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PHILIPPINE NATIONAL POLICE

PLANNING MANUAL

Directorate for Plans


Camp Crame, Quezon City
September 10, 2001

PREFACE
We all have heard of the "King in the Ivory Tower" isolated from the
rest of the world and yet making crucial decisions for his constituents on the
outside. This is what this manual tried so hard to avoid! tried so hard to
avoid! What it has attempted to attain is to be an eagleto soar high to see
all that is happening below, and glide low enough to observe the target.
Thus, while this manual presents theoretical concepts, it makes itself feasible
by basing on real life facts and experiences. With the vast wealth of
experience of each PNP personnel, the act of planning, therefore, becomes a
skill which is almost instinctive. All there is to do is to organize thoughts and
document experience in order that a proper plan may be formulated in
relation to the needs of the people vis a vis the mandates of the Philippine
National Police on peace and order.
Each PNP commander "worth his salt" must learn how to plan. With
scarce resources, human and materiel, units at all levels must be able to
maximize the utilization of re- sources to impact the community. Hence, there
is a need to reflect on each experience whether a victory or a defeat. There is
a need to "dig deep into the heart" and use intuition as guide to proper action
as there may not be material time to conduct costly surveys. Indeed, in
situations where there is uncertainty and tremendous constraints, the adept
planning skills of leaders become vital. This is not to say that leaders alone
should complete the planning. There is a universal belief in the wisdom of
"bottoms-up" consultation. The upper corners of the hierarchy do not have
the monopoly of brilliant ideas, Hence, an effort must be made to learn the
view from the ground level. This enhances ownership of the plan.
On the other hand, and consistent to the call for reciprocal
responsibility, it would be to everyone's benefit if people started asking
themselves how they can contribute in improving the performance of the
PNP. This had happened. But, it still takes the skill to "inter-operate" with the
Local Government, NGA's, NGO's, church and other community organizations
to actualize this type of collaboration. Perhaps, it is still incumbent upon the
members to display the values which increase the "inter-operability"
conditions.
Planning itself needs the capacity to engage in a vision. It needs the
"unbridled enthusiasm" and the "sophomoric fervour" to look at the internal
and external environment, and move to better existing conditions. These are
the leadership traits which shall enable the PNP to hurdle its stumbling blocks,
and run unimpeded towards a vision and an instituted direction or goal. One
of the enduring lessons derived from field commanders is that when the
community has enough trust and confidence in the integrity, dedication and
skill in a PNP unit, an all-out support is volunteered. This multiplies human
and materiel resources overcoming constraints or "shortages." There is a vast

source of support waiting to be tapped by an adept commander. This needs


astute planning.
In the book "Powerful Planning Skills" by Peter Capezio, he makes a
call for an individual audit of planning capabilities. "Am I a good planner?",
may well be a question the PNP leader must ask himself. Perhaps a scenario
to be practiced is in relation to the recent attack on America in which
terrorists erased the twin towers of the World Trade Center from the New
York Skyline. If a similar attack was done in the Philippines, are we ready for
it? What would be your relevant responses? The answer of each individual
policeman would measure individual awareness of the importance of
planning.
How do we plan against terrorism? The recent events prove that
materiel, financial and technological sophistication can fail and be breached
by forces intent on waging "asym- metrical warfare." In this nation's very own
backyard, the rapidly increasing conflicts of culture and values can not be
denied anymore. We are seeing, as we must, pockets of "clashes of
civilization" with all its implicit and underlying causes coming into play. Perhaps, it is time to recognize an emerging "religious intolerance" which would
define one group of peoples from another, and which has the potential to
send them into that path of destruction! It would be alarming to step into this
realms of thinking, but, it might be more costly to totally ignore the
importance and the role of "religious dimension" as it influences terrorism. It
is time to see the Abu Sayyaf in the light of the emerging global network of
terrorism. They must be seen as part of the worldwide global cells linked by
technology and intertwined by a set of politico-cultural ties set-up by Osama
Bin Laden and other "jackals" of terrorism. It is important to see if we will see
the advent of "religious kamika- zes" with no regard for innocent lives and
whose only aim is to forward the purpose of their politico-cultural beliefs.
Thus, the leaders of the 21st Century in the PNP must plan with these
in mind. The responses to these elements challenges the aptitude of each
PNP Commander.
How do we view the relationships of the several organized crimes
happening in the country? It is becoming clear that some sort of active interrelationship exists among them. Some names of known criminal personalities
seem to consistently crop-up when ever (or whatever type of) crime occurs.
That there is collusion among these syndicates is very likely.
How does the PNP unit commander attack these problems at the
tactical level armed with this knowledge? His ability to forecast and see the
future scenario would come into play. Planning develops this capability.
A note of caution though. Plans are good. Planning is vital. These are
facts. But, if they are kept in the ivory tower or in the inner recesses of the
office filing cabinet, THEY MEAN NOTHING. The advice is, execute your plan.

Its real measure of soundness is in execution. A final advicesuccess is one


(1) percent instructions and ninety nine (99) percent supervision.
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT
A. Francisco Gold Condominium II, EDSA cor. Mapagmahal Street
Quezon City
Message
The global environment in which government, in general, and the PNP
in particular, find themselves in, challenges the decision-making skills of the
PNP commander. This is especially true at the cutting-edge level of policing.
Here, situations present themselves so suddenly that immediate action has to
take place. The police units must therefore be so designed as to be dynamic.
They must be prepared to react properly to contingencies. This state of
readiness can be achieved through a well-orchestrated and properly executed
plan. We cannot afford to be caught flat-footed in any kind of situation nor
can we be derailed by contingencies which suddenly confront us.
The PNP must be strategic and global in its outlook even as it
addresses the principles of sustainability in its tactical or ground-level efforts.
To achieve these, an active collaboration with the local government units
must be encouraged. The PNP must continue to work with the entirety of the
ecology around it. In fact, it must realize that it is but one part of the national
environment. It cannot succeed by being alone or in isolation. The PNP must
find its way to establish the vital links with the community.
In order to do this with effectively, it has to plan its moves carefully.
Hence, this planning guide becomes relevant and useful to the organization.
It is imperative that each commander be skilled in the
art and science of planning.
There must be an organizational appreciation for the importance of
establishing a plan, no matter how simple. While valor in itself is a value,
there is no substitute for careful and deliberate planning. It
is my belief that good governance in itself requires the formulation of a wellthought of plan.
Let this planning guide be your reference.
JOSE D LINA JR
Secretary

Republic of the Philippines


Department of the Interior and Local Government National Police Commission
NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS, PHILIPPINE NATIONAL POLICE
OFFICE OFTHE CHIEF, PNP
Camp Crame, Quezon City
Message
Congratulations to the Directorate for Plans for coming out with this
PNP Planning Guide!
This Planning Guide is a necessary tool to optimize the performance of
PNP Field Commanders. In the light of the mounting challenges posed before
us, and the PNP's constraints, effective and efficient planning is an
imperative. It is the method to assess current directions and "re-energize" the
PNP efforts to respond in accordance to the people's will. Planning allows us
to see the opportunities for synergy and cooperation. It opens doors for a
"bottoms-up" consultation and "co-opting" with those who are stakeholders in
the peace and order effort.
Thus every PNP Commander must realize the importance of a well
established plan without forgetting the aspect of sound execution. Stephen
Covey in his book stated the importance of "honing the saw." Thus, make a
conscious effort to refine your plans as the obtaining environment requires.
This Planning guide is timely and relevant.

LEANDRO R MENDOZA
Police Director General
Chief, PNP

Republic of the Philippines


Department of the Interior and Local Government National Police Commission
NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS, PHILIPPINE NATIONAL POLICE
DIRECTORATE FOR PLANS
Camp Crame, Quezon City
Message
Planning is one of the more important skills that a police unit
commander must acquire.
This skill allows the commander to be proactive. It enhances the ability
to optimize the utilization of scarce resources in pursuit of peace and order. It
establishes order in the complexity of competing functions. It gears programs
towards a common direction under a coherent methodology for the
attainment of the PNP Vision and Mission.
Planning is important. It develops an imperative for environmental
scanning and situational analysis. It trains good commanders to hone their
forecasting and prioritization skills.
The new paradigm of police unit leadership is not to see the
organization in isolation from the total ecology of society. There is a need for
the enlightened leader to "get-out-of-his-shell" and establish the network
which will enable him to overcome the financial and material constraints of his
unit. There is a network with vast resources to offer to the PNP which is only
waiting for the innovative and dedicated leader to tap. Planning shall be the
tool to discover these.
Good planning involves people. It empowers them. When people do
get involved in the formulation of policing plans, they feel ownership of the
peace and order effort. They become aware that they are stakeholders and
partners of the police in its mission to prevent and solve crimes. They begin
to have a better understanding of their role. They become real partners of the
police.
Hence, the Directorate for Plans is proud to share this Planning Manual
with the more discriminating and conscientious police commander. Side by
side with the revised Medium-Term Development Plan (2001-2004), this tool
should allow for the establishment of the other necessary plans to guide the
administration and operations of all police units.
There was a deliberate effort to simplify the presentation of the
precepts contained in this manual. Furthermore, it was the objective of this

manual to incorporate the formats of all the plans required in the PNP
organization. Hence, this should be useful guide.
The environment on the ground is increasingly becoming complex and
challenging. A well-established plan should provide a clear "guiding star" for
the commanders to address the challenges confronting the Philippine National
Police in the 21st century.

RICARDO F DE LEON
Police Director
Director for Plans

TABLE OF CONTENTS
PREFACE
MESSAGES
CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION OF PLANNING
Definition of Planning
Elements of Planning
Importance of Planning
Skills Needed for Planning
Fundamentals of Planning
Planning Cycle
Alternative Model of Planning
Suggested Guides to a Good Plan
Tools in Making a Plan
CHAPTER II
PNP PLANS
Medium-Term Development Plan
Operations Plans and Budget
Program Review and Analysis
CHAPTER III
INTEGRATED AREA/COMMUNITY
PUBLIC SAFETY PLAN
CHAPTER IV
OTHER PNP PLANS (FORMATS)
Types of Operational Plan
Types of Intelligence Reports
Other Formats of PNP Reports
CHAPTER V
CRISIS MANAGEMENT AND TERRORISM
CHAPTER V1
SEVEN HABITS OF SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE
BIBLIOGRAPHY
TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP

CHAPTER I - INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION
"In all campaigns against violence and crime,
there is one process that must continue. It is advocacy.
Here is where the spirit of a crusading community finds its salt."
- PDG LEANDRO RMENDOZADEFINITION OF PLANNING
A documented method by which a thing should be done.
For this purpose, plans should be written down. Otherwise, there will
be no way of establishing what is to be done, who will do it, when to start
doing the tasks involved, what are you doing or who is doing what. This is
what a plan establishes.
A listing of a course of action by a tasked group or groups; or
individuals in order to reach a certain goal.
The plan may be implemented by an individual or groups following a
predetermined course of action.
A good example of a plan is the Patrol Plan of police stations.
Formal act or process of making a plan.
It is writing down what you want to do, how you would do it, and
who would help you do the tasks involved to reach a certain end.
ELEMENTS OF PLANNING
-

a goal - what do you want to attain?


course of action - how would you reach your goal ?
implementing group - who is tasked to do the actions?
resources needed - what is needed to accomplish the task ?

