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SEPTEMBER 25, 2015

SEPTEMBER 25, 2015 TIMES Locally Owned & Operated STRATHMORE VOLUME 7 ISSUE 39 TERRIFICTWILIGHT Monday,Tuesday

TIMES

Locally Owned & Operated STRATHMORE
Locally Owned & Operated STRATHMORE
Locally Owned & Operated STRATHMORE

Locally Owned & Operated

STRATHMORE

VOLUME 7 ISSUE 39

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Page 3

Page 3 Terry Fox legacy Page 8 Albertans gather at anti-NDP rally Page 21 Bisons win

Terry Fox legacy

Page 8

Page 3 Terry Fox legacy Page 8 Albertans gather at anti-NDP rally Page 21 Bisons win

Albertans gather at anti-NDP rally

Page 21

Fox legacy Page 8 Albertans gather at anti-NDP rally Page 21 Bisons win exhibition tourney Offering

Bisons win

exhibition tourney

Offering IV Sedation Dr. Ashkan Hamzehi DDS Dr. Jungsoo kim DDS Dr. Jason Pan DMD
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Dr. Arzy Kafrouny DDS
General Practice Family Dentistry
100 Ranch Market, Unit 105F
Strathmore, AB 403.934.5292
www.theranchdentalcentre.com

Look on Page 4 for Town of Strathmore Municipal Notices

Contact Us Today! 403.934.5589 info@strathmoretimes.com www.StrathmoreTimes.com
Contact Us Today!
403.934.5589
info@strathmoretimes.com
www.StrathmoreTimes.com

Crime goes down in Strathmore

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

Sgt. Steve Vince, from the Strathmore RCMP, updated council on policing efforts conduct- ed by the RCMP as part of their contract to the town and on the enhanced policing re- quested by council. “The bottom line is the nice part, the crime statistics inside the municipality are down,” said Vince. “They have been steadily declin- ing for the last three years, both in persons crime and in property crime.” The statistics given were for the first six months of 2015. There were 940 calls, com- pared to 1140 from two years ago. The enhanced traffic enforcement asked for last year by council showed that the stats are still high. They have issued approximately 70 tickets per month with a $13,000 income from the tickets that goes to finance the po- licing effort. When stops indicate other crimi- nal activity, the town is not charged for that service. “The program is certainly worthwhile. Last month we had a traffic stop that ended up in a high speed pursuit that ended down by Eagle Lake. It ended up apprehending some- one who was wanted for multiple warrants in Calgary,” said Vince. He said the search led to discovery of three individuals involved in a human traf- ficking ring working in the sex trade in the Strathmore area. The ladies were taken off the street and put in more appropriate condi- tions. Two weeks ago $40,000 in cash was taken off an ex-convict who was involved in the human traffic trade. Councillors were concerned about noise complaints that they had from the public in areas about town. However, Sgt. Vince said that they only received 20 complaints, regis- tered with them about Kinsman Park, in a six month period and only four were noise re- lated. Response time on non-emergency calls show they respond 96 per cent of the time in under 10 minutes. Vince said that there had been some frustration with the centralized dispatch system coming out of Red Deer as they had noticed some delays in getting calls to the detachment. Council asked if better bylaws might give officers more enforcement options; however, Vince said that they were a tool, but not the primary service of the RCMP and suggested that it might be more appro- priately relate to duties of the town peace of- ficer.

Continued on Page 5

What a ride! Twenty-five to 30 trail riders from the Siksika Nation and across southern

What a ride!

Twenty-five to 30 trail riders from the Siksika Nation and across southern Alberta gathered on Siksika land on Sunday, Sept. 20, raising over $2,100 for the Alberta Cancer Foundation in the first annual Blackfoot Crossing Ride for Cancer. The ride began and ended at the spot where chiefs from the Blackfoot and other First Nations met government representatives in 1877 to

sign Treaty 7.

Justin Seward Photo

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Page 2 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

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September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 3

Larger than life Brentwood students broke out their artistic side, as part of their 35th

Larger than life

Brentwood students broke out their artistic side, as part of their 35th anniversary celebrations. They tin foiled the playground structures to look like a giant spider web, catching otherworldly tinfoil insects. The project was part of the Atomic 13 Ingenuity projects sponsored by Beakerhead, which is a partnership of companies and the Alberta government to encourage creativity and ingenuity.

Sharon McLeay Photo

Moving towards water approval

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

Wheatland Regional Water Corporation got an interim vote from Wheatland Coun- cil, to have consultants start on plans for the water reser- voir on Sept. 8. “Engineers need to know something by the end of September, in order to get the reservoir up and full by next year,” said Reeve Glenn Koester. “If we wait, there could be a potential delay in startup of another year.” Koester said normally the motion would be made in principle at the meeting of the whole (council organi- zational meeting) that takes place in October and then finalized in council later. There was $150,000 previ- ously committed to the proj- ect and Councilor Rex Har- wood asked if the engineers could be included under that commitment, so work could begin. Councilor Brenda

Knight said she felt the move would be premature, as they would not know what cost the engineers would charge and no guidelines had been given to the engineers as to what was expected to date. Koester said council could approve utilizing money out of the $150,000, which would be repaid through grant money if the grant were approved. “Sometimes we have made decisions on issues that put the chicken before the egg, and this is just the other way around,” said Armstrong. Council decided to amend resolution 15-05-07, to in- clude interim funding for preliminary consultation for the engineers, which will aid in the grant process as well. Koester said final deci- sions would be made once the grant approval is known. “If it is not approved, the project may be dead any- way,” said Koester.

approved, the project may be dead any- way,” said Koester. Run like Terry Fox Community runners
approved, the project may be dead any- way,” said Koester. Run like Terry Fox Community runners

Run like Terry Fox

Community runners gathered at Strathmore’s Kinsmen Park on Sept. 20, to register for the Terry Fox Run. The runners could do a five or 10 km run, walk or roll and donate pledges to the Terry Fox foundation. This is the 35th anniversary of Terry Fox’s historic run. Wil- drose MLA Derek Fildebrandt leads off the race and ad- dressed runners thanking them for their worthwhile participa- tion in the run.

Sharon McLeay Photos

worthwhile participa- tion in the run. Sharon McLeay Photos Running for a cure Sacred Heart Acad-

Running for a cure

Sacred Heart Acad- emy raised funds for cancer cures, when they took part in the Terry Fox Run around Kinsmen Park on Sept. 16. Cassidy VanBavel (l- r) and Ally Dovichak.

Manny Everett Photo

Now part of the Simply Holistic Team Camie Chanasyk, RMT #108, 304-3rd Ave Strathmore, AB
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Cremation is the process of subjecting dead human remains to direct flame and reducing them to a powder-like substance that can be buried or scattered. A crematorium reaches temperatures of around 1600° C. This process takes roughly 6 hours, depending on several factors. All that remains after the cremation is bone fragments and ash that is reduced to a finer powder to be placed in an urn and returned to the family or scattered. A stamped medallion is often placed with a body to ensure proper identification, along with many other systems in place to ensure the identification of the cremated remains is never in question. The cremated remains are entirely sterile and completely safe to handle. Because cremation is irreversible, unlike burials, more paperwork is required, including permission from a Medical Examiner, before a crematorium may proceed with any cremation.

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Page 4 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING, OCTOBER 7, 2015, 7:00 PM: VOLUNTEER DRIVERS REQUIRED BYLAW NO. 15-20
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING,
OCTOBER 7, 2015, 7:00 PM:
VOLUNTEER DRIVERS REQUIRED
BYLAW NO. 15-20
Bylaw No. 15-20: Proposed textual amendment to
the Land Use Bylaw which adds “Eating and Drinking
Establishments, Major” to the list of Discretionary Uses in
Section 4.11 CHWY – Highway Commercial District.
Strathmore FCSS Needs You. We are looking for
Volunteer Drivers to assist us with the KARE (Kind,
Accessible, Reliable, Economical) Volunteer Driver
Program. The purpose of the KARE Volunteer Driver
Program is to assist those who do not have access to
affordable, inter-municipal transportation (between
communities) for their Healthcare and personal
appointments/errands.
We require a minimum of Six volunteers to start the
2015.
you have any questions, please call Strathmore FCSS at
The next regular
Council Meeting
will be
October 7 & 21, 2015
A copy of the proposed Bylaw may be inspected by the
public during regular office hours, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm,
Monday to Friday at the Town Office (680 Westchester
Road, Strathmore, AB), or can be found on the Town
website (www.strathmore.ca). Please contact the Town
Office if you would like an opportunity to review and
provide input on the proposed amendments prior to the
Public Hearing.
program and our goal is to have at least 10 by the end of
If you are interested in volunteering as a driver or if
403-934-9090.
COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS- SEPT 16, 2015
Council moved In Camera at 6:26 PM to discuss a land
matter.
The Public Hearing will be held at the Council Chambers,
Strathmore Municipal Building, 680 Westchester Road,
Strathmore Alberta on Wednesday, October 7, 2015,
commencing at 7:00 pm with procedures in accordance
with the Town of Strathmore Council Procedural Bylaw
#07-11 and amendments thereto. Any person or group of
persons, or person acting one’s behalf, who claims to be
affected by any or all of the proposed bylaws may present
suggestions or concerns by making a submission to the
public hearing.
Council directed administration to enter into negotiations
to purchase the Anglican Church Property.
Council gave second, third and final reading to Bylaw No.
15-23 Edgefield Phase 2 Area Structure Plan Amendment
as amended.
Council directed administration to provide the
information regarding the Traffic Impact Analysis and
identified issues with Bylaw 15-23 to Prairie Merchant as
requested.
Council give second, third and final reading to Bylaw
No. 15-24 Land Use Bylaw Amendment Bylaw – Edgefield
Phase 2.
Written submissions to the Public Hearing or the name
of any person wishing to make an oral presentation at
the Public Hearing must be received by the Planning
and Development Department prior to 12:00 noon on
Thursday, October 1, 2015 as outlined in Bylaw #07-11 and
amendments thereto. If your written submission is not
received by this time, please provide fifteen (15) copies
for distribution at the Public Hearing. Each person wishing
to address Council at the Public Hearing shall complete
their verbal presentation within five minutes. Please note
that written submissions will become public documents
once submitted to the Town, unless otherwise requested.
Council gave second, third and final reading to Bylaw No.
15-22 – Land Use Bylaw Textual Amendments.
Council gave second, third and final reading to Bylaw No.
15-19 Redesignation of 224 – 4th Avenue.
Council indicated their support for the Calgary Regional
Partnership South Pilot Project by requesting Mayor Ell
support the same in his position on the executive of the
Calgary Regional Partnership.
Council will support the CRP Transportation Committee
goals as they pertain to Regional Transportation and that
Council fully support the concept of having Strathmore
considered as a community involved in a future CRP
regional transportation pilot project.
UTILITY BILLS
Council approved the installation of the RRFB pedestrian
crossing of George Freeman Trail at Parklane Drive /
Utility bills ending September 15, 2015 have gone out for:
Edgefield Gate with a budget of $30,000.00 as an offsite levy
project.
Wildflower Heights/Strathmore Lakes
Westmount • Downtown • Thorncliff
Parkwood • Green Meadow/Grande Point
Aspen Creek • The Ranch
Council increased the budget for the Ag Grounds Water
Service Metering project to $70,000.00 with funds to be
drawn from Financial Stabilization.
-and-
THAT Council approve to proceed with the tender and
VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED
award of the mainline water meter vault/building portion of
this project with an estimated cost of $40,000.00.
The following Committee of The Town of Strathmore
requires volunteers to serve either a one year or two
year term:
Council approved the construction of Segment 4 (as
shown on the attached Schedule A) of the proposed
Names Advisory Committee
The Names Advisory Committee reviews applications
submitted in regard to the naming of new subdivisions,
streets, parks, and municipal buildings, making
recommendations to Council for approval. Time
commitment example: 2 after hours meetings
scheduled in 2012, ½ hr to 1 hour in length and 1
meeting in 2013, 1 meeting in 2014.
Pathway on the west side of George Freeman Trail for an
amount not to exceed $65,000.00 with funds to be drawn
from the financial stabilization reserve.
-and-
THAT an estimated sum of $55,000.00 be funded by the
Town and recovered back from United Communities
through an Endeavor To Assist payable at the time of
subdivision of Ranch Phase 5/7
-and-
If
you are interested in serving your community as
THAT the report be referred to the October 2015 Fall
Planning Session complete with the information as
a
volunteer, please submit a Volunteer Application
provided by Engineering for the purpose of future planning.
(available at the Town Office or on the Town’s website)
to Jennifer Sawatsky, Municipal Clerk, in person or via
email: jennifers@strathmore.ca
Council approved the formation of a Traffic Consultation
Committee and that Administration be directed to create
the Terms of Reference for this new committee.
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680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1 • 403-934-3133 • Office Hours: M - F
680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1 • 403-934-3133 • Office Hours: M - F

680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1

•
680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1 • 403-934-3133 • Office Hours: M - F 8:30

403-934-3133

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680 Westchester Road, Strathmore, AB T1P 1J1 • 403-934-3133 • Office Hours: M - F 8:30

Office Hours: M

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September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 5

September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 5 Sweet smell of success Brian, owner/operator of

Sweet smell of success

Brian, owner/operator of Strathmore Florists and staff celebrated their 35th anniversary on Sept. 18,

with a huge plant sale. Betty (l-r), Colleen, Bethan, Sunni, Brian and Heather.

Manny Everett Photo

Handibus keeps essential hours

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

A Strathmore special needs family was questioning why nighttime service could not be provided by the Strath- more and District Handibus to educa- tional opportunities. The service had been used in the past and they ques- tioned why it was no longer available. Councillor Rocky Blokland addressed this and similar concerns at the Sept. 16, Town of Strathmore council meet- ing, clarifying the hours of operation and mission goals for the Handibus. “The Strathmore Handibus is there mainly for transportation to and from medical appointments. It is stated in the mission statement,” said Blokland. The organization set summer operat- ing hours in July of 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., until Sept. 21, which is consistent with other Handibus organizations in the province. The Handibus has been struggling to meet its patient obligations as the ser- vice is well used. They have doubled up patient loads to maximize service times, but are still delayed by wait times experienced in Calgary, occur- ring around medical appointments. There are only two full-time drivers and five part-time drivers. Blokland gave examples of how staff have gone above and beyond, sometimes working more than their shifts, to accommodate

the needs of the patients. They also ensure that evening hospital patients from Sagewood are returned to the fa- cility. They are averaging approximate- ly 600 trips per month. Alberta Health Services were ap- proached in the past for support on medical transfers; however, no support was forthcoming. The Strathmore Taxi was open to providing a van for night service; however, the province wanted the owner to make an upfront invest- ment of $70,000 for the vehicle, which the owner said he could never get back in fares. Blokland said the Handibus organi- zation must also manage their finan- cial, staffing and six bus maintenance and equipment needs, in order to re- main viable and serve the public. Last year it cost $300,000 to keep the orga- nization running. He said the organization gets a lot of positive feedback from its users and has only had two complaints last year, each dealing with transportation to so- cial engagements. The board meets on Sept. 21 and will be discussing the hours of operation at that time. The Strathmore and District Handibus is a volunteer operation that is a separate entity from the Town of Strathmore and Wheatland County, and which raises operating funds through grants and donations (including those from the town and county).

