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The Founder

The GIK Institute is as dear to me as a child to his parents.


It gives me pleasure to see that the sapling we planted in
1993 is now a flowering tree providing its cool shade to
seekers of knowledge.
Ghulam Ishaq Khan

From the Rector


The past few years, like before, have been quite productive for the GIK Institute. A number of
new disciplines (undergraduate and postgraduate) have been introduced. Curriculum and
laboratories are being updated all the time and new equipment added. Student and faculty
numbers have increased substantially, without compromising quality. Student-teacher ratio has
improved. Collaboration has been established with several more reputable foreign universities
and faculty and students continue to shine at the national and international levels. All this has
been possible because of the hard work and dedication of our world class faculty, and the
support of our many friends, particularly the alumni. As a result, GIK continues to maintain its
high academic standards, and its position as one of the leading institutions of higher learning in
Pakistan.
A unique feature of GIK is that all students and faculty members have to live on its attractive, selfcontained and secure campus, which facilitates close interaction between teachers and
students, as well as among the students themselves. While the emphasis is on academics,
including research, students have an opportunity to participate in a range of activities outside
the classroom, which is essential to an all round education and personality development. Apart
from the excellent sports facilities, there are some two dozen students' societies: from art to
aero-modelling; from mathematics to media.
The GIK admissions process is based entirely on merit. Although we are a not-for-profit
institution, we try to ensure that the brightest students do not miss the opportunity of coming
here because of their limited financial resources. About one-fourth of the new intake will receive
scholarships or financial assistance, both from our own resources and with the help of our many
partners, which include alumni, philanthropists, companies and Federal and Provincial
governments, to whom we are grateful. The Institute disbursed more than Rupees thirty five
million from its own resources in the 2014-15 academic session in the form of scholarships and
interest free loans.
I look forward to the opportunity of welcoming you to the GIK Institute.

Jehangir Bashar

CONTENTS
CONTENTS
Campus

Campus Life
Genesis
Aims & Objectives
Board of Governors
Environment and Location of the Institute
Facilities
Library & Information Services

07
08
09
10
11
12
16

Academics
International Advisory Board
Admissions Office
Fees and Expenses
Financial Assistance and Scholarships
Examinations

18
20
22
23
24

Faculties
Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering
Faculty of Electrical Engineering (Electronics & Power)
Faculty of Engineering Sciences
Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering
Chemical Engineering Program
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering
Management Sciences Department

29
55
73
87
103
115
129

Student Affairs Office


Open House & Careers Fair
ORIC & QEC
GIK Alumni
Gold Medalists 2014

150
154
155
156
157

Information
Administration and Faculty
Academic Calendar
How to get to GIK Institute

158
159
160

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Chancellor
I note with satisfaction the progress
made by the Ghulam Ishaq Khan
Institute as a highly reputed centre of
excellence in engineering sciences
and technology. It is also gratifying to
learn that the Institute continues to
maintain its high standards of
teaching and research and is
producing graduates of great caliber
and potential who are contributing
significantly towards socioeconomic and industrial
development of the country.
Being a developing country, Pakistan needs a workforce which is
not only competent but is also imbued with a spirit to take the
challenges of nation building. Fortunately we have no dearth of
talent. Our youth is our asset. We need to exploit this huge
potential. By imparting quality education, we can transform our
youth and prepare them to acquire and assimilate the latest in
science and technology, to innovate, and to add to the body of
world knowledge, including the development of indigenous
technologies. A great responsibility, thus, lies on the universities,
like the GIK Institute, and other seats of higher learning. The
nation expects these institutions to produce the kind of
manpower that has the capacity and will to bring about
qualitative change in the society.
It is indeed heartening to note that GIK Institute is playing its role
and is contributing significantly towards the cause of nation
building. I therefore wish to commend the Board of Governors
and Executive Committee of the Institute, the faculty and the
entire staff of GIKI for their dedication and commitment. I trust
that they will continue discharging their responsibilities with
same vigor and enthusiasm.
I also welcome GIKI's initiative to increase number of students by
addition of modern engineering disciplines. I pray for even
greater success of this institute in its mission.

Mamnoon Hussain
President, Islamic Republic of Pakistan

President, SOPREST
Established more than a decade ago
the GIK Institute has, by the grace of
Almighty God, risen like a shining star
on the academic horizon of Pakistan
and won national and international
recognition for its high standard of
teaching, quality of research and
competent faculty. The alumnae of
the Institute are holding high the flag
of the Institute and are serving in
responsible positions in different
countries and continents of the world.
The Institute has shaped into a center of excellence in engineering
education and research.
As I now look back at the saga of its brilliant success, my thoughts
go back to late Ghulam Ishaq Khan, the Founder of the Institute.
The Institute is a living tribute to his sagacious and inspiring
leadership in its formative phase. I am sure that the future
generations will always pay rich tribute to him for creating this seat
of learning which bears his name.
To the new entrants, I send my greetings and good wishes with the
assurance that they will find the GIKI environment congenial and
highly conducive for academic achievement and personality
development. Let us all work together to enable the Institute
achieve greater heights in its pursuit of excellence.
May Allah Almighty be our protector and Guide. Ameen!

Engr. Shams ul Mulk, HI, Ph.D (Hon), D.Sc. (Hon)


Former Chief Minister KPK

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

From the Pro-Rector (Academic)


The GIK Institute comprises of six engineering faculties as well as a Management Sciences
and Humanities department. Each of these faculties is research led and undertakes diverse
eld of study from investigation of human behaviour to range of complex engineering
problems. Students enrolled for BS, Master and PhD Degree programmes benet from
working alongside with highly qualied faculty members and supported by state-of-the-art
laboratories. The Institute has also embarked on an ambitious journey to adopt Outcome
Based Education (OBE) as part of its commitment to continuous improvement through
innovative teaching methods. OBE is an initiative of top ranked institutes in the USA to
improve the quality of graduates based on pre-dened Programme Learning Outcomes
(PLOs). On fully assimilating OBE system GIKI graduates would be at par with those of many
North American Universities, as a consequence our graduates would nd it easy to assimilate
in OBE based educational institutions across the globe with ease.
As you may be aware that a university is only as good as its faculty; we therefore set a high standard in attracting
faculty of repute. These are individuals with demonstrated ability, who are deeply committed to their vocation and
have outstanding track records in teaching and research. However we do not rest on our laurels and earnestly strive
to excel in teaching and research through academic collaborations and attracting research grants. Providing solution
to real world problem is paramount hence we forge industrial partnership that is of signicance to Institution, Region
and the Nation. At GIKI you will nd an informal yet disciplined academic environment. We rmly believe the
stimulating environment we provide helps the students in the realization of their not only intellectual potential but
also shape their moral and ethical attitude. It is therefore no wonder why our graduates are sought after by top notch
multi-national companies, research organisations or get accepted for higher education degree programmes in
reputed universities across the globe.
We adhere to our core values of intellectual freedom, moral uprightness, upholding the merit in decision we make
and a rm commitment to academic excellence. I invite you to visit GIKI Mission and Vision page to get further insight
to what we stand for and in which direction we are heading. GIK Institute stands on a solid foundation ably supported
by a team of committed professionals and enthusiastic students. I invite the brightest of brains to joins us in this
wonderful journey of academic pursuit where we address the challenges and enjoy the success together. Although
we have achieved many milestones, but for us best is yet to come. Welcome aboard!
Prof. Dr. Javed Ahmad Chattha

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

From the Pro-Rector (Admin. and Finance)


It is a matter of great pleasure and privilege for me to welcome you to the prestigious
seat of learning and centre of excellence. Administering the vast GIKI campus, which
includes the Faculties, Hostels, Civic Amenities, Faculty residence and many other
structures and services, poses a challenge within itself. This challenge is met by the
Administration, Finance, Procurement, Security and Protocol, Maintenance and Works
Departments, each headed by Director (Administration) and Director (Finance), Director
Procurement, Director (Works and Maintenance) and Director Security and Protocol
working under my supervision. These are based in the H. U. Beg Admin Block.
The Departments endeavors to work in close coordination with other faculties and
related departments, providing proactive administrative, financial and logistic support for all the activities of the
Institute. Managing the human and economic resources of the Institute within the overall ambit of financial
discipline, procurement of supplies, improving and maintaining horticultural beauty of the campus, meeting the
transport needs fall within the scope of Administration & Finance. It is thus one place to which you, as a student,
will stay connected to during your stay at the Institute, especially as office bearers of the 25 professional and
non-professional societies functioning in the Institute.
I take pride in the role which Administration and Finance play in GIK Institute, striving for academic excellence,
meeting both the needs of the academic faculties and the students.
All the best for the entrance test and looking forward to seeing you becoming a part of the unique Campus
having a life style of its own kind and carrying the title of Gikian for the rest of your life.

Ahsan Basir Sheikh

Campus Life

CAMPUS LIFE

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Genesis
The Genesis of the Institute goes back to the early 50's when
Mr. Ghulam Ishaq Khan, during his close association with the
Water and Power Development Authority and the Pakistan
Industrial Development Corporation, became acutely aware of
Pakistan's dependence on foreign expertise and imported
technology. His frequent interaction with foreign and local
experts led to the idea of a center of excellence in engineering
sciences and production technology whose standards of
education would be comparable to those of its counterparts in
the advanced countries. The transformation of this idea into a
practical proposition took place in December 1985 when the
Benevolent Community Care and Infaq Foundation donated
Rs. 50 million for setting up an institute, and the Khyber
Pakhtun Khwa Government donated 218 acres of land for its
campus.
A milestone in the evolution of the Institute was the
registration, in June 1988, of its parent body, namely the
Society for the Promotion of Engineering Sciences and
Technology in Pakistan (SOPREST). Mr. Ghulam Ishaq Khan, the
then President of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, was elected
President of the Society for life and Mr. H. U. Beg appointed its
honorary Executive Director
The task of conceiving and formulating the basic form and
features of the Institute was entrusted to a group of eminent
scientists and engineers. Civil works at the campus site were
started in early 1990. An interim office of the Institute was set

up in August 1992 where experienced professionals worked


on the educational aims and philosophy of the Institute, its
curricula and details of equipment for its laboratories and
workshops. The ordinance for the establishment of the
Institute was promulgated by the Frontier Government in
March 1993 and the first batch of students entered its portals in
October 1993. It is the first not-for-profit, non-governmental
institute of its kind in the country and is dedicated to bring our
engineering education at par with that of advanced countries.

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Aims and Objectives


The aim of the Institute is to pursue excellence in education
and research by developing appropriate curricula and
teaching practices, acquiring talented faculty and providing
an environment conducive to teaching and learning. Its
graduates are expected to possess high professional
competence combined with the humanistic and moral values
envisaged in its Profile of the Graduates. The educational
philosophy of the Institute lays emphasis on training of the
mind rather than stuffing it with an inert body of facts; on
expanding the scientific imagination of the students rather
than making them tread well-worn and outmoded grooves of
thought. Guided by such convictions, the Institute educates
its students by confronting them with real-life problems, and
inculcating in them a problem-solving approach. They are
encouraged to explore and solve problems, to break new
grounds and to cultivate leadership qualities. Pakistan is on
the threshold of a major breakthrough in the technoindustrial fields and needs professionals with ability and
vision to lead the way. The Institute aims at producing such
professionals with a strong base of engineering education
and research. It strives to produce graduates who can
upgrade existing technological activities in the country and in
whom professional excellence is inseparable from a
commitment to the national ideals.

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Board of Governors
The Board of Governors sits at the apex of the statutory
pyramid of the Institute and its composition is the same as
that of the General Council of the Society for the Promotion
of Engineering Sciences and Technology. It has overall
control of the Institute, the powers to create new
components of the Institute such as a school, faculty or any
other teaching or research unit, and to change the
constitution of its Executive Committee and Governing
Council.
PRESIDENT
Engr. Shams ul Mulk, HI
Ph.D (hon), D.Sc (Hon)
Founding Members
Engr. Shah Nawaz Khan
Engr. Salim Saifullah Khan
Dr. Ishfaq Ahmad, NI, HI, SI
Mr. Yusuf H. Shirazi (or Mr. Ali H. Shirazi)
Mr. M. Adil Khattak

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Mr. Farid Rahman


Mr. Khwaja Zaheer Ahmad
Mr. Atif Rais Khan
Mr. Osman Saifullah Khan
Other Members
Mr. Abdul Razzaq Dawood
Mr. Shah Faisal Afridi
Ex-officio Members
Chairman, Higher Education Commission
Chairman, Water and Power Development Authority
Executive Director, SOPREST
Secretary, Finance Division, Govt. of Pakistan
Chief Secretary, Khyber Pakhtunkhawa
Secretary Law, Khyber Pakhtunkhawa
Secretary SOPREST and BOG
Mr. Mushtaq Ahmed

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Environment
Spread over an area of more than 400 acres, the Ghulam Ishaq
Khan Institute is located in the midst of the unspoilt and naturerich countryside of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province of
Pakistan. Lying at the foot of the beautiful lake of Tarbela Dam,
one of the largest earth-filled dams of the world, it is set against
the picturesque backdrop of rolling hills, vast grassy fields with
the mighty Indus meandering across a lush green belt.
Bordering on its campus is the traditional village of Topi, the
birth place of Sahibzada Abdul Qayyum Khan, who was the
pioneer of modern education in the Province. Close by is the
ancient village of Hund where Alexander the Great crossed the
Indus. The surrounding area, once known as the land of
Ghandara, is dotted profusely with archaeological sites of great

cultural significance. These include the well-known sites of the


ancient seats of learning, the Taxila University of the Ghandara
period and the Buddhist monastery at Takht Bhai. To these seats
of learning flocked students and scholars from all over South
Asia, Central Asia and China. It is in this region that we find the
sayings of Ashoka carved on rocks at Shabaz Garhi; the Naighe
Gatte megaliths (stone columns) on the Swabi-Mardan road;
and numerous stupas and chambers which fire the imagination
of the visitors to the area with the mysteries and glories of its
past. The excavated sites around Taxila, at Takht Bhai, Dir and in
Swat Valley transport them back to the civilization that
flourished here almost 2500 years back. Exquisite relics of that
era are the treasured possessions of the museums at Lahore,
Peshawar, Karachi, Dir, Swat and Taxila.
In addition to its great historical character, the location of the
Institute offers many advantages. The northern areas of
Pakistan which attract expeditions from all over the world are
easily accessible from here. Perhaps the most important
advantage is the invaluable opportunities it offers for
establishing interaction between industry and the university.
Some of the most important national industries are located
quite close to the Institute. These include the Telephone
Industries of Pakistan, Heavy Mechanical Complex, Heavy
Foundry and Forge Engineering, Kamra Aeronautical Complex,
Heavy Rebuild Factory and Locomotive Complex. Their
proximity offers invaluable opportunities for practical training
of the students.

Location of the Institute


Though away from the congestion, noise and pollution of big
cities, the Institute has easy access to Islamabad and Peshawar.
Both cities are connected with the rest of the country through
frequent air, train and bus services. Islamabad, the capital of
Pakistan, has an international airport which provides ready
access to the outside world. The Institute is located just by the
river Indus, adjacent to Tarbela Dam, and near the border with
Punjab. Driving time from Islamabad is just over an hour mostly
along the Islamabad - Peshawar motorway.

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CAMPUS LIFE

Facilities
Each Faculty of the Institute is housed in a building of its own
which has a graceful exterior and an elegant interior with all
comforts and conveniences for its users. Each academic
block has its teaching and research laboratories, workshops,
a computer centre, and offices for the faculty and staff, a
well-furnished conference hall, a discussion room, three
class-rooms, a lecture hall and a library for the faculty. The
number of laboratories in the Institute has now risen to 74.
The laboratories are equipped with the most advanced and
up to date equipments where high quality research is
possible.
The Administration block of the Institute includes the offices
of the Rector, Pro-Rectors, Dean (Student Affairs), Director
(A&E), Director (Admin), Director (Finance), Director
(Procurement) and other allied offices.

Students Accommodation: The accommodation


facilities for students are entirely on-campus. There are
eleven (11) hostels for boys and one separate hostel-wing for
girl students. The rooms in the hostels are equipped with
modern furniture and attached bathroom. The Institute
provides shared accommodation to all freshmen and
sophomore students. Single rooms are usually allotted to
junior and senior students on merit basis.
Since Topi has cold winters (with temperatures reaching -

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1C), the rooms are centrally heated and running hot water is
available during winter.
Each hostel has an air-conditioned common room that can
seat up to 80 students. It has a television with a satellite
receiver. The mess is run on a no-profit no-loss basis and a
student mess committee regulates the weekly menu and the
quality of the food.

Guest House & Auditorium: The first building


which was constructed right at the inception of the Institute
was the Guest House to accommodate guests for their short

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

stay at the campus. It is situated close to the main entrance of


the Institute and is centrally air-conditioned. Fully furnished,
it has ten bedrooms and a big lounge for indoor functions. A
spectacular auditorium occupies the central place in the
campus and its dome meshes with the surrounding hills to
present a breath-taking skyscape. It has a seating capacity of
535 and is a venue of conferences, seminars, debates,
declamation contests, concerts, and other such functions. A
lavishly furnished conference room, a seminar/workshop
room and a service centre are also parts of this block.

Faculty Club: Faculty Club has been constructed on the


top of a hill and presents a picturesque view of Tarbela Dam
and its environs. Its building is air-conditioned and is fully
furnished. The accommodation comprises four bedrooms, a
spacious sitting hall and a dining room where over 100
persons can be entertained.
Civic Amenities: The campus is becoming a selfcontained university town with adequate health, security,
welfare, and other civic amenities. There are three beautiful
mosques on the campus, one of which is in the staff
residential area, the other near the hostels and the third one,
next to the Guest House.

Parents Lodge: In view of the difficulties faced by the


visiting parents/guardians for overnight stay, a Parents
Lodge has been set up near the students hostels. It is a fiveroom fully furnished and air-conditioned accommodation.
This accommodation is available to parents and guardians
on first-come-first-serve basis on reasonable charges for
short visits. Efforts are made to make their stay as
comfortable as possible.
Medical Centre: Medical Centre on the campus
provides round-the-clock health care to students,
employees and their dependent family members. At present

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


it has a ten-bed ward, operation theatre, pharmacy, X-Ray
department and clinical laboratory with computerized
equipment for a wide range of haematology, biochemistry
and endocrinology tests.
The staff include a medical specialist, a gynecologist, a
physician and a radiographer in addition to trained nurses
and paramedical staff. The set-up also has a modern
maternity unit and an emergency room with all necessary
resuscitation facilities. Radiology department has also been
set-up.

Cafeteria: The Institute's cafeteria offers regular meals


and snacks at modest prices. It caters for both the faculty and
the students. Students who normally have their regular
meals in their hostel mess use this facility as an alternative.
Official and private parties and numerous student functions
are also held in the cafeteria.
Shopping Area: The following utility services are
available at the shopping centre located within the premises
of the Institute:
General Stores
Campus Restaurant
Barbeque Corner

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Coffee Corners
Stationery Shop
Fruit and Vegetable Shop
Dry Cleaning and Laundry Service
Barber Shop

Service Centre: The Centre provides photocopying


services to the staff and students on payment.
Sports Facilities: Sports Complex is located in close
proximity to the students hostels. It is spread over an area of
3100 Sq. Yds. with a covered area of 31500 Sq. Ft. It consists
of a completely covered swimming pool of international
standard with comprehensive facilities, three stand and
Squash Courts and a Gymnasium. The Gymnasium consists
of a main hall and an exercise room. The main hall houses the
facilities to play Basketball, Volleyball and Badminton. In the
exercise room, modern equipments for various physical
exercises have been installed. Common facilities such as
lockers, showers, storage, checkroom, administrative offices
and refreshment rooms have been provided. A separate
ladies gym is also operative in the sports complex. Grounds
are available for outdoor sports like tennis, basketball,
volleyball, football and cricket etc. There are hiking and
jogging tracks in the hills behind the main buildings of the

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Transport Facilities: Transport section of the


Institute has 20 vehicles in its pool comprising cars, vans,
trucks and air-conditioned coaches. The Institute provides
pick-and-drop services to students and staff from
Rawalpindi, Islamabad and Peshawar on weekends, mid and
end of semester breaks, industrial tours and picnics. Day and
night emergencies are attended to by the ambulance service
and duty vehicles. In emergency, students and employees
are transported to Rawalpindi, Islamabad or Peshawar by
Institute vehicles.

Faculty and Staff Residences: The Institute is


fully residential. Th entire faculty and staff of the Institute are
accommodated in independent houses and flats on the
campus.

GIK College: The founding fathers of the Institute were

program. The Institute's transport is provided for pick and


drop of the employees' children who live outside the Institute
and for the college-going students who go out of the
campus.

conscious of the need for providing good education to the


children of the employees. Keeping this objective in view, the
GIK Institute School was established in April 1994 with a
modest intake of 25 students. The school has grown rapidly
and the current student enrolment is643. Now it has been
upgraded as an English medium higher secondary school
offering courses up to intermediate level in pre-engineering
and pre-medical groups. It is affiliated with the Federal Board
of Intermediate & Secondary Education, Islamabad. Along
with academic excellence, due importance is given to
character building and personality development by involving
children in a large number of creative co-curricular activities
and sports programs. Educational excursions, debates,
declamations, science modelling projects and children's art
and crafts exhibitions are a regular feature of the educational

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Library and Information Services


A stately three-storey building, set against the background
of brooding and austere hills of Tarbela, houses the Central
Library of the Institute. Its interior design, decor, and
furniture create an atmosphere of an intellectual sanctuary
wherein the students and faculty can concentrate on their
studies. It operates in two shifts and remains open till late in
night seven days a week. It has textbooks, reference works,
printed as well as online journals to meet the needs of
students and faculties. To share resources through interlibrary loan and exchange of databases, it is electronically
linked to all prominent libraries of the country. It also
provides re-prographic services.
The GIK Institute's digital library provides access to resources
of HEC that include databases of journals and books to
support the faculty and students community of the Institute.
The digital resources include about 15000 electronic
journals, 80,000 e-books, audio/video materials, IEEE
databases on DVDs and other reference databases. The
students and faculty members at the Institute can easily
access all the resources on their desks through
http://www.digitallibrary.edu.pk/giki.html, which provides
online access to IEEE, Science-Direct and other valuable
resources.

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CAMPUS LIFE

ACADEMICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

ACADEMICS

International Advisory Board


The founding fathers of the Institute were conscious of the
fact that in spite of all the idealism one may have, new
institutions tend to regress towards the existing models,
and fail thereby to live up to the ideals which inspired their
creation. They therefore took care to build monitoring
devices to maintain the Institute's standards of education
and research. One such device is the International
Advisory Board consisting of leading scientists, engineers,
and academicians of international standing. The Board
sets up international standards for the Institute in terms of
the quality of education and research, the caliber of
faculty, revision and review of the curricula, and the
adequacy of the laboratory and library facilities. It also
reviews the development programs of the Institute and
provides guidelines for its growth in the future.
The present Advisory Board comprises the following
members:
Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering (FCSE)

Eric Gaussier
University of Grenoble, France
Marcel Waldvogel
Department of Computer and Information Science
University of Konstanz, Konstanz Germany
Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FEE)
Kamran Iqbal
Department of Systems Engineering
University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR USA
Costas Constantinou
Reader in Communications Engineering
School of Electronic, Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK
Muhammad Suhail Zubairy
Department of Physics
Texas A&M University, College Station TX USA

Ashfaq A. Khokhar
Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Illinois, Chicago , IL USA.

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Faculty of Engineering Sciences (FES)

Management Science and Humanities Department

Talat S. Rehman
Department of Physics
University of Central Florida, Orlando FL USA

John Gowdy
Rittenhouse Teaching Professor of Humanities and Social
Sciences
Department of Economics
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY, USA

Sabin Stoica
Department of Physics
University of Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
Mehmet Pakdemirli
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Celal Bayar University, Muradiye, Mansia Turkey

Kaifeng Yang
Administration and Policy College of Social Sciences and
Public Policy
Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA
Chemical Engineering Program

Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering (FMSE)


John H. Weaver
Donald B. Willet Professor
Department of Materials Science & Engineering and
Department of Physics
University of Illinosis at Urbana-Champaign, IL USA
Manfred Roth
Head Joining and Interface Technology
Swiss Institute of Technology (EMPA),
Dubendorf, Switzerland
Shuichi Miyazaki
Institute of Materials Science
University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Japan
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (FME)
David H Nash
Reader & Vice Dean (Knowledge Exchange)
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow UK
Zahid Ayub
President Isotherm, Inc
East Arlington, TX USA
Ahmed F. Ghoniem
Ronald C. Crane Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA USA

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Joan-Francies Bloch
Physique des structures fibreuses
Saint-Martin dHeres Cedex, France

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

ACADEMICS

Admissions and Examinations


Director (Admissions and Examinations)

Muhammad Faheem Akhtar


M.Sc. (Rensselaer)
Assistant Director (Admissions and Examination)
Zil-e-Huma

Admission Officer
Saeedullah Jan
Examinations Officer
Waheed-Ur-Rahman

Admissions
The Institute is open to all persons who a r e a c a d e m i c a l l y
qualified for admission to the courses of study offered by the
Institute, and no such person shall be denied the privileges of
the Institute on the grounds only of sex, religion, colour, creed,
race, class or domicile.
The admission to the Institute is strictly on the basis of merit
determined by its own admission test and earlier academic
achievements. There are no special quotas, reserved seats or
admission by donations nor any arbitrary age limit for the applicants,
but preference will be given to fresh graduates.
Admission to the Bachelor Programs of the Institute is decided on
the basis of candidate's earlier educational achievements and his
score in the admission test, which comprises multiple choice
questions based on Pakistani intermediate level Physics and
Mathematics. Since medium of instruction of the Institute is English,
students are also assessed for their English language skills. A sample
of such questions is available on institute website. The test is held
simultaneously at Islamabad, Karachi, Lahore, Multan, Peshawar,
and Quetta. The venue and general instructions for the test are
intimated along with the dispatch of Admit Cards. Applicants can
choose the test center according to their convenience. The results of
the admission test are communicated to all successful candidates
online and by post. Those applicants who do not receive the admit
card one week prior to the test are advised to contact the Admission
Office. A former student of the Institute whose enrolment was
cancelled due to unsatisfactory academic performance is also
allowed to appear in the admission test. If selected, he will be
enrolled in the first semester as a freshman. Any student who is
currently on the roll of the Institute and wants to change the faculty is

allowed to re-appear in the admission test. If selected, he may not be


given any credits for the courses passed earlier.
Applications: The admission processing fee is Rs.3,000 (US$ 139 for
oversees applicants). Rs.4,000 in case of appearing in both admission
tests. The payment can be made through Habib Bank Limited (HBL)
A/C No. 19790000085901 for local applicants or in US Dollar for
oversees applicants to HBL A/C No. 19790002044611. The original
receipt of payment should be brought to Test Center. Prospectus will
be dispatched at the postal address of applicants. Those applying for
Financial Assistant must pay Rs.500 extra with processing fee.
Advance Standing: A person who has been enrolled for a relevant
Bachelors degree program in engineering at some PEC accredited
and HEC recognized Institution and has earned 15 or more
transferable credits hours with a minimum CGPA of 2.5 on the scale
of 4.0, may apply to this Institute for admission with advanced
standing. However, the student at the GIK Institute, to qualify for a
bachelor degree, must earn a minimum of 70 credits including 6
credit of senior design project. An applicant for transfer from a local
or foreign Institution is required to have passed the Institute's
admission test or SAT-II (Overseas Applicants), respectively, by
securing equal/more marks than the minimum merit of the faculty in
which he/she seeks admission. However, acceptance of request for
transfer will depend on availability of seat, and the quality of
academic work already completed by the applicant. For
supplementary information and application form please contact the
Admission Office.

HOW TO APPLY
Only Online Applications will be accepted. Complete instructions
will be available on the link http://admissions.giki.edu.pk by the
end of April 2015. The tentative application procedure is as below:
1. Register yourself as Candidate for Admission on above link
2. Fill in and submit online admission form
3. Arrange to pay in any branch of HBL as per amount printed on
bank challan.
4. Receive Prospectus from GIK Institute
5. Appear in admission test at designated Test Center. Bring along
Admit Card, Paid Bank Challan and SSC or O-Level cetificate.
6. Check your result and proceed as per online instruction.