IMPORTANCE OF PLANNING
We must PRO-ACT, not just RE-ACT.

It is best to solve a problem before it happens. A plan which is put in


place, rehearsed, and evaluated would make implementation easier. It would
make the police units dynamic and responsive.
Doing more with less.
PNP resources are always not enough. Hence, they must be used to
the fullest and with maximum impact. In this case one plus one should equal
three or more (1 +1 >3) or the sum of the parts should be greater than the
whole.
Foundation of your work.
A plan establishes the basis for what you are doing. You will have a
guide or a roadmap to help you do the right things. Take for example the
station patrol plan. It coordinates movements and extends police visibility in
crime prone areas and periods.
Helps make your people become more productive.
When people know what you want to do, how you want it done and
what is expected of them they adapt to their roles and become more
productive. They will have a mastery of their job. When people know their
roles and understand their value and contribution in the over-all operations,
they are able to improve themselves and become more useful.
Reflects your competence.
Your experience and training will be reflected on the plan you make. It
will establish that you have "your act together." It will also compel you to
"sharpen your saw" or to read more about delivering quality police service. A
good plan is a good image-builder.
Gives you the strategic and tactical advantage.
A well formulated and instituted plan allows the commander to make
actions and decisions which have long-term impact. At the same time it
prepares the unit for contingencies needing short-term solutions. Dynamism is
an essential requirement of any unit. It must be flexible and attuned to the
people's will.
SKILLS NEEDED FOR PLANNING
Good Analytical Mind
You have to know your situation. You have to set-up your baseline
data, learn to analyze what is happening and how it affects you and your unit.
Where is your crime prone area? What is your crime clock?
Forecasting
Seeing ahead and making sound assumptions. Begin with the end in
mind. Use your intuition based on a sound reflection of past experiences.
Look at the confluence of events and look at the future scenario. Use your
imagination. Play around with ideas which would help you to be more

effective as a police unit commander. Examine the causal relationship of


events, and draw conclusions with a view of the future.
Prioritizing
Compare your resources/capabilities with your goals and objectives;
what and who should be tasked to reach certain purposes or ends. Ask what
should be done first? What is more important? What has a strategic impact?
Sound objective setting
Know where you are going and how to get there. Be practical. A
journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step.
Contingency Planning and Crisis Management
Monitoring
Identifying success indicators and follow-up. Try to see the progress of
your plan. Make a checklist of what have been done. Place reminders on
conspicuous places to remind you of the progress of your plan.
Documenting
If you have not written it, then you have not thought of it. Write your
ideas down. Report the progress of your plan.
Flexibility
Adjust your plans to resources. Be realistic. Do not incorporate tasks
which need legislation. Also, be flexible to the point of being able to modify
certain parts of the plan which do not work.
Inter-Operability
This refers to the capability of the commander to work in synergy with
the different government and private sectors of the community. These sectors
are just waiting to be tapped and are eager to work with the PNP in pursuit of
peace and order. In this regard strategic and tactical alliances may be
established with the church, the schools, the local government units and with
civic organizations to realize community support for the PNP.
"Inter-Operability" is not just mere coordination, collaboration or
liaisoning. It is a commitment to deploy and employ resources, and mobilize
with synchronized energy with the different sectors of the community. It is
establishing strategic and tactical alliances towards the vision of peace and
order.
FUNDAMENTALS OF PLANNING
Know your situation
What are your problems? What do you have in terms of resources to
change your situation? Why are you in your present situation? Make an
analysis of your obtaining condition. Know your officials. Study the

demographics of your area. Study the previous reports of your predecessors.


Talk with the people and your own policemen.
Know what you want to do
What is your purpose or goal? Always "start with the end in mind"
(Stephen Covey). Determine how, where and when your tasks will be
finished. This will help you manage your resources and energy properly.
Breakdown your goals into smaller tasks
Make your action steps towards your goal. Reaching a big goal is a
result of accomplishing small connecting tasks. Know the first step towards
your goal.
What are the resources needed
Pinpoint what needs to be done (action steps), what is needed to do a
n d who is the best person to give the job to. Resources will always be
scarce; otherwise economists will be out of work. Plan on maximizing and
optimizing the use of your resources. Plan on how to get needed resources.
Practice "interoperability" with the community. Collaborate, coordinate and
work with barangay/municipal/city officials. Attend meetings of civic
organizations when invited.
Anticipate problems or changing conditions
Do some scenario-setting exercises. Imagine or dream about your
plan. Be ready to adapt to changes in the environment. Anticipate resistance
to the plan. Organize believers to your plan to infect others with your
enthusiasm. Discuss things
with your key PNCO's and NUPs.
Implement your plan
There will always be critiques to your plan. That is their job. Do yours!
After doing your best to plan, implement it. Remember they are just
EX(outside) PERTS. You are on IN(inside) PERT of your situation.
Monitor results
Measure the progress of your plan. Find out the difficulties and
problems encountered by tasked resources. Discuss on how to get over the
humps and bumps with your people. Conduct perception surveys and ask for
feedback from the church, the media, the schools and business groups,
Evaluate the plan
Part of the plan, are the sets of success criteria or indicators of
success. Are you happy with what has been achieved so far? Do you need to
change some aspects of your plan? Don't be drastic in changing your plan.
Change only when vitally needed. Measure the impact through tools like crime
solution efficiency, crime reduction, citizen feedback, media feedback and
feedback from the implementors.

Document the experience


Keep a record of what is happening. Keep a diary of significant
events. Write down your thoughts about everything relevant to the plan. The
lessons you learn will be valuable in teaching others what to do or how not to
do it. Place your write-up in the PACREPS, Special Reports and executive
briefs which you submit to higher offices.
Report your experience
Share your experience to your superiors and peers. Let them analyze
your plan or your methods. Learn from these. Report your plan during
command conferences, meetings with local officials and even corporate
groups if you have the chance.
THE PLANNING CYCLE
STRATEGIC PLANNING
Strategic Planning is long-term and with a far reaching impact. The
commonly agreed timeline for these types of plans is more than five (5) years
in duration. This is usually done at the executive levels.
Environmental Analysis. The assessment of external factors;
physical environment, geographical location and the social climate - in order
to cope with the rapid changes in the environment.
Organization Audit. The assessment of the organization's capability
to adequately respond with the increasing demands of its constituents. This
would enable the organization to maximize its opportunities and neutralize the
existing threats.
Strategies. The major course of action that an organization takes to
achieve its "goals" - taking in consideration the opportunities the organization
may exploit, and the threats it must address.
Components:
1. Strategic Alternatives - set of strategic options from which an organization
can derive their preferred choice.
2. Strategic Choice - it is the preferred choice taken from strategic
alternatives.
MEDIUM-TERM PLANNING
These are plans whose timelines are between those of strategic plans
and tactical plans usually between one (1) to three (3) years. There are some

texts which include medium-term plans as among the strategic plan, as it


shapes the organization partially.
TACTICAL PLANNING
Tactical Planning is short-term and usually has limited impact. This is
also referred to as a near term plan. The commonly agreed timeline for these
types of plans is less than one (1) year. This is usually done at the ground
levels of the organization.
Mission, Vision and Goals
Mission: the organization's purpose
Vision: the dream or the aspiration of the organization
Goals: the desired target
Identification of Tasks. The job description.
Staffing. This would involve the allocation of funds or budgets to
sustain and at the same time realize the plan.
Set-up Performance Standards. How would you know that the tasked
groups are accomplishing their tasks at the proper time, place and quality?
In a nutshell, strategic planning answers the question "Where are we going?"
While tactical planning answers the question "How do we get there?"
PLANNING CYCLE

ALTERNATIVE MODEL OF PLANNING


(Peter Capezio)

The Alternative Planning Process Model


(for single-use plans)

The planning process is both linear and cyclical. It is linear because


certain actions must be done in a certain order. For example, the overall
purpose must be defined prior to data collection. It is cyclical because you
must frequently refer to your defined purpose or goal to evaluate your
progress. Also, you may need to return to previous steps of the planning
process if you find that they no longer support the overall purpose. In
general, the following steps show how you might typically move through the
planning process, assuming there are no major glitches!
Steps in the Planning Process
1. Define the overall purpose or goal.
2. Determine the major components or objectives of the plan.
3. Make sure that your objectives align with (support) the overall purpose.
4. Collect and evaluate the data you will need to determine what it will take to
complete each component of the plan.
5. Make sure that the data you collected and evaluated support the overall
purpose.

6. Develop a forecast plan.


7. Make sure that your forecast plan supports the overall purpose.
8. Determine action steps.
9. Make sure that your action steps support the overall purpose.
10. Develop a contingency plan.
11. Make sure that your contingency plans support the overall purpose.
12. Implement your plan.
13. Make sure that your implementation supports the overall purpose.
14. Check the progress of your plan frequently.
15. Make sure as your plan is implemented that the overall purpose remains
in focus.
Seems like lots of steps! In reality, you will find that taking a few
moments to focus on the plan's overall purpose will save you time over the
life of your project. Much more time is wasted reworking project plans when
halfway through you discover that the project is off course or does not
support the overall goal.
Define the Purpose or Goal
What: Ironically, this first and most crucial step is often the most
forgotten. For any plan to be successful you must have a clear understanding
of the desired outcome. So until the overall purpose is understood, nothing
else should be done. As the model shows, you return to the purpose or goal
between each step of the planning process to ensure that you are on the
right track. Many well-intended plans go awry because people lose sight of
the overall goal.
How: A well-defined purpose or goal takes some thought. Here are
some of the main elements:
1. It states in broad terms what the desired outcome is.
2. It defines the project's time schedule.
3. It describes the resources that will be used. Resources should be
expressed in terms of people's time and financial costs, among others.
4. It states any quality standards that are applicable (general accounting
practices, customer satisfaction guidelines, no negative impact on other
processes, etc.)
Set Objectives
What: Based on your well-defined purpose or goal, you will want to
set broad objectives that describe the major components of your project.
Make a list of your broad objectives for easy reference.
How: You want to move from your overall purpose or goal statement
to the details of your project. Do this by determining the major "chunks" of
the project.

