In the afternoon, we invite you to join us in Open Space. What one challenge do you face everyday and
how might you examine it? How can we support each other in constructing action plans to examine
those challenges? To make the most of the Open Space, we suggest you take some time to think
about some critical incidents in your teaching. How did you respond as a teacher? What did the class
do? What could you do differently in future? Did you get any support from your peers? By the end of
the day, we hope to walk away with simple, realistic but inspiring plans for our own development...
in search of rewards.
As well as this, you are sure to walk away with new and renewed friendships - a perfect end to our
day, and a perfect starting point for the main conference.

24

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

RESEARCH SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE


Developing as a researcher

It is now well-established that ELT professionals beliefs influence both how they learn and how they
behave and in teacher training and education contexts the beliefs of trainees and trainers will thus
interact in defining the impact that the training has. In this interactive event we will investigate how
beliefs impinge on teacher training and education and how attending to beliefs can enhance our
work as teacher trainers and educators. In the first part of the day we will focus on trainees beliefs,
on how they shape trainee learning, and on specific strategies trainers can use to understand
trainees beliefs; in the second part of the day the focus will be on the beliefs that trainers have
and how these influence their work. Throughout the day, the focus will be on critically reflective
discussion and debate through which participants will be encouraged to make explicit and challenge
their own beliefs about and practices in language teacher education. Discussion will be supported
with input that draws on contemporary research and theory in the field of teacher education. The
facilitator will be Simon Borg, who is well-known internationally for his work on language teachers
beliefs - see http://simon-borg.co.uk
YOUNG LEARNERS & TEENAGERS SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE
Learner first - teens
How can we put the teenage language learner first and focus on their needs? Teenagers are often
seen as difficult by a lot of teachers. With a wide variety of presentations and workshops we will
consider a Learner First approach and how this can help teens to fulfill their potential.
Speakers for this event include:
Joanna Budden - Putting the learner first: obstacles and action plans
She will challenge us to think about how we can put learners in their classroom first. She will also
work with participants to create positive action plans for putting our teenage learners first in the
areas of learning that are most relevant for them.
Joe Dale - Lights! Camera! Action! iPad! - moviemaking in the languages classroom
In this session, Joe will look at movie-making and animation apps to promote creativity, collaboration
and higher order thinking, including Popplet Lite, iMovie, Do Ink Green Screen, Tellagami and
Lego Movie Maker. Volunteers from the audience will be welcome to take part in the practical
demonstration.
Olha Madlylus - Teenagers what makes them tick?
She will delve into the reasons behind not only what we often see as difficult and unreasonable teen
behaviour but also the potential that teens have for engaging with learning. She will seek to identify
strategies, tasks and modes of participation within the classroom which may suit and stimulate
teens and help make the school a more successful and fun experience for them.
Herbert Puchta - The importance of values in teaching English to teens
He will look at why it is important to pass them on to our teenage students, and how we can help
our students to understand and take on board important values. He will explore various models of
how to respectfully influence students values and help them to understand the importance of valuebased behaviour.

PRE-CONFERENCE EVENTS

TEACHER TRAINING & EDUCATION SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP PCE


Exploring trainee and trainer beliefs and practices

25

DEADLINE DATES FOR YOUR DIARY

24 JULY 2014

18 SEPTEMBER 2014

16 DECEMBER 2014

29 JANUARY 2015

18 MARCH 2015

10 APRIL 2015

11-14 APRIL 2015

26

Scholarship application deadline - online only

www.iatefl.org/scholarships/scholarships-overview-and-faqs

Speaker proposal submission deadline- online only


www.iatefl.org/annual-conference/manchester-2015

Speaker payment deadline

Early bird payment deadline for non-speaker delegates

Online conference booking closes (exisiting orders can be


paid prior to conference & onsite bookings are welcome)

Pre-Conference Events and Associates Day

IATEFL Manchester Conference and Exhibition

DEADLINES FOR YOUR DIARY

IATEFLS 49TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE AND EXHIBITION


MANCHESTER CENTRAL, MANCHESTER, UK.

PREVIEW OF PRESENTATIONS
(PROVISIONAL)
Please note
provisional
and will change before the conference. Updates will be on our website.

Saturday
Applied linguistics
The ethics of researching English
language skills in rural
Bangladesh
Qumrul Hasan Chowdhury

Appropriate strategies for teaching


grammar a Dave Willis retrospective
Jane Willis

Developing teacher language


awareness
Daniel Xerri & Odette Vassallo

Evaluation for returns - a fourlevel approach


Naziha Ali Jafri

An impact study of BEC Vantage on


test-takers in China
Xiangdong Gu

Communicating communicative
competence
Pete Rutherford

The pragmatics of successful


business communication
Chia Suan Chong

Market smarter to sell higher as a


freelance trainer
Christina Rebuffet-Broadus

What not to do. What not to say


Barry Tomalin

What motivates an English


language teacher to teach?
Hsuan-Yau (Tony) Lai

Business English

English for academic purposes


Formative assessment
Simon Andrewes

Teaching intercultural
communication competence in the
ESP tertiary context
Agnieszka Dudzik & Agnieszka
Dzieciol-Pedich

English for specific purposes


Teaching intercultural
communication competence in the
ESP tertiary context
Agnieszka Dudzik & Agnieszka
Dzieciol-Pedich

27

Exploring techniques for shifting


classroom energy and sustaining
student motivation
Mohamed EL-Zamil

An overview of ESP research in


Brazil: developments and
directions
Rosinda Ramos

Structured tasks for reading


authentic journal articles in EAP
Barbara Howarth

Dictogloss redux: grammar


dictation in a digital age
William Kerr

EAP writing: teaching strategies


for effective paraphrasing
Tina Kuzic

Teaching technical English


challenge
Dominic Welsh

Metadiscoursal features of
academic writing in the university
business school
Philip Nathan

Teaching technical English


challenge
Dominic Welsh

The Digitshire Project


Mojca Belak

Fun listening
Lindsey Gutt

Visualising English grammar:


picturing, gesturing and
performing in the classroom
Natalia Belousova

Communicative teaching: what do


PRC students think?
James Jenkin

Jazz and the dark matter of


teaching
Adrian Underhill

Metadiscoursal features of
academic writing in the university
business school
Philip Nathan

An overview of ESP research in


Brazil: developments and
directions
Rosinda Ramos
Language proficiency profiles - the
demise of global language
proficiency
Geoff Tranter

English for specific academic purposes


Structured tasks for reading
authentic journal articles in EAP
Barbara Howarth
EAP writing: teaching strategies
for effective paraphrasing
Tina Kuzic

General

Begin anywhere an
improvisational approach for ELT
Roy Bicknell

The use of own-language


techniques in multilingual classes
Philip Kerr

Effective questioning for effective


learning
Lindsay Warwick
HOT (high-order thinking) listening
tasks for learners
Jennie Wright

Classroom management share


the responsibility with your
students!
Agnieszka Luczak

Silent way for intermediate and


advanced classes
Roslyn Young

What does "get" mean?


Kate Evans

Forever grammar: what every


teacher needs to know
Martin Parrott

Forum on approaches to
developing reading skills

Medium and message in


PowerPoint
Peter Grundy

Emotional engagement for adult


students
Herbert Puchta

Thinking in English: ways to


develop cognitive skills
Michele C Guerrini

The importance of emotions in


language learning
Eva Trumpesova-Rudolfova

The playful approach: activating


children's self-learning language
strategies
Opal Dunn

Practical ways to develop fluency


in L2 reading
Michael Green
Reason to read: a genre-specific
development approach to reading
David Petrie
Revisiting reading
Peter Watkins

28

Global issues
'International Youth Forum model'
- a leadership skill-building
workshop
Tatiana Ischenko
Teaching English in an atmosphere
of insurgency; the Nigerian
example
Agnes Ada Okpe

teachable moments throughout a


content-based curriculum
Sylvia Ozbalt & Cristina Peralejo

Leadership & management

Forum on nurturing creative global


leaders through cooperative
learning

Migrant workers and mobile


phones: an aid to learning?
Mike Solly

Practical guideline of English class


toward global citizenship
education
Sohyon Jo

Doing diversity in English language


programmes for young learners
David Valente

Nurturing creative global citizens


through collaborative learning
You Kyoung Jung

Something to MULL over: mapping


the urban linguistic landscape
Damian Williams

Nurturing resourceful students


through 3Cs: cultural
understanding, creativity and
collaboration
Kyuyun Lim

Exploring techniques for shifting


classroom energy and sustaining
student motivation
Mohamed EL-Zamil

Engaging teachers in curriculum


development; an appreciative
inquiry approach
Suzanne Littlewood

Creating a successful induction


programme for EFL teachers
abroad
Ross Thorburn

Rolling enrolment: what do


teachers and students think?
Jenny Johnson

The why and the how of


management research
George Pickering

What not to do. What not to say


Barry Tomalin

Collaborative learning and the joint


construction of meaning and
understanding
Anja Burkert

Fostering learner autonomy online


- Facebook as a social learning
space
Christian Ludwig & Ward Peeters

When project-based learning met


the person-centered approach
Patricia Salguero

EAP learners developing as


practitioners of learning
Susan Dawson

Beyond language skills: inspiring


projects in secondary teaching
Tien Minh Mai

Can we do it? Yes, we can


Helen Jackson

Teacher expectations, learner


interpretations: assessing selfdirected projects
Diane Malcolm

Learner autonomy

A new way to teach reading


Ken Lackman

29

Around the world in 45 minutes:


global justice in ELT
Linda Ruas

Becoming one with language:


reflections on becoming different
Ian Michael Robinson

Social networking: developing


intercultural competence and
fostering autonomous learning
Ruby Vurdien
Teachers wanted! Spot the teacher
in the classroom
Mehtap Yavuzdogan

Learning technologies

Creating TBL lessons from online


video content
Steve Bliss

Sounds good, looks good: using


short video clips in ELT
Michael Harrison

Through the looking Glass:


creating a video-ready classroom
David Read & Will Nash

Using iAnnotate for integrated


online academic writing feedback
Nancy Carter & Alex Golding

Dictionary evolution: exploiting


modern referencing tools to the
max
Julie Moore & Lisa Sutherland

Digital corner
Liliana Esther Simon

Filmmaking in the classroom


Vanja Fazinic
Making virtual technology in
teaching intercultural
communication personal and real
Natalia Grishina

Introducing tablets and leading


teachers toward effective use
Ryan Parmee
Augmented reality: practical ideas
for its use in the classroom
Stephen Pilton

Why bother implementing an


ePortfolio system in a language
school?
Rolf Tynan
Writing and the art of collaboration
an online project
Monica Veado

Literature, media & cultural studies


Teaching language or teaching
culture?
Benjamin Dobbs

The roles of extensive reading in


teacher education
Chris Lima

Teaching culture - teaching critical


thinking
Ivana Kirin & Marinko Uremovic

Literature in an age of distraction


Alan Maley

Literature, critical, creative


thinking and assessment mould a
creative writer
Inas Kotby

The house that crack built: a


picturebook for teens
Sandie Mourao

Shakespeare for English language


learners
Lisa Peter

literature to enhance their


intercultural competence
Jennifer Schumm Fauster

Materials development
Improving English-taught course
delivery at university
Victoria Bamond & Birgit
Strotmann
Uncovering expertise in
coursebook writing
Heather Buchanan & Julie Norton
Intermediate plateau: helping our
students with authentic material
Ila Cristina Coimbra