20

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

ACADEMICS

Basic Eligibility for Engineering & Computer Science Programs


Basic Eligibility Criteria: Candidates for admission must meet one of the following criteria:
1. HSSC (Pre-Engineering i.e Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry) with 60% or above marks each in Mathematics, P h y s i c s &
Overall.
2. HSSC (Pre-Medical) with Additional Mathematics and 60% or above marks in Mathematics, Physics & Overall.
3. A-Levels in three subjects Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry with D or above grade each in Mathematics & Physics and Olevel in eight subjects (English, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology/Computer Science, Urdu, Islamic Studies & Pakistan
Studies) for local applicants and in five subjects (English, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology/Computer Science) for
those applying from abroad with 60% or above overall marks as per IBCC equivalence formula.
4. American or Canadian High School Diploma or International Baccalaureate Diploma with Mathematics (with Calculus), Physics
and Chemistry with 60% or above marks, as per IBCC equivalence formula, in Mathematics, Physics & Overall.
5. B.Sc. (Mathematics & Physics) with 60% or above marks in Mathematics, Physics & Overall.
6. Three years Diploma of Associate Engineering (DAE) in relevant technology from a Pakistani Board of Technical Education with
at least 60% marks in Mathematics, Physics & Overall.
Notes:
I.
Applicants with Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry background can apply for all programs including Computer Science or
Computer Engineering
ii. Applicants with Computer Science/Computer Studies background instead of Chemistry at their HSSC or A-Level can only apply
for Computer Engineering or Computer Science.

Basic Eligibility for BS Management Sciences Program


Basic Eligibility Criteria: Candidates for Admission must one of the following criteria:
1. HSSC (Pre-Engg), HSSC (General Science), HSSC (ICS), HSSC (Pre-Medical), HSSC (Humanities) with at least 60% marks.
2. A-Level in three subjects with two Ds or above grades and O-Level in eight subjects for local applicants and in five subjects for
those applying from abroad with overall 60% or above equivalence as per IBCC formula.
3. American or Canadian High School Diploma or International Baccalaureate Diploma with overall 60% or above marks, as per
IBCC equivalence formula.

Comparative Assessment Criteria (Merit List)


Score in Admission Test OR SAT-II (in Mathematics and Physics for Engineering and Computer Science Programs
and in any two subjects for Management Sciences Program) for those applying from outside Pakistan
HSSC Part I + SSC/Equivalent.

85%
10% + 5%

O-level (for those with A-Level and O-Level backgroun).

15%

Last completed qualification for High School diploma, IB diploma or B.Sc. or DAE.

15%

Candidates who have completed one of the above qualifications and are awaiting results, may apply for provisional admission.
Confirmation of admission will, however, be subject to submission of results by the date specified in the offer letter and fulfillment of the
above criteria.

Candidates are advised to carefully read above eligibility criteria before applying for admission.

21

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

ACADEMICS

THE ADMISSION OFFICE


Fees and Expenses
The Institute is a non-profit organization and provides subsidized
education. The annual tuition fee (non-refundable), except in case
an applicant is rendered ineligible upon declaration of results where
refund is made, is as under for the 4 years for local residents and
wards of expatriate Pakistanis.
Engineering &
Management
Computer Science
Sciences

1. Academic Year 2015-16


2. Academic Year 2016-17
3. Academic Year 2017-18
4. Academic Year 2018-19

Rs. 465,000
Rs. 505,000

Rs. 430,000

Rs. 550,000
Rs. 600,000

Rs. 505,000

Rs. 465,000
Rs. 550,000

The annual tuition fee for foreign students is US$ 7,500/The tuition fee is payable before the commencement of the Fall
semester each year. A non-refundable admission fee of Rs. 55,000/for Pakistani or US $ 680 for foreign applicants is also required to be
deposited along with the annual tuition fee. Rs. 25,000 will be
charged as security, refundable at the time of leaving the Institute
subject to the clearance from relevant departments. The final year
students are charged convocation fee of Rs. 12,500. An advance of
Rs. 8,000 is to be deposited by each student as mess security. Actual
charges will be deducted from advance amount every month.

The fee charged per course offered during the summer session is
notified with announcement of the summer school.

Academic Calendar
An academic year comprises two regular semester of sixteen weeks
each, and an eight-week summer school. The timings of two
semesters and summer school are as follows:
Fail:
August to December
Spring:
January to May
Summer:
June to July
The last week of a semester is allocated to the final examinations.
There is normally a mid-semester break in a semester.

Duration of Bachelor Studies


Students have to complete their entire degree requirements within
the following time-limits:
Normal Duration:
4 years
Maximum Duration:
6 years

Academic Advisors
All Students are assigned to academic advisors. The advisors
develop plans of study for them, monitor their records, and guide
them on all academic matters.

The Institute shall provide fee electricity to each student in the


hostels as under:
Summer
Winter

93 units per month


61 units per month

In addition to above, free units allowed for common areas per hostel
will be as under:
Summer
Winter

3943 units per month


534 units per month

Any excess consumption of electricity in the hostels will be charged


from the students.

22

ACADEMICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Financial Assistance and Scholarships


Financial Assistance: The Institute provides liberal financial assistance to the needy and deserving students in the form of
grants covering full or partial tuition fee in the form of interest fee loan. Each year about 30-40 students get the benefit of
financial assistance. Students desirous of getting financial assistance may submit financial assistance form is available on the
Institute website (please add Rs. 500 as financial assistance processing fee in addition to Rs.3,000 of admission procession fee).
Applicants are informed about the award of financial assistance along with admission offer. The GIKI Alumni Association also
provides financial assistance to the deserving students. Contact GIKI Alumni Association for further details.
Scholarships: Following full or partial scholarships are likely to be available for those to be admitted in the academic year
2015-2016.

Scholarship
Altas-GIK Scholarship
Ayub Memorial Scholarship

Qualification/Conditions/Criteria
Merit
Domiciled in Kurram Agency

Scholarships
01
01

Chief Minister Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

KP Domiciled with annual Family


income less than Rs. 300,000.

20

Dr. Razia Raouf Scholarship

Female student top of the merit list

01

FATA Scholarships

FATA Domiciled

10

Frontier Education Foundation


GIK Alumni Association

KPK Domiciled
Needy GIKI Students

03
04

Govt. of Balochistan
Ihsan Trust Qarze Hasna (Meezan
Bank)
Lucky Cement Pvt. Ltd
Mobilink Scholarship

Balochistan Domiciled

02

Need Basis

04

01 Afgan National
Merit Basis

01
01

National ICT Program


Prof. Mian Zaheen-ud-Din Memorial
Scholarship

Belonging to rural areas of Pakistan

10

Need cum Merit

01

Punjab Education Endowment Fund

Punjab Domiciled with annual family


salaried income less than 360,000
Punjab Domiciled
Need-cum-Merit Basis
KP domiciled

Sindh Education Endowment Fund


Financial Assistance by GIK Institute
CMEEF Funded Scholarship

42
02
35
01

Campus Jobs: A number of on-campus jobs are available for students with remuneration adjusted against fee and mess bills,
however, qualification conditions and hours per week limitation apply.
23

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

ACADEMICS

Examinations
Examinations Office
The Examinations Office works under the supervision of Director
(Admissions & Examinations). This office is responsible for
preparing class and examination schedules, holding of semesters
examinations, maintenance and compilation of results issuance of
semester result reports, transcripts, certificates and degrees.

move on the major courses of their own faculty. The aim of these
courses is to provide through grounding in the basic principles
and analytical skills essential for studies in specialized areas of all
faculties before they move on the major courses of their own
faculty.

Management Sciences and Humanities Courses


Credit Hour System
The credit hours assigned to a theory or a laboratory course are
determined by the contact hours allocated to it per week
throughout a semester. For a theory course one credit hour is
equivalent to one contact hour of lecture per week, and for a
laboratory course, three contact hours of practical work per week
constitute one credit hour.

Common courses in English language, social sciences and


engineering management are required for all students. They are
meant to inculcate in them an awareness of our history and
culture, to help them cultivate aesthetic and moral dimensions of
their personalities and to equip them with communicational and
managerial skills.

Faculty Courses
Semester Credit Load
Students can normally register in accordance with his / her degree
program, 15-18 credit hours in a semester. No exception to this
upper limit is allowed to freshmen. However, in later ears this limit
may be relaxed for students with good academic standing, with
the approval of the Dean. Under all cases the maximum limit
remains 21 credit hours.

Degree Requirements
For a Bachelor degree a student must earn a minimum of 134 to
136 credits, depending upon his / her faculty. At the time of
graduation, the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) should
not be below 2.00.

Students are required to take a number of core and elective


courses of their own faculty which are listed in the academic
programs of each faculty.

Inter-faculty Courses
Students are required to select some courses offered by faculties
other than their own. Such courses aim at providing broader
bases to their studies, and widening their awareness of allied
fields, which impinge on their areas of specialization.

Technical Electives

The medium of instruction and examination of the Institute is


English. All the courses are taught through out in English.

Students are also required to take a number of advanced


technical courses. To fulfil this requirement, they may choose
additional courses in their own field of specialization, select a
second area of specialization, or select advanced courses from
some different fields. Each faculty offers a number of advanced
courses in different fields.

Curriculum Components

Project

The major academic components of the Bachelors degree


programs are described below:

In the final year, students have to undertake a project, which is


assigned 6 credits hours. They must work under direct supervision
of their project advisor for the completion of the project. Students
are encouraged to undertake projects, which are of interest to
industry or to government of departments. They are expected to
complete their projects and present their reports by the end of the

Medium of Instruction

Foundational Courses in Engineering Education


Courses in physics, chemistry, mathematics and introductory
engineering are common for students of all faculties before they

24

ACADEMICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


eighth semester before the final examination.

Summer Internship
Every student has to participate in a practical training program of
six to eight weeks during the summer of junior year and submit a
formal written report about it.

D
F

Minimum acceptable
Failure, implying that the student must repeat the course to
receive any credit
I
Incomplete
W Withdrawn
Each grade is assigned Grade Points per Credit (GPC). The
following table indicates the gradation from excellent to failure.

Course Codes
The courses are identified by the course numbers, which consist of
two letters and three digits. The first two letters represent the
major field; the first digit indicates the level of course; the next
digit the broad area of the course; and the last, the sequence
number of the course offered in the same area at the same level
(year).
CE Computer Engineering
CH Chemical Engineering
CS Computer Science and Engineering
EE Electronic Engineering
ES Engineering Sciences
HM Humanities & Social Sciences
ME Mechanical Engineering
MM Materials Science and Engineering
MS Management Sciences
MT Mathematics
PE Power Engineering
PH Physics

Student Evaluation
Students are evaluated by mid-semester test, home assignments,
quizzes, case studies, course project, laboratory reports, oral tests
and the end-of-semester examination. The weight allocated to
them depends upon the nature of the course. Usually, the end-ofsemester examination carries 50% weightage of a course.

Grading System
Depending upon academic performance, students are awarded
grades A, A-, B+, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, F, I, W for each course. These
grades indicate the following levels of performance:
A Excellent
B Good
C Adequate

25

Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+

GPC
4.00
3.67
3.33
3.00
2.67
2.33

Grade
C
CD+
D
F

GPO
2.00
1.67
1.33
1.00
0.00

I am W grades are not counted in calculation of GPA. The


academic standing of a student is referred as grade point average
(GPA) which is the ration of the total number of grade points
earned to the total number of credits attempted. The maximum
possible GPA is 4.00.
The minimum semester GPA to remain is satisfactory academic
standing is 2.00. Students are placed on academic probation at

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


the end of any semester in which their semester GPA falls
below 2.00. A student on probation is allowed to register only
10-13 credit hours.
A student whose semester GPA remains below 2.00 is given a
warning for his/her poor performance. If his/her SGPA remains
below 2.00 for two consecutive semester (excluding summer
school) his/her name is removed from the roll of the Institute.
Freshmen, upon request, may start afresh with no credit transfer if
two consecutive probations are experienced in first two
semesters.

ACADEMICS
Attendance Rule
Although the students are expected to attend all the Lectures and
Laboratories work pertaining to their courses of study but are
required to attend at least 80% of the total Lectures/Lab work for
each course to qualify for appearance in the final examination.

Change in Courses
Once registered for a semester, students may add or drop courses
only with the approval of their Deans and in conformity with the
prescribed procedures and time-limits. Courses dropped during
this period are not shown on the semester result report or
transcript.

Registration Schedule
Students have to register for their courses during the period
specified for the purpose before the commencement of a
semester. The office of the Examinations, before the start of every
semester, will notify the registration deadline. Requests for late
registration for valid reasons can be entertained by the ProRector (Academic) till the end of the third week of a semester.
However, such students are required to pay Rs. 850 per day late
registration fee.

Registration in the Summer

Withdrawal from Courses


Students may withdraw from one or more courses with the
approval of their Dean between the 4th and 10th week of a
semester. In such cases, a W grade appears on their transcripts.
Any withdrawal after the 10th week entails award of an F grade in
the course.

Incomplete (I) Grade


An I grade is given to students in a course if:

An eight week summer session is organized each year for those


students who fail to qualify in a course or they have obtained a D
or a D+grade. The courses offered in the summer are decided by
the respective Deans office keeping in view the number of
students interested in taking a particular course. Students have to
pay separately for registering in a summer course. Students
cannot register in a higher level course during summer and the
maximum limit for registration is 8 Credit Hours.

The outstanding requirement, in such cases, is to be met during


the first two weeks of the next semester, and the students
themselves are responsible to make arrangement for the purpose
with their instructors. Failing this, the I grade is converted to F
grade. They cannot re-register for a course in which they have the
I grade. The grade point average of a student for a semester is
calculated excluding the I grade, and it is re-calculated when a
regular grade has been awarded in the course.

Double Degree Program

Repeating Courses

Graduates of the Institute desirous of obtaining a degree in a


discipline other than the previously earned degree can apply
afresh for a separate Double Degree Program. They would be
required to spend additional two to four semesters in the Institute
to complete the requirements of a double degree. The students
have to do a separate project for a Double Degree. The
acceptance in the Degree program and details of the
requirements are worked out by the respective Deans office and
communicated to the office of the Controller of Examinations.

Courses in which students secure F grade, and which are a


requirement for the degree have to be repeated in entirely. They
may opt for a substitute course only if there is an alternative in the
curriculum. Students can repeat courses for which they obtained
F, D+ or D grade, on the condition that they repeat the courses
within 3 semesters after the semesters in which they obtained
these grades. In case of repeated courses, all grades achieved by
students appear in their transcripts. However, only the latest
grade will be counted for the Cumulative Grade Point Average,

26

ACADEMICS

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


even if it is lower than the earlier one.

Interruption of Studies
If a student interrupts is study programs for a period longer than
one semester then, upon his return, all the credits previously
earned by him at the Institute are evaluated by the Dean to
determine their relevance to the changes made in the curriculum,
if any. He may be required to modify his degree plan to ensure
conformity to the latest version of the curriculum.

Institute-Industry Partnership Program


The recent advancement in science and technology has led to the
crumbling of the traditional geo-cultural barrier and the whole
world has been transformed into a single global market. This is a
challenging situation for the developing countries like Pakistan
who have to ensure for survival that their industries and
production systems are globally competitive. Pakistan is yet to

respond adequately to this challenge and has to gear up to cope


with the situation. One major input in this respect can be a close
liaison between industry and the pool of expertise in our
universities and research organizations. The Institute has taken
the initial steps in this direction by establishing the partnership
program.
Under the program the Institute invites industry to participate at
various membership levels. The membership provides flexible
and tailored access to students, faculty, research, publications,
seminars, workshops, and conferences, Corporate Liaison
Program is designated to serve as the firms personal
representative ensuring that the interactions between the
member firm and Institute are as productive as possible.
Recruiting assistance is provided to member firms in addition to
computerized database of undergraduate and graduate students
seeking permanent, summer, or co-operative job opportunities.
Graduate fellowships are also available for support. The liaison
provides compus-wide visibility and access to resources of the
GIK Institute.

Continuing Education Program


The last few decades have witnessed a vertiginous pace of
advancement in almost all fields of science and technology. The
galloping technological advancements have created a host of
socio-cultural dislocations and prominent amongst them is the
rapid obsolescence of the know-how of technologists and
engineers. What they had learnt at schools or universities
becomes antiquated within years of the commencement of their
practical careers. It poses new challenges for technical universities
and creates new role for them.
The Institute has responded to this need and established a
Continuing Education Programme for the purpose. Under this
programme a faculty committee is assigned the task of surveying
national industries for identification of their need for updating of
technical personnel, and to apprise them of the expertise
available at the Institute. The programme was inaugurated in
summer 1995 with intensive short courses for engineers and
managers from industries. The Institute is now offering intensive
courses on a number of subjects to managers, supervisors and
engineers from public and private sector industries and
organizations.

27

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

28

ACADEMICS

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


THRUST AREAS
Artificial Intelligence and Robotics
Computational Theory
High Performance Computing
Machine Learning & Data Mining
Network Communications and Distributed Systems
Pattern Recognition and Knowledge Engineering
Signal and Image Processing
Software and Systems Engineering
Theoretical Computer Science

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

FACULTY
S. Fawad Hussain, PhD (University of Grenoble, France)
Suleman Mazhar, PhD (The Univ. of Tokyo, Japan; Post doc. Georgetown Univ., USA)
Masroor Hussain, PhD (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Zahid Halim, PhD (National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, PK)
Ahmar Rashid, PhD (Jeju National University, South Korea)
Ghulam Abbas, PhD (University of Liverpool, UK)
Rashad Jillani, PhD (Florida Atlantic University, USA)
Iftikhar Ahmad, PhD (University of Saarland, Germany)
Badre Munir, MS (Pakistan)
Shahabuddin Ansari, MS (Canada)
Adeel Parvez, MS (USA)
Gibrail Islam, MS (Sweden)
M. Suleman, MS (Sweden)
Rizwana Kalsoom, MS (Pakistan)
JOINT FACULTY
Nisar Ahmed, Ph.D (London, UK), FEE
Fida Muhammad, Ph.D (California), FMSE
FACULTY ON LEAVE FOR PHD
Zaheer Ahmad, Muhmmad Afaq, Shams ur-Rehman
ENGINEERS/PROGRAMMERS
Mumtaz Ali Shah , MS, VU University
Jehad Ali, BS. Engg. UET, Peshawar
Usman Ali, BS. Engg. GIKI, Topi
Aisha Khan, MS, Peshawar University
Faheemullah, BS, Engg., GIKI, Topi
M. Ehtisham Hassan, BS, Engg., GIKI, Topi
M. Nauman Khatak, BS, Engg., GIKI, Topi
Imran Zeb Durrani, BS. Engg. NUCES-FAST
Graduate Assistants
Zawar Hussain, BS. Engg. GIKI, Topi
Usman Raza, BS, BZU, Multan
Naureen Akram, BS, CS, UoP, Peshawar
Iffat Maab, BE, CE, UET, Taxila
Uzma, MIS, AWK, Mardan
Mohammed Atif, BE, IT AQK, Kahota
Shahid Iqbal, BCS, AWK, Mardan
Mahma Rehan, BE, SE, UET, Taxila

30

Dean
Khalid J. Siddiqui
PhD (Concordia University, Canada)

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

The faculty strives to produce competent professionals who


have sound knowledge in the field of computing and
information technology. Faculty is to produce graduates having
enhanced creative thinking, problem solving skills and ability for
lifelong learning in their professional careers and to develop
research programs to address the evolving needs of industry,
academia and society.
The graduates of the Faculty of Computer Science and
Engineering shall play a productive role both in the practical and
research areas of computing. The Faculty uses modern
technologies to enhance the learning capabilities of the
students and to provide them with a stimulating and
challenging environment. Emphasis is placed on the practical
applications of computer systems to the software and hardware
needs of the global industry in general and the Pakistani
industry in particular. The Faculty offers courses leading to
Bachelor's (BS), Master's (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
degrees in Computer Engineering and Computer Science.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS (OBJECTIVES)
The undergraduate program combines the strength of
Computer Science and Computer Engineering curricula. The
courses develop a professional approach to design computer
based systems, looking at both widely applicable principles of
software engineering and the evolving computing technologies
in the thrust areas of the faculty. The students are admitted to a
four-year BS degree in the Faculty of Computer Science &
Engineering, and may opt for one of the following two
specialized degree programs:
- Computer Engineering
- Computer Science
The Computer Engineering focuses on knowledge of
mathematics and basic sciences necessary for the analysis and
design of computer software, hardware and systems through an
understanding of the principles of computer programming,
software engineering, algorithms, data structures, and
microprocessor systems, electronics with an understanding of
the applications of computer engineering principles.
The Computer Science program offers a broad understanding of
the field through introducing concepts, theory, and techniques

with intensive education in the core areas of Computer Science.


This program encourages students to develop and use abstract
models in addition to applying respective technology in
practical situations.
Both streams focus on establishing a strong mathematical
foundation, basic hardware aspects of computing, and
advanced technical electives spanning areas such as computer
communications, neural networks, expert systems, databases,
biologically inspired computing and image processing.
Abundant opportunities exist for students to develop expertise
in their areas of interest through enrolment in an assortment of
elective courses offered by this and other faculties of the
Institute.
Students are also accepted into various programs under the
scholarship schemes offered by the Government of Pakistan,
National ICT R&D fund and other agencies.
Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) of BS (CE):
1.

2.

3.
4.
5.

To produce practicing and employable engineers who have


sound theoretical foundation and practical capabilities in
computer engineering to serve in industry, academia and
related organizations.
To produce graduates who can use problem solving
techniques and modern tools to solve complex design
problems in the field of computer engineering and its
applications.
To produce engineers who know the social, ethical, and
environmental aspects of their work.
To produce computer engineers who have good
leadership skills and can work effectively in a team.
To produce graduates who can stay current with
technological and IT innovations through lifelong learning,
higher education or research.
PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOs) of BS (CE):

1.

Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science,


engineering fundamentals and an engineering
specialization to the solution of complex engineering
problems. (Engineering Knowledge)

31

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Ability to identify, formulate, research literature, and


analyze complex engineering problems reaching
substantiated conclusions using first principles of
mathematics, natural sciences and engineering sciences.
(Problem Analysis)
Ability to design solutions for complex engineering
problems and design systems, components or processes
that meet specified needs with appropriate consideration
for public health and safety, cultural, societal, and
environmental considerations. (Design/Development of
Solutions)
Ability to investigate complex engineering problems in a
methodical way including literature survey, design and
conduct of experiments, analysis and interpretation of
experimental data, and synthesis of information to derive
valid conclusions. (Investigation)
Ability to create, select and apply appropriate techniques,
resources, and modern engineering and IT tools, including
prediction and modeling, to complex engineering
activities, with an understanding of the limitations.
(Modern Tool Usage)
Ability to apply reasoning informed by contextual
knowledge to assess societal, health, safety, legal and
cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant
to professional engineering practice and solution to
complex engineering problems. (The Engineer and
Society)
Ability to understand the impact of professional

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


engineering solutions in societal and environmental
contexts and demonstrate knowledge of and need for
sustainable development. (Environment and
Sustainability)
8. Ability to apply ethical principles and commit to
professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of
engineering practice. (Ethics)
9. Ability to work effectively, as an individual or in a team, on
multifaceted and/or multidisciplinary settings. (Individual
and Team Work)
10. Ability to communicate effectively, orally as well as in
writing, on complex engineering activities with the
engineering community and with society at large, such as
being able to comprehend and write effective reports and
design documentation, make effective presentations, and
give and receive clear instructions. (Communication)
11. Ability to demonstrate management skills and apply
engineering principles to one's own work, as a member
and/or leader in a team, to manage projects in a
multidisciplinary environment. (Project Management)
12. Ability to recognize importance of, and pursue lifelong
learning in the broader context of innovation and
technological developments. (Lifelong Learning)
Upon completion of BS (CE) degree all the students should have
attained the aforementioned 12 PLOs.
Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) of BS (CS):
1.

2.
3.
4.
5.

32

To produce practicing and employable computer scientists


who have sound theoretical foundation and practical
capabilities in computer science to serve industry,
academia or related organizations.
To produce graduates who can use algorithms and IT tools
to solve complex problems.
To produce practitioners who know the social, ethical, and
environmental aspects of their work.
To produce computer practitioners who have good
leadership skills and can work effectively in a team.
To produce graduates who can stay current with
technological and IT innovations through lifelong learning,
higher education or research.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOs) of BS (CS):


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science,


computing fundamentals and any of it's
specializations to solve complex problems.
(Knowledge of Computing)
Ability to identify, formulate, research literature, and
analyze complex problems reaching substantiated
conclusions using first principles of mathematics,
natural sciences and computer science. (Problem
Analysis)
Ability to design solutions for complex problems and
design software systems, components or processes
that meet specified needs with appropriate
consideration for public health and safety, cultural,
societal, and environmental considerations. (Design/
Development of Solutions)
Ability to investigate complex problems in a
methodical way including literature survey, design
and conduct of experiments, analysis and
interpretation of experimental data, and synthesis of
information to derive valid conclusions.
(Investigation)
Ability to create, select and apply appropriate
techniques, resources, and modern IT tools, including
prediction and modeling, to complex activities, with
an understanding of the limitations. (Modern Tool
Usage)

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

Ability to apply reasoning informed by contextual


knowledge to assess societal, health, safety, legal and
cultural issues. (Society Impact)
Ability to understand the impact of professional
solutions in societal and environmental contexts and
demonstrate knowledge of and need for sustainable
development. (Environment and Sustainability)
Ability to apply ethical principles and commit to
professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of
professional practice. (Ethics)
Ability to work effectively, as an individual or in a team,
on multifaceted and/or multidisciplinary settings.
(Individual and Team Work)
Ability to communicate effectively, orally as well as in
writing, on complex activities with the community and
with the society at large, such as being able to
comprehend and write effective reports and design
documentation, make effective presentations, and
give and receive clear instructions. (Communication)
Ability to demonstrate management skills and apply
systems development principles to one's own work, as
a member and/or leader in a team, to manage projects
in a multidisciplinary environment. (Project
Management)
Ability to recognize importance of, and pursue
lifelong learning in the broader context of innovation
and technological developments. (Lifelong Learning)

Upon completion of BS (CS) degree all the students should have


attained the aforementioned 12 PLOs.

OUTCOMES
The graduates of this faculty should be able to meet the highest
standards of training for leadership in leading fields of computer
science and computer engineering profession, including
research, higher education, teaching and R&D organizations at
the national and international level. This fact is evident from the
positions and respect our graduates are enjoying at
international universities and multi-national software/IT
enterprises.

33

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


COMMON IT FACILITIES
Internet/LAN
The Institute provides 96Mbps Internet access to all faculties
and student hostels through Pakistan Education and Research
Network (PERN-II). All rooms in student hostels are connected
through Fiber Optics LAN that also provides peer-to-peer file
sharing and IRC facilities for student collaboration.
Videoconferencing room
The videoconferencing facility is located at the Workshop Room
Adjacent to the Agha Hasan Abedi Auditorium. The Room is
equipped with LifeSize Room 220 System for high-definition
H.323 multipoint videoconferencing and a high-resolution
Interactive smartboard digital projector. The Room provides
seating for 65 participants and is equipped with conference
sound/microphone system.

INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH LABORATORIES


The Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering is well
equipped with state of the art computer systems running a wide
range of applications and specialized software supporting the
courses. In addition well-equipped research laboratories are
available for the use of faculty, graduate students and senior
undergraduate students. The following is a brief description of
various laboratories and their functions.