GET YOUR

CLASSIFIED

ADS IN THE

TIMES!

and county). GET YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS IN THE TIMES! Kudos go to RCMP for crime reduction

Kudos go to RCMP for crime reduction

Continued from

If I had a 15-year-

Page 1

old daughter in

munity. You guys get a lot of flack, but I think you should get some credit too! We live in a good town and a safe town. So thank you.”

this

town, and I

don’t

have,

but

if

said

night ‘I am going

9:30 at

did and she

I

at

for a walk,’ wouldn’t an ounce of View all of our listings and virtual tours
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reps.remax@gmail.com View listings at www.the-reps.ca r e a l e s t a t e r

realestatereps

Carey Rose

Debra Enslen

Hayley Poirier

you said, there is

a

crime in the com- munity over the last three years and that is not done easily,” said Councillor Bob Sobol. “It speaks highly to the members on the force and I would like you to thank the members of the force for the job they are doing.

thank the members of the force for the job they are doing. Strathmore RCMP is currently
Strathmore RCMP is currently investigating a break and enter and theft from vehicle that occurred
Strathmore RCMP is currently investigating a break and enter and theft from vehicle that occurred

Strathmore RCMP is currently investigating a break and enter and theft from vehicle that occurred on September 17. Sometime between 1230 AM and 0800 AM, 2 unlocked vehicles on Centre Street were broken into. Unknown suspect(s) then broke into an unlocked garage and stole several items including a Dewalt electric saw, a wooden air pellet gun with the name “Daisy” on it, and a older model 12 gauge shotgun. RCMP is reminding people to keep their doors locked at night to help avoid these incidents. If you have any information that could help in solving this investigation, please contact the Strathmore RCMP.

File: 20151202187

1-800-222-TIPS

(1-800-222-8477)

this investigation, please contact the Strathmore RCMP. File: 20151202187 1-800-222-TIPS (1-800-222-8477) 403-934-2125
this investigation, please contact the Strathmore RCMP. File: 20151202187 1-800-222-TIPS (1-800-222-8477) 403-934-2125

403-934-2125

Times TIDBITS

Did You Know?

According to superstition, catching leaves in autumn brings good luck Every leaf means a lucky month next year.

YOUR WEEKLY

HEALTH ADVICE

Gord Morck Pharmacist Capsule Comments
Gord Morck
Pharmacist
Capsule Comments
HEALTH ADVICE Gord Morck Pharmacist Capsule Comments People with tinnitus hear sounds from within their ear.

People with tinnitus hear sounds from within their ear. Sounds like ringing, buzzing, whistling, roaring or hissing can be very draining and stressful. There is hope on the horizon. A new drug, AM-101 is being tested and looks promising to treat tinnitus. It is administered as an injection into the ear past the ear drum. Clinical trials so far have shown significant reduction in the sounds with minimal side effects. We’ll keep you posted on this one. Another good reason to exercise regularly: It helps reduce the loss of height that often comes with aging. Those little discs between our vertebrae often dry out and get smaller with age. This results in our becoming shorter. But regular exercise will compress and relax these discs and help keep them from shrinking. During pregnancy, when you or the people around you smoke, your baby smokes too. Smoking interferes with the efficient transport of oxygen in the blood so your baby gets less oxygen and that can cause the baby to grow more slowly, gain less weight and could be born prematurely. No alcohol during pregnancy is a good rule to follow. Add no smoking to the list as well. People who have had one kidney stone will probably have another within 5 years. Most kidney stones contain calcium oxalate. Eating foods high in calcium (or supplements) can help bind the oxalate in the gut reducing the amount reaching the urine. For help in choosing the right calcium product for you, talk to our pharmacists.

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Page 6 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

Federal

election

2105

25, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com Federal election 2105 Federal election candidates chose one issue that they feel

Federal election candidates chose one issue that they feel is important in this election and gave their views as to possible solutions to those issues prob- lems.

Fahed Khalid

Democratic Advancement Party of Canada

Rural Ridings and Their Dynamics in Big Government

of Canada Rural Ridings and Their Dynamics in Big Government How do rural ridings get represent-

How do rural ridings get represent- ed? Does your candidate have expe- rience and knowledge of both a rural riding and an urban riding and why is this important? Rural riding dynamics are totally dif- ferent than urban dynamics. First off, the candidate of a rural riding should live in the riding. If not, then they should at a minimum have lived in a rural community at one point to un- derstand the dynamics and issues, as they are much different than a large city. If the candidate for a rural rid- ing is city based and has never lived in a rural riding, how can one really represent the people or understand the issues. Likewise, if a rural individual has never lived in the city, how can one understand the mindset of urbanites and communicate issues to big govern- ment, which are usually based in big

cities with large populations. When I say big cities this would be like Edmon- ton, which is the capital, and not like the towns and smaller cities within the province. Therefore the optimal solution would be to have a candidate that has both qualities of experience and knowledge of the two sides of this paradigm, which is rural and urban. This would make your candidate effective and efficient, as a public servant whose voice could be heard and views expressed would be listened to, as they know what they are talking about and can communicate with both types of people. At the end of the day the public ser- vant is responsible to the tax payer, thus picking one who understand both sides is the simple solution to a large and present problem in the election and government that we have today.

Canada Federal Election 2015 BOW RIVER RIDING CANDIDATE FORUM The Strathmore Times, with the support
Canada Federal Election 2015
BOW RIVER RIDING
CANDIDATE FORUM
The Strathmore Times, with the support of the Town of
Strathmore, Rocky’s Bakery and the Strathmore & District
Agricultural Society, is hosting a forum for the candidates
of the Bow River Riding on October 1, 7 p.m.
at the Strathmore Civic Centre,
located at 120 Brent Boulevard.
The forum will be moderated by Herb McLane.
Residents of the Bow River Riding are invited to attend
the forum and submit generic questions that will be asked
by the moderator to ALL of the candidates. There will be
a formal opportunity to ask each candidate questions
one-on-one after the forum has concluded.
Coffee and snacks will be provided.
Candidates running for the Bow River Riding are:
Martin Shields (Conservative Party),
Rita Fromholt (Green Party), William MacDonald Alexander
(Liberal Party), Lynn MacWilliam (New Democratic Party),
Frans VandeStroet (Christian Heritage Party) and
Fahed Khalid (Democratic Advancement Party).
TIMES
RR cky’scky’s
STRATHMORE

I have the experience and knowledge of rural issues and big city issues which are inherently different from each oth- er and understand the dynamics to ad- dress them and find a solution to them.

Frans

to ad- dress them and find a solution to them. Frans VandeStroet Christian Heritage Party (CHP

VandeStroet

Christian Heritage Party (CHP Canada) Abortion One issue that is very important to the Chris- tian Heritage Party (CHP) and me is the terrible fact that Canada is the only Western country without any legisla- tion to regulate abortion. Worldwide we are in dubious company of only two notorious human rights violators, China and North Korea. This means that it is not illegal or punishable in Canada to kill a baby in even the latest stages of a pregnancy, all in the name of ‘CHOICE’. The CHP believes in the rights of men and women to choose, but we don’t believe in the right to kill our unborn children if we choose to do so. Mainstream parties like the Lib- erals and NDP have decided that it is OK to kill the unborn, if the mother thinks she has to make that choice. The Conservatives play it safe by not touch- ing the subject and by punishing their own Members of Parliament, if they get too noisy about this subject. The CHP is Canada’s only federal pro-life party who speaks up for the human rights of the unborn! We will work hard to implement legislation that pro- tects the unborn, and gives women all the support they need to avoid the ugly choice to kill their unborn baby. We need to stimulate adoption, not abortion! Unwanted pregnancies are often the symptom of unhealthy rela- tionships. The CHP wants to strength- en the traditional family unit, thereby creating the best possible environment for our teenagers when they grow up and explore relationships. Strong fami- lies often also form the support base that is needed to avoid the choice to kill an unborn baby in case of unwant- ed pregnancy. So in short, the CHP wants family friendly policies, encour- age healthy sexual behaviour, promote adoption, and make abortion unthink- able as soon as possible!

and make abortion unthink- able as soon as possible! Course Kings Several golfers enjoyed the warm
and make abortion unthink- able as soon as possible! Course Kings Several golfers enjoyed the warm
Course Kings
Course Kings

Several golfers enjoyed the warm September day for the second annual Wheatland Kings golf tournament at Strathmore Golf Club on Sept. 18. The tournament raised $4,000 towards the op- erational expenses of the franchise.

Justin Seward Photos

September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 7

Lynn MacWilliam

25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 7 Lynn MacWilliam NDP National Daycare Program One thing

NDP National Daycare Program One thing that I am excited about during this election is the pros- pect of having a $15-a- day National Childcare Program. Ca- nadian families have wanted this for a long time and it is finally within reach. In 1993, the Liberals promised to bring in a childcare program. Even with 12 years of majority government, they did not deliver. The last year they were in power, they cobbled together a program at the eleventh hour; too little, too late. The cost of childcare is breaking household budgets. Families are cur-

Rita Fromholt

breaking household budgets. Families are cur- Rita Fromholt Green Party Greenhouse gas re- duction How can

Green Party Greenhouse gas re- duction How can we reduce greenhouse gas emis- sions when our econ- omy and society are heavily dependent on fossil fuels such as oil, gas and coal? While the Green Party of Canada is a federal party fully engaged on all the issues Canadians care about, real action on climate change by reducing GHG emissions is core to who we are. We believe in a Canada that works together – across party lines and across jurisdictional boundaries – to deliver results. Those results include more jobs for Canadians in the grow- ing clean tech sector, in renewable energy, in building a modern infra-

rently paying between $1,000 and $2,000 per child. Career goals have been sacrificed because parents have been unable to find affordable child- care. Studies show that for every dollar invested in childcare, our economy grows by two dollars. A National Child- care Program would generate $3 bil- lion in government revenue. Tom Mulcair and the NDP have made

a National Childcare Program a prior- ity in this election. In Quebec, Tom saw firsthand how the province’s uni- versal, affordable childcare program helped families, boosted the economy and helped more than 70,000 join the workforce. We will work with provinces, territo- ries and First Nations communities to

structure, and in retrofitting Canadian buildings. Greens are calling for 80 per cent re- ductions, below 1990 levels, by 2050.

A short-term target is 40 per cent, be-

low 2005 levels, by 2025. These tough targets are achievable through a series of important mea- sures all designed to move us away from economic and cultural fossil fuel dependency. Canada’s recently an- nounced targets by the Harper gov- ernment are the weakest in the G7. We would implement a federal car- bon fee that would only be levied on fossil fuels at source – when the coal, oil or gas comes out of the ground or crosses the border into Canada. The exact fee would vary according to the different global warming potential of the different fuels. Those paying the fee would pass the extra cost on down

deliver a National Childcare Program, where parents pay no more than $15 a day. As a councillor for the Town of Bas- sano, I know the only way for the town to grow is to have affordable childcare. This will bring young families to the town which, in turn, will bring in more services and businesses. I have heard concerns from stay- at-home parents, worried they will be forced to put their children into childcare. Parents who wish to stay at home with their children still can, but the NDP want to ensure that there are quality, regulated childcare spaces for families who need them. To find out more about the program and costing details, please go to www. ndp.ca.

the business chain. However, we be- lieve that every dollar generated by the carbon fee should be returned to Canadians through an equal per capi- tal dividend payment. Other measures we would imple- ment to reduce emissions include re- moving subsides to fossil fuel indus- tries, create funding for clean tech and alternative energy businesses and mobilize trades and workers across Canada in a national federally funded program to retrofit residential, busi- ness and institutional buildings to drastically improve energy efficiency. Greens also believe that Canada must show leadership in reaching an international agreement on emissions reductions targets at the UN negotia- tions in Paris in December. Contact the Green party: 866-868-3447, ext 252 Cell: 250-884-5751

Conservative Party candidate Martin Shields and Liberal Party candidate Mac Alexander were not available for comment as of press time.

Alexander were not available for comment as of press time. Dress-up day! Sacred Heart Acad- emy
Alexander were not available for comment as of press time. Dress-up day! Sacred Heart Acad- emy
Dress-up day!
Dress-up
day!

Sacred Heart Acad- emy kindergarten teacher Natasha Kent (right back) gets in the spirit of dressing as her favourite charac- ter, Barbie, on Sept. 17. Her students also did their part by dress- ing as their favourite movie characters.

Sharon McLeay Photo

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Small Business Week

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October 18 - 24
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“Recognize and celebrate the outstanding contributions made by small and medium sized businesses in our communities”

Pass the popcorn
Pass the popcorn

Sacred Heart Academy kicked off their school year with a family BBQ and movie in the park, where the feature presentation was the movie Home. As the evening drew near kids and adults were huddled under blankets and sleeping bags, eating popcorn and getting ready for the event. Bryann Evans (l-r), Grady Hanson, Tate Hanson, Carson Kalbhen and Jett Evans.

Manny Everett Photo

Advertising costs include full color

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The Strathmore Times will be publishing this special section on October 16. Deadlines on October 7.

For information or to book your ad please call

Rose 403.934.5589 rose@strathmoretimes.com

STRATHMORE TIMES

STRATHMORE

STRATHMORE TIMES

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FREE Strathmore Times Newspaper

in your mail box please

give us a call 403.934.5589

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Did You Know?

Go for a walk! Just because the weather is a little cooler in fall, doesn’t mean it’s time to hibernate. Dress in layers so you and your family can enjoy a walk outdoors even in the evening, after dinner.

time to hibernate. Dress in layers so you and your family can enjoy a walk outdoors

Page 8 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

Page 8 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015 G8 for Legion Ladies Auxiliary presidents The
Page 8 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015 G8 for Legion Ladies Auxiliary presidents The
Page 8 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015 G8 for Legion Ladies Auxiliary presidents The
Page 8 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015 G8 for Legion Ladies Auxiliary presidents The

G8 for Legion Ladies Auxiliary presidents

The Strathmore Legion and seven other Royal Canadian Legion Ladies Auxiliary groups from Calgary gathered on Sept. 17 at the Strathmore Legion for a tribute to their past and present presidents. The male volunteers from Strathmore gave a stunning fashion show of spring flowers represented by cre- ative headdresses.

Sharon McLeay Photo

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

e s s e s . Sharon McLeay Photo www.StrathmoreTimes.com Discontented voters Residents gathered at the
Discontented voters
Discontented voters

Residents gathered at the CalFrac build- ing off Hwy. 1 west to listen to grassroots speakers, who are against NDP gover- nance. Some in attendance wore t-shirts that supported the oil sands and bumper stickers stating ‘Why blame me I didn’t vote NDP’ were worn and handed out. Some of the issues discussed were the economy, job security, taxes and styles of governance.

Sharon McLeay Photo

o f g o v e r n a n c e . Sharon McLeay Photo

Water meter for ag grounds

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

A $40,000 budget was allocated in 2014 for the Ag Grounds Water Metering project; however, cost anal-

ysis shows that an additional $30,000 will be needed later to complete the entire project, which includes

a meter/vault building, line meters to the various

buildings and ice rink, hardware, contingency work fund and engineering costs. Planners asked that the original $40,000 be put towards the mainline water meter installation that would tie town water into the agricultural society grounds, which was necessary to protect the quality of town water. “We have been asked and been engaged by the Strathmore Agricultural Society on the technical re- view for water service to the ag grounds,” said Gord Elenko, engineering director for the Town of Strath- more. He said the team was doing an onsite technical review this week.