Collect and Evaluate Data


What: Once your broad objectives are set, data collection begins. For
each major component of your project you need to determine what the
relevant facts are and what actions are necessary to complete each objective.
Then develop a realistic and factual list of specific details or critical success
factors for each objective of your plan.
Be sure to involve others throughout the planning process, but
especially at this point. You need feedback from people who will implement
the objectives or be affected by them. By involving others now, you may
prevent many problems down the road, where they are much harder to fix.
How:
To collect the data needed for each objective, you should ask
and answer the following questions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

What work is required to accomplish this objective?


Who must perform this work?
What issues or challenges will arise while getting this work done?
Are those involved committed to this project?
How long has similar work taken?
What is a realistic amount of time to complete this objective?
Are there risks involved?

There are several tools you may want to use for collecting data. Again,
make sure that your analysis supports your overall purpose or goal statement.
A not on risk: The future is always more or less uncertain. You reduce
the degree of uncertainty - the risk - when you collect the relevant data and
apply them to your forecast, which is the next planning step.
Develop a Forecast
What: Forecasting is perhaps the most creative step of the planning
process that a police managers must develop, because several views must be
tested before you decide on a project schedule. At this point in the plan, all of
your data should be integrated into a cohesive road map. Now you will take
this detailed information for each objective and test how it works together in
meeting the overall purpose or goal. This step is called forecasting because it
is the first time that you will have information available to predict the project's
schedule, the resources needed and necessary quality measurements.
At this point the feasibility of your purpose or goal statement may be
challenged. Questions about timing or resources generally will surface as you
look at each major chunk of the project and see how it relates to the other
chunks. At the end of this planning step you will have a detailed schedule of

activities - some that need to be done in a linear fashion and some that can
be done concurrently.
How:
Forecasting will be less difficult if you compare different
possible scenarios to find the solution or courses of action that best meets the
needs of the overall purpose or goal. To make schedule for each major
component of the project, answer these three questions:
1. Which activities must be done? Eliminate any duplicate tasks or tasks that
do not add value to the project.
2. What must be completed before work starts on each specific objective?
3. What other activities are dependent upon the completion of this group of
activities?
A forecast with concurrent activities contains a certain amount of risk.
When comparing possible schedules, your analysis should include a risk
assessment. Weigh the possible benefits against the possible costs and
possible contingency actions. The more information you have about each
objective, the better prepared you will be to assess the possible risks.
Unrealistic plans can create more problems than they solve! To
determine if your plan is realistic, follow these three steps:
1. Have a trusted peer play devil's advocate.
2. Evaluate how your plan will impact other departmental plans.
3. Involve others-get their input!
Determine Action Steps
What:
Based on your forecast and the details you gathered during
data collection, determine what tactical steps are needed to be taken and in
what order. During this part of the planning process, activities are defined in
a very detailed manner. Eventually, you will develop detailed daily, weekly,
and/or monthly activity checklists, and/ r action plans.
How: The key to success during this part of the planning process is
not leaving anything out! As simple as this may seem, the tiniest forgotten
step may sometimes stall an entire project. Depending on the nature of your
project, you may want to develop daily or weekly checklists. There are
countless ways that you can do this; however, you will want to use a format
that makes the most sense for your project. Here are a few sample
approaches:
1. Use daily checklists that tie into weekly checklists and/or weekly checklists
that tie into monthly tracking sheets for your action plan.
2. Keep all activities and their due dates listed on a master action plan.
3. Maintain individual checklists for each employee.
4. Post checklists will all employees' names and their assigned responsibilities.
(Peer pressure is a great motivator.)

5. Take advantage of project management software to track the completion


of activities.
Develop a Contingency Plan
What: A contingency plan represents your efforts to guess what might
go wrong or differently with your plan and how to handle it if it does.
Developing a contingency plan is important because things rarely go exactly
as planned. With a contingency plan in place, you can minimize the negative
effects that changes may have on the success of your project. A contingency
plan consists of several if/then statements that list what changes you will
make to your plan if certain situations occur.
How:
Coming up with these possible situations requires
brainstorming. Be sure to involve several people in the brainstorming session
and answer the following questions:
1. What could happen differently from how we have predicted?
2. What effect, if any, will these differences have?
3. How should we deal with these differences if they occur?
Develop if/then statement for those situations that are either most
likely to occur or those that will do the most damage if they occur.
Implement the Plan
What: By this time, implementing your plan should not be like taking
a plunge into the unknown. You've done your research, you've consulted with
other people, and you have remained focused on your overall desired
outcome or purpose. Now, take your forecast, action plan, checklists,
contingency plans and begin.
How: Plan implementation has three phases: the start, the storm, and
maintain and sustain. You must be aware of how these three phases will
impact your plan's success.
The Start
Follow these steps to begin your plan implementation.
1. Communicate the plan. Make sure that everyone involved clearly
understands the overall purpose and the roles he will play in the
implementation.
2. Track the initial activities very closely.
3. Get feedback from those who are involved. Are there any activities that
need to be changed or added?
4. Communicate your initial findings to everyone involved.

The Storm
As the plan is implemented, several issues are sure to arise. Some
people may be confused about the purpose of the plan and its time line;
perhaps financial pressures and/or unexpected complications may surface.
This is normal.
1. Try to determine the root causes of the problems by talking to several
people involved.
2. Make several small but needed adjustments. Look at ways of clarifying the
plan so that small "irritants" don't get in the way.
3. Don't hesitate to implement your contingency plans if necessary
4. Communicate, communicate, communicate. Plans often stall due to lack
of communication or conflicting messages.
Maintain/Sustain
As the initial focus and attention on the plan die down a bit, the people
involved may become complacent or less motivated. It is important to keep
up that momentum until the plan is fully implemented.
1. Space out any fanfare or special events connected to your plan. If you
hold a big kickoff rally for your plan and then don't have milestone rallies
along the way, people will sense that the project's importance has dwindled.
2. Be a role model - make sure that your motivation doesn't wane either!
3. Develop creative ways to keep the plan in everyone's mind. For example,
use periodic memos with status information and graphics, post charts, leave
phone or computer messages with reminders, updates, etc.
Follow-up
What: Follow-up is a continuous activity. As your plan is implemented,
you need to frequently check its progress. The follow-up stage is also where
you will determine if any contingency actions are needed. Following up on a
plan should be automatic and as frequent as necessary to ensure that your
plan is still on course.
How: Check your plan as often as needed. Base your follow-up
approach on these criteria:
1. Complexity of the plan - the more complex, the more frequent the followups.
2. Past experience with similar plans - yours and those of others involved.
3. How others think the follow-up should be conducted.
4. The likelihood that contingency plans will be necessary.

Keep in mind that the more specific and measurable your plan, the
easier it will be to determine its progress. Also, remember that the overall
purpose or goal should still be the focus of all your activities.
SUGGESTED GUIDES TO A GOOD PLAN
SMART METHOD
Simple
People will understand how to do it and why they are doing it. Make
the language of your plan simple. Make the goals clear-cut. Make the
methodology easy.
Measurable Results
After all is said and done, you have to know what has been said and
done. Back this up with statistics. Is the crime volume decreasing? Is CSE
increasing? Is crime rate decreasing? Are the people satisfied? Are you
making an impact?
Affordable
You don't have to go to the WB to afford the plan. Move within your
resources. Do not use "initiative". Do not use your salary. If your plan is good
the LGU will certainly support your plan. This is proven by several experiences
where LGU's themselves volunteer their help because they know that you are
serious with your job. Not only this civic organizations and other sectors will
want to join you since they will be the direct beneficiaries of a stable peace
and order situation.
Reasonable
It must be accomplished within a reasonable period of time. Do not
expect people to work on it for 25-hours a day, 10 days a week. The
objectives must be those which can be done within your normal capabilities
with your natural talents. Consult your people regarding work schedule. Ask
them the difficulties they encounter during Tl & E's and other unit meetings.
Time-Bound
Don't let the plan take forever to achieve its purpose. Finish it or at
least see some of its goals achieved within your lifetime.
BRAINSTORMING AND CONSULTATIONS
Present your Plan

Do not keep the plan to yourself. Let those who shall get involved
know the details of the plan. For other stakeholders, give them a general
outline, and ask them to contribute their moral and financial resources. Do
not be afraid of critiques. Do not be discouraged when others disregard the
value of your plan. Present it during Command Conferences.
- Let your men know
- Let your commander know
- Let the Peace and Order Council (POCs), Disaster Council
and other legitimate organizations know
- Let others know on a "need-to-know" basis.
Encourage a Question and Answer Session
An effective plan should have undergone a question and answer
session, it's the only way to test whether the plan is sufficient, effective and
efficient. Organize People's Day and other Consultative Fora like Barangay
Pulong Pulong, POCs, Disaster Council, and Civic Organization Meeting to get
citizen feedback.
Encourage suggestions
Entertain suggestions, but consider only those that do not drastically
digress from what you have in mind. After all you are going to be the one, to
implement it. But do not let them know that you won't make use of their
suggestions. Put-up suggestion boxes in your situation and in the barangay
halls. Conduct client satisfaction surveys to see if your programs can still be
strengthened.
Don't Take Forever in Brainstorming and Consultations Just do It!
The only measurement of an effective plan is in the implementation.
So, just do it! Apply the maxim that success is 99% supervision and 1%
order.
TOOLS IN MAKING A PLAN

The STEP Analysis

S.T.E.P. stands for Structure, Task, Environment, People. Structure


refers to the elements of organizational set-up (command and
control/hierarchy), policies and procedures, the decision-making process,
communication flow, rewards system and the reporting relationships. Task
refers to the elements of assigned jobs, or functions of each individual, the
performance standards, the goals and the work low/processes. Environment
refers to the external environment includes socio-political forces, the
community, support groups, regulatory groups, science and technology and
other concerned agencies. Internal environment includes the leadership,
mission, vision, values and culture. People includes the elements of
knowledge/skills of the Human Resource, demographics, needs and
expectations, groups, interpersonal relations, and conflicts. It will be best for

the planner to make a two-or-three-sentence description of each element in


S.T.E.P. This will form the basis of what problem to attack and how.
EXERNAL ENVIRONMENT

SWOT Analysis

S.W.O.T. stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats.