34

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


PC Lab
The Personal Computing laboratory is the central computing
laboratory of the institute, providing general purpose
computing facilities to all students, e-mail and internet as well as
printing facilities. It is open seven days a week from early
morning till late at night. It houses eighty Corei7 networked
machines running Windows as well as Linux operating systems.
DSL - WiFi facilities are also available. Introduction to
Computing and Intensive Programming modules are conducted
here. Student workshops and software competitions are also
held in this laboratory.
SE Lab
The Software Engineering laboratory focuses on providing
facilities for courses such as Software Engineering, Language
and Compilation Techniques, and Databases. It houses 50
networked Corei7 machines. These are connected to database
and other servers of the Institute. Including the printing
facilities software tools such as Eclipse, various compiler tools,
Oracle/Developer and Rational Rose are also available. In
addition, DSL - WiFi facilities are also available. Student
workshops and software competitions are held in this
laboratory as well.
OS Lab
The Operating Systems laboratory is used mainly for Operating
Systems, Computer Communications and Networking and
Systems Programming courses. This lab is equipped with 80

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

machines running various operating systems and network


simulation software tools.
SD Lab
The Software Development laboratory is used for coding and
simulating problem related to both academia and industry. It is
primarily used for lab sessions for students of Data Structures
and Signals. It is also used for conducting workshops and events
organized by faculty members and different societies at GIKI. It is
equipped with 48 Core-i5 workstation running window 7
professional, Visual Studio 2012, Matlab, Packet Tracer and
other software tools.
FYP Lab
The Final Year Projects laboratory is used by seniors mainly for
developing their final year projects. This lab is equipped with 22
Core-i5 workstations running various operating systems,
network simulation software tools, Visual Studio 2012, and other
simulation and development software.
High Performance Computing Facility
An AMD Opteron based computing cluster was installed in the
FCSE faculty in 2006. Currently graduate and undergraduate
students and faculty use it to study various problems in the
scientific and engineering domains. This facility is also intended
as a hub and a model for scientific technical/industrial and

business/commercial organizations of Pakistan to support their


high-end computing needs. Now, this facility has been
upgraded (Dr. Masroor Hussain - PI) using 10 million rupee
funds from Directorate of Science and Technology, Government
of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. The facility consists of 160 CPU cores,
1024 GPU cores, 640 GB main memory and 10GB Ethernet switch
interconnection. The High Performance Computing facility is
aimed at serving highly compute intensive research projects for
the higher education sector of the entire country over Pakistan
Education and Research Network. The facility is accessible
remotely and is located at the CPU Room of the Faculty of
Computer Science and Engineering.
BiSMiL
Bio-Inspired Simulation and Modeling of Intelligent Life lab is an
active research lab with a strength of over 30 students
(undergraduate and graduates), mentored by Dr. Suleman
Mazhar. The lab is equipped with latest robotic test-beds (aerial,
land and underwater), high-performance development server,
bio-medical devices, computing machines and software. The lab
serves as an incubator for future technologies. Particular
emphasis is on indigenization of the state-of-the-art global
technologies. BiSMiL members frequently meet and participate
in business plans and invention competitions around the world.
The lab actively collaborates with national and international
partners in the area of ICT4D (Microsoft, Tokyo University,
Georgetown University, LMKR, WWF-Pakistan, ICIMOD, LUMS,
to name a few). Lab. has received a funding of more than 3
million rupees. Notable projects include analysis of Indus
dolphin sounds, parallel computing for bio-inspired image
processing, and development of data-loggers for livestock
monitoring and agricultural wireless sensor networks.
Accreditation
The BS Degrees in Computer Engineering is accredited by the
Pakistan Engineering Council (PEC) whereas BS degree in
Computer Science is accredited by the National Computing
Education Accreditation Council (NCEAC).

35

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering


(a) General Education Requirements (47-52 Credit Hours)
Course Titles

Course Code

Computing
Mathematics
Sciences
Basic Engineering Courses
English
Humanities

CH

CS101, CS101L
MT101, MT102, MT201
PH101, PH102, PH101L, PH102L
MM101, ME101, MM102, MM141/CS121*, ME201,
ME291, ME102
HM101, HM102
HM211, HM321, HM322

4
9
8
16/11*
6
9

(b) Computer Science & Engineering Common Courses (37 Credit Hours)
Course Titles
B B
Digital Logic Design
Data Structure & Algorithms
Computer Organization & Assembly Language
Operating Systems
Systems Programming
Software Engineering
Introduction to Databases/
Database Management Systems
Computer Communications & Networks
Numerical Analysis & Computational Methods

CH

Course Code
CS231
EE221, EE221L
CS221, CS221L
CS222, CS222L
CS311, CS311L
CS312, CS312L
CS325
CS232/CE431, CS232L/CE431L

3
4
4
4
4
4
3
4

CE313, CE313L
CS342

4
3

(c) Core Requirements for Computer Science (33 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Course Code

CH

Programming Techniques Course & Lab


Formal Languages &Automata Theory
Computer Architecture
Artificial Intelligence
Design & Analysis of Algorithms
Compiler Construction
Human Computer Interaction
CS Elective (Breadth)
Senior Design Project

CS112, CS112L
CS322
CS324
CS351, CS351L
CS478
CS424, CS424L
CS421
XXxxx
CS481 & CS482

4
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
6

(d) Core Requirements for Computer Engineering (25 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Course Code

CH

Circuit Analysis
Electronics I

EE211, EE211L
EE231, EE231L
CE241, CE241L
EE323, EE323L
CE323
CS481 & CS482

4
4
4
4
3
6

Signals & Systems


Microprocessor Interfacing
Object Oriented Analysis and Design
Senior Design Project

36

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

(e) Computer Science Specialization Electives (9 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Course Code

CH

Parallel Processing

CS417

Digital Image Processing

CS418/CE419

Applied Image Processing

CS419

Computer Graphics

CS433

Data & Network Security

CS464

Design Patterns

CS425

Software Testing & Quality Engineering

CS426

Design of Programming Languages

CS428

Software Project Management

CS429

Advanced Databases

CS432

MIS & DSS

CS435

Data Warehousing and Data Mining

CS437

Web Mining and Social Media Analysis

CS438

Artificial Neural Networks

CS452

Real-Time Programming

CS454

Distributed Systems

CS458

Web Engineering

CS463

Data Security & Encryption

CS465

Bio-Inspired Computing

CS472

Bio-Informatics

CS474

Computational Biology

CS476

Robotic Vision

CS453/CE453

(f) Computer Engineering Specialization Electives (12-14 Credit Hours)


Parallel Processing

CS417

Digital Im age Processing

CE419/CS418

Advanced Computer Architecture

CE421

Real-Tim e Em bedded System s

CE432

M obile Com puting

CE426/CS326

Digital Signal Processing

CE461/EE452 CE461L/EE452L

W ireless & M obile Networks

CE463

M ultim edia System s

CE471

Data Security & Encryption

CS465

Bio-Inspired Computing

CS472

Bio-Inform atics

CS474

Com putational Biology

CS476

Digital Com m unication

CE475

Digital Controls

CE477

VLSI Design

EE436

Instrum entation

ES451

Advanced Digital Design

EE331

Design & Analysis of Algorithm s

CS478

Com piler Construction

CS424, CS424L

Applied Artificial Intelligence

CE451

Robotic Vision

CE453/CS453

37

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

(g) Computer Science Electives - Breadth (3-4 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Course Code

The aim of education should be to teach us rather how to think,


than what to think. Among all the decisions taken by me in my life
coming to GIKI was the most prodigious one. An educational system
isn't worth a great deal if it teaches young people how to make a
living but doesn't teach them how to make a life. GIKI develops
critical thinking, confidence, and social interaction by providing
fierce competition and a rich set of co- curricular activities. GIKI
builds knowledge and amalgamates problem solving with
intelligence to make a person to be able to face real technical
challenges of the world. The institute has helped me to enhance
and practically apply my skills while studying in a dynamic and a
visionary environment, and also to strive and attain as much possible
perfection in the field of Computer Science.

Rehan

CS327

CH
3

Object Oriented Analysis and Design

CS323/CE323

Introduction to Soft Computing

CS352

Mobile Computing

CS326/CE426

(g) Engineering Electives - Breadth (3-4 Credit Hours)


Applied Artificial Intelligence

CS451

Communication Theory

CE361

Design Patterns

CS425

Computer Graphics

CS433

Artificial Neural Network

CE452/CS452

Cellular Mobile Communication

EE463

Electronic & Magnetic Materials

MM463

Introduction to FEM

ME466

Semiconductor Materials & Devices

ES462

Evaluation Techniques & Instrumentation

MM221

(h) Management Electives (6 Credit Hours)


Operation Research
Entrepreneurship & Technology Commercialization
Network Security & Cyber Ethics
Total Quality Management
Project Management
Technology Management

CS436
CS491
CS492
MS494
MS496
MS494

3
3
3
3
3
3

(i) Summer Training (Pass/Fail grade; NIL credits)


Every student is required to participate in a summer training program and submit a formal written
report during the summer of Junior Year.

(j) Total Requirements (132*/135 credits)


For the B.S. degree in Computer Science/Computer Engineering, a student has to complete 132/135
credit hours with a CGPA of 2.0 or above.
---------------*
For CS Only

38

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Computer Science Semester-wise Breakdown


Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

Pre-req

Co-req

MT101
PH101
HM101
CS101
CS121
PH101L
CS101L

Calculus I
Mechanics
English and Study Skills
Introduction to Computing
Fundamentals of CS
Mechanics Lab
Introduction to Computing Lab

3
3
3
2
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3

3
3
3
2
3
1
1

None
None
None
None
None
None
None

None
None
None
None
None
PH101
CS101

MT102
CS112
PH102
HM102
ME102
CS112L
PH102L

Calculus II
Programming Techniques
Electricity & Magnetism
Technical Report Writing
Engineering Graphics
Programming Techniques Lab
Electricity & Magnetism Lab

3
3
3
3
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
2
1
1

MT101
CS101
PH101
HM101
None
CS101
PH101

None
None
None
None
None
CS112
PH102

MT201

MT102

None

EE221
CS221
CS231
HM211
CS221L
EE221L

Linear Algebra & Differential


Equations
Logic Design
Data Structure and Algorithms
Discrete Mathematics
Pak. & Islamic Studies
Data Structure and Algo. Lab
Logic Design Lab

3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
3
3

3
3
3
3
1
1

None
CS112
None
None
CS102
None

None
None
None
None
CS221
EE221

CS232

Introduction to Databases

CS244

Formal Languages and Automata


Theory
Engineering Statistics
Engineering Economy
Computer Organization &
Assembly Language
Introduction to Databases Lab
Computer Organization &
Assembly Language Lab

3
3

0
0

3
3

CS 221
CS 231

None
None

3
3
3

0
0
0

3
3
3

None
None
EE221

None
None
None

0
0

3
3

1
1

CS221
CS112

CS232
CS232

4rt Semester

3rd Semester

1st Semester

Course Title

2nd Semester

Course Code

ME201
ME291
CS222
CS232
CS222L

39

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

8th Semester

7th Semester

6th Semester

5th Semester

Course Code

CS325
CS 311
CS 342

Course Title

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

Pre-req

Co-req

3
3
3

0
0
0

3
3
3

CS 112
CS221
MT201

None
None
None

CS324
HM321
C S311L

Software Engineering
Operating Systems
Numerical Analysis &
Computational Methods
Computer Architecture
Sociology and Human Behavior
Operating Systems Lab

3
3
0

0
0
3

3
3
1

CS222
None
CS211

None
None
CS 311

CS351
CS312
+
CS 3xx

Artificial Intelligence
System Programming
CS Elective (Breadth)

0
0
0

3
3
3

Computer Communication and


Networking
Ethical and Legal Dimensions of
Engineering

CS221
CS321
**
CS311

None
None
**

CE3 13

3
3
3
3
3

None

None

HM322

None

CS351L

Artificial Intelligence Lab

CS221

CS351

CS312L

0
0

3
3

CS311

CS312

CE3 13L

Systems Programming Lab


C omputer Communication and
Networking Lab

CS311

CE313

CS478
CS 421
CS 4xx
MSxxx
CS481

Design & Analysis of Algorithm


Human Computer Interaction
CS Elective I
Management Elective- I
Senior Design Project (Part-1)

3
3
3
3
0

0
0
0
0
9

3
3
3
3
3

CS221
CS 325
**
None
None

None
None
**
None
None

Management Elective- II
Compiler Construction
CS Elective II
CS Elective III
Compiler Construction Lab
Senior Design Project (PartII)

3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
3
9

3
3
3
3
1
3

**
CS 322
**
**
CS 322
None

**
None
**
**
CS424
None

MSxxx
CS424
CS 4xx
CS4 xx
CS424L
CS482

+ Computer Science /Engineering Course

40

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Computer Engineering Semester-wise Breakdown


Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

Pre-req

Co-req

MT101
PH101
CS101
HM101
MM101
CS101L
PH101L
ME101

Calculus I
Mechanics
Introduction to Computing
English and Study Skills
Industrial Chemistry
Introduction to Computing Lab
Mechanics Lab
Workshop Practice

3
3
2
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
2
3
3
1
1
1

None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None

None
None
None
None
None
CS101
PH101
None

MT102
MM102
PH102
ME102
HM102
MM141
PH102L
CS102L

Calculus II
Introduction to Eng. Materials
Electricity & Magnetism
Engineering Graphics
Technical Report Writing
Materials Lab
Electricity & Magnetism Lab
Intensive Programming Lab

3
3
3
1
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
3
0
3
3
3

3
3
3
2
3
1
1
1

MT101
None
PH101
None
HM101
None
PH101
CS101

None
None
None
None
None
MM101
PH102
None

MT201

MT102

None

EE221
EE211
CS231
HM211
EE211L
EE221L

Linear Algebra & Differential


Equations
Logic Design
Circuit Analysis
Discrete Mathematics
Pak. & Islamic Studies
Circuit Analysis Lab
Logic Design Lab

3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
3
3

3
3
3
3
1
1

None
MT101
None
None
None
None

None
None
None
None
EE211
EE221

CS221

Data Structure and Algorithms

CS112

None

EE231
ME201
ME291
CS222

Electronics - I
Engineering Statistics
Engineering Economy
Computer Organization &
Assembly Language
Data Structure and Algorithms Lab
Computer Organization &
Assembly Language Lab
Electronics I Lab

3
3
3
3

0
0
0
0

3
3
3
3

EE211
None
None
EE221

None
None
None
None

0
0

3
3

1
1

CS102
CS112

CS221
CS222

EE2 11

EE231

4rt Semester

3rd Semester

1st Semester

Course Title

2nd Semester

Course Code

CS221L
CS222L
EE231L

41

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

Pre-req

Co-req

Signals & Systems


Object Oriented Analysis and
Design
Microprocessor Interfacing
Sociology and Human Behavior
Operating Systems
Operating Systems Lab
Microprocessor Interfacing Lab
Signals & Systems Lab

3
3

0
1

3
3

MT201
CS221

None
None

3
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
3
1
1
1

EE222
None
CS221
CS221
EE222L
MT201

None
None
None
CS211
EE323
CS341

Software Engineering
Systems Programming
Computer Communication and
Networking
Numerical Analysis &
Computational Methods
Ethical and Legal Dimensions of
Engineering

3
3
3

0
0
0

3
3
3

CE 323
C S311
C S311

None
None
None

MT201

None

None

None

C S312L
C E313L

Systems Programming Lab

C S311

CS312

Computer Communication and


Networking Lab

C S311

CE313

7th Semester

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CE431
CE4xx
CE4xx
MSxxx
CS481
CE431L

Database Management Systems


Specialization Elective I
Specialization Elective II
Management Elective
Senior Design Project (Part-I)
Database Management Systems
Lab

3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
9
3

3
3
3
3
3
1

CE 323
**
**
**
None
CE3 23

None
**
**
**
None
CS331

8th Semester

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

CE4xx
CE4xx
All
MSxxx
CS482

Specialization Elective - III


Specialization Elective - IV
Engineering Elective(Breadth)
Management Elective
Senior Design Project (Part-II)

3
3
3
3
0

0
0
0
0
9

3
3
3
3
3

**
**
**
**
None

**
**
**
**
None

Course Code

5th Semester

CS341
C E323
EE323
HM321
C E 311
C E 311L
EE323L
CS341L

6th Semester

CS325
C S312
C E313
ES342
HM322

Course Title

42

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Course Descriptions
Cs101 Introduction to Computing (3 0 3): History and basic
components of a computer system, approaches to solving
problems using computers, problem solving in C++, control
structures, functions, structures, arrays and strings, pointers
and advanced topics in arrays, file handling, graphics, etc.
Prerequisite(s): none
CS112 Programming Techniques (3 0 3) : User defined data
types, structures, unions and enumerations, recursion,
preprocessing in C++, bit manipulation, strings, pointers,
reference and dynamic memory allocation, function pointers,
ADTs and C++ classes, constructor, destructors, static data
members and functions, constant data members and
functions, copy constructor, inheritance, virtual functions and
polymorphism, operator overloading, function and class
templates, exception handling, I/O streams and file handling,
graphic mode programming, GUI programming, introduction
to standard template library.
Prerequisite(s): CS101
CS121 Fundamentals of Computer Science (3 0 3): This
course introduces the basics of computer science. It provides
the necessary breadth and gives a bird-eye view of computer
science. Material covered includes basics of computer
organization and hardware, operating systems, networking

and the Internet, algorithm development, software


engineering, databases, etc. The course also discusses the use
of computers in various domains and recent and future trends
in IT.
Prerequisite(s): none
CS221 Data Structures & Algorithms (3 0 3): Introduction
to data structures and algorithms, arrays, stacks, infix, postfix
and prefix notations, recursion, backtracking, binary search,
queues, linked lists, trees, graphs and operations, algorithm
performance, complexity issues, sorting algorithms, searching
algorithms, hashing, dynamic memory management.
Prerequisite(s): CS112/CS102L
CS222 Computer Organization and Assembly Languag (3
0 3): Microprocessor bus structure: addressing, data and
control, memory organization and structure (segmented and
linear models), introduction to registers and flags, data
movement, arithmetic and logic, programme control,
subroutines, stack and its operation, peripheral control
interrupts, interfacing with high level languages, real-time
applications.
Objectives and perspectives of Assembly language,
addressing modes, introduction to the assembler and
debugger, manipulate and translate machine and assembly
code, describe actions inside the processing chip, discuss
operations performed by an instruction set, write
documented programs, using an assembler of choice.
Prerequisite(s): CS112, CE121/EE221
CS224 Formal Languages and Automata Theory (3 0 3):
Study of regular languages, regular expressions and finite
state machines, deterministic and non-deterministic finite
state machines, pushdown automata, context free grammar,
Turing machines and applications of all kinds of finite state
machines.
Prerequisite(s): CS231
CS231 Discrete Mathematics (3 0 3): Formal logic,

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

quantifiers and predicates, tautologies, rules of inferences,


proof techniques, mathematical induction, recurrence
relations, set theory, counting, permutations and
combinations, relations and functions, Boolean algebra,
introduction to group theory and algorithms, analysis and
complexity of algorithms.
Prerequisite(s): none
CS232 Introduction to Databases (3 0 3): Introduction to
databases, basic concepts and architecture, relational model,
SQL, data manipulation, data definition language,
methodology-conceptual, logical, physical database design,
data modeling, entity-relationship diagrams, functional
dependencies, normalization, relational database design,
relational algebra, record storage and primary file
organization, query processing and optimizations, transaction
processing, concurrency control.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
CS311 Operating Systems (3 0 3): History and goals,
evolution of multi-user systems, process and CPU
management, multithreading, kernel and user modes,
protection, problems of cooperative processes,
synchronization, deadlocks, memory management and virtual
memory, relocation,
fragmentation, paging and
segmentation, secondary storage, security and protection, file

systems, I/O systems, introduction to distributed operating


systems, scheduling and dispatch, introduction to
concurrency.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
CS312 Systems Programming (3 0 3): Programming over
Linux, gcc and associated tools, file I/O with low-level file
descriptors, the standard I/O library, error reporting
mechanisms, kernel statistics and parameter modifications,
process creation and management system calls, signals and
associated system calls, pipes and FIFOs, single and multiple
reader/writers, semaphores, shared memory and messagequeues, sockets, attributes and addressing schemes, multiple
client connections, connectionless socket communication.
Prerequisite(s): CS311
CS323/CE323 Object Oriented Analysis and Design (3 0 3):
Evolution of Object Oriented (OO) programming, OO
concepts and principles, problem solving in OO paradigm,
classes, methods, objects and encapsulation; constructors and
destructors, operator and function overloading, virtual
functions, derived classes, inheritance and polymorphism, I/O
and file processing, exception handling, UML: conceptual
model, use case diagrams, object models, class diagrams,
system sequence diagram, object-oriented life cycle,
modeling user interface requirements, designing and
evaluating methods, synchronizing dependent attributes,
normalizing classes with dependent data, design at the object,
etc.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
CS324 Computer Architecture (2 0 2): Fundamentals of
computer design including performance measurements and
quantitative principles, principles of Instruction Set Design,
operands, addressing modes and encoding, pipelining of
processors: issues and bottlenecks, exception handling
features, instruction-level parallelism and dynamic handling
of exceptions, memory hierarchy design, cache design,
performance issues and improvements, main memory
performance issues, storage systems, multiprocessors and

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


thread level parallelism, case studies.
Prerequisite(s): CS222
CS325 Software Engineering (3 0 3): Software development
life cycle, software development processes, software
requirement identification and specification, system analysis,
software architecture, software design approaches: objectoriented and function-oriented, user interface design,
program design techniques, software testing and
maintenance, software technical metrics, introduction to
quality assurance and project management.
Hands-on Practice: using Microsoft Project, introduction to
MS .Net framework, introduction to Windows form
programming in MS .Net, creating user interfaces in .Net,
debugging applications, performance testing of applications.
Prerequisite(s): CS112/CE323
CS351 Artificial Intelligence (3 0 3)
Overview of artificial intelligence, issues and application,
knowledge representation, searching techniques, pruning,
heuristics, production systems, basic elements of Prolog
language, expert systems, neural networks, robotics, etc.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
CS478 Design & Analysis of Algorithms (3 0 3):

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Introduction, comparison sorting, integer sorting and


selection; lower bounds, divide and conquer, master theorem,
dynamic programming, graph representation, traversal,
ordering, shortest paths, greedy algorithms, minimum
spanning trees, string algorithms, amortized analysis,
computational geometry, NP-completeness and
approximation.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
CS424 Compiler Construction (3 0 3): Study and practical
implementation of lexical analysis, syntax analysis using top
down as well as bottom up approaches also detail study of LL,
LR, and LALR parsers, semantic analysis using attribute
grammars and dependency graphs, intermediate code
generation using three address codes and code optimization.
Students are required to implement a small compiler using
modern compiler writing tools.
Prerequisite(s): CS224
CS342 Numerical Analysis & Computational Methods (3 0
3): Error and computer arithmetic, root finding for non-linear
equation, interpolation and polynomial approximation,
solution of system of linear equations, numerical
differentiation and integration, and numerical solution of
ordinary differential equations.
Prerequisite(s): MT201
CS421 Human Computer Interaction (3 0 3): The human,
computer and interaction, usability paradigm and principles,
introduction to design basics, HCI in software process, design
rules, prototyping, evaluation techniques, task analysis,
universal design and user support and computer supported
cooperative work, introduction to specialized topics such as
groupware, pervasive and ubiquitous applications.
Prerequisite(s): CS325
CS481 & CS482 Senior Design Project I & II (6 Credits)
(0 18 6): The aim of the course is to fine tune the general
computing skills of the students in a specific area and exercise
their communication skills. It will allow students to choose a

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

specific area of study of interest to them and to choose a


method of working which is suited to their area of study.
Therefore, some may adopt a research-oriented approach
while others may concentrate on building specific systems to
solve known problems.
CE313 Computer Communications & Networks (3 0 3):
Introduction to data communications, network topologies,
LAN and WAN, OSI model of computer communications,
communications media, data link layer, network layer,
transport layer, TCP/IP protocols, switching and routing,
networking technologies.
Prerequisite(s): CS311
CE341 Signals & Systems (3 0 3): Introduction to continuous
and discrete-time signals, concept of frequency, A/D and D/A
conversion, sampling theorem, discrete-time systems:
representation, classification and analysis, characteristics of
LTI systems, convolution and correlation, z-transform, Fourier
transform, Laplace transform, time and frequency domain
analysis, introduction to digital filters.
Prerequisite(s): MT201
CE431 Database Management System (3 0 3): Introduction
to databases, basic concepts and architecture, relational

model, SQL, data manipulation, data definition language,


methodology-conceptual, logical, physical database design,
data modeling, entity-relationship diagrams, functional
dependencies, normalization, relational database design,
relational algebra, record storage and primary file
organization, query processing and optimizations, transaction
processing, concurrency control, recovery techniques,
distributed databases, data mining, data warehousing
concepts.
Prerequisite(s): CE323
EE211 Circuit Analysis (3 0 3): The course represents the
fundamental of circuit analysis. It starts with basic concepts
like voltage, current, sources and Ohm's law, then follows to
develop methods and procedures (nodal/mesh analysis,
network theorems) to resolve complex electric circuits. Initially
the solutions would be provided for resistive circuits followed
by complex elements such as capacitors, inductors and
operational amplifiers. Circuits with DC sources and with
sinusoidal sources will also be discussed at final stage of the
course.
Prerequisite(s): MT101
EE221 Digital Logic and Design (3 0 3): Deals with the basic
concepts and tools used to design digital hardware consisting
of both combinational and sequential logic circuits, Boolean
algebra, logic gates, combinational logic design, sequential
logic design, memory, programmable logic devices (PLDs),
introduction to hardware description language (HDL) and
their use to design the basic digital hardware.
Prerequisite(s): none
EE231 Electronics - I (3 0 3): Introduction to basic electronics,
semiconductor diode, diode applications, bipolar junction
transistor, transistor configurations, DC biasing, field-effect
transistor, BJT and FET small signal equivalent circuit models,
design of BJT and FET amplifiers, differential amplifiers.
Prerequisite(s): EE211
EE323 Microprocessor Interfacing (3 0 3): Introduction to
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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


16 bit microprocessor, software model, addressing modes,
instruction set, assembly language programming, hardware
model, read/write cycles, exception/interrupt processing,
interfacing to ACIA, PIA, PI/T, DMA, A/D, D/A converters,
introduction to micro-controllers and embedded systems.
Prerequisite(s): CS222/EE222

LAB COURSES:
CS101L Introduction to Computing & Programming Lab
(0 3 1): Introduction to Windows, learning Microsoft Word,
Excel, algorithms and flow charts, first program in C++,
variables, casting, and operators, problem solving in C++,
control structures, functions, arrays and strings, pointers, file
handling and structures.
Co-requisite(s): CS101
CS102L Intensive Programming Lab (0 3 1): Background,
advanced concepts of functions (overloading, default
arguments), recursion, pointers and functions, pointers and
strings, fundamentals of classes, templates and generic
programming, bit manipulation, dynamic memory
management, exception handling.
Prerequisite(s): CS101
CS112L Programming Techniques Lab (0 3 1): Problems

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


exercising concepts of structures, enumerations, unions,
recursion, file handling, function templates and generic
programming, function pointers, callback mechanism,
exception handling, dynamic memory allocation, I/O streams,
introduction to ADT, classes methods, objects and
encapsulation; composition, constructors and destructors,
operator and function overloading, virtual functions, derived
classes, inheritance and polymorphism; memory
management, graphics in C.
Prerequisite(s): CS101, Co-requisite(s):CS112
CS221L Data Structures and Algorithms Lab (0 3 1): Review
of pointers, functions, structures, dynamic memory allocation;
introduction to stacks with their applications, recursion with
focus on problem solving, queues: introduction and
applications, linked lists and their advantage over queues,
different problems related to linked lists and their solutions,
introduction to tree, binary search tree, graphs, graph
searching, heaps, implementation of sorting and searching
algorithms.
Prerequisite(s): CS112/ C102L, Co-requisite(s):CS221
CS222L Computer Organization and Assembly Language
Lab (0 3 1): Objectives and perspectives of assembly
language, addressing modes, introduction to the assembler
and debugger, manipulate and translate machine and
assembly code, describe actions inside the processing chip,
discuss operations performed by an instruction set, write a
fully documented program, using an assembler of choice.
Prerequisite(s): EE221 Co-requisite(s):CS222
CS232L/CE431L Database Management Systems Lab (0 3
1): Introduction to Microsoft Access, creating tables and
relationships, SQL data manipulation language (DML),
conceptual modeling using ER diagrams, logical design,
translation of ER diagrams into logical schema, introduction to
Microsoft SQL Server 2000, stored procedures and T-SQL,
database application programming Visual Studio.Net,
database application design and architecture, SQL server
administration, data warehousing and OLAP.
Prerequisite(s): CS221/CE323, Co-requisite(s):CS232/CE431

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CS311L Introduction Operating Systems Lab (0 3 1):