The grounds have service lines that provide wa- ter to the campground and three structures on the south end of the grounds. The grounds currently have one private well. There were concerns that the untreated well could cross-contaminate town lines, unless a special isolation valve is installed. There were financial concerns noted by Council- lor Denise Peterson as to whether the ag society could afford metered water. “I certainly support in theory what we are do- ing to protect the integrity of the water supply and know how much water we are using,” said Peterson. “My concern is once we put this meter in, we could typically, with the ball diamonds there … I think I heard one time a figure sometime … be looking at the amount of $30,000 to $50,000 worth of water. I have had the opportunity in the last few years to look at the ag society books, and I don’t see them actually being able to afford this. If this converts into an actual cost to the society, it could bring them down. In order to support this, I need some kind of

assurance that this something that can be looked at in depth.” Administration indicated that the ag society has requested a meeting to discuss whether a joint part- nership with the town could be reached to deal with the issue. Administration assured council that at this point, the mainline water meter will not result in a bill. A bill wouldn’t be forthcoming until the issue comes through council for approval. Currently, the ag society pays about $3,000 per month for water service just to the onsite washrooms. Councillor Rocky Blokland reminded council that Strathmore residents were paying high costs for their water use and that the 30 per cent water losses experienced by the town needed to be considered. He questioned whether the town knew how much water the grounds were actually using. Elenko said metering would help establish how much water was being used. Council approved the additional funds, which would be taken from the financial stabilization fund.

Alberta’s government needs to settle things down

DEREK FILDEBRANDT MLA for Strathmore-Brooks and the Wildrose Shadow Minister of Finance

In challenging economic times, good governments should

bring stability and predictability

to the markets.

In challenging economic times, good governments should

bring stability and predictability

to the markets.

Whatever else a government does, it should follow the first rule of medicine with regards to the economy: ‘Do no harm.’ When questioned about the

potentially harmful effects of her government’s policies, NDP Premier Rachel Notley told the Edmonton Sun that “folks need to settle down a bit.” There is no silver bullet that governments can use to cure the economy through their own managerial genius, but there is a lot that governments can do to hurt the economy. Already, Alberta’s NDP gov- ernment has brought forward an energy royalty review that is almost sure to hike royalty rates at a time when the industry is reeling from globally depressed oil prices.

This means that even when oil prices recover, Alberta will

be poorly positioned to ride the next boom of investment rela- tive to our primary competitors. Investors don’t just put their money where they can make

a profit. They put their money

where they can make the most

profit. That means that if Sas- katchewan or North Dakota has

a competitive royalty advantage

over Alberta, investment dollars that would otherwise come here will find their way to our com- petitors. Beyond this, the government has raised business and per-

What’s Happening a free weekly community calendar

What’s Happening

a free weekly community calendar

 

Classic Movie Mondays – Mon. Sept. 21 (1-3pm) – Strathmore Library. Spend an afternoon with the stars of the silver screen! Free to attend. Drop-in! 403-934- 5440 for details.

Bridges Society starting September 10th

Parent Link – Every third Wednesday 4:30 p.m. until

·

New – “Autumn Trails”

6:30 p.m. • Our 10th Annual Artists Among Us Gala October

22nd

Mixed Media – Joan Packham – Nov. 14 at the Strathmore Municipal Library

·

Sing & Play Your High Note

The Standard Municipal Library Invites you to join in at our 27th annual Ham &

Oyster Supper Fundraiser &

Adults! Connect with art this fall…Hope Bridges (www.

Tuesdays weekly – Strathmore

Hospital Physio Wing starting September 8th

·

hopebridges.ca ) welcomes you! Projects include:

· Painted ted Quilt Bees – We are currently looking for Strathmore buildings to put our quilts on. · New – The Zentangle Community Project – starting September 29th Workshops:

Community Drum Circle

Sept. 19 at Hope Community Church

·

Portrait Photography

– Kenzie Kettenbach – Strathmore Nov. 7 and Rosebud Nove. 21. · New – Hand Built Pottery – Charlene Hart – Nov. 25

and Dec. 9, location to be determined.

Silent Auction. This event will be held on Friday, October

9th, 2015, from 5 – 7 pm.

All proceeds will go to the library. Thank you for your support.

Strathmore Rural Firefighters Ladies Night Roaring 20’s. Saturday, October 17, doors open at 5 pm. Buy your

· Go Green Upcycling – Every Thursday morning at Hope

·

Go Green Upcycling

tickets at Pro Water and Lil’ Hoots.

sonal tax rates, while leaving in place several tax hikes on things like gasoline imposed by the Redford-Prentice gov- ernment. All of these tax hikes taken together are now only pro-

jected to net about one-third of the revenue that the NDP said they would during the election campaign. Taken

together with massive new spending measures, this is only adding to Alberta’s re- cord $9.1 billion deficit. In this same interview with the Edmonton Sun, Premier Notley left the door wide open to even further tax hikes beyond those that her party campaigned on, while her environment minister has openly mused about a new carbon tax and vehicle tax on Albertans. With major royalty and tax hikes on job creators in Al- berta and the very real threat of more to come, it’s no won- der that Albertans are unset- tled right now. But it’s not the job of Albertans to “settle down” when the government tells them to do so. It’s the job of the government to re- store economic confidence and certainty. To do that, the Wildrose Opposition is trying to pro- vide constructive alternatives for the government. The best thing that the gov- ernment can do right now

to restore confidence in our economy would be to close the door on any further tax hikes that they did not cam- paign on during the election. They can make clear that the royalty review is not an ideological crusade with pre- determined outcomes. They can begin to get government spending under control and bring it to a more sustainable level in line with the national average. They can put for- ward a credible plan to bal- ance the budget after eight consecutive deficits. Alberta’s government hasn’t passed a budget since Alison Redford was premier in the spring of 2014. The new government has been in power for 4.5 months and still hasn’t put forward its own budget. MLAs have had a long enough summer break. We should be in the legislature right now passing one, which would go some way to providing direction and certainly. I’ve met with business leaders in Strathmore, in Brooks, and across the prov- ince. They are all worried. They need their government to get back on the rails. While my colleagues and I in the Wildrose Opposition are not in the majority of the legislature, we will be doing our best to work across the aisle and get this done.

September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 9

Decision making process moves ahead

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

Hussar residents took a rainy night on Sept.14 to do some deep thinking and productive brain- storming for the Municipal Affairs Viability Team, at the workshop held in the Hussar Community Centre. They were presented with five simple, direct, open-ended questions that participants answered individually and in group sessions. The ques- tions were not targeted for specific responses or given leading multiple choice options. They gave participants a jumping off point to express their thoughts and concerns. “You are residents of Hussar, and have so much

in your heads about Hussar, and that is what the team wants to hear from you,” said facilitator Lyn- da Reynolds. The questions were:

• What is important to you about Hussar being

a village?

• What do you thing the top priorities for the Village of Hussar should be?

• Are property taxes and utility rates in Hussar affordable for the current service levels?

• What other viability issues should the Hussar Viability review team be reviewing?

• Do you consider the village of Hussar to be

sustainable in the long run? Discussion varied from table to table but top- ics included infrastructure, bylaw enforcement, economic development, growth, future planning, taxes, communication, the need for clarification of some issues, community spirit and participation,

aging populations, and a request for more infor- mation and comparisons of options available and their ramifications. There were some responses to topics that were split among the respondents and Reynolds said the individual responses from the worksheets will help with clarifying some areas. Some interesting ideas were floated to improve viability, such as developing the nearby lake, pro- viding a seniors lodge which would generate em- ployment opportunities, developing the commer- cial base, utilizing an economic advisor, marketing the town and rural lifestyle and requesting that the provincial government honour commitments to support rural communities. Reynold said that all input would be considered when developing the plan, which would present the options that apply to dissolution vs remaining a village. She hoped the process of gathering information, engagement and gaining feedback will help the viability team to produce a working viability plan for consideration. The next step is to compile the information and have the viability team review the information. Members of the team were on hand to listen to discussion and they rotated through the various workgroups. There are ten members on the team, which included representatives from Alberta Municipal Affairs, Hussar council and ad- ministration, Wheatland County council and ad- ministration, Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties, Alberta Municipalities and Urban Associations and Local Government Admin- istration Association. The members did not fill out forms or direct discussion.

New additions to Edgefield development

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

A school, pathways and a lighted intersection for the Edgefield development were under dis- cussion in the Town of Strathmore council meet- ing on Sept. 16, with W. Brett Wilson making an appearance for clarification on how plans might

affect his adjacent development of Prairie Strath- more. “We have been an active supporter as the town, the administration and certainly the school dis- trict. We are fully supportive of the putting the school here” said Wilson. “We have been chal- lenged in conversations with the administration in understanding of the TIA (traffic intersection assessment) and what impact on the joint road.” The study pointed out that during peak hours in the late afternoon and evening there would be

a need for the lighted intersection and construc-

tion would need to develop a way to alleviate the northbound congestion on the road. There was some consideration to a possible round about or turning lanes to solve the possible traffic delay. Council advised administration to work with Wil-

son’s team and provide them the documentation that they needed to help with their planning on this issue. A full traffic signal light system will cost $300,000, but council voted to support a sugges- tion that an interim portable, solar operated pe- destrian crossing light system be purchased for $30,000 and utilized at the intersection until traffic flow warranted a more complex permanent fix- ture . The school site is set for the north side of the development in Phase 2 of the development along with an additional 70 residential lots. The inter- section would connect to Parklane Drive, across George Freeman Trail and between the two de- velopments onto Edgefield Gate. Construction of paved walkways is planned for the east side of George Freeman Trail, starting in the Ranch area and extending up to Brent Blvd and making connections with existing walking trails. Council closed the public hearings and passed second and third readings to the Area Structure Plan amend- ments to accommodate the changes in Phase 2 of the Edgefield development and begin the first phase of walkway development along George Freeman Trail in the Ranch area.

Upcoming Club Events Stix Restaurant & 2 Person Best Ball Lounge is Open 7 Days
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September 26
Strathmore Cup Playoffs
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October 3
The Stix Restaurant
Mexican Scramble
October 18
Halloween Scramble
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October 25
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For those not at the meeting and members of the surround- ing community, worksheets are available at the Hussar vil- lage office and can left with Jennifer Pratt, or mailed to: Vil- lage of Hussar, Viability Review, Municipal Services Branch, 17th floor, Commerce Place, 10155 102 Street NW, Edmon- ton, Alberta T5J4L4, or scanned and sent to viabilityreview@ gov.ab.ca Deadline for submission is Sept, 25.

Pass the Salt FINDING THE GIFT Finding the extraordinary in the ordinary … I think
Pass the Salt
FINDING THE GIFT
Finding the extraordinary in the
ordinary … I think this is gift. If
you are able to find the extraor-
dinary in the ordinary, everyday
is a special gift offering joy and
contentment.
Truth be told, most of life is lived
in ‘ordinary’ time. Each day holds
its routine. Perhaps the miracle
of the day is the most delicious
breakfast you enjoyed. Biting
into the season’s fresh fruit – the
pear dripping its juice down your
chin. Sipping the smooth rich
flavor of your favorite brew. The
melted butters salty flavor mixed
with that homemade sweet jam
smothered on toast – what a
treat! An extraordinary gift on an
ordinary morning.
Each day holds its routine –
school or work. What a gift to
be able to study, or work. An
extraordinary way to spend
your ordinary day. Learning and
enriching your mind, or working,
contributing your time and
energies to how society runs.
And in the process, enjoying the
company of those whose journey
crosses yours; other students,
co-workers, friends.
Is the sun shining, warming
the air really ordinary? Are the
flowers opening, displaying their
multicolours and fragrances
ordinary? Is the seed growing
into a plant offering flavor filled
tomatoes ordinary? Is the night
sky filled with stars ordinary?
The scent of rain, the sounds of
birds singing, the crunch of fresh
snow underfoot on an icy cold
day … extraordinary!
Hearing the sound of a child gig-
gling, watching the children play
as they pour out of the school
at recess – extraordinary bursts
of energy as they chase around.
The extraordinary in the ordinary
routine of the day.
As I sit in my office and look out
the window I am overwhelmed
by the beauty of the trees. Some
remain green while others have
turned incredible shades of yel-
low and gold … extraordinary!
To see the extraordinary in the
ordinary leads to contentment
and joy, in the ordinary days of
life. What a gift! Thanks you,
Jesus, for the extraordinary,
bursting in, invading the ordinary
times of life.
Rev. Pamela Scott
Strathmore United Church
BOW RIVER ALLIANCE CHURCH
105 Main St. Carseland
403-934-9337
office@bowriveralliance.com
Pastor: Andy Wiebe
Sunday Worship: 10:30 am
www.bowriveralliance.com
RCCG PECULIAR PEOPLE ASSEMBLY
(1 PET. 2:9)
115A – 3rd Avenue, Strathmore
HARVEST HEALING CENTRE CHURCH
102 Canal Gardens
403-901-0893 / 403-880-3171
Pastor: Elizabeth Karp
Worship Sundays 10:30 am
Healing Room Monday 7-9 pm
Now available at The Seed (our book nook)
Living Books and Products
phone: 403-619-9279
Come Join us for a spirit-filled time
of worship
403-667-7832
Pastor: Dunmoye Lawal
Sunday Worship: 10:30 am
Thursday Bible Study: 7 pm
Friday (Prayer Meeting): 7 pm
www.rccgstrathmore.com
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC
Holy Cross Collegiate School Gym
709B - 2nd Street, Strathmore
403-934-2641
Pastor: Fr. Wojciech Jarzecki
Masses: Saturday 5 pm • Sunday 10 am
STRATHMORE FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
50 Maplewood Drive • 403-934-2225
Senior Pastor: Rev. Les Fischer
Youth Pastor: Kyle Lomenda
New Office Hours:
ST. MICHAEL & ALL
ANGELS ANGLICAN
“Becoming fully alive in Jesus Christ”
INTERIM WORSHIP LOCATION:
9 am - 4 pm • Tues - Wed - Thur
Worship Service: 10:30 am
Children’s Church & Nursery in Service
Extending Grace - igniting hope
www.strathmorefullgospel.com
245 Brent Blvd., Strathmore
(NORTH door) 403-934-3017
Pastor & Priest: Bryan Beveridge
Sunday Morning Worship 10:00 am
LORD OF ALL (NALC) LUTHERAN
112 Lakeside Blvd. • 403-934-2374
Pastor: Dawn Nelson
Worship Schedule
Thursday Evening 7:00 pm
Sunday Family 10:30 am
Christian Education
For All - Ages 3-103
Sunday at 9:30 am
Join us in Praising our Lord, Jesus Christ!
HOPE COMMUNITY
COVENANT CHURCH
245 Brent Blvd, Strathmore • 403-934-2424
Worship Service Sundays 10 am
Lead Pastor: Glenn Peterson
www.hope-community.ca
STRATHMORE SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
Meeting in the Lutheran Church
112 Lakeside Blvd. 403-983-0081
Pastor: Ghena Girleanu
Services held every Saturday
Sabbath School: 10 AM
Worship Service: 11 AM
www.strathmoreadventist.ca
STRATHMORE ALLIANCE
325 1 Ave • 403-934-3543
Corner of 1 Ave & Wheatland Trail
Transitional Pastor: Jim Hathaway
9:30 am Sunday School for All Ages
11:00 am Worship Service
www.strathmorealliance.com
STRATHMORE UNITED
Wheatland Trail & 3rd Avenue
403-934-3025
Rev. Pamela Scott
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Babysitting Provided
Wheel Chair Accessible
Loop system for the hearing impaired