Materials writing

Lying is the best policy... to get


learners speaking!
Jason Anderson

Sounds good, looks good: using


short video clips in ELT
Michael Harrison

Reading: a key skill in learning


English
Hans Mol

Dictogloss redux: grammar


dictation in a digital age
William Kerr

Whole class creativity in the L2


classroom
Brian Tomlinson

'Video for all' - video for language


learning and teaching
Steve Mann

Inclusive writing: taking learning


preferences into account
Marjorie Rosenberg

Questions for learning and some


unexpected answers
Andrew Walkley

30

Pronunciation
Developing a pleasant non-native
accent
Sebastian Lesniewski

Pronunciation coaching
Wayne Rimmer

Research
A difficult vocation: including
unmotivated students in EFL
further education
Foster Andrew & Runna Badwan

activities of various degrees of


communicativeness
Yi-Mei Chen
The ethics of researching English
language skills in rural
Bangladesh
Qumrul Hasan Chowdhury
Four weeks of pain: is the CELTA
worth it?
Elizabeth Davies
Rethinking monolingualism in
TESOL courses - a plurilingual
view
Danielle Freitas

Teacher development

Networking as a professional
development resource for ELT in
Yemen
Khaled Kaid Ahmed Abdu Albaraty
A difficult vocation: including
unmotivated students in EFL
further education
Foster Andrew & Runna Badwan
EFL teacher trainer: could this just
be the beginning?
Ben Beaumont
The pragmatics of successful
business communication
Chia Suan Chong

31

The difficulty of defining


grammatical difficulty
Johan Graus
TESOLacademic.org - the story so
far!
Huw Jarvis
The development of cognition and
beliefs on CELTA courses
Karla Leal Castaneda

Social networking: developing


intercultural competence and
fostering autonomous learning
Ruby Vurdien
Something to MULL over: mapping
the urban linguistic landscape
Damian Williams

Forum on English medium


instruction

Research and teaching: bridging


the gap
Patsy Lightbown

Learning through English: children


in India meeting the challenge
Simon Etherton

Designing materials: from theory


to practice?
Sonia Munro & Susan Sheehan

English medium of instruction


policy: community perspectives in
Nepal
Ashok Raj Khati

Reflecting on reflection revisited


Nicola Salmon & Elna Coetzer

Strategic English education


development for schools in Algeria
Nora Menia & Deirdre Nicholas

The joys of being a mature entrant


to EFL teaching
Helen Dennis-Smith

Transition from trainee to teacher:


a mentoring programme
Kaithe Greene

Read? Why read? Skip, scan or


skim? Reading solutions
Ermek Esenaliev

Twerking the meaning: the


pragmatic implicature of song
lyrics
Andreas Grundtvig

Let's see! Drawing skills for


teachers
Martyn Ford
How social media is changing the
DNA of professional development
Ann Foreman
Strictly Come CELTA. An analogy
and some thoughts on feedback
Jo Gakonga

Language students' perceptions of


practice lessons in a pre-service
course
Sally Janssen
TESOLacademic.org - the story so
far!
Huw Jarvis

Continuing the quest for


developing teacher educator skills
Rubina Khan

Helping teachers motivate


learners - with a touch of drama
Alison Smith

Forum on novice teachers

Self-assessment skills: the role of


the teacher
Richard Kiely

Questions for learning and some


unexpected answers
Andrew Walkley

What motivates an English


language teacher to teach?
Hsuan-Yau (Tony) Lai

Only connect: seven strategies for


ensuring teacher-student
communication
Ken Wilson

EFL novice teachers: teaching and


participating communities of
practice
Gloria Romero

Research and teaching: bridging


the gap
Patsy Lightbown
The roles of extensive reading in
teacher education
Chris Lima
Engaging teachers in curriculum
development; an appreciative
inquiry approach
Suzanne Littlewood
Literature in an age of distraction
Alan Maley
A status update for teachers
Neil McCutcheon
Vietnamese teacher education's
changing landscape in a global
economy
Rosemary Orlando

Developing teacher language


awareness
Daniel Xerri & Odette Vassallo

Forum on blended teacher training


The flipped model of teacher
training
Fakhra Al-Mamary
Developing teachers' classroom
English through self-directed
learning
Julia Cave Smith & Patrick
Musafiri
British Council's professional ELT
program: blended learning, MI, a
breakthrough
Mohammadreza Soofinajafi

Forum on peer observation

How low can you go? High-impact


low-resource activities for YLs
Tom Ottway, Barbara Gardner &
Rachel Johnson

EFL teachers and peer


observation: beliefs, challenges
and implications
Gihan Ismail

Market smarter to sell higher as a


freelance trainer
Christina Rebuffet-Broadus

Peer observation: introducing a


system that actually works for
everyone
Shirley Norton

Engaging parents in their


learning
Karen Saxby

Pairing the unpaired


Laxman Gnawali

The resilience of novice teachers


Barbara Roosken

Forum on INSETT
The impact of a short in-service
course for Chinese teachers
Ailsa Deverick
Teachers in the making: learning,
reflecting and growing
Monica Freire
Case studies of INSET impact on
EFL teacher change
Ming Li

Forum on action research


Action research for teacher
trainers
Alex Cann
Capacity building of English
teachers through guided action
research
Blerta Mustafa & Yllke Pacarizi
Spreading and embedding teacher
research in difficult circumstances
Paula Rebolledo

Peer observation: making it work


for lasting CPD
Carole Robinson & Maria Heron

32

Teacher training & education


Exploring language teaching in
pre-service TEFL education in
Chile
Loreto Aliaga
How to make speaking assessment
more reliable
Mila Angelova

Where are we now? Current


teaching paradigms in pre-service
training
Bill Harris

Improving English-taught course


delivery at university
Victoria Bamond & Birgit
Strotmann

Language students' perceptions of


practice lessons in a pre-service
course
Sally Janssen

EFL teacher trainer: could this just


be the beginning?
Ben Beaumont

Continuing the quest for


developing teacher educator skills
Rubina Khan

Familiarisation activities
awareness of the CEFR levels and
descriptors
Jana Beresova

The development of cognition and


beliefs on CELTA courses
Karla Leal Castaneda

how to
develop thinking skills in taskbased learning
Dina Blanco-Ioannou
Four weeks of pain: is the CELTA
worth it?
Elizabeth Davies
How social media is changing the
DNA of professional development
Ann Foreman
Strictly Come CELTA. An analogy
and some thoughts on feedback
Jo Gakonga

33

The difficulty of defining


grammatical difficulty
Johan Graus

'Video for all' - video for language


learning and teaching
Steve Mann
Designing materials: from theory
to practice?
Sonia Munro & Susan Sheehan
Warmth-recognition-sense-ofbelonging: a framework for
success
Karina Nazzari
Vietnamese teacher education's
changing landscape in a global
economy
Rosemary Orlando

Getting it right: how to rate writing


Sibylle Plassmann
The artsy side of teaching
Radmila Popovic
Through the looking Glass:
creating a video-ready classroom
David Read & Will Nash

Jetstream Helbling's course for


adults in the 21st Century
Jane Revell
Digital corner
Liliana Esther Simon
Creating a successful induction
programme for EFL teachers
abroad
Ross Thorburn

Forum on reflection
Investigating reflective practice in
a training course for young
learners
Oliver Beddall
Looped reflective practice
for teacher development
Martin Froggett

a tool

The role of and cultural


differences in TEFL reflective
thinking
David Gerlach

Testing, evaluation & assessment


Evaluation for returns - a fourlevel approach
Naziha Ali Jafri

Identifying the academic reading


skills needed for IELTS success
Pauline Cullen

Communicating communicative
competence
Pete Rutherford

Formative assessment
Simon Andrewes

An impact study of BEC Vantage on


test-takers in China
Xiangdong Gu

Potential and pitfalls of


assessment: enhancing learning
through constructive alignment
Alex Thorp

How to make speaking assessment


more reliable
Mila Angelova
Familiarisation activities
awareness of the CEFR levels and
descriptors
Jana Beresova
Vocabulary levels: which words are
at which level?
Stephen Bullon

An uncertain and approximate


business? Why teachers should
love testing
Jeremy Harmer
Self-assessment skills: the role of
the teacher
Richard Kiely

Language proficiency profiles - the


demise of global language
proficiency
Geoff Tranter

Getting it right: how to rate writing


Sibylle Plassmann

Young learners & teenagers


The right age?
Mandana Arfa Kaboodvand
how to
develop thinking skills in taskbased learning
Dina Blanco-Ioannou
Memorable, not memorized
learning
Lulu Campbell
Getting the most from video
Robert Campbell

activities of various degrees of


communicativeness
Yi-Mei Chen

Hand-holding for effective


formative assessment and better
teaching-learning outcomes
Kirti Kapur

Warmth-recognition-sense-ofbelonging: a framework for


success
Karina Nazzari

Literature, critical, creative


thinking and assessment mould a
creative writer
Inas Kotby

Make up poor class time by


sending an audio file
Martha Ada Onjewu

Beyond language skills: inspiring


projects in secondary teaching
Tien Minh Mai
Groove.me: Learning English
through pop music in primary
school
Elona Manders

Filmmaking in the classroom


Vanja Fazinic

Reading: a key skill in learning


English
Hans Mol

'International Youth Forum model'


- a leadership skill-building
workshop
Tatiana Ischenko

Learning to listen: teaching


purposeful listening to develop
language proficiency
Pallavi Naik

How low can you go? High-impact


low-resource activities for YLs
Tom Ottway, Barbara Gardner &
Rachel Johnson
Shakespeare for English language
learners
Lisa Peter
When project-based learning met
the person-centered approach
Patricia Salguero
Engaging parents in their
learning
Karen Saxby

34

You too can make young pupils


bilingual with English!
Claire Selby
Helping teachers motivate
learners - with a touch of drama
Alison Smith
Doing diversity in English language
programmes for young learners
David Valente

Helping ESOL students navigate


the complicated US university
application process
Elizabeth Wentzel
Only connect: seven strategies for
ensuring teacher-student
communication
Ken Wilson

Forum on nurturing creative global


leaders through cooperative
learning
Practical guideline of English class
toward global citizenship
education
Sohyon Jo
Nurturing creative global citizens
through collaborative learning
You Kyoung Jung
Nurturing resourceful students
through 3Cs: cultural
understanding, creativity and
collaboration
Kyuyun Lim

Sunday
Applied linguistics

Innovations in ELT in Iran


Chris Kennedy & Danny Whitehead
Getting 'em out there: cultural
exploration and second language
learning
Deak Kirkham

Developing the Survey of ELT


Research in India
Lina Mukhopadhyay
Thai EFL teachers' evaluation of
teaching practice: a self-rated
investigation
Sureepong Phothongsunan

Language-supportive education in
English medium-of-instruction
contexts
John Simpson
Walk before you run: reading
strategies for Arabic learners
Emina Tuzovic

Authenticity in English language


classrooms: going beyond the
text(book)
Erkan Kulekci

Business English

Are all the roads leading to Rome?