Introduction to Linux, Linux commands, streams, redirection
operators, pipe operator, file security, semaphores,
background/foreground processing, wild cards, regular
expression, shell programming, scripting, expressions and
variables, selection structures, loop structures, arrays and
functions, system programming fork and exec, pipes and
signals, files, Linux system administration.
Prerequisite(s): CS221, Co-requisite(s):CS311
CS312L Systems Programming Lab (0 3 1): Process
attributes and process creation, parent and child processes,
signals, shared memory, memory mapped files, pipes,
message queues, socket programming, Internet domain
socket programming, semaphores.
Prerequisite(s): CS311, Co-requisite(s):CS312
CS351L Artificial Intelligence Lab (0 3 1): Introduction to
Prolog, proof and matching, lists, arithmetic, more on lists,
finite automata, finite state parser and transducer, terms and
advanced Prolog concepts, working with files and modules,
programming in LISP, introduction to CLIPS and expert system
design, artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms, fuzzy
systems, computationally intelligent hybrid systems.
Prerequisite(s): CS221, Co-requisite(s):CS351

CS424L Compiler Construction Lab (0 3 1): NFA-DFA


conversion, syntax directed translation, concept of compiler
generators, introduction to Lex and Yacc, lexical analysis,
syntax analysis and error recovery using Lex and Yacc.
Prerequisite(s): CS224, Co-requisite(s):CS424
CE313L Computer Communication & Networking Lab (0 3
1): Linux administration, Squid configuration, firewalls,
physical layer and encoding mechanisms, socket
programming, network simulator, more topology's in network
simulator, error checking algorithms, sliding window protocol,
router simulation, advanced routing algorithms, routing
algorithms in NS, advanced network simulation in NS, OPNET
introduction.
Prerequisite(s): CS311, Co-requisite(s):CE313
CE341L Signals & Systems Lab (0 3 1): Introduction, LTI
systems, Fourier series, CT Fourier transform, DT Fourier
transform, Laplace transform, Z transform, sampling.
Prerequisite(s): MT201, Co-requisite(s):CE341

Specialization Courses

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


CS326/CE426 Mobile Computing (3 0 3): This course
introduces the state-of-the-art mobile computing platforms and
provides an appropriate entry point to future careers in mobile
applications development and allied technology. Key contents
include: introduction to mobile computing, architecture of
android platform, using emulator, debugging and DDMS, content
providers, App. networking, App. multimedia, App. 2D and 3D
graphics, using sensors, publishing, designing Apps using XAML,
introduction to iPhone platform, iPhone supported development
features and tools for developing mobile web applications.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
Specialization(s): CE
CS327 Software Engineering II (3 0 3): Product and process,
objected oriented analysis, formal methods, algebraic
approaches, verification, introduction to Z language and formal
specification, function point analysis, refactoring, clean room
software engineering, component bases software development,
software re-engineering, architecture and estimation.
Prerequisite:
CS325
Specialization(s): CS
CS352 Introduction to Soft Computing (3 0 3): The course
provides an in-depth overview of the theoretical and the practical
aspects of the soft computing paradigm. The focus is on the
theory and applications of probabilistic graphical models and
related topics, such as, knowledge elicitation issues, belief
updating in singly and multiply connected networks, simulation
schemes for belief updating, parameter and structure learning of
Bayesian networks, and integration of time and uncertainty.
Alternative models of uncertain reasoning including belief
function theory and fuzzy logic and biologically inspired
computational models (neural networks and evolutionary
algorithms) are also presented.
Prerequisite(s): CS232
Specialization(s): CS
CS417 Parallel Processing (3 0 3): High performance
architectures and programming languages; graph concepts:
control flow graph, dominance frontiers, data dependence in
loops and parallel constructs; program dependence graph; loop
transformations, inter-procedural transformations; concurrency

49

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

analysis: synchronization, strength reduction, nested loops;


vector analysis; message-passing machines; communicating
sequential processes.
Prerequisite:
CS311, EE222
Specialization(s): CS, CE
CS419 Applied Image Processing (3 0 3): Introduction to digital
image processing, advanced image recognition topics like texture
analysis and fractal analysis, advanced segmentation techniques
using fractal dimension, clustering, watershed transform, medial
axis transformation, 2D to 3D rendering, 3D visualization, stereo
imaging, medical imaging applications, and signal image
processing techniques.
Prerequisite:
CS418
Specialization(s): CS
CS425 Design Patterns (3 0 3): Overview of object-oriented
design, software reusability, classification of design patterns,
pattern description formats, design and implementation issues
in: creational patterns, structural patterns, behavioral patterns;
patterns in software architecture; patterns for user-interface
design; pattern languages.
Prerequisite(s):CS325
Specialization(s): CS
CS426 Software Testing & Quality Engineering (3 0 3):
Introduction, the quality challenge, quality control v/s quality
assurance, quality assurance in software projects, quality
management, quality assurance and standards, quality planning
and quality control, verification and validation, critical system
validation, reliability validation, safety assurance, security
assessment, inspections and reviews, software quality assurance
(SQA), plans, SQA-organizational level initiatives, software
testing, specification based test construction techniques, whitebox and grey-box testing, testing techniques for SDLC, control
flow oriented test construction techniques, data flow oriented
test construction techniques, clean-room approach to quality
assurance, product quality and process quality standards,
walkthroughs and inspections, structure, checklist, audits, roles
and responsibilities.
Prerequisite(s): CS325

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Specialization(s): CS
CS427 Software Design and Architecture (3 0 3): Overview of
SDLC, engineering design vs. software design, design heuristics
and principles, reusability, metrics and quality of design,
frameworks, and architectures, framework development
approaches, service-oriented architectures, middleware
architectures, design patterns, architectural patterns, design
issues for distributed and real-time software, re-engineering and
reverse engineering.
Pre-requisites: CS325
CS428 Design of Programming Language (3 0 3):
Programming practices: program analysis and construction
practices, programming language classification, data types,
structured data types, subprograms, control statements
scooping, and storage management.
Prerequisite(s): CS224
Specialization(s): CS
CS429 Software Project Management (3 0 3): Project
management processes and phases, resource identification,
software size estimation, budgeting and costing, project planning
and scheduling, customer relationship management, technical
resource management, configuration management, outsourcing,
team selection, risk management, software process management,
process improvement framework, software release management.
Prerequisite(s): CS325
Specialization(s): CS
CS432 Advanced Databases (3 0 3): Design of data models,
recently developed protocols to guarantee consistency of
databases, the design of physical models, and performance
analysis techniques, algorithms and data structures such a Btrees, transposed files, phantom files, and hybrid structures,
distributed databases and database machines, object oriented
databases concepts.
Prerequisite(s): CS232/CE431
Specialization(s): CS
CS433 Computer Graphics (3 0 3): Computer graphics and its
fundamental algorithms. Topics include graphics input and

output, the graphics pipeline, sampling and image manipulation,


three-dimensional transformations and interactive modeling,
basics of modeling and animation, simple shading models and
their hardware implementation, and fundamental algorithms of
scientific visualization. Basic structure of interactive graphics
systems, characteristics of various hardware devices, control of
display devices, implementation of simple packages, device
independence, and standard packages, distributed architectures
for graphics, hidden line and hidden surfaces algorithms,
representation of surfaces, 2-D graphics methods,
transformations, and interactive methods, 3-D graphics,
transformations, viewing geometry, object modeling, and
interactive manipulation methods, basic lighting and shading,
video and animation methods.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
Specialization(s): CS
CS435 MIS & DSS (3 0 3): Advance topics in systems analysis and
software engineering, design and development of large
information systems, usefulness to the management, integrated
environments, application of artificial intelligence to MIS,
development of expert systems and decision support systems.
Prerequisite(s): CS232/CE431
Specialization(s): CS
CS437 Data warehousing and Data Mining (3 0 3): Concepts of
data mining and data warehousing, data preparation techniques:
outlier and missing data analysis, data reduction techniques,
learning methods in data mining, statistical methods in data
mining, cluster analysis, hierarchical, agglomerative and nave
Bayesian methods, decision trees and decision rules, association
rules, other soft computing approaches in data mining, artificial
neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithm, and evolutionary
algorithms.
Prerequisite(s): CS232
Specialization(s): CS
CS438 Web Mining and Social Media Analysis (3 0 3): This
course introduces mining data from the web and social media,
state-of-the-art methods in mining heterogeneous data,
association rule mining supervised and unsupervised learning
with particular emphasis on web data, key contents also include

50

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

methods specifically developed for information retrieval such as


latent semantic indexing, meta-searches, search based ranking,
social media analysis such as link analysis, page rank and HITS
algorithms, community discovery, etc.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
Specialization(s): CS

time systems, design issues, programming languages for realtime systems, fault tolerance and reliability issues, exception
handling, concurrent programming, synchronization,
communication, scheduling.
Pre-requisites: CS311
Specialization(s): CS

CS452/CE452 Artificial Neural Networks (3 0 3): Neural


network basics, Hebb net, perceptron, Adaline and Madaline,
Hetero-associative and auto-associative networks, discrete
Hopfield network, bi-directional associative memory (BAM),
backpropagation neural network (BPN), variants of BPN,
simulations using backpropagation, radial basis function
networks, neural nets based on competition, self-organization
aps (SOMs), learning vector quantization (LVQ), counter
propagation betworks, adaptive resonance theory (ART),
probabilistic neural networks, temporal processing using
feedforward nets, genetic algorithms, case studies
Prerequisite(s): CS351 / CS221
Specialization(s): CS, CE

CS458 Distributed Systems (3 0 3): Introduction to distributed


systems, communication, naming and name services, processes,
synchronization, fault tolerance, distributed file systems,
distributed transaction processing, replication, object-based
systems, document-based systems, coordination-based
systems, security in distributed systems.
Pre-requisites: CS311, CS313
Specialization(s): CS

CS454 Real-Time Programming (3 0 3): Introduction to real-

51

CS463 Web Engineering (3 0 3): Internet technology trends,


real-time data transmission, security over Internet, introduction
to Web applications development, software architecture patterns
for Web Apps, MVC, Web browsers, HTTP, DOM and browser
engines, client-side development with HTML, CSS & JavaScript,
server-side development over Web applications framework, Web

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

App deployment, virtualization, cloud computing, IaaS, PaaS and


SaaS models.
Pre-requisites: CS313
CS464 Data and Network Security (3 0 3): Introduction,
cryptology and simple cryptosystems, conventional encryption
techniques, stream and block ciphers, DES, more on block ciphers,
advanced encryption standard, confidentiality and message
authentication: hash functions, number theory and algorithm
complexity, public key encryption, RSA and discrete logarithms,
elliptic curves, digital signatures, key management schemes,
identification schemes, dial-up security, e-mail security, PGP, SMIME, kerberos and directory authentication, emerging Internet
security standards, SET, SSL and IPsec, VPNs, firewalls, viruses,
miscellaneous topics.
Prerequisite(s): CS313
Specialization(s): CS
CS465 Data Security and Encryptions (3 0 3): Mathematical
background (principle of number theory, probability theory
including primes, random numbers, modular arithmetic and
discrete logarithms), cryptographic algorithms and design
principles, conventional and symmetric encryption (DES, IDEA,
Blowfish, Rijndael, RC-4, RC-5), public key or asymmetric
encryption (RSA, Diffie-Hellman), key management, hash functions
(MD5, SHA-1, RIPEMD-160, HMAC), digital signatures, and
certificates, network security and authentication protocols (X.509,
Kerberos), electronic mail security (S/MIME, PGP), web security and
protocols for secure electronic commerce (IPSec, SSL, TLS, SET).
Prerequisite(s): CE313
Specialization(s): CS, CE
CS472 Bio-Inspired Computing (3 0 3): Biological organisms
cope with the demands of their environments using solutions quite
unlike the traditional human-engineered approaches to problem
solving. Biological systems tend to be adaptive, reactive, and
distributed. Bio-inspired computing is a field devoted to tackling
complex problems using computational methods modeled after
design principles encountered in nature. This course is strongly
grounded on the foundations of complex systems and theoretical
biology. It aims at a deep understanding of the distributed
architectures of natural complex systems, and how those can be

used to produce informatics tools with enhanced robustness,


scalability, flexibility and which can interface more effectively with
humans. It is a multi-disciplinary field strongly based on biology,
complexity, computer science, informatics, cognitive science,
robotics, and cybernetics.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
Specialization(s): CS, CE
CS474 Bio-Informatic (3 0 3): Bioinformatics, sequence analysis,
microarray expression analysis, Bayesian methods, control theory,
scale-free networks, and biotechnology applications, current realworld examples, actual implementations, and engineering design
issues, engineering issues from signal processing, network theory,
machine learning, robotics and other domains, , use of NCBI's
Entrez, BLAST, PSI-BLAST, ClustalW, Pfam, PRINTS, BLOCKS, Prosite
and the PDB.
Prerequisite(s): CS121/CE323
Specialization(s): CS, CE
CS476 Computational Biology (3 0 3): Algorithmic and machine
learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory
with practice, principles of algorithm design for biological
datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques,
analyzing real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and
proteomics, Genomes: biological sequence analysis, hidden
Markov models, gene finding, RNA folding, sequence alignment,
genome assembly, networks: gene expression analysis, regulatory
motifs, graph algorithms, scale-free networks, network motifs,
network evolution, evolution: comparative genomics,
phylogenetics, genome duplication, genome rearrangements,
evolutionary theory, rapid evolution.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
Specialization(s): CS, CE
CE361 Communication Theory (3 0 3): Introduction to modern
analog and digital communication systems, Fourier analysis of
signals and systems, signal transmission, amplitude and angle
modulation techniques, sampling theorem, PCM, DPCM, and delta
modulation, digital communication systems, principal of modern
digital communication systems including M-ary communication,
digital carrier and multiplexing, and emerging digital
communication technologies.

52

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Prerequisite(s):MT201, CE341
Specialization(s): CE
CE419 Digital Image Processing (3 0 3): Concept of digital image,
types of images, image data vs. text data, image compression
techniques: pattern analysis, re-construction and recognition of
images.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
Specialization(s): CE
CE421 Advanced Computer Architecture (3 0 3): Instruction set
architecture (ISA), RISC & CISC, pipelining, instruction-level
parallelism, super scalar processors, VLIW architecture, parallel
processing, high-speed memory systems, storage systems,
interconnection networks.
Prerequisite(s): EE222
Specialization(s): CE

53

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


CE432 Real Time Embedded Systems (3 3 4): Introduction to real
time systems, embedded systems, interrupts, performance and
optimization, simple single task operating system, real time operating
system and scheduling, concurrency, communication, real time
benchmarks, adaptive and real time systems, real time control over the
internet/remote.
Prerequisite(s): CS311, EE323
Specialization(s): CE
CE444 Simulation and Modeling (3 0 3): Analysis of physical systems
and industrial processes, formulation in the form of mathematical
equations or inequalities (the mathematical models), solution of
models using computers, use of computers for design, optimization
and control of actual systems in engineering.
Prerequisite(s): none
Specialization(s): CE

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CE451 Applied Artificial Intelligence (3 0 3): Overview of


Artificial Intelligence, fuzzy systems, state-space problems,
heuristics, path finding, game trees, solving optimization
problems, unsupervised learning, supervised learning, case
study of AI application areas.
Prerequisite(s): CS221
Specialization(s): CE
CS453/CE453 Robotic Vision (3 0 3): Vision tasks and
applications, Cameral models and image acquisition, image
segmentation, feature detection and matching, image
recognition, 3D visualization, robot perception (robot and
sensors), visual navigation, localization and other relevant
topics in robotic vision.
Pre-requisites: CS221
Specialization(s): CS, CE
CE461 Digital Signal Processing (3 0 3): Discrete-time signals,
sampling theory, interpolation and decimation, discrete-time
Fourier transform, z-transform, discrete Fourier transform, fast
Fourier transform, digital filter design techniques, parallel IIR
and FIR filters, finite word length effects, introduction to
discrete stochastic processes.
Prerequisite(s): CE341
Specialization(s): CE
CE463 Wireless & Mobile Networks (3 0 3): Introduction
to wireless environment, wireless network architectures,
wireless local area networks (WLANs), wireless personal area
networks, middleware for wireless and mobile networks,
mobile IP, TCP in wireless environments, mobile ad-hoc
networks and their routing, nomadic services, security in
wireless networks, mobile data services, pervasive computing
applications.
Prerequisite(s): CE313
Specialization(s): CE
CE465/EE424ASIC Design (3 0 3): Introduction to application
specific Integrated circuits (ASIC) design methodologies,
design and implementation using FPGAs, design verification,
digital design using hardware description language, libraries,
utilities for high level description, data flow description, timing

and delays, modeling techniques.


Prerequisite(s): CS222
Specialization(s): CE
CE471 Multimedia Systems (3 0 3): Introduction to
multimedia systems, software, hardware, various equipment,
video and audio capture, annotation, storage and playback
techniques, multimedia software development tools,
multimedia applications, step-by-step procedure in
developing multimedia systems: (specification, design, testing,
and prototyping), multimedia standards, Student projects developing multimedia systems in the laboratory.
Prerequisite(s): CE341
Specialization(s): CE
EE331 Advanced Digital Design (3 3 4): Introduction to
hardware description languages (HDLs), VHDL, synthesizable
subset of VHDL, digital system modeling and design using
VHDL, implementation architectures, finite state machines,
digital logic testing and simulation, fault simulation techniques,
design and implementation using FPGAs, introduction to
application specific integrated circuits (ASIC), ASIC
technologies, design methodologies, design verification,
analysis of faulted circuits, design methods for data intensive
applications (digital signal processing and telecommunication).
Prerequisite(s): CE121/EE221
Specialization(s): CE
EE436 VLSI Design (3 3 4): Semiconductor theory, IC
fabrication methodologies and processes, details of MOS
transistors, fabrication and analysis of PMOS & NMOS
transistors, inverters, resistors, capacitors, gates etc.,
introduction of VLSI CAD tools and simulation modeling,
implementation of gates, mux, counters, adders, multipliers
and memories etc., IC layout design rules, chip layout, design
calculations, gate and transistor level schematics and their
conversion to layouts, design optimization, interconnects,
minimization of die area and power and maximization of speed,
modeling chips using FPGAs, design project.
Prerequisite(s): CE231/EE231
Specialization(s): CE

54

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


Communication and Digital Signal Processing
Microelectronics and ASIC Design
Electric Power and Control Systems

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Faculty
Khasan S. Karimov , PhD (S. Petersburg, Russia)
Adnan Noor, PhD (University of Manchester, UK)
Husnul Maab, PhD (QAU, Pakistan)
Zia-ul-Haq Abbas, PhD (University of Agder, Norway)
Farrah Fayyaz, PhD (University of Purdue, USA)
Arbab Abdur Rahim, PhD (Politecnico di Torino, Italy)
M. Ali Ghias, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Mazhar Javed, MPhil. (QAU, Pakistan)
Salman Khan, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
M. Mehran Bashir, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Attique Ur Rehman, MS (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
M. Ahsan Saeed, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Abdul Basit Zia, MS (University of Malaya, Malaysia)
Bakht Zaman, MS (HIK Institute, Pakistan)

Lab Engineers and Graduate Assistants (GA)


Muhammad Salman, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Junaid Bin Masood, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Inzamam Anwar, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Abdullah Nisar, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Zain ul Abideen, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Asad Khalid, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Zaiwar Ali, BS (COMSATS, Pakistan)
Khan Wali, BS (COMSATS, Pakistan)
Muhammad Uzair Khan, BS (UET Peshawar, Pakistan)
M. Haroon Rashid, BS (University of Faisalabad, Pakistan)
Habibullah Manzoor, BS (HITEC, Pakistan)
Muhammad Farhan, BS (UET Peshawar, Pakistan)
Tahir Khan, BS (NUCES-FAST, Pakistan)
Umair Asghar, BS (NUST SEECS, Pakistan)
M. Mussawar Pervez, BS (UET Peshawar, Pakistan)
M. Arsalan, BS (IUB Bahawalpur, Pakistan)
Adnan Jafar, BS (IUB Bahawalpur, Pakistan)
Ijaz Ahmad, BS (UET Peshawar, Pakistan)
Personal Assistant

Ikram Ullah
56

Dean

Nisar Ahmed
Ph.D (ICSTM, London, UK)

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Electrical Engineering-An Ever-Expanding Field
Electrical Engineering is one of the oldest disciplines of
engineering. Initially it was confined to few areas such as power
generation, transmission and distribution; radio communication
and wireless telephony. However, in fifty years, it has seen
tremendous growth and expansion in some areas of Electrical
Engineering. The diversification and expansion in some areas of
Electrical Engineering has been of such a large magnitude that
they seem to be independent disciplines in their own. These
include Electronic Engineering, Power Engineering,
Telecommunication, Computer Engineering, Information
Technology, and Control Systems. However, in a large part of the
world, Electrical Engineering is still considered to be the parent
discipline.
Electrical Power Engineering is an important and vital discipline
in Pakistan due to present crisis in power generation. The main
aim of this discipline is not only to study existing methods of
power generation, transmission and distribution but also to study
the new ways of power generation i.e., renewable and
sustainable technologies. The Electrical Power Engineering
Program covers a broad range of activities and evolving issues
that are of great importance in the field of sustainable and smart
power systems.
With the turn of the century, we have entered a new era in which
micro and nano-fabrication technologies. With the new chip
design methods at these scales, System-On-Chip has enabled
to bring millions of devices in small sized chips, thus enhancing
exponential capabilities offered by the electronic devices. Other
micro-fabrication technologies related to the fields such as
MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems), are now reaching a
point of being able to contribute in the same way.
The immense development in the field of microelectronics has
generated an ever-increasing demand for electronic and
electrical engineers to cope not only with the development in
traditional fields like communications, robotics, digital signal
processing, power and control systems but should also have a
good knowledge base and theoretical understanding of the
emerging areas like biomedical instrumentation (where
biological samples can be tested and analyzed on a single chip
(lab-on-a-chip)), security & surveillance and biometrics.
Keeping in mind the latest requirements of the national and
international job market and research trends, Faculty of
Electrical Engineering has designed an updated curriculum and
offers high-quality courses aimed at individuals who can

amicably meet these challenges. The program of study enables


them to lead the teams of future young engineers and to realize
their innovative ideas. The faculty also provides student with the
opportunity to learn how research carried out by the faculty
members is transformed into education.
Undergraduate Program
The Faculty offers a four-year degree program through courses
that are modular in nature and are evenly spread across eight
regular semesters. The theoretical education obtained in the
classroom is reinforced with laboratory work. These laboratories,
which accompany more than 70% of the courses, are equipped
with the latest pedagogical tools to illustrate important concepts,
and provide a practical demonstration of them. In the final two
years, students can opt for one of the following streams:

Specialization in Electronic Engineering


Specialization in Power Engineering

Program Educational Objectives (PEOS)


The Faculty of Electrical Engineering at GIK Institute has
formulated the Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) using
the feedback from the stake-holders. There are four PEOs for
the EE program.
PEO_1: Be suitable for designing, research, and development
jobs; and be able to serve in academic, industrial, and
government organizations.

57

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


PEO_2: Be able to analyze and solve complex electrical
engineering problems by applying fundamental knowledge of
mathematics, science and engineering; and are aware of the
importance of lifelong learning and sustainability.
PEO_3: Be sensitive to ethical, societal, and environmental
issues while applying their modern engineering and IT skills
and tools in their professional work; and have the capability
of meeting strict timelines when working individually or in a
team.
PEO_4: Be equipped with entrepreneurial and
communication skills in order to be effective contributors in
professional organizations.
Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)
There is a set of twelve Program Learning Objectives (PLOs) of
Electronic Engineering program which describe what students
are expected to know/perform/attain by the time they graduate
from Faculty of Electrical Engineering. These PLOs are set such
that all course deliveries encompass these objectives, and are
described as follows:
(i) Engineering Knowledge: Ability to apply knowledge of
mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and an
engineering specialization to the solution of complex

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


engineering problems.
(ii) Problem Analysis: Ability to identify, formulate, research
literature, and analyze complex engineering problems reaching
substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics,
natural sciences and engineering sciences.
(iii) Design/Development of Solutions: Ability to design
solutions for complex engineering problems and design systems,
components or processes that meet specified needs with
appropriate consideration for public health and safety, cultural,
societal, and environmental considerations.
(iv) Investigation: Ability to investigate complex engineering
problems in a methodical way including literature survey, design
and conduct of experiments, analysis and interpretation of
experimental data, and synthesis of information to derive valid
conclusions.
(v) Modern Tool Usage: Ability to create, select and apply
appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and
IT tools, including prediction and modeling, to complex
engineering activities, with an understanding of the limitations.
(vi) The Engineer and Society: Ability to apply reasoning
informed by contextual knowledge to assess societal, health,
safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent
responsibilities relevant to professional engineering practice and
solution to complex engineering problems.
(vii) Environment and Sustainability: Ability to understand the
impact of professional engineering solutions in societal and
environmental contexts and demonstrate knowledge of and
need for sustainable development.
(viii) Ethics: Ability to apply ethical principles and commit to
professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of
engineering practice.
(ix) Individual and Team Work: Ability to work effectively, as an
individual or in a team, on multifaceted and /or multidisciplinary
settings.

58

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


(x) Communication: Ability to communicate effectively, orally as
well as in writing, on complex engineering activities with the
engineering community and with society at large, such as being
able to comprehend and write effective reports and design
documentation, make effective presentations, and give and
receive clear instructions.
(xi) Project Management: Ability to demonstrate management
skills and apply engineering principles to one's own work, as a
member and/or leader in a team, to manage projects in a
multidisciplinary environment.
(xii) Lifelong Learning: Ability to recognize importance of, and
pursue lifelong learning in the broader context of innovation and
technological developments.