Page 10 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

Slick Water: Andrew Nikiforuk launches book in Rosebud

LAUREEN F. GUENTHER Times Contributor

Canadian journalist and author Andrew Nikiforuk presented a book talk and launch of his newest book, Slick Water, at Rosebud’s Community Hall, Sept. 12. The event was attended by over 75 people from nu- merous Alberta communities

including Rosebud, Drum- heller, Kathyrn, Didsbury, Red Deer, Fox Creek, Airdrie and Lethbridge. Guests from the Green Party, Wheatland County Council, University of Lethbridge and Greensence Environmental were also present, as were representa- tives of Rosebud Theatre and Rosebud School of the Arts. Slick Water, subtitled

Strathmore Legion Branch #10 NEWS By Irene Knappe, Secretary / PR / Membership PLEASE NOTE:
Strathmore Legion Branch #10 NEWS
By Irene Knappe, Secretary / PR / Membership
PLEASE NOTE:
• SPORTS: Has begun. It is not too late to join in!
• BINGO: Every Wednesday night!!! Anyone can come join us!
• 2016 MEMBERSHIP CARDS: Available at the bar
• Next LADIES AUXILIARY BREAKFAST will be on Sunday, October 18th ,
from 9 - 11 a.m. Open to everyone!
• Next Executive Meeting: Tuesday, October 13th, at 7:00 p.m.
• Next General Meeting: Tuesday, October 27th, at 7:30 p.m.
THE POPPY CAMPAIGN WILL BEGIN ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th, 2015
AND END ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th, 2015. FOR THOSE WHO WISH
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STORES: WALMART, NO FRILLS, CANADIAN TIRE OR COOP; PLEASE PUT
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THANK YOU!!!
DID YOU KNOW?
Read more about
the Legion and its story.
We need your continued support! Come join us at the Legion! BE A VOLUNTEER!!
For further information, please call the Legion at 403.934.5119
further information, please call the Legion at 403.934.5119 Thought for the Week ~ Our behaviors flew
Thought for the Week ~ Our behaviors flew out of our belief systems.
Thought for
the Week
~
Our
behaviors
flew out of
our belief
systems.
Week ~ Our behaviors flew out of our belief systems. Fracking and One Insider’s Stand Against
Week ~ Our behaviors flew out of our belief systems. Fracking and One Insider’s Stand Against
Week ~ Our behaviors flew out of our belief systems. Fracking and One Insider’s Stand Against

Fracking and One Insider’s Stand Against the World’s Most Powerful Industry, cen- ters on the story of Jessica Ernst, a Rosebud-area resi- dent who’s been engaged in a lawsuit against Encana, the Alberta Energy Regulator and the Alberta government since 2008, when she report- ed that fracking had made her well water undrinkable and unsafe to use. Nikiforuk presented the history and evolution of hydraulic fracturing, infor- mally known as fracking. He explained that frack- ing involves injecting wa- ter, sand and chemicals into underground rock at high pressure, in order to release the petroleum resources at- tached to that rock. As much greater force is now used in the process than when frack- ing began in the mid-19th century, there’s growing risk that harmful levels of gases such as methane will be released into surrounding aquifers. Ernst also spoke, receiving a standing ovation when she was introduced and another when she concluded. She said she’d come to Rosebud to live a quiet, peaceful life, but when her water was ru- ined, she wanted account- able people to be account- able, but they wouldn’t. So she took on a legal case that’s ended up lasting over seven years. It has taken a

Ni-

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copy of

latest

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Laureen F.

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copy of latest Slick residents. Laureen F. Guenther Photo toll on her physical body, and brought

toll on her physical body, and brought worldwide at- tention to fracking, to Rose- bud and to Ernst herself. “The greatest thing so far (in the lawsuit) has been this event,” Ernst said, pointing out the number of communi- ties represented. She empha- sized the power in commu- nity and said, “my lawsuit is your lawsuit.” Ernst said she believes it’s not possible to frack safely, because if it were, energy regulating bodies around the world would ensure it was done safely. Instead, she gave several examples of regulating bodies covering up the dangers and damages of fracking. When she asked the crowd, “how many peo- ple here think fracking can be made safe with regula- tion?” there was silence. She concluded, “no one here.” Ernst said she hears from

engineers and other oil and gas work- ers who express concern about the risks of injury that fracking poses to themselves and their fellow workers. They also refer to the contamination of groundwater. She said they ask them- selves, ‘do we want to be poisoning children?’. She expressed hope that we can find a better way to obtain energy. “We (human beings) have the most incredible imagination of any species,” she said. “We can create healthy jobs.” After the presentations, Nikiforuk and Ernst answered audience ques- tions, which indicated audience mem- bers’ support for Ernst in her lawsuit, concern about the safety of their own water, and an increased desire to chal- lenge the practice of fracking, both provincially and globally. Slick Water: Fracking and One In- sider’s Stand Against the World’s Most Powerful Industry is available at online outlets and in major bookstores. Fif- teen per cent of the book’s proceeds go to help Jessica Ernst fund her law- suit.

The Shack author to speak in Rosebud

LAUREEN F. GUENTHER

Times Contributor

How do you explain outside-the-box thinking to your children? Paul Young said he wrote The

Shack as a Christmas gift for his six children, be-

cause his wife had asked him to write something

to help them understand the concept.

He made 15 photocopies of the book, gave them to his children

and his friends, and was satisfied the book had accomplished its pur- pose. “But my friends started giving it to their friends, who started giving it to their friends,” Young said. “So that started this conversation about making 15 more.” Young, author of the bestsell- ing book The Shack, will come to Rosebud, Oct. 4, to speak, and then share a meal with guests. He explained that The Shack is best described as “a suspense-mys- tery-wrapped-up-in-a-what-if.” The book poses the big question that in the midst of our true human suffering, what if there was a God who was good all the time? What would that be like? Young said people discovered that The Shack gave people a language to have a conversation about God that wasn’t religious. The book outlines the conversation was relational and asks really human questions. A copy of the book got into the hands of some- one who suggested making it into a movie – and that led to conversations about formally publish- ing it. Young and friends submitted The Shack to 26 publishers, but all of them, both faith-based and secular, turned it down. So Young said he and his friends started their own company, set up a website, printed 10,000 copies and spent less than $300 on marketing. In May 2007, they started sell- ing it out of one man’s garage, and in the first 13

months, they sold 1.1 million books. Multiple millions of copies have now been sold, the book has been translated into 48 languages, and shooting has just finished for a major motion picture. “It’s very exciting,” Young said, “So surreal to be on the set and watching 50 crew people and cast, working on something that you made 15 copies that did all that you wanted.” He’s also written two more nov- els: Crossroads, which focuses on the question of how grace gets into the world of someone who doesn’t want it and Eve, released this month, which asks if men are so obviously more messed up than women, how come they’re in charge. Young predicted that Eve may make even bigger waves than The Shack did. He said his Oct. 4 talk will cen- ter on telling stories, some of his own, and some from people who’ve interacted with The Shack. “Every human being has a story, so I think we have a natural affinity for story,” Young said. He’ll follow storytelling with a question-and-re- sponse time, explaining that he doesn’t do ques- tion-and-answer sessions because he doesn’t have all the answers, but he loves questions. “The beautiful thing about questions is there’s always nuances to them,” Young said. “and people also bring meaning from their own lives to those

questions

questions are an invitation to rela-

tionship.” After the formal presentation, there’ll be a meal with guests who choose that option when pur- chasing tickets. Young’s presentation will begin at 3 p.m., fol- lowed by the optional meal. For tickets to the show or meal, call 1-800-267-7553 or go to rose- budtheatre.com.

p.m., fol- lowed by the optional meal. For tickets to the show or meal, call 1-800-267-7553

September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 11

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Thank you council!

To the Editor Thank you town council for not going ahead with the purchase of the old Co-op building. It is beyond me why it was even considered, when the future of this town is looking at 50,000 to 60,000 people in the next 20 to 25 years. It makes much more economic sense to purchase 10 to 20 acres to provide a new town office building that can expand to more than one story and room for storage buildings for park and road equipment, plus a repair shop. The purchase of 30 to 40 acres should also be looked at in the near future for bus barns and shops. Bussing systems should be planned out now to allow

new subdivisions to accommodate bus roads and pull off’s. As roads are being redone, bus pull offs should be put in place as we will need a bussing system in the next three to five years. This is not a profitable venture, but a necessary one. If this council is truly looking at ways to use the old Co-op area, allow it to be rezoned to high rise apart- ment building, built five to eight stories high, to house low income and disable people. It is people that can walk downtown that will keep the core business run- ning.

Sincerely

Vivian MacCallum

Strathmore

Unit D, 202 Canal Court, Strathmore, AB

403.934.6044

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Setting terms for good neighbours

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

Wheatland County council gave first reading to the Intermunicipal Development Plan (IDP) between Wheatland County and the MD of Foot- hills 31 on Sept. 9. It is the first such agreement to be considered with the five counties that bor- der Wheatland County land. The Foothills 31 and Wheatland County border each other along fif- teen sections of land bordering the river, which divides Township 21 and Range 26 between the two counties. “This is basically a good neighbour policy,” said Diane Horvath, representative planner from the Oldman River Regional Services Commision project team. The plan falls under the mandate of the South Saskatchewan Regional plan and agreements must comply with its strategies. It also covers those participating in the Calgary Metropolitan Plan (CMP) and members of the Calgary Re- gional Partnership (CRP), but not those that have agreements outside of the CMP and CRP. Public consultation, discussions with develop- ers, administration and various councils were done in the initial planning prior to drawing up a draft plan. There was an open house held in Carseland in June of this year, where several representatives from the various interests were present to an- swer questions; however, there were few of the public in attendance. There were no public in attendance in Wheatland County council for the Sept. 8 public hearing either. First reading of the plan was passed in July and another public hear- ing was held in the Wheatland County Council chambers. The purpose of the agreement is to foster coop- eration and mitigate conflict between municipali- ties in land use, infrastructure and future growth of their bordering properties. Some of the goals were to:

• Work together to achieve the shared envi- ronmental, economic, and social outcomes in the South Saskatchewan Regional Plan and minimize negative environmental cumulative effects. • Address common planning issues, especially where valued natural features and historic re- sources are of interests to more then one stake-

holder and where the possible effect of develop- ment transcends jurisdictional boundaries.

• Coordinate and work with each other in their

respective planning activities (such as in the de-

velopment of plans and policies) and develop- ment approval process to address issues of mu- tual interest. • Work together to anticipate, plan and set

aside adequate land with the physical infrastruc- ture and services required to accommodate fu- ture population growth and accompanying com- munity development needs.

• Build awareness regarding the application of

land-use planning tools that reduce the impact of residential, commercial and industrial devel- opments on the land, including approaches and

best practices for promoting the efficient use of private and public lands.

• Pursue joint use agreements, regional servic-

es commissions and any other joint cooperative

arrangements that contribute specifically to inter- municipal land use planning.

• Consider the value of intermunicipal devel-

opment planning to address land use on fringe

areas, airport vicinity protection plan or other ar- eas of mutual interest.

• Coordinate land use planning activities with

First Nations, irrigation districts, school boards, health authorities and other agencies on areas of mutual interest. Background studies, issue ex- amination, discussions with planners and open ‘houses for the public were all part of the prepa- ration to drafting agreements. The process hopes that the administration staff of the two counties can discuss common issues and reach an agreement and forward those agree- ments to their respective councils for approval. The plan sets out rules for dispute processes. If the dispute can’t be solved in 30 days, the op- tion to appeal to the Municipal Government and enter into mediation is the next step. There have been many instances where such a plan would have helped Wheatland Council resolve issues for their ratepayers, such as subdivisions of land bordering two counties, resolving roadway access in initiatives like the Rosebud Motorsports development and possibly water and utility placement in situations like the Muirfield area. The plan received second and third reading Sept. 8 and is now in effect.

TIMES

STRATHMORE

   

Mario Prusina Publisher / Editor Miriam Ostermann Associate Editor

Justin Seward Reporter

Rose Hamrlik Advertising

Kristina Bezic Office Manager

Manny Everett Office Manager

Alissa Jensen Production

Jody Schneider Production Manager

Contributors : Doug Taylor, Sharon McLeay, John Godsman, Kevin Link, Wendi Tashlikowich, Laureen F. Guenther

123 2nd Avenue, Strathmore, Alberta T1P 1K1 • 403.934.5589

Strathmore Times is published every Friday by Strathmore Times Inc. and is distributed by Canada Post to Strathmore, Carseland, Cheadle, Cluny, Gleichen, Hussar, Indus, Langdon, Lyalta, Namaka, Nightingale, Rockyford, Rosebud, Speargrass and Standard. We also have various pickup locations throughout our coverage area. Our 11,500 issues are printed by Star Press Inc., Wainwright, Alberta. The content in the Strathmore Times is copyright and reproduction without the proper written consent of the Strathmore Times is strictly prohibited.

The Times welcomes letters to the editor for publication. All submissions must be signed and a phone number included for verification purposes. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, legal considerations and taste. Please try and keep your letters under 400 words to ensure that it will appear as close to its original form as possible.

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Page 12 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

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Intent support for regional transportation pilot project

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

After head-to-head discussion over Strathmore council’s support for the Calgary Regional Transportation south pi- lot project in Okotoks, Turner Valley, Black Diamond, High River and Nanton, council agreed to have Mayor Ell convey their support for the project at a Calgary Regional Partner- ship vote in Cochrane on Sept. 17. The Calgary Regional Transportation partnership is made up of 14 municipal communities, with the goal to increase transportation opportunities. Representatives from the partnership appeared in council the previous meeting, to answer questions about the proj- ect. Councilor Steve Grajczyk wanted to ensure that this consent presented no direct or indirect financial obligations for the town. Sobol countered it had no ramifications. “The long-range plan is to include Strathmore in the re- gional transportation plan. I have worked for years in order to make this happen. We are next in line for a pilot project, or at least I hope we still are,” said Councilor Bob Sobol. “No funds have been committed and before this can hap- pen, it would have to come for review before council.” “This gives direction on what we would like to move for- ward within the plan and we still get to observe how things work in Okotoks. They weren’t expecting any money or anything, they basically have a two-year pilot project, so if we do give the approval to you (Mayor Ell), it is just for the overall philosophy or direction,” said Councilor Pat Fule. “I think we are in a perfect situation because we are only giving direction and guidance and indicating that we are interested and involved, but we get to sit back and watch how the south situation evolves, so we are in a great situ- ation here.” Councilor Denise Peterson said she was impressed with the presentation and that it would give a made-in-Strath- more solution that would build on our community strengths. Mayor Ell said that it will connect our communities and keep emissions down. The money has been given to the CRP and is financed by the Green fund and the municipali- ties involved. Prior to commitment by Strathmore, a needs assessment will be done. Councilor Sobol qualified that populations under 30,000 would not have a plan similar to the south pilot project, but something that would be tai- lored to Strathmore’s present and future needs. “I go into a meeting tomorrow in Cochrane and I want to

tell them that Strathmore is open for business,” said Sobol. Council approved the directive for Mayor Ell and the Cal- gary Regional Transportation support.

