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Volume 118 No. 31 www.afro.com 75 CENTS MARCH 13, 2010 - MARCH 19, 2010 Day26
Volume 118 No. 31
www.afro.com
75 CENTS
MARCH 13, 2010 - MARCH 19, 2010
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Barry, Fenty ‘Good Meat’ for Media

By Dorothy Rowley AFRO Staff Writer

counsel to look into Fenty’s actions. When asked how much more the public can stand of such controversy, retired University of Maryland political science professor Ron Walters responded, “Much more,” but added that the larger concern would be how things will work out. “Washington is used to the media [limelight],” Walters said. “And with all that’s going on with other Black politicians, Barry and Fenty seem to be fair game.” He said the interesting thing about Fenty is that he has been compared to “[Newark, N.J. Mayor] Cory Booker and some of the others” who constitute the new wave of Black politicians. Alluding to a recent front- page Washington Post article on Fenty’s contract issues, Walters added that despite the mayor’s propensity for pragmatism, being detail- oriented and non racial, he has not only lost the support of the Black community but of the Post, which had always been in his corner. “This shows that he is not immune as a politician,” Walters said. “He’s got a touch of cronyism, arrogance and a whole lot of other things

Councilman Marion Barry’s supporters questioned the fairness of the District of Columbia Council’s censure of their Ward 8 peer last week. While Barry was taken to task for awarding $15,000 of taxpayer money to a former girlfriend, they say, Mayor Adrian Fenty hadn’t been held accountable for the $86

“Mayor now under scrutiny for friendly contracts”

million he allegedly doled out in contracts to his buddies for projects in the Department of Parks and Recreation. The issue around those contracts—which were awarded without the Council’s nod—question if the governing body has played favorites, particularly when its approval is required for any contract exceeding the $1 million mark. However, their sentiments were short- lived when the Council announced over the weekend that, as in the case of Barry, it had also appointed a special

Area Native Wins Oscar AP Photo/Matt Sayles Baltimore-born comedian/actress Mo’Nique poses backstage with the Oscar
Area Native Wins Oscar
AP Photo/Matt Sayles
Baltimore-born comedian/actress Mo’Nique poses
backstage with the Oscar for best performance by
an actress in a supporting role for Precious, based
on the novel Push by Sapphire, at the 82nd Academy
Awards March 7 in Hollywood.
See Oscar coverage on B3.

that make very good meat for the media.” On the other hand, Marion Barry’s a totally different case. According to Walters, he pops up like a bad penny every

other month. “And people are used to this,” the political analyst said. “He’s been part of the media circus for forever. As far as Barry’s concerned,

Continued on A4

Health Care Advocates, Opponents Swarm Capital

By Zenitha Prince and Gregory Dale AFRO Staff Writers

With a March 18 deadline set by the White House for the passage of the president’s marquee health care reform legislation, supporters and dissenters ramped up their lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C., this week. On March 9, more than 50 major labor, organizational, and religious leaders—under the aegis of Health Care for America Now (HCAN), a health reform campaign—led an estimated 5,000 marchers in protest outside the Ritz-Carlton hotel, where America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), a health insurers lobbying group, was holding its annual conference. The group, organizers said, had played a chief role in stymieing the first attempt at meaningful health care reform in decades.

AFRO Photo/Rob Roberts
AFRO Photo/Rob Roberts

Seen in the forefront of photo, Rochelle Spence, Geneirs Day and Salena Lockhart, of the United Food Commercial Workers union, were among an estimated 5,000 protestors who gathered in Washington, D.C., to push health care reform.

“We thought it was time to send a message to Congress that it was time to listen to us and not to the insurance companies,” HCAN spokeswoman Jacki Schechner told the AFRO. “And

Continued on A6

INSERTS • Home Depot Gay Couples Marry This Week in the District See the AFRO
INSERTS
• Home Depot
Gay Couples Marry This
Week in the District
See the AFRO on Channel 9
Thursdays at 9:30 a.m.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin
Darlene Garner, left, has a joyful tear wiped from her face by her partner of 14 years,
Candy Holmes, of Washington, after the couple obtained their marriage license March
3, the first day possible for gay couples since the District of Columbia legalized gay
marriage in Washington.
Your History • Your Community • Your News
Washington. Your History • Your Community • Your News 7 1 8 47105 21847 2 By

7

1 8 47105 21847 2
1 8
47105 21847
2

By Dorothy Rowley AFRO Staff Writer

Since same-sex marriage became a reality last week in the District of Columbia,

excited couples have prepared to make their way to the altar, embarking on a union that is still prohibited in most states and jurisdictions. To date, just five other states, including

Massachusetts and Iowa, allow such marriages. Mayor Adrian Fenty signed the District’s bill legalizing same-sex unions

Continued on A6

Education Dept. to Enforce Civil Rights

in Schools

A2

’Skins Can Learn from Ravens’ Oz

B5

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Join the AFRO on
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Census Officials Try to Dispel Myths

IRS Access Among Popular Fears

By Dorothy Rowley AFRO Staff Writer

Myths and falsehoods about the census have long played a role in people’s reluctance to participate. But with questionnaires for the decennial survey about to go out in the mail, U. S. Census Bureau officials remain focused on getting the word out that the March 15 count will be legitimate. They are also emphasizing that the country cannot fairly distribute $400 billion in federal funding over the next 10 years unless residents complete the forms and mail them in. Despite their efforts, some community members still have their doubts. Southeast District resident Sandy Marshall said she’ll fill out the form but has concerns about what will be done with the information or about people coming to her front door. “I intend to fill out the form and get it back to them,” Marshall, 38, said. “But you still have to wonder.” Michael Cook, the Bureau’s acting chief for decennial media relations, said the Census wants to “hit the African- American community hard” with the fact that if they mail back their forms, no one will visit their home. “During a focus group study, the one thing that clearly stood out was that the African-American community tends to frown on someone [sent from the agency] knocking on their door,” Cook said. In response to Marshall’s concerns, a spokesman for the NAACP Washington bureau offered that there is a level of distrust with data collected by the government. “We have not had the best of experiences with the U.S. government, and it is certainly understandable that people would be leery of sharing information that’s collected in the Continued on A7

be leery of sharing information that’s collected in the Continued on A7 Copyright © 2010 by

Copyright © 2010 by the Afro-American Company

A2

The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

AFRO National Briefs

Comedian Steve Harvey Launches Mentoring Campaign

Steve Harvey Courtesy Photo
Steve Harvey
Courtesy Photo

After the success of his first Father’s Day Mentoring Program Weekend last year, entertainer and author Steve Harvey is launching mentoring camps in 10 cities across the nation this year, according to a press release sent to the AFRO. The Steve Harvey Mentoring Weekend for Young Men was created to guide young men whose fathers are not active in their lives. “When you teach the principles of manhood, you will produce a better man, because a boy without a male role model is like an explorer without a map,” said Harvey in a statement. Harvey hopes to raise $1 million for the program, which will host 1,000 boys and their caregivers for 10 mentoring weekends this year. Interested students can register for the program until March 31 at SteveHarvey. com and 100 participants will be selected. Fifty of those spots will be open only to Dallas-area boys, while the

remaining slots are open to young men throughout the United States between the ages of 13-18 from a single female-led household. Eligible participants must also be enrolled as students in grades 8-11. “That weekend in 2009 was a life-changer, and I am going to keep pedaling to make the Mentoring Weekend bigger and better this year to set up camps in 10 cities,” Harvey said. “How long can I keep going on this bike? Join me to find out. With your help, I will keep going as long as it takes to bring mentoring nationwide.” For information visit SteveHarveyFoundation.com.

New Legislation to Cancel Haiti’s Debt Advances California Rep. Maxine Waters’ legislation, which would cancel all debt Haiti owes to the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and other institutions, was passed by the House Financial Services Subcommittee on International Monetary Policy and Trade during a subcommittee hearing last week. According to a press release, the House of Representatives may vote on the legislation in the near

Maxine Waters AP Photo
Maxine Waters
AP Photo

future. The Black Democrat has long championed social and economic improvement in Haiti, and introduced the Debt Relief for Earthquake Recovery in Haiti Act (H.R. 4573) not long after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit the country in January. “Haiti faces enormous challenges now, and the burden of paying off foreign debt would prevent the nation from taking necessary steps to help its people at this perilous time,” said Waters in a statement. “I introduced H.R. 4573 so that Haiti can use its limited resources to make both immediate and long-term investments in essential humanitarian relief, reconstruction and development efforts.” The legislation would require the U.S. executive directors at the World Bank, IMF, IDB and other institutions to do the following:

• Immediately cancel all

debt owed by Haiti to these institutions.

• Suspend the Caribbean

nation’s debt service

payments until the debt is canceled completely.

• Provide grants to Haiti

so the country does not accumulate additional debt.

Education Secretary to Enforce Civil Rights Laws Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced this week that his agency will increase enforcement of civil rights laws in colleges and schools, according to a press release. By doing so, Duncan allegedly hopes to show the

marked differences between his policies and those of his Republican predecessors. In a speech written for his appearance at a civil rights landmark in Selma, Ala., Duncan said the department’s Office for Civil Rights plans to release guidance letters to educators that will address fairness and equity. According to Duncan’s speech, the department will also announce additional enforcement procedures to ensure that students of all backgrounds have equal opportunities to take college prep courses, advanced curriculum and mathematics and science classes. “The truth is that, in the last decade, the Office for Civil Rights has not been as vigilant as it should have been in combating gender and racial discrimination and protecting the rights of individuals with disabilities,” Duncan said in the draft speech. “But that is about to

change.” Duncan is expected to deliver the speech at the

Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, a site where civil rights marchers were brutally beaten by police in March

1965.

U.S. Troops Withdraw from Haiti in Large Numbers American troops are leaving Haiti while the capital city, and much of the surrounding areas, still remains in ruins, according to The Associated Press. The United States’ withdrawal marks the end of Haiti’s most public international aid, even while the city remains in

public international aid, even while the city remains in Courtesy Photo Several billboards in Georgia equate

Courtesy Photo

Several billboards in Georgia equate abortion to genocide in the African-American community.

economic and social peril. According to the report, more than a half-million people are still living in outdoor encampments, which have been made more deplorable with the advent of the rainy season. “I would like for them to stay in Haiti until they rebuild the country and everybody can go back to their house,” Marjorie Louis, a 27-year-old mother of two, told the AP. U.S. officials said the troops’ withdrawal does not indicate lessened commitment to Haiti, but instead marks a change nature of their operation. According to the report, security will be the responsibility of the 10,000-member U.N. peacekeeping brigade and the Haitian police. Some U.S. forces will remain in Haiti, although the exact number has not been released, according to Gen. Douglas Fraser, head of the U.S. Southern Command, which spearheads the relief efforts in Haiti. “Our mission is largely accomplished,” Fraser said.

Anti-Abortion Billboard Draws Fire in Black Community According to a BlackAmericaWeb.com report, a recent billboard campaign promoted by anti- abortion groups in Georgia has raised the eyebrows of many in the African- American community. The advertisement, which likens abortion to “genocide” for Black people, shows the partial face of a crying African-American child. “It’s just another way to limit women’s right to choose,” the Rev. Carlton Veazey, president and chief executive officer of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, told BlackAmericaWeb.com. “Black religious people are very sensitive to the issue of abortion. I’m not pro- abortion, I’m pro-choice and there’s a big difference between the two.” In several towns throughout Georgia, and mostly in Atlanta, the ads have cropped up with the same face of a Black child and the phrase, “Black children are an endangered species.” Black anti-abortion activists claim pro-abortion groups are targeting Black women to keep the numbers of African Americans down, according to the report. The campaign also quotes Alveda King, a niece of slain civil rights icon the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who once said, “The Negro cannot win if he is willing to sell the future of his children for his personal and immediate comfort and safety. Those words are still true today. After all, how can the dream survive if we let them take our children?”

can the dream survive if we let them take our children?” Save money. Reduce power use.
Save money. Reduce power use. DISCOVER 15 TIPS TO LOWER YOUR ENERGY CONSUMPTION…AND CUT YOUR
Save money.
Reduce power use.
DISCOVER 15 TIPS TO LOWER YOUR
ENERGY CONSUMPTION…AND CUT YOUR COSTS.
Be part of a
Maryland that
is Smart, Green
and Growing.
Turn down the temperature of
your water heater to the warm
setting (120 degrees). You’ll save
energy and reduce the risk of scalding.
Pump up your tires; properly inflated
tires improves gas mileage by 3%.
CFLs use 75% less electricity
than incandescents, last up to 10
times longer and can save you up to
$65 over the life of the light bulb.
When not in use, unplug your
gaming system. A game console
left plugged in costs an estimated
$25.73 annually.
You can save up to $115 per year
on gasoline costs by reducing your
miles driven 5% through biking,
taking public transportation, walking
or combining trips.
In top-loading washing
machines, use cold water to
save energy and up to $63 a year.
Detergents formulated for cold
water get clothes just as clean.
Wash only full loads of dishes,
air dry and use cold water if possible.
If washing dishes by hand, do not
leave water running in between piles.
Turning your thermostat back
10%-15% for 8 hours can save as
much as 10% on your energy bill.
Using a programmable thermostat
makes this a user-friendly process.
When not in use, unplug your TV.
A plasma TV left plugged in costs
an estimated $159.76 annually.
Windows account for 10%-25% of
your energy bill. During the summer,
your air conditioner must work
harder to cool hot air from sunny
windows. Use curtains or shades
to give your air conditioner and
energy bill a break.
The average household dedicates
11% of its energy budget to lighting.
Turn off lights when not in use.
Wasted energy is wasted money.
Install a low-flow showerhead to
achieve savings of 25%-60%. Showers
use less hot water than baths.
When not in use, unplug your
laptop. Left plugged in, it costs an
estimated $15.90 annually.
Ceiling and other fans
provide additional cooling and
better circulation so you can raise
the thermostat and cut down on air
conditioning costs.
Save money by setting your
refrigerator temperature to
between 37-40 degrees (F)
and your freezer to between
0-5 degrees (F). Unplugging an
extra fridge or freezer can save
you up to $200 a year.
To find out more visit ENERGY.MARYLAND.GOV
or call 800-72-ENERGY
Martin O’Malley, Governor
Anthony G. Brown, Lt. Governor
Malcolm Woolf, Director, MEA

March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American A3

Black Press Celebration to Feature Civil Rights Heroes Next Week

By Hazel Trice Edney NNPA Editor-in-Chief

WASHINGTON (NNPA) - Black Press Week, the annual celebration of the nearly two centuries-old mission of Black- owned newspapers, will be fueled this year by the fact that the 183-year-old civil rights institution is continuing to plead its own cause even as it honors the achievements of others. “When Mr. Russwurm and Mr. Cornish said, ‘We wish to plead our own cause. For too long have others spoken for us’, they began publishing the very first Black newspaper on March 16, 1827,” said Dorothy R. Leavell, chair of the National Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation, which leads the annual event in Washington, D.C. “It certainly is momentous because 183 years later, with a Black president in the White House, we still have to plead our own cause, as evident in the lack of meaningful outreach to count all African Americans in the United States in the census that’s now being conducted; it’s evident in many of the advertisers in this country who shun us even though we have strong economic impact upon the economy of the United States and the world… And even in this day and time, we are still an afterthought in the mainstream media.” NNPA newspaper publishers, who over the past year have taken stands against what appears to be advertising discrimination in economic stimulus dollars, the automobile industry, the U.S. Census and other industries, will convene in the nation’s capital next week for the annual celebration of “pleading the cause,” a phrase first coined by John B. Russwurm and Samuel Cornish as they founded Freedom’s Journal, the first Black newspaper, in New York City. Among those to be honored during the annual NewsMaker of the Year Awards Gala on March 18 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel are civil and social justice warriors Dr. Dorothy I. Height, chair and president emerita of the National Council of Negro

Courtesy Photo
Courtesy Photo

Dr. Dorothy I. Height, chair and president emerita of the National Council of Negro Women

Women, for her lifetime of civil rights achievements; Dr. Ron Daniels, president of the State of the Black World, 21st Century; Earl and Amanda Stafford of the Stafford Foundation and Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins for their outstanding community service; Rep. Barbara Lee, chair of the

Great Gathering Conference

Methodists Present Black Male Investment Plan

By Zenitha Prince Washington Bureau Chief

COLUMBIA, S.C. — The African Methodist Episcopal, AME Zion and Christian Methodist Episcopal churches presented their plan to address the plight of African- American males on March 3, the last day of their Great Gathering conference. Called the Male Investment Plan (MIP), the initiative’s goal is “to dramatically change the lives of participants by exposing them to the awesome gifts given them by God.” Church leaders say while the concept may not be unique, the combined effort and dedication of the three churches are what will make it successful. “I don’t know that you’re going to see anything different under the sun,” said the Rev. Staccato Powell, chairman of the event. “But what you’re going to see is an intentionality, [which] will cause it to have the kind of traction necessary to propel us forward.” “Before, the churches collectively have never said we’re going to take this issue on and I’m confident that the impact will be synonymous to what we saw with the civil rights movement when the churches got behind that,” he added. Powell and other leaders said the churches decided to work together in light of the barrage of social ills— violence, imprisonment, drug addiction and trade, poor education, joblessness and more—that have befallen Black males, problems they said have persisted for too long. They hope the MIP’s central tool—a Saturday academy—will address those ills. The academies will be located in the three partner churches on a rotating basis. The workshops will teach life skills, career options, self-esteem, anger management and spiritual enhancement, study habits and financial literacy among other lessons. The plan also calls for mentors, the possible involvement of celebrities and other professionals and for relationships with

and other professionals and for relationships with Photo Courtesy Great Gathering The Rev. Dr. Staccato Powell,