Cari Freer
The world is my classroom
Richard Osborne
Business storytelling: helping
learners to create memorable
stories
Dana Poklepovic

35

Soft power: adding soft skills


training to your teaching toolkit
Mark Powell

A multi-skill approach to designing


a business English course
Tatiana Tolstova

English for academic purposes


The difference is academic:
developing elementary EAP
Edward de Chazal
Planning C1 level translation
activities
Carol Ebbert
Learner autonomy in the language
classroom: academic writing in
action
Natalia Eydelman
Reaching the right balance in
students' self-driven
videoconferences
Hana Katrnakova
English speakers' club for
enhancing English culture
Krishna Khatiwada
However, while, thus... how to
teach transitions successfully
Petra Kletzenbauer
An integrated writing task: a tool to
teach and assess
Irina Nuzha

Swapshop - ideas for teaching


IELTS
Mina Patel
Academic writing for students of
economics: for and against
Svetlana Petrovskaya
What is the question? Dealing with
IELTS Writing Task 2
Sarah Philpot

Academic Reading Circles:

improving learner engagement


and text comprehension
Tyson Seburn
How does just chatting become a
purposeful conversation?
Candy van Olst
The development of L2 reading
self-concept in an academic
context
Carolyn Walker
Teaching study skills to university
students
Dorothy Zemach

Forum on EAP writing


Integrating simulations in a
seminar-based approach to EAP
writing
Gusztav Demeter
Explicit SPRE instruction - an aid
to essay writing
Niall Lloyd
Beyond the five-paragraph essay in
EAP writing
Jennifer MacDonald

Forum on different perspectives on


feedback
Managing mindsets: an approach
to providing effective feedback
Anna Hasper
Error correction for speaking: an
evidence-based approach
Christopher Smith
Years of teaching experience and
perceiving and handling spoken
errors
Ozgur Taskesen

English for specific purposes


Keep CALM and write accessible
ESP materials!
Emily Bryson
Soft skills in ESP: lawyer-client
interview and the like
Barbora Chovancova
The difference is academic:
developing elementary EAP
Edward de Chazal

Reaching the right balance in


students' self-driven
videoconferences
Hana Katrnakova
Language teachers' target
language: ESP of language
teaching
Alexey Korenev
An integrated writing task: a tool to
teach and assess
Irina Nuzha

Implementing task-based needs


analysis in an ESP curriculum
Catherine Prewett-Schrempf
A reappraisal of translation in ESP:
legal English
Belen Ramirez
Practical advice on creating
authentic Medical English listening
materials
Sheila Thorn

36

General
ToT impact on students' learning in
Egyptian technical colleges
Mohamed Ahmed Abd Elwakeel

Mystery mini dramas


for your next class
Colin Granger

Achieving meaningfulness,
developing language skills and
building confidence through
ethnography
Krista Court

A few histories of English


Jonathan Marks

Grammar: deixis - pointing this


way and that
Paul Davis
Online teacher education: building
effective and affective learning
strategies
Adriana de los Santos
Revitalizing language classes
through humor
Kobra Derakhshan
Towards a functional approach to
teaching conditionals
Adam Dixon
Memorisation in the EFL
classroom
Mary Giuraniuc
Uncovering culture
Ben Goldstein & Ceri Jones
Strengthening English language
teaching with classroom activities
Geeta Goyal

something

How to harness emotions for


success in the classroom
Sean McDonald
Engaging 30 students in an
inclusive classroom
Romulo Neves
Developing a lexical syllabus:
challenges and opportunities
Diane Schmitt
Reading and listening activities:
understanding today or
understanding tomorrow?
Catherine Walter

Forum on motivating students to


read
Advocating reading to an antireading generation
Baya Bensalah
Autonomous reading tasks: their
influence on confidence and
language skills
Ilse Born-Lechleitner
Self-regulated reading vs. critical
reading: which one boosts reading
motivation?
Mona Khabiri

Global issues
Integrating human values in EFL
instruction
Ruwaida Abu-Rass

37

Exploring EFL learners'


intercultural competence through
international service-learning
programs
Chiuhui Wu

Forum on interculturality
Building intercultural competence
and managing international
projects
Barbara Lapornik
Intercultural experiences of South
Asian students in the Germanic
cluster
Adrian Millward-Sadler
Educating for cultural awareness
Kristina Urboniene

Forum on non-nativeness in ELT:


implications, knowledge of
language, and credibility
The taboo issue of a (non-native)
teacher's knowledge of English
Higor Cavalcante
Non-nativeness and its critical
implications on non-native
English-speaking teachers
Shazia Nawaz Awan
Promoting non-native trainers'
credibility
Ahmed Othman

Leadership & management


Integrating new teachers into an
established staffroom
Fiona Dunlop

The Chimp Paradox and a stressfree life


Diarmuid Fogarty

Are all the roads leading to Rome?


Cari Freer
The dogme and demand high of
ELT management
Maureen McGarvey

How to get your team thinking


Duncan Foord

Learner autonomy

How can the British Council


products lead to learner
autonomy?
Nadeem Abdulbaqi Al-Murshedi
The next generation of
autonomous instruction thru

VoiceThreads

Marsha Appling-Nunez & Melissa


Van De Wege
Getting 'em out there: cultural
exploration and second language
learning
Deak Kirkham

Learning technologies

Creativity in teacher development:


peer group mentoring and
collective writing
Felicity Kjisik, Sandro John
Amendolara & Leena Karlsson
Enhancing second language
acquisition through formal
instruction in English-speaking
environments
Alan Martins Amorim

products lead to learner


autonomy?
Nadeem Abdulbaqi Al-Murshedi

EFL teacher education for the 21st


Century
David Coulson

The next generation of


autonomous instruction thru

Chop, knead and slice: getting the


multiValentina Dodge

VoiceThreads

Marsha Appling-Nunez & Melissa


Van De Wege
Camelot project: machinima for
online language learning and
teaching
Tuncer Can
How can the British Council
Student support in online-only
courses
Deirdre Cijffers & Gordon Lewis

Who needs ELT newsletters? The


Greek issue! Your issue
Kantarakis Eftychios
Learner autonomy in the language
classroom: academic writing in
action
Natalia Eydelman
Technology and learning oriented
assessment: helping teachers and
learners
Evelina Galaczi & Angeliki
Salamoura

Using performance indicators to


monitor training initiatives
Vinicius Nobre
Institutional self-assessment: a
leadership tool for quality
assurance
Susan Sheerin

Peer teaching activities for


pronunciation lessons
Bindu Varghese
Teaching study skills to university
students
Dorothy Zemach

It's MALL and it's powerful


David Gatrell
Successfully implementing
effective flipped or blended
learning: a StudyBundles approach
Daniel Hinkley
A teacher-centred approach to
new technologies and blended
learning
Mike Howard
Multimodal texts in language
teaching: developing viewing and
representing skills
Tamas Kiss
Learning English in a mobile age:
successful classroom practices
Margarida Marques Pereira

38

From whiteboards to Web 2.0


Daniel Martin
Managing teacher digital identity:
sharing, oversharing and
undersharing
Sophia Mavridi
iPads in ELT: how are we using
them and why?
Mark Osborne
Digital or analogue: making
choices about technology in lesson
planning
David Pearce

Training university students into


digital natives challenge taken!
Nora Tartsay Nemeth
Improving English language
learner outcomes using online
data
Rasil Warnakulasooriya

The challenge: motivation and


productive skills through
technology
Nataliya Yordanova

Forum on blended learning

Test-teach-test with technology


Philip Weir

Blended learning in higher


education; motivating mixed-ability
classes
Joyce den Heijer

Can remote teaching promote deep


learning?
Paul Woods

Flipped lessons in and out of the


EFL classroom
Jose Maria Lopez Lago
New Vistas OpenClass opens to
university graduates
Elena Yastrebova

Literature, media & cultural studies


Film-music, film and TEFL
realizing a vision
James Fitzgibbon

Shakespeare now: resetting and


Robert Hill

Want to spice up your lessons? Try


with a song
Sandra Vida

Storytelling and improvising:


creativity at play
David Heathfield

How do you like me? Participatory


culture and ELT
Ana Carolina Lopes

for song lyrics in EFL


Chris Walklett

Materials development
Can a picture tell a thousand
words?
Hugh Dellar

However, while, thus... how to


teach transitions successfully
Petra Kletzenbauer

Shakespeare now: resetting and

Exploiting "ear slips" and


misplaced boundaries in oral skills
instruction
Maria Parker, Brenda Imber &
Carson Maynard

Robert Hill

Practical advice on creating


authentic Medical English listening
materials
Sheila Thorn

Materials writing
Free and fair ELT: for writers,
publishers and teachers
Katherine Bilsborough & Chuck
Sandy

39

Can a picture tell a thousand


words?
Hugh Dellar

Keep CALM and write accessible


ESP materials!
Emily Bryson

From tradition to innovation: a


British Indian collaboration in
course design
Penny Hands

Soft skills in ESP: lawyer-client


interview and the like
Barbora Chovancova

Tools, tips and tasks for


developing materials writing skills
John Hughes

your project the editor!


Fiona MacKenzie & David Baker
The why, what and how of selfpublishing for teachers
Johanna Stirling
Teaching creative writing through
the iStory project
Djalal Tebib

Pronunciation

Exploiting "ear slips" and


misplaced boundaries in oral skills
instruction
Maria Parker, Brenda Imber &
Carson Maynard

Peer teaching activities for


pronunciation lessons
Bindu Varghese

Pronunciation
tied?
Robin Walker

(m)other tongue

Teacher voices: does research


meet practice?
Zarina Markova

Towards initiating YELTA


Nagm-Addin Saif

Focusing on sounds - using


synthetic phonics to teach listening
Adam Scott

Research
Researching professional
development with the use of the
narrative approach
Volha Arkhipenka
Evaluating an action research
scheme for English language
teachers
Simon Borg
Exploring a new global framework
for continuing professional
development
Paul Braddock
The impact of action research on

Developing the Survey of ELT


Research in India
Lina Mukhopadhyay

Focusing on sounds - using


synthetic phonics to teach listening
Adam Scott

iPads in ELT: how are we using


them and why?
Mark Osborne

Language-supportive education in
English medium-of-instruction
contexts
John Simpson

Thai EFL teachers' evaluation of


teaching practice: a self-rated
investigation
Sureepong Phothongsunan

The development of L2 reading


self-concept in an academic
context
Carolyn Walker

Sensing our teaching space:


changing our practice
Valeria Benevolo Franca

A reflective journey for language


teachers
Caroline Campbell

Evaluating an action research


scheme for English language
teachers
Simon Borg

Action research in the classroom


the ultimate development tool
Gill Davidson & Sarah Glinski

development
Emily Edwards

Teacher development
Researching professional
development with the use of the
narrative approach
Volha Arkhipenka
Quality improvement in teacher
development through peerobservation and feedback
Mohamed Tahar Asses
How to increase your market
worth as an EFL teacher
Carol Bausor

Exploring a new global framework


for continuing professional
development
Paul Braddock

Professional development through


observational feedback
Ibrahima Diallo

40

From pragmatism to professional


autonomy: transforming online
postgraduate study
Alex Ding & Jane Evison
Lessons learned as a language
learner
Madeleine du Vivier & Jo-Ann
Delaney
The impact of action research on
development
Emily Edwards
Who needs ELT newsletters? The
Greek issue! Your issue
Kantarakis Eftychios
Classroom observations: a tool for
mentoring and growth
Sophie Farag
The Chimp Paradox and a stressfree life
Diarmuid Fogarty
It's MALL and it's powerful
David Gatrell
Peer facilitators: supporting
teachers with mobile-learning
professional development
Malcolm Griffiths
Creativity in teacher development:
peer group mentoring and
collective writing
Felicity Kjisik, Sandro John
Amendolara & Leena Karlsson

41

Teacher voices: does research


meet practice?
Zarina Markova
Managing teacher digital identity:
sharing, oversharing and
undersharing
Sophia Mavridi
Enabling teachers to teach
emerging middle class students
Henrique Moura

Forming synergetic professional


learning communities: becoming
highly effective TESOL
professionals
M. Athar Hussain Shah
The why, what and how of selfpublishing for teachers
Johanna Stirling
A sustainable model for CPD:
reflections from China
Maggie Swannock & Donna Cook

Using performance indicators to


monitor training initiatives
Vinicius Nobre

Teaching @ the edge of chaos


Adrian Tennant

Topics, texts, tasks and a stolen


packet of sweets
Danny Norrington-Davies

Improve your teaching: profile,


plan, progress
Mary Whiteside & Virgil Ierubino

Better together: peer-coaching for


continuing professional
development
Dita Phillips & Ela Wassell

Forum on teacher reflection in


practice

STAD (Student TeamsAchievement Divisions): energizing


cooperative learning
Siddika Sabooni
Towards initiating YELTA
Nagm-Addin Saif
Teacher identity - in search of who
we really are
Liliana Sanchez

Reflective teaching: an
institutional bottom-up approach
to CPD
Artemis Aghvami
Operationalizing reflective practice
in teaching English as a foreign
language
Niki Christodoulou
Training international teachers on
a Masters programme: a reflective
approach
Teti Dragas & Lesley Kendall