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September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 13

After 50 years in Rockyford We’re making the leap

After 50 years in Rockyford We’re making the leap

Rockyford Agencies announces our 2nd location

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• harvestinsurance.ca www.StrathmoreTimes .com Kayla-Ann Mercer (left photo: l) and instruc- tor Dee-Ann
• harvestinsurance.ca www.StrathmoreTimes .com Kayla-Ann Mercer (left photo: l) and instruc- tor Dee-Ann

Kayla-Ann Mercer (left photo: l) and instruc- tor Dee-Ann Wagner-Mercer co-teaching the children’s sign language class being offered at the Strathmore Library Thursday afternoons at 4 p.m. Mom Heather McKinnon (top photo: l) with daughter Tavia finding “A” words in a cross word and then learning the signs for them.

Manny Everett Photos

Life in a silent world comes alive

MANNY EVERETT Times Contributor

Strathmore’s Marigold Library is continuing to offer a second round of Sign Language classes. Dee-Ann Wagner-Mercer is teaching two groupings of the sign language classes on Thursdays this fall, a chil- dren’s class from 4-5 p.m. and adults from 7-8:30 p.m. No experience nec- essary and all skills levels are wel- come to attend. The free program was

so successful this past spring that the Library has had an overwhelming re- sponse to the adult class with over 35 adult registrants. Wagner-Mercer is using ASL (Ameri- can Sign Language), which is the lan- guage of most deaf Canadians. ASL is

a visual language made up of specific

signs, finger-spelling as well as the use of facial expressions. As with all languages ASL has its own rules for grammar and sentence structure. “When I started helping in my daughter’s school back when she first started playschool, I said to many people ‘one day I’m gonna have half this town signing.’ “It is a huge dream of mine to live in

a community where it is not so isolat-

ing,” said Wagner-Mercer. “I don’t get into the classroom as much anymore, and it has been great to have a place like the library to have people inter- ested in ASL to get together. “I want to give back to my community and also set an example to my daughter. It’s super easy as a late deaf person to sit out as life goes by, I refuse to let my daughter watch me do that, so stepping out of my comfort zone and getting out there in the community. I have been very overwhelmed by the support and kindness of everyone.” In the children’s class, Wagner- Mercer utilizes games like crossword puzzles and coloring with the kids in order to enhance memorization of the hand gestures. Daughter, Kayla–

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Denture Clinic
Terry Grant Denturist
403.934.3877
• Complete / Partial Dentures
• Same Day Relines & Repair
• Custom Mouthguards
• Custom Night Guards
• Natural Teeth Whitening
413 - 3rd St. Strathmore

Ann Mercer helps her Mom with the younger participants. “Kayla-Ann is in Grade 6 this year at Westmount,” said Wagner-Mercer. “She has always been happy to share with anyone wanting to learn ASL, as I am. She has ran small little sign groups at recess among her friends in the past.” The classes will be running until Dec. 17 and the library will be offer- ing it again in the spring of 2016 as long as there is interest in the com- munity. For more information, please con-

tact the Strathmore Library at 403-934-

5440.

$ 10 $ 25 $ 40 ~OR~ ~OR~ SAVE SAVE on your next $75 grocery
$
10
$
25
$
40
~OR~
~OR~
SAVE
SAVE
on your next
$75 grocery
purchase.
on your next
$150 grocery
purchase.
on your next
$225 grocery
purchase.
One coupon per member. Purchase excludes prescriptions, postage, transit passes, gift cards, event tickets,
passes and lottery tickets. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. All applicable taxes will be based on
the selling price prior to the discount on coupon. No copies. No rainchecks or substitutions. Coupon cannot be
combined with any other offers or discounts.Valid only at Edgefield Co-op until October 31, 2015.
100 Edgefield Place

Page 14 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

Nancy Stairs (403) 934-1625 Steve Farran (403) 901-9335 Residential • Acreage • Commercial Alisa Wurz
Nancy Stairs (403) 934-1625
Steve Farran (403) 901-9335
Residential • Acreage • Commercial
Alisa Wurz Assistant
In the office at (403) 934-3900
A+ Better Business Bureau Accredited
Visit all of our listings & virtual tours at www.nancystairs.com
STRATHMORE • MAPLEWOOD ESTATES
STRATHMORE - THORNCLIFF
STRATHMORE • CAMBRIDGE
$ 569,900
$ 419,900
$ 399,900
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
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BACKS PARK AND TREES
BETTER THAN NEW!!
BACKS ONTO PARK/GREENSPACE
• 2200 SqFt 5 Bed 3.5 Bath Fully Finished
• 2199 SqFt 3 Bed, 2.5 Bath Unfinished
• Granite, Brazilian Hardwood, Fresh Paint
• Fully Finished 2+3 Bed, 3 Bath
• Hardwood, Massive Kitchen
• Massive Kitchen/Open Concept
• Dbl Garage, RV Parking, Like NEW!!!
• Beautiful Landscape, RV Parking!!!
• Beautiful Finishings/Large Yard!!
CALGARY • PINERIDGE
STRATHMORE
STRATHMORE • STRATHAVEN
NEW
$ 389,000
$ 379,900
$ 354,900
PRICE
SOLD
SOLD
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BEAUTIFUL HOME!
3 ACRES MANY TREES
MOVE IN READY!!
• 1160+/-Sqft 3 Bed+2Den Fully Finished
• 2 Fireplaces, Large Kitchen
• Dbl Det Garage, nice yard!
- 1356 SqFt 3 Bed, 2 Bath
- 5 Car Garage with Workshop/Office
- 2 Horse Barn, MUST SEE!!!
• 1184 SqFt Fully FI 3+2 Bed, 3 Bath
• Large Kitchen open to Livingroom
• 26x24 Det Garage, RV Parking
STRATHMORE • STRATHAVEN
STRATHMORE • CAMBRIA
STRATHMORE • ASPEN CREEK
$ 354,900
$ 339,000
$ 335,000
SOLD
SOLD
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OPEN CONCEPT!!!!
LOVELY HOME
LOOK AT THE PRICE!!!!
• 1734 SqFt 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath
• 1826 SqFt Fully Finished, 4 Bed, 2.5 Bath
• 1423 SqFt, 3 Bed, 2 Bath
• Large Kitchen, Beautiful Hardwood
• Open Concept, Dbl Att. Garage
• Oversize Dbl Det. Garage MUST SEE!!!
• Large eat in Kitchen, Dining room
Dbl Att. Garage, Large Yard
• Large Bedroom, and Yard. MUST SEE!!!
STRATHMORE • CRYSTAL RIDGE
STRATHMORE • PARKWOOD
STRATHMORE • MAPLEWOOD
$ 289,900
$ 279,900
$ 279,900
SOLD
SOLD
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WONDERFUL LOCATION
ADULT LIVING IN DESIRED NEIGHBORHOOD!!!
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
• 1223 SqFt 2 bed, 2 Bath
• Vault Ceiling, Big Oak Kitchen
• Single att garage, Backing Green Space/Canal
• 1075 SqFt 3 Bed, 2 Bath
• 984 SqFt 3 Bed, 2 Bath Fully Finished
• Fireplace, Large Kitchen
• Single att. Garage, Beautiful Landscaping
Large Living Room& Kichen
• RV Parking, Large Yard
STRATHMORE • STRATHAVEN
ROCKYFORD • SOUTHVIEW
STRATHMORE • DOWNTOWN
$ 269,900
$ 269,900
NEW
$ 264,900
LISTING
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JUST BEING BUILT!!
LOVELY HOME!!
ADULT LIVING NO CONDO FEES!
• 1245 3 bed, 2.5 bath fully finished walkout END UNIT!
• Open Concept with Built in Entertainment Unit,
Stone counters
-Single att. Garage, Backs onto future park and greenspace
• Fully Finished 2+3 Bed, 2 Bath
• Open Concept, 3 sided FP
• DBL Det Garage, MUST SEE!!!
• 2 Bed, 1 Bath Unfinished
• Main Floor Laundry, Single att. Garage
• Open Concept Kitchen, Livingroom
WHEATLAND • KEOMA
STRATHMORE • STRATHAVEN
STRATHMORE • STRATHAVEN
$ 259,900
$ 259,900
$ 259,900
C/S
mls C4022756
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MASSIVE LOT!!
JUST BEING BUILT!!
JUST BEING BUILT!!
• 906 SqFt 2 Bed+Den, 1 Bath
• 1245 3 bed, 2.5 bath fully finished walkout!
• 1245 3 bed, 2.5 bath fully finished walkout!
• Large Living room w/Fireplace
• Beautifully Landscaped!!!
• Open Concept with Beautiful Finishing
• Single att. Garage,
Backs onto future park and greenspace
• Open Concept with Beautiful Finishing
• Single att. Garage,
Backs onto future park and greenspace
STRATHMORE-BRENTWOOD
STRATHMORE-CENTRE STREET
STRATHMORE-CENTRE STREET
$ 224,900
$ 199,900
$ 199,900
SOLD
SOLD
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mls C4022357
DOUBLE ATTACHED GARAGE
NEEDS SOME TLC!
NEEDS SOME TLC!
- 1348 SqFt 2 Bed, 1.5 Bath
- Many upgrades, Own the Lot
- Chef’s Dream Kitchen, Fireplace & MORE!!!
• 1049 SqFt 2 Bed, 1 bath
• 1481 SqFt 3+1 Bed, 2.5 Bath
• Large Family Room & Living Room
• 2 Family rooms, 1 living room
• Master w/ensuite, Dbl Det. Garage
• Massive Kitchen, Single Det. Garage
REALTY HORIZON “Our family serving your family!” Our office is located at 122 2nd Ave.

REALTY HORIZON

“Our family serving your family!”

Our office is located at 122 2nd Ave. Strathmore, Alberta Fax: 403 934-2742

serving your family!” Our office is located at 122 2nd Ave. Strathmore, Alberta Fax: 403 934-2742

www.nancystairs.com

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

Pedestrian

fatality

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

On Sept. 13, at approxi- mately 1:25 a.m., Strath- more RCMP officers were dispatched to the report of a

pedestrian hit on Highway 1 near Range Road 260 east of Cheadle. Upon arrival at the colli- sion, the officers found the pedestrian was wearing dark clothing and had been walk-

ing in the east-bound travel-

ling lane of Highway 1, when he was struck. “It is undetermined why he was walking late at night. There are no criminal charg- es in the incident and the driver stopped immediately and called for assistance,” said Strathmore RCMP Crpl.

Duane White. The 40-year-old Calgary male was pronounced de- ceased at the scene of the collision. At the request of the family, the name of the deceased is not being re- leased. White suggested that peo- ple walking or biking along a busy thoroughfare at night should let someone know where they are and pay at- tention to their surroundings. It is suggested that pedes- trians should walk on the shoulder facing oncoming traffic, so that they can see cars coming towards them and be seen by drivers. White suggests wearing lighting devices or illuminated safe- ty vests and light coloured clothing.

or illuminated safe- ty vests and light coloured clothing. 240 - 3rd Avenue, Strathmore • 403-901-0664
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September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 15

September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 15 Prayer for Terry and Hailey Strathmore residents
Prayer for Terry and Hailey
Prayer for Terry and Hailey

Strathmore residents sympathized with the tragic circumstances that happened to the Dunbar-

Blanchette family last week and gathered at Kinsman Park on Sept. 19, for a twilight vigil. Partici- pants made a meditative walk for the deceased father and daughter, five km around the pond and

gathered at the end, for a prayer for the family.

Sharon McLeay Photo

Proposed guidelines set for Muirfield

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

Wheatland County planning depart- ment was doing some housekeeping at the Sept. 8 council meeting, asking council to rescind and replace bylaws that no longer applied to some proper- ties within the county. One of the requests had to do with the Muirfield Direct Control area, which had a first reading for Bylaw 2015-39, a request to rescind Bylaw 2015-30, as well as making textual amendments to Bylaw 2005-03 for the Lakes of Muir- field. When bylaw 2015-30 was accepted, there were no direct control mecha- nisms designated for a variety of resi- dential, commercial and recreation uses within the Lakes of Muirfield develop- ment. It basically only covered the golf course and single-family dwellings. On review, planners felt there needed to be guidelines for some of the dis- cretionary use categories. The bylaw

required amendments to include struc- tures currently in place within the de- velopment. “This turned into a bigger beast than we thought it would be,” said Gerry Me- lenka, Wheatland County Community Planner. “We made some changes.” The nine-page document of proposed changes for Muirfield can be viewed on the County of Wheatland website, un- der the Sept. 8 agenda, listed after the Bylaw 2015-39 request. “This document corrects the earlier bylaw and includes all kinds of build- ing designations, yet deals with the in- tent of the ASP,” said Melenka. He said that architectural guidelines were used to develop the direct control guidelines and that servicing regula- tions were sent to legal council, who tightly crafted the content. First reading was passed for Bylaw 2015-39 and a public hearing will be set in the future. Other bylaws given first reading for repeal were 2015-40 through 2015-44.

NEW to the Strathmore Municipal Library! VISITING LIBRARY OPENING YOUR WORLD Offering ongoing home delivery
NEW to the Strathmore
Municipal Library!
VISITING LIBRARY
OPENING YOUR WORLD
Offering ongoing home delivery of library materials to
Town of Strathmore residents who are confined to their homes
or assisted care facility.
If you or someone you know is interested in this service please
call the library at 403-934-5440 or visit us online at
www.strathmorelibrary.ca/visitinglibrary.
Made possible by the United Way of Calgary & Area

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Times TIDBITS

Did You Know?

The aurora borealis – otherwise known as the northern lights – is a vivid demonstration of the Earth’s magnetic field interacting with charged particles from the sun. It’s also beautiful, and worth braving a cold night out when visiting the high northern (or southern) latitudes.

Important NotiCe

FLUSHING OF WATER MAINS IN STRATHMORE

DOWNTOWN • CANAL • ORCHARD PARK SEPTEMBER 28 - OCTOBER 16, 2015

Water main flushing is part of EPCOR’s maintenance program to remove sediment and to maintain water quality. This process may temporarily result in cloudy water and/or changes in water pressure. Your water remains safe to use. Once flushing is complete we recommend you run your cold water tap for approximately ten minutes or until water runs clear. Please check your water supply before doing laundry to avoid possible staining.

