Sei sulla pagina 1di 1

Famous Conspiracy Theorists in History

The next time somebody rolls his eyes and calls you a “conspiracy theorist,” tell that person you’re in good
company and quote liberally from the following:

Franklin D. Roosevelt: American President who, in a letter dated November 23, 1933 to President Wilson's top
advisor, Colonel Edward House, wrote, "The real truth of the matter is, as you and I know, that a financial element
in the large centers has owned the government ever since the days of Andrew Jackson." FDR was also quoted as
saying, "In politics, nothing happens by accident. If it happens, you can bet it was planned that way."

Elliot Roosevelt: Son of the American President, FDR, who wrote, "There are within our world perhaps only a
dozen organizations which shape the courses of our various destinies as rigidly as the regularly constituted
governments."

Woodrow Wilson: American President who wrote, "Some of the biggest men in the United States, in the field of
commerce and manufacture, are afraid of something. They know there is a power somewhere so organized, so
subtle, so watchful, so interlocked, so complete, so pervasive that they had better not speak above their breath
when they speak in condemnation of it."

Felix Frankfurter: U.S. Supreme Court justice who said, "The real rulers in Washington are invisible, and
exercise power form behind the scenes."

Joseph P. Kennedy: 1920’s era "bootlegger" with mob connections, who became ambassador to England (His
son would later become President.) He was quoted as saying, "Fifty men run America and that's a high figure."

John F. Hylan: Mayor of New York who, in 1922 said, "The real menace of our Republic is the invisible
government which like a giant octopus sprawls its slimy length over our city, state and nation...At the head of this
octopus is the Rockefeller-Standard Oil interests and a small group of powerful banking houses, generally referred
to as the international bankers (who) virtually run the U.S. government for their own selfish purposes."

Buckminster R. Fuller: Great innovative thinker who said, shortly before his death in 1983, "The USA is not run
by its would-be 'democratic government.’ Nothing could be more pathetic than the role that has to be played by
the President of the United States, whose power is approximately zero. Nevertheless, the news media and most
over-thirty-years-of-age USA citizens carry on as if the President has supreme power."

Benjamin Disraeli: British Prime Minister who, in 1856, told the House of Commons, "It is useless to deny,
because it is impossible to conceal, that a great part of Europe - the whole of Italy and France and a great portion
of [then fragmented] Germany, to say nothing of other countries - is covered with a network of these secret
societies...And what are their objects? They do not attempt to conceal them. They do not want constitutional
government...they want to change the tenure of land, to drive out the present owners of the soil and to put an end
to ecclesiastical establishments." He was also quoted as saying, “The world is governed by very different
personages from what is imagined by those who are not behind the scenes.”

Stewart Alsop: Famous newspaper columnist who once wrote, "Knowledge is power, and power is the more
valuable commodity in government. So whoever knows the secrets controls the knowledge and therefore holds
power. Many people today feel that a mere handful of persons and organizations control much of the global
knowledge. This knowledge is jealously guarded by secrecy. It turns the old adage 'What you don't know can't
hurt you' right on its head. What you don't know CAN hurt you!"

George Washington: First American President who, in a letter dated 1782, wrote, "It was not my intention to
doubt that the doctrines of the Illuminati, and the principles of Jacobinism, had not spread in the United States. On
the contrary, no one is more fully satisfied of this fact than I am"

Compiled from Ruled by Secrecy by Jim Marrs