Strengths refer to the elements in the organization which give it advantage or
make it strong and capable of accomplishing its mission. Weaknesses refer to
the elements which constrain the organization from effectively and efficiently
attaining its objectives. Opportunities refer to the elements which can be
tapped to allow the unit to move forward or progress. Threats refer to the
elements which pose serious challenges to the organization.
(Model 1)

Strength

Weakness

Opportunities

Threats

(Model 2)
Internal Factors STRENGTHS
(Organizational
Analysis)

WEAKNESSES

Environmental
Factors
(Environmental
Analysis)

Relevance - Tree Analysis


Level 1
2
3

STRATEGY
P1

P2

SP1

P3

SP2

P4

P5

SP3

Level
Level
Level
Level

1: Strategy
2: General problem
3:
4: Specific Problems

This figure is metaphorically illustrated as a "tree" that is similar to an


organizational chart. The first "branches" are major modules, necessary for
achieving the objective. Second branches drop from the first ones. Third
branches from the second, and so forth until an entire structure of the
relevant parts of the objective has been displayed.

Moreso, the relevance-tree aids in planning and predicting the


complexities of future events, hence, it would sustain accurate predictions.
Nevertheless, the diagram factors out the real essence of planning which is
back to basic problem identification under a causal relationship.
Fishbone Analysis (Ishikawa Diagram)

This diagram sought to help team members (which in this regard are
the PNP personnel display categorize, and evaluate all the possible causes of
problems. These in turn lead to the solution of the problem.
It is suggested then, to follow these steps:
Step 1: The team needs to begin by agreeing on the "effect" which
should be stated in a form of a problem (e.g. inefficient community service
malfunctioning facilities, ameliorating criminality). If the team is not able to
begin with a clear view of the problem's nature, facilitate brainstorming to
arrive at certain consensus of what the problem is.
Step 2: After stating the problems, the team must identify all general
factors that cause the problem. Identify all specific causes and divide it into
four major categories - people, equipment, methods and materials.
Step 3: Brainstorm - this is helpful in any situation especially in solving
cases. However, there is a danger in brainstorming. It may lead to endless
discussions and clashes of ideas. If you wish to be successful in your group
brainstorming, your team leader must follow the basic rule: 1) impose time
limit for the session; 2) limit your discussion to relevant and specific
questions; 3) summarize all ideas; and 4) say little else - or else you'll end up
with nothing productive at all.
Step 4: Arrive at an agreement. Vote on issues which are contentious
or draw lots just so that a decision is arrived at.

CHAPTER II
PNP PLANS
"... Master the Art of Timing... Sniff out the Spirit of the times...
learn to stand back when the time is not yet ripe...
and to strike fiercely when time has reached fruition..."
-

Robert Greene

Model 1. PLANS FLOWCHART AND APPENDED REPORTS

Model 2. PLANS FLOWCHART AND APPENDED REPORTS


Pre-Planning Stage

Planning Stage

Program Monitoring and Evaluation

MEDIUM-TERM DEVELOPMENT PLAN (MTDP)


The Medium-Term Development Plan of the PNP is established to
initially set the direction towards the PNP's aspirations for its organization. It
consists of the Key Result Areas to guide the organization's mission and
vision. Challenges are also important in the MTDP for they foster the lessons
learned from the past, vital for the reformulation and modification of its
priorities.
THE FORMAT:
I.
Introduction
II. PNP vision, mission and declaration of Principles
III. Identification of Priorities
IV. Retrospect and Challenges
A.
B

Challenges
Meeting the Gaps

V. Core values, Key Result Areas and Goals


VI. Policies and Strategies
V11. PNP Priority Programs and Parameters of Success
VIII. Priority Legislative Agenda
IX. Prognosis
TABLE
Key Result
Areas

Policies Programs, Activities and


Projects

Challenges

(Refer to PNP MTDP 2001-2004)


Appended Reports to the Medium-Term Development Plan
In the PNP, there are two appended reports to the Medium-Term
Development Plan. These are the Operations Plans and Budget (OPB) and the
Program Review and Analysis (PRA). These are implementing instruments or
execution mechanisms and provide for quantitative and qualitative measures
of real-time program accomplishments or performance.

OPERATIONS PLANS AND BUDGET (OPB)


The Operations Plans and Budget is formulated by the Operating Plan
and Budget Committee chaired by The Chief of Directorial Staff to insure
consistency and maintain balance of resources within and among major
activities of the Command. It reflects the total coordinated effort of
management officials in so far as fiscal administration and resource
management are concerned.
Preparation of the Operating Program starts upon receipt of the
comprehensive allotment advice by the Director for Comptrollership who
temporarily distributes the funds by program/project and expense class after
taking into consideration of the PNP's Program and Budget Guidance. The
Preliminary Operating Plan and Budget Estimate and other guidelines from
higher authorities.
The temporary allocation of fund is then presented to the OPBC which
in turn reconciles differences and corrects flaws, and allocated the budget
ceiling of the different major operating units. The approved allocation is then
distributed by the comptroller to the Program Directors who in turn divide the
peso allocation among the projects, activities and sub-activities by major
units. The program Directors then coordinate with the Project Administrators
to submit their respective programs of expenditure, indicating the distribution
by major unit, program/project/activity, and object class.
THE FORMAT:
I. Executive Summary (General Statements of what had been done in
relation to the KRAs)
A. Organizational Development and Human Resource Management
B. Materiel and Financial Resource Management
C. Community Partnership
D. Effective Law Enforcement
E. Crime Prevention and Control
F. Maintenance of Peace and Order and Internal Security
G. Credible Institutional Image
II. Table of Accomplishments

III. Assessment
Problems Encountered
Recommendations
IV. Prognosis/Conclusion
RD Signature
PROGRAM REVIEW AND ANALYSIS
The Program Review and Analysis (PRA) provides a complete picture of
how the resources were used to accomplish objectives and programs. It is
based on the authorized operating program and budget and the
accomplishment of the unit or office for a given period of time.
The PRA is the responsibility of the Comptroller and Budget and Fiscal
Officers of the major units, including the Directorial Staffs, program Directors,
and Project Administrators. It is undertaken quarterly on a cumulative basis,
meaning that the semi-annual documentation includes the first and second
quarters, while the annual report covers the four (4) quarters of the fiscal
year.
The PRA is composed of two parts: the documented PRA and the oral
presentation which requires the condensation of the documented PRA into a
briefing manuscript.
A consolidated Program Review and Analysis is presented by the PNP
Chief to NAPOLCOM on a semi-annual basis. During these PRAs, the
NAPOLCOM sits en bane to review the PNP's performance viz-a-vis the
available resources.
THE FORMAT:
I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
The executive Summary shall contain an overview of the
accomplishments and shortcomings of the unit/office given its general and
specific objectives and considering the resources made available.
II. MISSION AND FUNCTIONS:

A.
B.

Mission
Functions

III. OBJECTIVES:
A.
B.

Broad Objectives
Specific Objectives

IV. REVIEW OF RESOURCES:


Present the resources made available to support the PPAs of the
office/unit. Reflect the comparative data between programmed (Approved
Networking Appropriations) vs Actual Releases.
A. FINANCIAL RESOURCES
A. FINANCIAL
RESOURCES
FUND RESOURCES

ACTUAL RELEASES

VARIANCE

APPROPRIATED
FUNDS
PS(01)
MOOE
CAPITAL OUTLAY
SUB-TOTAL
OTHERS

TOTAL

OTHERS
TRUST
RECEIPTS
DONATIONS
FUND
TRANSFER
SUB-TOTALS
TOTALS

(NOTE: Variance must be explained)


B. HUMAN RESOURCES
AUTHORIZED
STRENGTH
Uniformed Personnel
Non-Unformed Personnel
Permanent
Temporary
Casual
Contractual/ Emergency
Others
TOTALS

ACTUAL

VARIANCE

A. CAPITAL RESOURCES
PROGRAMMES

ACTUAL

VARIANCE

INFRACTRUCTURE
Bldngs and Structure
Facilities
Other Capital Assets
EQUIPMENT
Ship/vessels/aircrafts
Transport/Mobility
Armor
Engineering/Heavy
Equipment
Other (Organic to NSUs)
TOTALS

V. P/P/As OUTPUTS BY FUNCTIONAL AREAS


This is statistical presentation of the output-volume of
Programs/Projects/ Activities PPAs as specifically supported by the output
specifications, the target universe and the actual Performance.
PERFORMANCE
PERFORMANCE
PPAs

OUTPUT
SPECIFICATION

ACTUAL
PERFORMANCE

VARIANCE

COST OF PERFORMANCE
TARGET

COST OF
ACTUAL
PERFORMANCE

VARIANCE

VI. FIXED EXPENDITURES (For DL, RDs, and Dir, HSS only)
The PRA will also concentrate on the performance of the PNP units visa-vis the Billings for fixed expenditures (FE):
A. UNITS/OFFICES
VOLUME

BILLING

ACTUAL
PAYMENT

VARIANCE

Light
Water
Telephone
B. PRIOR YEAR'S CLAIMS
UNIT/OFFICE

PRIOR YEARS FIXED


EXPENDITURES CLAIMS

ACTUAL RELEASES
DURING THE SAME

VARIANCE

PERIOD

VII. ASSESSMENT OF PERFORMANCE


The assessment of performance is derived from the analysis of the
input of resources and relating them to the actual output of performance of
the respective PPAs as mentioned in Part V. It will be a straight analysis of
the results versus costs/expenditures to provide the direct relationship of the
resources input to the physical output of the PPAs.
Likewise, the assessment shall also include adjustments made in response to
the variances and impact of these in the performance.
Also, the overall level of performance shall also be assessed, citing
specific areas of concern.
On Fixed Expenditures, the unit must be able to explain the
accumulation of its prior year's. Accounts and the programs/activities to
reduce expenses for light, water and telephone. Did the Programs have
concrete impact on the Command's Fixed Expenditures?
PPAs

VARIANCE TARGET
vs ACTUAL

COST OF VARIANCE

VIII. PROBLEMS
A. Manpower
B. Finance
C. Equipment/logistics
D. Operations
E. Other matters
VIII. PLANS
IX. CONCLUSION A wrap-up of the presentation made with the recommended solutions.
To problems presented, if any, and purposes to improve/enhance
performance.