Photo Courtesy Great Gathering

The Rev. Dr. Staccato Powell, Great Gathering chairman, left; Bishop George Walker Sr., AME Zion Church; Bishop John Bryant Sr., AME Church and Bishop Thomas Hoyt, Great Gathering host bishop.

organizations such as the Children’s Defense Fund and the nation’s historically Black colleges and universities. The Right Rev. Warren Brown, senior bishop of the AME Zion church, said the plan—which calls for 16 regional centers—will be launched in May and will begin in Washington, D.C., where there are congregations from each church and several HBCUs. The central idea, Bishop Brown said, is to prevent rather than fix problems such as incarceration. “We’ve been doing prison ministry too long…. We’ve got to rewrite our role in this matter so we’re not just going to visit you in prison, we’re going to try to keep you out of prison,” he said to the assembly. “We’ve got to push [an approach] that says [to Black males] we’re not going to lose you rather than we’re going to try and find you.” Joshua Dubois, executive director of White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, praised the Black Methodists for their effort. He attended the event and said while the federal office could not contribute much funding to the effort, it would help in other ways. “One of the things we’re looking at is how outside of financial resources can we help local churches and other

nonprofits—how can we share information, how can we use our convening power to bring them together, how can we attract private resources— that’s some of the things we will be working on with these groups,” he told the AFRO. Bishop Warren said the churches would not go to any organization or government entity with empty hands. Instead, they were hoping to raise $10 million in seed money by asking 1 million members in the three churches to donate $10 each. “We’re not asking you to do for us what we can’t do for ourselves…we’re through with that,” he said. In one sign of that independence and also the bond between the churches the AME Zion Church donated $100,000 each to its sister denominations to

aid in the recovery of their ministries in Haiti. The CME does not have congregations in the Caribbean nation. “They were excited, some were surprised because this was not a common thing to do,” said AMEZ Bishop George Walker of the reaction to the monetary gifts. “But, it was the right thing to do…. This is one gesture that helps to strengthen the ties between us.” That strengthening tie is what will help the MIP yield the desired results, Bishop Brown said. “We are going to leave this place united and committed, and I know it’s going to be a success because all of you here are going to do your part to make it work,” he said. “The world is going to feel the impact of what happens when Black Methodists get together.”

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Identification Statements

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Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) will be awarded for her political leadership; and a posthumous salute will be given to entertainer Michael Jackson. Height, among one of the most important figures in civil rights history, is to receive the lifetime achiever’s award at the NewsMaker dinner. “She is a jewel in our community,” says Leavell, comparing her to famous publishers of old like Frederick Douglas and Ida B. Wells who were counselors to United States presidents. “She is still very vibrant, she is still a warrior and at 97 we are excited that she will grace us with her presence on that evening.” A special State of the Black Press Address by NNPA Chairman Danny Bakewell will be given during a State of the Black Press Luncheon and Forum at the National Press Club, also on March 18. The State of the Black Press event, which will feature Leavell’s response to the Blakewell speech, will also feature civil rights leaders from a broad spectrum of Black institutions to discuss the current mission and future of the Black Press. They are the Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr., Rainbow/PUSH Coalition; Dr. Julianne Malveaux, Bennett College; Dr. Ron Daniels; NAACP Chairman Roslyn Brock; Harry Alford, National Black Chamber of Commerce and Marc Morial, National Urban League. With a new slogan coined by Blakewell, “The Power to Influence Black America,” as its backdrop, publishers will also meet with CBC and other congressional and White House leaders during the three days. The week will culminate March 19 with an annual enshrinement luncheon at Howard University’s Blackburn Center where Dr. Thomas Battle, retired director of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, will be honored. “We’re really excited. We have exciting plans,” says Leavell. “Our voice is still needed. How will our communities know what we are doing educationally and culturally and as entrepreneurs if it were not for the Black Press? In this day and time, it is just as important because otherwise stories about our communities, stories that involve our issues would still not be on the front burner.”

otherwise stories about our communities, stories that involve our issues would still not be on the
otherwise stories about our communities, stories that involve our issues would still not be on the
otherwise stories about our communities, stories that involve our issues would still not be on the

A4

The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

Texting Bans Loom, But Supporters Lack Statistical Evidence

By Ben Giles Maryland Newsline/Capital News Service

COLLEGE PARK - State Sen. Mike Lenett, D-Montgomery, once took his two sons, David and Aaron, to a Baltimore Orioles game. As Lenett and the boys crossed a street on their way from the stadium to a downtown-parking garage, he spotted a woman driving her car and using her cellular phone — she was headed straight for David. The woman sped toward the boy, lost in her phone. At the last possible moment, Lenett grabbed his son and pulled him out of the car’s path. He watched as the woman drove away, oblivious to the accident that almost was. It was 1996, more than a decade before Lenett was elected to the Maryland Senate, but he says the moment stuck with him. It’s one of many stories being told during hearings in support of a handful of bills moving through the General Assembly addressing cell phone issues, most of which focus on texting and driving. But support of new legislation lacks a key element: specific statistics. Maryland State Police officials say there are no records showing exactly how often texting while driving causes car accidents in Maryland. Only general figures and factors on automobile accidents are available.

File Photo
File Photo

Local and state police departments also keep no records of enforcement of the Maryland ban on writing and sending text messages while driving, which went into effect in October. Tom Williams, state police liaison to the General Assembly, said that departments typically don’t keep track of specific traffic infractions. “We’re never going to have good statistics on how well these laws work,” Lenett said. “But we know for certain that this is a frequent offense.”

County’s 2011 Budget Reveals Harsh Reality

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

Prince George’s County Executive Jack Johnson released the budget for fiscal year 2011 on March 3, and as predicted, the numbers were discouraging. The county has gone from a funding peak of $220.8 million on education and public safety in fiscal year 2008 to a deficit of $51 million in 2010. The county is facing a major budget crisis due to the current economic situation and Gov. Martin O’Malley’s reduced funding in Prince George’s will make the situation worse for residents. “We don’t generate the kind of dollars that we need,” said Johnson. “We just cannot raise those funds through taxes, policies or individuals.” Though the governor’s budget has placed Prince George’s in a larger bind, county officials haven’t abandoned hopes of garnering more funding. “We’ve been working with the Montgomery County delegation and some of the other delegations to work on the two issues that we think are paramount,” said Sen. Douglas J.J. Peters (D-Dist. 23). “The first is the disparity grant where we are down $18 million. We have yet to tackle the education money which is a $28 million shortfall, but that’s just because the formulas didn’t go our way this year.

AFRO File Photo
AFRO File Photo
County Executive Jack Johnson
County Executive Jack Johnson

“We’re experiencing some serious cutbacks so we’re hoping we can resolve that and we’re working on that right now.” Peters believes relief will come with the disparity grant, as do many members of the Prince George’s delegation in Annapolis. Despite the decreased funding, county officials still plan to honor their commitment to the school system. Johnson pledged the county would continue to give 62.8 percent of the funding to education, while building new schools, renovating existing educational facilities and improving classroom performance. Though funding for public safety has dwindled as well, officials believe there are enough staff to police the number of residents living in Prince George’s. After the county showed record lows in crime last

year, county leaders are optimistic that 2010 will have similar results. “The one positive thing about the economy is that there’s not a lot of new construction going on,” said Peters. “Residential is flat and therefore the police officers that we’ve hired are close to the ratio of police- to-residents. At this point right now, I think we’re in very good shape.” Those good vibes are shared by Johnson, who believes the county can rebound from its current economic situation. He believes the success of new business and retail opportunities in Prince George’s will bring much- needed jobs and tax revenue. “We have to build our commercial base,” he said. “We have the infrastructure in place now. National Harbor, Brandywine Crossing, University Town Center, East Campus,

Konterra, Woodmore Towne Center and others are coming on line and they’ll begin to generate huge additional dollars for us. “With the commercial starts we’ve had for the last four, five or six years, we will begin to close to the gap.” However, while the economy continues to falter, financial gains for the county will remain static. It’s a frustrating situation for officials, who say there’s little more they can do until the economy improves. “We’re obviously having difficulty meeting the maintenance of effort,” said Peters. “We have to cut in all areas so we’re going to continue to have difficulty funding at the levels we did in the past.” The budget goes before the County Council on March 15. The Council has until June 1 to approve the plan.

Barry, Fenty

Continued from A1

that goes with the territory.” In a March 5 statement from his office, Ward 5 Councilman Harry Thomas announced that the Council has retained Robert Trout of the law firm Trout Cacheris PLLC to head up an inquiry into the mayor’s dealings. The councilman was not available for comment by AFRO press time. Fenty reportedly set aside contracts for at least two close friends with whom he either attended Howard University or were members of his fraternity. According to the Post, one friend in particular had been running a failed dry cleaning business during the time Fenty served as a representative on the Council. The friend did a lot

“[Barry’s] been part of the media circus for forever. As far as Barry’s concerned, that goes with the territory.”

of stumping for Fenty during his mayoral campaign, going door to door in his efforts to help get him the mayor’s seat. Then, after Fenty assumed the city’s helm, that friend and others suddenly began to prosper in their businesses after being awarded top- dollar contracts for parks and recreation projects. Meanwhile, Barry and his supporters have called the Council’s reprimand and the report that prompted it both wrong and downright unfair. Barry said the 104-page Bennett report was totally wrong in its assessment of him, and equated it to a witch

hunt to remove him from the Council on which he has served for more than 30 years. During last week’s 12 -0 censure, Barry, 73, was stripped of his chairmanship of the Committee on Housing and Workforce Development and has been relegated to little more than a side seat on the 13-member Council. At-large Councilman Michael Brown will now oversee that committee which has an annual budget of

$350,000.

The report spearheaded by special counsel Robert Bennett accuses Barry of side-stepping ethics rules and details at length

his romantic involvement with Donna Watts-Brighthaupt, a 40-something divorcee, with whom he negotiated the $15,000 personal services contract. Following release of the report – which also highlighted other Council members’ spending – Barry offered a profuse apology to the Council and his constituency, saying he used poor judgment in his dealings with Watts-Brighthaupt. “I feel that I didn’t get a fair deal, a fair shake,” Barry said. “The report itself was not written in [a] normal investigatory [format].

Until such records are available, there’s no telling what affect the laws are having on drivers. What is known is that nearly 6,000 people were killed in

accidents caused by distracted drivers in the United States in 2008, according to National Highway Traffic Safety data. Another 515,000 were injured.

In Maryland, there were 35 fatalities and 11,636 injuries

caused by distracted drivers in 2008, according the Maryland State Highway Administration. The Maryland texting ban, passed during the 2009 General

Assembly, was the first of its kind in the state. It prohibits writing and sending text messages while driving, but allows drivers to read text messages they receive. Maryland is now one of 19 states that have passed some form of a texting ban, according to the governor’s Highway Safety Administration.

A study conducted at the University of Utah Applied

Cognition Laboratory found that a driver’s reaction to traffic while texting is comparable to a drunk driver’s. For 98 percent of the population, the likelihood of a crash increases fourfold while texting. Studies such as this, coupled with stories of deaths caused by distracted drivers, make an emotional case for legislation completely banning texting while driving. The Maryland bill that passed in 2009 was stripped down in the House of Delegates to only ban sending messages. It was originally a more comprehensive ban that would have prohibited all forms of texting. According to John Townsend III, spokesman for AAA Mid- Atlantic, removing the full ban from the bill was a mistake. “The landscape is changing so quickly,” Townsend said. “I think that the legislation has yet to keep up with where people are.” House Bill 192, co-sponsored this year by Del. James Malone Jr., D-Baltimore County, and Del. Wade Kach, R-Baltimore County, would close the loophole in the law. Speaking in support of the bill, AAA argued that the bill is a

“In Maryland, there were 35 fatalities and 11,636 injuries caused by distracted drivers in 2008, according the Maryland State Highway Administration.”

strong clarification of the current law. Texting while driving, AAA wrote, “has become one of the most common, visible and dangerous forms of districted driving behavior.” Yet AAA added, “There is no specific data on how many

messages are typed or read by drivers, or how often the activity leads to collisions.” Elena Russo, Maryland State Police director of communications, said the state police don’t keep either record. Accident reports show only scattered and inconsistent notes that could point to texting as the cause of an accident.

If an officer is able to discern that texting was a factor, it is

listed in the contributing circumstances category, she said. Officials with police departments in Montgomery, Anne Arundel and Prince George’s counties also said they do not keep track of the number of texting violations. A spokesman for Prince George’s said his department has no plans to start keeping track. While local police officials would not speculate as to why no statistics are kept, Kach said he’s heard firsthand from police

officers just how difficult the texting ban is to enforce. It’s easy for a driver to either hide his phone or lie about whether or not he was texting or reading a message. Lenett is also skeptical of how well supporting data can be collected. But Lenett, who’s co-sponsoring a bill in the Senate to prohibit all uses of a cell phone while driving, said a lack of data is not enough of a reason to dismiss a law. He and Kach say it’s common sense that texting is a dangerous problem, and that a law should be passed to enforce safer driving habits.

A great majority of the public will obey the law if it’s

passed, Lenett said, regardless of whether they think it’s fair. At least one study suggests that drivers may not be obeying new traffic laws.

A new study by the Highway Loss Data Institute examining

insurance claims in New York, Connecticut, California and the District of Columbia found that accident rates were unaffected by the passage of texting bans.

That report was accusatory, inflammatory and made to make things look like they weren’t.” Howard University radio host Harold Fisher, who once worked for Barry, featured him as a guest on his “Daily Drum” talk show following the Council’s censure. Fisher said that based on phone calls to the March 3 show, Barry’s constituents still support the beleaguered lawmaker. ”Marion Barry is and remains extremely popular,” Fisher told the AFRO. “That is not a secret and I think that people know that very well.” According to Fisher, residents of Ward 8 know about the man, and they know about his history. “There are many people

who are products of his summer youth employment initiative,” Fisher said. “Those people are grown now, in their 30s and 40s and they’ve benefitted in some way. So when you start getting down into the minutiae of Council protocol, I don’t think that they care about that.” Nevertheless, Addie Cooke, president of the Fort Stanton Civic Association, said investigations of both Barry and Fenty have shed a negative light on the city. “Especially for its African- American residents,” she said, “because we worked hard [to get them to the top]. Now it seems that morals have just gone out the window – there doesn’t seem to be anything that’s above the law.”

March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American A5

Howard Students Raise Money to Help Others

Special to the AFRO from Howard University

Scores of Howard University students took to the streets and local celebrities lent their support at WHUR 96.3 radio during a 12-hour radiothon to raise money to finance the students’Alternative Spring Break of helping others in cities across America. The students raised $25,350 to fund their efforts in Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, New Orleans and Washington to help children struggling with gangs and gun violence, adults and teens who don’t know how to read and a city still trying to recover from a hurricane. Beginning at 6 a.m. on March 7, students lined Georgia Avenue and Bryant Street and Bryant and Fourth Street asking for donations. Meanwhile, the radio station invited donors to call in or to donate online at http://www.

howard.edu/asb/2010/.

Two of the donors were Prince George’s County Executive Jack B. Johnson and his wife, Leslie E. Johnson, both graduates of Howard University School of Law. “I’m here because I believe everybody should donate some part of their life to serving others,” said Leslie Johnson, who went on air to ask others to follow her example. “Service is part of the legacy at Howard, and if I can lend a hand to their effort, then I’m happy to do that.” The Rt. Rev. Vashti Murphy McKenzie, the first female bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church and national chaplain of

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, also stopped by the station to ask others to support the campaign. Andre Cooper, 21, of Fort Worth, Texas, was one of the many students who collected money. “I was getting a lot of support,” he said. “It was nice. It’s a nice feeling to ne able to help others, and it felt good to see the people’s willingness to help.” Vogue Lee-McWilliams, 19, of Atlanta, collected money on Bryant and Fourth streets. “I was only there for a few minutes before people started giving me money,” said Lee-McWilliams, a marketing major. “The weather is nice, and everybody has their windows down. That makes it easier. As soon as people find out what it’s for, they want to donate.” This year, nearly 300 Howard students will be working from March 14-19 on youth development in Atlanta and Washington; gun violence

in Chicago; literacy in Detroit and environmental concerns in New Orleans. Monique Rochon, 20, of Bloomfield, Ind., is the site coordinator for New Orleans this year. She volunteered in the city last year, but hopes to make a greater impact in

2010.

“For me, ASB [Alternative Spring Break] epitomizes striving to make a difference,” said Rochon, who works to plan every aspect of the trip to the Big Easy. “It is a week of service where concepts of social welfare and community outreach are

explored through various work projects.”