Teacher training & education


Integrating human values in EFL
instruction
Ruwaida Abu-Rass
How to increase your market
worth as an EFL teacher
Carol Bausor
Camelot project: machinima for
online language learning and
teaching
Tuncer Can
Initial teacher training: challenges
and innovations in course design
Willy Cardoso
EFL teacher education for the 21st
Century
David Coulson
Professional development through
observational feedback
Ibrahima Diallo
From pragmatism to professional
autonomy: transforming online
postgraduate study
Alex Ding & Jane Evison
Lessons learned as a language
learner
Madeleine du Vivier & Jo-Ann
Delaney
Classroom observations: a tool for
mentoring and growth
Sophie Farag
Teaching English at public
nocturnal schools in Brazil
Andreia Fernandes
Peer facilitators: supporting
teachers with mobile-learning
professional development
Malcolm Griffiths

Language teachers' target


language: ESP of language
teaching
Alexey Korenev

Improve your teaching: profile,


plan, progress
Mary Whiteside & Virgil Ierubino

Topics, texts, tasks and a stolen


packet of sweets
Danny Norrington-Davies

Forum on using online resources


for teacher development

Teachers helping teachers: the


Venezuelan experience
Evelin Ojeda Naveda
Better together: peer-coaching for
continuing professional
development
Dita Phillips & Ela Wassell
Teacher identity - in search of who
we really are
Liliana Sanchez
The effect of goal quality on
subsequent self-regulation of
learning
H. Douglas Sewell
Forming synergetic professional
learning communities: becoming
highly effective TESOL
professionals
M. Athar Hussain Shah
A sustainable model for CPD:
reflections from China
Maggie Swannock & Donna Cook
Training university students into
digital natives challenge taken!
Nora Tartsay Nemeth
Teaching @ the edge of chaos
Adrian Tennant
Are trainers really omniscient?
Ushakiran Wagle

Theory at home, practice in class


John Arnold
Exploiting seminar and conference
videos for professional
development and training
Ellen Darling
Experiences of a webinarian
Gayle Norman

Forum on professional
development
Designing and delivering effective
professional development from
EFL teachers' perspectives
Anwar Abdel Razeq
A project-based approach to
professional development
Andrew Bosson
The impact and issues of a
Malaysian professional
development programme
Wendy Hiew

Forum on large and medium-scale


resources provision
CPD in low-resource contexts
Michael Connolly & Reesha Alvi
IT self-access in Ethiopia: a
challenging context
Peter Hare & Yonas Bekele
The need for Regional English
Support Centres in developing
countries
Shane Martenstyn

42

Testing, evaluation & assessment


Enhancing assessment literacy:
nurturing learning-oriented
outcomes in the language
classroom
Vivien Berry
Fairness as a consideration in
writing test items
Marian Crandall
Technology and learning oriented
assessment: helping teachers and
learners
Evelina Galaczi & Angeliki
Salamoura

Young learners & teenagers


Making up grammar rules
Georgios Chatzis

Developing readable Englishmedium textbooks in Rwanda


John Clegg
Using authentic storybooks in an
early years classroom
Nicky Francis
L1 - how to avoid it and when to
use it
Rachael Harris

43

The role of visual stimuli in EAP


listening tests
Saeede Haghi
Raising scores: gamification
activities for test preparation
teachers
Christien Lee
What is the question? Dealing with
IELTS Writing Task 2
Sarah Philpot

Out-of-school English learning:


hidden resource or classroom
curse?
Samuel Lefever
Developing fluency through video
Nino Maisuradze, Nino Salukvadze
& Nino Mikeladze
Parental engagement: practical
ideas from opening a new teaching
centre
Laura Jane McWilliams

A reflective workshop on writing


standardization practices: is
standardization possible?
Mehvar Turkkan
From summative to formative
assessment in a traditional ELT
institute
Isabela Villas Boas Katia Falcomer

Working with readers and genre


using a project-based approach
Rafael Monteiro
Using writing and drawing to
release tension among
traumatised students
Hasan Ramadan
Can remote teaching promote deep
learning?
Paul Woods

Monday
Applied linguistics

Students' strategic skills and their


relation to test validity
Abdullah Al Fraidan

Effects of task type and pre-task


planning on L2 performance
Saraswati Dawadi

Conversational routines: right


words at the right time and place
Gerrard Mugford

Listening activities: teachers and


students think the same in
Sarajevo?
Harun Bastug & Mehmet Akdogan

Getting to grips with anxiety: from


understanding to classroom
practice
Christina Gkonou & Mark Daubney

How to optimize language learning


through effective noticing
strategies
Harisimran Sandhu

Some (further) doubts about CLIL


learning outcome research
Anthony Bruton

How to assess students' grammar:


introducing a new practical
method
David Jay

Bringing corpus research into the


language classroom
Jane Templeton

Yesterday... today... tomorrow...


Olena Korol

Changing the mindset of lower


level learners through online
collaborations
Ellen Rana

Business English
Teaching English as a lingua
franca (ELF): pros & cons
Rudi Camerer
English for the workplace:
changing needs and changing
contexts
Jonathan Deer
How to make ELT videos
Vicki Hollett

English for employability:


assessing oral skills through a job
interview
Patrick McMahon
Developing listening competence
Evelina Miscin

Spice up your Business English


class with Pecha Kucha!
Suzanne Vetter-M'Caw

English for academic purposes


Being a student in English-medium
engineering programmes:
experiences & challenges
Holi Ali
Learning on the job: professional
development through materials
writing
Olga Barnashova, Rod Bolitho,
Svetlana Suchkova & Ekaterina
Shadrova
Developing the vocabulary strand
of an EAP program
Ozlem Baykan

Critical thinking skills and their


effect on EAP competence
Jane Brooks

Neurodrama in ELT - planned with


the brain in mind
Alicja Galazka

Advanced reading skills


subskills, tasks and texts
Jill Buggey

The dictogloss adapted for


teaching phrases common in
academic writing
Seth Lindstromberg

Low level, not low ambition!


Teaching EAP to low-level learners
Stephanie Dimond-Bayir
How does L1 affect IELTS scores?

Promoting learner agency through


teaching language learning
strategies
Nuwar Mawlawi Diab

Louisa Dunne

44

English for employability:


assessing oral skills through a job
interview
Patrick McMahon
Assessing hospital communication
skills of migrant health
professionals in Europe
Diana Metzner

English for specific purposes


From monolithic to binomial CLIL:
a novel merged learning approach
Renata Agolli
The learner: a resource to make
ESP specific?!
Martin Beck

Critical thinking skills in English


language teaching
Edward Newbon
that you do it: ESP as
process
Jemma Prior

Assessing hospital communication


skills of migrant health
professionals in Europe
Diana Metzner
process
Jemma Prior

Raising awareness of group


formation: some of the
complexities
Ann F.V. Smith
Worlds without: English language
learners' speaking activities
outside the classroom
Simon Williams

English skills and technicalvocational education in a


developing context
Arifa Rahman

you do it: ESP as

English for specific academic purposes


English-medium instruction (EMI)
teaching strategies for Korean
engineering students
EunGyong Kim & Soo-Ok Kweon

CLIL: integration is the keyword


Irina Titarenko

ES(O)L
Language input through projectbased learning: why and how
Steve Brown
Talk English: from CELTA to
volunteer ESOL in South Africa
Julie Douglas

General

Extensive reading: benefits and


implementation
Marcos Benevides
Textploitation: getting more from a
text
David Byrne & Mark Heffernan
A visual manifesto for language
teaching
Kieran Donaghy & Anna Whitcher
English language teaching using a
theme-centred interaction (TCI)
approach
Cyriac Joby

45

Recognising and working with


emergent language in the ESOL
classroom
Richard Gallen
Meeting the needs of English
Creole-speaking students
Yvonne Pratt-Johnson
Promoting more meaningful
learning and critical thinking in
class
J. Daniel Martin Neto & Claudia
Freitas Triumpho
Write more! Making the most of
student journals
Sandy Millin
Say anything - using impro to
develop language fluency
Nicholas Munby

The Cambridge English Scale


future of results reporting
Andrew Somers

the

Make or break it! Teaching


learners to write delicate emails
Genevieve White

Communicative language teaching


in the 21st Century
Chaz Pugliese
Dyslexia and other SpLDs: simple
strategies for maximum inclusion
Anne Margaret Smith
Do you love the theatre as we do?
Olga Vavelyuk
The teacher as an event maker
Andrew Wright

Forum on dyslexia

Forum on vocabulary learning

Forum on extensive reading

Dyslexia in the teaching


environment
Martin Bloomfield

Are previously-learned formulaic


sequences gone? A longitudinal
study
Thamer Alharthi

Reading interests and attitude


among foundation year Arab EFL
learners
Nkechi Christopher

Low-level students' perceptions


about the usefulness of online
vocabulary learning
Sermin Celik

Extensive reading competition: in


quest of enlightened souls
Pankaj Paul

Using interactive web in teaching


LD students
Julia Koifman
Classroom-based interventions for
dyslexia inclusion in language
education
Maria Reraki

Forum on drama activities in


different language contexts: theory
and praxis
Classroom drama activities:
research and a pedagogical
proposal
Vera Cabrera Duarte

More than words...


Bruno Leys

Forum on feedback on student


writing
The concept of student
engagement and written corrective
feedback
Alia Moser

Drama festival: from kick-off to


final performance
Andrea Calvozo

Effect of metalinguistic written


corrective feedback on linguistic
errors
Mehdi Solhi Andarab

Transforming the EFL learning


environment through drama
activities
Adolfo Tanzi Neto

feeding forward for self-regulated


learning
Stephanie Xerri Agius

Global issues

From monolithic to binomial CLIL:


a novel merged learning approach
Renata Agolli

English alone is not enough:


teaching multilingualism
Michael Carrier

Critical thinking skills and their


effect on EAP competence
Jane Brooks

Investigating young bilingual


children: possible reasons for
underachievement at school
Hilda Hio Fong Fok

Can the Common European


Framework be adapted for young
learners?
Trish Burrows

Book Club Cafe! Improving


vocabulary through extensive
reading
Lesley Speer & Jose Lara

Teaching English through


international children's songs: a
global approach
Joan Kang Shin
Gender, ideology and humor in the
ESL/EFL classroom
Thais Regina Santos Borges

Middle East meets West: global


English and Emirati cultural
identity
Sarah Hopkyns

46

Interactive Language Fair


Lesson study approach to
professional development in ELT
Seyit Omer Gok
Developing learning-oriented
assessment tools: implications for
teacher learning
Padmini Kankata

No classes, such learning;


experiences of In-House Distance
courses (IHDs)
Vilhelm Lindholm
Exploratory practice for language
learning with engineering students
Hugh Nicoll

Visual teaching and learning


practice in Cambodian EFL higher
education
Bophan Khan

Monological and dialogical


approaches in learning English at
secondary level
Anne Ontero

Going mobile: a language learning


Enes Kurtay CIG

What can you learn from a test?


Daniel Pell

More than a holiday English


teaching assistants in Thailand
Lauren Perkins
Teaching ESP at an economic
university: looking for new
techniques
Elena Velikaya
Anxiety in self-study foreign
language learning
Corinna von Ludwiger
Using assessment rubrics for
improving learner autonomy and
summarising skills
Irina Yunatova

Leadership & management


Implementing blended learning: an
institutional view
Eric Baber & Carla Arena
Embedding quality deep in the
or
threat?
Bruna Benedetti Caltabiano

Managing renovation and change


in ELT curriculum and materials
development
Isora Justina Enriquez O'Farrill
Noah's ark: planning for mobile
Nicky Hockly

Aspiring to inspire: how to become


a great LTO manager
Fiona Thomas
English as bridge between Afghan
army cadets and British forces
Tareq Walizada

Learner autonomy

47

Teaching learning strategies in a


flipped instruction model
Anna Uhl Chamot

Sequential drift from teacher


dependence to learner autonomy
Shafqat Khalil

Teaching children how to learn


Gail Ellis & Nayr Ibrahim

Yesterday... today... tomorrow...