EPCOR continues to monitor and perform ongoing water quality tests to ensure you have quality water at the tap. If you have any questions please call us at 403-934-9440.

water quality tests to ensure you have quality water at the tap. If you have any
water quality tests to ensure you have quality water at the tap. If you have any
water quality tests to ensure you have quality water at the tap. If you have any
water quality tests to ensure you have quality water at the tap. If you have any

Page 16 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

We’ll Make You We’ll Make You SMILE SMILE onsite Denture Services Now available Please call
We’ll Make You
We’ll Make You
SMILE
SMILE
onsite Denture Services
Now available
Please call 403-934-9681
to schedule your appointment
Dr. Elizabeth Robinson • Dr. Leanne Lesniak
NEW patIENtS WELcoME
#11 - 55 Wheatland trail, Strathmore
www.
www.
crystalRidgeDental
crystalRidgeDental
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Serving Strathmore, Drumheller, Airdrie & Calgary 403-983-2121 123 2nd Ave, Strathmore, AB Bob Sheddy Broker
Serving
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403-983-2121
123 2nd Ave, Strathmore, AB
Bob Sheddy
Broker
Sheddy.ca
403-324-2222
bob.sheddy@century21.ca
Acreage with Revenue
Potential for Sale
$675,000
c21.ca/100840308
for more info
Karen
Helfrich
KarenHelfrich.ca
587-225-9336
karen.helfrich@century21.ca
Katelyn
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KateRealEstate.ca
403-324-9999
katelyn.haffner@century21.ca
66 Aspen Circle
Fully finished, walkout,
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$689,900
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Warrack
VanessaWarrack.ca
403-690-4206
vanessa.warrack@century21.ca
$1,495,000
8 Units in Brentwood
walking distance to the
university
SOLD

Travelling Mabels close to sellout

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

Those hoping to catch the Travelling Mabels at the Strathmore Travelodge on Oct. 17 better order tickets quick. “We are almost 75 per cent sold out,” said organizer Linda Storksen. The Travelling Mabels were voted the Academy of Country Music Awards 2011 Group of the Year. Suzanne Levesque characterized their music as a little bit of everything. She said they would play accordion, acous- tic and bass guitar and piano as well as sing in three-part harmony. “We play country, folk and acoustic rock and sing three-part female harmo- ny,” said Levesque. The group is partly comprised of Levesque and her mother Eva, who writes many songs, and their stage name is derived from a song she wrote about a bluetic hound dog. The two met their other band mates, Lana and Keith Floen, at the Canadian

Country Music Awards (CCMA) and jammed with them at a Royalty records party, which led to them forming the Travelling Mabels. Lana has opened for some famous stage artists such as Shania Twain, Tom Jackson and Ian Tyson. Keith was nominated at the 2012 CCMA as the Keyboard Player of the Year. He is a jack-of-all-trades, taking care of the road management, stage and lighting, as well as helping the group cut their album in the recording studio in the Floen home. They have two albums and are work- ing on their third. They will have CD’s for sale at the Oct. 17 performance or they can be pur- chased through iTunes or cdbaby.com. “If you are planning on coming out, we know you’ll enjoy yourself,” said Levesque. “We get comments from our patrons all the time about Eva. She tends to keep it light and tell corny jokes. People say they feel uplifted when they leave.”

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY Give-aways Saturday, October 3, 10am - 3pm Door Prizes New products and
CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION
DAY
Give-aways
Saturday, October 3, 10am - 3pm
Door Prizes
New products
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TANS FOR CANS
Help us stock the local Food Bank
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Bring in your donations of non-perishable
food items and receive FREE UV tanning, FREE
infrared sauna, FREE whole body vibration or
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$15 off the cost of your Mystic sunless session.
Customer Appreciation Day only
some limits may apply.
join us!
Appointments needed for infrared sauna
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recommended for other services.
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Fri: 9:30 am to 7 pm
Sat: 10 am to 3 pm
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www.StrathmoreTimes.com

Home offer for first responders

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

Any first responders looking to do

a move in Strathmore should check

out Reidbuilt Homes in Strathmore’s Edgefield area. “We do promotions throughout the year and for October we are offer- ing a $5,000 discount off the house

prices for our first responders,” said Janis Doherty, Sales & Marketing co- ordinator. “Our Unity by ReidBuilt Homes showhome, The Montgom- ery, recently received the Best New Duplex award from the Canadian Home Builders Association (Alberta) awards. You don’t feel like you’re in

a duplex once you enter this incred- ible home.” The Edgefield area has some great

side-by-side homes and single dwell- ings up to 1,800 square feet with attached garages. It is close to the new Ranch shopping complex, and

a school site is being considered in

new phases of the development. Interested buyers can check out the website at www.rbhcalgary.com. Show home is open Monday to Thursday 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Sat- urday and Sunday Noon to 5 p.m. Closed Fridays. Josh Main is the area manager and can be reached at 403- 771-3038 for more information on the promotion. Doherty said that first responders only need to show employment ID to qualify for the offer.

FALL STOCK ARRIVING DAILY! We now have CSA approved workboots for both men and women
FALL
STOCK
ARRIVING DAILY!
We now have CSA approved
workboots for both men
and women Brands such
as Keen & Redwing!
Monday - Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 4pm
Closed Sundays & Statuary Holidays
Store Hours
Family Owned and Operated by
Kelly Warrack, Katelyn Haffner & Jillian Warrack
136 - 2nd Ave Strathmore, AB
(in the old Strathmore Standard Building)
thestandardshoeshop@gmail.com
403.983.0020
CHECK OUT THESE GREAT OFFERS! 403.934.3334 • www.strathmoremotors.com • 900 Westridge Road, Strathmore Patrice
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Patrice Fernandez
Phil Dube
Chris George
Patrick Mohan
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Financial Services Manager
General Sales Manager
Sales
Sales
Sales
Sales and Financial Services

September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 17

CANADA WIDE CLEARANCE JUST GOT BETTER! 0 % 84 FOR UP TO OR UP TO

CANADA WIDE CLEARANCE

JUST GOT BETTER!

0 % 84

FOR

UP TO

OR

UP TO

$ 10,380

IN

TOTAL

VALUE

$

PURCHASE

MONTHS*

INCLUDES $1,000 OWNER CASH ¥

FINANCING

AND $750 PACKAGE DISCOUNT

ON SELECT 2015 MODELS

WITH AN

EXTRA

500

ONLY UNTIL SEPTEMBER 30

TH

ON SELECT MODELS

500 ONLY UNTIL SEPTEMBER 30 TH ON SELECT MODELS † † 2015 GMC SIERRA 1500 DOUBLE

2015 GMC SIERRA 1500

DOUBLE CAB 2WD 1SA

NHTSA 5-STAR OVERALL VEHICLE SCORE FOR SAFETY **

SIERRA 1500 DOUBLE CAB 1SA MODEL SHOWN

0FINANCING 84 2015 MODELS.

%

FOR

UP TO

PURCHASE

MONTHS* ON SELECT

$5,000 IN FINANCE CREDIT OR

+

UP TO

$ 10,380

IN TOTAL VALUE ON OTHER MODELS

INCLUDES $1,000 OWNER CASH ¥ AND $750 PACKAGE DISCOUNT

INCLUDES $1,000 OWNER CASH ¥ AND $750 PACKAGE DISCOUNT TERRAIN SLE-1 AWD MODEL SHOWN 2015 GMC

TERRAIN SLE-1 AWD MODEL SHOWN

2015 GMC TERRAIN

SLE-1 AWD

GMC TERRAIN WAS NAMED A 2015 TOP SAFETY PICK BY IIHS

PURCHASE

0FINANCING

%

FOR

UP TO

84

MONTHS* ON SELECT

2015

MODELS.

$2,250 IN FINANCE CREDIT ˆ OR

+

UP TO

$ 5,450

TOTAL CASH CREDIT ON OTHER MODELS

INCLUDES $750 OWNER CASH ¥ AND $500 SEPTEMBER BONUS

$750 OWNER CASH ¥ AND $500 SEPTEMBER BONUS † † ACADIA SLE-1 AWD MODEL SHOWN 2015

ACADIA SLE-1 AWD MODEL SHOWN

2015 GMC ACADIA

SLE-1 AWD

NHTSA 5-STAR OVERALL VEHICLE SCORE FOR SAFETY **

PURCHASE

0FINANCING

%

FOR

UP TO

84

MONTHS* ON SELECT

2015

MODELS.

$750 IN OWNER CASH ¥ OR

+

UP TO

$ 4,750

INCLUDES $750 OWNER CASH ¥

TOTAL CASH CREDIT ON OTHER MODELS

ONLY UNTIL SEPTEMBER 30 TH

ONLY UNTIL SEPTEMBER 30 T H ALBERTA GMC .COM

ALBERTAGMC.COM

ON NOW AT YOUR ALBERTA GMC DEALERS. ALBERTAGMC.COM 1-800-GM-DRIVE. GMC is a brand of General Motors of Canada. Offers apply to the nance of a 2015 Sierra 1500 Double Cab 2WD 1SA, Terrain SLE-1 AWD, Acadia SLE-1 AWD. License, insurance, registration, administration fees, dealer fees, PPSA and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to quali ed retail customers in Alberta GMC Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer trade may be required. * Offer available to quali ed retail customers in Canada for vehicles delivered between September 1 and September 30, 2015. 0% purchase nancing offered on approved credit by TD Auto Finance Services, Scotiabank® or RBC Royal Bank for 84 months on select new or demonstrator 2015 GMC vehicles excluding Yukon, Yukon XL, Sierra 2500 HD Diesel, Savana, Canyon 2SA and Canyon 4x4. Participating lenders are subject to change. Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $45,000 at 0% APR, the monthly payment is $535.71 for 84 months. Cost of borrowing is $0, total obligation is $45,000. Offer is unconditionally interest-free. Freight, air tax ($100, if applicable) included. License, insurance, registration, PPSA/movable property registry fees, applicable taxes and dealer fees not included. Dealers may sell for less. Limited time offer which may not be combined with certain other offers. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate offers in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. ®Registered trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia. RBC and Royal Bank are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. † $10,380 is a combined total credit consisting of a $3,000 manufacturer-to-dealer delivery credit (tax exclusive) $5,195 Cash Credit (tax exclusive) available on 2015 GMC Sierra Double Cab 1SA 4WD models, $1,000 Owner Cash (tax inclusive), $750 manufacturer-to-dealer Elevation Package Discount Credit (tax exclusive) for 2015 Sierra 1SA Elevation Edition with 5.3L Engine and a $435 manufacturer-to-dealer cash credit (tax exclusive) on any 2015 GMC Sierra Elevation Double Cab AWD with a 5.3L engine, which is available for cash purchases only and cannot be combined with special lease and nance rates. By selecting lease or nance offers, consumers are foregoing this $5,630 credit, which will result in higher effective interest rates. Discounts vary by model. ** Government 5-Star Safety Ratings are part of the National Highway Traf c Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (www.SaferCar.gov). ‡‡ $5,000 is a combined credit consisting of a $1,000 Owner Cash (tax inclusive), $3,000 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit (tax exclusive) for 2015 Sierra 1500 Double Cab and a $1,000 manufacturer to dealer nance cash (tax exclusive) for a 2015 Sierra 1500 which is available for nance offers only and cannot be combined with special lease rates and cash purchase. ‡ $5,450/$4,750 is a combined total credit consisting of $500/$0 September Bonus (tax inclusive), $750/$750 Owner Cash (tax inclusive) and a $4,200/$4,000 manufacturer to dealer cash credit (tax exclusive) for a 2015 Terrain SLE-1 FWD/Acadia SLE-1 FWD, which is available for cash purchases only and cannot be combined with special lease and nance rates. By selecting lease or nance offers, consumers are foregoing this $4,200/$4,000 credit which will result in higher effective interest rates. Discounts vary by model and cash credit excludes Terrain SLE-1 AWD/Acadia SLE-1 AWD. ^ $2,250 is a combined credit consisting of $500 September Bonus (tax inclusive), $750 Owner Cash (tax inclusive) and $1,000 manufacturer to dealer nance cash (tax exclusive) for a 2015 Terrain which is available for nance offers only and cannot be combined with special lease rates and cash purchase.†† Offer available to retail customers in Canada only. $500 Bonus Cash applies to new 2015 GMC Sierra LD Crew Cab, Terrain delivered between September 16th and September 30th 2015. The $500 bonus cash includes HST/GST/QST/PST as applicable by province. Limited time offers, which may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without notice. See dealer for details. ¥ Offer applies to eligible current owners or lessees of any model year 1999 or newer car that has been registered and insured in Canada in the customer’s name for the previous consecutive six (6) months. Credit valid towards the retail purchase or lease of one eligible 2015 model year GMC SUV, crossover and pickups models delivered in Canada between September 1, 2015 through September 30, 2015. Credit is a manufacturer to consumer incentive (tax inclusive) and credit value depends on model purchased: $750 credit available on eligible GMC vehicles (except Canyon 2SA, Sierra 1500 and HD); $1,000 credit available on all GMC Sierras. Offer is transferable to a family member living within the same household (proof of address required). As part of the transaction, dealer may request documentation and contact General Motors of Canada Limited (GMCL) to verify eligibility. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. Certain limitations or conditions apply. Void where prohibited. See your GMCL dealer for details. GMCL reserves the right to amend or terminate offers for any reason in whole or in part at any time without prior notice.

Page 18 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

TIMES • September 25, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com www. StrathmoreTimes .com New Blood story still brings
www. StrathmoreTimes .com
www. StrathmoreTimes .com

New Blood story still brings healing

LAUREEN F. GUENTHER Times Contributor

New Blood, a theatri- cal dance show created by Deanne Bertsch and the dance, glee and Blackfoot classes at Strathmore High School in 2014, tells the story of Indian residential schools and is being per- formed at two reconciliation events this month. On Sept. 23, it was per- formed at Moving Together as People in Stand Off, Al- berta. It’ll be performed again on Sept. 28, in Cal- gary’s Central Public Li- brary, for Bow Valley Col- lege’s Indian Residential School Awareness Day.

“Both events celebrate the healing that has taken place as a result of what the Truth and Reconciliation Com- mission has done,” Bertsch said, “and the healing that they hope will continue to take place.” This year’s New Blood cast, dancing to Peter Ga- briel’s music by the same title, ranges from 10 to 60 years in age, Bertsch said. It includes SHS students and graduates, Siksika elders and children, and students and graduates of Rosebud School of the Arts (RSA). Eulalia Running Rabbit, who narrates the play and plays the mother, attended residential school as a child,

but she was a day student, riding the bus home every day. She suffered abuse at school, but more than that, she remembers the stories of abuse she heard from her classmates and friends, who often said they wished they could go home at the end of the day like she did. “There’s times when they would run up to the windows and stare out into nothing,” she said. “They would look at me and they would say, ‘I was just thinking I wish that I saw my parents coming.’” Or they’d ask her, ‘What are you doing after school when you get home?’ Running Rabbit didn’t want to tell them. “I didn’t want them feeling bad that I get to do things and they don’t. They’re not as free as I was,” she said. “You could tell that they were very, very lonely. “Some were really abused, that (residen- tial schools) ruined their lives. It ruined their future. It took our identity away, our self-esteem.” So when we see aboriginal people home- less and on the streets, or struggling social- ly in other ways, she wants us to remember that many of them were the people who had no future after residential schools. But now, performances of New Blood are bringing hope. “It’s such a healing play. It heals a lot of people that see it,” Running Rabbit said, because most survivors of the schools see something in it that they relate to. And survivors aren’t the only people it touches. After one performance, a young woman came to Running Rabbit in tears saying, ‘I cannot believe that this is what my grandparents went through’. Running Rabbit added, “That’s how pow- erful the play is.” Non-aboriginal audience members have also come to her afterward, saying they didn’t know this had happened in residen- tial schools. New Blood’s impact continues to grow. “It’s still in demand, right today,” Run-

ning Rabbit said. “And what it’s doing is, it’s

It has healed

healing. It’s a healing play

many, and many more to come.” Bertsch will teach New Blood to RSA dance students in 2016, and hopes to re- mount New Blood with her SHS dance class this year and to invite school groups to see it. Look at newbloodthedanceshow. com or New Blood on Facebook, to follow the performances.