This year, the more than

80 students going to New

Orleans will concentrate on improving the environment. They will plant tress, secure the coastline and clean up the city park. Another 40 students from the School of

Law will help the city with its backlog of criminal and civil cases. San Diego native Christina Smith will be in Chicago this year and remembers the moment she realized the importance of aiding others during spring break rather than sunbathing at the beach back home. Her moment of revelation came while working with youths in Chicago last year. “One of the students told me how his aunt owned

a store in his neighborhood,

but it was too dangerous for him to walk to the store and visit her,” Smith, 20, recalled. “Other kids told us how they had to walk the long way back and forth to school because some areas on the way were too dangerous. And everybody could tell

you a story about a friend or someone from their family who had been killed.” Sheena Hall, 20, of Richmond, Ind., is the site coordinator for Chicago. The former high school

prom queen and cheerleader

is responsible for housing,

feeding the students, coordinating transportation to and from Chicago and planning the week’s activities. “It’s a lot of work, but it’s

worth it,” she said. “Last year,

33 public school children

were murdered. That’s crazy.

33 public school children were murdered. That’s crazy. Howard University students lined Georgia Avenue at Bryant
Howard University students lined Georgia Avenue at Bryant Street to collect money.
Howard University students lined Georgia
Avenue at Bryant Street to collect money.

We all want to help.” Hall will be working with the Rev. Michael Louis, an

activist Chicago Catholic priest who is known for working a number of causes, including drugs, economic disparities and gun violence. In Detroit, Denys Symonette will tackle literacy issues, but sees her journey to the Midwest city — which

Erica Lindsay, left, student coordinator for the five-city Howard University Alternative Spring Break, helps other
Erica Lindsay, left, student
coordinator for the five-city
Howard University Alternative
Spring Break, helps other
students collect money
during the students’ 12-hour
WHUR 96.3 radiothon to raise
money to help pay for the
event. Nearly 300 students
will be working in Atlanta,
Chicago, Detroit, New Orleans
and Washington during
their spring break to help
others. They will work on a
variety of issues, including
youth development, coastal
and forest restoration, gun
violence and literacy.
Photos by Justin D. Knight/Howard University

coordinator in Atlanta this year. The nearly 100 students there will be working with the new mayor, Howard alum Kasim Reed, to help clean up the city and to work with youth. “For all of us, this is personal,” Lindsay, 20, said. “It’s because we care. But it’s also part of the tradition of service at Howard.”

has been hit particularly hard by the recession — as more of a spiritual calling. “For me, this is part of my spiritual journey, part of my faith as a Christian,” Symonette said. “If you’re a Christian, you help people.” Overseeing all of the operations is Erica Jai Lindsay, a Chicago native who also will be site

is Erica Jai Lindsay, a Chicago native who also will be site Greater Washington Urban League

Greater Washington Urban League

38th Annual Whitney M. Young Jr. Memorial Gala March 17

2 0 2 - 2 6 5 - 8 2 0 0

Honorees Chuck Brown

Virginia & Ben Ali

James Brown

Clark Construction Group, LLC

Performances By

Northeast Groovers Chelsey Alyse Green Christylez Bacon

Keynote Speaker

Marc H. Morial

President National Urban League

M E M O R I A L G A L A D I N
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March 17, 2010
Volume 5
www.gwul.org

A6

The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

District Tax Office on Standby to Help Filers

By Dorothy Rowley AFRO Staff Writer

With the tax filing season in full swing, things can become quite hectic for the 300,000 taxpayers expected to complete a return this year with the District Office of Tax and Revenue (OTR). And, rushing to get the job done in anticipation of a timely refund can result in a variety of unnecessary and costly mistakes, officials said. Among them: failure to sign forms, not double checking math computations, entering incomplete or incorrect Social Security numbers and forgetting to attach W-2 statements that show District withholdings, according to a spokeswoman for the District’s Office of Tax and Revenue. “We are encouraging taxpayers to file their return electronically, and that if they’re getting a refund to have it deposited directly into their account,—or they can go online and pay if they owe anything,” said OTR spokeswoman Natalie Wilson. “It’s a faster and more efficient. If they’re due a refund they’ll get it in a few days as opposed to weeks if they file a paper return.” But Wilson is also cautioning taxpayers to be aware of unscrupulous tax preparers. “There are tax preparers that claim they can get you a really large refund and that’s not necessarily true,” said Wilson. “Once you sign, you are saying that the information on your return is true and correct, so be careful as you select a tax preparer.” The District is on standby to help filers as well. There is no

cost to taxpayers, however, they must have already completed filing for their federal return. OTR is also encouraging taxpayers to take advantage of the Earned Income Tax Credit. “In the District, if they qualify for EIC, they can get up to 40 percent of the credit and that could be worth up to $2,200, depending on your filing status and your family size,” Wilson said.

The office announced recently that it has extended the 2010 electronic W-2 filing deadline to March 15. Otherwise, the due date for all returns is April 15. Among individuals required to file are those who were lived in the District last year and were required to file a federal tax return and people who lived in the city 183 days or more during the taxable year, even if their permanent residence was outside the District. Forms can be downloaded or obtained at several locations around the city, including the OTR building on North Capitol Street. Additionally, people who anticipate they will need more time to file their return can request an extension by using of time Form FR-127. That request must be submitted on or before April 15. Taxpayers also have three years from the due date of the return to file for a refund. H& R Block, one of several tax filing businesses in the

H& R Block, one of several tax filing businesses in the District, serves about 20,000 clients

District, serves about 20,000 clients each season. Rick Carter, a local district manager, said tax time is usually laden with stress as people scurry about gathering information needed to complete their filings. “This year is not much different than any other time,” said Rick Carter, local district manager. “Of course, the recession and snow storms certainly set

everybody back, causing many people to get shut in their houses for a week so. But they’re pretty much caught up now.” Carter added that when it comes to tax deductions, his businesses are seeing many responses because of the $8,000 first-time homebuyer credits. “D.C.’s always had it, but we’ve seen a lot more people take advantage of that,” he said.

Gay Couples Marry

Continued from A1

late last year, and after its enactment on March 3, employees in the District of Columbia Superior Court’s room 4485 began processing license applications. In doing so, an historic milestone was struck for members of the local gay and lesbian community. “I’m very pleased and very excited for all the couples who have been married, and I wish them all the best,” said At-large Councilman David Catania, who introduced the District’s gay marriage legislation. Catania is one of two gay members of the City Council. The other is Ward 1 representative Jim Graham. “This is a great step forward in [the city’s] progress,” Catania continued. Graham was present at the three ceremonies held Tuesday at the Human Rights Campaign headquarters building in downtown Washington. The weddings

attracted some 100 onlookers and another gay couple reportedly said their vows at the courthouse. Graham said that as a whole, the three separate events he witnessed were among the most uplifting experiences he’s encountered. “To have seen the expressions of commitment and love was very heartwarming,” he said. Graham said however, that he has a lot of respect for places that are still grappling with legalizing gay marriages. “I think we’re just going to have to adopt a live-and- let-live attitude on that,” he said. “Let’s celebrate our differences but find common ground as we continue getting things done in the city.” So far, more than 150 gay couples have paid the $35 fee and lined up for marriage licenses. They have to wait three days from the issuance of their license to exchange vows.

Health Care Advocates

Continued from A1 we needed to send a message to the insurance companies that we’re fed up of them raising premiums and denying us health care when we need it most.” Meanwhile, the Nationwide Tea Party Coalition had begun its offensive on Capitol Hill called “Take the Town Halls to Washington.” The tea party activists plan to question and review the positions of approximately 50 House Democrats, whose vote on the pending health care legislation has not yet been announced publically. “President Obama has indicated his willingness to ignore the people and force his bill through Congress using whatever means necessary,” spokesman Mark A. Skoda, also chairman of the Memphis Tea Party, said in a press release. “Our objective is to bring thousands of constituents to D.C. to meet with their representatives, capture their comments and produce a review of those positions on a daily basis.” Organizer Michael Patrick Leahy said their opposition to the bill reflects the will of the American people. “After more than a year of tea party resistance to the big government efforts of the Obama administration, it all comes down to the next three weeks,” he stated. “The administration has made it clear. They intend to ram down the health care takeover through a corrupt Congress by the end of this month, in direct defiance of the clearly expressed will of the American people.” Shechner said she was not aware of the concurrent initiative by the tea party activists, nor was she really concerned. “I’m really not interested about what rallying is going on around misinformed people; I’d rather pay attention to people that need health care reform,” she said. And, despite what her opponents say, she added, most Americans want health care reform. “They may oppose the bill in name because there’s been so much misinformation spread about it, but when you talk to people about what’s actually in the bill, these are things that they actually want.” Hilary Shelton, vice president of advocacy of the NAACP and speaker at the March 9 rally, said adversaries of health care reform are hiding from the facts. “The NAACP is convinced that our health care system is not only fractured, but it is broken,” he said. Over 46 million Americans lack healthcare insurance, he cited, and those who have it find themselves underinsured and at the mercy of changing rates among other problems. Shelton said the tea party campaigners—and anyone else who would deny reform in the face of these truths—are unpatriotic. “If their strategy—going into the Easter recess of all times— is to do what they did during the August recess, which is to prevent the Democratic process of us discussing what is in the best interest of ‘we the people,’ then indeed they’re proving to be one of the most un-American forces we’ve seen since this issue was raised.”

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March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American A7

Wells Fargo Touts Commitment to Blacks

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

In advance of its merger with Wachovia, Wells Fargo is re-affirming its commitment to African Americans by kicking off its National African American Media Tour in Washington, D.C., during Black Press Week, March

17-19.

“The goal of the event is really to start to talk about Wells Fargo and the work we’re doing to help African Americans succeed financially,” said Michelle Thornhill, senior vice president and African- American segment manager at Wells Fargo. “We believe by having a conversation with journalists creates an opportunity for us to continue to build our relationship

with the African-American community and talk about Wells Fargo as we transition into the Wachovia brand.” That transition will be critical to Wells Fargo nationally. Wachovia has 408 branches in the Mid-Atlantic region alone, the company is excited about the possibilities the merger brings. “The opportunity we have is to leverage Wachovia’s brand equities and positive attributes it brings to the table,” Thornhill said. “Carry that with what Wells Fargo is already doing, even though our African-American footprint is much smaller.” Current “CSI-New York” star Hill Harper will be the guest speaker during the event’s March 15 media luncheon. Harper has written three motivational books and

luncheon. Harper has written three motivational books and Courtesy Image Wells Fargo hopes its merger with

Courtesy Image

Wells Fargo hopes its merger with Wachovia will improve business relationships with African Americans.

participates in the United Negro College Fund’s “Empower Me” tour sponsored by Wells Fargo. The firm could have chosen many financial experts to be the guest speaker for the event, but believes

Harper fits the role perfectly, since financial empowerment among African Americans is among many of his platforms. “He understands the importance of financial empowerment for African Americans and really the theme for the tour is how Wells Fargo is committed to

helping African Americans succeed financially,” said Thornhill. At the March 15 event, he and Harper will be joined by Pete Jones, regional president for Wells Fargo Mid-Atlantic; Georgette Dixon

, senior vice president and director of Wells Fargo’s national partnerships and Brenda Ross-Dulan, regional president for the Southern New Jersey market and national spokeswoman for Wells Fargo’s African American Business Services program. With the company trying

Non-Profit Groups Join the Census Fight

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

Census Bureau officials are working towards 100 percent participation in the 2010 census and they’re seeking help from myriad and innovative sources—including the non-profit sector. “It is really important that we get the word out any way we can,” said Cheryl Harrington, head of Prince George’s Complete Count Committee. “We need to make sure we exhaust all of our resources.” Two of the county’s partners are the Training Source, a non-profit that provides training and job placement for unemployed Prince George’s residents, and Casa de Maryland, a non-profit group that provides various services to the Hispanic population throughout Maryland. Evelyn Kim Rhim, the founder and executive director of the Training Source, said she is excited to have her organization involved in this year’s census as she recognizes the importance of the process. In addition to helping people find jobs as census enumerators, the Training Source is also educating the public on the merits of the census, primarily in hard-to-count communities. “We’re working to make sure there is a complete count in inner beltway communities like Seat Pleasant, Capitol Heights

beltway communities like Seat Pleasant, Capitol Heights and Suitland,” said Rhim. “We actually go into four

and Suitland,” said Rhim. “We actually go into four homeless shelters a week in Prince George’s County to make sure they know.” Already, Rhim is noticing that there are many residents who are ignorant to what the census entails. She’s glad that groups like hers are there to be a part of the process. “Once I educate people on [the census] I see light bulbs going off,” she said. “This is not an invasion of privacy. This is not telling all your business. It’s expressing what I need so that resources come to my family and my community.” That hasn’t necessarily been the case for the county’s Hispanic population. Tania Del Angel, spokeswoman of Casa de Maryland, believes there’s still rampant mistrust of the process in immigrant communities. “People are concerned about the government having their information,” said Del Angel. “They are also angry about the lack of progress on immigration reform and are not enthusiastic about helping.” Those are reasons why Casa de Maryland will be going door-to-door until April 1 to dispel those myths about the decennial survey. They’ll not only be in Prince George’s County, but in Baltimore City and Montgomery County as well. “Our message to the community is that census is very important because it affects the numbers of seats your state

Census Myths

Continued from A1

census,” Hilary Shelton said. “But it is important for the African-American community to know that the information they provide, by law, cannot be distributed to any other government agency.” For instance, if a person is worried about not having paid taxes, the Census cannot share that information with the IRS, Shelton said. If a person is worried about outstanding arrest warrants or any other personal information, the Census is restricted from sharing that as well. However, legitimate Census workers will carry easily recognizable official identification cards to help differentiate them from tricksters. They will only visit those households that have not responded by April 1. Cook added that because scams may exist, it’s even more important to make the public aware of his agency’s operations. “Our job is to constantly promote the census and educate people about what our processes are, so that they’re armed with that information,” Cook said. “If somebody tries to do something above and beyond what we normally would do, they can determine that it’s not us.” Cook said forms received in the mail contain “the real [census] information” and that if residents receive “something questionable” they can go online at the Census Bureau (2010Census. gov) and see exactly what the form looks like.

(2010Census. gov) and see exactly what the form looks like. Photo by Dorothy Rowley Census officials

Photo by Dorothy Rowley

Census officials say the form residents will begin receiving on March 15 will ask for statistical data that, by law, cannot be shared with other government agencies.

Additionally, there’s a census road tour, he said. “And residents can go to our Web site and see where our vehicles are located and where they’re traveling,” Cook said of the host of interactive kiosks that will be posted at locations across the country. “Residents can visit them to see the rationale behind why questions on the form are being asked.” He also said that many immigrants, such as those from the Caribbean, are

accustomed to population counts that are completed by someone knocking at their door. “In 2000, there were numbers of folks in highly- urbanized areas like New York City who filled out their forms but were waiting for people to come knock on their doors,” Cook said. “So we’re trying to educate people that in the United States, our Census is a mail-out, mail- back program.” Meanwhile, myths

continue to surround the census. They include that information will be given to the immigration and naturalization service, and that the forms are too long and ask too many personal questions. In reality, the agency is only interested in statistical information that also takes into account housing and social economic data. Also, the form has just 10 questions that take just 10 minutes to complete. Others believe filling the census form is optional. But according to the Census Bureau, United States code requires persons receiving a form to fill it out truthfully and return it. The code also stipulates penalties for failing to do so. The way Sylvia Ballinger, a Census coordinator for the District of Columbia, sees it, “The 2010 census isn’t about myths.” She told the AFRO that over the next several weeks the thrust is about residents’ participation. “This week every household received an advance letter, because we found through our research that these letters increase the participation,” Ballinger said. “It’s important to know that about $85 million is saved for every 1 percent in the mail participation rate, therefore we’re asking that when people get their questionnaire, that they simply take the 10 minutes answer the 10 questions and mail it back.”

to maintain a solid presence in the region, Wells Fargo

said choosing the District as

a starting point was natural to

the company. “Our goal is to serve all of our customers regardless of their income,” said Thornhill. “We certainly recognize that when you look at the D.C. area, there are a significant number of affluent African Americans and we are positioned to be able to meet their financial needs as well.” Wells Fargo said it understands the need to get information about its company out to as many people as possible. With a focus on minority segments of business, the firm believes holding the event during Black Press Week will help inform consumers about Wells

Fargo’s products and services. One of the programs

Wells Fargo looks forward to advertising is the African-American Business Services Program. With President Obama focusing on strengthening small businesses, Wells Fargo is hoping this program sets it apart from other financial firms. “It’s really focused on helping African-American businesses in terms of providing tools and resources,” said Thornhill. “More importantly, it’s really to access the capital. Ten years ago we had a $1 billion lending goal put into place and we met that goal two years ahead of plan. We‘ve set a goal to lend another $1 billion by 2018.”