Olena Korol

Making ourselves expendable:


corpora training for learner
autonomy
Federico Espinosa

Promoting learner agency through


teaching language learning
strategies
Nuwar Mawlawi Diab

Pronunciation to go: learning to


learn from the dictionary
Mark Hancock

How to improve speaking


proficiency in learners
Justin Noppe

Fostering autonomy: harnessing


the outside world from within the
classroom
Elizabeth Pinard
Changing the mindset of lower
level learners through online
collaborations
Ellen Rana
Using Pinterest to promote
genuine communication and
enhance personalised learning
Andreia Zakime

Learning technologies

Tailoring a comparative corpus


website
Emrah Akkurt & Asli Abak Sen

Apps for learning independence


and inclusion
Raquel Gonzaga

Using Skype to help Palestinian


speaking
Atiyyeh Al-Habal

Ways to exploit authentic videos in


EFL classes
Muzeyyen Nazli Gungor & Mustafa
Akin Gungor

Implementing blended learning: an


institutional view
Eric Baber & Carla Arena

Nine steps into the digital


classroom
Marjorie Hernandez

Bringing corpus research into the


language classroom
Jane Templeton

The app trap: why are entertaining


ELT apps so rare?
Jonathan Bygrave

Noah's ark: planning for mobile


Nicky Hockly

Interactive whiteboard in teaching


English for students with special
needs
Kuangyun Ting

Is self-publishing a realistic option


in ELT? Trends, tips, challenges
Deborah Capras
Mobile devices for teacher
learning training: lessons and
implications
Kalyan Chattopadhyay
Innovation and quality: videoconferencing, team-teaching and
digital literacy for YLs
Hannah Ciborowska
Teens and their apps what is
there to know?
Ana d'Almeida

Tracy Dumais
Making ourselves expendable:
corpora training for learner
autonomy
Federico Espinosa
Developing and managing an
eBook project from concept to
completion
Aysen Gilroy & Andrew Mcgladdery

Getting started with blended and


online learning
Cleve Miller
Help your students to master their
vocabulary faster
Anna Poplawska
Passive users or critical thinkers?
Developing critical thinking with
technology
Dimitrios Primalis
Premier Skills English: an action
research project on teaching
vocabulary
Michael Radford
An engaged tone: how ELT might
Nick Robinson, Tim Gifford &
Laurie Harrison
Digital twitteracy: 10 teaching
solutions
Claire Ross
Principles for meaningful
technology integration
Maria Victoria Saumell

Audio feedback in writing: can it


help chronically dissatisfied
learners?
Petek Sirin
Assessing the writing process like
a fly on the wall
Ismael Sombra

Social learning: motivating


students to use English through
social technology
Catherine Whitaker
An App(etite) for construction
Shaun Wilden & Nikola Fortova
Using Pinterest to promote
genuine communication and
enhance personalised learning
Andreia Zakime

Forum on online learning


platforms
What the MOOC? Managing the
massive online course
Chris Cavey & Eleanor Clements
Using Google sites to support
teachers in multiple locations
Tam Connors-Sadek
MOOC mania: implications for
English language teaching
Peter Davidson

48

Literature, media & cultural studies


visual competences using films
and TV shows
Annika Kreft & Viviane Lohe

Materials development

Learning on the job: professional


development through materials
writing
Olga Barnashova, Rod Bolitho,
Svetlana Suchkova & Ekaterina
Shadrova
Language input through projectbased learning: why and how
Steve Brown
Managing renovation and change
in ELT curriculum and materials
development
Isora Justina Enriquez O'Farrill

Teaching literature using the five


senses
Maria Lucia Sciamarelli

The three worlds of Chinese


school-age English learners
Yafu Gong & Wenjuan Ding

Getting started with blended and


online learning
Cleve Miller

Addressing mismatches between


classroom context and
coursebooks
Kathleen Graves

Help your students to master their


vocabulary faster
Anna Poplawska

Subskills: the key to unlocking


texts
Rob Metcalf

Premier Skills English: an action


research project on teaching
vocabulary
Michael Radford

Materials writing
Is self-publishing a realistic option
in ELT? Trends, tips, challenges
Deborah Capras
Frameworks for creativity in
materials design
Jill Hadfield

How to make ELT videos


Vicki Hollett
Fostering autonomy: harnessing
the outside world from within the
classroom
Elizabeth Pinard

Vocabulary testing: why, what and


how?
Russell Whitehead & Felicity O'Dell

Pronunciation
Do we still need the phonemic
chart?
Richard Benson

Pronunciation to go: learning to


learn from the dictionary
Mark Hancock

Listening and connected speech:


untruthful rules, unruly truths
Richard Cauldwell

People, pronunciation and play


Luke Meddings

Feeding speaking-fluency forward:


using technology to raise the bar
Jessica Cobley & Becky Steven

49

The ear of the beholder: helping


learners understand different
accents
Laura Patsko

Research into practice: revisiting


pronunciation teaching
Pamela Rogerson-Revell
Authentic listening: stepping from
bottom-up processing to
understanding
Olga Sergeeva

Research

Se habla ingles: an analysis of


language policy in Mexico
Pilar Aramayo Prudencio

Some (further) doubts about CLIL


learning outcome research
Anthony Bruton
Exploring the metacognitive
approach to teaching listening
David Collett
Beyond myths and rituals:
developing a 'grammar of choice'
Martina Elicker & Ulla
Fuerstenberg
Recognising and working with
emergent language in the ESOL
classroom
Richard Gallen
Teacher beliefs, practices and
teaching speaking
Arwa Gandeel
Getting to grips with anxiety: from
understanding to classroom
practice
Christina Gkonou & Mark Daubney

Teaching English in primary


schools: challenges of the Chilean
classroom
Maria Jesus Inostroza

Audio feedback in writing: can it


help chronically dissatisfied
learners?
Petek Sirin

The dictogloss adapted for


teaching phrases common in
academic writing
Seth Lindstromberg

Do EFL textbooks foster


intercultural teaching/learning?
Pawel Sobkowiak

Inside their heads: the importance


of learner beliefs and attitudes
Jessica Mackay

Monitoring and evaluation: 9000


Malaysian English language
teachers
Zoe Tysoe & Vanessa Lee

Understanding group dynamics in


the English classroom
Olja Milosevic

Inclusive education - what we, ELT


teachers and directors, can do
Mercedes Viola

Conversational routines: right


words at the right time and place
Gerrard Mugford

Forum on EAP/ESP reading

English skills and technicalvocational education in a


developing context
Arifa Rahman
Gender, ideology and humor in the
ESL/EFL classroom
Thais Regina Santos Borges

Nine steps into the digital


classroom
Marjorie Hernandez

What makes the online productive


level of vocabulary tests difficult?
Wei-Wei Shen

Middle East meets West: global


English and Emirati cultural
identity
Sarah Hopkyns

Creating intercultural
ambassadors through English in
Nepal: a case study
Sagun Shrestha

Metacognitive strategy instruction


for ESL university-level learners'
reading strategy
Bushra Ahmed Khurram
Reading strategies and incidental
vocabulary acquisition in ESP
Sanja Radmilo Derado
Trying to meet first-year English
majors' academic reading needs
Marina Vulovic &Kris Van de Poel

Teacher development
Planning for am/is/are? Planning
for relative clauses?
Nazan Akturk & Nurdan Yesil

Motivating reluctant learners:


from challenges to achievements
Peyman Bohlori

Continued professional
development making a lasting
impact in the classroom
Alex Birtles & Annamaria Pinter

Opening up the 'moment': inside


Demand High
Chris Edgoose

in lesson feedback: a proposed


framework
Ana Garcia-Stone
Frameworks for creativity in
materials design
Jill Hadfield

50

Lesson jamming: planning lessons


in groups
Tom Heaven
What's so special about Special
Educational Needs?
Graeme Hodgson
How to be paper light in your EFL
classrooms
Paramjit Kaur Gibbons
Parent-teacher dialogues
Divya Madhavan
Where are the women in ELT?
Russell Mayne & Nicola Prentis
Fit and fun - educating our
students for a healthy future
Anton Prochazka
Alternatives to coffee and
chocolate: energy management for
teachers
Margit Szesztay
In defence of TTT
Emma Whitehouse

Bridging the technophobetechnophile gap in teacher training


and development
Tessa Woodward & Daniel
Monaghan

Forum on teacher blogs

Innovated interactions - how to


elevate and redefine speaking
activities
Nihal Yildirim & Sally Ghalayini

See you on the other side: blogs


and teacher reflection
Barbara Chamberlin, Angela
Pickering & Paul Slater

Learning from adjacent fields:


economics and economy of EFL
classrooms
Svetlana Zhavoronkova

Forum on thoughts on the


observation process
Lesson observations - the
observer becomes the observee
Conrad Heyns
The elephant in the classroom:
thoughts on the observer paradox
Phil Keegan
Interactive observation an
alternative training approach
Karen Waterston

How does blogging help teacher


candidates construct their teacher
identities?
Salli Aysegul

Blogging; an adventure in support


of teacher development
Asli Lidice Gokturk Saglam

Forum on online teacher


training/development
Teacher training and EAP:
developing a framework for online
training
James Lambert
Using online teacher development
to make vocational education more
fun
Ahmed Salem
Working together online: insights
into a teacher education
programme
Marja Zibelius

Teacher training & education


Becoming a teacher trainer:
learning to share skills with others
Ahmad Jamshed Adel
Planning for am/is/are? Planning
for relative clauses?
Nazan Akturk & Nurdan Yesil
Teaching English as a lingua
franca (ELF): pros & cons
Rudi Camerer
Teaching learning strategies in a
flipped instruction model
Anna Uhl Chamot
Mobile devices for teacher
learning training: lessons and
implications
Kalyan Chattopadhyay

51

Innovation and quality: videoconferencing, team-teaching and


digital literacy for YLs
Hannah Ciborowska

Beyond myths and rituals:


developing a 'grammar of choice'
Martina Elicker & Ulla
Fuerstenberg

Effects of task type and pre-task


planning on L2 performance
Saraswati Dawadi

The 4Cs of a successful


partnership in teacher training
Gulshan Huseynova

Capturing the reality of the


classroom in teacher education
courses
Gabriel Diaz Maggioli

Making it awesome: teaching and


reaching teens
Niki Joseph

Quality control: towards a


framework for assessing online
training courses
Gavin Dudeney & Thom Kiddle

Artistic and creative practice in


foreign language teaching and
learning
Peter Lutzker
Best activities out of the den
Gabriela Marcenaro Bonsignore

Mindful corrective feedback:


supporting learning
Lesley Painter-Farrell

Monitoring and evaluation: 9000


Malaysian English language
teachers
Zoe Tysoe & Vanessa Lee

In defence of TTT
Emma Whitehouse

Testing, evaluation & assessment


Students' strategic skills and their
relation to test validity
Abdullah Al Fraidan
The learner: a resource to make
ESP specific?!
Martin Beck
Continuous and comprehensive
evaluation (CCE) a reality check!
Ravinarayan Chakrakodi
Feeding speaking-fluency forward:
using technology to raise the bar
Jessica Cobley & Becky Steven
How does L1 affect IELTS scores?