Career in Electrical Engineering


The Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FEE) students have
careers in three major fields that are:
Communication and Digital Signal Processing
Microelectronics and ASIC Design
Electric Power and Control Systems
These areas have been selected keeping in mind the current
and future requirements of Pakistan. The first,
Communication and Digital Signal Processing, is the key to

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


the global information revolution. The second,
Microelectronics and ASIC Design, targets the heart of the
computer revolution, and encompasses issues related to the
theory, fabrication and design of high speed, dense
integrated circuits. The third, Power and Control, has special
relevance to Pakistan given the level of investment in the
power area, and wide spread application of control systems
in industry. Choosing this degree course does not restrict the
graduates' choice of careers. In the past, our graduates have
b e e n e m p l o y e d i n a r e a s a s d i v e r s e a s p o w e r,
communications, computer networks, industrial control, and
VLSI/ASIC design. A significant number of graduates have
also gone on to pursue advanced education in the US,
Europe.
FEE Laboratories: Keeping in mind the needs of today and
the future, this Faculty has an assortment of equipment and
facilities for the students so they can cope up with the fast
moving technology. It provides them with the opportunity to
learn and understand the concepts of electronic & power
engineering and constructively transform them to practical
use. Some of its facilities are summarized below:
Wave Propagation and Antennas Lab: This lab contains
microwave training systems, antennas, waveguides, and
transmission line demonstrators suitable for the study of

59

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


signals. This Lab is used in connection with Wave
Propagation & Antennas and Microwave Engineering
courses.
Electric Machines Lab: In this laboratory, students augment
their concepts about the fundamentals behind working of
transformers and the rotating machinery. The laboratory is
equipped with single and three-phase transformers,
induction motors, synchronous generators and motors, DC
generators and motors, DC and AC power supplies, electrical
and mechanical loads, and a number of test and monitoring
equipment such as watt-meters, power-factor meters,
voltmeters, ammeters and frequency meters. The students
also learn practically the synchronization of two electricity
networks and the power flow between them.
Logic Design Lab: This lab is meant for the understanding of
fundamental digital logic related concepts and contains 30
sets of oscilloscopes, digital trainers, Digital Multi-Meters
(DMMs), function generators and support accessories.
Starting with simple Universal NAND/NOR Gates, the
students learn to design and implement different
combinatorial as well as sequential circuits taught in the
associated theory class.
Analog Electronics Labs: There are two analog electronics
laboratories in the faculty, where in total, there are above 60
sets of oscilloscopes, trainers, power supplies and functional

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


generators. The labs are used for the courses of Electronics I
& II, and Circuit Analysis I. The labs augment the theoretical
knowledge, which the students acquire in classroom theory.
On the basis of experiments in these labs, the students not
only can verify their theoretical analysis but also learn about
the limitations associated with the equipment, which are
always there regardless of how sensitive and expensive the
equipment is. The labs also help to enhance the students'
knowledge in fundamental design concepts.
Communication Systems Lab: The faculty has a very
comprehensive Communication Systems Laboratory, which
covers both the analog and digital communication systems.
The central equipment of the lab is set of training panels,
which have built-in modules ranging from angle modulation to
coding of digital data. The panels are equipped with 200 kHz
function generators, noise generators and spectrum analyzer
modules to help set up various experiments. In addition to
this, the lab is also equipped with universal MCU-controller
trainers and computers. There is also telephone switching
module and optical fiber transmitter and receiver trainers.
Signal Processing Simulation Lab: This lab has 50
networked Core i5 PCs with various kinds of software
packages installed including Matlab, PSpice, Microwave
Office, ModelSim, Xilinx. Matlab is used for running exercises
in the courses of Signals and Systems, Control Systems,
Digital Communication Systems, Digital Signal Processing
and Digital Image Processing. PSpice, a simulation tool for
analysing electric and electronic circuits is used in the labs of
Circuit Analysis I & II, and Electronics I. Matlab and PSpice
can also be used to simulate the results of the tutorial and
assignment problems in the course of Power Electronics.
Process Control and Automation Lab: This laboratory
offers a unique opportunity to familiarize with PLC structure
and learn their programming techniques. PLCs are attached
with models to demonstrate different PLC functions and
understand their applications. These models include: Traffic
Light Model, Surface Treatment Chariot Model, and
Pneumatically Controlled Robotic Arm. Controls lab is also
equipped with models that demonstrate and give practical
knowledge about different theoretical concepts studied in

60

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Control Systems course, such as PID control, state feedback
control, positional control and speed control. These models
include: Digital Inverted Pendulum, Digital Servo Workshop,
Magnetic Levitation Unit, Twin Rotor MIMO system, and
Analogue Computers.
Microprocessor Lab: The intent of this laboratory is to
provide an insight to a typical microprocessor and
microprocessor-based systems. Used in two courses,
Computer Architecture & Microprocessor Interfacing, this
laboratory is equipped with trainers designed to provide
comprehensive hands-on training employing the latest stateof- the-art technology. Lab-Volt trainer and 8051
Microcontroller trainers used in this Lab employs a
modularised approach to teach microprocessor architecture
and interfacing concepts and its applications. In addition to
these trainers, this laboratory is also equipped with a
universal programmer used to program microcontrollers of
different types as well as EPROMs.
ASIC Design Lab: This laboratory is equipped with VLSI and
Electronic Design Automation (EOA) tools, such as Xilinx,
ModelSim, Leonardo Spectrums, place and route tools, ISE
web pack, Microwind and DCH tools. Altera and Quartus are
available for AIC design in HDL (Hardware description
language) working environment for simulation and synthesis.
Moreover, the laboratory is equipped with number of
Xilinx/Altera FPGA development boards.
Instrumentation and Measurement Lab:The
Instrumentation and Measurements Lab covers investigation
of instruments, error types and characteristics of instruments,
determination of dynamic behavior of typical sensors, signal
conditioning circuits such as DC and AC bridges,
instrumentation amplifiers and filters, computer-based data
and signal processing for different measurement systems.

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


Image Processing, Power System Analysis and Design and
Power distribution and utilization. PSpice, a simulation tool
for analysing electric and electronic circuits is used in the labs
of Circuit Analysis I & II, and Electronics I. Power World
Simulator is used for solving problems involving power flows.
Calculux is used for luminance calculations in lighting
systems.
Power Electronics Lab: Power Electronics Lab is equipped
with the state-of-the-art instrumentation for design,
simulation, layout, prototyping, and testing of
switching/analog circuits. The experiments in the Power
Electronics Laboratory involve modeling, control, topologies,
and integration of switching converters, inverters, singlephase and three-phase Thyristor, power factor correction
methods and active power filters, power conversion for
alternative energy sources.
Power Distribution and Utilization Lab: The main focus of
this lab is to introduce students with state of art power
distribution and utilization approaches and equipment. It
includes experiments on power cable size calculation for the
given load, measure the high level voltage, current and
resistance using instrument transformers & megger,
operation and constructional features of a distribution
transformer, substation equipment and its one line diagram,
power factor improvement using calculux, projects on design
of general lighting scheme for an office, calculate the charges
in industrial/commercial bill, home electrical wiring earth
resistance and soil resistivity measurement.
Accreditation: The Degree of Bachelor of Science in
Electrical Engineering is accredited by the Pakistan
Engineering Council (PEC).

Power Simulation Lab: This lab has 50 networked Core i5


PCs with various kinds of Software packages installed
including Matlab, PSpice, Power World Simulator and
Calculus. Matlab is used for running exercises in the courses
of Signals and Systems, Control Systems, Digital
Communication Systems, Digital Signal Processing, Digital

61

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Computing
Mathematics
Sciences
Basic Engineering Courses
English
Humanities Courses

Know one thing before coming to GIKI; it's going


to push you, and it's going to push you hard. But
that is what reaching beyond one's potential is all
about leaving the comfort zone. Both the
faculty and the students residing on campus
creates an ambiance that stimulates your
intellect, and means that the process of learning
and imparting knowledge continues even after
working hours. Ready to be challenged, and
willing to grow? Then GIKI is the place for you.
Eeman Afroz

62

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

CS101, CS101L, CS102L


MT101, MT102, MT201
PH101, PH102, PH101L, PH102L
MM101, MM102, MM141, ME101, ME102,
MS291, ME231/MM211/ES331
HM101, HM102
HM211, HM321, HM322

4
9
8
16
6
9

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

63

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Electronic Engineering- Semester wise Breakdown


CH

1st Semester

Lab. Hrs

MT101
PH101
CS101
Mm101
HM101
PH101L
ME101
CS101L

Calculus I
Mechanics
Introduction to Computing
Industrial Chemistry
English and Study Skills
Mechanics Lab
Workshop Practice
Computing Lab

3
3
2
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
2
3
3
1
1
1

2nd Semester

Lec. Hrs

MT102
PH102
MM102
HM102
ME102
PH102L
MM141
CS102L

Calculus II
Electricity & Magnetism
Introduction to Engg. Materials
Technical Report Writing
Engineering Graphics
Electricity & Magnetism Lab
Materials Lab I
Intensive Programming Lab

3
3
3
3
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
2
1
1
1

3rd Semester

Course Title

MT201
EE211
EE221
ME231
HM211
EE211L
EE221L

Differential Equations and Linear Algebra


Circuit Analysis I
Logic Design
Thermodynamics I
Pak & Islamic Studies
Circuit Analysis I Lab
Logic Design Lab

3
3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1

4th Semester

Course Code

EE212
EE222
EE231
EE251
MS291
EE222L
EE231L

Circuit Analysis II
Computer Architecture
Electronics I
Probability and Random Variables
Engineering Economy
Computer Architecture Lab
Electronics I Lab

3
3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1

64

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

CH

5th Semester

Lab. Hrs

EE313
EE323
EE351
EE333
HM321
EE313L
EE323L
EE351L

Electric Machines
Microprocessor Interfacing
Signals & Systems
Solid State Electronics
Sociology and Human Behavior
Electric Machines Lab
Microprocessor Interfacing Lab
Signals and Systems Lab

3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1

6th Semester

Lec. Hrs

Ee332
EE341
EE361
EE371
HM322
EE332L
EE341L
EE361L

Electronics II
Control Systems
Communication Systems
Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
Ethical & Legal Dimensions of Engineering
Electronics II Lab
Control Systems Lab
Communication Systems Lab

3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1

7th Semester

Course Title

EE452
EE472
EE/PE/ CS/ ES4XX
EE481
MS49X
EE452L
EE472L

Digital Signal Processing


Wave Propagation and Antennas
Technical Elective I
Senior Design Project (Part-I)
Management Elective I
Digital Signal Processing Lab
Wave Propagation and Antennas Lab

3
3
3
0
3
0
0

0
0
0
9
0
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1

8th Semester

Course Code

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

EE434
EE/PE/ CS/ ES4XX
EE/PE/ CS/ ES4XX
EE482
MS49X

Power Electronics
Technical Elective II
Technical Elective III
Senior Design Project (Part-II)
Management Elective II

3
3
3
0
3

0
0
0
9
0

3
3
3
3
3

65

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Power Engineering- Semester Wise Breakdown


CH

1st Semester

Lab. Hrs

MT101
PH101
CS101
MM101
HM101
PH101L
ME101
CS101L

Calculus I
Mechanics
Introduction to Computing
Industrial Chemistry
English and Study Skills
Mechanics Lab
Workshop Practice
Computing Lab

3
3
2
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
2
3
3
1
1
1

2nd Semester

Lec. Hrs

MT102
PH102
MM102
HM102
ME102
PH102L
MM141
CS102L

Calculus II
Electricity & Magnetism
Introduction to Engg. Materials
Technical Report Writing
Engineering Graphics
Electricity & Magnetism Lab
Materials Lab I
Intensive Programming Lab

3
3
3
3
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
2
1
1
1

3rd Semester

Course Title

MT201
EE211
EE221
ME231
HM211
EE211L
EE221L

Differential Equations and Linear Algebra


Circuit Analysis I
Logic Design
Thermodynamics I
Pak & Islamic Studies
Circuit Analysis I Lab
Logic Design Lab

3
3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1

4th Semester

Course Code

EE212
PE213
EE231
EE251
MS291
PE213L
EE231L

Circuit Analysis II
Electrical Instruments & Measurements
Electronics I
Probability and Random Variables
Engineering Economy
Electrical Instruments & Measurements Lab
Electronics I Lab

3
3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1

66

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

CH

5th Semester

Lab. Hrs

EE313
EE323
EE351
PE341
HM321
EE313L
EE323L
EE351L

Electric Machines
Microprocessor Interfacing
Signals & Systems
Power Generation and Transmission
Sociology and Human Behavior
Electric Machines Lab
Microprocessor Interfacing Lab
Signals and Systems Lab

3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1

6th Semester

Lec. Hrs

EE332
EE341
PE342
EE371
HM322
EE332L
EE341L
PE342L

Electronics II
Control Systems
Power Distribution and Utilization
Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
Ethical & Legal Dimensions of Engineering
Electronics II Lab
Control Systems Lab
Power Distribution & Utilization Lab

3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1

7th Semester

Course Title

EE434
PE451
PE/EE/ CS/ES 4xx
PE481
MS49x
EE434L
PE451L

Power Electronics
Power System Analysis
Technical Elective
Senior Design Project (Part-I)
Management Elective I
Power Electronics Lab
Power System Analysis Lab

3
3
3
0
3
0
0

0
0
0
9
0
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1

8th Semester

Course Code

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

PE452
PE4xx
PE4xx
PE482
MS49x

Power System Protection


Area Elective I
Area Elective II
Senior Design Project (Part-II)
Management Elective II

3
3
3
0
3

0
0
0
9
0

3
3
3
3
3

67

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Course Descriptions
EE211 Circuit Analysis- I
(3 0 3)
System of units, circuit variables and elements, simple resistive
circuits, techniques of circuit analysis, Wye-Delta Transformation,
the operational amplifier, Superposition, Thevenin's and Norton's
Theorems, inductors and capacitors, response of first order RL and
RC circuits, natural and step response of RLC circuits, sinusoidal
and complex forcing functions, Phasors.
Pre-requisite(s): MT101
EE212 Circuit Analysis II
(3 0 3)
Steady-state power analysis, Poly-phase circuits, magnetically
coupled networks, frequency characteristics, variable frequency
network performance, resonant circuits, the Laplace transform,
application of Laplace transform to circuit analysis, Fourier analysis
techniques, two-port networks.
Pre-requisite(s): EE211
EE221 Logic Design
(3 0 3)
Boolean algebra, logic gates, combinational logic design,
sequential logic design, memory, programmable logic devices
(PLDs), and introduction to hardware description languages (HDL)
and their use to design the basic digital hardware.
Pre-requisite(s): CS101, CS102L
EE222 Computer Architecture
(3 0 3)
Introduction to microcomputer, microprocessor register and ALU
design, control unit design, instruction cycle, memory types and
Read/Write cycles, memory mapping, address decoding, address
decoder design, interrupts, polling, I/O devices interfacing, DMA,
bus arbitration, Introduction to CICS/RISC architectures.
Pre-requisite(s): EE221

68

EE231 Electronics I
(3 0 3)
Introduction to electronics, semiconductor diode, diode
applications, bipolar junction transistor, transistor configurations,
DC biasing, field-effect transistor, BJT and FET small signal
equivalent circuit models, design of BJT and FET amplifiers.
Pre-requisite(s): EE211
EE251 Probability and Random Variables
(3 0 3)
Probability, joint and conditional probability, Bayes' theorem,
random variable, distribution and density functions, the Gaussian
random variable, expectation, moments, transformation of a
random variable, multiple random variables, random processes,
stationary and independence, correlation and covariance, power
spectral density, coloured and white noise.
Pre-requisite(s): MT102
EE313 Electric Machines
(3 0 3)
Fundamentals of electromechanical energy conversion,
electromechanical devices and systems, operational
characteristics and equivalent circuits of transformers, DC motors,
DC generator, AC synchronous and Induction motors and
generators, equivalent circuits and operational characteristics of AC
and DC motors and generators.
Pre-requisite(s): EE212
EE323 Microprocessor Interfacing
(3 0 3)
Introduction to 68000, software model, addressing modes,
instruction set, assembly language programming, hardware model,
read/write cycles, exception/interrupt processing, interfacing to
ACIA, PIA, PI/T, DMA, A/D, D/A converters, introduction to microcontrollers and embedded systems.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Pre-requisite(s): EE222
EE332 Electronics-II
(3 0 3)
Differential and multistage amplifiers, frequency response, analog
integrated circuit operational amplifiers, op-amp applications,
power amplifiers, timers, A/D & D/A converters, phase lock loops,
filters, signal generators, waveform-shaping circuits, power
supplies, voltage regulators, differential amplifiers.
Pre-requisite(s): EE231
EE333 Solid State Electronics
(3 0 3)
Introduction, semiconductor materials, basic structure and
properties, carrier transport in semiconductor, pn-junction, band
diagrams, drift diffusion equations, metal-semiconductor contacts,
mathematical models of junction field-effect-transistors, metal oxide
semiconductor FET and bipolar transistors, microelectronics.
Pre-requisite(s): PH102, EE231
EE341 Control Systems
(3 0 3)
Introduction to control systems, dynamic system models, statevariable models, block diagrams, transfer functions, dynamic
response, basic properties of feedback, classical PID controller,
Routh-Hurwitz and Nyquist stability criteria, root locus design, Bode
plots, frequency-response design, state-space design, introduction
to digital control.
Pre-requisite(s): EE351
EE351 Signals and Systems
(3 0 3)
Introduction to continuous and discrete time systems, analysis of
continuous (CT) systems using Fourier and Laplace transforms,
ideal and practical CT filters, sampling, analysis of discrete time
(DT) systems, difference equations and unit sample response, ztransform, DT Fourier transform.
Pre-requisite(s): MT201, EE212
EE361 Communication systems
(3 0 3)
Introduction to modern analog and digital communication systems,
Fourier analysis of signals and systems, signal transmission,
amplitude and angle modulation techniques, Sampling theorem,
PCM, DPCM, and Delta Modulation, digital communication
systems, Principles of modern digital communication systems
including M-ary communication, multiplexing, and emerging digital
communication technologies.
Pre-requisite: EE351
EE371 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
(3 0 3)
Vector analysis, Coulomb's law and electric field intensity, electric
flux density, Gauss's law and divergence, energy and potential,
electrical properties of materials, experimental mapping methods,
Poison's and Laplace's equations, the steady magnetic field and
magnetic properties of materials, time-varying fields and Maxwell's

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

equations.
Pre-requisite(s): PH102, MT201
EE424 Introduction to ASIC Design (Elective) (3 0 3)
Introduction to Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC),
design methodologies, design and implementation using FPGAs,
digital design using hardware description language, libraries,
utilities for high level description, data flow description, timing and
delays, modeling techniques.
Pre-requisite(s): EE222
EE425 Digital Integrated Circuit Design (Elective)
(3 0 3)
CMOS devices and deep sub-micron manufacturing technology,
CMOS inverters and complex gates, modeling of interconnect wires,
optimization of design with respect to a number metrics: cost,
reliability, performance, and power dissipation, sequential circuits,
timing considerations, and clocking approaches, design of large
system blocks including arithmetic, interconnect, memories, and
PLAs, design methodologies.
Pre-requisite: EE222, EE332, EE333
EE434 Power Electronics
(3 0 3)
Introduction to power electronics, power switching devices and
circuits, rectifying circuits, single-phase and three-phase rectifiers,
thyristors, commutation circuits, AC voltage controllers and
stabilizers, DC to DC converters, single-phase and three-phase DC
to AC inverters, industrial applications of power converters, DC and
AC motor drives.
Pre-requisite(s): EE332, EE313
EE436 VLSI Design (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Revision of the semiconductor theory, IC fabrication methodologies
and processes, Details of MOS transistors, fabrication and analysis
of PMOS and NMOS transistors, Inverters, Resistors, Capacitors,
gates, Introduction of VLSI CAD tools, modeling and simulation,
Implementation of gates, MUX, Counters, Adders, Multipliers,
Memories, IC layout design rules, Chip layout, Design calculations,
Gates and transistors level and their conversions to layouts, design
optimization, interconnects, minimization of Die area and power and
maximization of speed, Modeling chips using FPGAs, Design
project.
Prerequisite(s): EE231
EE442 Introduction to Robotics (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Introductory aspects of robotics, homogeneous transforms, robot
arm kinematics, robot configurations, inverse kinematics, robot arm
dynamics, robot control, trajectory planning, work-space
considerations, obstacle avoidance.
Pre-requisite(s): EE341

69

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


EE443 Industrial Process Control (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Introduction to process control, sensors and transducers,
measurement techniques, signal conditioning, analogue to digital
conversion, process modeling, process control principles, controller
design, process control techniques, discrete process control,
distributed control.
Pre-requisite(s): EE332, EE341
EE444 Digital Control Systems (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Introduction to discrete-time control systems, The Z transform, zplane analysis of discrete-time control systems, design of discretetime control systems by conventional methods, State space method
analysis, Pole placement and Observer design, Polynomial
equations approach to control systems design, Quadratic optimal
control systems, Kalman filtering.
Pre-requisite(s): EE341
EE452 Digital Signal Processing
(3 0 3)
Discrete-time signals, sampling theory, interpolation and
decimation, discrete-time Fourier transform, z-transform, Discrete
Fourier Transform, Fast Fourier Transform, digital filter design
techniques, practical IIR and FIR filters, finite word length effects,
introduction to discrete stochastic processes.
Pre-requisite(s): EE351
EE461 Communication System Design and Performance
Analysis (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Review of probability fundamentals, system noise analysis, SNR
and BER calculations, behavior of analog/digital systems in
presence of noise, optimal receiver design concepts, introductory
information theory, coding and multiplexing techniques including
source, channel, and line coding techniques, and FDM, TDM, and
CDM techniques, introduction to advanced digital
modulation/multiplexing techniques such as OFDM, W-OFDM,
SDM.
Pre-requisite(s): EE251, EE361

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


system capacity improvement techniques, mobile propagation
models including large-scale path loss and small-scale fading
models, multiple access techniques for cellular systems, speech
codes and standards.
Pre-requisite(s): EE361, EE472
EE464 Digital Image Processing (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Sampling and quantization, image transforms, discrete cosine
transform, image random models and prediction techniques, image
restoration, image enhancement, image and video coding and
compression, image understanding, image recognition, computer
vision.
Pre-requisite(s): EE452
EE465 Satellite Communication Systems (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Introduction to satellite communications, satellite orbit and system
description, antenna, HPA/LNA and converter design for earth
station, transponder design and analysis, satellite link analysis,
multiple access techniques for satellite communication, VSAT
networks.
Pre-requisite(s): EE371, EE361
EE466 Introduction to Wavelets (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Analysis and synthesis of signals, time-frequency and time-scale
analysis, continuous wavelet transform, multi-resolution analysis,
filter banks and discrete wavelet transform, properties of the filters,
scale and wavelet functions, designing wavelets.
Pre-requisite(s): EE452
EE472 Wave Propagation and Antennas
(3 0 3)
Wave propagation, transmission line theory, Smith chart,
impedance matching and two port networks, network analysis, sparameters, strip-type transmission line, rectangular and circular
waveguides, antenna fundamental parameters, radiation power
density, directivity, elementary dipole antenna.
Pre-requisite (s): EE371

EE462 Computer Communication Networks (Elective) (3 0 3)


Introduction to computer networks, Network layers, OSI (open
systems interconnection model) and TCP/IP network models, data
encoding, error detection techniques, multiplexing techniques,
circuit, message and packet switching, routing, congestion and flow
control, local and metropolitan area networks.
Pre-requisite(s): EE361

EE474 Microwave Engineering (Elective)


(3 0 3)
Introduction to microwave engineering, non-uniform transmission
lines, reciprocal multi-port junctions, microwave resonators and
filters, antenna arrays, wideband antennas, aperture antennas,
patch antennas.
Pre-requisite (s): EE472

EE463 Cellular Mobile Communication Systems (Elective)


(3 0 3)
Introduction to wireless communications, basic cellular concepts,
frequency reuse, channel assignment and hand-off techniques,
interference and system capacity, trunking and grade of service,

PE213 Electrical Instrumentation and Measurements


(3 0 3)
Precision measurements terminologies, instrument calibration,
engineering units and standards; instruments for measurement of
electrical properties, signal processing and transmission; modern
instrumentation techniques, instrumentation and signal
conditioning responses; data manipulation, oscilloscope, signal

70

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


generators, transducers, bridges, power and energy meters; highvoltage measurements.
Pre-requisite (s): PH102, EE211
PE341 Power Generation and Transmission
(3 0 3)
Different types of power plants i.e. thermal, hydroelectric, nuclear,
Analysis and design of thermoelectric, MHD and photovoltaic
generators, Fuel cells and wind power generation
Percent and per-unit quantities, node equations, one-line diagram,
HV, EHV and UHV system, Conductor types, resistance, skin effect,
line inductance and capacitance, Ferranti effect. Short, medium and
long transmission lines, traveling waves, surge impedance loading,
Line supports, mechanical degree of safety, types of insulators,
corona effect, Underground cables, fault locating techniques, HVDC
transmission.
Pre-requisite (s): EE212
PE342 Power Distribution and Utilization
(3 0 3)
Introduction to distribution system, characteristics and estimation of
load, grounding and earthing, power factor and methods for its
improvement, batteries & electrochemical processes, cathodic
protection, heating and welding, fundamentals of illumination
engineering: laws, units and terms used, types of lamps, their
working and relative merit.
Pre-requisite (s): EE212
PE414 Electrical Machine Design and Equipment Training
(Elective)
(3 0 3)
Part-A Machine Design:
Industrial standardization, design considerations for electrical
machines, properties and applications, cooling systems of
transformers and rotating machines, duty cycles, ratings and
temperature-rise, mechanical design considerations, design of
transformer or induction motor, introduction to CAD and CAM.
Part-B Installation, Maintenance and Troubleshooting of
Machines:
Safety precautions, troubleshooting and emergency repairs,
Installation, commissioning, testing, maintenance, and
troubleshooting of (i) power transformers and (ii) induction motors.
(iii) AC generators.
Part-C Equipment's Training (Practical):
Measurement of magnetic flux, inductance and reluctance of a part
of electrical machines, study of transformer and rotating-machine
parts, operating principles power supplies, magnetic contactors,
thermal overloads, miniature circuit breakers, metallic-clad circuit
breakers, earth leakage circuit breaker, clip-on meters, cable fault
locators, Megger earth tester, relay testers, motor controllers,
tachometers, phase tester (L.V. and H.V.)

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


Pre-requisite (s): EE313
PE415 Electrical Machine Drives and Control (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Electromechanical Systems, machine load characteristics, drive
system elements, required drive characteristics, DC Drives,
Induction Motor Drives, Current-Sourced Inverter Drives, VoltageSourced Inverter Drives, Advanced Control of Voltage-Sourced
Inverters, Synchronous Motor Drives, Induction Motor Dynamics,
Torque (Vector) Controlled Drives
Pre-requisite (s): EE313
PE416 Advanced Electrical Machines (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Basic Principles for Electric Machine Analysis, Direct-Current
Machines, Reference-Frame Theory, Symmetrical Induction
Machines, Synchronous Machines, Theory of Brushless dc
Machines, Machine Equations in Operational Impedances and Time
Constants, Linearized Machine Equations, Reduced-Order
Machine Equations, Symmetrical and Unsymmetrical 2-Phase
Induction Machines, Semi-controlled Bridge Converters, Dc
Machine Drives, Fully Controlled 3-Phase Bridge Converters,
Induction Motor Drives and Brushless dc Motor Drives.
Pre-requisite (s): EE313
PE433 Industrial Electronics (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Principles and applications of electric heating, induction and
dielectric heating, high frequency welding, Spot welding control,
Industrial control, Speed control of DC, AC, and servo motors,
Process control, measurement of non-electrical quantities, i.e.
temperature, displacement, pressure, time, frequency, digital
industrial measuring systems, ultra-sonic generation and
applications, X-ray applications in industry, photo-electric devices,
industrial control using PLCs, data acquisition, distributed control
system in process industries.
Pre-requisite (s): EE332, EE341
PE443 Electrical Estimation Installation and Planning
(Elective)
(3 0 3)
The estimating process, components of electrical system,
Installation, protection circuits design and testing, Planning:, system
protection, low voltage switch boards and distribution system,
Grounding system, power factor correction and harmonic filtering,
power cables, supply systems, electrical installation equipment and
system.
Pre-requisite (s): PE451
PE444 Renewable Electrical Energy Systems (Elective) (3 0 3)
Introduction and overview, sociological, political and economic
aspects, review of basic thermodynamics and thermal sciences,
hydroelectric power plants, reaction and impulse turbines, reservoir

71

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


based and run of the river hydroelectric projects, solar energy, wind
energy, geothermal, biomass, fast breeder reactors, fuel cells, and
alternative fossil fuel energy.
Pre-requisite (s): PE342
PE445/ME471 Power Plant Engineering (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Variable load problem, Gas turbine power plants, Steam power
plants, Rankine with superheat and reheat, Steam generators, firetube boiler, water- tube boiler, Steam turbines types and efficiency,
Steam condensers, Nuclear power plants, PWR and Fast Breeder
reactors, Hydro- electric power plant, Reaction and Impulse
turbines, Wind turbines and photo voltaics.
Pre-requisite (s): PE342
PE446 Electrical Insulation Materials (Elective) (3 0 3)
Electrical Field Analysis: experimental and computational methods,
electrical breakdown in gasses, Townsend's breakdown criterion,
Paschen's law, Streamer or Kanal mechanisms, breakdown in
non-uniform field and corona, electrical break down of dielectric
liquids and solids, insulating materials, dielectric measurements.
Pre-requisite (s): MM102, EE371
PE447 Power Economics and Management (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Principles of economics, engineering economy, economic
environment, Price-supply-demand relationship, elementary
financial analysis, break even analysis, selection between
alternatives, value engineering, linear programming, business
organization, capital financing & allocation.
Pre-requisite (s): MS291, Co-requisite: MS49x
PE448 High Voltage Engineering (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Generation of high voltages, Cockroft-Walton cascade rectifier,
Transformer cascade, Marx generator for impulse voltages, High
voltage dividers, High voltage test technique, Electrical breakdown
strength of gaseous, liquid and solid insulation, Dielectric properties
of electrical insulation, Complex permittivity and dielectric response
functions, Kramers-Kronig relations, Insulation diagnostics,
Dielectric spectroscopy, Partial discharges
Pre-requisite (s): PE342
EE414/PE451 Power System Analysis
(3 0 3)
Fundamentals of an electric power system, Transmission Line
Parameters, power system operation studies, load-flow studies,
symmetrical components, balanced and unbalanced faults on
power systems, power system stability.
Pre-requisite(s): EE313
EE415/PE452 Power System Protection
(3 0 3)
Types and effects of faults, principles of circuit interruption, types of
circuit-breakers (fuses), switch-gears and relays, SF6 power circuit
breakers, over current protection, distance protection, differential
protection of transformers, generator protection, bus bar protection,

72

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


arc interruption, re-striking voltage and recovery voltage, powersystem transients and over-voltages, voltage control, power system
control, control of reactive power & power factor, interconnected
control & frequency ties, supervisory control .
Pre-requisite(s): EE313
PE453 Power System Operation and Control (Elective) (3 0 3)
Introduction to power system control and its importance, modes of
power system operation, major tasks of operation, SCADA system,
control centres, controller tuning, communication sub system,
remote terminal unit, data logging, economic dispatch,
characteristics of power generation units, economic dispatch
problems with and without consideration of losses, incremental fuel
cost, penalty factor, economic power interchange, voltage, power
and frequency control, evaluation of the effect of speed change on
droop characteristics.
Pre-requisite (s): EE341, PE451
PE454 Power System Design (Elective)
(3 0 3)
Characteristics, performance & design of transmission lines, design
of EHV transmission lines, advantages and disadvantages of HVAC
and HVDC, selection of sizes and locations of generating stations
and substations, designs of distribution systems, economics of
distribution systems.
Pre-requisite(s): EE451
EE/PE481 & 482 Design Project
(0 18 6)
The aim of the design project is to sharpen the electronic
circuit/system design skills of the FEE graduating students by
participating in projects that are to be identified in collaboration with
the industry. Every project will be assigned a Faculty advisor. The
students may work independently or jointly (in small groups) on the
projects. The duration of the project term is one full year. The
progress will be monitored through interim presentations and
reports. A final report will be due at the end of the term.
EE / PE / CS / ES 4XX Area Electives / Technical Elective
I/II/III
(3 0 3)
Stands for elective courses. These courses are offered by the
Faculty in different areas of specializations to meet the changing
requirements of the technology.
EE/PE XXXL Lab Course
(0 3 1)
Stands for lab work associated with a theory course having the
same code number. A Lab course can be registered only as a corequisite of its associated theory course. Experiments performed in
a lab course are related to those topics covered in the respective

theory course.