We‘ve set a goal to lend another $1 billion by 2018.” Courtesy Photo Evelyn Kim Rhim,

Courtesy Photo

Evelyn Kim Rhim, head of the Training Source, said she is being proactive in educating the public on the census.

occupies in the U.S. House of Representatives,” she said. “In fact, the information the census collects helps to determine how more than $400 billion of federal funding each year is spent on infrastructure and services like hospitals, job training centers, schools, senior centers, other public works projects and emergency services.” Rhim said she is taking an aggressive approach to educating the public, though. Her organization will be canvassing communities and that approach, she said, will garner the best count possible in her target areas. “I’m being so strong in my encouragement that the enumerators should never have to contact the people I touch,” she said. “My people will have already sent their forms in.” Despite her confidence, Rhim does recognize there will be challenges. “What I’m concerned about is those we can’t reach,” she said. “I’m concerned about those who won’t read their mail or, as a matter of fact, will throw it in the trash. Then when the enumerator shows up, they won’t open the door because it’s a stranger.” Whatever the concerns or challenges may be, the message

is universal for both groups: The more people who participate,

the more assistance people receive. “There’s strength in power and power in numbers,” said Rhim. “You want to be included to make sure you get the resources you need.”

Be counted for the good of your community.

Complete the Census and mail it back.
Complete
the Census
and mail it
back.

IT’S IN OUR HANDS!

A8

The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

Commentary

I Am Empowered – Are You?

2010 - March 19, 2010 Commentary I Am Empowered – Are You? Marc Morial (NNPA) -

Marc Morial

(NNPA) - “I pledge to responsibly commit my time and talent to ensure that the nation is empowered to eliminate racial gaps and disparities in housing, education, employment and healthcare by

2025…”

Last week, the National Urban League officially kicked off its centennial celebration and takes its century-long fight for equal opportunity and empowerment to the next level. The centerpiece of our celebration is a bold, new social mobilization campaign which we are calling I AM EMPOWERED. We have also launched a new, interactive Web site, www.iamempowered.com, which asks citizens across the country to join us in a pledge of time and talent to achieve four empowerment goals by 2025:

Education: Every child is ready for college, work and life. Jobs: Every American has access to jobs with a living wage and

good benefits. Housing: Every American lives in safe, decent, affordable, energy-efficient housing on fair terms. Health care: Every American has access to quality and affordable health care solutions. Individuals can also text EMPOWER to 69866 or download the IAE mobile application, available at the Apple App Store, Android Market and coming soon, the Blackberry App World to take the pledge. This important campaign reminds us of the power of the individual to become a force for change by galvanizing collective action to uplift entire cities and communities.

“The National Urban League has come a long way since it was founded in 1910 to assist African Americans moving North to flee economic, social and political oppression in the South.”

But that’s not all. The new Web site will be a social mobilization platform that connects, engages and serves the National Urban League’s growing community of constituents and partners like never before. The I AM EMPOWERED Social Mobilization Platform uses 21st century technology to unite people from all walks of life with the Urban League, its affiliates, coalition of supporters and one another in one location. Members can access information, services and share ideas to advance the cause of equality 24-hours a day, seven days a week in real time, on line. The I AM EMPOWERED cyber community harnesses all social media vehicles, including Facebook and Twitter, to let members customize their experience, create profiles and sub- groups, advocate on issues and upload and share videos, content and information with others. Members can also obtain assistance in the areas of homeownership and entrepreneurship through an ever-expanding set of tool boxes and other guided experiences. The online and

of tool boxes and other guided experiences. The online and mobile platforms also connect the Urban

mobile platforms also connect the Urban League and its family of nearly 100 affiliates in one continuous community for the first time. I AM EMPOWERED has the support of an honorary centennial committee whose members include former President Bill Clinton, Bill Cosby, Condoleezza Rice, Quincy Jones, Dorothy Height, Magic Johnson, Iman, Muhammad Ali, Colin Powell, Linda Johnson Rice and Spike Lee. The National Urban League has come a long way since it was founded in 1910 to assist African Americans moving North to flee economic, social and political oppression in the South. We have been at the forefront of every major achievement of the freedom movement – from the abolishment of Jim Crow to the election of the nation’s first Black president. And, with the persistence of inequality in health care, jobs, education and housing, it is clear, our work is not yet done. I urge you to become a part of our 21st century movement for change by taking the I AM EMPOWERED pledge and joining our new online community. I am empowered —are you?

Marc Morial is president and CEO of the National Urban League.

Letters to the Editor

General Assembly Changes have Strange Results I’ve been incarcerated for 37 years, during which I’ve graduated from eight different college curriculums, and devoted over a quarter of a century to various tutoring, teacher’s aide and clerical positions in correctional education in prisons throughout Maryland. Never have I seen more bizarre education policies than these that resulted from good intentions gone awry. Gov. Martin O’Malley proposed, during the 2009 General Assembly, that all correctional education programs be moved from the Department of Education (DOE) to the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation (DLLR). The stated purpose was to change the focus of prisoner education from academic learning to vocational training; the goal was to generate better coordination between prisoner education programs and prisoner employability upon release. The General Assembly agreed to make the statutory change. However, neither the DOE nor the DLLR believed the bill would pass, and the change has been nothing but a disaster for prisoner education programs, as DLLR has neither funding nor budget appropriations for maintenance of even the minimal programs previously offered by DOE. Adding insult to injury, DLLR just announced that all prisoner graduates of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Program (the equivalent of the old Eighth Grade Certificate) will not receive certificates for their accomplishment. The reason cited was the (pennies of) “expense” necessary to put a seal on these certificates. Instead, DLLR will notify prisoners they

graduated to high school level, but prisoners will not be given proof they passed the eighth- grade level. And how is this supposed to help prisoners obtain jobs, the very purpose for which the correctional education programs were transferred to DLLR? Recently released felons can’t go to an employer and expect employers to accept their word they earned an Adult Literacy and Life Skills (eighth grade) certificate they can’t produce. And what kind of support, for correctional education that allegedly focuses on job skills training, does this message send to prisoners? Next we’ll hear the piece of paper that certifies a high school diploma is too expensive to award graduates. As for employers, they’ll quickly perceive the mockery that DLLR policies are making of prisoner education. Douglas Scott Arey Jessup, Md.

Helping Hands

I want to bring to the attention of the public the contributions the following groups and organizations have made in recent months to the advancement and empowerment of local and national communities. They have quietly joined forces without seeking recognition:

• The East Indian Community of Central Maryland

• The Asian Community of Central Maryland

• Morgan State University Alumni

Association of Maryland and Washington, D.C.

• Delta Sigma Theta Sorority (an

international African-American sorority of college-educated women, whose ideals are embodied in my role model at Morgan State, Laura Phillips Byrd, scion of John H. Murphy

Sr., founder of the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. Afro-American newspapers. Without the involvement of this united front, the obstructionist policies of certain national leaders would have impeded the progress of the agenda put forth by representatives of the federal government. Caroline Ava Harcum Columbia, Md.

More Timothy McVeighs in The Making As a former [member of the] military, I sadly watched the Bush administration slowly destroy the active military force (mainly the Army) and the reserve components. I supported Secretary [Robert] Gates to retain his job under the Obama administration because during his short tenure under Bush, he demonstrated that he was going to “clean up” the mess and cronyism created by Rumsfeld and return creditability to the Defense Department (Pentagon). Currently, his major problem is not “don’t ask don’t tell,” but the right-wing extremists that were allowed to enter the military when standards were lowered by the Bush administration. While we see the “patriot” groups and “militias” being fueled by FOX News, tea parties, talk radio hosts Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin, Rep. [Michele] Bachmann and others with their antigovernment conspiracies outside the military, the Oath Keepers group is recruiting men and women in the military to resist the Obama administration. Have Republican elected members and military personnel been exempted from treason? Will Congress, the Justice Department, the FBI, the DHS (Department of Homeland Security) and the Southern Poverty Law Center monitor and investigate these groups and their activities? The Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) held last month clearly reflects that the

GOP has a very small tent.

Walt Hill

Petersburg, Va.

Under Attack or Just Plain Wrong It’s been so long ago, I hope I remember the right story. Legend has it when Adam Clayton Powell was charged with wrongdoing in Congress, he leaned back, lit one of his famous long cigars and, basically, said to his accusers that they were guilty of what they said he had done, implying racism was the root of what occurred. William Jefferson Clay, he of the cold cash in his freezer, basically hid behind the veil of racism until the truth, not only hurt, but didn’t set him free. Now, Charles Rangel, with the help of the House speaker and the Congressional Black Caucus, held on until it was evident that he needed to face the charges against him. Look to Washington, D.C., where Marion Barry and Baltimore, where Sheila Dixon, fell from grace, and wonder what’s going on. Unless there is a hidden conspiracy from the Klan or the White Citizens Council, then, the transparency promised by the Obama administration is alive and well. Consider that others, not of color, have been exposed and ousted, then, be glad the system works. It is necessary to revive the Jackie Robinson Syndrome to remind those in positions of power, especially those elected, that, although it may not be right that we have to be better than the rest to be effective, but, also, good that we are. It shows the critics, some (many?) who still dislike us because of ancestry that we have the integrity to succeed, regardless. It also, reminds those that election is not an anointing and, just because you look like us gives you no license to do as you please.

McNair Taylor

Baltimore, Md.

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March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American A9

Opinion

Census 2010: All Americans Need To Be Counted

A9 Opinion Census 2010: All Americans Need To Be Counted Sen. Benjamin Cardin Census Day comes

Sen. Benjamin Cardin

Census Day comes only once every 10 years and it’s one of the most important days of the decade. That’s because it’s when everyone in our nation is counted. In addition to telling us about ourselves, the results ensure fair representation in Congress and the amount of funding that states will

receive for a multitude of critical services, including money for schools, roads and hospitals. The 2010 census will have a profound impact on Maryland. The federal government distributes more than $400 billion to state governments every year,

and an accurate count of all Marylanders could result in more than $57 billion for our state over the next decade – money that we depend on to ensure our citizens have the health care, education and other services they need. April 1 is Census Day 2010 and it’s critical that all Marylanders participate. Maryland has approximately

5.7 million residents,

according to the Census Bureau’s 2009 population estimate. If all Marylanders

are counted, that translates into more than $5.7 billon a year for our state’s treasury. That money will help us balance budgets and provide essential services that are needed. There is no excuse for anyone not to participate. Your answers will be kept

million American households will receive a census form. You will be asked to mail it back on April 1. If you fail to do so, Census workers will be visiting households to contact residents to ensure the most accurate count possible. In addition to being used to calculate funding for

impact our democracy, but

it will also create jobs for

Americans. The Census Bureau is expected to hire approximately 1.4 million temporary workers to reach

people who have failed to mail back their census form. If you are interested in getting

a job with the U.S. Census

“The form has been reduced to just 10 questions that should take no more than 10 minutes.”

strictly confidential and this year the process is easier than ever. The form has been reduced to just 10 questions that should take no more than 10 minutes. In fact, The U.S. Census Bureau is using the slogan “10 questions –10 minutes” to get the point across. Around March 15, 130

states, the census is used to apportion representation in Congress. The U.S. Constitution states that there are to be 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and that census data is to be used every 10 years to reapportion representation based on population. Not only will the census

Bureau, please visit their Web site at www.2010censusjobs. gov or you can call 1-866- 861-2010, FedRelay: 1-800- 877-8339 TTY. It is hard to imagine that our founding fathers Thomas Jefferson and James Madison – two of the biggest supporters of a census – could have envisioned the

importance it would have

more than 200 years later. Their idea of a census has made our democracy stronger and more representative, but it also has provided us with important information that will help us plan for the future needs of our citizens.

This year, April 1 is Census Day 2010, and I urge every Marylander to participate. Remember, democracy works best when everyone is counted.

Sen. Benjamin Cardin is a member of five Senate committees: Foreign Relations, Judiciary, Environment and Public Works, Budget, and Small Business and Entrepreneurship. His Web site is: cardin.senate.gov. He also can be found at YouTube.com/ SenatorCardin.

Weighing the Promise of Healthcare and Finding It Wanting

Weighing the Promise of Healthcare and Finding It Wanting Joseph C. Phillips Speaking on ABC’s “This

Joseph C. Phillips

Speaking on ABC’s “This Week,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi commented, “I think everybody wants affordable health care for all Americans. They know that this will take courage. It took courage to pass Social Security. It took courage to pass Medicare. And many of the same forces that were at work decades ago are at work again against this bill.” There is that word again. What exactly does affordable mean? The Left tosses the word about but never bothers to define exactly what they mean by affordable. It could mean anything and everything and no doubt it will. Affordable is a political

term that is unassociated with actual costs, only addresses price and means, “You pay according to the amount of political capital you have.”

For instance, if you belong to the SEIU you pay less than if you didn’t. But I digress.

I dare say that the only

reason it takes courage to pass “Obamacare” is because a majority of Americans oppose it. According to a recent CNN poll, only 25 percent of Americans want Congress to pass this healthcare bill. It

is particularly telling that the New Left continues to depict the 75 percent of Americans that oppose their efforts to nationalize healthcare (which

is the end game) as ignoble,

uncompassionate, ignorant racists. More annoying is

that they portray themselves as visionary, compassionate champions of good.

I suspect that the truth

is that Americans do not

like the substance of the healthcare bills – all 4,000 pages. Nor are they enamored of the backroom deals this administration cut in order to secure the votes of their own party. Frankly, the stench of bribes like the latest appellate-

judgeship-for-yes vote is more

reminiscent of B.S. than it is of hope and change.

It is also likely true that

Americans have weighed the fiscal promises of huge government programs like Social Security against their

reality and decided they would like to find other avenues towards reforming healthcare—other than putting it in charge of Washington

increasing to 3 percent over

the next 12 years. In 1966 the Medicare tax rate was split

from the Old Age, Survivor, and Disability (OASDI) rate. Since the inception of OASDI there have been

20 increases in the tax rate,

which now stands at 6.2 percent for both employer and employee on earnings up to $109,000; the Medicare rate is 1.45 percent with no cap on

Office (CBO) those deficits will continue into 2011. The system rebounds slightly until 2016 when the deficits begin to accelerate at a steady and rapid pace. This in direct contradiction of the rosy picture painted by Budget Director Peter Orzag and Congressional Democrats, who assured us that Social Secure was secure for at least 50 years.

“Frankly, the stench of bribes like the latest appellate-judgeship- for-yes vote is more reminiscent of B.S. than it is of hope and change.”

bureaucrats.

Social Security was passed in 1935 as an insurance program to protect a small segment of workers in their retirements. In 1940 just over 222,000 citizens received

monthly social security

benefits. The program has since grown to become the single largest item in the federal budget, consuming over 22 percent of total expenditures. The program was originally funded by a 1 percent tax on the first $3,000 of income, with the tax

earnings. Nearly 80 percent of Americans pay more in Social Security taxes than they do in federal income tax.

And still Social Security faces

a fiscal crisis. What’s more, what began as an insurance program is now simply

a welfare program. The

Supreme Court has ruled that

citizens do not have a right to social security benefits. This year social security will run a cash deficit for the first time in more than

25 years. According to

the Congressional Budget

And what of Medicare? Medicare trustee Tom Saving and his colleague Andrew Rettenmaier estimate that Medicare will consume 25

percent of federal income tax revenue by 2020, and 50 percent by 2040.

Both programs are in need of a fiscal “fix.” What are the Democrats recommendations? President Obama, after acknowledging that the system is running out of money, suggests taxing a larger share of income. True to progressive form Obama

suggests what would be the largest tax increase in U.S. history, at least $1.3 trillion over the first 10 years. Yet according to the Cato Institute, such an increase would increase Social Security’s cash-flow solvency by just seven years. Former Enron advisor Paul Krugman is on record as recommending a combination of tax increases and benefit cuts. In some languages denying benefits in order to save money is called rationing. And it is into these steady and trustworthy hands that we are being asked to entrust another one-sixth of our economy. Americans have listened ad nauseam to the promises of this administration and found them to be fantastic. The mantra that a national healthcare plan will cost less money, will not raise taxes and will not result in a rationing of care is not only unsupported by history, but is patronizing as well.

Joseph C. Phillips is the author of “He Talk Like a White Boy” available where ever books are sold.

Consider What The Haitian People Want

ever books are sold. Consider What The Haitian People Want Nicole Lee (NNPA) — In the

Nicole Lee

(NNPA) — In the midst of the rubble that still contains the bodies of loved ones, the real people of Haitian civil society and NGO leaders met last month to begin to think about how they would build a new Haiti. I am on my way to Haiti now to consult with many of those leaders in order to ensure that I and TransAfrica Forum fully understand their reality, their needs and their vision for

a new society. Haiti’s full

recovery must be based upon their priorities and their needs. But even while Haitians are beginning to imagine their future, I also know that the reality of day-to-day life in Haiti is overwhelming. If you have read my earlier columns, then you already know the facts. Haiti suffered a magnitude 7.0 earthquake on Jan. 12. To date, an estimated 222,000 were killed; officials estimate that once the rubble is removed that the numbers will increase to over 300,000.