III. INTEGRATED AREA/COMMUNITY PUBLIC SAFETY PLAN


(IA/CPSP)
"... to do great, important tasks, two things are necessary:
a plan and not quite enough time..."
- Anonymous A. Introduction
The formulation of an Integrated Area Community Public Safety Plan is
mandated by Sec. 51 of Republic Act 6975. Under its provisions, the municipal
or city mayor shall in coordination with the local peace and order council of
which he is the Chairman pursuant to E.O. Nr 309, as amended, develop and
establish an Integrated Area/Community Public Safety Plan embracing
priorities of action and programs thereat for implementation by the local PNP
Station.
This plan is the "blue-print" for the protection of life and property in a
given locality geared towards the enhancement of public safety and welfare,
maintenance of the stability of the LGU and the safeguarding of the
democratic institutions. It creates a
unified and integrated direction for all local public safety programs including
counter-insurgency.
As an integrated plan, it mobilizes all government instrumentalities and
resources towards the task of public safety. This is without prejudice to
encouraging private sector participation. The PNP is a major player in the
establishment of the IACPSP together with the AFP. Furthermore, the five (5)
pillars of Criminal Justice System play an important role in this plan.
It is important that PNP field unit commanders move towards the
institutionalization of the IACPSP in the Regions (thru the RPOC), the
Provinces (thru PPOC), the Cities (thru CPOC), and the Municipalities (thru
MPOC). This will address criminality in some other aspects other that through
law enforcement. It will remove some of the root-causes of crime occurrence
which the PNP can not and should not address. It will actualize "interoperability" or the condition where easy and intensive "collaboration and
cooperation" obtains. In times of emergencies and contingencies, IACPSP
serves as the guide to proper and coordinated responses of all concerned
agencies and organizations.
Copies of this IACPSP shall be submitted to the DILG, NPOC and the
PNP.

B. Rationale of the IACPSP


I. AUTHORITY FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED AREA/COMMUNITY
PUBLIC SAFETY PLAN.
RA 6975 Sec. 51
The Municipal/City Mayor shall, in coordination with the local peace
and order council of which he is the Chairman pursuant to Executive Order
No. 309, as amended, develop and establish an integrated area/community
public safety plan embracing priorities of action and program thereat for
implementation by the local PNP Station.
NPOC Memo Circular No. 004 s 1993.
NPOC Memo dated October 27, 1993.
Governors and Mayors as Chairman of POCs, CPOCs and MPOCs
to develop, establish and oversee the implementation of IA/CPSP.
The IA/CPSP envisions the establishment of an organization generated
from readily available resources in coordination with provincial, regional
and national agencies.
THE PLAN
Blueprint for the protection of lives and property in a given locality;
The checklist regarding the provisions for the enhancement of public
safety and welfare, maintenance of the stability of the LGU and safeguarding
of our democratic institutions;
The unified and integrated direction for all local public safety programs,
including counter insurgency.
II. The IA/CPSP CONCEPT
Total mobilization of all available resources and the simultaneous
conduct of complementary programs which will involve the civilian, police and
military components of society.
Civilian Component deals with socio-economic welfare and
development activities and support services.
Police deals with law enforcement and police operations.
Military tasked with physical security and combat operations.
IV. IA/CPSP OBJECTIVES

To protect lives;
To enhance Public safety plan;
To maintain the stability of the government;
To safeguard our democratic institutions; and
To provide unified direction of all local public safety plans.

V. FORMULATION OF THE PLAN

The IA/CPSP is formulated and developed by the local Peace and


Order Council (POC)in coordination with all concerned agencies.

The REGIONAL PEACE AND ORDER COUNCIL (RPOC)


CHAIRMAN and the MUNICIPAL/CITY MAYOR, in coordination with the
Provincial Peace and Order Councils (PCOs) shall develop, issue and oversee
the implementation of the regional public safety plan embracing priorities of
action and program thrusts for implementation of all concerned agencies.
VI. AREAS OF CONCERN (KEY RESULT AREAS)
The Key result areas are the priority concern of the agency by which
the agency seeks to obtain maximum results and create favorable impact.
Moreover, the agency invests its focal attention, efforts and resources to the
key result areas to further its purpose to achieve progressive level of
competence, performance and credibility.
The Key result areas:
Crime Prevention
Law enforcement
Prosecution and Courts
Corrections
Fire Prevention and Suppression
Internal Security Operations
Environmental Protection
Health and Sanitation
Civil Defense
Community Development
VII. PROGRAM THRUSTS
Administrative Changes and Reforms
Operational Effectiveness
Speedy Disposition of Cases
Improved Credibility of the Criminal Justice System
Community Participation in Public Safety
Improved Coordination and Cooperation among the pillars of the
Criminal Justice System
VIII. GUIDELINES IN THE PREPARATION OF THE IA/CPSP
The lead agency shall prepare the detailed action plan to implement the
specified program/activity/project and shall submit the same to the local POC
for approval and implementation by all agencies concerned.
The detailed action plans of the lower POCs need not be submitted to the
next higher POC but shall remain in the custody of the local POC for
reference.

The IA/CPSP accomplishment reports submitted to the NPOC Secretariat


should already be a consolidated report from all those submitted by the lower
level POCs within the region.
IX. MONITORING PROCEDURES
The concerned POC level shall check monthly on the status of
activities/targets as indicated in the formulated IA/CPSP from the designated
task groups. Maintaining a project status board based at the POCs Command
Post can do this. The flow of monitoring process shall be as follows;
Tasked groups shall submit monthly and quarterly reports on assigned
activities per KRA to the implementing POC level.
The Secretariat of the concerned POC level shall then consolidate all the
reports and reflect the status of the targets per KRA on the overall IA/CPSP.
The monthly and quarterly status of the plan shall then be submitted to
the Chairman of the implementing POC level for notation and approval of
submitted proposals to accomplish unsatisfied periodic targets.
The Chairman, implementing POC shall schedule periodic meetings among
the tasked groups/offices to discuss the status of the plan.
HOW IS THE IA/CPSP MONITORED AND EVALUATED
The City/Municipal Mayor, as Chairman of the CPOC/MPOC, monitors the
IA/CPSP through the reports of accomplishments submitted. Through the
consolidated accomplishments (reflected on a status board), he can see what
activities fall short of the periodic targets. Noted deficiencies will be discussed
and analyzed in the presence of tasked agencies heads/representatives so
that the needed solutions can be effected.
The Provincial Governor, as Chairman of the PPOC monitors the status of
the province IA/CPSP also through reports of accomplishments (on status
board) submitted quarterly to the PPOC by the concerned MPOCs/tasked
organizations.
The RPOC Chairman at his level monitors the status of the regional IA/CPSP
of the tasked agencies/organizations aside from the reports rendered by the
different PPOCs.
The Chairman at different POC levels can always monitor at anytime the
status of the implementation of respective IA/CPSP by actual visits and
evaluation of the programmed activities concerned. The NAPOLCOM Regional
Office as the RPOC Secretariat will prepare the Regional Quarterly Report.
Additional information needed by the NPOC in connection with the IA/CPSP
reports will be furnished by the regional secretariat concerned.
The submission of accomplishment/progress reports shall not be later than
the second week of the succeeding month after every quarter.
THE FORMAT

REFERENCE: Executive Order No. 1012 dated march 1985 as amended by


Executive Order No. 1027
1.
GENERAL: (This a brief description of the situation. It discusses the
threats, their capabilities and your present method of confronting them.)
2.
OBJECTIVES: (Set up what you want to accomplish. Arrange them
according to importance).
3. CONCEPT: (Make a general description of your plan)
(A)
Physical security programs: This refers to the active and passive
measures to be undertaken.
A.1 Defense plan of population centers
A.2 Tactical measures
(B)
Socio-economic development programs: This pertain to the physical
and material improvement of the locality to give credence to local
government's presence and authority and its concern to its constituents. The
office of the Governor, specifically the Provincial Action Officer, shall be
responsible for the implementation of the following:
B.1 Social Development Programs
B.2 Political Development Programs
B.3 Mass Organizational Development programs
(C)
Information Programs: This is to keep populace informed of what their
government is doing and issues confronting it and devising ways of
knowing/detecting infiltrators entering/frequenting the locality The Provincial
Public Information Office shall be the lead agency in the Implementation of
the program.
C.1 Dissemination of information relative to government programs and
activities.
C.2 Information net system
(D) Welfare Programs: This is geared towards the uplift of the individual's
well-being in the province. The Local Government shall be responsible in the
implementation of the program.
Self-help Projects
D.1
D.2
D.3
D.4
D.5

Local initiated projects


National initiated projects
Health services
Literacy Services
Livelihood

(ES) Legal and law enforcement programs: These pertain to the protection of
the rights of the people and the fair application of justice system to all in the
locality. The Provincial Prosecutor's Office in coordination with the Provincial
Attorney shall be the lead agency in the Implementation of the program.
(P) Training program: This provides orientation training and seminar to the
populace about their role in the implementation of the different programs.
4. ORGANIZATION: (Describes the command and control structure of the
plan).
5. TASKS: (Describes what jobs to do and who will do it).
6. COORDINATING INSTRUCTIONS: (State when to begin, how to work
together
and what are the methodologies/arrangements).
7. CONTROL: (Establish milestones for monitoring. Set deadlines for certain
tasks).
Prepared by:
The PNP usually take the initiative
to prepare the plan.
Approved by:
The Provincial Governor or
the City Mayor approves
the plan after incorporating
their inputs.
TABLE
CITY/MUNICIPAL INTEGRATED AREA/COMMUNITY SAFETY PLAN (IA/CPSP)
For the Year ________
City/Municipal:_________________
AREAS OF CONCERN/
PROGRAM/PROJECTS ACTIVITIES

OBJ

EXPECTED
OUTPUT

Region:____________
TIME FRAME

START

1. CRIME PREVENTION
11. LAW ENFORCEMENT
III. PROSECUTION and COURTS
IV. CORRECTIONS
V.
FIRE
PREVENTION
&

COMPL
ETION

LEAD
AGENCY

SUPPORT
ORGANIZA
TION/
AGENCY

REMA
RKS

SUPPRESSION
VI.
INTERNAL
SECUTITY
OPERATION
VII.
ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION
VIII. HEALTH & SANITATION
IX. CIVIL DEFENSE
X. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

SAMPLE OF ANNEXES TO THE IA/CPSP: DISASTER MANAGEMENT


(Based on KRA's)
I.

References
A. IA/CPSP of Region
B. Map of tee Region

II.
Situation
III. Objectives
IV Concept
V. Organization
VI. Tasks
VII. Coordinating Instructions
VIM. Administration and Logistics
IX. Command and Signal
SAMPLE OF ANNEXES TO THE IA/CPSP: ENVIRONMENTAL
MANAGEMENT
I.