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES


Semiconductors and Superconducting Devices
Lasers and Optoelectronics
Modeling and Simulation

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES


Muhammad Shafiq, MA English (University of Peshawar)

Faculty
Syed Ikram A. Tirmizi, PhD (Brunel University, UK)
IrgazievBakhadir, PhD (Moscow State University, Russia), D.Sc.
(Institute of Nuclear Physics,Uzbekistan)
Muhammad Hassan Sayyad, PhD (University of Dublin, Ireland)
Ghulam Shabbir, PhD (University of Aberdeen, UK)
Habibullah Jamal, PhD (University of Toronto, Canada)
SirajulHaq, PhD (University of Liverpool, UK)
Muhammad Amer Qureshi, PhD (The University of Auckland, New
Zealand)
Tahseen Amin Khan Qasuria, PhD (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Umar Hayat, PhD (University of Warwick, UK)
Dur-E-Zehra, PhD (University of New South Wales, Australia)
Sheharyar Pervez, MS (Indiana University Bloomington,USA)
Rahim Umar, MS (Linnaeus UniversityVxj,Sweden)
Naveed Ahmed Azam, M. Phil (Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan)
Taimoor Ali, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Safiullah Khan, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan).
Jalil Ahmed, MS (Tu Berlin, Germany)
Shahid Ahmed, MS (Urbana Champaign, USA)
Eram Asghar, MS (NUST, Pakistan)

Faculty(on study leave for PhD)


Fahad Nawaz, Saleem Khan, Shafqat Ali
Joint Faculty
KhasanKarimov, PhD (PTIP, Uzbekistan), D. Phil (Tashkent,
Uzbekistan
Nisar Ahmed, PhD (ICSTM, UK)
S.M. Ahmed, PhD (Sheffield, UK)
Electronic Engineers
RehanYousaf, BS (COMSATS Islamabad, Pakistan)
ShoaibAzam, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Waqar Ahmed, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Asad Munir, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Seerat ul Urooj, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Yousaf Hemani, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Usman Khan, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Graduate Assistants
Muhammad Hilal, MSc (AWKU, Mardan)
Munir Ahmed, MSc (AWKU, Mardan)
M Raiz, Msc (AWKU, Mardan
PS to Dean, FES

74

Dean
Dr. Jameel-Un-Nabi
Ph.D. (Heidelberg)

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Students are asigned projects and suitable advanced elective courses
to develop expertise in the specialized areas. Maximum efforts are
made to induct equal number of students into the various streams.
The vigorous growth of the electro-optic industries, lasers,
semiconductor technology, instrumentation and simulation of
systems has created a demand for engineers who can completely cope
with the present and future demands of the modern industry. The
graduates of engineering sciences will be suitable for industry that is
involved not only in production but also in research and development
both within the country and abroad. Already, within the country a
number of organizations are pursuing R & D work and production in
engineering field of technologies. At present the main power for such
organizations in these fields is either trained or the assistance of
foreign consultants is sought. The graduates of this faculty will be wellequipped to fill this gap in national expertise, and can look forward to
highly rewarding careers as also discussed below.
Undergraduate Programs: Faculty of Engineering Sciences offers
program in three contemporary fields of engineering. These include
lasers and optoelectronics, semiconductor and superconducting
technologies and modeling and simulation. The Institute is the trendsetter in establishing these programs within the country which is duly
accredited by the Pakistan Engineering Council. Students are required
to opt for the specialization during third year (5th Semester) of their
studies. In order to complete the degree requirement students must
complete 13 credit hours in one of the specialization fields mentioned
below.
Laser and Optoelectronics Located at the crossroads of natural
sciences and engineering, Lasers and Optoelectronics encompasses
the use of lasers from probing atomic media to laser treatment of
living tissues and from laser cutting to design of laser guided missiles
and much more. The Nobel Prize 1964 in Physics to Basov, Prokhorov
and Townes highlighted the importance of Lasers and the subsequent
rapid progress in the field of Lasers highlighted the everlasting impact
which Lasers continue to have on our society. The Faculty of
Engineering Sciences under the stream of Lasers and Optoelectronics
provides state of art working facilities ranging from simple diode
lasers to high power cutting lasers, optical communication systems to
high precision spectrometers. The course content has been designed
to enable the students to gain an insight into the basic working and
design principles of lasers and Optical communications.
Laser and optoelectronics based technologies are the central to the

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES


modern life. For example, they are needed to make and inspect the
integrated circuits in nearly every electronics device we use. They are
used in high-efficiency lighting, displays, and the harvesting of solar
power. Optical fibers have enabled the internet and laser is essential to
precision manufacturing and metrology, and a plethora of medical
applications including clinical diagnosis, surgery, and genome
mapping.
Career in Laser and Optoelectronics Laser, optoelectronics and
photonics is playing a huge role in the world economy and many jobs
are available in industrial, defense, research, telecommunication and
medical organizations.
BS. Degree in Engineering Sciences with major in Laser and
optoelectronics will enable students to analyze and design optical and
laser systems for a broad set of applications including manufacturing,
healthcare, telecommunication, defense, security, and entertainment.
The curriculum of lasers and optoelectronics also provides the
students a firm support to pursue their higher studies in the field of
lasers and Optics.
Modeling and Simulation: Modeling and simulation is a dynamic field
that is utilized in engineering, science, health science, business,
education and many other disciplines. This emerging field is based on
developments in diverse engineering areas and brings elements of art,
engineering, and science together in a complex and unique way that
requires domain experts to enable appropriate decisions when it
comes to application or development of modeling and simulation
technology. Generally, modeling and simulation is a discipline of
designing mathematical model of actual or theoretical physical
systems executing the model on a computer and analyzing the
execution output. Due to its dynamic nature, the modeling and
simulation field has tremendous potential for creating student interest
in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines.
Computer simulations are extensively being used in aerospace
industry, automobile systems, financial markets, environment systems
and medical sciences. Students graduated in this discipline get
attractive jobs opportunities in almost all industries including national
and multi-national sectors.
Modeling and simulation is playing a vital role to solve problems from
almost all domains. Most of the time an investment in Modeling and
Simulation saves more than it costs. Modeling and simulation is very
important because the description of the system behavior by
experimentation might not be feasible due to the following reasons.

Some experiments may be very harmful

Some experiments might take longer time than expected and

75

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES

also may be very costly

There might be obstructions during experimentation

We might not have access to inputs and outputs.

Career in Modeling and Simulation

Oil and gas industry: (e.g. reservoir characterization)

Space/defense industry:(e.g. in national security mission,


simulation of universe, space vehicles and missile trajectories)

Software systems: (e.g. simulation software used by Google,


IBM)

Chemical interactions: (e.g. paper and pulp industry).

Semiconductor and Superconducting Technologies: Semiconductor


and superconducting technologies are the hardcore of electronics e.g.
modern electronics, communication systems, defence industry,
automobile, medical diagnostic equipment, biomedical electronic and
aerospace industry. Semiconductor is not only limited to the above
mentioned areas but it opens interdisciplinary opportunities in the
area of photonics, materials, chemicals and MEMS. Semiconductor is
also a core of nanotechnology. A developing technology which has
potential to improve our quality of life in diverse ways, such as faster
electronics huge memory/storage capacity for Pcs. Semiconductor
technology provide the state of art solutions to the photovoltaic
technology for the economical production and storage of electricity.
Organic semiconductor is another newly developed stream of
semiconductor for the production of OLEDs, flexible displays and a
variety of multifunctional sensors. Semiconductor students can
explore new horizons for the betterment of humanity and can upraise
the standard of living by providing economical and efficient solutions
to the problems.
Career in Semiconductor and superconductor BS degree in
Engineering Sciences with major in semiconductor and
superconductor technology will enable students to pursue their
carriers in all kind of electronic equipment manufacturing industry.
They can excel in R&D defense organizations (Space, Missiles,
Communicationetc). Semiconductor students can also pursue their
carriers in the renewable energy technologies (Solar, Wind, Tidal etc)
and power electronics.
This stream also provides the students with the option of pursuing
interdisciplinary careers in the field of nanotechnology, Micro
electromechanical systems (MEMS), organic semiconductors and
renewable energy resources.
Accreditation: The BS Degree Program in Engineering Sciences is
accredited by the Pakistan Engineering Council.

76

Teaching and Research Labs Faculty of Engineering Sciences has a


large number of teachings and Research Laboratories are Mechanics,
Electricity & Magnetism, Circuit Analysis, Logic Design, Computer
Architecture, Micro Processor/Micro Controller Interfacing,
Engineering Instrumentation, Simulation, Semi Conductor, Lasers &
Optics, and Photonics.
will be suitable for industry that is involved not only in production but
also in research and development both within the country and abroad.
Already, within the country a number of organizations are pursuing R
& D work and production in the emerging field of technologies. At
present the manpower for such organizations in these fields is either
trained abroad or the assistance of foreign consultants is sought. The
graduates of this Faculty will be well-equipped to fill this gap in
national expertise, and can look forward to highly rewarding careers as
also discussed above.
Research Laboratories: The research labs functional at Faculty of
Engineering Sciences include Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Lab,
Thermal Analysis Lab, Spectroscopy Lab, Organic Electronics Lab, High
Power Laser Lab, Lithography Lab and Computational Physics Lab. A
brief introduction to research labs in FES is presented below.
Thermal Analysis Lab: The Thermal Analysis Laboratory has state-ofthe-art equipments purchased from PerkinElmer including Differential
Scanning Calorimeter (PerkinElmer DSC-7), Differential Thermal
Analyser (DTA_7), Thermal Gravimetric Analyser (TGA_7) and Dynamic
Mechanical Analyzer (DMA-7). These equipments can be used to
investigate the kinetic parameters and change of mass and
mechanical properties of various materials with temperature.
Moreover, the equipment has direct application for the product
development in the paper ceramic, polymer, rubber, glass and paint
industries.
Spectroscopy Lab: Spectroscopy Laboratory houses Perking Elme
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR System 2000) and
UV/VIS/NIR (Spectrometer Lamda-19). Facilities are available for the
spectroscoptic analysis of liquid, solid and gaseous sample in
transmission as well as reflection mode. The equipment has direct
application in environmental studies, chemical biochemical and
pharmaceutical industries.
Organic Electronics Research Lab: The laboratory has so far produced
five PhDs and several MS students in the investigation of organic
semiconductors, conducting polymers and nanoparticles of organic
semiconductors for potential applications in organic electronic and
photonics devices. The facilities are available for the fabrication and
charachterization of organic junction diodes, sensors, organic

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


software packages installed (e.g. MATLAB, PSPICE, ModelSim).
MATLAB is used for running exercises in the courses of Signal and
System and Computer Simulating Methods. PSPICE, a simulation tool
is also used for analysing the electric and an electronic circuit is used in
the Lab of circuit analysis 1.
Microprocessor Lab: This Lab is meant for the students to learn about a
typical microprocessor and microprocessor based systems. It is used
in two courses, Computer Architecture and Microprocessor
Interfacing. The laboratory is equipped with Oscilloscopes, Digital
trainers, Burners (Programmer), Digital Multimeters and support
electrical and electronics accessories.
Semiconductor Lab: The semiconductor laboratory is an integral part
of the modern curriculum in Faculty of Engineering Sciences. It allows
students to apply what they have studied in Semiconductor Devices
course. They learn how to find the properties related to
Semiconductor Devices and explore the device fabrication. the
experiments like resistivity measurement, conductivity type and
carrier concentration are addressed. Students are given
demonstrations on the photo lithography machine. For
characterization of the material, they are given demos on the SEM ,
EDS, XRD and Optical Microscopy. For the device fabrication they are
given demos on Thermal Vacuum Evaporator and Spin Coater.
Students are further given demos on Probe station and Locking
Amplifier for device characterization. Experiments on Solar Cell I-V
characterization and thermoelectric generator are also conducted in
this lab. Major equipment includes Hall Effect board (P/nGe), Hal Effect
board (Zn/Cu), Universal Measuring Amplifier and support
accessories.
Mechanics Lab: This is a complementary laboratory course to the
PH101 Lectures. In this laboratory students perform the experiments
relate to measurements, error analysis, vector properties, equilibrium,
kinematics and dynamics of translator motion, two dimensional
motion Work-Energy Theorem, rotational dynamics and oscillations.
The laboratory is equipped with various kits including Mechanics
System Kit (PASCO), Air Track Kit (PASCO), Rotational Dynamics Kit
(PASCO and PHYWE), Projectile Launcher (PASCO) Gravitational
constant apparatus (PASCO), Free Fall apparatus (PASCO) and
Variable g pendulum (PASCO).

FACULTY
OF ENGINEERING
SCIENCES
FACULTY
OF ENGINEERING
SCIENCES
Electricity and Magnetism Lab: This Lab is meant for the
understanding of the fundamentals and concepts related to Electricity
an Magnetism. This Lab includes experiments related to electric
charge, electric field, electric potential, DC circuits, magnetic field of
current Faradays law of induction, ferromagnetic materials,
capacitance, inductance and alternating current etc. The laboratory is
equipped wit trainer boards, oscilloscopes, apparatus for magnetic
moment (PHYWE), apparatus for magnetic force (PHYWE), apparatus
fo measuring e/m of electron (PASCO), Coulombs law apparatus
(PASCO), electric field apparatus (PHEWE), Magnetic field of a coil an
solenoid apparatus (PHEWE), Faradays law of induction apparatus
and apparatus to study the magnetic properties of materials.
Laser and Optics Lab: The Laser & Optics Laboratory at the Faculty of
Engineering Sciences is currently engaged in numerous research
projects in the fields of laser, photonics and optical technologies.
Active research areas include free space laser communication, fiber
optics communication, fiber optic sensors and designing of LIDAR
systems. Laboratory facilities include Michelson interferometer kits,
advanced optics kits, Newport fiber optics kits, spectrometers, DSP
lock-in-amplifiers, fiber optics patch cards, optical modulators, WDM
and directional couplers, He-Ne lasers, high power Nd:YAG laser,
diode lasers, laser power meters, PIN diodes, APDs, phototransistors,
computers with DAQ cards, Oscilloscopes, analog & digital trainers,
optoelectronic device fabrication & characterization and a wide range
of other electronic and optics components.

For further details visit the Engineering Science Program


website www.giki.edu.pk/FES

77

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES

A student majoring in Engineering Sciences must complete the following


courses:
CH
Course Titles
Course Code
(a) General Education Requirements (52 Credit Hours)

GIKI is the best thing that has


happened for me so far. My
personality has evolved
tremendously in these four years.
The diverse culture of GIKI has
helped me grow personally as well
as socially. The experience of
hostel life is amazing; in fact, I'd
rather say that it's a must for every
individual. The best thing is that
my faculty has supported me in all
the best ways possible and I am
immensely grateful for that.
Mariam Iqbal

78

Computing
CS101, CS101L, CS102
Mathematics
ES202,ES304, MT101, MT102, MT201
Sciences
PH101, PH102, PH101L, PH102L
Basic Engineering MM101, MM141, ME102, ME101, MM102
English
HM101, HM102
Humanities
HM211, HM321, HM322
(b) Core Requirements (Minimum 59 Credit Hours)
Circuit Analysis I
ES211/EE211
Circuit Analysis II
ES214/EE212
Electronics I
ES231/EE231
Logic Design
ES212/EE221
Computer Architecture
ES213/EE222
Data Structures & Algorithms
ES221/CS221
Operating Systems
ES322
Microprocessor Interfacing
ES314
Thermodynamics
ES232
Signals & Systems
CS341/ES332
Fluid Mechanics
ES333/ME321
Numerical Analysis
ES341
Engineering Electromagnetics
ES371
Instrumentation
ES451
Semiconductor Materials and Devices
ES462
Senior Design Project Part-I & II
ES481/ES482
Circuit Analysis Lab
ES211L/EE211L
Logic Design Lab
ES212L/ES221L
Computer Architecture Lab
ES213L/EE222L
Electronics I Lab
ES231L
Operating Systems Lab
ES222L/CSE211L
Microprocessor Interfacing Lab
ES314L
CS341L/ES332L
Signals & Systems Lab
Instrumentation Lab
ES451L

4
15
8
10
6
9
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Course Titles

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES

Course Code

CH

(c) Specialization Requirement (13 Credit Hours)


Lasers and Optoelectronics
Optics Lab
ES471L
Optical Engineering
ES376
Lasers and Applications
ES472
Optoelectronics
ES474
Optical Communication and Computing
ES475/EE473

1
3
3
3
3

Semiconductors and Superconducting Devices


Semiconductor Devices Characterization Lab
Solid State Electronics
Electronic and Magnetic Materials
Characterization of Materials
Semiconductor Devices and Applications
Modelling and Simulation
Simulation Lab
Modelling Processes
Computer Simulation Methods
Heat Transfer and Modelling
Optimization Modelling

ES462L
ES361/EE333
ES463/MM463
ES464
ES465

1
3
3
3
3

ES441L
ES342
ES444
ES445
ES446

1
3
3
3
3

(d) General Management Electives (Minimum 06 Credit Hours)


MS492-Operations Management, MS493-Industrial Safety, MS494Total, Quality Management, MS495-Maintenance Management,
MS496-Project Management.
(e) Inter-Faculty Electives (Minimum 06 Credit Hours)
These electives have to be chosen from faculties other than that of
Engineering Sciences with the consultation of the advisor.
(f) Summer Training (Pass/Fail Grade; Nil Credits)

"Being one of the most prestigious


universities, GIKI offers more than
quality education and academic
excellence. There is nothing more
challenging than studying in GIKI. I
will always cherish my time spent in
GIKI where I enjoyed studying in a
professional environment provided
by the institute which inculcated in
me skills necessary for an industrial
career. Moreover, the student-run
societies and excellent sporting
facilities gave me a chance to
develop myself holistically as an
individual. My development at GIKI
has made me a more valuable asset
for the society and the time that I
spent at GIKI was the best of my
life.

Every student is required to participate in a program of practical training


in industry or an R&D organisation and submit a formal written report
during the summer of Junior Year.

M. Ghawas

(g) Total Requirements (135 Credit Hours)


For the BS degree in Engineering Sciences a student is required to
complete 135 credit hours.

79

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES


1st SEMESTER

No.

Course Titles

CSE101
HM101
MMI01
MT101
PH101
PH101L
CSE101L
ME101

Introduction to Computing
English and Study Skills
Industrial Chemistry
Calculus I
Mechanics
Mechanics Lab
Computing Lab
Workshop Practice

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

2
3
3
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

2
3
3
3
3
1
1
1

0
3
1
3
3
3
0
0

3
0
3
0
0
0
3
3

1
3
2
3
3
3
1
1

3
0
3
0
3
3
3

0
3
0
3
0
0
0

3
1
3
1
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
0
3
0

0
0
0
0
3
0
3

3
3
3
3
1
3
1

2nd SEMESTER

CSE102
HM102
ME102
MM102
MT102
PH102
PH102L
MM141L

Intensive Programming Lab


Technical Report Writing
Engineering Graphics
Introduction to Engineering Materials
Calculus II
Electricity and Magnetism
Electricity & Magnetism Lab
Material Lab. I

ES211/EE211
ES211L
ES212/EE221
ES212L/EE221L
ES232
HM211
MT201

Circuit Analysis I
Circuit Analysis Lab
Logic Design
Logic Design Lab
Thermodynamics
Pakistan and Islamic Studies
Differential Equations & Linear Algebra 1

ES202
ES214/EE212
ES231/EE231
ES213/EE222
ES213L/EE222L
ES221/CSE211
ES231L/EE231L

Engineering Statistics
Circuit Analysis II
Electronics I
Computer Architecture
Computer Architecture Lab
Data Structure
Electronics I Lab

3rd SEMESTER

4th SEMESTER

80

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES

5th SEMESTER
No.

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

ES371
ES314/EE323
ES322
ES332/CS341
HM321
ES314L/EE323L
ES332L/CS341L
ES322L

Engineering Electromagnetics
Microprocessor Interfacing
Operating Systems
Signals & Systems
Sociology and Human Behavior
Microprocessor Interfacing Lab
Signals & Systems Lab
Operating Systems Lab

Lab. Hrs

CH

3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1

3
3
3
3
3
3

0
0
0
0
0
0

3
3
3
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
9
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
1
1

3
3
3
3
0

0
0
0
0
9

3
3
3
3
3

6th SEMESTER

ES333/ME321
ES341
ES304
ES3XX
XX3XX
HM322

Fluid Mechanics
Numerical Analysis
Linear Algebra II
Faculty Elective (Specialization)
Interfaculty Elective
Ethical and Legal Dimension of Engineering
7th SEMESTER

ES451
ES462
ES4XX
MS4XX
ES481
ES451L
ES4XXL

Instrumentation
Semiconductor Materials & Devices
Faculty Elective (Specialization)
General Management Elective
Senior Design Project Part-I
Instrumentation Lab
Specialization Lab
8th SEMESTER

ES4XX
ES4XX
XX4XX
MS4XX
ES482

Faculty Elective (Specialization)


Faculty Elective (Specialization)
Interfaculty Elective
General Management Elective
Senior Design Project Part-II

81

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES

Course Description

82

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES

83

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


transforms, Ideal and practical CT filters, sampling analysis of
discrete time (DT) systems, difference equations and unit sample
response, z-transform, DT Fourier transform.
Pre-requisite(s): ES214/EE212

ES333 Fluid Mechanics (3-0-3): Fluid flow theory; hydrostatics;


dimensional analysis and similitude; pipe flow; flow
measurement; open channels; fluid machinery and forces.
Pre-requisite (s): ES331
ES341/CSE342 Numerical Analysis (3-0-3): Error and computer
arithmetic, Rootfindig for non-linear equations, Interpolation
and polynomial approximation, solution of system of linear
equations, numerical differentiation and integration, and
numerical solution of ordinary differential equations.
Pre-requisite(s): MT 201
ES342 Modelling Processes (3-0-3): Introduction to modelling,
revision of mathematics of modelling, proportionality, scaling
and similitude, dimensional analysis, modelling of basic
mechanical systems, modelling of basic electrical systems,
similarity of electrical and mechanical systems, combination of
systems, analysis of vibrations, modelling of dynamic systems,
modelling of experimental data, curve fitting, least-squares
criterion, interpolation and extrapolation, cubic splines, error
analysis.
Pre-requisite(s): MT201

84

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES


ES361/EE333 Solid State Electronics (3-0-3): Introduction to
semiconductor materials, basic structure and properties, carrier
transport in semiconductor, pn-junction, metal-semiconductor
contacts, mathematical models of junction field-effecttransistors, metal oxide semiconductor FET and bipolar
transistors, microelectronics.
Pre-requisite(s): PH102
ES371 Engineering Electromagnetics (3-0-3): Vector analysis,
static electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's equations,
potential, wave equation, uniform plane waves, transmission
lines, waveguides, cavities, antennas
Pre-requisite(s): PH102, MT201
ES376 Optical Engineering (3-0-3): Optical beams and
resonators, laser dynamics and advanced topics, principles of
operation and applications of lasers, geometrical optics and
wave optics, Fermal's principles, Fresnal's formulae for
amplitude coefficients, reflected and transmitted energy,
normal incidence, polarization by reflection, total internal
reflection, principle of interference and diffraction.
Pre-requisite(s) Es371
ES444 Computer Simulation Methods (3-0-3): Introduction to
simulation, types of simulation, continuous system simulation,
simulation schemes, simulation of basic mechanical and

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES

85

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


electron beam techniques, ion beam techniques, x-ray and
gamma ray techniques.
Pre-requisite(s): Es361
ES465 Semiconductor Devices and Applications (3-0-3):
Semiconductor device fabrication, metal-semiconductor and
metal-insulator-semiconductor junctions and devices,
photonic devices, transferred-electron devices, switching
devices, other semiconductor devices; Amorphous
semiconductors, band models of amorphous semiconductors,
electronic applications, optical applications, magnetic
applications. Super conductive materials and devices.
Pre-requisite(s): ES462
ES472 Lasers and Application (3-0-3): Laser operation,
characteristics of Laser beams, review of laser technology,
industrial application of lasers: laser cutting, drilling and
welding. Meteorological measurement systems: alignment
gauging and range finding. Holography, laser beam
communications.
Pre-requisite(s): ES376
ES474 Optoelectronics (3-0-3): Polarization, light propagation
in an anisotropic medium, electro-optic effects and devices,
magneto-optic effect and devices, acousto-optics, integrated
optics, optical MEMs, waveguide modulators, display devices,
optical amplifiers, optical detection, noise in optical detection,
photovoltaic devices, photonic switching, organic
optoelectronics.
Pre-requisite(s): ES376
ES475/EE473 Optical Communication and Computing (3-03): An overview of optical communications, principles of fiber
optics, signal degradation in optical fibers, optical fibers,
principles of fiber optic communication, modulation and
multiplexing, fiber optic components, sources,
photodetectros, transmitter and receiver design, optical
multiplexers and demultiplexers, fiber optic communication
system designing, optical networks, fiber optic measurement,
optical computing.
Pre-requisite: ES376
ES481 & ES482 Senior Design Project Part-I & II (0-18-6): The

86

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES


aim of the course is to sharpen the skills of the electronic
engineering students by participating in projects that are to be
identified in collaboration with the industry. Every project will
be assigned a faculty advisor. The students may work
independently or jointly (in small groups) on the projects. The
duration of the project term is one full year. The progress will be
monitored through interim presentations and reports. A final
report will be due at the end of the term.
PH101L, PH102L, ES211L, ES212L, ES213L, ES222L, ES314L,
ES303L, ES441L, ES451L, ES462L, ES471L (Laboratory Courses, 1
Credit Hour each). The relevant course must be a co-requisite.

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


Materials Processing, Manufacturing and Characterization
Surface Engineering and Coating Technology
Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials
Ceramics, Polymers and Composites
Computational Materials Science
Corrosion and Oxidation

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Faculty:
Javaid Rabbani Khan, Ph.D (University of New Castle Upon Tyne, UK)
Muhammad Imran Khan, Ph.D (University of Tsukuba, Japan)
Yasir Faheem Joya, Ph.D (The University of Manchester, UK)
Shozab Mehdi, Ph.D (PIEAS, Pakistan)
Khurram Imran Khan, Ph.D Politecnico de Torino, Italy
Roman Zaib Babar, Ph.D Politecnico de Torino, Italy
Dr. Azhar Hussain, Ph.D Politecnico de Torino, Italy
Dr. Ramzan Abdul Karim, Ph.D Politecnico de Torino, Italy
Dr. Rashid Ali, Ph.D Roma Tre University Rome, Italy
Syed Zameer Abbas, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Ahsan Waseem, MS (Karlstad University, Sweden)
Fraz Saeed Butt, (Otto von Guericke University, Germany
Syed Ali Afraz, MS (KTH Stockholm, Sweden)
Tahir Sattar, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Hafiz Kabeer Raza, MS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Muhammad Omer Farooq, MS Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel, Germany
Tauheed Shehbaz, MS (NUST, Islamabad)

Dean
Fida Mohammad
Ph.D (University of California, Davis, USA)

Faculty on Study leave:


Fahd Nawaz Khan, Ph.D (Northumbria University, Newcastle, UK) Sabbatical leave
Engr. M. Umer Farooq, Engr. Hassan Zaib, Engr. Irfan Haider Abidi, Engr. Atif Rasheed and Engr.
Atta ul Haq.