Over 300,000 were injured, resulting in thousands of

newly disabled. Additionally,

1.2 million are living in

spontaneous camps, and over 3 million people are affected. Millions of ordinary U.S. citizens responded to the quake with their hearts and their pocketbooks. Over $600 million dollars was raised in the U.S. alone and

the Obama administration committed $100 million to the relief effort. Today, almost two months after the quake, millions of meals have been served and about 50,000 emergency shelters distributed – tarpaulins or tents. These efforts are noteworthy; however, the

stored; a neighborhood of approximately 300 people had received no access to food and other supplies. So, they have self-organized. Relying on community resources, including food and financial savings, they have been able to provide for their own basic needs. As a result of the quake

programs. The rains have already begun and there is significant concern given the crowded and unsanitary conditions in which most are forced to live; new medical emergencies, such as diarrhea and respiratory infections are feared. I’ll be visiting a few

increasing distribution at the local level, outside the capital city.”

I

hope to better understand

the

way in which we can support

devastation caused by the earthquake exceeds the levels of support provided by the international community. While many in Port-au-Prince

have yet to receive any help at all, humanitarian flights have decreased by 50 percent.

I spoke with a colleague

who recently returned from Haiti and she shared that a community located just 10 to 15 minutes away from the airport, which is where humanitarian supplies are

community members are unemployed, their schools are destroyed and savings are now exhausted. This community and hundreds of communities throughout the country do not have access to food or other relief

distributions. I know before boarding my flight that the situation remains dire. Around the country people in camps require food, shelter, health care, sanitation and access to cash for work

of the secondary cities as well as rural areas to better understand the conditions facing the more than 600,000 displaced peoples who have left Port-au-Prince area for the rural countryside and smaller towns. Part of what I hope to better understand is the way in which we can support increasing distribution at the local level, outside the capital city. I’ll be looking for

evidence that our government

is supporting the distribution of agricultural inputs and seeds, so that peasants and farmers can grow their own food and Haiti can become self-sufficient. Agriculture provides 60 percent of the national food production and seeds need to be made available immediately; planting season began on Feb.

19.

Lastly, I will be looking to see if Haitian government and civil society are being included in the discussions around reconstruction and to determine ways in which African Americans, Haitian Americans and Haitians can join together to ensure that goals of a sovereign nation are addressed.

Nicole C. Lee is the president of TransAfrica Forum.

A10

The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010 Health Counselor’s Coping Method Helps Detoxify Stress

Health

Counselor’s Coping Method Helps Detoxify Stress

By Stephen D. Riley AFRO Staff Writer

From work to family to relationships and environments, the causes of stress can be plentiful and often, unavoidable. For many African Americans, one of the leading causes of stress stems from money, or a lack thereof. With the cost of living on the upswing, an unstable economy has led to trying times for many Americans. A recent survey completed by Mental Health America (MHA) revealed that nearly half of Americans, 48 percent, are financially stressed. That number jumps to 56 percent for African Americans and carries with it a host of other stress-related implications. Statistics from The American Institute of Stress show that nearly 75 percent of all illnesses affecting Americans are stress induced. High blood pressure, heart disease and cancer can all be linked to stress and without proper knowledge or assistance, the results can be fatal. Suzanne Jessee, a professional counselor who promotes spiritually based stress coping mechanisms, was once plagued by anxiety disorders and agoraphobia (fear of being in public). However, she developed an emotional detoxification program that aims to lessen mental distress through lifestyle changes and exercise. “It’s just the process of going through and cleaning emotional house,” Jessee said of the program. “I use a combination of therapeutic techniques to take you through the detoxification process. It goes along the lines of the seven R’s: relaxation, realization, re-education, rehabilitation, reinforcement, responsibility and reassurance.” Because stress is inevitable, improving coping mechanisms can better African Americans’ quality of life. While many turn to alcohol or increased food consumption to escape unpleasant realities, the ramifications of these methods can often cause more harm than good. Avoiding or limiting the intake of white flour, sugar and caffeine are some of Jessee’s most important tips along with the healthy consumption of lean proteins such as turkey, fish and almonds. “So many times we eat for pleasure, enjoyment and emotional satisfaction,” Jessee said. “The best fuel for our [bodies] is

Jessee said. “The best fuel for our [bodies] is Courtesy photo Financial worries are one of

Courtesy photo

Financial worries are one of the numerous factors that can lead to debilitating stress.

food from the earth that hasn’t been altered chemically.” Jessee’s therapy method differs from other stress alleviation models because it teaches lifelong skills to manage future anxiety- inducing situation. Participating in group and community activities can also be vital to the psyche, but for others, time alone is essential. Different races may also have different formulas for combating stress. MHA revealed that 82 percent of African Americans resort to prayer and medication to help them alleviate stress. But according to Jessee, the effects of prayer, medication and other coping methods will vary based on a person’s personality type and other inherent inclination. “You don’t have to be a certain personality but you do have to learn the tools and practice the tools to manage stress,” Jessee said. “Some people combat it naturally just like some people are natural athletes [and] singers. Other people have to work at. I was definitely a Type A, chronic worrier. [I] ended up in the hospital 18 years ago with panic disorder, anxiety and severe depression. I’m well today because I practiced the techniques that they showed me. Even the most acute Type A personality can learn to better manage their stress.” There’s no such thing as a perfect existence, but with healthy coping methods, life doesn’t have to be unbearably stressful. For more information on Suzanne Jessee’s emotional detoxification model: visit www. suzannejessee.com

Commentary

Stopping Diabetes Starts with You

By Larry Lucas Special to the AFRO

For many of us, a modern, busy life means pre-made meals and entertainment such as video games, movies and television. Unfortunately, the widespread consumption of processed foods coupled with sedentary lifestyles has led to a dramatic rise in diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 23.6 million American children and adults live with diabetes, while another 57 million are on the verge. Sometimes referred to as a “silent killer”—the ADA says 5.7 million people have the disease and don’t even know it—diabetes needs to be a disease that everyone understands. So what exactly is diabetes? Simply put, diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food for energy. A healthy person can break down digested sugar into glucose, which then circulates in your blood and waits to enter cells as fuel for your body. But, if you have diabetes, this process breaks down, and blood sugar levels become too high. There are two main types of full-blown diabetes, Types 1 and 2. People with Type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin at all and those with Type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but their cells don’t respond to it. Of these two, Type 2 is far more common, particularly because it’s a lifestyle disease that is affected by your weight and how much exercise you get. While adjusting your diet is a major step in preventing and managing diabetes, there is more to it than just laying off the candy and there are some serious side effects that you need to prevent. Left untreated, diabetes can have serious affects on your body. For example, people with diabetes have a higher risk for blindness than the general population. They are also more at risk for artery disease that decreases blood flow to the feet causing nerve damage, potentially leading to foot or leg amputation. The good news is that most people can avoid serious complications by properly managing their diabetes. Unfortunately, diabetes is a particular concern in our community. According to the National Institutes of Health’s National Diabetes Education Program, 14.7 million African Americans have diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes. Lowering this number depends on our ability to reduce and mange risk factors that can lead to diabetes, such as obesity, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. And it’s not just about us—we need to watch out for our children, too. A recent study from the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine found that African-American girls are more likely to develop diabetes than their peer groups and parents with Type 2 diabetes are likely to have children who also develop the condition. Thankfully, you can both prevent and manage diabetes primarily on your own. Start eating a healthier diet that is low in sodium and fat and get regular exercise to maintain a healthy weight. It’s also a great idea to learn more about your risk factors. American Diabetes Alert Day is March 23, and the ADA is asking Americans to take The Diabetes Risk Test (www. diabetes.org/alert), a short questionnaire to help you determine your risk for developing the condition. The results will let you know what factors, such as age, family history or weight might be the biggest risk for you. And don’t forget about the kids! Parents, be aware of your children’s blood pressure levels and body mass index, as high levels of these measurements can often be telltale signs of diabetes. And, if you or your children are diagnosed with diabetes, please be sure to take the medication as prescribed by your doctor. Diabetes medication can be a life saver for those who need it, but these medicines mean nothing if those who need it most can’t afford it. Patients who need help can turn to the Partnership for Prescription Assistance (PPA), which has connected 6 million patients in need to programs that provide free or nearly free medicines. For more information, patients can call 1-888-4PPA-NOW or visit www.pparx.org. Diabetes no longer has to be a silent killer. Pay attention to the risk factors for you and your family and make positive health changes today.

Larry Lucas is a vice president for Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American B1

Civil rights icon Earnest Green of the Little Rock Nine with his daughter, MacKenzie The
Civil rights icon Earnest Green
of the Little Rock Nine with his
daughter, MacKenzie
The Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall (formerly Fort Myer) Gospel Service held its Black History Month Closing Celebration on Feb.
Air Force JROTC Cadets
Andre Birdsong and
Brittany Peters served as
escorts for the honorees.
27 at the Memorial Chapel. Five individuals and organizations were given the Keeper of the Community Awards for their achievements
and good works, which have significantly impacted the surrounding community.
The honorees were the Hon. Sonia Sotomayor, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court; Maj. Gen. Reuben Jones,
commanding general, Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command; Judge Robert Rigsby, D.C. Superior Court/COL in
the Army Reserves; Sheila Stewart, community affairs director, Radio One and Ron Blakely, deputy executive director, White
House Initiative on HBCUs. Inspirational music was provided by the Gospel Service Choir, the Women’s Choir of First Mount Zion
Baptist Church, the Chosen Generation Choir of First Baptist Church of Glenarden, Md., and retired Sgt. 1st Class Dwayne
Ferost Sr., a wounded warrior from Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Min. Lougenia Carnell and Ciera Brookins gave the
scripture and prayer respectively and Nikole Killion, correspondent, Hearst Television served as
the mistress of ceremonies.
“A Moment in Black History: A Tribute to the 100th Birthday of the National Urban
League” was given by Army Ret. Lt. Col. Pamela Hart. The celebration closed with a video
presentation of the Black national anthem, “Lift
Every Voice and Sing.”
Ret. Army Lt. Col. Pamela
Hart pays tribute to the
National Urban League’s
Chaplain (Lt. Col.)
After the benediction, there was
a dinner in the chapel fellowship
hall. Edgar Brookins chaired
the planning committee and
Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Harry
Rauch is the pastor.
100th birthday.
Harry Rauch presents
Keeper of the
Community Award
to Justice Sonia
Sotomayor.
The famed Buffalo Soldiers
with Command Sgt. Major
Jefferson Varner (right), joint
The Gospel Service
Base Myer-Henderson Hall
choir kicked off
the program with a
rousing, spirited song.
Edgar Brookins, chair, BHM Planning
Committee, presents a plaque to the
emcee, Nikole Killion, correspondent,
Honorees Maj. Gen. Reuben Jones, Sheila Stewart, the Hon.
Hearst Television
Sonia Sotomayor, Judge Robert Rigsby and Ron Blakely
Chosen Generation Choir from First Baptist Church of Glenarden,
Md., presents a musical selection
Sheila Stewart and Bill Russell, attorney Michael Melton,
president of 100 Black Men (Washington, D.C. chapter);
MacKenzie Green, Miss D.C. USA; Sam Hale, Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity; Allison Hill, Miss Black D.C. USA; Hope Wiseman,
The Women's Choir from First Mount Zion Baptist Church, Dumfries, Va., provided inspirational music for the program.
Miss D.C. Outstanding Teen and Walter Kirkland
By Kristin Gray
AFRO Managing Editor
Hundreds flocked to Washington, D.C.’s Zanzibar on the Waterfront nightclub for
DMV Rocks 4 Haiti, a red carpet benefit fundraiser featuring performances from R&B
greats, local entertainers and up-and-coming celebrities.
The event was a call to action for the area’s entertainment industry after Haiti’s
devastating earthquake left millions without food and shelter. Among the attendees
were event hosts Howard Hewett and Alena 7, singers Kyonté, V. Rich, Tony Terry and
Damerien McCants, comedian Chico and
poet Messiah.
Many of the night’s entertainers
expressed their support for the people
of Haiti and vowed to promote unity
among people of the Diaspora.
“The message I want to send out is that I’m from the Caribbean myself, Trinidad,
West Indies, and maybe a month after [the earthquake] I realized that there’s been
some media diversion from the topic,” said rapper/poet Messiah, a Howard University
graduate and three-time Apollo winner. “The people of Haiti need to know that you
have a lot people on this side that are very adamant about what’s going on — the
struggling, the suffering— and that we know that until its fully resolved, the
struggle continues and we all have a part to play in bringing a resolution to the
table. I’m honored to be one of those people in the continuous effort to help Haiti.”
Washington, D.C.-based singer Kyonté, whose album 831 was recently released,
echoed Messiah’s sentiments and said he hopes America will remember Haiti’s
plight.
“The message is we haven’t forgotten about you and everybody’s gonna do their
part no matter how small it may seem to us,” said Kyonté. “I’m just here to do my part
and raise funds and show that this issue isn’t going anywhere for a long time.”
Arthur Stokes, a member of social empowerment organization Positive
Controversy, had encouraging words for the Haitian community.
“For the people of Haiti, I want to tell them that through every dark night it’s
a bright day after that. When you go through situations you can either let them
destroy you or implore you,” said Stokes. “When stuff like that happens, it’s for the
people to reach out and make a difference.”
Net door proceeds from the event were donated to musician Wyclef Jean’s
foundation, Yéle Haiti.
Former NFL
star and
Arthur Stokes of “neo
Washington,
R&B singer
Vocalist Alyson Williams
hip-hop soul movement”
D.C.-based
Poet/rapper Messiah
Damerien
Magician Reggie Rice
(“SuperMagicMan”)
Positive Controversy
singer Kyontè
McCants
Soul singer Tony Terry
Hip-hop artist Mair
Pianist, singer and
producer V. Rich
Event host Alena 7, Timothy Pearson, and singer Howard Hewett
Photos by Rob Roberts
Photos by Rob Roberts

B2

The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010 Entertainment Briefs Zane’s ‘Sex Chronicles’ Returns

Entertainment Briefs

Zane’s ‘Sex Chronicles’ Returns Steamy Cinemax series “Zane’s Sex Chronicles” has returned for a second season this spring, according to blackamericaweb.com. The popular show – Cinemax’s highest rated series ever – is based off Maryland-based author Zane’s

Zane Courtesy Photo
Zane
Courtesy Photo

erotic novels, which have topped bestseller charts since her debut in 2001. The show centers on Patience James, a seemingly mundane corporate executive during the day and erotic blogger by night, according to the report. However, James’ best friends,

Maricruz and Anna Marie, do not know her identity. “I am extremely excited about the second season of the show,” Zane said in an interview with blackamericaweb.com. “This year, we have expanded the cast, the storyline and the overall concept. It has been a pleasure to have my work translated to television because, like books, film and television have always been my passions. It is true that every reality was once someone’s dream.” According to Cinemax’s Web site, 13 episodes of “Zane’s Sex Chronicles” will air this spring.

Beyoncé Cosmetology Center Opens in New York Singer Beyoncé and her mother Tina Knowles traveled to New York recently for the opening of The Beyoncé Cosmetology Center, a seven-month cosmetology training program for adults at substance abuse treatment program Phoenix House. The singer was joined by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz. According to blackvoices.com, Beyoncé visited Phoenix House while preparing for her role as a

Beyoncé Courtesy Photo
Beyoncé
Courtesy Photo

drug-addicted Etta James in the film Cadillac Records. The Grammy Award-winning actress said she dedicated her paycheck from the film to the charitable effort.

Winans Family Member Involved in Ponzi Scheme Michael Winans Jr., a member of the famed Winans gospel family, is being named a ringleader in a Detroit-area Ponzi scheme, according to blackvoices.com. Winans Jr.’s dealings in the scheme

may have made him as much as $11 million. The Office of Financial and Insurance Regulation recently announced that officials had launched a 14-month investigation into Winans Jr.’s dealings, which allegedly involved a “Saudi Arabian crude oil bond scam.” According to blackvoices. com, Michigan state regulators announced Winans Jr. was the mastermind of the scam during a conference call. The regulators also said Winans Jr., who is a member of gospel quartet Winans Phase 2, earned the trust of his victims by using his popular family name. According to the report, the Ponzi scheme targeted members of Detroit’s New Beginning Church in Detroit.