References
A. IA/CPSP of Region
II.
General Situation
III.
Objectives
IV. Concept
V. Tasks
VI. Coordinating Instructions
SAMPLE OF ANNEXES TO THE IA/CPSP: HEAIilN AMU SANITATION
I.

References
A. IA/CPSP of Region
B. Map of the Region

II.
Situation
III.
Objectives
IV. Concept
V. Tasks
VI. Coordinating Instructions
VII. Administration and Logistics
VIII. Command Signal

SAMPLE OF ANNEXES TO THE IA/CPSP: CRIME PREVENTION


I.

References
A. IA/CPSP of region
B. Map of Region
II. Situation
III.
Objectives
IV. Concept
V. Tasks
VI. Coordinating Instructions
VII. Administration and Logistics
VIII. Command and Signal
MONITORING
To ensure the effectiveness of the IA/CPSP and efficiency of all
involved agencies and personalities, the formulated monitoring procedures
shall be consistently followed.

IV. OTHER PNP PLANS (FORMATS)


"Plan all the way to the end. The ending is everything.
Plan all the way to it, taking into account all the possible consequences,
obstacles, and twists of fortune that might reverse your hard work".
- Robert Greene TYPES OF OPERATIONAL PLAN
PATROL PLAN
Ref:

Map of AOR
Crime Prone Areas of AOR
Crime Clock of AOR

Introduction
(Present a discussion of what Problem you are trying to solve and the
resources you will use to solve them. You may also state the other
tasks/objectives you want to accomplish)
Concept of Operation
(What is the general concept of the Plan? Have you divided the AOR by
sectors)
Checklist of Patrol Actions
Know my beat
What is the situation?
Introduce myself to the beat
who are the persons you want to inform about your presence?
Knowing the important establishments in my beat
Visit community leaders and other government officials
Find a citizen-buddy or citizen-beat-partner
Assist in traffic direction and control
Assist pedestrians
Enforce local ordinances
To inform citizens of the station's anti-criminality plans
Assist in cleanliness effort with the community
To suggest improvements to barangay officials
IV. Tasking
V. Coordination
Commander

THE FORMAT OF PNP MASTERPLANS


I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.

VI.

INTRODUCTION
A. Purpose and Scope
B. Situation
DEFINITION OF TERMS
COMMANDER'S INTENT
OBJECTIVES
A. Broad Objectives
B. Specific Objectives
CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS
A. Strategic Concepts
B. Operational Concepts
C. Taskings
COORDINATING INSTRUCTIONS
COMMANDER'S SIGNATURE

THE OPERATION PLAN (OPLAN)


OPERATION PLAN (Title of Plan)
Organization:
Reference:
1. SITUATION:
a. Enemy Forces
b. Friendly Forces
c. Attachment and Detachment
d. Assumptions
2. MISSION:
3. EXECUTION:
a. Concept of Operation
b. Tasks
4. SERVICE SUPPORT:
5. COMMAND AND SIGNAL:
a. Signal
b. Command
Director's Signature

THE LETTER OF INSTRUCTION (LOI)


SUBJECT:
TO

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

REFERENCES:
PURPOSE:
SITUATION:
MISSION:
EXECUTION:
a. Concept of Operations
b. Task
6. SERVICE SUPPORT:
a. Logistical support
b. Personnel or units
7. COMMAND AND SIGNAL:
a. Signal
b. Command
8. COORDINATING INSTRUCTIONS:
Director's Signature
POLICE COMMUNITY RELATIONS PLAN
Unit/Office:__________
Date: _______________
SUBJECT: LETTER OF INSTRUCTIONS
References:
a. Various policy guidelines on Tri-Media Relations
b. Crisis Communication
c. LOI Pagbabago
Task Organization
Definition of Terms
I. PURPOSE AND SCOPE:
II. SITUATION:
a. General:
b. Assumptions:
III. MISSION:
a. Purpose:
b. Objectives:
IV. EXECUTION:
A. Concept of Operation:
ACKNOWLEDGE

THE PROJECT PROPOSAL FORM


Police Officers are required to submit specific Project Proposals in
support of their formulated plans.
I.
Project Title: A brief title should be given that would clearly describe
the proposed project.
II.
Proponent: The legal name of the individual or organization which will
receive the funds of the project is approved.
III.
Project Description: The proponent should describe the nature of
the project, i.e., what activities will be done, who will do it, where the
activities will be held and when. It should be clear if the project is for a
performance, an exhibit, a conference, a research project, book or magazine,
etc. Any extraordinary or innovative component of the project should be
identified.
IV.
Project Background: The context of the project, i.e, as part of the
proponent's long term programs, or as part of an integrated set of activities
being undertaken by a group of organization or individuals. The importance
and rationale of the project should be explained. Whenever possible, the use
of statistical information should be presented to justify the purpose of the
project.
V.
Objectives and Expected Output: The target objectives that are
expected to be realized/concretized after implementation should be stated in
the SMART way-Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound.
VI. Impact: This should explain the project's potential contribution to the
community where it will be implemented, or the project's significance and
effect on society, in general.
VII. Target Beneficiaries: The proponent should indicate the number and
type of direct project beneficiaries an the number of indirect beneficiaries.
I.
Activities and Strategy: The principal activities and strategy involved
should be described, as well as the manner through which the stated project
objectives are to be achieved. The sequence of operations to be followed in
executing the project, based on a realistic time-table, should be described in
detail and accompanied by a Gantt Chart. Appropriate headings and subheadings should be used and target dates for the completion of each step
should be indicated. The inclusion of a flow chart would be desirable. The
relationship of each major step of operation to preceding and subsequent
phases should be explained. The project timetable should be stated and an
estimate given of the start up and completion dates, as well as major
milestones along the way.

II. Location: The proponent should cite the municipality/city, province and
region where the project is proposed to be implemented.
III. Project Cost: The estimated cost of the project should be presented
by expenditure object. The cost should be identified by object, as specified on
the Project Proposal Form. There should be an indication of the schedule of
proposed expenditures and receipts, as basis for releases of approved
funding.
IV.
Project Organization: An individual applicant should submit his
curriculum vitae, with a list of significant works or projects. The name,
position, address, telephone and fax numbers of the project coordinator and
contact person/s assigned by the proponent to coordinate/oversee the
project, should be indicated. The project coordinator's signature must also
appear on the completed form.

PROPOSED LINE ITEM BUDGET

Project Title:
Proponent:
DETAILS

PARTICULARS

1.
Personal
Services(10010) (Honoraria
to
Project
Personnel)

No. of Persons
x
rates
x
day/month

COUNTERPART
FUNDING
AND/OR OTHER
SOURCES

NCCA FUNDING
ASSISTANCE
SOURCE

TOTAL
AMOUNT

AMOUNT

II. Maintenance
and
Other Operating
Expenses
a) Travel (10002)
b) Communicat
ions (100-03)

No. of
xrate

Persons

No. of
xrate

Persons

c) Food (100-06)
d) Accommoda
tion (100-06)

No. of Persons
x days

e) Other Services
(printing, et.al.)
f) Supplies and
Materials
g) Rentals

TOTAL

FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT STATUS


Project Title:___________
Proponent: ____________
POSITION

FUNCTION

EXPECTED
OUTPUT/SERVICES

ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
Project Title :_________________
Proponent : _________________

ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION
(by Phase)

DATE
From

TARGET OUTPUT
To

CAMP DEFENSE PLAN


Revised Camp Defense Plan 2K
I. Reference
II. Task Organization
III. Situation
A. General:
B. Enemy Forces:
C. Friendly Forces:
IV. Assumptions
V. Mission
VI. Execution
VII. Concept of Operation
Tasks:
VIII. Coordinating Instructions
V. Service Support
VI. Command and Signal
Signal:
Command:
TYPES OF INTELLIGENCE REPORTS
Appended Reports to Commonly Established PNP Plans
The following are the formats of some reports which aid in the
formulation of the PNP Plans. These serve as references and benchmarks to
guide police officer in the formulation and updating of plans. Examples of

which are Periodic Area Commander's Report (PACREP) and Security Survey
Report. Normally, these aid in the SWOT analysis or environmental scanning.
FORMAT OF THE PERIODIC AREA COMMANDER'S REPORT (PACREP)
Copy Nr __ of _ Copies
Issuing Unit
Place of Issue
Date-Time, Month, Year
I. GENERAL
II. SITUATION
A. Organized Threats
Organized Threats
Organized Threats
Affected Areas
Violent Incidents
Non-violent Activities
Plans
B. Sectoral Development
C. Crime Situation
D. Fire Situation
E. Other Factors that Affected the Situation
III. INTELLIGENCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS
A. Administrative
B. Operations
C. Production
D. Counter intelligence
E. Budget and Fiscal
F. Training
IV. ANALYSIS AND FORECAST
V. RECOMMENDATIONS
PNP SECURITY SURVEY REPORT FORMAT
SCOPE: The scope of the security survey consists of topography of
critical areas surrounding the installation.
I.
Authority - The authority to conduct of security survey can be: (select
one)
a. Written directive from higher authority
b. Written request from the installation
c. Preparation of the installation to establish adequate security
measures
II. Inclusive Date of Survey - (e.g: March 26-28,2001)

III. Composition of the Team - (Identity and designation of the team leader
and members.
IV. Entrance Briefing
V. Identity of the Personnel Who Accompanied the Survey Team
VI. History of Installation
VII. Threats to Security and Peace and Order (consisting of but not limited to:
a. Threats to Security
b. Threats to Peace and Order
VIII. Mission of the Installation
IX. Function of the Installation
X. Importance of the Installation to National Security
XI. Working Relationship of the Installation with Other Police and Military
Intelligence Units in the Area
XII. Physical Security
a. Perimeter Barriers
b. Security of Building and Structure
c. Guards and Guarding System
d. Identification and Control of Personnel and Visitors
e. Identification and Control of Vehicles
f. Photography and Package Control
g. Fire Fighting Facilities and Supplies
h. Power and Water Facilities and Supplies
i. Anti-Intrusion Alarm System
j. Other Utilities and Maintenance
XIII. Personnel Security:
a. Personnel Strength
b. Security Clearance Program
c. Security Education Program
d. Labor Turnover, Absentee Rate and Morale
e. Security Check and Investigation
f. Personnel Firepower
g. Transport and Mobility Supply
XIV. Document and Information Security
a. Security Classification of Document
b. Flow of Incoming and Outgoing Classified Documents
c. Transmission of Outgoing Classified Documents
d. Destruction of Classified Documents
e. Storage of Classified Documents
XV. Communication Security:
a. Physical Security
b. Transmission
c. Emission
VI. Recommendation:
a. Physical Security
b. Personnel Security
c. Document Security
d. Communication Security
With Name and Signature

Team Leader
OTHER FORMATS OF PNP REPORTS
CASE OPERATIONS PLAN
APPROVAL SHEET TO CASE OPERATION PLAN (Code Name)

RECOMMEND APPROVAL:

(Project Officer)
(PD/DD/CD/PO)
(Project Director)
(C, RIID/ADI)
(Project Supervisor)
(RD/DIR)

APPROVED/DISAPPROVED:

(Project Sponsor)
(Director for Intelligence)
CASE OPERATIONS PLAN
CASE OPERATION PLAN: (Code name of activity)
PROJECT REFERENCE:
(the code name of the Unit whose objective the
COPLAN aims to accomplish)
REFERENCE:
I. SITUATION:
A.