Adjunct Faculty:
Fazal Ahmad Khalid, SI, D.Phil (Oxon)
Peter Humphrey Draper, Ph.D (Imperial, London)
Jawad Dar, Ph.D (QMUL) City University London)
Tahir I. Khan, Ph.D (Cantob) University of Calgary, Canada

Engineers:
Madasser Khan, B.S Engg. (GIK Institute, Topi)
Salman Khalid, B.S Engg. (GIK Institute, Topi)
Muaz Tahir, B.S Engg. (GIK Institute, Topi)
Azhar Tanveer, B.S Engg. (GIKI Institute, Topi)
Abeera Fatima, B.S Engg. (GIKI Institute, Topi)
Muhammad Imad, B. Engg. (UET Peshawar)

Graduate Fellow:
Faheem Iqbal, B.S Engg. (GIK Institute, Topi)

Personal Assistant:
Nizakat Ali Khan, MBA
Muhammad Khalid Khan, Store Keeper

88

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Introduction
Enormous changes are taking place in the development of new
and exotic materials. These developments are due to several
reasons. Firstly, application of basic sciences by materials
engineers to understand and explain the synthesis, structure and
behavior of materials. Secondly, the availability of sophisticated
technology to materials engineers to manipulate materials on the
size of nano scale. Thirdly, due to the driving force from the
market where new and exotic materials are required for various
advanced applications such as in transportation, health care,
energy production, biomedical implants, and aerospace industry.
Thermal, electrical, magnetic, optical, mechanical and chemical
properties of materials are continuously being improved by
materials engineers all over the world which in turn leads to
improvements in our life style.

Undergraduate Program
Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering in Ghulam Ishaq
Khan Institute for Engineering Sciences and Technology is striving
to educate and train professionally competent and skilled
graduates in the field of materials science and engineering,
specifically in two specializations of Manufacturing and
Nanotechnology. For this purpose talented faculty with
international qualification have been hired; sophisticated
equipments such as atomic force microscope have been procured
and a new four years' BS program in Nanotechnology has been

launched since Fall 2012. The importance of nanotechnology can


be judged from the fact that over 200 products in the market
today use nano particles for various purposes.
Every effort is being made to create conducive environment for
students to learn latest courses in theory and develop practical
skills in the labs. To ensure quality of teaching, outcome based
education was introduced from Fall 2014 and the curriculum for
both the Specializations was revised in April 2015 and the revised
curricula are not only geared to the demands of the world of work
but also they meet international standards.

Graduate Program
In addition to educating and training undergraduates, the faculty
also conducts post graduate teaching and research programs. For
this purpose, graduate engineers with BS degree are enrolled to
study at the MS and Ph.D levels in the areas of Super alloys,
Ceramics, Composites, Biomaterials, Corrosion Engineering,
Smart materials and Nanotechnology. Most of the students
enrolled for MS and Ph.D are financially supported by various
sources including GIKI during their post graduate studies. These
students are required to complete the prescribed course work as
well as demonstrate their research capability through
independently conducting research in the lab.

Careers in Materials Engineering


In terms of opportunities of jobs after graduation, majority of our
graduates are hired by national and multinational research and
academic institutions and industry within one year of graduation.
Lately, opportunities for post graduate research leading to MS
and Ph.D degree outside Pakistan are on the rise and it is
encouraging to note that our graduates are competing
successfully in international competition for grabbing
opportunities of jobs and research. ASM-TMS International
Student Chapter
The International Student Chapter of TMS at GIK Institute helps
students in professional development and training. Its activities
include organization of seminars, video shows, discussions and
industrial visits.

89

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Program Outcome
The graduates should be able to have good understanding of
basic, social and engineering courses to demonstrate their
abilities to work and lead the national and multinational
organizations. They are also expected to carry out research in
new and advanced materials and nanotechnology.

Accreditation
The BS Degree in Materials Engineering is accredited by the
Pakistan Engineering Council.

A student majoring in Materials Science & Engineering must complete the following requirements:
a) General Education Requirements (52 Credit Hours) Crd Hours
Course Titles

Course Code

CH

Mathematics
Sciences
Computer System Engineering
Basic Engineering Courses
Humanities/Social Sciences

Mt101, MT102, MT201


PH101, PH102, PH101L, PH102L
CS101, CS101L, CS102L, ES341
ME101, ME102, ME201, MS291, EE213, CH261
HM101, HM102, HM211,HM322, HM321

9
8
7
13
15

b) Core Requirements (50 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Course Code

Chemistry for Engineers


Introduction to Eng. Materials
Thermodynamicsof Materials
Evaluation Techniques & Instrumentation
Phase Equilibria and Microstructures
Crystallography & X-ray Diffraction
Strength of Materials
Alloy Production
Heat Treatment and Processing
Deformation and Fracture
Polymer Science and Engineering
Ceramics and Glasses
Materials Labs I to VII
(INTERACTIVE SESSIONS)
Senior Design Project

CH101
MM102
MM211
MM221
MM231
MM232
MM222
MM312
MM333
MM322
MM361
MM362
MM141, MM242, MM243, MM344, MM345,
MM446, MM447
MM481, MM482

90

CH
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
8
6

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

c) Specialization Requirements (21 Credit Hours)


Manufacturing
Course Titles

Course Code

Industrial Management
Corrosion and Degradation of Materials
Joining of Materials
Manufacturing Processes I
Powder Metallurgy
Entrepreneurship and Marketing
Manufacturing Processes II

CH

3
3
3
3
3
3
3

MM391
MM451
MM324
MM323
MM426
MM493
MM427

Nanotechnology
Course Titles

Course Code

Nanomaterials & Nanotechnology


Characterization of Nanomaterials
Thin Film Technology
Materials for Energy and Environment
Advanced Materials
Electronic and Magnetic Materials
Nanostructures and Devices

CH

3
3
3
3
3
3
3

MM331
MM363
MM364
MM434
MM466
MM463
MM435

d) Technical Electives (06 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Casting Design and Foundry Technology


Materials Characterization
Nuclear Materials
Advanced Materials
Nanostructured Materials
Biomaterials
Standards and Quality Assurance
CAD/CAM
Introduction to Finite Element Methods
Surface Engineering
Composite Materials
Automobile Engineering and Materials
Powder Metallurgy
Materials for Energy and Environment
Electronic and Magnetic Materials
Nanostructures and Devices

Course Code

CH

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Mm416
MM425
MM464
MM466
MM467
MM468
MM472
MM428
MM429
MM452
MM465
MM469
MM426
MM434
MM463
MM435

91

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

e) Engineering Management Electives (06 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

"I knew I had to choose a university that was


surrounded by spectacular scenic view, energetic
social life, finest faculty, constructive learning
environment and an unrivalled character. G.I.K.I
was the place for me"
Rozeen Nazir, 2012318
FMSE

92

Course Code

Operations Management

ME492

Industrial Safety

ME493

Maintenance Management

ME495

Total Quality Management

MM491

Fuel and Energy Management

MM479

Technology Management

MM494

Entrepreneurship and Marketing

MM493

CH

3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Summer Internship (Pass/Fail grade; NIL Credit)


Every student is required to participate in summer internship (eight weeks)
during the summer of third year and submit a formal written report.
For the award of B.S. degree in Materials Engineering along with the options
taken for specializations streams, a student has to complete 135 credit hours.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Courses per Semester


First Semester
No.
MT101
PH101
CS101
HM101
CH101
PH101L
CS101L
ME101

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

Calculus I
Mechanics
Introduction to Computing
English and Study Skills
Chemistry for Engineers
Mechanics Lab
Computer Lab
Workshop Practice

3
3
2
3
3
0
0
0

Lab. Hrs
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

CH
3
3
2
3
3
1
1
1

Second Semester
No.
MT102
CS102L
PH102
HM102
MM102
ME102
PH102L
MM141

Course Titles
Calculus II
Intensive Programming Lab
Electricity and Magnetism
Technical Report Writing
Introduction to Engineering Materials
Engineering Graphics
Electricity and Magnetism Lab
Materials Lab I

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

3
3
3
3
3
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

1
3
3
3
2
1
1

"GIKI is a forge, in which strongest and most


durable steels are made. My time here has
taught me the value of diversity, friendship and
hard work. Apart from personality development
and confidence building, GIKI provides you an
environment for intellectual growth and helps
you become a responsible person
Syed Hashim Shah, 2012377
FMSE

Third Semester
No.
MT201
MM211
MM221
EE213
MM242
HM211

Course Titles
Differential Equations
Thermodynamics of Materials
Evaluation Techniques & Instrumentation
Applied Electrical Engineering
Materials Lab II
Pakistan and Islamic Studies

3
3
3
3
0
3

0
0
0
0
3
0

3
3
3
3
1
3

Fourth Semester
No.
MM231
MM222
MM232
MM243
ME201/ ES202
MS291
CH261

Course Titles
Phase Equilibria and Microstructures
Strength of Materials
Crystallography and X-ray Diffraction
Materials Lab III
Engineering Statistics
Engineering Economics
Occupational Health and Safety

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

3
1

0
0

3
1

93

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Specialization in Manufacturing
Fifth Semester
No.

Course Titles

MM312
MM322
MM333
MM391
MM344
HM321

Lec. Hrs

Alloy Production
Deformation & Fracture
Heat Treatment and Processing
Industrial Management
Materials Lab IV
Sociology and Human Behavior

Lab. Hrs

CH

Sixth Semester
No.

Course Titles

MM323
MM324
MM361
MM362
MM345
ES341 / CS342
HM322

Lec. Hrs

Manufacturing Processes I
Joining of Materials
Polymer Science and Engineering
Ceramics and Glasses
Materials Lab V
Numerical analysis
Corporate Law and Professional Ethics

Lab. Hrs

CH

Seventh Semester
No.

Course Titles

MM427
MM451
MM4XX
MM4XX
MM446
MM481

Lec. Hrs

Manufacturing Processes II
Corrosion and Degradation of Materials
MM technical elective
Management Elective
Materials Lab VI
Senior Design Project I

Lab. Hrs

CH

Eighth Semester
No.

Course Titles

MM493
MM426
MM4XX
MM49X
MM447
MM482

Entrepreneurship and Marketing


Powder Metallurgy
MM Technical Elective
Management Elective
Materials Lab VII
Senior Design Project II

94

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Specialization in Nanotechnology
Fifth Semester
No.
MM312
MM322
MM333
MM331
MM344
HM321

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

Alloy Production
Deformation & Fracture
Heat Treatment and Processing
Nanomaterials & Nanotechnology
Materials Lab IV
Sociology and Human Behavior

Lab. Hrs

CH

Sixth Semester
No.
MM361
MM362
MM363
MM364
MM345
ES341 / CS342
HM322

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

Polymer Science and Engineering


Ceramic and Glasses
Characterization of Nanomaterials
Thin Film Technology
Materials Lab V
Numerical analysis
Corporate Law and Professional Ethics

Lab. Hrs

CH

Seventh Semester
No.
MM434
MM466
MM4XX
MM4XX
MM446
MM481

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

Materials for Energy and Environment


Advanced Materials
MM technical elective
Management Elective
Materials Lab VI
Senior Design Project I

Lab. Hrs

CH

Eighth Semester
No.
MM463
MM435
MM4XX
MM49X
MM447
MM482

Course Titles
Electronic and Magnetic Materials
Nanostructures and Devices
MM Technical Elective
Management Elective
Materials Lab VII
Senior Design Project II

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

95

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Course Description
MM102 Introduction to Engineering Materials (3-0-3):
Pre Req: Nil
Fundamentals of engineering materials -crystal structure,effects
of stress on structure, mechanical properties, solutions and
phase diagrams, metals and alloys, mechanical properties of
engineering ceramics; polymers and composites; biomaterials
and semiconductor.
MM211 Thermodynamics of Materials (3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil
First law of thermodynamics, enthalpy, internal energy, Heat
capacity, Relationship between heat and work, Reversible and
irreversible processes, Second law, entropy, Third law, Heat
engines, refrigerators, heat pumps, Property relations, Maxwell
equations, Gibbs and Helmholtz free energies, Isentropic P-T
relationship, Isentropic Compression of Solids, Equilibrium,
activity/fugacity and the chemical potential, Gas-solid equilibria,
Ellingham diagrams, Classius-Clapeyron Equation, Vant Hoff's
Isotherm, Electrochemistry, Pourbaix Diagrams, Nernst
Equation, Behavior of solutions, non-ideal solutions,
thermodynamics of phase diagrams, Phase equilibria in single
and multicomponent, Systems, Phases, components, Gibbs
phase rule, Thermodynamics Simulation toolkit, Computational
thermodynamics.
MM221 Evaluation Techniques & Instrumentation (3-0-3):
Pre Req: MM102
Evaluation and Quality Assurance, Tensile Testing, Three point
bend test, Tensile testing Machines, Load measurement, strain
measurement, strain gauges, wheatstone bridge, sample
gripping, Compression Test,
Load Cells, Transducers
(Piezoelectric, EMAT), ECI Probes, and Thermocouples, Hardness
Testing, Sheet Metal Testing, Impact Testing and Fracture
Mechanics, Fatigue testing, Creep Testing, Non-Destructive
Testing, Visual Inspection (VT), Liquid Penetrant Test (LPT),
Radiographic Examinations, Magnetic Analysis, Ultrasonic
Testing, Advanced NDE Techniques, Optical Microscopy,
Reflected light Microscopy Vs Polarization Light Microscopy,

96

Application of OM, Electron Microscopy, SEM and TEM


principles and applications, AFM principles and application like
Imaging, Force Mapping, Dip-Pen Nanolithography,
Nanofabrication.
MM231 Phase Equilibria and Microstructures (3-0-3):
Pre Req: MM211
Solid Solution, Hume Ruthery Rules for Solid Solution, Phase
Rule, Pressure vs. Temperature phase diagram.
BinaryIsomorphous system and Construction of Phase diagrams
from cooling curve. Phase diagrams of isomorphous and
eutectic. Tie Line and Lever Rule. Interpretation phase Diagram
in terms of Gibbs phase rule Development of Microstructures in
binary isomorphous systems, Mechanical Behavior of
Isomorphous alloys. Microstructures development while slow
cooling and fast cooling, Equilibrium diagrams having
Intermediate phases or compounds, Eutectoid and Peritectic
Reaction Congruent Phase Transformations, The isomorphous
alloy and Eutectic system from the point of view of free energy,
Iron Iron Carbide Phase diagram, Development of
microstructures in iron carbon alloy, Influence of other alloying
elements in iron carbon alloy, Evolution and development of
microstructure during process like precipitation, Ternary Phase
diagrams, Binary Solutions , Ideal Solution Model and Regular

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Solution Model, Kinetics of Phase transformation, Nucleation,


Homogenous Nucleation and Heterogeneous nucleation,
Diffusional Transformations, Types of diffusional
transformations, Diffusionless Transformation, Characteristics
of diffusionless Transformation, The solid solution of carbon in
Iron, Military transformation
MM222 Strength of Materials (3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil
Theory of solid mechanics, Elastic and plastic strains,
Engineering vs. True stress and strains, the equilibrium and
constitutive equations, Shear Force and Bending Moment
Diagram, Free-body Diagram, Factor of Safety, Stress
concentration, Deflection of beams and columns, Torsional
loading of solid and hollow circular shafts, Pressure in thin and
thick walled cylinders / vessels, Thermal Stresses, Combined
Stresses, Principal stresses and Mohr's Circle of stress and strain,
Energy methods, Computational methods and Yielding Criteria
MM232 Crystallography and X-ray Diffraction (3-0-3):
Pre Req: MM102
Crystals and crystal systems, Construction of crystals and
packing of layers, Crystal Projections, Coordination Polyhedra,
Stacking Faults and Twins, Lattices, Crystal systems and Crystal
Symmetry, Plane group symmetry, Bravais Lattices, Crystal
Systems, Crystal Symmetry, Point Group Symmetry, space
Groups, Symmetry Versus Property, QuasiCrystals, Zone Axis,
Zone Law, Miller Indices,Miller-Bravais Indices, Transformation
Matrices, Indexing in Hexagonal Systems, Reciprocal Lattices,
Introduction to X-rays, Safety Precautions, Diffraction, Lau's
Approach for X-ray Diffraction, Bragg's Analysis of X-ray
Diffraction, Ewald's Sphere Construction, Diffraction Methods
(Powder method, Laue Technique, Crystal rotating method),
Structure Factor Calculations, Indexing patterns,
Crystal Structure Determination, Hanawalt Method, Quantitative
analysis, Amorphous and Crystalline nature and XRD Patterns,
Application of XRD

MM312 Alloy Production (3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil


Casting, Pattern making and materials, types of patterns, Core
making and materials, Testing and control of molding sands,
Molding processes and materials, casting techniques, gating
system design, Melting furnaces and melting, Solidification of
pure metal and alloys, directional and progressive solidification,
Casting Defects and Inspection and quality control, Phase
Separation, Crushing and grinding, Screening, Concentration
processes, Coke coal and oil for ore preparation, Iron extraction
by smelting, by reduction process, The Blast
Furnace,Thermodynamics of iron making, Steel and cast iron,
Nomenclature of steels, Charge calculations and Ellingham
diagram, Steel Making processes, Induction furnace, Arc furnace,
Steel refining processes, Non-ferrous metals Al, Ni, Ti, Cu, Mg,
MM322 Deformation & Fracture (3-0-3): Pre Req: MM222
Types of stress-strain and flow curves, elastic and plastic
deformations, Strain and Stress tensors, Mohr's Circle of stress
and strain in 2D and 3D, Principal stresses and strains,
Hydrostatic and deviator strain and stress components,
Generalized Hooke's Law, Anisotropy of elasticity,
Crystallographic aspects of plastic deformation, Dislocation and
its types, Mechanisms of Deformation, Critical resolved shear

97

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

stress, Strain hardening of single crystal FCC, Barriers to


Dislocation glide, Strengthening Mechanisms, Theories of
fracture, Fracture toughness, Creep mechanisms, Grain
boundary sliding, Creep fracture, Larson-Miller equation for
creep life,Fatigue, Fatigue Fracture mechanism
MM333 Heat Treatment and Processing (3-0-3):
Pre Req: MM231
Introduction to Fe-Fe3C diagram, effect of alloying elements,
transformation temperatures, transformation reactions, critical
temperatures, A1, A3 and Acm, kinetics of transformation, IT and
TTT diagrams, interphase precipitation, divorced eutectoid
structures, Martensite and its formation mechanism,
morphology of martensite, plate martensite, lath martensite,
tempered martensite, Bainite, types of structures, Mechanism of
formation, Ferritic microstructures, Widmenstatten Ferrite,
Austenite formation mechanism, Austenite grain size effect on
phase diagram, effect of second phase particles, discontinuous
grain growth, CCT Diagrams, batch and continuous heat
treatment furnaces, annealing, normalising, oxidation and

98

decarburization, austempering, martempering, Heat treatment


defects and their remedies, subzero treatment, thermomechanical treatment, hardenability, effect of quenching rates
and quenching media, HSLA processing, dual phase and microalloyed steels, surface hardening processes and surface
modification, stainless steels
MM323 Manufacturing Processes I (3-0-3): Pre Req: MM322
Manufacturing principles, Manufacturing and Processing
operation: Shaping operations, Assembly operations,
Production machines and tooling, Production systems,
Engineering materials, design of components, Mechanical
Properties for Design and Manufacturing of Materials, Electrical
and Thermal properties, Measurements and inspection:
Dimensions and Tolerances, Standards (ISO), Metrology, Metal
working processes, Bulk metal forming, Mechanics of metal
working Forging, Rolling, Extrusion, Drawing of rods, Wires and
Tubes, sheet metal forming, Metal cutting, types of machine
tools, design of machine tools, nontraditional machining
processes, Cutting tool materials and cutting fluids, Abrasive

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

machining and finishing process, Thread and gear


manufacturing, Advanced machining operations: Chemical
machining, Electrochemical machining, EDM, Water Jet
cutting, Laser machining, EB machining, Hybrid machining
operations
MM324 Joining of Materials (3-0-3): Pre Req: MM221
Basic principles of joining, Mechanical joint designs, failure in
fatigue and bending, corrosion and environmental damage,
Fasteners and their functions, Adhesive bonding and cementing,
Cement and mortar and its uses, Welding processes, fusion (gas,
arc and high energy beam processes) and non-fusion welding
(friction, roll, diffusion etc), Joint design, weld defects, inspection
and testing, Principle of brazing, types, comparison and
Selection criteria, Soldering process, types and fluxes, solder
alloys, joint design, solderability testing, Metallurgy of welding,
brazing and soldering, heat and mass flow, consideration in the
zones (fusion, partially melted and heat affected) around joints,
control of microstructure, defects formed in the zones and
preventive measures, tests of weldability.
MM361 Polymer Science and Engineering (3-0-3):
Pre Req: MM102 & MM231
Chemistry and structure of polymers, isomerism in polymers,
molecular weight calculations, Synthesis and mechanism of
polymerization, industrial polymerization processes,
polymerization kinetics, Thermal transitions in polymers,
Characterization of polymers by Mass Spectroscopy, DTA,
DSC/TG, GPC, NMR and FTIR, Crystallization, melting point and
glass transition temperatures, mechanical properties,
viscoelasticity, crazing, polymer additive and fillers, Industrial
shaping processes of polymers, selection criteria, conducting
polymers, biodegradable polymers
MM362 Ceramics and Glasses (3-0-3): Pre Req: MM231
Ceramics, Pauling rules Crystal structure of ionic solids, Structure
of solids Examples of different ionic solids, Physical, thermal,
electrical and mechanical behavior of ceramics, Phase
transformation in solids types and transformation in silicate

structures, Thermomechanical sintering methods, Structural


imperfections types of disorder, Ceramic industry in Pakistan,
Advance Ceramics, Ceramics Biomaterial requirement of
biomaterials, Thermal barrier coatings, Piezoelectric Ceramic
Materials, Glass ceramics structure and properties of glass
ceramics, Production and types of glass ceramics, Refractories
introduction and their applications, Type, properties and heat
treatment of glasses,
MM427 Manufacturing Processes II (3-0-3):
Pre Req: MM323
Component design for manufacturing, Conventional and nonconventional machining, Machining fundamentals,
Manufacturing operations, group technology, abrasive
machining, Thread and gear manufacturing, chemical
machining, electrochemical machining, EDM, laser jet
machining, EBmachining, hybrid machining operations,
nontraditional machining processes, Rapid prototyping, 3D
scanning and printing, stereo-lithography, FMS, DFA,
Automation and industrial control technologies, Sensors and
other control systems, Materials handling and identification
processes, Storage and inventory, quality control systems, SPC
and charts, Design and process planning, agile manufacturing,
Production volume and Assembly Techniques
MM451 Corrosion and Degradation of Materials (3-0-3):
Pre Req: MM101 & MM102
Corrosion Engineering, corrosion environments and damage,
corrosion classification, roles of a Corrosion Engineer, Modern
electrochemical theory and thermodynamics of corrosion,
electrochemical cell, Electrode potential/emf series, Nernst
equation, Pourbaix diagrams for Fe system, electrode kinetics,
passivity, Polarization and types, Ohmic drop at
electrolyte/metal interface, exchange current density and its
measurement, types of corrosion and their preventive measures,
weld decay, selective leaching/dealloying, dezincification,
graphitization, velocity induced corrosion, Mechanically assisted
attack, stress corrosion cracking, Hydrogen damage and
embrittlement, Microbiologically influenced corrosion,

99

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

monitoring:salt spray/fog test, corrosion rate (MPY) and


penetration rate calculations, electrochemical corrosion
testing, limiting current density, polarization diagrams (Evans
diagram) and corrosion data analysis,Tafel extrapolation, Tafel
slopes determination from polarization curve, linear
polarization resistance (LPR), potentiodynamic and
potentiostatic polarization resistance, electrochemical
impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Corrosion protection measures,
cathodic protection, anodic protection, types of coatings, rust
converters, corrosion inhibitors, synergistic mixtures.
MM426 Powder Metallurgy (3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil
Production of metallic powders, Powder characterization
techniques Lubricants and binders, Shaping methods, injection
molding, die-compaction, extrusion and cold isostatic
compaction, Solid state and liquid phase sintering, enhanced
sintering techniques, hot isostatic compaction, Dynamic and
explosive compaction, Characterization of sintered components,
finishing operations, Structural and porous components, cutting
tools, MIM, magnetic materials
MM425 Materials Characterization (3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil
Characterization techniques, phase contrast microscopy,
Polarized light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, confocal
microscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected
area diffraction (SAD) and indexing, Scanning electron
microscopy (SEM), Scanning probe microscopy (SPM), scanning
tunneling microscopy (STM), operational modes and
applications, atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic
operational modes of AFM, static mode, Spark Emission
Spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), K, L and M series of x-ray
emission lines, fluorescence yield, WDS and EDS systems, EDS in
electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron (XPS),
instrumentation Charge neutralization in XPS/AES, Thermal
Analysis, DSC, TG and DTA analysis Vibrational spectroscopy,
Infrared and Raman activity, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR for
molecular analysis, FTIR and Raman spectra and interpretation,
applications in carbon nanomaterials

100

MM 465 Composite Materials(3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil


Composite types, forms, applications, parameters, rule of
mixtures, nature and size reinforcements, Reinforcements and
matrices, interface, production and properties of various fibers,
testing of composites, Metal matrix composites, Ceramic matrix
composites, Carbon reinforced composites, protective coatings,
glass ceramic composites, Polymeric matrix composites, Rubber
composites and other examples, Stress-strain relations for
unidirectional composites, compliance and stiffness, laminate
plate theory, Micromechanics, prediction of strength and
stiffness, moisture and thermal effects, Testing of fracture
toughness and parameters effecting toughening mechanisms in
composites, Impact resistance and failure modes of composites,
Fatigue properties of composites, Joining of composites, repair
of composites, Inspection and testing of composites, ultrasonic,
radiographic and thermal inspection, sonic and other
techniques.
MM 465 Surface Engineering (3-0-3): Pre Req: MM102
Elements of bulk and surface structures,Terrace ledge kink (TLK)
model, FIM, Low energy electron diffraction, Surface
Crystallography, surface point defects, STM and AFM,
Chemisorptions, physisorption and their kinetic view, Surface
cleaning and finishing, Surface modification and plating: Corona
and plasma treatment, shot peeing, polymer coatings, Cr, Ni and
Cu plating (electro and electrolessplatings), Coatings:
Galvanizing, hot-dip coatings, anodizing, hard facing, glazing
and enamelling, hydrophobic and hydrophilic coatings, CVD
techniques: The chemical vapour deposition process, Plasmaassisted chemical vapour deposition, Hard coatings produced
by chemical vapour deposition, PVD techniques: Thermal
evaporation, laser ablation, sputtering techniques, arc
processes, Atomic layer deposition, ion implantation, Thermal
spray processes, Advanced coatings for friction/wear/abrasion
and corrosion and oxidation resistance, Solid phase cladding,
Nanostructured and lubricating coatings, Wear in tribocontacts, coating for biomedical applications, Fracture, adhesion
and scratch tests of coatings, hardness and nano-hardness,

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

surface acoustic wave spectroscopy of coatings.

regarding Nanomaterials.