Assessment for learning in


primary EFL classrooms:
challenges and successes
Sophie Handy
How to assess students' grammar:
introducing a new practical
method
David Jay
Measuring learner outcomes:
examples from around the world
Claire Masson
What makes the online productive
level of vocabulary tests difficult?
Wei-Wei Shen

Assessing student progress on


rolling enrolment courses
Katherine Solomon
Curriculum vs. teaching: CLT in
teaching English in Bangladesh
Nasreen Sultana
Re-conceptualising young learner
language classroom assessment
feedback?
Achu Charles Tante
Vocabulary testing: why, what and
how?
Russell Whitehead & Felicity O'Dell

Louisa Dunne

Young learners & teenagers


Using Skype to help Palestinian
speaking
Atiyyeh Al-Habal
Continued professional
development making a lasting
impact in the classroom
Alex Birtles & Annamaria Pinter
Learning is a game we play
Carol Brown Morales
Can the Common European
Framework be adapted for young
learners?
Trish Burrows

Tracy Dumais
Teaching children how to learn
Gail Ellis & Nayr Ibrahim
Investigating young bilingual
children: possible reasons for
underachievement at school
Hilda Hio Fong Fok
Assessment for learning in
primary EFL classrooms:
challenges and successes
Sophie Handy

What's so special about Special


Educational Needs?
Graeme Hodgson
Teaching English in primary
schools: challenges of the Chilean
classroom
Maria Jesus Inostroza
Increase student motivation with
authentic learning
Nasy Inthisone Pfanner

Switch off, tune in! Mindful singletasking with teens


Joanna Dossetor

52

Making it awesome: teaching and


reaching teens
Niki Joseph

Subskills: the key to unlocking


texts
Rob Metcalf

Teaching English through


international children's songs: a
global approach
Joan Kang Shin

Understanding group dynamics in


the English classroom
Olja Milosevic

visual competences using films


and TV shows
Annika Kreft & Viviane Lohe
Is storytelling relevant in the 21st
Century primary classroom?
Viv Lambert & Mo Choy
Artistic and creative practice in
foreign language teaching and
learning
Peter Lutzker

Passive users or critical thinkers?


Developing critical thinking with
technology
Dimitrios Primalis
Fit and fun - educating our
students for a healthy future
Anton Prochazka
Creating intercultural
ambassadors through English in
Nepal: a case study
Sagun Shrestha

Re-conceptualising young learner


language classroom assessment
feedback?
Achu Charles Tante

Forum on poetry
Poetry in teaching: incorporate
verse in your everyday classroom
Jasmina Arsenijevic
Grammar templates for the future
with poetry for children
Janice Bland
Approaches to introducing
contemporary poems in ELT
Kirill Ignatov

Parent-teacher dialogues
Divya Madhavan

Tuesday
Applied linguistics
Emails for teaching pragmatics in
the ESL classroom
Afrah Ali

Teaching for knowledge vs.


teaching for use
Neil Armstrong & William Ford

Business English

Biz15 Byte-sized Business English


Mike Hogan

53

Mini-conference simulation:
business communication skills
Andrew Preshous

Is younger always better? The age


debate in young learners
Victoria Murphy

English for academic purposes


and learning
Chris Heady
IELTS heading/section matching an effective and time-efficient
technique
Deborah Hobbs
What's on your mind? Social
networking for EAP students
Tim Leigh

English for specific purposes


Real world tasks to engage and
motivate
Louise Pullen & Dan Jones

Sustainable assessment? Users'


perception of an ESL multi-source
feedback system
Boon Sier Jeanette Lim
Real world tasks to engage and
motivate
Louise Pullen & Dan Jones

How spiky can a spiky profile be?


Karen Smith
Preparing for PTE Academic and
IELTS; comparisons and resources
Jo Tomlinson

Towards a critical teaching of


English
Rachel Ramsay

Topic knowledge and IELTS


success
Louis Rogers & Nicholas Thorner

General
Examining differentiation of
instruction in ELT
Thomas Ewens & Wieslawa
Karczmarczuk

Global issues

Exploiting print & digital


newspapers for intercultural
sensitivity development
Gloria R L Sampaio

Leadership & management


Mobile learning - empowering
teachers and engaging students
Jane Cohen

Learner autonomy
Structured academic
controversies: creating friends not
foes in classroom debates
Sanaa Abdel Hady Makhlouf

Learner autonomy in action: where


do we go from here?
Gamze Sayram

Teaching with technology in a


classroom without any
Kathryn Smelser

54

Learning technologies
Beyond classroom limits:
podcasting for EFL learners'
writing
Yousif Alshumaimeri & Ebrahim
Bamanger
BYOD a real account of
implementation
Leticia Camila Bissoto Queiroz de
Moraes

Biz15 Byte-sized Business English


Mike Hogan

Videocameras in the hands of


learners
Jamie Keddie

Reviewing EdTech products


Jo Sayers

English & ICT for adolescent girls


Masuda Khatoon

Teaching with technology in a


classroom without any
Kathryn Smelser

What's on your mind? Social


networking for EAP students
Tim Leigh

Course (be)ware: key lessons in


online course development
Paul Sweeney

How to gamify your English class


Elena Peresada

Literature, media & cultural studies


Motivating ESL learners using
folktales
Rout Anirudha

Materials development

Emails for teaching pragmatics in


the ESL classroom
Afrah Ali
Taking flight from the OK plateau
Nick Bilbrough

LearnEnglish Schools: ICT

solutions for contexts with limited


internet access
Deepali Dharmaraj

Materials writing

Critical issues and mainstream


textbook content: a disruptive
innovation?
Derek Philip

Pronunciation
Pronunciation: what to do before
you do sounds
Piers Messum

55

How poetry can aid students'


comprehension
Rosemary Westwell

Creative grammar
Charles Robert Hadfield
Classic exercises and why they
work in the 21st Century
Hanna Kryszewska
Structured academic
controversies: creating friends not
foes in classroom debates
Sanaa Abdel Hady Makhlouf

Course (be)ware: key lessons in


online course development
Paul Sweeney

Learning listening: the challenge


of unscripted language
Anne McDonald
Mini-conference simulation:
business communication skills
Andrew Preshous
How poetry can aid students'
comprehension
Rosemary Westwell

Research

Drawings are talking: exploring


visual narratives
Julide Inozu
Teaching grammar in context at
primary school
Maree Jeurissen

Virtually unknown: web


conferences as a tool for teacher
development
Caroline Moore

Critical issues and mainstream


textbook content: a disruptive
innovation?
Derek Philip

Developing a sustainable
exploratory/action research
project: improving oral
presentations
Katie Moran

Learner autonomy in action: where


do we go from here?
Gamze Sayram

Developing a sustainable
exploratory/action research
project: improving oral
presentations
Katie Moran

Why isn't your group work


achieving the desired results?
Adam Simpson

Teacher development
Through the eyes of the teachers:
seeing beyond the surface
Meltem Akbulut Yildirmis &
Mehtap Ince
Overcoming challenges for
continuous professional
development in teacher education
Marcela Cintra

and learning
Chris Heady
Virtually unknown: web
conferences as a tool for teacher
development
Caroline Moore

Teacher training & education


Through the eyes of the teachers:
seeing beyond the surface
Meltem Akbulut Yildirmis &
Mehtap Ince

Using metaphors in evaluating the


work of teacher trainers
Lola Bulut
Improving your classroom test
through simple statistics
Louise Lauppe

Quality education at scale:


possibilities, problems and PEELI
Sobia Nusrat
Developing teacher excellence
Andrew Nye & Karen Momber
Practical, scalable training for
compulsory education teachers
addressing the challenge
Liz Robinson & Tim Banks

Quality education at scale:


possibilities, problems and PEELI
Sobia Nusrat
Developing teacher excellence
Andrew Nye & Karen Momber

Introducing literacy in an earlyyears EFL setting


Stephen Thompson & Jane
Thompson
Structured spontaneity.
spontaneity and creativity for
roleplaying
Robert Zammit

Practical, scalable training for


compulsory education teachers
addressing the challenge
Liz Robinson & Tim Banks
The natural CELTA - a farewell to
language?
Joanna Stansfield & Emma MeadeFlynn

56

Testing, evaluation & assessment


IELTS heading/section matching an effective and time-efficient
technique
Deborah Hobbs

Sustainable assessment? Users'


perception of an ESL multi-source
feedback system
Boon Sier Jeanette Lim

Teacher cognition on written


feedback: novice and experienced
teachers
Gul Karaagac

Topic knowledge and IELTS


success
Louis Rogers & Nicholas Thorner

How spiky can a spiky profile be?


Karen Smith
Preparing for PTE Academic and
IELTS; comparisons and resources
Jo Tomlinson

Improving your classroom test


through simple statistics
Louise Lauppe

Young learners & teenagers


Motivating ESL learners using
folktales
Rout Anirudha

Phonics for parents as partners in


learning
Chloe Goudvis

Is younger always better? The age


debate in young learners
Victoria Murphy

Learning language through arts:


teaching street art in EFL
classrooms
Henriette Dausend

Engaging, fun learning: helping


students gain grammar and EFL
skills
Carol Higho

Difficulties with team teaching in


Hong Kong kindergartens
Mei Lee Ng

LearnEnglish Schools: ICT

Drawings are talking: exploring

solutions for contexts with limited


internet access
Deepali Dharmaraj
Help yourself! Exploring selfmotivating strategies with
teenagers
Edmund Dudley

57

visual narratives
Julide Inozu
English & ICT for adolescent girls
Masuda Khatoon

How to gamify your English class


Elena Peresada
Introducing literacy in an earlyyears EFL setting
Stephen Thompson & Jane
Thompson

Poster presentations (sponsored by ETS TOEFL )


From professional development to
professional dissemination
Noha Faisal Mohamed
Abdelmotagally
Mini reading self-assessment tools
fatma Al Alalwi & Noura Al Kalbani
Recurring writing errors preservice teachers make at lowerintermediate levels
Marisol Amigo
Peacebuilding and grammar
acquisition in Kurdistan Region,
Iraq
Lone Bendixen Goulani

logs from two essay categories


Okon Effiong, Omama Osman, Alaa
Al-Housain & Reham ALHousain
Diamonds are forever: ensuring
language learners achieve lifelong
learning aspirations
Carol Joy Everhard
Effective strategies for teaching
English words by using etymology
Yoko Hirase
Role of inhibition/extroversion in
raising cultural awareness at the
kindergarten
Nadine Jaafarawi

Knowing ME - a non-profit-making
project on Maritime English
Alexia Piaggio
Exploring EFL l
communication strategies via
computer-mediated oral
communication
Sumanee Pinweha
English for academics
Marija Popova
Need for a new assessment and
role of ELT teachers
Betul Ayse Sayin

The Ultimate Guide to CELTA and


self-publishing
Emma Jones & Amanda Momeni

Developing an online master's


course: experience, challenges
and evaluation
Helen Thompson & Helen
Donaghue

Oral feedback behaviour of native


and non-native English teachers
Burcin Kagitci Yildiz

Using the vizualisation method in


teaching language skills
Aida Tulegenova

Enhancing EFL learners'


motivation and autonomy through
webskills and activities
Warda Khouni

Reading approach in foreign


language (English) proficiency
attainment
Birsen Tutunis

payment, attendance, assessment


and more
Carol Cregg

Demonstration of a personalized
English reading learning system
Jim-Min Lin

Aligning the Vocabulary Levels


Test with the CEFR
Desiree Verdonk

Integrated assessment in foreign


language teaching
Carolyn De Meyer & Vanessa De
Wilde

What makes UFRO students


succeed and fail at learning
English?
Oriana Onate

Global perspectives, local


incentives
Fernanda Benedito
Using English picture book
storytimes to build confidence in
ELL
Diane Nancy Brown
The impact of podcasts on
learners' listening comprehension
Saliha Chelli

Apprentisys - managing student

58

Additional sessions
S ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
The IATEFL AGM, sponsored by telc - language tests, will take place on Sunday 12th April from 1310 to 1410.

TRIBUTE SESSION

The tribute session is an opportunity to remember colleagues who've died during the year since the last
conference. If you've lost a colleague or former colleague, you'll have an opportunity to say a few words in their
memory and, if you wish, to bring along a memento (book, teaching materials, etc.). Or you may just want to
come to the session to hear about colleagues who are no longer with us, and perhaps to add any memories you
may have. The tribute session will take place on Sunday 12th April from 1710 to 1815.