R&B Singer Arrested for Soliciting Prostitute Once an R&B heartthrob, singer D’Angelo has had little problem attracting members of the fairer sex throughout his career. But the mellow-voiced singer was arrested last week in New York after attempting to solicit sex from an undercover female police officer for $40, according to The

D’Angelo Courtesy Photo
D’Angelo
Courtesy Photo

Associated Press. D’Angelo, born Michael Archer, is contesting the arrest, according to the report. His management said he has pleaded not guilty. “We know there is a lot of speculation in regard to the arrest of D’Angelo in New York City this past weekend. We would like his fans and the public at large to know that D’Angelo has pled not guilty and is contesting the allegations made against him,” a statement from Lindsay Guion of Guion Partners read. “Also know that he is in good health and is extremely excited about his forthcoming new album.” D’Angelo is best known for his hits “Untitled” (How Does it Feel?) and “Brown Sugar.” He has a child with R&B singer Angie Stone.

afro.com

Your History • Your Community • Your News

He has a child with R&B singer Angie Stone. a f r o . c o

March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American B3

13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American B3 2010 Oscar Recap Bigelow Stashes Six

2010 Oscar Recap

Bigelow Stashes Six Oscars in ‘The Hurt Locker’

Makes history as first female director winner

By Kam Williams Special to the AFRO

Kathryn Bigelow and The Hurt Locker emerged victorious in what had been touted as a David vs. Goliath showdown with her ex-husband James Cameron and Avatar, the biggest moneymaker in box- office history. Each entered the competition with nine nominations, with Bigelow’s Iraq war saga netting six Academy Awards, including best picture, director and

original screenplay, as well as

a trio in technical categories. Meanwhile, Avatar had to settle for just three Oscars in cinematography, visual effects and art direction. Bigelow made history as the first female ever to be named best director. An obvious hint that she was about to triumph, the supposedly sacrosanct secret ballots notwithstanding, was

the fact that the presenter in the category was Barbara Streisand, who had herself won a Golden Globe but not an Oscar for directing Yentl way back in 1984. There were no surprises in the lead acting categories with veteran thespians, Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart) and Sandra Bullock (The

of her fellow nominees by name. Sandra was most effusive about Gabby Sidibe (Precious), about whom she gushed, “I love you so much. You are exquisite. You are beyond words to me.” As for supporting roles, prohibitive favorites Mo’Nique (Precious) and Christoph Waltz (Inglourious

“I would like to thank the Academy for showing that it can be about the perfor- mance, and not the politics.” --Mo’Nique

Blind Side) both winning more for their body of work than for this particular role. Bridges, in his heartfelt acceptance speech, thanked his late parents “for turning me on to such a groovy profession.” And the self- effacing Bullock was equally gracious, thanking her mom and acknowledging each

Basterds) prevailed as expected. Mo’Nique got the last laugh after having been subjected to considerable criticism during awards season for not campaigning or kissing the ring of the Hollywood establishment. This explains why she began her acceptance remarks with, “First, I would like

Former Day26 Member Debuts Solo Act

By Andrea Young Special to the AFRO

Member Debuts Solo Act By Andrea Young Special to the AFRO Courtesy photo Qwanell “Que” Mosley

Courtesy photo

Qwanell “Que” Mosley recently released his single “Shake Dat.”

Qwanell Mosley, known to R&B fans as “Que,” was the youngest male vocalist in Sean “Diddy” Comb’s hand-picked quintet Day26. Now a solo artist, the New York native released his latest single “Shake Dat” on Feb. 23, premiering with radio host Angie Ange on 93.9 WKYS. On March 23, the crooner will release his solo debut mixtape Q Files exclusively hosted by the District’s own DJ Quicksilver. Despite the excitement surround his solo endeavors, several life-changing events led to Que’s latest venture, particularly his split with “Making the Band 4” singers Robert, Brian, Willie and Michael. According to the 21-year-old singer, questionable management led to the career shift, but he’s ready to bring “Shake

Dat” to the masses and woo legions of female fans. “It’s a salute to all the ladies,” Que said of the up-tempo single. “My music will be remixed with house, reggae and techno (beats).” As a member of Day26, Que was partially responsible for the success of singles “I’mma Put it On Her” and “Got Me Going”, which peaked at No. 79 on the Billboard 100. However, Que, the solo artist, plans to inundate music charts with his soon-to-be-released ballads “Cupid” and “Positive Energy.” The singer said working as a solo artist feels “like a burden has been lifted.” He added, “I want to show my fans that I am working hard to make it happen just like everyone else out there.” Que’s fans seem to be pleased with his career direction, which includes a new manager, Cliff Jones of Soul World Entertainment. While visiting WKYS 93.9 for the release of “Shake Dat,” Que’s appearance caused the

radio station’s Web site to be flooded with over 30,000 hits in one hour, causing the site and eventually the phone lines to be shut down. But the singer said he’d prepared for the day when superstardom would catapult his life into a new direction. Que has studied award-winning R&B artists like Michael Jackson, Donnie Hathaway, Stevie Wonder and even gospel artist Kim Burrell, thanks to his mother, Nicole. He is also

a fan of pop princess Beyoncé and has gained the respect of R&B artist Brandy. Que’s other

influences come from alternative music, and the young vocalist said he enjoys listening to Björk and groups like Green Day and Cold Play. While Que is most comfortable making music, the singer said he has new business and civic prospects on the horizon, including plans for an MTV reality show. In addition, Que is working to establish a positive relationship with teens by sharing his inspirational message at high schools in Washington, D.C., and possibly his hometown, Rochester, N.Y. “I want to tell teenagers they can be whatever they want to be if they stay positive,” Que said. “Find that faith from within, speak it into existence and activate it.”

from within, speak it into existence and activate it.” to thank the Academy for showing that

to thank the Academy for showing that it can be about the performance, and not the politics.” In terms of upsets, the biggest surprise arrived when Geoffrey Fletcher and Precious won for best adapted screenplay over Up in the Air. However, the evening’s most shocking incident was undoubtedly the reverse Kanye West moment when Roger Ross Williams, who is Black, was rudely interrupted during

his acceptance speech as the director/producer of best documentary short film- winner Music by Prudence. Midway in, this ostensibly inebriated White woman appeared out nowhere to give him the bum’s rush, just like Kanye did to Taylor Swift. Then she started rambling into the microphone like a mental patient until her voice was drowned out by the orchestra. As it turns out, Elinor Burkett apparently wasn’t a complete lunatic,

but a former co-producer of Music by Prudence, who had abandoned the movie over

a year ago but now wanted

back in to bask in the glory

when the project turned out to be a tremendous success. Among other Oscar lowlights were Sean Penn’s mumbling presentation of the best actress award, a sleep- inducing, interpretative dance number choreographed to musical selections from the best score nominees, and Tom Hanks’ failure to introduce the 10 nominees before opening the envelope to announce the best picture. So much for dramatic effect. Overall, the 82nd Academy Awards Show was rather entertaining and engaging, especially how

it devoted time to intimate

introductions of the acting nominees, and to detailing the contributions made by a variety of craftsmen to the magic that is moviemaking. The festivities were capably co-hosted by Alec Baldwin and Steve Martin, whose hilarious, offhand introduction of Sandra Bullock with, “Please welcome my longtime dear friend, and by that, I mean I’ve never met her,” was nothing short of brilliant.

Hometown Hero

Mo’Nique Goes for Gold at Oscars

By AFRO Staff

Dressed in a ruched royal blue gown with a delicate white gardenia adorning her upswept tresses, actress/comedienne Mo’Nique embodied old-school glamour at the 2010 Oscars. As she accepted her award for best supporting actress in Precious, the Baltimore County, Md., native thanked her husband and co-workers for their support and later revealed that her decision to wear a striking blue dress was no fluke. “The reason why I have on this royal blue dress is because it’s the color that Hattie McDaniel wore in 1940 when she accepted her Oscar,” the entertainer said in a post-Oscar press interview. “The reason why I have this gardenia in my hair, it is the flower that Hattie McDaniel wore when she accepted her Oscar. So [this is] for you, Miss Hattie McDaniel; I feel you all over me.” Hattie McDaniel, the first African American to win an Oscar, was often criticized for her role as the servile, passive “Mammy” in Gone With the Wind. In an interview with fellow comedian and radio host Steve Harvey, Mo’Nique said she’d purchased the rights to McDaniel’s life story, but did not discuss any future projects related to the actress. Unlike McDaniel’s difficult road to success, Mo’Nique gained instant popularity with audiences in the now-defunct hit UPN series “The Parkers.” In addition, she was the first female to host the infamous “Showtime at the Apollo,” authored a New York Time’s best seller, Skinny Women Are Evil, and garnered producer credits for America’s first full-figured beauty pageant and VH1’s reality show “Charm School.” For the sassy, voluptuous entertainer dubbed the “Queen of Comedy,” success is a state of mind, and her road to stardom began during her days as a student at Milford Mill High School in Baltimore and with the opening of her self-named club in the ‘90s. “I was successful when I had Mo’Nique’s. I was successful before Mo’Nique’s. Baby, I was successful in the 12th grade walking down the hall in my pumps with my briefcase,” she told the AFRO in a previous interview. The actress, who also hosts a late night talk show on BET, said next to family her hometown is partly responsible for where she is today. “Baltimore was good to me,” said Mo’Nique, who briefly

attended Morgan State University. “It’s like ya’ll let me know…When ya’ll would come out to that club and pack it out, ya’ll would say, ‘Girl, we know you’re going to go far.’” And while winning an Oscar marks a pinnacle in Mo’Nique’s career, she refuses to be bogged down by fears about the future. “I’m just really working on tomorrow,” she said. “If I can just get to it, because my days are so full of excitement, I don’t want to worry about next year. If God just gives me tomorrow, I’m happy.”

my days are so full of excitement, I don’t want to worry about next year. If

Courtesy photo

Award-winning comedienne, actress and Baltimore native Mo’Nique won a coveted Oscar award for her portrayal of an abusive mother in Precious.

B4

The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

Community News

FBI’s ‘Top 10 Most Wanted’ Celebrates at 60

By Gregory Dale AFRO Staff Writer

Terrorists, murderers, and burglars alike have all appeared on this famous list, which celebrates its 60th anniversary on March 14. The FBI’s “Top Ten Most Wanted List” was incepted after a1949 article deemed “The FBI’s Most Wanted Fugitives” appeared in the Washington Daily News. The article received so much positive publicity that former Director J. Edgar Hoover implemented the “Ten Most Wanted Fugitives” program on March 14, 1950. Throughout its 60 years, the program experienced tremendous growth. In its beginning, the list was mainly comprised of bank robbers, burglars and car thieves. Thereafter, just as the priorities of the FBI had changed, the list also underwent transformation to later include revolutionaries, organized criminals and those linked to terrorist groups. The advent of modern technology has also assisted in the growth of the program. “With the Internet coming along, we put up the list on the Web, as well as partnering with ‘America’s Most Wanted,’” said Phillip Edney,

FBI spokesman. Edney added that the partnership with “America’s Most Wanted” the program’s Internet posting has led to many positive results. “Thirty-three percent of the top 10 fugitives printed have made results, with people calling in and going to the police and going to ‘America’s Most Wanted,’” Edney said. In discussing the fugitives that have been apprehended from the list, Edney also discussed one particular fugitive and his connection with the AFRO. According to Edney, Apee Hamp Chapman was being sought by the FBI for a double murder in Cleveland, Ohio, on Feb. 8, 1953. Chapman first fled to Pennsylvania, and later settled in Maryland. When his picture was featured in the AFRO on Feb. 9, 1954, a D.C. resident quickly recognized Chapman, leading to his arrest in Silver Spring, Md., the very next day. The cooperation of citizens has led to the detainment of 152 fugitives of the 494 featured. Edney cites citizen cooperation as a help to the FBI, and

Howard Dean to Head American Dental Education Association

By AFRO Staff

Zetas Converge in Annapolis

Zetas Converge in Annapolis Photo by Khalid Naji-Allah Maryland members of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority gathered

Photo by Khalid Naji-Allah

Maryland members of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority gathered at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md., March 5 for “Zeta Day in Annapolis.” The sorority members met with county executives, watched an executive legislative session and toured the State House. Zeta Phi Beta is a non-profit, serviced-based organization comprised of over 800 chapters worldwide.

Local Transit Union Leadership Wins Historic Re-Election

True Color Portraits
True Color Portraits

Esker “Butch” Bilger, left, financial secretary-treasurer; Roland Jeter, first vice president; Jackie Jeter, president; Larry Lockley, second vice president and Anthony Wayne Garland, recording secretary

In a history-making victory, local transit union president Jackie Jeter and her team became the first slate of officials in recent years to win re-election to lead Amalgamated Transit Union Local 689. The officers were sworn in at a festive sweetheart’s ball on where more than 1,000 Metro workers, donned in black tie apparel, celebrated their commitment to safety and service. They also had a moment of silence for the five Metro workers killed in rail accidents over the past seven months. ATU Local 689, including some 10,000 active and retired Metro workers, is the third largest affiliate in ATU’s international network.

assistance in keeping citizens safe. “We do a lot of things but we can’t be everywhere all the time,” he said. “The FBI has 56 field offices throughout the United States, and that’s a whole lot of area to try to cover. [Cooperation] helps us, but it helps keep the community safe also.”

Dr. Leo E. Rouse, dean of the Howard University College of Dentistry, was named president-elect of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) March 3, according to a press release. Rouse will become ADEA president in March 2011. Rouse currently chairs the ADEA Council of Deans and serves as one of the four ADEA commissioners on the Commission of Dental Accreditation. He received an ADEA

presidential citation I n2009 for distinguished service to the association and his efforts to advance the dental education community. Rouse also serves on the Board of Directors for the American Dental Association Foundation and the National Children’s Oral Health Foundation. Before his appointment as a dean at Howard in 2004, Rouse worked as an associate dean of clinical affairs and chair of the Department of Clinical Dentistry. Before beginning work in academia, Rouse served in the

U.S. Army for 24 years.

in academia, Rouse served in the U.S. Army for 24 years. Dr. Leo E. Rouse Community
Dr. Leo E. Rouse
Dr. Leo E. Rouse

Community Calendar

March 13

and supporters as they visit

Personal Story

202-829-0306.

Mardi Gras Ball

Capitol Movement

One D.C. Outreach Day

Sisterspace and Books,

Martin’s Crosswinds,

Project Dance Concert

The Carriage House,

3717 Georgia Ave. N.W.,

7400

Greenway Center

Lincoln Theatre, 1215 U

614 South St. N.W., D.C. 12-3 p.m. Join One D.C.

homes and place phone calls informing residents about organizing a better Washington. For more information: 202-232-

D.C. 12-3 p.m. Join workshop leader Aisha Karefa-Smart for an afternoon of reflection, empowerment and renewal. $10. For more information:

Drive, Greenbelt, Md. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Join the Gamma Pi Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity for their 37th annual “Mardi Gras Dinner and Dance Extravaganza.” For more information:

St. N.W., D.C. 8 p.m. Capitol Movement presents the fifth annual Capitol Movement Project Dance Concert featuring a diverse collection of musical genres, including jazz, hip-hop, contemporary, gospel and more. $40-$50.

2915.

March 16

$34.50-$54.50. For more

gammapi.org.

For more information: 202-

Je’Caryous Johnson’s

328-6000.

Black Women in Corporate America Sisterspace and Books,

‘Cheaper to Keep Her’ Warner Theatre, 1299 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.,

March 20 Relationship Skills for Youth

‘Spread the Love” Comedy Tour

national comedy show tour.

7328.

3717 Georgia Ave. N.W.,

D.C. 8 p.m. Romantic

Largo-Kettering Library,

Constitution Hall, 18th

D.C. 3-5 p.m. Dr. Jessica

comedy starring actress

9601

Capital Lane, Largo,

and C streets N.W., D.C.

Gordon Nembhard will

Vivica A. Fox and

Md.

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

8 p.m. Join comedienne/

discuss the role of Black women in corporate America. For more information: 202-

singer Brian McKnight.

information: 202-397-

Children learn how to resolve conflicts at home and school. $10-$25. For more

actress Mo’Nique in her

Also joining the lineup are

829-0306.

7328.

information: www.pefacpg. com.

comedians Rodney Perry and Tone-X. $39.50-$59.50. For

Mardi Gras Ball Show Place Arena,

301-925-7999.

March 19 AT&T 28 Days- D.C.

Ultimate Step Show

precision, presented by Delta

more information: 202-397-

14900 Pennsylvania Ave., Upper Marlboro, Md. 7 p.m. Celebrate 10 years of masquerading, mayhem and merriment. Features fine cuisine, cocktails, stilt walkers and more. For ticket prices and more information:

Featuring Russell Simmons Cramton Auditorium, Howard University, 2455 Sixth St., N.W., D.C. 6-7 p.m. Empowerment event targeting those who are ready and willing to follow 28 simple steps to unleashing leadership potential. For more information:

Challenge Show Place Arena, 14900 Pennsylvania Ave. Upper Marlboro, Md. 7 p.m. Collegiate and alumnae teams from the mid-Atlantic region show spirit and

Sigma Theta Sorority. For more information: 301-925-

March 21 Cashflow Party Comfort Inn & Suites Hotel, 14402 Laurel Place, Laurel, Md. 2-6 p.m. Come out and increase your financial IQ. Network with others and learn how to create multiple streams of income. $20. For more

March 14

att28daysdc.eventbrite.

7999.

information: cashflowparty.

Create a Powerful

com.

eventbrite.com.

Courtesy Photo

7999. information: cashflowparty. Create a Powerful com. eventbrite.com. Courtesy Photo

March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American

B5

www.afro.com
www.afro.com

Howard University Women’s Basketball

Geckeler Points Lady Bison in Winning Direction

Basketball Geckeler Points Lady Bison in Winning Direction Courtesy Photo/HU Head coach Niki Reid-Geckeler has led

Courtesy Photo/HU

Head coach Niki Reid-Geckeler has led Howard to a 10-6 winning record in the MEAC this season, a huge

improvement from the losing record she inherited in

2008.