Background: (Includes information of the general situation


leading to the justification of the project. It should include
historical facts leading to the current state of affairs.)

B.

Operational Conditions: (Answers the question, "Why case


operations? Why not just normal police operations?)

II. MISSION:
A.
Purpose: (The same purpose stated in the Intelligence Project
under which the case operations is launched.)
B.
Objective(s): (One specific objective or a number of interrelated
objectives, of the Intelligence Project which the case operations intends to
achieve.)
C. Targets: (A specific person or groups of persons, organizations,
installations, earlier designated as targets by the Unit.
III. OPERATIONAL PLAN:
A.
Concept of the Project: (The principles remain the same, but
much more specific compared to the concept of the project under the Project
Proposal.)
B.
Tasks: (The principles remain the same, but much more specific
compared to the task under the Project Proposal.)
Who will perform the piece of work?
What piece of work is to be performed?
When to start the performance of the task and for how long?
How should work be done?
And when found appropriate, why it should be done and
What is the expected outcome?
IV. ADMINISTRATIVE:
A.
Personnel.(Contains information on personnel involved in the
case operations, including those not available and is contemplated to be
employed for the purpose.)
B.
Finance. (Contains the estimated quarterly expenses (per diems
and operations expenses) of the project as a whole.
C.
Supply and Equipment. (Contains data on supplies and
equipment (and its finances) to be used in the operation. Supplies and
equipment already existing are not included.)
D.
Transportation. (Vehicle & POL requirements of the case
operation.)
E.
Miscellaneous. (Refers to other administrative data not covered in
the above paragraphs. May include disposition of arrested person/captured
enemy/ recovered documents, evidences, etc.)
V. COMMUNICATIONS: (Contains plan of communication and other
communications agreements between all persons, offices involved in the
project. It includes recognition and identification, communication policies,
codes, etc.)

VI. REPORTS: (Instruction on the type of report (s) and the frequency of
submission required from the case officer: the Monthly Development Report
(MDR), and the Special Report submitted in between MDR to disseminate
significant incidents.)
Case Officer

V. CRISIS MANAGEMENT AND TERRORISM


(Lifted from the Crisis Management Manual)
"If good governance were to be kept we// as a house,
there are three pillars that must support it in good times and in bad,
namely: sound moral foundation, transparency and effective implementation".
- Her Excellency President GLORIA MACAPAGAL-ARROYO -

"Expect the unexpected". Crisis or contingencies are unique and


precarious because they occur when they are least expected. The difficulty of
such is a result of the abject failure to anticipate control, prepare and stop its
detrimental effects to society.
Terrorism, for instance, is among the most prominent contingencies of
our times. Recently, the world was terrified by the consecutive terroristic
attacks against United States. Indeed, the darkest hour for America became a
marked trepidation to the rest of the world. Thus, the Philippine National
Police should be prepared at all times - to uphold its duties and secure public
safety in any circumstance.
The destruction of the World Trade Center building, and the many
other carnage done by the "new jackals" opened the eyes of the world to the
reality of TERRORISM. The seemingly patternless or chaotic methodologies
used to inflict death and devastation leads to a form of bewilderment on how
to preempt or prevent the success of terroristic acts. The "Attack on
America," with its vast intelligence resources and the most modern
technological equipment, proves that such actions defy predictive accuracy.
The necessary question asked is, "Is the Philippines prepared to address this
kind of situation?" Do we even have the "crisis counseling system" in place in
order to address the needs of the families of victims, all rescue workers and
other volunteers? Are we ready?
Are we read for the damage brought by natural disasters like typhoons,
volcanic eruptions, earth quakes and conflagrations? Are we ready for manmade disasters like civil disturbances, hijacking, hostage-taking and other
socio-political instability?
The PNP units play a major role in these situations. Thus a necessary
understanding of [the principles of Crisis Management and its organizations
must be learned by its field commanders. In the aspect of terrorism which is
now known to defy all the frameworks of known laws and values, these
principles can contribute to coping rationally with the threat and/or
occurrence.
Crisis management is a continuing activity with two distinct phases:

The PRO-ACTIVE Phase is designed to predict and prevent the


probability of the occurrence of crisis and at the same time, be prepared to
handle it. It encompasses the 3P's of the 4P's Crisis Management Model prediction, prevention and preparation.
Prediction. This involves foretelling the probable occurrence of a
natural or man-made crisis through continuous assessment of all possible
threats. Threat groups, vulnerabilities of the organization and the like, e.g.
Crime crisis, can be predicted through updated inputs from intelligence
reports, and continuous monitoring.
The objectives of Prediction are: a) to ensure a high probability of
success in neutralizing the perpetrators; b) to minimize, or cushion the
adverse effects of the crisis incident; and c) to ensure smooth and speedy
rehabilitation of the society's equilibrium (Balance).
Prevention. With most man-made crisis/emergencies, prevention
would be described as the institution of passive and active security measures,
as well as the resolution of destabilizing factors and/or security flaws leading
to such. Natural crisis on the other hand, require vigilance and alertness to
the signs and manifestations of its development.
Preparation. This would include planning perse, organization,
training, and stockpiling of equipment and supplies needed for such
emergencies/crisis.
The REACTIVE PHASE-PERFORMANCE covers the last of the 4Ps, which
is Performance. PERFORMANCE occurs despite the pro-active measures
taken.
The performance of crisis management action for terrorism (especially
transnational terrorism) is done in three sub-stages; 1) initial action, 2)
action, and 3) port action.
Initial Action. All unit commanders are required to internalize the
crisis management doctrines. However, any law enforcement unit shall
immediately undertake appropriate actions to contain the crisis situation and
report it to the incumbent agencies regardless whether it is beyond its
capability to handle.
e.g. monitor the development of the crime scene
secure the sceneestablish perimeter security
evacuate innocent civilians, if possible
prevent the escape of perpetrators until the designated unit arrive
Action. The action phase consists of two distinct activities: negotiation
and tactical intervention which may take place independently either

simultaneously or in succession. In any case, however, the activities are


under the complete supervision of the On-Scene Commander.
Post Action. When the perpetrators are already captured, the OnScene Commander should take prompt action to take the case in court.
PROACTIVE PHASE

REACTIVE PHASE

Figure 1. CRISIS MANAGEMENT MODEL:


CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

ORGAN1ZATIONAL LEVEL
1. National
National Peace and Order Council (NPOC)
NPOC Crisis Management Committee (CMC)
Secretary, Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)
Secretary, Department of National Defense (DND)
Secretary, Department of Social welfare and Development (DSWD)

Secretary, Department of Justice (DOJ)


Chairman, Cabinet Crisis Committee
NHQ, PNP
GHQ, AFP
2. Regional
Regional Peace and Order Council (RPOC)
Regional Crisis Management Committee (RCMC)
Regional Crisis Management Operations Centers (RCMOC)
AFP units in the region
PA divisions
PAF Composite Air Support Forces
PN Districts
Philippine Coast Guard
Philippine Marine Brigades
Regional Non-Government Organizations
PNP units in the Region
3. Provincial
Provincial Peace and Order Councils
Provincial Crisis Management Committees
Provincial crisis Management Operation Centers
Provincial Government Agencies
AFP and PNP units in the provinces
PA Brigades/Battalions

PAF Elements
Elements
PNP Units in the Province
Provincial Non-Government Agencies
4. Municipal/City
Municipal/City POCs
Municipal/City CMCs-same composition as that of the
Provincial level with the DOJ being represented by the
Municipal Attorney or prosecutor at the city/municipal level.
Municipal/City CMOCs-to be designated by the CMC
Municipal/City AFP and AFP units
PA Battalions Companies
PAF Elements
PN Elements
Municipal/city PNP units
Municipal/City NGOs
5. On-Scene Command Posts (OSCPs)
6. Crisis Management Action Groups
Negotiation Group
Negotiation
Liaison
Operations Group
Security
Tactical/action/intervention
Utilities liaison team
Service Support Group
Investigation/legal
Intelligence
Communication-Electronics
Medical
Transportation
Logistics
Administrative Support
Public Affairs Group
Media Control/Liaison
Public Information
Civil Relations

Figure 2. CRISIS MANAGEMENT AD HOC ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

7. National Level Crisis Management Organization


All crisis incident at the national level shall be handled by the NPOC
Crisis Management Committee, headed by the Secretary of the
Department of the interior and Local Government.
The NPOC CMC shall give the necessary orders to those concerned for the
activation of the Ad Hoc National Crisis Management Organization.
The National Crisis Management Operations Center (NCMOC) hall be
establish IRC, NHQ Building, Camp Crame and the On-Scene Command
Post shall be established at the most appropriate location in the vicinity
of the crisis incident scene.
The participation of all AFP Units in CMC-directed operations involving
PNP units shall be as directed by the Chief of Staff, AFP in coordination
with C, PNP.
The NPOC CMC shall monitor crisis incident situations at the lower levels and
be prepared to make decisions on matters referred by these lower
level CMC.
8. Regional Level Crisis Management Organization
All crisis incidents at regional level shall be handled by the Regional
Crisis Management Committee.
The Regional CMC shall give the necessary orders to those concerned
for
the activation of the AD Hoc Regional Crisis Management
Organization. Upon activation thereof, the Chairman of the Regional
CMC shall immediately inform the Chairman, NPOC-CMC.
The Regional Crisis Management Operation Center (RCMOC) shall be
established at the PNP Regional Command Operations Center and on
the On-Scene Command Post shall be established at the most
appropriate location in the vicinity of the crisis incident scene.
The participation of attached AFP units shall be as directed by the PNP
Regional Director in coordination with the Commanders of the AFP
Major Service Components in the region. He shall likewise direct the
participation of all PNP units in the crisis management operations.
9. Crisis Management Operations Center (CMOC)
A Crisis Management Operations Center (CMOC) shall be established at
the appropriate PNP Headquarters Operations Center where a crisis incident
occurs. The CMOC shall be the focal point of all communications coming from
the ON-Scene Command Post (OSCP) and all instructions from the CMC. The
CMC members shall be at the CMOC while the crisis incident is in progress.