HORNBY SCHOLAR & ALUMNI SLOTS

The name of A.S. Hornby is highly regarded in the ELT world, not only through his publications and ideas on
teaching methods but also through the work of the A.S. Hornby Educational Trust, set up in 1961. This was a farsighted and generous initiative whereby a large proportion of Hornby's income was set aside to improve the
teaching and learning of English as a foreign language, chiefly by providing grants to enable English teachers
from overseas to come to Britain for professional training.
The Hornby scholars this year will present Teacher cognition and communicative curricula: bridging the gaps
on Saturday 11th April.
The Hornby scholars are:
Wimansha Abeyawickrama (Sri Lanka), Babita Chapagain (Nepal), Abdou Dieng (Senegal), Suzuki Koda Fuentes
(Chile), Natalia Gatti (Uruguay), Jingli Jiang (China), Jenny Joshua (South Africa), Shefali Kulkarni (India),
Saleha Mersin (Malaysia), Bulara Monyaki (South Africa) & Seetha Venunathan (India)
Facilitated by Martin Weddell (University of Leeds, UK)
Two Hornby Alumni will also be presenting. The alumni are: Evelin Ojeda Naveda (Venezuela) presenting on
Teachers helping teachers: the Venezuelan experience and Ravinarayan Chakrakodi (India) presenting on

Continuous and comprehensive evaluation (CCE) a reality check!

SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP OPEN FORUMS

Saturday
Sunday
English for Specific Purposes
Leadership & Management
Global Issues
Materials Writing
Learner Autonomy
Research
Learning Technologies
Testing, Evaluation & Assessment
Literature, Media & Cultural Studies
Young Learners & Teenagers
See pages 63-66 for information on the SIG Days.

Monday
Business English
ES(O)L
Pronunciation
Teacher Development
Teacher Trainers & Educators

ELT CONVERSATION

Teaching English for the Workplace Issues and Discussion

Join Almut Koester and Evan Frendo as they discuss some of the big issues in teaching English for the
workplace. The format is simple. They have selected a series of quotations from recent publications on
workplace English, covering areas such as business English as a lingua franca, the relationship between
research and practice, and the role of the teacher. These quotations will be projected onto the screens in the
room. Together they will explore what each quotation means, and discuss whether or not they agree with it. You
will then have a chance to challenge or add to what they have said. Come prepared for a lively discussion!
Evan Frendo has worked in ESP since 1993, mostly in the corporate sector. He travels regularly in Europe and
Asia to run courses, speak at conferences, or to work as a consultant.
Almut Koester is Professor of English Business Communication and researches spoken workplace discourse.
She is interested in applications of research to Business English teaching.

59

OPEN SPACE 2015

Open Space is a mini-conference in itself. It gives you the chance not only to flag up and explore the topics that
matter to you and your colleagues, but also to learn a new conference tool for use elsewhere in your
professional life.
Facilitated by Adrian Underhill, Susan Barduhn and Ros Wright, you will have the opportunity to identify issues
that are professionally significant or that fire you up at that moment, and through a brief selection process
arrive at a spontaneous conference during which you might host a session in relation to your topic, or
participate in the sessions of others. After the first round each group gives a content resume to the other
groups, and then a second round of sessions begins, either growing out of a previous session or starting afresh.
The whole point is to come without notes or preparation and to work with what is collectively brought in the
form of experience, inquiry and the passion of the moment.
This session lasts 1hr 45 mins. The iterative and developing nature of Open Space necessitates participants to
stay throughout. So, come prepared to engage with the ELT issues that fire you and others up (mobile learning,
the
perspectives, new contacts and a new ELT conference methodology.

These morning sessions aim to inform and support delegates across a range of areas they may be unfamiliar
with. The sessions will take place from 0815 to 0845, giving you time to get to the plenary sessions. Please see
the Conference Programme, handed to you at conference, for the venues.

Saturday 11 th April

How to get the most out of this conference


Susan Barduhn
This session is for new IATEFL conference participants as well as those of you who have attended many
conferences... but feel your experience could go deeper. We will analyze the programme, form learning groups
for those who wish to jigsaw their conference experience, and share conference time management tips.
This session will be repeated at lunchtime.
How to reflect on research talks at the conference
Sarah Mercer
In this session, we will explore how to make the most of the talks and presentations we attend during the
conference. In particular, we will focus on how to reflect on the research we hear about and consider its
relevance for and connections to our own professional contexts.
How to give a presentation at an international conference
Jeremy Day
Giving a presentation can be a stressful experience. This session will give you ways of organising yourself
before your presentation and conducting yourself during your presentation to reduce that stress. The aim of
the session is to make your presentation a more satisfying experience for you and for your participants.

Sunday 12 th April
How to become a successful freelancer
Mike Hogan
1) Organizational details budgeting & finances, flexible schedule, security,
2) How to get work self-marketing & professionalizing yourself,
3) How to keep work quality control, referrals, and solid admin.

60

How to be successful in an ELT interview


Timothy Phillips
Appearance, Attitude, and Awareness of your interviewer are as important as your abilities. In this session,
learn how to get yourself a AAA-rating and the job!
How to write for IATEFL Voices and other English teaching magazines
Alison Schwetlick
In this session I will outline how to come up with an idea, choose the right publication for it and then convert it
into a publishable piece. I will include examples of genres; writing styles; pertinent guidelines; and tips on how
to work with the editor.

Monday 13 th April
How to get the most from your teaching association
Jane Ryder & Ros Wright

Committee as well as help you evaluate the skills you can offer the TA in your locality.
How to move into language school management
Andy Hockley
This session will look at starting the transition from teacher to manager - including reasons why you might
think about making that move, ways of developing to prepare yourself to take on new responsibilities, and
issues that you might want to be aware of. Come and see what is involved.
How to get published in a refereed journal
Graham Hall
This session will look at why you might want to get published in an "academic" journal, and how to go about it.
The editor of ELT Journal will share tips and suggestions for getting your work in print.

Tuesday 14 th April
How to submit a speaker proposal
Madeleine du Vivier
In this session, we will review the criteria that are used to decide if a conference proposal is accepted for the
IATEFL Annual Conference programme. We will discuss what makes a successful proposal, both in terms of the
abstract and the summary, and how to ensure that your proposal is accepted.
How to move from being a teacher to becoming a trainer
Silvana Richardson
It is often a challenge to go from being a teacher to a teacher trainer. In this session, I will describe how you can
develop the skills and knowledge that you need for the role, as well as formal progression routes.
How to write successfully for IATEFL Conference Selections
Tania Pattison
Conference Selections publication. The editor will provide guidance on how to prepare your report, will show
examples of past submissions that were accepted for publication, and will answer any questions you have.

61

IATEFL SIGs
(SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS)
What are the SIGs?

The aim of the IATEFL Special Interest Groups is to extend the work of IATEFL into professional specialist
areas, to enable members to benefit from information regarding new professional developments and local
and international events.

Why should I join a SIG?

Each Special Interest Group aims to provide its members with three mailings per year (at least two of
which are newsletters or equivalent publications). The SIG newsletters often include articles from
members, as well as informing the membership of the proceedings of conferences and one-day events
which members may have been unable to attend.
Each Special Interest Group aims to organise a minimum of two face-to-face events per year (ideally at
least one outside the UK). In addition, online events may be held.
In addition there are other benefits for SIG members, which vary from one SIG to another, such as
websites, discussion lists, use of social media, scholarships and archives of online events and publications.
Full Individual Members of IATEFL are entitled to join one Special Interest Group included in their
membership fee.

Who are the SIGs?

Business English
English for Specific Purposes
ES(O)L
Global Issues
Leadership & Management

Learner Autonomy
Learning Technologies
Literature, Media & Cultural Studies
Materials Writing
Pronunciation

You can be active in IATEFL: Be active

Research
Teacher Development
Teacher Training & Education
Testing, Evaluation & Assessment
Young Learners & Teenagers

Join an IATEFL SIG

For more information about the SIGs, come to the IATEFL stand in the exhibition, contact IATEFL at
generalenquiries@iatefl.org, visit www.iatefl.org, or contact the coordinators of each group at the relevant
email address below:
Business English besig@iatefl.org
English for Speakers of Other Languages esolsig@iatefl.org
English for Specific Purposes - espsig@iatefl.org
Global Issues - gisig@iatefl.org
Leadership & Management - lamsig@iatefl.org
Learner Autonomy - lasig@iatefl.org
Learning Technologies - ltsig@iatefl.org
Literature, Media & Cultural Studies - lmcssig@iatefl.org

Materials Writing mawsig@iatefl.org


Pronunciation - pronsig@iatefl.org
Research resig@iatefl.org
Teacher Development - tdsig@iatefl.org
Teacher Training and Education - ttedsig@iatefl.org
Testing, Evaluation & Assessment - teasig@iatefl.org
Young Learners & Teenagers - yltsig@iatefl.org

62

SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP DAYS


What is a SIG Day?
From the speaker proposals submitted for the conference, each SIG chose presentations related to their SIG
particular SIG area, you have the opportunity to follow this track of selected sessions throughout the day.
One session in each SIG Day
about the SIG, its events and its committee.
Details, including which day each SIG Day is on, are shown below.
Presentations (pages 27-58) to see what other interesting
presentations related to your areas of special interest are being held throughout the conference.

Business English (Monday)


Ellen Rana
Jonathan Deer
Patrick McMahon
Evelina Miscin
Suzanne Vetter-M'Caw
Olena Korol
Vicki Hollett
Open Forum

Changing the mindset of lower level learners through online collaborations


English for the workplace: changing needs and changing contexts
English for employability: assessing oral skills through a job interview
Developing listening competence
Spice up your Business English class with Pecha Kucha!
Yesterday... today... tomorrow...
How to make ELT videos
BESIG Open Forum

English for Specific Purposes (Saturday)


Tina Kuzic
Philip Nathan
Open Forum
William Kerr
Rosinda Ramos
Agnieszka Dudzik & Agnieszka
Dzieciol-Pedich
Dominic Welsh
Barbara Howarth

EAP writing: teaching strategies for effective paraphrasing


Metadiscoursal features of academic writing in the university business
school
ESPSIG Open Forum
Dictogloss redux: grammar dictation in a digital age
An overview of ESP research in Brazil: developments and directions
Teaching intercultural communication competence in the ESP tertiary
context
Teaching technical English a challenge
Structured tasks for reading authentic journal articles in EAP

ES(O)L (Monday)
Genevieve White
Richard Gallen
Julie Douglas
Open Forum
Yvonne Pratt-Johnson
Steve Brown

63

Make or break it! Teaching learners to write delicate emails


Recognising and working with emergent language in the ESOL classroom
Talk English: from CELTA to volunteer ESOL in South Africa
ES(O)LSIG Open Forum
Meeting the needs of English Creole-speaking students
Language input through project-based learning: why and how

Global Issues (Saturday)


Sylvia Ozbalt & Cristina
Peralejo
Sohyon Jo
You Kyoung Jung
Kyuyun Lim
Tatiana Ischenko
Open Forum
David Valente
Damian Williams
Mike Solly

based curriculum
Practical guideline of English class toward global citizenship education
Nurturing creative global citizens through collaborative learning
Nurturing resourceful students through 3Cs: cultural understanding, creativity
and collaboration
'International Youth Forum model' - a leadership skill-building workshop
GISIG Open Forum
Doing diversity in English language programmes for young learners
Something to MULL over: mapping the urban linguistic landscape
Migrant workers and mobile phones: an aid to learning?