By Perry Green AFRO Sports Editor

The Lady Bison has surprised many critics within the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference this season. Despite being picked to finish eighth in the MEAC pre-season poll, Howard went on to win 15 games (13 losses) and captured a 10-6 record in the MEAC to take a fourth-place seed in the conference championship tournament. The Lady Bison’s young but talented squad managed to win six more games than most basketball pundits expected because of their ability to edge out victories in the most tightly competitive games. In fact, Howard played in 10 games this season that have been decided by five points or fewer, and they are 9-1 in those games. But most Howard

basketball followers remember that not long ago, the Lady Bison would have been the losers of most of those games. Just two seasons ago, they finished with a dreadful 4-26 overall record, and were eliminated from the MEAC tournament just as fast as it started. Something had to be done to shift the team back into a winning direction. Fortunately for HU, that “something” was the hiring of former Georgetown University star player Niki Reid Geckeler. Geckeler left Georgetown in 1993 as the school’s all-time leader in assists and in three- point field goal percentage, and has been in coaching ever since, so there was no doubts about her ability to manage Howard’s squad. “I always knew that I wanted to be a head coach,” said Geckeler, who graduated with a degree in psychology. “The various duties and responsibilities that I performed in various capacities helped prepare me for this opportunity. And the fact that I played the point guard position was also key because it helped me hone my leadership skills.” Displaying the same patience and mental toughness she used as a point guard, Geckeler led

Continued on B6

D.C. High School Basketball

Stags Face Knights in City Title

By Stephen D. Riley AFRO Staff Writer

After convincing wins in their respective conference title games, the Ballou Knights and DeMatha Stags will meet up on March 14 at the Verizon Center for arguably the most anticipated City Title game in years. The Stags rolled to a 71- 52 win over Gonzaga in the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference (WCAC) tournament final on March 8, their fifth conference title in six years. Ballou blasted Eastern, 103-89, in the D.C. Interscholastic Athletic

Association (DCIAA) final on March 6 to claim their second consecutive conference crown. With both teams ranked No. 1 and No. 2 in the District, the Stags will enter the game as the top-ranked school and defending city champions. DeMatha beat Ballou, 55-48, in last year’s game, but both teams have a different look this season. The Stags lost last year’s leading scorers Naji Hibbert to graduation and junior Josh Selby after the guard left the team for personal reasons last year. But DeMatha (29-3) has

team for personal reasons last year. But DeMatha (29-3) has Courtesy Photo DCIAA’s Ballou will take

Courtesy Photo

DCIAA’s Ballou will take on DeMatha of the WCAC in the City Title game on March. 14.

rebounded nicely. Led by standout guard Quinn Cook, the Stags still finished the regular season as the area’s top team and with a history of success on their side, the Stags coaches and players believe they can play with anybody. “They [Ballou] have a very good team but DeMatha has a good team also,” Stags head coach Mike Jones said. “We’ve won four out of the last five city championships; I think everybody needs to remember that.” The WCAC has dominated the City Title game during the last five years. In fact, a DCIAA team hasn’t won a City Title game since 2004 and aside from last year’s seven-point margin, the WCAC had won the previous four title games by an average of 31 points. Expectations are a little different this year, though. While DeMatha lost a few key players from the previous season, Ballou acquired a pair of their own. Talented guards Zalmico Harmon and Christian Leach transferred to the school last summer to join forces with the DCIAA’s top player in

Continued on B6

‘Skins Can Learn From Ravens’ Oz

By Stephen D. Riley AFRO Staff Writer

may not be ideal but it’s certainly one that Washington should scrutinize. If they were to ever make a music video of NFL owners “making it rain” at a club, the guy in the tank top, khakis and cash falling out his pocket would be none other then Redskins owner Daniel Snyder. Snyder’s “spend-or-die” approach in recent seasons has netted him no trophies or titles just losing seasons, ridicule and mockery from critics and fans. His $100 million pickup of Albert Haynesworth at the start of free agency last year was lauded more for the acquisition’s price tag than its judiciousness. Instead of bolstering an aging and depleted offensive line, Snyder added $100 million to a defense that finished fourth in the league the previous season. But that’s Snyder for you. It doesn’t matter what the team’s needs are, just reel in the best free agent on the market, make a PR splash and sell some tickets. Operating at times with no blueprint or direction, Snyder’s hiring of head coach Mike Shanahan and General Manager Bruce Allen may be arguably the best set of moves he’s ever made in his career as an owner. The

Just what in the heck is going on around here? A Maryland-based NFL team breaks

out the dollars at the start of free agency and it’s not the Washington Redskins? Nope, guess again. The Redskins’ Interstate 95 north neighbor, the Baltimore Ravens, pulled off the headline move of the weekend when they snagged disgruntled Arizona receiver Anquan Boldin for a couple of mid-round draft picks and a handshake. The Ravens, never too shy to make a move, don’t usually play the monopoly game of the NFL offseason. But when they do take a gamble, it’s usually a big one. From Shannon Sharpe to Willis McGahee and even the late Steve McNair, Baltimore has shown it will spend wisely on high- profile free agents. It’s that same method that has allowed the Ravens to stay ultra- competitive among the Indianapolis Colts, San Diego Chargers, New England Patriots and Pittsburgh Steelers-type contenders of the AFC. Ravens General Manager Ozzie Newsome (the NFL’s first Black general

manager) has made some brilliant moves during his tenure with Baltimore, and whenever he senses his team is a piece or two from seriously competing, he adds more ice to his veins, twists his cap back and rolls the dice with no

hesitation. The Ravens have been ousted from the playoffs the last two years by the eventual AFC Super Bowl representative. With a blossoming offense and still stingy defense, Newsome patched up the one sore spot he felt was holding his club back: the receiver position. That’s Newsome for you. He builds his team from the draft up then patches his weak positions with proven veterans who can still bring it on gameday. The only thing that’s stood between Newsome and a few more Super Bowl titles was a problematic quarterback position the city of Baltimore believes he’s since rectified. The likes of Boldin and the newly acquired Donte Stallworth may not be enough to get Baltimore back to the promise land, but it’s enough to put Joe Flacco and company back in the position of Super Bowl favorites again. Baltimore’s team-building formula

"If they were to ever make a music video of NFL owners 'making it rain' at a club, the guy in the tank top, khakis and cash falling out his pocket would be none other then Redskins owner Daniel Snyder."

team is now run by Allen and Shanahan, and it’s showing already. Washington didn’t ring the dinner bell when free agency started this year, they simply signed versatile offensive lineman Artis Hicks to a quiet three-year deal to man the right side of the line. Washington’s interest in linemen Tony Pashos and Chad Clifton didn’t end in lucrative big dollar deals – both men signed with other teams – but it showed the Redskins are recommitted to building a winner with solid acquisitions at troubled positions, instead of free wheel spending on flashy players. It may be a different approach from what Redskin fans are used to, but if Snyder and Washingtonians are looking for the formula of how to get back to being competitive, they don’t need to look far. A trip up Interstate 95 is all that’s needed to show them how it’s done.

Bowie State Basketball

Lady Bulldogs Miss Out on ‘Big Dance’

By AFRO Staff

The NCAA Division II Women’s Basketball Committee recently announced its 2010 Championship Tournament field of 64. Unfortunately for Bowie State, the field did not include the Lady Bulldogs. Bowie State was ranked eighth in the final regular season Atlantic Region poll, and was hoping to make the cut after falling to the Fayetteville State Lady Broncos, 66-50, in the 65th annual Central Interscholastic Athletic Association Championship tournament finals. While FSU (20-9 overall record) will receive an automatic bid into the D-II tournament after claiming their first CIAA title since 2001 (third in school history), Bowie State (18-8 overall) needed help from another team. But the Lady Bulldogs didn’t get that help as the Fairmont State upset West Liberty, 85-78, in overtime during the West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference tournament finals. The win gave Fairmont State an automatic appearance in the Division II tournament because West Liberty was ranked fourth in the Atlantic Region Poll. “It was disappointing not to get the bid for the tournament, but overall we had a successful season,” said head coach Donna Polk. “I was pleased with our Atlantic Region ranking all season and to end the season ranked eighth was a good thing for the program. I wish our fellow CIAA schools success as they represent our conference in the tournament.”

as they represent our conference in the tournament.” Courtesy Photo/BSU Bianca Lee and the Lady Bulldogs

Courtesy Photo/BSU

Bianca Lee and the Lady Bulldogs just missed out on a chance to compete in the NCAA Division II basketball championship tournament.

Continued on B6

B6

The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010 Geckeler Points Lady Bison in Winning Direction

Geckeler Points Lady Bison in Winning Direction

Continued from B5

the slumping Lady Bison to a 9-9 MEAC record during the 2008-09 regular season and onto the second round of the ‘09 MEAC tournament, before losing to eventual champion, North Carolina A&T. “I have to admit that it was a challenging transition for me,” Geckeler said. “We had to change the culture and get them to believe that they could win.” Changing the culture meant adding new players, so Geckeler and her staff instantly began rebuilding the program by signing eight incoming freshmen. Among the newbies were top recruits such as point guard Cheyenne Curley-Payne, talented guard Tamoria Holmes, twin forwards Portia and Nicole Deterville and swing forward Kara Smith. “It was important for us to bring in student athletes who were from winning programs,” says Geckeler. “Coach (Jimmy) Howard, our recruiting coordinator, did an outstanding job in that area.” The Lady Bison is now one of the youngest teams in Division I women’s basketball, but it still managed to compete at a high level, thanks to Geckeler, who’s now responsible for a girl far

Stags Face Knights in City Title

younger than any of her players. A little more than nine months ago, Geckeler gave birth to her daughter, Makenzie. She admitted the added responsibility forced her to change her coaching style a tad. “I had to slow down because I was trying to do things that I normally do in terms of practice and demonstrating certain things to the players,” she said. “But I get so much support from my husband, my staff, the university and the players. They have all been great. It is really a blessing.” Coach Geckeler believes that blessing is not only shared with her husband, but with each of her players, too. “It is interesting how I have gone from being ‘Coach G’ to ‘Mama G’ with the players,” she says. “But one of the biggest keys to success is the communication between the coaches and the student athletes. It is important that they become not only successful in the sport of basketball, but also in their lives as they mature and develop as a result of this experience.”

Ed Hill Jr., Howard’s sports information director, contributed to this article.

Continued from B5

Donte Thomas. The trio combined for 68 points in the Knights win over Eastern, headlined by Thomas’ 32 points. Thomas has led the conference in scoring for the last three years and with the addition of Leach and Harmon, the results have led to a 30-4 record and double-digit wins in 19 games this season. When faced with competition, Thomas has annihilated all comers this year. His 62 points in two DCIAA playoff games were defined with three-pointers and slashes to the basket. At 6-foot-3, Thomas plays bigger than his listed size and will definitely be on the Stags’ scouting tape this week. Coach Jones

may elect to put 6-foot-4 defensive standout Victor Oladipo on Thomas in attempts to slow the high-scoring guard. Whatever the strategy is, Jones isn’t telling on the eve of the biggest game of the year. “We’re going to play basketball and we’re going to play the best game we can play,” Jones said. “We’re going to prepare the way we need to prepare and we’re going to come up with whatever game plan we need to come up with.” Perhaps the one thing that will make this game more competitive than either team’s last outing is the fact that this will be the first time since last season’s title game that the schools have played against each other.

Both Ballou’s and DeMatha’s conference title games marked the third meeting between their respected opponents, so familiarity may have played a factor in the wide margins of victory. DeMatha’s 71-59 win over Coolidge in early December was the only matchup between the DCIAA and WCAC for both schools this season. Just how unfamiliar are the clubs? When Quinn Cook sits down to review film this week, it’ll be the first time all season that he’s seen Ballou play. “I’m hearing they’re real good,” Cook said. “I haven’t seen them play yet.” He will on March 14.

Lady Bulldogs Miss Out on ‘Big Dance’

Continued from B5

Men’s team upset in CIAAs As for the men’s squad, No. 2 conference ranked Bowie State suffered their own upset loss in CIAA Championship tournament, falling to Elizabeth City State, 68-56, in the quarterfinals. ECSU stole the win by containing the teammates of BSU’s Duke Crews, who was named CIAA Player of the Year, heading into the tournament. Crews performed well, scoring 19 points, along with 13 rebounds, but the rest of the team was limited in production. “If I was the opposing team, I think I’d do kind of the same thing,” said Crews, on how his teammates were contained. “We’ve kind of faced it the whole year. You have to give them all the

credit. They executed their game plan and they came out with the win.” Elizabeth City State went on to lose to St. Augustine, 63-59, in the CIAA men’s tournament final.

More on the ‘10 CIAAs Popular brewing company Miller Lite sponsored a couple of events during the 2010 CIAA tournament in Charlotte, N.C. The Miller Lite Time Gallery and the Miller Lite Main Stage offered participants a fun-filled experience that included performances by Black musicians and comedians from around the country. Miller Lite also donated $10,000 in scholarship funds to promote education at HBCUs.

comedians from around the country. Miller Lite also donated $10,000 in scholarship funds to promote education

March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American B7

Faith In Action

Church Briefs

Compiled by Herb Quarles

Peoples’ Lenten Schedule The 2010 Lenten season schedule will continue at 6 p.m. on March 12 in Fellowship Hall at Peoples Congregational Church located at 4704 13th St. N.W. The discussion, led by the church’s Board of Christian Education, will be “Difficult Conversations.” All are welcome. Call the church office at 202-829-5511 for additional information.

Revival Ends The three-night revival service that is being held in

Ends The three-night revival service that is being held in Courtesy Photo The Rev. Dr. Jeremiah

Courtesy Photo

The Rev. Dr. Jeremiah A. Wright is the evangelist for Plymouth Church’s revival.

connection with the Lenten study service will continue at 7 p.m. through March 12 at Plymouth Congregational Church located at 5301 N. Capitol St. N.E. The evangelist is the Rev. Dr.

Jeremiah A. Wright. He is pastor emeritus at Trinity UCC in Chicago, Ill. The Rev. Dr. Graylan S. Hagler, senior pastor at the church, invites the community to come and hear this dynamic and controversial preacher. He will address the theme, “Lord, Help Me to Hold Out.” Call the church office at 202-723-5330 or visit online at Plymouth-ucc. org for additional information.

Jazz Concert The Jazz Society of Peoples Congregational will present a concert at 4 p.m. on March 14 at the church located at 4704 13th St. N.W. The concert, “Here’s to Love,” will feature Peoples’ Women in Jazz with the Wes Biles Quartet. The women will include Toni Robinson, Shirleta Settles, Gail Shipp and Ester Williams. This concert was set for Valentine’s Day weekend but was canceled because of the snow. Call 202-723-3953 for ticket and other information. The e-mail address is jazzatpeoples@gmail.com.

HU Chapel Services Howard University is on spring break and there will be no chapel services on March 14. The Rev. Dr. Cynthia Hale will preach during the 11 a.m. worship services on March 21 in Cramton Auditorium located at 2455 Sixth St. N.W. on the school’s campus. She is pastor of Ray of Hope Christian Church in Decatur,

Ga. The Rev. Dr. Renita J.

Weems will preach on March

28.

Broadcasts of sermons can be heard the following Sunday at 11 a.m. on WHUR-FM 96.3 radio. Call 202-806-7194 or visit online at chapel.howard. edu/Worship/ChapelSevices/ SpeakersSchedule.

Soprano in Concert Frances A. Jones, a mezzo- soprano, will be presented in a concert at 3 p.m. on March 20 at Albright United Methodist Church located at Fourth and Rittenhouse streets N.W. Jones is a graduate of Duke Ellington School of the Arts and continued her studies at the North Carolina School of Music and the University of Hartford Hartt School of Music. Her program will feature selections from the standard recital repertory and spirituals. It will be open free to the public and the proceeds from sponsorships will benefit By Grace Through Faith Ministries, a public charity. Call Ida Brown at 202-545- 1300 by March 13 to become a business or individual sponsor.

KSU Choir in Concert The Kentucky State University Choir, under the direction of Carl Smith, will be presented in concert at 7:30 p.m. on March 16 at Enon Baptist Church located at 505 L St. N.E. The church’s choirs will also participate

505 L St. N.E. The church’s choirs will also participate The Kentucky State University Choir in

The Kentucky State University Choir

in the program, which will be hosted by the Kentucky State University Alumni

Association. There is no cost to attend the concert, but

a free-will offering will be

collected. The choir will also perform at 1:30 p.m. on the same day at the Luke Moore Academy on Monroe St. N.E. This event provides an opportunity for members of the faith community and local students to hear

a performance from an

acclaimed, historically Black institution. There will be a question– and-answer period following this performance and Smith will hold auditions for students interested in studying music at Kentucky State. In addition to talent, the student must have a 2.5 grade average and be at least 18 to qualify. Prentiss Ervin, the music teach at the academy, will assist in this process. The choir tours the

United States annually and has performed with several major orchestras. Frequently, the choir appears at music workshops, seminars and

professional conventions including the Southern and National Divisions of the American Choral Directors Association and the Music Educators National Convention. The choir also participates in choral competitions and

most recently received the top rating in the HBCU competition “Extravaganza in Black.” For more information about Kentucky State Choir’s performance at Enon Baptist Church, contact Geraldine Jackson at 202-347-7561.