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September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 19

Get that job McBride Career Group in Strathmore held a successful career fair Sept. 16.
Get that job
Get that job

McBride Career Group in Strathmore held a successful career fair Sept. 16. Roughly 77

clients visited the event, which had 11 em- ployment recruiters available for information

and application forms.

Manny Everett Photo

information and application forms. Manny Everett Photo Rainy day fun The rain didn’t hold back Trinity
Rainy day fun
Rainy day fun

The rain didn’t hold back Trinity School when they moved their BBQ activities into the gym, where teachers and staff served the returning parents and students a BBQ beef on a bun. Noah Adamah (l-r front) with Grade 2 teacher Andrea Klesken.

Manny Everett Photo

Historical Society proposes new plan

SHARON MCLEAY Times Contributor

There may be a way that the Western District Historical Society (WDHS) can keep the old Anglican church situated on its present site. The church was to be renovated for use as a historic museum and a visitor’s information centre. WDHS representa- tives, appearing in Strathmore council on Sept. 16, said there has been some opposition from the community about moving the church. They were pleased to announce that they had a new op- portunity to keep the church on its original foundation. The Anglican dio- cese has consented to sell the lot under the church and there is an interested party looking to purchase the land not utilized for the museum site. The society won $5,000 in the town- sponsored ‘Let’s Make a Pitch’ event and it planned to utilize that money to move St. Michael’s Anglican Church to a new location near the new farmer’s

market buildings, situated next to the HiHo gas station. The benefits to leaving the church at the existing site are no moving costs, putting some of that money to site de- velopment, qualification for larger res- toration grants and contribution to the downtown revitalization effort; and the proximity to Wheatland Trail still al- lows for easy access to its role as a visi- tor’s centre. Councilor Denise Petersen gave her support to the historic effort. “The desire to commemorate the re- markable history of this community has been demonstrated throughout the last 40 to 50 years,” said Councilor De- nise Petersen. “Last year the effort was renewed when the Western District Historical Society was formed.” Council directed administration to look into researching the cost to the purchase of the lots, and if feasible af- ter approval of the lot purchase, ne- gotiate with the interested party for resale of the unused portion of the property.

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Bisons win tourney JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter The CFR Bisons have to be feeling pret-
Bisons win tourney
JUSTIN SEWARD
Times Reporter
The CFR Bisons have to be feeling pret-
ty good about themselves after going 5-0
and winning their annual exhibition tour-
nament last weekend at the Strathmore
Family Centre.
Head coach Sandy Henry and his staff
got a great look at players they were keen
on, and he thought this
was a great way to get a
piece-by-piece look at the
players that will best suit
the team.
“We’ll have five extra,
so we got 25,” said Henry.
“For us it’s an excellent
way to sort out our ros-
ter. I think anyone could
see we had quite a few
more extra guys than the
other three teams that
were there. We carried 15 extra guys in
the tournament, most of the other teams
were between six and eight. I think our
guys tried to equalize out and we got an
all situation look at every guy and it was
really useful.”
Henry saw some mistakes out there
that are normal because of players com-
ing from different leagues, and another
step in the evaluation process without
any systems put into place.
However, he did see positives come of
players as their defensive coverage im-
proved steadily in the tournament.
“Obviously we haven’t had a chance to
work on any defensive zone at all,” said
Henry. “When you have five guys from
five different associations on ice, with
five different ideas … that wasn’t match-
ing as good. Definitely we saw some d-
zone breakdowns where they weren’t get-
ting proper coverage. The thing I did like
about our d-zone, I think our attack to
the point man was very good. The lanes
we took, blocked a lot of shots and that’s
a part of us being a really quick team and
makes that more effective, where we real-
ly close that space and teams have a hard
time getting that puck through clean.”
He did mention
he challenged the
veterans earlier in
the week, and the
coaches felt the ones
dressed met expecta-
tions in solidifying
their spots on the
team.
“I thought they did
that,” said Henry. “Ev-
ery guy got a little bit
of a pat on the back,
but they also got a gun lashing at times. I
thought at the end of the tournament they
were real good.”
The Herd had two exhibition games
this week and Henry thinks now it will be
down to choosing the right mix of play-
ers, who want to sacrifice some offense
to help out in the defensive end and who
can make plays out of nothing to produce
offensively.
With the regular season coming up, he
is excited to get things rolling.
“I think you’re always excited to get
your team on the ice with what you feel is
your team,” said Henry. “This trial process
is a grind. It’s a grind on parents, players
and coaches. We’ll be glad to get to the
games and excited too. I think we got a
good squad.”
Air Spartans!
Strathmore Spartans high school quarterback Kobe Holloway attampts to avoid a massive
mid-air tackle from a Fort McMurray Holy Trinity Player during exhibition play at the Strath-
more High School on Sept 18. The Spartans won 23-20.
Justin Seward Photo

Kings hope to make life difficult for opponents

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The Wheatland Kings brass has been left with noth- ing but positive impressions, from training camp right through the exhibition season. There is reason for optimism that the team will be tough enough for opposing clubs on a nightly basis. “The evaluation process was quite tough,” said co- coach Emilio Fuoco. “We had to make some tough de- cisions on some players, but our foundation is there and we’re looking forward to having a very successful season.” Fouco said injuries have made the decisions on play- ers difficult. Whether that will affect the roster for the early part of the season is unclear.

“We’ve had some unfortunate injuries,” he said. “Our numbers are a little skewed right now. We haven’t made our decisions on some players, on the basis we need to have those numbers to cover some of the injuries, so we’re not quite where we need to be, but we’re close.” The season is around the corner and the club’s vet- erans have made a noticeable impact. Fuoco believes they have fit into their roles nicely, which will create a balance in the line up and help the rookies along. “What I was really impressed with was our veterans,” said Fouco. “Changing our mindset and them showing great leadership and buying in. The excitement of play- ers bonding together and eventually we’ll have some good things happen. The expectation is always for the older players to lead and guide the younger players, no matter what the skill level might be and they’re doing

a great job.” Aside from the strength of the veterans, he men- tioned there are a variety of skill levels that could be potent as the campaign goes along. “We’ve got some really skilled players,” said Fouco. “We’re excited that they’re going to be able to show the skill they have in game situations a lot better than in the exhibition series.” He added the Kings goal is to be the best team in the league and play hard every night, making it difficult for opposing teams to play. The practice of better discipline these past couple of games will only help the players be successful. The home opener is Sept. 26 versus the Cochrane Generals (8 p.m.) at the Strathmore Family Centre, while the first road game will be Sept. 27 in Coaldale.

Get there early for the Home Opener Celebration! Saturday, Sept 26 • 8:00 pm vs
Get there early for the
Home Opener Celebration!
Saturday, Sept 26 • 8:00 pm
vs Cochrane Generals
Strathmore Family Centre - Gold Arena
Admission: $5 • Under 12 free
Tuesday, Sept 29 • 8 pm vs Banff Academy
Home Opener
Come Cheer on Your Strathmore Wheatland Kings!
CFR BISONS HOME OPENER Oct. 2 (8 p.m.) at the Strathmore Family Centre versus the
CFR BISONS HOME OPENER
Oct. 2 (8 p.m.) at the Strathmore Family Centre
versus the Calgary Royals!
Be there early for the season opener celebration
and the jersey retirement of Markus Lavallee!
Medicine Hat Tigers at CFR Bisons
Sunday, Oct. 4 (2 p.m.) at the Strathmore Family Centre
Come Watch Some Great Hockey!

Page 22 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

TIMES • September 25, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com The Strathmore Wheatland Kings would like to thank all of

The Strathmore Wheatland Kings would like to thank all of the volunteers, businesses, individuals and participants for their support, generosity and contributions to the Strathmore Wheatland Kings Junior Hockey 2nd Annual Golf Tournament held at Strathmore Golf Course on Friday, September 18!

Team Major Sponsors

Golf Course on Friday, September 18! Team Major Sponsors Birdie Level Sponsors TIMES STRATHMORE Hole Sponsors
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September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 23

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Spartan golf focuses on provincial berths

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The Strathmore High School saw many eager golfers come to a practice round last week and will have enough players to field a girls team, which the school has not seen in a while. The solo returning female golfer, Ali- cia Kennedy, is ecstatic to have a girls team this season as she said it would be easier to be play with them and ease up the competition on the course. “We gained a couple of girls,” said Kennedy. “We actually have a girls team now, that’ll be fun. It was defi-

nitely weird going for the first time be- cause I didn’t have any girls with me.

I was put with the actual provincial

champions … but it was fun and I’m excited to go back. I think we should do decent overall.” With only one player going to pro-

vincials last year, the Grade 12 student feels that there is optimism at sending more this time around.

“I think we have a chance at a cou-

ple of people going to provincials,” she said.

A hopeful on the team, Connor McK-

innon, who is a regular at Speargrass, would like to take the strong play in

his game and transfer it to the team in tournament play.

“I like to kind of keep it calm,” said

McKinnon. “My putting is struggling but hopefully I can get my short game up, my long game is good. It’s differ- ent, I’ve never really golfed with peo- ple from school, it’s just been me and a couple of guys that I’ve worked with.” Co-coach Jennifer Meyers is excited

CIS volleyball comes to Strathmore

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

Strathmore High School is hosting a CIS Canada West volleyball exhibition match between Mount Royal Universi- ty and Trinity Western University. Fans can expect a great evening of competi-

tive, high-octane volleyball from expe- rienced players on both sides. “I thought it would be a good op- portunity for the community to watch

a high level of volleyball right here in

Strathmore,” said Cole Hintz, game or- ganizer. “I thought it would be a great experience for the university teams too. Some of the younger players are

just out of high school, so to kind of be back in a high school gym, sometimes is a unique experience for the univer- sity athletes as well.” In discussions with both schools, they thought it was a great opportu- nity for a tune-up game in preparation for the Dino Cup Oct. 2-3 and for Trin- ity Western’s coach to revisit his old stomping grounds.

“I talked to Ben Joesphson, the coach

for Trinity Western, who is a Strath- more High School Alumni,” said Hintz. “He was here last year for the Pillars of Strathmore and he was inducted in. I talked to him then. He was definitely interested in doing something back in Strathmore, where he used to go to high school. In just talking, and talking to the coaches in Calgary, we were able to work something out.” The match will take place on Oct. 1 (8 p.m.). Admission will be $2 and that will get you a raffle ticket for a Gavin Schmitt national team jersey.

The Strathmore Spartans high school golf team has a good mix of players from all three grades and hope to send more players to provin- cials this year.

Photo Courtesy of Jennifer Meyers

provin- cials this year. Photo Courtesy of Jennifer Meyers about the crop of Grade 10’s coming

about the crop of Grade 10’s coming out who are mixing in with a couple of returning players and forming a com- petitive team. “It’s nice to see some younger players out like some Grade 10s,” said Meyers. “It’s always hard when we have full teams of Grade 12s because it means the next year we have to reload a full team. It’s nice to have Korbin (Allan) back in Grade 11 and a few Grade 10s that look really nice. There are definite- ly a lot of people that are eager which is good to see.”

She said that the boys might have to cut it down at divisional to decide the fifth spot on the team, but with a lot of them having played all summer that will make the decision difficult. “They have been playing all summer and this is what they love to do,” she said. “There’s some that are playing other sports right now and not quite as dedicated but there is a couple guys who this is their passion and this what they want to continue on doing.” Regionals and provincials will be held later this month in Cochrane again.

Soccer Spartans look to experienced young core

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The key to success for the Strathmore Spartans high school girls soccer team will be relying on the youthful Grade 10 group because of graduating play- ers and some injuries early on in camp. “Unfortunately this year we didn’t have a lot of returning players,” said head coach Kaitrin McDonnell. “A cou- ple due to injuries and just other com- mitments, jobs, getting on with their Grade 12 year and very few of them are focusing on academics. I have a huge chunk of Grade 10s … and it’s the natural progression of ‘ok here’s our new squad.’” According to McDonnell, it has been a ‘night and day’ difference with the player’s experience of the game com- pared to a couple of years ago, and she hopes it will lessen the basic training that needs to be done. “A lot of girls this year know how to play soccer,” she said. “I am hoping so

(the game knowledge) because I have less to do in terms of basic training. It focuses on conditioning, building as a team and now I can go into all the spe- cifics like actually running drills and using what they know already to my full advantage as a coach.” McDonnell has only seen the girls four times before their exhibition matches in Drumheller, which was held earlier this week, and said there are no set positions until after that game. Defensive member and sweeper Jill Warrack has played soccer for a few years and is looking forward to mak- ing new friendships on the team and win some games. “I’m looking forward to playing the game and hopefully winning,” she said. With her experience in the game, Warrack thinks the high school level will be more competitive. “I find it’s more competitive because it’s for a shorter time,” said Warrack. “We already get pushed harder than we do at rec soccer.”

Strathmore’s CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS CHRISTMAS PARK Mark your calendars to drop down to the Strathmore
Strathmore’s
CELEBRATION OF
LIGHTS
CHRISTMAS PARK
Mark your calendars to drop down to the
Strathmore Farmers Market Fall Harvest
at the Strathmore and District Agricultural Grounds
(Blue Livestock Building)
Motorized
Saturday, September 26
11 am to 4 pm
Barbie Car
donated by
Canadian Tire
Drop by our table and get your tickets
for this fantastic Motorized Barbie Car.
Draw date - Christmas Eve.
Tickets will also be available for
purchase on “Opening Night”
of the Christmas Park on
Saturday, November 28th.
(Weather Permitting)
TIMES
STRATHMORE
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Call us for a quote or advice

403.870.2753

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FLAT ROOF SLOPE ROOF EXTERIORS Call us for a quote or advice 403.870.2753 www.unitedroofing.ca
FLAT ROOF SLOPE ROOF EXTERIORS Call us for a quote or advice 403.870.2753 www.unitedroofing.ca
FLAT ROOF SLOPE ROOF EXTERIORS Call us for a quote or advice 403.870.2753 www.unitedroofing.ca

Page 24 • Strathmore TIMES • September 25, 2015

www.StrathmoreTimes.com

TIMES • September 25, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com Showin’ off the chrome the autos a character of their
TIMES • September 25, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com Showin’ off the chrome the autos a character of their
TIMES • September 25, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com Showin’ off the chrome the autos a character of their
TIMES • September 25, 2015 www.StrathmoreTimes.com Showin’ off the chrome the autos a character of their

Showin’ off the chrome

the autos a character of their own.