Figure 3. CRISIS MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS CENTER


10. On-Scene Command Post (OSCP)
The On-Scene Command Post shall be established at the vicinity of the
crisis incident site where it can best monitor and control the crisis
management operations. All instructions from the CMC shall be relayed to the
OSCP through the CMOC.
An On-Scene Commander (OSC) shall be designated by the Chairman,
CMC from among the senior officers of the PNP Headquarters. He may be the
Deputy Regional Director, RECOM operations Officer, Provincial Director,
Company Commander of Station Commander or any Officer in the locality
chosen depending upon the nature, gravity and possible implications of the
incident. He shall be responsible for everything happening at the crisis
incident scene. He shall exercise direct command and control over all
negotiation, operations, support and public affairs groups assigned to him by
the CMC, regardless of the presence of any officer more senior than him,
unless relieved by higher competent authority. All orders at the scene of the
crisis incident shall emanate from the On-Scene-Commander only. He shall
communicate and clear all his actions, if necessary, with the CMC.

Figure 4. ON-SCENE COMMAND POST (OSCP)


11. Crisis Management Action Groups

Figure 5. CRISIS MANAGEMENT ACTION GROUPS


Negotiation Group: This group shall be composed of selected civilian
officials/ personalities and military/police personnel for the purpose of
negotiating with the terrorist elements and performing liaison functions
between them and On-Scene Command Post. This group shall be under the
direct control and supervision of the On-Scene Commander.
Negotiation Team-The Negotiating Team shall be headed by a chief
negotiator properly selected by the Chairman, CMC from among trained
negotiators. It may include a psychologist or an interpreter as required by the
situation. The primary concern of the Negotiation Team is to save lives,

prevent destruction of property, and pave the way for a peaceful resolution of
the crisis situation.
Liaison Team -This team shall work in coordination with the Negotiation
Team and the OSC and the Tactical Action Commander to ensure smooth
coordination. It shall coordinate for all the support required of the Negotiation
Team.

Figure 6. NEGOTIATION GROUP


Operations Group: This group shall be composed of regular and
special military and police units/elements deployed in the crisis incident site to
perform security functions and conduct tactical operations/intervention
necessary and appropriate to neutralize the terrorist elements/perpetrators at
the earliest possible time and at minimum risk and cost to life and property.

Figure 7. OPERATIONS GROUP

Security Units/Elements: These are military or police personnel


who shall compose the area and perimeter security. Depending on the
magnitude of the crisis, area security outside the immediate vicinity of the
incident shall be established to prevent other forces friendly to the
perpetrators from interfering or sending reinforcements of men or materials.
@ Area Security Units/Element: AFP/Police units/elements tasked to
provide general area security to contain enemy and criminal elements who
may take advantage of the crisis incident and neutralize terrorist
reinforcement elements.
@ Perimeter Security: AFP/Police units/elements tasked to provide
outer and inner perimeter security in the immediate vicinity of the incident.
Tactical Action/Intervention Units/Elements: These are
AFP/police units or elements specially organized, trained and equipped to
perform highly specialized anti-terrorist operations such as sniper operations,
bomb detection, disposal and the like.
Public Affairs Group: This group shall be composed of civilian and
military/ police personnel tasked to coordinate and control public
information/media coverage, and community relation functions.
Public Information/Media liaison and control Teams
Community Relations Teams
PUBLIC AFFAIRS GROUP
PUBLIC INFOR TEAM
MEDIA CONTROL TEAM
CIVIL RELATIONS TEAM

Figure 9. PUBLIC AFFAIRS GROUP


12. Inter-Agency Relationship at the lower levels
The lower level Crisis Management Committees shall be under the
direct umbrella of the corresponding lower level Peace and Order Councils.
These committees shall be guided by the policies set forth by such POCs.
In cases of crisis incidents where immediate military/police action is
needed, the Chairman of the CMC at any of the lower levels may coordinate
directly with the designated military/police commander responsible in his
locality for the deployment of the necessary crisis action force/units.

For purposes of implementing this interim doctrine, all AFP/PNP units


designated as crisis management operations forces/units shall be placed
under the operation control of the Chairman of the particular CMC having
cognizance of a crisis incident, by the C, PNP, Chief of Staff, AFP, or the Area
Commander concerned, on orders of the Chairman, Crisis Management
Committee.
In both of the foregoing instances, the AFP/PNP units designated to
compose the crisis management force shall take orders directly from the
designated military/ police tactical commander during the conduct of
operations. These units shall revert to the control of their assigned Command
upon termination of the crisis incident.
Utilities Liaison Team: On orders of the OSC, the team coordinates with
power, telephone, and water utility and tries to regulate supply to the area
where hostage taking occurred for the purpose of enhancing the government
negotiation position.

Figures 8. SERVICE SUPPORT GROUP


Service Support Group. This group shall be composed of civilian
agencies and military/police units tasked to provide the necessary
administrative, operational and logistics support to the ON-Scene Command
Post. These support activities include food distribution, medical evacuation,
communication-electronics, transportation and other services. The Service
Support shall have the following elements:
Legal/Investigation Teams
Intelligence Team
Communication-Electronics Team
Logistics Team

Medical Team
Fire-Fighting Team
Administrative Support Team
Public Affairs Group: This group shall be composed of civilian and
military/ police personnel tasked to coordinate and control public
information/media coverage, and community relation functions.
Public Information/Media liaison and control Teams
Community Relations Teams

PUBLIC AFFAIRS GROUP


PUBLIC INFOR TEAM
MEDIA CONTROL TEAM
CIVIL RELATIONS TEAM

Figure 9. PUBLIC AFFAIRS GROUP


12. Inter-Agency Relationship at the lower levels
The lower level Crisis Management Committees shall be under the
direct umbrella of the corresponding lower level Peace and Order Councils.
These committees shall be guided by the policies set forth by such POCs.
In cases of crisis incidents where immediate military/police action is
needed, the Chairman of the CMC at any of the lower levels may coordinate
directly with the designated military/police commander responsible in his
locality for the deployment of the necessary crisis action force/units.
For purposes of implementing this interim doctrine, all AFP/PNP units
designated as crisis management operations forces/units shall be placed
under the operation control of the Chairman of the particular CMC having
cognizance of a crisis incident, by the C, PNP, Chief of Staff, AFP, or the Area
Commander concerned, on orders of the Chairman, Crisis Management
Committee.
In both of the foregoing instances, the AFP/PNP units designated to
compose the crisis management force shall take orders directly from the
designated military/ police tactical commander during the conduct of

operations. These units shall revert to the control of their assigned Command
upon termination of the crisis incident.

VI. SEVEN HABITS OF HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE


By: STEVEN COVEY
"Managers have had to come to grip with the accelerating pace of change.
There is a need for a unifying framework by which decision makers
can view the entire range of issues".
- Niceto Poblador, PhD Be Proactive.
Anticipate problems and do something before it happens. Proactive
people and organizations are self-aware; accept responsibility for their own
action; don't blame and accuse others when things go wrong. Proactive police
officers are smart and value-driven. They read reality and know what's
needed.
Begin with the end in mind.
Set your target goals. It will set direction on what, when and how to
get to your desired end. The second habit nurtures the principle of leadership
and mission. Leadership focuses more on people than on things; on the long
term rather than on the short term; on developing relationships rather that on
equipment; on values and principles rather than on activities; on mission,
purpose and direction rather than on methods, techniques, and speed.
The most fundamental application of "begin with the end in mind" is
for us to begin today with the image or picture of our goal in life as our frame
of reference. It means to start with a clear understanding of our destination
by asking ourselves questions, such as: "What is that we want or ought to
accomplish? What kind of PNP image do we want to portray? And how do we
look at ourselves five, ten or fifteen years from now? It will create a
difference in our lives if we really know what is deeply important to us, and
keeping that picture in mind, we manage ourselves each day to be and to do
what really matters most.
Put first things first.
Prioritize. Put the "most" as your priority. As police officers, our
objective is to manage our lives effectively- from a center of sound principles,
from a knowledge of our personal mission, with a focus on the important as
well as the urgent, and within the framework of maintaining a balance
between increasing our output in terms of community or police service and
increasing our potential for leadership.
Think Win-win.

Your mind set should be positive. You must be highly convinced of


your capability to make a difference. Or else, you'll be stuck with pessimism
and end up with nothing. Win-Win is a frame of mind and heart that
constantly seeks mutual benefit in all our human interactions. It means that
our agreements or solutions are mutually beneficial and satisfying to both
parties. With a win-win solution, all parties feel good about the decision and
feel committed to the action plan. As police officers, we do not claim
monopoly of choices nor impose our will to the community. For in win-win
approach, life is seen as a cooperative and not as a competitive arena.
Seek first to understand... Then to be understood
Be open-minded. This is an indicator of maturity and growth. You can
not expect others to understand your perspective unless you'll start saying
"Yes, I got your point"... The police officer must have a clear and deep
understanding of the nature, root causes and implications of communal or
personal problems in the community. This will open the door to creative
solutions and third alternatives. In that case, our differences are no longer
stumbling blocks to communication and progress in the community.
Synergize
In planning for a group, coordination is a prerequisite. You can not
come-up with an effective plan for your organization unless your group
arrived with consensus. It means that "the sum is greater than the whole of
its parts" -attained through synergy, fostered and nurtured through
empowering management styles and supportive structures and systems. In
an environment of trust and open communication, police officers working
interdependently with the community will be able to generate creativity,
improvement and innovation beyond the total of their individual but separate
capacities.
Sharpen the saw
Theory and Practice is the secret of success although experience
counts. It is best that you'll never stop LEARNING (I'm not only referring to
the formal education). Attend relevant seminars, workshops and training that
could ponder your knowledge. It is the principle of continuous improvement.
Police officers who fail to sharpen the saw regularly find that not only their
saw becomes dull, but they also become obsolete and increasingly dependent
upon playing it safe. They become protective and politically or security
minded. Developing within ourselves consistent commitment and continued
performance in refining and expanding their abilities in the physical,
psychological, social and spiritual areas are the keys to the overall continuous
development of the PNP organization.

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"

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