Benedict Choir in Concert The Benedict College Concert Choir, under the direction of Linda L. Kershaw, will perform in concert at 4 p.m. on March

Courtesy Photo

14 at Third Street Church of God located at 1204 Third St. N.W. The choir, from Columbia, S.C., has been dedicated to the preservation of African- American music throughout the history of the college. With a membership of more than 70 voices, it is recognized for its stylistic diversity and originality. Its repertoire includes works ranging from anthems, operas, oratorio choruses, spirituals, contemporary gospel and Broadway show tunes. The touring group includes members representing every academic discipline on Benedict’s campus. The Rev. Dr. Cheryl J. Sanders, senior pastor, invites the community to come out and enjoy an afternoon of beautiful music. The concert is open free to the public, but a freewill offering will be collected. Call the church office at 202- 347-5889 or visit online at thirdstreet.org for additional information.

Obituaries

Obituaries

Morgan A. Wallace, 65

Prince George’s County Department of Public Works Employee

Morgan Alfonso Wallace was born April 18, 1944, in Washington, D.C., to the late William Benjamin Wallace and Alice Thelma Wallace Tyler. He departed this life Feb. 6 at Southern Maryland Hospital. Morgan received his education in the Anne Arundel County Public School System and he retired from the Prince George’s County Department of Public Works in October 2005 with 39 years of service. Morgan was known as a “jack of all trades.” Retirement didn’t slow him down and he want on to pursue other interests and hobbies, including starting his own tree removal service and rendering catering and restaurant services. Morgan was united in holy matrimony to Winnie Mason on July 19, 1986. God blessed them with three children, Craig, Vanessa and James. Morgan was truly loved by all and he

Vanessa and James. Morgan was truly loved by all and he possessed a great love for

possessed a great love for his family and friends. He demonstrated this by the numerous gatherings had had at his home. His parents and twin sisters, Zelma Wallace and Thelma Wallace Penny preceded him in death. He leaves to cherish his memories one daughter, Vanessa (Errin); two sons, Craig and James (Melanie); eight grandchildren, Darius Mason, Dashawn, Craig Jr., Amira, Zion, Elyssia Wallace, J’Miyah and Sabrina Sheard; one sister, Arlethia B. Carter (Daniel); six brothers, Stanley (Alberta), Bishop William J. Wallace (Dorine), Bishop James C. Wallace (Luray), Thomas (Elaine), Arnold (Rachel) and Elder Michael Wallace Sr.; one aunt, Mary E. Mosby; special niece Darlene Hudson; godsons Lorenzo Simms, Michael Wright and Adrien Greenwell; devoted friend Winnie Wallace; sidekick Dale Wright and a host of relatives and friends.

Robsol G. Pinkett, 57

Robsol G. Pinkett, 57

Contractor, Writer

The life of Robsol Grant Pinkett Jr. was celebrated March 6 at the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Baltimore and officiated by William F. Taylor Lodge No. 57. Pinkett died of a heart attack on Feb. 20 in Moreno Valley, Calif. Pinkett was the son of the late Robsol G. Pinkett Esq. and Shirley H. Pinkett of Baltimore. He was the

Robsol was a highly respected and well known builder/contractor whose skill was widely applauded and

Robsol was a highly respected and well known builder/contractor whose skill was widely applauded and sought by the larger construction firms of the city. In addition to his work as a contractor, Robsol wrote short stories, poems and songs. Prior to his death, Rob was refining and preparing to produce and publish many of his works. Among friends joining

father of Jada Pinket-Smith, Caleeb Jacheem Pinkett of

California, and Terab Marissa Pinkett of Baltimore. Robsol was the brother

of Stephen M. Pinkett Sr., uncle of Stephen M. Pinkett Jr. and Jessica A. Pinkett of Baltimore.

in the celebration of his life were longtime friends

ROBSOL G. PINKETT

and classmates Joan Pratt, Baltimore City comptroller; retired Lt. Col. Quintin Faison of Texas, Ronald Robinson of Washington, D.C., Joseph Bright, Mr. and

Mrs. Marvin Jackson and Mr. and Ahmad Burundi of Baltimore.

B8 The Washington Afro-American, March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010

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LEGAL NOTICES

S uperior Court of t he District of

C olumbia

C ivil Division Case No. 0000953-10 I N RE:

E rica Justine Schaller Applicant O RDER OF P UBLICATION C HANGE OF NAME Erica Justine Schaller h aving filed a complaint f or judgment changing Erica Justine Schaller name to Erica Justine Volpe and having ap- p lied to the court for an Order of Publication of t he notice required by l aw in such cases; it is

by the Court this 19th d ay of February, 2010. O RDERED, that all per- sons concerned show cause, if any there be, o n or before the 26th d ay of March, 2010, why the prayers of said com- p laint should not be g ranted; provided that a copy of this order be published once a week f or three consecutive w eeks before said day in the Afro-American.

J UDGE

A TRUE COPY TEST:

2/26, 3/5, 3/12

S uperior Court of t he District of D istrict of Columbia P ROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

2 0001-2131

A dministration No.

2 010ADM105

Agnes W. Hawkins

D ecedent

NOTICE OF

APPOINTMENT,

NOTICE TO

CREDITORS

AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

L. Johnson, whose

address is 607 Irving Street, NW Washington

DC 20010 was ap-

pointed personal repre- sentative of the estate of Agnes W. Hawkins, who died on January 13, 2010 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter

their appearance in this

Ella

proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of de-

cedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before Au-

gust 26, 2010. Claims

against the decedent

shall be presented to the

undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before August 26, 2010, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be

heirs or legatees of the

decedent who do not re-

ceive a copy of this no-

tice by mail within 25

days of its first publica-

tion shall so inform the Register of Wills, includ- ing name, address and relationship.

Date of Publication:

February 26, 2010 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter Ella L. Johnson Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 2/26, 3/5, 3/12

LEGAL NOTICES

S uperior Court of t he District of District of Columbia P ROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

A dministration No.

2010ADM97

M arlene Elizabeth A llison Decedent W illiam A. Bland, Esq 1140 Connecticut Ave NW #1100 Washington DC 20036 A ttorney NOTICE OF

A PPOINTMENT,

N OTICE TO CREDITORS A ND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Kim M. Waddy, whose

a ddress is 25065

Pappys Way, Hol- l ywood, MD 20636 was

a ppointed personal re-

presentative of the

e

E

died on November 3, 2 009 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All un-

k nown heirs and heirs

whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter t heir appearance in this

proceeding. Objections to such appointment

s hall be filed with the

Register of Wills, D.C., 5 15 5th Street, N.W., 3 rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or be- f ore August 26, 2010. Claims against the de- cedent shall be pre-

s

s

Register of Wills or filed

w

w

signed, on or before Au-

g

e

b

l egatees of the decedent

w ho do not receive a

c opy of this notice by

m ail within 25 days of its

f irst publication shall so

elieved to be heirs or

ver barred. Persons

ust 26, 2010, or be for-

ith a copy to the under-

ith the Register of Wills

igned with a copy to the

ented to the under-

lizabeth Allison, who

state of Marlene

i nform the Register of W ills, including name,

a ddress and relation-

ship.

D ate of Publication:

F

N

A

Washington Law

R eporter Kim M. Waddy

P ersonal

R epresentative

TRUE TEST COPY

R EGISTER OF WILLS

ebruary 26, 2010

ame of newspaper:

fro-American

2 /26, 3/5, 3/12

S uperior Court of t he District of

District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

2 0001-2131

Administration No.

2 010ADM96

R obert Lee Twitty Sr

aka R obert L. Twitty D ecedent

A rnettia S. Wright Esq Wright Law Group PC 5 335 Wisconsin Ave N W Suite 440 Washington DC

20015

A ttorney NOTICE OF

APPOINTMENT, N OTICE TO C REDITORS

AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

G eorgene Twitty, whose

address is 4415 A

Street, SE, Washington

D C

p ointed personal repre-

sentative of the estate of

R obert Lee Twitty, Sr.

a ka Robert L. Twitty,

who died on August 10,

2008 without a will, and

will serve without Court supervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter

their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C.,

515 5th Street, N.W.,

20019 was ap-

3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or be- fore August 26, 2010. Claims against the de- cedent shall be pre- sented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the under- signed, on or before Au- gust 26, 2010, or be for- ever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its

first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relation- ship. Date of Publication:

February 26, 2010 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Georgene Twitty Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 2/26, 3/5, 3/12

Notice is hereby

given that the Free- dom Fellowship Christian Church (FFCC), Washington,

DC is now dis-

banded. Legal no-

tices

can be sent to

PO

Box 30857,

Washington, DC

20030.

LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of t he District of

C olumbia

Civil Division C ase No. 0001004-10 I N RE:

Robert Region Miller

A pplicant

O RDER OF PUBLICATION C HANGE OF NAME Robert Region Miller having filed a complaint f or judgment changing

Robert Region Miller

n ame to Lytesha Deb-

o rah Ann Miller and hav-

ing applied to the court f or an Order of Publica-

t ion of the notice re-

quired by law in such

c ases; it is by the Court

t his 22nd day of Feb-

ruary 2010. O RDERED, that all per- sons concerned show

cause, if any there be,

o

day of March 2010, why

the prayers of said com-

p laint should not be

granted; provided that a

c opy of this order be

p ublished once a week

for three consecutive

w eeks before said day

i n the Afro-American.

JUDGE

n or before the 29th

A TRUE COPY TEST:

3/5, 3/12, 3/19

Superior Court of t he District of D istrict of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

2 0001-2131

A dministration No.

000ADM116-10

Emanuel Young

D ecedent

NOTICE OF

APPOINTMENT,

N OTICE TO

CREDITORS

AND NOTICE TO

UNKNOWN HEIRS

obyne Erska Crews

R

H

1 202 Java Place Land-

o ver, MD 20785 was ap-

pointed personal repre-

s entative of the estate of

E manuel Young, who

d ied on December 29,

2 009 with a will, and will

s erve without Court su-

p ervision. All unknown

heirs and heirs whose

w hereabouts are un-

k nown shall enter their

appearance in this

p roceeding. Objections

t o such appointment (or

t o the probate of de-

cedent´s will) shall be

f iled with the Register of W ills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor W ashington, D.C. 2 0001, on or before

S eptember 5, 2010.

Claims against the de-

c

s

signed with a copy to the

R

the Register of Wills

a copy to the under-

w

w

signed, on or before

S eptember 5, 2010, or

b

sons believed to be

h

d

ceive a copy of this no-

tice by mail within 25

d

t

ion shall so inform the

ays of its first publica-

ecedent who do not re-

eirs or legatees of the

e forever barred. Per-

ill, whose address is

edent shall be pre-

ented to the under-

egister of Wills or filed

ith

ith

Register of Wills, includ- i ng name, address and

r elationship. Date of Publication:

March 5, 2010

N ame of newspaper:

A fro-American

Washington Law

R

R

Hill

Personal

R epresentative

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 3 /5, 3/12, 3/19

obyne Erska Crews

eporter

Superior Court of t he District of

District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2010ADM122

Rosa L Johnson

Decedent

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Sharon J. Graham, whose address is 4220 Alexis Lane, King George, VA 22485 was appointed personal re- presentative of the estate of Rosa L. John- son, who died on January 2, 2010 with a will, and will serve with- out Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are un- known shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of de- cedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before September 5, 2010. Claims against the de- cedent shall be pre- sented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the under- signed, on or before September 5, 2010, or be forever barred. Per- sons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not re- ceive a copy of this no- tice by mail within 25 days of its first publica- tion shall so inform the Register of Wills, includ-

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LEGAL NOTICES

i ng name, address and r elationship.

Date of Publication:

M arch 5, 2010 N ame of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law R eporter S haron J. Graham Personal

epresentative

T RUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 3/5, 3/12, 3/19

R

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2010ADM139

Mary V. M. Stovall Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Sylvia C. Saunders, whose address is 3522

Bruton Parish Way, Sil- ver Spring, MD 20904 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Mary V. M. Stovall, who died on December 16, 2009 with

will, and will serve

without Court supervi- sion. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are un-

known shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections

such appointment (or

the probate of de-

cedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before September 5, 2010. Claims against the de- cedent shall be pre- sented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the under- signed, on or before September 5, 2010, or be forever barred. Per- sons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not re- ceive a copy of this no-

to

to

a

LEGAL NOTICES

tice by mail within 25 d ays of its first publica- t ion shall so inform the Register of Wills, includ- ing name, address and

r elationship.

Date of Publication:

M arch 5, 2010 N ame of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law Reporter S ylvia C. Saunders Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 3/5, 3/12, 3/19

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

000ADM138-10

Marcia Slacum Greene Decedent Paul Terrence O’Grady 131 E Broad Street Suite 205 Falls Church, VA

22046

Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO

UNKNOWN HEIRS Jackie Greene, whose address is 8010 West Beach Dr., NW Washington DC 20012 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Marcia Slacum

Greene, who died on

January 4, 2010 without a will, and will serve without Court supervi- sion. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are un- known shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or be- fore September 5, 2010. Claims against the de- cedent shall be pre- sented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed

under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed LEGAL NOTICES with the

LEGAL NOTICES

with the Register of Wills w ith a copy to the under- s igned, on or before September 5, 2010, or be forever barred. Per- s ons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not re- ceive a copy of this no- t ice by mail within 25

days of its first publica- t ion shall so inform the Register of Wills, includ- ing name, address and relationship. Date of Publication:

March 5, 2010 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter Jackie Greene Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 3/5, 3/12, 3/19

Superior Court of the District of

District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

000ADM128-10

Mary Ethel Walker Decedent James E. McCollum Jr. 7309 Baltimore Ave. Suite 117 College Park MD

20740

Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Rodney S. Walker, Sr, whose address is 2403 Pimpernel Drive, Wal- dorf, Maryland 20603 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Mary Ethel Walker, who died on Au- gust 27, 2009 without a will, and will serve with- out Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are un- known shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C.,

appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., LEGAL NOTICES 5 15 5th Street,

LEGAL NOTICES

5 15 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington,

.C. 20001, on or be-

D

f ore September 5, 2010.

Claims against the de- cedent shall be pre-

ented to the under-

s

s

R

with the Register of Wills

w

s

September 5, 2010, or

b

sons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not re-

ceive a copy of this no- tice by mail within 25

days of its first publica- tion shall so inform the Register of Wills, includ- ing name, address and relationship. Date of Publication:

March 5, 2010 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

e forever barred. Per-

igned, on or before

ith a copy to the under-

egister of Wills or filed

igned with a copy to the

Rodney S. Walker, Sr. Personal Representative

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 3/5, 3/12, 3/19

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

000124ADM-10

Frank Thomas Halpin Decedent R. Rochelle Burns Esq 2201 L Street NW Suite # T-3 Washington DC 20037 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS R. Rochelle Burns, whose address is 2201

L

Street, NW Suite # T-3

Washington, DC 20037 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Frank Thomas Halpin, who died on February 4, 2010 with a will, and will serve with- out Court supervision. All unknown heirs and

March 13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American B9

13, 2010 - March 19, 2010, The Washington Afro-American B9 LEGAL NOTICES heirs whose hereabouts are

LEGAL NOTICES

heirs whose

hereabouts are un-

k

appearance in this

roceeding. Objections

p

t o such appointment (or

the probate of de-

c

filed with the Register of

W

S

Washington, D.C. 2 0001, on or before

eptember 5, 2010.

Claims against the de-

c

s

signed with a copy to the

egister of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with a copy to the under-

igned, on or before

s

September 5, 2010, or

forever barred. Per-

s

heirs or legatees of the

d

c

tice by mail within 25

ays of its first publica- t ion shall so inform the

Register of Wills, includ- i ng name, address and r elationship. Date of Publication:

M

Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

R . Rochelle Burns

ersonal

Representative

T

EGISTER OF WILLS

3/5, 3/12, 3/19

R

d

be

ons believed to be

R

ented to the under-

edent shall be pre-

S

to

edent´s will) shall be

nown shall enter their

w

ills, D.C., 515 5th

treet, N.W., 3rd Floor

ecedent who do not re-

eive a copy of this no-

arch 5, 2010

P

RUE TEST COPY

S uperior Court of

the District of D istrict of Columbia P ROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

2

0001-2131

Administration No.

2010ADM111

N eil J. Paterson Decedent Wesley L Clarke 1 629 K Street Suite 300 Washington DC 2 0005 A ttorney NOTICE OF

A

PPOINTMENT,

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO U NKNOWN HEIRS Sharon Paterson Bush, whose address is 164 Upper Norfolk Avenue, PO Box 113, Park City, UT 84060, was ap-

p

ointed personal repre-

entative of the estate of Neil J Paterson, who

d

s

ied on February 26,

2 006 with a will, and will

serve with Court su-

p

h

hereabouts are un-

k

a

p

such appointment (or

t o the probate of de-

c

filed with the Register of

Wills, D.C., 515 5th

treet, N.W., 3rd Floor

S

ashington, D.C.

20001, on or before

eptember 5, 2010.

laims against the de-

cedent shall be pre-

sented to the under-

s

egister of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills

ith a copy to the under-

s

September 5, 2010, or

b

s

eirs or legatees of the decedent who do not re-

eive a copy of this no-

c

t ice by mail within 25 days of its first publica-

tion shall so inform the

R

egister of Wills, includ-

h

w

R

igned with a copy to the

C

S

W

edent´s will) shall be

to

roceeding. Objections

ervision. All unknown

eirs and heirs whose