Showin’ off the chrome the autos a character of their own. Many car buffs displayed their

Many car buffs displayed their custom cars at the PHD Show and Shine held Sept. 19, on the grassy area next to their shop. PHD served BBQ and a bouncy house on hand for the kids. The classic cars did a run to Sagewood later in the day so elders could come out and see the cars. Several trucks had some unique paint jobs and modifications that lent

Sharon McLeay Photos

paint jobs and modifications that lent Sharon McLeay Photos A great deal Strathmore’s Parker Petruska started
paint jobs and modifications that lent Sharon McLeay Photos A great deal Strathmore’s Parker Petruska started
paint jobs and modifications that lent Sharon McLeay Photos A great deal Strathmore’s Parker Petruska started

A great deal

Strathmore’s Parker Petruska started a little sports swap consignment business to raise funds for players who can’t afford equipment or registration fees. The first fund- raiser raised $85 on Sept. 17 held at the Strathmore Family Centre.

Photo Courtesy of Michelle Bishop

Wheatland expected to have contending teams

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The Wheatland Athletic Association has seen many unfamiliar faces come into camp for all three levels this season, but from a coaching perspective they are all expected to get stronger as the season goes along and hope to have a deep run in the playoffs. Second-year bantam bench boss Cody Brown will be looking for a lot of hard work game in and game out, and said he is fairly confident in the group he has assembled for the season. “We’re looking for guys to show up to the rink and work hard every time they hit the ice,” said Brown. “We’re fairly confident in the group we got. We’ve got everybody on board with the hard work thing.” Brown thinks the game plan will be altered this year because of the young line up and all the new faces that made the team. The goal is to get everyone on the same page early. “It’s a totally different group of guys we got this year,” said Brown. “We got to adjust to that and it’s going to be a totally different dynamic … you just got to see what you’ve got early in the year and work with it and see what you can do.” He is hoping that players will offer a variety of skill sets on the ice and not become just a one-di- mensional player. “You’re obviously looking for dynamic guys,” said Brown. “Just guys that are willing to listen, recep- tive guys. You tell them something, we’re looking for players taking that advice and trying it out there.”

He added the team is icing a fairly deep roster and it should be a good year all around. “Ideally you want in the end is being able to run all four lines,” he said. “I think we got the group of guys to do it. It’s just a matter of guys stepping up and making that possible for us for sure.” The Wheatland Warriors will open up in Medicine Hat on Sept. 25 before their home opener on Sept. 26 vs. the Bow Valley Timberwolves (4:45 p.m.) at the Strathmore Family Centre. Wheatland Chiefs head coach Shadoe Stoodley is thrilled at the enthusiasm that the young guys are showing early on, in trying to earn a spot on the midget team. “So far we’ve got a lot of young guys that look pretty good from the M15’s last year,” said Stoodley. “That’ll help going on a championship run, I think they know what it takes to win. Our defense, I think, is the biggest weakness right now,” Stoodley added that the young players’ skillsets will help the team’s success over the course of the season. “There’s a few guys that have a scoring touch,” he said. “With some of our returnees, they’re kind of more role players right now, but there’s some scor- ers there too. But with the young guys coming, they look like a lot of goal scorers in that group.” The Wheatland Chiefs will begin the season with back-to-back games on Oct. 3 and 4 in Cranbrook, before their home opener on Oct. 10 against the CNHA Blazers (4:45 p.m.) at the Strathmore Family Centre.

The Wheatland Braves are seeing a lot of return- ing players from last season’s peewee team and new coach Carl Knudsen hopes they will take on more of a leadership role, with a lot of new faces coming into the mix. “We have seven returning players from last year but we also have a healthy mix of first years,” said Knudsen. “We’re happy to have them. Both our goal- tenders are first years, they should be solid there. We got pretty good group of returning players, I’m hoping they’ll do their best to show the younger first years the path out there.” Knudsen wants to ease the players into game day form, by coaching the basics of the game such as puck and skating skills, which he hopes will help in getting the players on the same page early on. “We’re just going to keep working on skills,” said Knudsen. “Especially at the start of the season, just to get everyone moving and up to speed and even- tually start working as a team. It’s a long summer sometimes and these kids haven’t been on the ice a whole lot yet.” The staff will expect the players to work hard ev- ery night, but will not make the players intimidated right off the bat and punish them. “At this age you can’t punish kids,” said Knudsen. “You can’t hold it against someone for a mental er- ror, but as long as they’re working hard for me and the coaching staff, we’ll do well, and in return their development should go well.” The Braves play their home opener on Sept. 25 against Taber at the Strathmore Family Centre.

Fun Country Riders travel to Chestermere

Bea Winter - Secretary, Fun Country Riding Club of Strathmore

The 26th Annual Chestermere Fair Gymkhana was held on Saturday, Sept. 12 on a hot summer day with a good turnout of enthusiastic, smiling competitors. Thank you to all the volunteers who helped make the event run so smoothly. A very special thank you goes to Janice Brown and the other members of the Chestermere Agricul- ture Society (“the Ag Society”) for all their hard work to ensure the fair was such a great experi- ence. Terry Watkins of the Ag Society did an excellent job of preparing the arena for the gymkhana and keeping our club current with everything we needed to know for the day. See you next year for the 27th Chestermere Fair Gymkhana! Results to third place of the competition are as follows:

BARREL RACING

Pee Wee:

2nd – Dylan Zip;

1st – Jessica Tyrrell;

1st – Karla Kvicala;

FLAG PICKING

2nd – Anna Kvicala ;

Bantam:

1st – Cobie Klassen;

3rd – Melissa Busby

3rd – Jessica Tyrrell

1st – Cassandra Dahl; 2nd – Miranda Green;

2nd – Fenella Murphy; 3rd – Jenissa Shippelt

Senior Novice:

KEYHOLE

Junior:

2nd – Johanna Zip;

Leadline:

3rd – Garnett Green Pee Wee:

1st – Cobie Klassen; 2nd – Jenisssa Shippelt; 3rd – Lexy Doyle Junior:

1st – Melissa Busby; 2nd – Lauryn Schimke;

1st – Jessica Mas-

1st – Melissa Busby; 2nd – Lauryn Schimke; 3rd – Dylan Zip Senior Novice:

1st – Jessica Tyrrell; 2nd – Johanna Betts; 3rd – Tina Dahl

3rd – Tasha Turner Open Senior:

2nd – Ashley Gilmore; 3rd – Bernie Shippelt

1st – Shayden Minhas Bantam:

1st – Miranda Green; 2nd – Garnett Green; 3rd – Cassandra Dahl Pee Wee:

3rd – Sadie Matus

Open Senior:

Bantam:

1st – Tristyn Erickson; 2nd – Helen Tyrrell;

1st – Dylan Zip;

Senior Novice:

son-Carter; 2nd – Johanna Betts; 3rd – Tasha Turner

1st – Karla Kvicala; 2nd – Jessica Tyrrell; 3rd – Katrina Janzen

STAKE RACING

1st –Cassandra Dahl Pee Wee:

1st – Cobie Klassen; 2nd – Jenissa Shippelt; 3rd - Lexy Doyle

3rd – Fenella Murphy Junior:

2nd - Josilynn Dahl Senior Novice:

Open Senior:

Bantam:

Junior:

1st – Tasha Turner;

1st – Ashley Gilmore; 2nd – Karla Kvicala; 3rd – Terry Watkins

1st – Miranda Green; 2nd – Garnett Green; 3rd – Cassandra Dahl

1st – Cobie Klassen;

1st –Melissa Busby; 2nd – Josilynn Dahl; 3rd – Dylan Zip

1st – Jessica Tyrrell;

2nd – Trevor Dahl; 3rd – Karla Kvicala Open Senior:

POLE BENDING

Pee Wee:

Senior Novice:

1st – Katrina Janzen; 2nd – Jessica Tyrrell;

Bantam:

1st – Garnett Green; 2nd – Miranda Green; 3rd –

2nd – Fenella Murphy; 3rd – Jenissa Shippelt Junior:

2nd – Johanna Betts; 3rd – Trevor Dahl Open Senior:

3rd – Bernie Shippelt

Cassandra Dahl

1st – Lauryn Schimke;

1st – Tina Carlson;

Check the Club’s website at www.funcountryriders.com for more information and to see some great pictures of our activities taken this year by Grant Larsen.

What: GPS - Get Planning for Success

Navigating Your Way Through Post-Secondary Confusion Post-Secondary Evening

When: Wednesday, October 7, 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Over 30 Booths and Displays

Where: Strathmore High School Gym

Who:

Everyone! Open to the Public

-

parents, students, adult learners

Why:

Searching for education programs is confusing!

- find out about all the exciting programs being offered at institutions here in Alberta
- find out about all the exciting programs being offered
at institutions here in Alberta - everything from cake
and pastry chef to private investigator to engineer
and nurse
Partners: Strathmore High School and Holy Cross Collegiate
Lots of Door Prizes and Hand Outs

September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 25

September 25, 2015 • Strathmore TIMES • Page 25 The Holy Cross Collegiate Hawks Junior A

The Holy Cross Collegiate Hawks Junior A volley- ball team is a youthful squad that will have to be patient and learn the fundamentals this season on the court.

patient and learn the fundamentals this season on the court. Holy Cross Collegiate Hawks Junior B

Holy Cross Collegiate Hawks Junior B volleyball team will look to a positive attitude on the court and hard work to gain points during matches and make sure the serves count.

gain points during matches and make sure the serves count. Mitchell Desjardins (#14) of the Holy

Mitchell Desjardins (#14) of the Holy Cross Colle- giate Hawks Senior volleyball team goes up for a loft shot over a Holy Trinity Knight defender during their league opener on Sept. 21. The Hawks lost three sets to two.

Justin Seward Photos

Hawks volleyball look to have strong seasons

JUSTIN SEWARD Times Reporter

The Holy Cross Collegiate Hawks volleyball teams have

many new faces on each of their teams, but the coaches see

a lot of poise and dedication to have success on the court

this season. “I’d say the strength is youth,” said Junior A boys coach Tomas Rochford, “We do have a few big middles which is something we haven’t had before. It’ll be very much a development year because we only have two returning starters. The rest either

didn’t play before or they played on the ‘B’ team. It’ll be not quite as strong to start the season as last year.” Rochford added that with a fairly inexperienced squad that there will some basics techniques taught to the players, and he knows there will have to be patience shown by the coaches in the development process. “A lot of just starting with the basics,” said Rochford. “Probably being patient with them as they learn the ba- sics, getting the rotation out … and getting used to each other on the floor for the first month.” He thinks where the team’s success lies is with their height but cautioned that players will be hitting them more aggres- sively compared to ‘B’ level, and this is where positioning will be key. “I think that’s the major thing in progression of volleyball,

is it always gets faster,” he said.

“It’s similar to hockey in it always gets faster and the ball comes harder and positional play and technique is so im- portant. If you’re thinking about all that and playing at a high level you’re going to lose because it has to become automatic.” For Jason Burns’ Junior B squad, his players are eager and ready to learn the sport and are excited to see what that at- titude will produce on the court. “We’re excited,” said Burns. “I think three or four Grade 8’s are on there, mainly Grade 7’s and they’re excited to get that first game or two under their belt and settle in. We’re going to work a lot on commu- nication with each other, we’re going to work a lot on serves making them count and the big one is service reception to avoid getting pinned in.” Burns said that the biggest goal will be learning to bump, set and put it over the net, as he is not expecting techniques such as spiking to be perfected just yet. He hopes that the early tournaments on the road will give them momentum into winning their home tournament in late October. Senior boys coach John Reinhart will have a few deci- sions at many positions this year as size at the net will not be on their side compared to previous years. “Being a little bit shorter from last year, we’re going to have to create some offence,” said Reinhart. “We’ll still be able to block but we’re going to have to play defense behind the block. If we can create some offense then the other teams won’t be able to set up on us as much.” Reinhart added the players will learn the senior level fairly quick with the pace of play as the ball will be coming at them a lot faster than in junior high. “It going to be quite an experience because everything just happens so much slower at the junior high level,” he said. “There’s not the quantity or quality of hits that you’d see at senior high where you have six players that can hit.” With the players available on the roster, there will be a feeling out process as to where players will fit in but Rein- hart thinks early on in league play will be a good indicator as to who he will go with in matches later on.

“I want to see who’s a player, “ said Reinhart. “It’s a bit of a feeling out process. I obviously want to win … if we’re getting that success and winning, doing well

part way through the season, I’m totally satisfied with that.

I want to see who those players are, I want to give those

Grade 10’s a chance to get on the court under pressure and learn the systems.” On the girls side, Alex Hutcheon has seen a lot of growth, which is leaving him with some optimism that the Junior B’s will win games this season. “There was honestly no rust at all to knock off the chains,” said Hutcheon. “They were right ready to go. Their skill level is phenom- enal for Grade 8 girls for sure. I’ve set the bar high for these guys just from these last two practices.” His goal for the team is to hopefully win at least one of the four tournaments and it would be a bonus if they can win the home tournament. Vito Peraino’s Junior A Girls team will have a lot of club volleyball players on the roster this year and it will be quite

a strong unit that will have experience on the court. “The team seems fundamentally sound so far,” said Per- aino. “The fundamentals automatically leads to good team chemistry and when you have good team chemistry, every- thing comes together after that.” Peraino added that with the experience gained from the club level the girls are dedicated to playing and the expecta- tions are higher than they were at previous volleyball levels. “You can see the desire to play,” said Peraino. “Having a club team in the community has increased the skill levels of the girls that are coming out. I think in the past you might’ve seen Grade 9 girls for example make the team and more of the Grade 8 girls would’ve beat them out but because of so many of the Grade 9 girls playing club this year, there was that big difference in skill level.” He coached the ‘B’ level last year and said the intensity will be the biggest difference he will see going into coach- ing the ‘A’ team this season, because of going from teaching

a lot fundamentals to coaching more experienced players. “We’re bringing it up a notch,” said Peraino. “We’ve already told the girls the intensity is going to be the same thing as it is in club season. We’re going to be pushing these girls to play as if it was a club team. No point waiting until club season to do that, this is a school team, we want to do well as a school, whether it’s a community, Holy Cross or Strathmore.” The senior girls team are developing into a young, ener- getic team that have already seemed to gel early on in the season and coach Josh Jalbert is excited to see what the season unveils for the team. “It’s a fun group,” said Jalbert. “Everyone enjoys each oth- er’s company. We’ve already had a lot of fun in practices, it’s

a very upbeat positive team.” The team has a lot of new players and there will be a lot of systems to go over. It’s a matter of getting girls adjusted in practice because the pace of play is quicker than at the junior high level. “It’s just getting accustomed to a little bit quicker volley- ball,” said Jalbert. “Our passing especially off the serve, moving our feet a little but quicker, that’s kind of the main thing.” Jalbert’s main goal for the team is to be competitive at zones and considers that a high point in the season. Holy Cross Collegiate have created a Junior C girls devel- opment league for those who are new to the sport and want to learn the game, and Jalbert is thrilled to give those girls extra gym time. “I’m really excited about it because it just gives the girls the opportunity to get out and get lots of touches,” he said. “No one got cut which is awesome and you can develop all these different players. First off, it’s great for these kids to be involved in extracurricular and second of all give them the opportunity to play more volleyball. It’s something that’s really popular in our school.”

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