Leadership & Management (Sunday)


Duncan Foord
Diarmuid Fogarty
Open Forum
Maureen McGarvey
Vinicius Nobre
Fiona Dunlop
Cari Freer
Susan Sheerin

How to get your team thinking


The Chimp Paradox and a stress-free life
LAMSIG Open Forum
The dogme and demand high of ELT management
Using performance indicators to monitor training initiatives
Integrating new teachers into an established staffroom
Are all the roads leading to Rome?
Institutional self-assessment: a leadership tool for quality assurance

Learner Autonomy (Saturday)


Christian Ludwig & Ward
Peeters
Ruby Vurdien
Anja Burkert
Helen Jackson
Diane Malcolm
Open Forum
Susan Dawson
Mehtap Yavuzdogan

Fostering learner autonomy online - Facebook as a social learning space


Social networking: developing intercultural competence and fostering
autonomous learning
Collaborative learning and the joint construction of meaning and understanding
Can we do it? Yes, we can
Teacher expectations, learner interpretations: assessing self-directed projects
LASIG Open Forum
EAP learners developing as practitioners of learning
Teachers wanted! Spot the teacher in the classroom

Learning Technologies (Saturday)


Michael Harrison
Monica Veado
Liliana Esther Simon
Ryan Parmee
Stephen Pilton
Nancy Carter & Alex
Golding
David Read & Will Nash
Open Forum

Sounds good, looks good: using short video clips in ELT


Writing and the art of collaboration an online project
Digital corner
Introducing tablets and leading teachers toward effective use
Augmented reality: practical ideas for its use in the classroom
Using iAnnotate for integrated online academic writing feedback
Through the looking Glass: creating a video-ready classroom
LTSIG Open Forum

64

Literature, Media & Cultural Studies (Saturday)


Sandie Mourao
Benjamin Dobbs
Jennifer Schumm Fauster
Open Forum
Lisa Peter
Alan Maley
Chris Lima
Inas Kotby

The house that crack built: a picturebook for teens


Teaching language or teaching culture?
competence
LMCS SIG Open Forum
Shakespeare for English language learners
Literature in an age of distraction
The roles of extensive reading in teacher education
Literature, critical, creative thinking and assessment mould a creative writer

Materials Writing (Sunday)


Fiona MacKenzie & David
Baker
Katherine Bilsborough &
Chuck Sandy
Emily Bryson
Johanna Stirling
Hugh Dellar
John Hughes
Penny Hands
Open Forum

the editor!
Free and fair ELT: for writers, publishers and teachers
Keep CALM and write accessible ESP materials!
The why, what and how of self-publishing for teachers
Can a picture tell a thousand words?
Tools, tips and tasks for developing materials writing skills
From tradition to innovation: a British Indian collaboration in course design
MaWSIG Open Forum

Pronunciation (Monday)
Pamela Rogerson-Revell
Luke Meddings
Open Forum
Mark Hancock
Olga Sergeeva
Richard Cauldwell
Richard Benson
Laura Patsko

teaching
People, pronunciation and play
PronSIG Open Forum
Pronunciation to go: learning to learn from the dictionary
Authentic listening: stepping from bottom-up processing to understanding
Listening and connected speech: untruthful rules, unruly truths
Do we still need the phonemic chart?
The ear of the beholder: helping learners understand different accents

Research (Sunday)
Paul Braddock
Nagm-Addin Saif
Volha Arkhipenka
Zarina Markova
Lina Mukhopadhyay
Open Forum
Simon Borg
Emily Edwards

65

Exploring a new global framework for continuing professional development


Towards initiating YELTA
Researching professional development with the use of the narrative approach
Teacher voices: does research meet practice?
Developing the Survey of ELT Research in India
RESIG Open Forum
Evaluating an action research scheme for English language teachers
development

Teacher Development (Monday)


Tom Heaven
Conrad Heyns
Phil Keegan
Karen Waterston
Margit Szesztay
Ana Garcia-Stone
Open Forum
Divya Madhavan
Tessa Woodward & Daniel
Monaghan

Lesson jamming: planning lessons in groups


Lesson observations - the observer becomes the observee
The elephant in the classroom: thoughts on the observer paradox
Interactive observation an alternative training approach
Alternatives to coffee and chocolate: energy management for teachers
TDSIG Open Forum
Parent-teacher dialogues
Bridging the technophobe-technophile gap in teacher training and
development

Teacher Training & Education (Monday)


Kalyan Chattopadhyay
Anna Uhl Chamot
Gulshan Huseynova
Lesley Painter-Farrell
Gavin Dudeney & Thom Kiddle
Gabriel Diaz Maggioli
Open Forum

Mobile devices for teacher learning training: lessons and implications


Teaching learning strategies in a flipped instruction model
The 4Cs of a successful partnership in teacher training
Mindful corrective feedback: supporting learning
Quality control: towards a framework for assessing online training courses
Capturing the reality of the classroom in teacher education courses
TTEdSIG Open Forum

Testing, Evaluation & Assessment (Sunday)


Marian Crandall
Isabela Villas Boas & Katia
Falcomer
Evelina Galaczi & Angeliki
Salamoura
Christien Lee
Vivien Berry
Mehvar Turkkan
Saeede Haghi
Open Forum

Fairness as a consideration in writing test items


From summative to formative assessment in a traditional ELT institute
Technology and learning oriented assessment: helping teachers and learners
Raising scores: gamification activities for test preparation teachers
Enhancing assessment literacy: nurturing learning-oriented outcomes in the
language classroom
A reflective workshop on writing standardization practices: is standardization
possible?
The role of visual stimuli in EAP listening tests
TEASIG Open Forum

Young Learners & Teenagers (Sunday)


Georgios Chatzis
Rachael Harris
Samuel Lefever
Hasan Ramadan
Nicky Francis
John Clegg
Open Forum
Laura Jane McWilliams
Paul Woods

Making up grammar rules


L1 - how to avoid it and when to use it
Out-of-school English learning: hidden resource or classroom curse?
Using writing and drawing to release tension among traumatised students
Using authentic storybooks in an early years classroom
Developing readable English-medium textbooks in Rwanda
YLTSIG Open Forum
Parental engagement: practical ideas from opening a new teaching centre
Can remote teaching promote deep learning?

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PLENARY SPEAKERS
Donald Freeman
Frozen in thought? How we think and what we do in ELT

Saturday 11 th April

ought to know and be


able to do. These prescriptions are anchored in central ideas in the field that we generally take for
granted. We do not challenge them, even though they inexorably shape all aspects of the work of
ELT- from national policies and standards for teaching to administrative procedures and day-to-day
work in ELT classrooms. These central ideas come from diverse sources: some are loosely derived
from research, while others are inherited in the history of what we do. The ideas themselves are
taken as common sense, and thus are woven into the social expectations of the work of teaching. In
the field of ELT has
become immobilized in a critical sense by these ideas and what they mean for what we do as
teachers and teacher educators.
This talk examines some of these central ideas that we live by in ELT, including ideas about how
teaching and le
instruction. I examine what the ideas mean for the work of classroom teachers given how English
functions in the 21st Century, and how they shape and constrain our thinking in teacher education
and research. I argue that, if they are left unscrutinized and unchallenged, the ideas can undermine
-examining them,
thereby thawing our thinking, is a critical step in reasserting social control over the public work of
English language teaching.

Joy Egbert
Sunday 12 th April
Engagement principles and practice in classroom learning, language and technology

A still-common issue with technology use in language learning is an overly-strong focus on the
digital tools and a relatively weak emphasis on actual learning. This technocentric approach may
arise, in part, from a lack of clear theoretical grounding for classroom technology use. While it's
unclear whether atheoretical uses of technology actually provide barriers to learning, it is clear
from the research that principled uses can lead to student achievement. But which principles should
language educators use to guide their planning? This plenary proposes that principles of task
engagement, as part of an educator's overall understanding of second language learning, can serve
both educators and learners well in technology-enhanced environments. Task engagement -- which
includes principles of authenticity, connection, interaction, feedback and challenge/skills balance -supports current popular trends such as flipping instruction and the use of serious education games
that underscore the need for students to find their studies engaging. This plenary provides an
overview of task engagement and examples of why and how language educators might engage their
learners with technology.

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Ann Cotton

Monday 13 th April
a model of action

In the theatre of international development, girls' education has moved from the wings to centre stage
in the last 25 years. Ann Cotton will chart this change and both the philosophical underpinnings and
utilitarian arguments that have propelled it. Camfed's work is driven by the right to education of every
child, and the delivery of that right. Its work has demonstrated that girls' exclusion from education is
rooted in family poverty and the enforced decisions as to which child should go to school. Ann will
explore the arguments that variously place culture, traditional mores and poverty at the root of girls'
educational exclusion. The address will describe how Camfed has worked with rural communities in
five African countries - Ghana, Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe - where family poverty is
endemic. The Camfed Model works in a full partnership with Ministries of Education, traditional and
faith-based leaders, head teachers and teachers, parents and children. This inclusion is a
fundamental principle of the Model and one that shows evidence-based results in delivering
sustainable systemic change. Ann Cotton will illuminate the systems and processes that have been
built to ensure transparency and accountability first and foremost to the child, Camfed's primary
client. Ann will describe the different forms of capital that Camfed recognises respects and extends capital that includes knowledge, social and institutional capital. The address will conclude with the
analysis of Cama, the alumnae organisation of Camfed secondary school graduates that is more than
25,000-strong, explaining the depth of empathy and analysis members bring to the stage as we work
to establish and build health and education systems that serve the needs of everyone.

Harry Kuchah
Tuesday 14 th April
ELT in difficult circumstances: Challenges, possibilities and future directions
classrooms
accommodated in an unsuitably shaped room, ill-graded, with a teacher who perhaps does not speak
he number of pupils learning
English around the world has grown exponentially, especially in developing countries where the
movement for Education for All has led to increased enrolments at primary level without a
concomitant increase in resources. In sub-Saharan Africa, for example, this has exacerbated existing
challenges to classroom practice such as over-crowded and multi-grade classrooms, lack of
textbooks, lack of libraries, poor exposure to the English language usage, lack of financial and
material resources and other cultural constraints. Despite these challenges, the dominant discourse
on ELT methodology promoted in such contexts is still being largely generated in ideal (North)
contexts and sometimes resisted by local practitioners as not sufficiently appropriate for their
challenging local realities. Studies examining language teaching policy and practice in developing
countries reveal incompatibilities between MoE policies and actual classroom practices of teachers
and bring into perspective calls from several ELT professionals and researchers for the development
of contextually appropriate forms of ELT pedagogy in underprivileged contexts. In this presentation, I
draw from my experiences of teaching very large classes (over 200 teenagers and 100 children) in
under-resourced contexts in Cameroon and go on to examine the pragmatic responses of teachers in
otherwise difficult circumstances. Then I make a case for an ELT methodology which takes on board
both learner and teacher agency and suggest ways in which teaching English in such circumstances
may benefit from a bottom-up enhancement approach to teacher development and the dissemination
of good practice.

Carol Ann Duffy


A Poetry Reading by Carol Ann Duffy, Poet Laureate

Tuesday 14 th April

A poetry reading by the poet laureate from old and new work. Followed by a book signing.

68

SIGNATURE EVENTS
Pearson

Saturday 11 th April

through learning. We are working on


measuring the impact of our products on learners in order to improve learning outcomes and ensure we are
equipping learners to achieve what they need to make progress.

British Council
Saturday 11 th April
Identifying and developing the skills and knowledge a teacher needs

Quality of teaching is important in increasing learner achievement. How can quality be improved and meet the
challenges of education in the twenty-first century? An invited panel will discuss how we identify and develop
the skills and knowledge a teacher needs to achieve quality teaching and learning.

Cambridge English
The language debate

Sunday 12 th April

The Cambridge English Teaching Framework, along with most other ELT professional development

needs to be an accurate model. This raises a number of questions:

anguage improvement course for teachers focus on?


These questions will be explored in a panel session, with experts in the field discussing their views and
experiences. The topic will then be opened up to the audience for further debate.

ELTJ Debate
Monday 13th April
This house believes that language testing does more harm than good
A remarkable amount of time is devoted to testing and assessment in ELT by teachers and learners, by
schools and institutions, and, of course, by test designers and administrators themselves. Whilst tests are

testing do more harm than good? Our two speakers will debate the issues surrounding language testing in ELT.
Please come along, have your say, ask questions and join in the vote.

IATEFL Signature Event


A question of language with David Crystal

Tuesday 14th April

Following the enormous success of IATEFL's first Q&A webinar with David Crystal in 2013, this year IATEFL is
proud to offer its very own Signature Event featuring our highly knowledgeable patron. During this session, you
decide on the content! David will answer questions on various language issues such as language use and
change as well as grammar and lexis. Questions will be collected in advance on IATEFL's various social media
sites and at the Meet the Patron events at the IATEFL Stand during the conference. David will also take
questions from the floor. Come join this IATEFL Signature Event and get those questions answered!

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THIS BROCHURE IS SPONSORED BY

WWW.IATEFL.ORG

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