MM466 Advanced Materials (3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil


Advanced materials, challenges for advanced materials, Shape
Memory Alloys, TiNi Based SMAs, High temperature TiNi based
SMAs, Nanomaterials, Nano Particles, Synthesis of nanoparticles, Nucleation and growth mechanisms, stable dispersion
and Agglomeration of nano particles, Metallic nano-particles,
Intermetallic nano-particles, Alloyed nano-particles, and
Composites based nano-particles, BottomUp Synthesis, Gas
(Vapor) Phase Fabrication, Spray Pyrolysis, Spray PyrolysisDroplet Evolution, Precipitation control, Liquid Phase
Fabrication, Physical methods of synthesis, Physical methods of
synthesis, advanced applications of Nanomaterials,
Nanotechnology Applications in Medicine, Nano Computing
Technology, Batteries, Catalysts, Magnetic Nano Materials
applications, Safety, Intermetallics, Nickel aluminides, Bulk
Metallic Glasses, Pd-based BMG , ZrTiCuNiBe glass-forming
alloy family, Structure of BMGs, Mechanical Properties of BMGs,
BMG composites, Functionally Graded Materials, Fuel Cell
Materials, ODS alloys, Biomaterials, Super Alloys

MM363 Characterization of Nanomaterials (3-0-3):


Pre Req: Nil
Overview of chemical and physical characterization of nanostructures, Specific surface area, high resolution scanning
electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), ESEM, Particle size
measurement, Zeta Potential, Laser techniques, Sample
Preparation techniques, Ion milling and focus ion beam (FIB)
milling techniques, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM),
HRTEM, scanning scanning transmission electron microscopy
(STEM) and EELS, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), STM, Optical
nano-scopy, Super resolution fluorescence microscopy, XRD
and related techniques, Holography and tomography, Nanoindentaion, nano-tribology and surface properties, Thin films
and nanostructures characterization, special techniques for
characterization of nanomaterials

MM331 Nanomaterials & Nanotechnology (3-0-3):


Pre Req: Nil
Nanomaterials, classification, synthesis and types, Physical
Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Surface Energy, Electrostatic
Stabilization, Steric Stabilization, Zero-Dimensional
Nanostructures, One-Dimensional Nanostructures, TwoDimensional Nanostructures, Three dimensional
Nanostructures,Bulk nanomaterials, Carbon, Fullerenes and
Nanotubes, Optical, Electrical and Mechanical Properties of
Nanomaterials, Micro and Mesoporous Materials, OrganicInorganic Hybrids, Intercalation Compounds,Nanograined
Materials, Nanofluids, Magnetic Nanomaterials, Applications of
Nanomaterials, Molecular Electronics and Nanoelectronics,
Nanobots, Biological Applications of Nanoparticles, Catalysis by
Nanoparticles, Band Gap Engineered Quantum Devices, Carbon
Nanotube Emitters,Photoelectrochemical Cells, Safety concerns

MM364 Thin Film Technology (3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil


Review of materials properties, Vacuum science and technology,
Preparation of thin films, chemical methods, sol-gel processing,
CVD, Physical methods, PVD, evaporation, laser ablation,
sputtering, Epitaxy, Nucleation and growth mechanism,
deposition monitoring and control of thickness, Ellipsometry,
Electrical and magnetic properties, dielectric properties,
mechanical properties, optical properties, Metallurgical and
protective coatings, Surface engineering,applications of thin
films, Clean Room Technology, Components, Operation and
Maintenance
MM434 Materials for Energy and Environment (3-0-3):
Pre Req: Nil
Nanotechnology in clean and renewable energies,
Nanotechnologies in solar cells (PV),Li- ion batteries, Li-Polymer
batteries, Energetic materials, Nanotechnologies in the
electricity, Interrelationships between material properties and
processing, Interrelationships device structure,and the electrical,
mechanical, optical, chemical or biological behavior of devices,

101

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Nano Membrane Technology for Liquids and Gases, fuel cells


and CO2 captures, Radiation filtering

MM345 Materials Lab-V (0-3-1): Experiments related to welding,


joining, mechanical working and corrosion engineering.

MM463 Electronic and Magnetic Materials (3-0-3):


Pre Req: Nil
Introduction to Magnetic Materials, Diamagnetism And
Paramagnetism, Ferromagnetism, Antiferromagnetism,
Ferrimagnetism, Domains and the magnetization process, Soft
magnetic materials, Hard magnetic materials, Electronic
materials, Elementary Quantum Physics
Semiconductors,
Semiconductor Devices, Packaging of devices/ Dicing/ Wire
bonding/ Packaging

MM446 Materials Lab-VI (0-3-1): Experiments related to study of


mechanical properties of composite and surface engineering
other materials and special case studies.

MM435 Nanostructures and Devices (3-0-3): Pre Req: Nil


Precision thin layer multilayer capacitors, Size reduction and
control of electro-mechanical devices, Energy storage devices,
Fuel cells, solar cells, micro batteries, Biomedical and bioactive
applications,Internal drug release devices, Contact Lenses,
Nanobots
MM141 Materials Lab-I (0-3-1): The complementary laboratory
course to the MM102 lectures. Experiments anddemonstrations
to give a basic understanding of thestructure and properties of
materials and an introductionto their fabrication and testing.
MM242 Materials Lab-II (0-3-1): Experiments using some of the
main techniques for the destructive and non- destructive
evaluation of materials.
MM243 Materials Lab-III (0-3-1): Exercises concerning
crystallography, and experiments demonstrating the use XRD
and optical microscopic techniques for the study and evaluation
of materials.
MM344 Materials Lab-IV (0-6-2): Experiments designed to
examine the effect of processing parameters and phase
transformations on the properties of steels, alloys and polymeric
materials.

102

Mm447 Materials Lab-VII (0-3-1): Experiments related to


powder metallurgy, semiconductors, design and selection of
engineering materials, and characterization of materials using
advanced techniques, special case studies.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


Rapid commercialization of conventional and modern, man-made
products gave birth to process industry. The dynamics of the
industry require group of highly trained professionals from almost
all engineering disciplines. However, a chemical engineer
organizes his/her coordination at the process plant and thus
deemed as process brain. Such responsibility demands basic
knowledge of all conventional trades of engineering in addition to
an in-depth knowledge of large-scale industrial dynamics.
Chemical engineering is all about changing raw materials into
useful products in safe, cost effective and eco-frinedly ways.
Sustainable development of process industry and thereby
contributing to the continual improvement of daily life is an
exclusive responsibility of this trade.

engineers not only supervising & ensuring their smooth operation


but also for troubleshooting, demanding interaction between the
engineers and scientists from various other fields. Resources at the
faculty are designed to inculcate the necessary knowledge,
practices and behavioural aspects in the graduates, and
prerequisites for the responsibilities of professional life. Chemical
engineers find their utility in various industries including chemical
& petrochemical, nuclear, energy, oil & gas, food, pharmaceutical,
cosmetics, and in various defense sectors, in addition to emerging
research fields. Furthermore, these engineers are equipped to
collaborate with different resources at the plant including
management, utility engineers and above all with the technicians
and plant operators as they will be their observing eyes in the field.

The faculty of chemical engineering at Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute


offers a 4-years degree program covering a thorough grounding in
basic science & engineering. In addition to that, it provides
specialized training in chemical engineering and application of the
various fields. Curriculum is designed so as to impart the
indispensable knowledge for a chemical engineer at an
undergraduate level, particularly the knowledge required to cope
with the problems of local industry.

Program Outcomes

The newly established laboratories are the prime feature, providing


state-of-the-art equipment. Most of the laboratories are designed
having conventional aspects imitated by the more sophisticated
and risk free digital equipment. Experiments are designed to
trigger the thinking of students and not just mere data logging.

Graduates should be sound in fundamentals of engineering in


addition to the advanced knowledge of this Particular field. They
are expected to act logically and ethically both in normal operating
conditions and under stress induced by any plant emergency. They
should behave like a captain of the ship having keen observation
on the plant activities and be able to communication with other
professionals at the facility.

Accreditation
The BS Degree in Chemical Engineering is accredited by Pakistan
Engineering Council (PEC).

Careers in Chemical Engineering


Quality of modern living standards has encouraged the mass
production of various utilities, necessities and amenities. Since the
birth of process & processing industry, after 18th century, there is a
dramatic increase in its volume. Population trends and a chain of
never ending new/modern products ensures the growth in this
sector. Furthermore struggling third world countries like Pakistan
are now focusing to process their raw materials in their own
facilities. When it comes to realization, chemical engineers become
an essential part of the team to chart the layout and erection of the
new production line. Existing plants also require chemical

103

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Student is required to fullfill the following requirements for BSc. Engineering Degree in Chemical Engineeering

a) General Education Requirements (55 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Course Code

CH

Mathematics
Sciences
Comp. System Eng.
Basic Engineering Courses
Humanities/Social Sciences/Management

MT101,MT102,MT201
PH101,PH102,PH101L,PH102L
CS101,CS101L,CS102L,ES341
ME101,ME102,MM102,MM141L,ME201,MS291,EE213
HM101,HM102,HM211,HM321,HM322

9
8
7
16
15

b) Core Requirements (69 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Course Code

CH

Chemistry for Engineers


Inorganic and Organic
Chemistry Chemical Process Industries
Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-I
Chemical Engineering Principles-I
Chemical Engineering Principles-II
Energy Engineering
Particle Technology
Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-II
Occupational Health and Safety
Fluid Mechanics-I
Fluid Mechanics-II
Heat Transfer
Mass Transfer
Heat Transfer Equipment Design
Reaction Kinetics and Reactor Design
Environmental Engineering
Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer
Instrumentation and Process Control
Process Equipment Design and Specs.
Transport Phenomenon
Chemical Engineering Plant Design
Process Modelling & Simulation
Chemical Labs
Chemical Engineering Project Design

CH101
CH201
CH211
CH214
CH231
CH331
CH212
CH241
CH321
CH261
CH341
CH342
CH311
CH313
CH312
CH322
CH361
CHE411
CHE415
CH453
CH412
CH441
CH431
CH251L,CH252L,CH351L,CH352L,CH451L,CH452L
CH481, CH482

3
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
1
3
2
2
3
2
3
1
3
3
1
3
3
2
6
6

c) Technical Electives (06 Credit Hours)


Food Technology
Petroleum Refinery Engineering
Pharmaceutical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering
Water Treatment & Purification
Enzyme Technology
Statistical Thermodynamics

104

CH413
CH414
CH417
CH418
CH419
CH420
CH421

3
3
3
3
3
3
3

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Heterogeneous Catalysts
Piping Design
Environmental Impact Assessment
Fuel & Clean Technology
Industrial Waste Management
Biomaterials
Corrosion & Prevention
Polymer Engineering
Nanotechnology

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CH422
CH442
CH461
CH462
CH471
MM468
MM351
MM361
MM434

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

d) Engineering Management Electives (06 Credit Hours)


Course Titles

Course Code

CH

Maintenance Engineering and Industrial Management


Operation Management
Industrial Safety
Total Quality Management
Maintenance Management
Project Management

Ch371
MS492
MS493
MS494
MS495
MS496

3
3
3
3
3
3

e) Summer Training (Pass/Fail grade; NIL Credit)


Every student is required to complete an industrial internship or training program (eight weeks) during the summer of third year
and submit a formal written report.

f) Total Requirement (136 Credit Hours)


Credit Hour Division:
Semester
Humanities

I
3

II
3

III
3

IV
0

V
2

VI
3

VII
0

VIII
0

Total
14

10

Basic Sciences

20

15

Eng. Sciences

20

15

Core Subjects

11

15

64

47

Electives

12

Project

Total

17

17

18

17

18

17

18

15

136

4
100

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


First Semester

No.
MT101
PH101
CS101
HM101
CH101
PH101L
CS101L
ME101

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

Calculus I
Mechanics
Introduction to Computing
English and Study skills-I
Chemistry for Engineers
Mechanics lab
Computing lab
Workshop Practice

3
3
2
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
2
3
3
1
1
1

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

3
0
3
3
3
1
0
0

0
3
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
1
3
3
3
2
1
1

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

3
3
3
2
3
3
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
3

3
3
3
2
3
3
1

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

3
3
3
0
3
3
1

0
0
0
3
0
0
0

3
3
3
1
3
3
1

Second Semester
No.

Course Titles

MT102
CS102L
PH102
HM102
MM102
ME102
PH102L
MM141

Calculus-II
Intensive Programming Lab
Electricity & Magnetism
Technical Report Writing
Introduction to Engineering Material
Engineering Graphics
Electricity & Magnetism Lab
Materials Lab I

Third Semester
No.

Course Titles

Mt201
CH241
CH201
CHE231
EE213
HM211
CH251L

Differential Equations
Particle Technology
Inorganic & Organic Chemistry
Chemical Engineering Principles-I
Applied Electrical Engineering
Pakistan & Islamic Studies
Chemical Engineering Lab-I

Fourth Semester
No.

Course Titles

CH212
CH214
CH211
CH252L
ME201
MS291
CH261

Energy Engineering
Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-I
Chemical Process Industries
Chemical Engineering Lab-II
Engineering Statistics
Engineering Economics
Occupational Health & Safety

106

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Fifth Semester
No.
CH311
CH313
CH321
CH331
CH341
CH361
CH351L
HM321

Course Titles
Heat Transfer
Mass Transfer
Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-II
Chemical Engineering Principles-II
Fluid Mechanics-I
Environmental Engineering
Chemical Engineering Lab III
Sociology and Human Behaviour

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

2
3
3
2
3
0
0
3

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
0

2
3
3
2
3
1
1
3

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

Sixth Semester
No.
CH312
CH322
XXXXX
CH342
CH352L
ES341/CS342
HM322

Course Titles
Heat Transfer Equipment Design
Reaction Kinetics And Reactor Design
Management Elective
Fluid Mechanics-II
Chemical Engineering Lab-IV
Numerical Analysis
Corporate Law and Professional Ethics

CH

Seventh Semester
No.
CH411
CH415
XXXXX
CHE453
XXXXX
CH451L
CH481

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

Simultaneous Heat & Mass Transfer


Instrumentation & Process Control
Technical Elective
Process Equipment Design and Specs.
Management Elective
Chemical Engineering Lab-V
Chemical Engineering Project Design-I

Lab. Hrs

CH

Eighth Semester
No.
CH412
CH441
CH431
XXXXX
CH452L
CH482

Course Titles
Transport Phenomena
Chemical Engineering Plant Design
Process Modelling & Simulation
Technical Elective
Chemical Engineering Lab-VI
Chemical Engineering Project Design-II

Lec. Hrs

Lab. Hrs

CH

107

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Course Description
CH101 Chemistry for Engineers (3-0-3): Importance of chemistry for
engineers, Photochemistry, free radicals, Energy states of molecules,
Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter; IR, Vis and UV
spectroscopy. Thermal Analysis; DSC, TGA, DTA. Standardization of
Solution for quantitative titration & Stoichiometry, Determination of
atomic mass and mass spectroscopy, Intermolecular forces; Colloids,
Emulsions, Detergents. Nano-chemistry, Thin Films, CVD, PVD, and
Silicon Purification, Electrochemistry; Galvanic Cells, Batteries,
Nernst equation, pH-measurement, Corrosion reactions. Fossil
Fuels, Environmental pollution; Acid rain, Urban Smog, Criteria
Pollutants, Ozone in the atmosphere, global warming. Osmosis and
Reverse Osmosis, Demineralization of water; Molecular sieves and
Membrane filters, Water Treatment (Industrial purposes, Domestic
purposes, Waste water).

compounds such as amino acids and polypetides, Bio-chemical


processes, Carbohydrates: di and poly-schharides, Nucleic acids and
DNA. Pre-requisite(s): Ch101
CH231 Chemical EngineeringPrinciples-I(2-0-2): Units, dimensions
and conversions, Temperature and Pressure scales, Composition of
mixtures, Principles of stoichiometric combination, Nature of
balances; Concept of a balance, Input-output relationships, Steadystate considerations, Sub-systems and interconnections, Mass
balance diagrams and tables, Mass balances for items of plant,
Choice of basis/datum for balances, Overall and component
balances, Limiting and excess reactants, Balances for systems with
recycle, purge and by-pass streams, Mass balances for reactive
processes, Mass balances for unit operations, Tie components,
Balances for batch and continuous plant.

CH201 Inorganic & Organic Chemistry (3-0-3): Inorganic


Chemistry:Chemistry for chemical engineering, Atomic, ionic and
molecular solids, Atomic structure and Transition elements, Multiple
oxidation states and shielding effect, Redox reactions, Coordination
compounds, Isomerism, Catalysis, Chemistry in non-aqueous
solvents, radioactivity, Organic Chemistry:Shape and structure of
organic compounds, Hydrocarbons and their derivatives, Functional
groups, Carbonyl compounds, Conformation, Isomerism and
chirality, Polarity, Inductive effect and acidity in organic compounds,
Reaction mechanism in organic reactions and structure-reactivity
relationships, Macromolecules and polymers, Biologically important

CH211 Chemical Process Industries(3-0-3): Various well established


chemical manufacturing processes;Fertilizer manufacturing,
Insecticides production, Polymer formation, Soaps & detergents,
Sugar industry, Cement industry, Refineries, Biomass processing,
other chemical manufacturing units;Soda ash, Caustic soda,
Chlorine, Sulphuric acid, Water treatment plants, Fermentation
industries, Food processing industry, Tannery processing,Pulp &
paper and Basic pharmaceutical industries. Pre-requisite(s): CH101,
Ch201
CH212 Energy Engineering(3-0-3): Classification of Conventional
energy resources, Origin, characterization and taxonomy of available
fuels, Principles of combustion, Combustion of solid, liquid, and
gaseous fuels. Fluidized Bed. Combustion calculation; energy
requirements and combustion efficiency of Industrial Burners.
Boilers, Furnaces; fuel economy measures, excess air, heat
distribution, temperature control, draft control and Flame stability.
Fuel quality & combustion efficiency enhancement. Importance of
Alternate Energy Resources;Solar, Wind, Wave, Tidal, geothermal,
Nuclear and Hydel, Densification & calorific value up-gradation of
biomass, Carbonization and Gasification of biomass, Energy
generation from municipal waste, Development of fuel cells.
Environmental and global impact of energy resources, Industrial
fuels & selection criteria, Energy audit, conservation waste heat
recovery, Environmental and global impact of deplete resources of
energy.
CHE214 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-I (3-0-3):
Thermodynamic
systems and processes, Reversible and

108

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Irreversible Processes, The first law of thermodynamics, Energy


balance for open systems; Property relations relevant to
engineering thermodynamics, p-v-T relation, Ideal gas model,
Enthalpy and Specific heat of ideal gases, Conservation of mass
and energy in a control volume, Steady-state and Transient
forms of mass and energy rate balances, Second law of
thermodynamics, Entropy and Entropy balance for closed systems,
Isentropic efficiencies of turbines, Nozzles, Applications of
thermodynamics to flow processes, Nozzles, Turbines, Compressors,
Heat engines, Refrigeration, Air conditioning and Liquefaction of
gases.
CH241 Particle Technology(3-0-3): Characterization of particle and
particulate systems (Size Analysis); Processing (Granulation,
Fluidization); Particle Formation (Granulation, Size Reduction);
Storage and Transport (Hopper Design, Pneumatic Conveying,
Standpipes, Slurry Flow); Separation (Filtration, Settling, Cyclones);
Mixing and agitation; Safety (Fire and Explosion Hazards, Health
Hazards); Engineering the Properties of Particulate Systems
(Colloids, Respirable Drugs, Slurry Rheology).
CH261 Occupational Health & Safety (0-3-1): Foundation in Health
& Safety, Organizing for Health & Safety, Promoting a positive health
and safety culture, Risk Assessment & Control, Incident and Accident
Investigation; recording and reporting, Occupational Health &
Hygiene, Hazards & control; Movement of people and vehicles,
Manual & Mechanical Handling, Working Equipment, Chemical and
biological health, Physical and psychological, Construction activities,
Electrical Hazards and control, Fire Hazards & control.

Understanding the responsibilities, Respiratory & Personal


Protective Equipment and their usage, World Wide Major Accidents
Videos during lectures related to activities.
CH311 Heat Transfer (2-0-2): Basic concepts of thermal energy and
heat transfer mechanism, Importance and significance of Heat
Transfer in process/industry, Identification of mechanism and
modes of heat transfer, Distinguish heat transfer from other forms of
thermal sciences, Fundamental laws thermal conduction in onedimensional, Steady state and transient states, Development of heat
conduction differential equations for multi-dimensional and time
dependence, Composite structures in rectangular, Cylindrical and
Spherical coordinate systems, Practice Conductive Heat transfer
problems, Physical mechanism of convection and its classification,
Significance of dimensionless groups governing convection
mechanism, Formation and co-relation of velocity and thermal
boundary layers, Derive differential equations for various flow
conditions and type of fluid on the basis of mass, Momentum and
Energy balances, Analogies between momentum and heat transfer
to evaluate film coefficients using friction coefficients, Identification
of thermal radiation and related properties and terminologies,
Classification of electromagnetic waves/spectrum, basic laws of
radiation and numerical calculations, Consequence of atmospheric
and solar radiation on greenhouse effect, Combined impact of
convective and radiative heat transfer in extended surfaces and
industrial application, Introduction to boiling and condensation,
Types of boiling and condensation, Different boiling regimes
corresponding to different regions of boiling curves, Correlations to
calculate heat flux and other associated parameters.
CH313 Mass Transfer(3-0-3): Diffusion in Fluids Molecular and Eddy
diffusion in a gas and liquid, Steady state diffusion under stagnant
and laminar flow condition, Diffusion measurement and
calculations, Ordinary diffusion in multicomponent gaseous
mixtures, Diffusion in solids, Interface mass transfer, Theory of mass
transfer, Concept of mass transfer coefficient, Overall mass transfer
coefficient, Analogies between momentum and mass transfer
coefficients, Distillation Vapour Liquid equilibrium diagram,
Raoult's law derivations from ideality, Methods of distillation, Design
and calculation of binary distillation column,Absorption theories of
gas absorption, Design of absorption towers, Absorption with
chemical reaction, Concept of NTU and HTU, Adsorption IonExchange, Theories of adsorption of gases and liquids,Industrial
adsorbents, Adsorption equipment for batch and continuous
operation, Ion exchange,Principles, Applications and Equipment.

109

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Extraction Processes, Liquid-Liquid extraction, Leaching; General


principles, Factors influencing the rate of extraction, Mass transfer in
leaching operations. Pre-requisite(s): ChE214
CH321 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-II (3-0-3): Advanced
principles of thermodynamics focusing on phase equilibria, Maxwell
relationships, Gibbs Duheum's theorem, Thermodynamics of
separation processes, Two component systems, Liquid-vapor
equilibria, Ideal and nonideal solutions, Composition of vapor in
equilibrium with liquid, Fractional distillation, Azeotropes, mixing,
Liquid-solid equilibria, Eutectic compound formation, Solid
solutions, Thermodynamic analysis of power plants, Liquefaction &
refrigeration systems, Chemical equilibrium, Chemical exergy. Prerequisite(s): CH214
CH331 Chemical Engineering Principles-II (2-0-2): Concepts of
Energy balance, Balances with reaction; Mass and energy balances
for reacting systems, Balances for combustion processes,
Environmental balances. Sub-systems and interconnections,
Concept of integrated pollution control, Case studies on balances for
a selection of important industrial processes, Efficiency and
conversion, Standard states, Temperature dependence, Heat Effects,
Application of Computers in stoichiometric calculations,
Simultaneous mass and energy balances, Temperature and pressure
dependence, Balances for condensing systems, Dynamic balances,
Humidity charts and their use.
Pre-requisite(s): CH231
CH341 Fluid Mechanics-I (3-0-3): Concept, Properties and types of
fluids, Stress analysis of static fluids, Newton's Law of viscosity,
Introduction to non-Newtonian fluids. Estimation and measurement
of Pressure and Pressure gradient, Manometery, Buoyancy and
Stability, Basic physical Laws in Fluid Mechanics, Conservation of
Mass, Continuity equation, Linear Momentum, Angular Momentum
and Energy, The Bernoulli's Equation and its application,
Dimensional Analysis and Similitude, Viscous Flow in internal flows,
Concept of Laminar and turbulent flow, Concept of friction and
pressure drop in flowing fluids, Friction factor in laminar and
turbulent flows in pipes, Concept of equivalent diameter, Pipe sizing
problems, Flow measuring devices such as Bernoulli devices,
Variable area meters, Notches and Weirs. Concept of Boundary layer
and its importance in fluid mechanics, A brief introduction to
external flows.
CHE361 Environmental Engineering (0-3-1): Introduction to
environment and ecology, Pollution concept, types of pollution,

110

Environmental policy and standards, Environmental Monitoring (Air,


Water & Soil), Objectives of sampling and monitoring program,
Design and types of samples; Pre-sampling requirements/
information, Sampling and design purposes, Air pollution control
technologies, Water pollution control technologies, Water
treatment technologies, Soil pollution control technologies, Noise
pollution control technologies, Biotechnology for environment,
Industrial pollution control, Solid Waste management.
CH312 Heat Transfer Equipment Design (2-0-2): Industrial
applications of heat transfer, Recognition, categorization and
selection criteria of numerous heat transfer equipment, Heat
exchangers classification, types and detailed design with practice
sessions. Heat transfer with phase change, study and design
(according to International standards TEMA and IPS) of boilers,
Waste heat boilers, Evaporators, Condensers, Reboilers, Crystallizer,
Alternative sinks for waste heat, Design of equipment based on
worst case scenarios, Water and air based systems, Environmental
effects, Modern trends and latest developments/research
concerning augmented and efficient industrial heat transfer. Prerequisite(s): CH311
CH322 Reaction Kinetics and Reactor Design (3-0-3): Equilibrium
and effect of heat on reactions, Rate of reactions, Molecularity and
order of reaction, Reaction mechanism, Various chemical reaction
and their kinetic laws including multiple reaction, Elementary
reactions, Complex and multiple reactions, Uncatalyzed and
Catalyzed (both homogenous and heterogeneous) reactions,

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Thermodynamics dictating reversibility of the reaction, Analysis of


kinetic data, Evolution of rate of reaction, Empirical and mechanistic
models, Polymer reaction processes, Mass and energy balance in
reactors, Various types of reactors and their deriving equations
especially catalytic reactors, Kinetic rate laws incorporation in
reactors operation, Thermodynamics dictating adiabatic and nonadiabatic operations, Rate controlling steps and Quasi state
equilibriums.
Pre-requisite(s): CH201, CH321
CH342 Fluid Mechanics-II (2-0-2): Compressible flow and its
application in chemical engineering, concept of Isentropic, Adiabatic
and Isothermal flows. Motion of particle in a fluid and flow of fluid
through bed of solid particles. Fluidization and types of fluidized
beds and their use in chemical engineering, concept of
hydrodynamic characteristics of fluidized beds. Turbo-machinery
and its classifications. Centrifugal pumps and its characteristics;
NPSH and its application; concept of specific speed; similarity laws in
centrifugal pumps; pumps in series and parallel; Positive
displacement pumps, their classification, characteristics and
selection; matching system characteristics with pump
characteristics. Compressors, their classification, characteristics and
selection. Turbines, their classification and selection.
Pre-requisite(s): CH341
Ch411 Simultaneous Heat & Mass Transfer(3-0-3): Various industrial
distillations: Extractive distillation, Molecular distillation, Azeotropic
distillation, Steam distillation, Reactive distillation, Multicomponent
distillation. Degrees of freedom in separation specifications, Key

components in multicomponent mixtures and recovery fraction.


Continuous flash distillation with heat balancing, Equilibrium and
enthalpy expressions, Multi-stage distillation, Numerical examples
of multi-component separation problems, Side streams and partial
condensers, Column Design, Tray design, hydraulics and
performance, Batch distillation, operation at constant product
composition or constant reflux ratio, Calculation of column diameter
and height, Drying: Diffusion and Capillary theory of drying,
Classification and selection of dryers, solvent drying, Superheated
steam drying, Freeze drying, Flash drying, Partial-recycle dryers, The
drying of gases, Humidification and Cooling Towers, Crystallization,
Operation and equipment. Pre-requisite(s): CH321, CH312, CH313
CH415 Instrumentation & Process Control(3-0-3): Instrumentation:
instrument'sterminologies and performance, Flow sheet symbols
and P&I diagram, Basic components of a measuring instrument
,General static & dynamic characteristics of an instrument
,Standards, Calibration and reference accuracy of instruments, Types
of measurements, Sources & classification of measurement errors,
Types of instrument errors, Working principle and application of
process sensors for temperature, pressure, level, flow, composition
and moisture. Transducers and transmitters, Hardware for a process
control system, Control valves, types, Characteristics, Selection and
sizing, Sensors for process safety. Process Control: Modelling and
Analysis of Process Control, Transfer functions and their
determination using Laplace transform inpu toutput models,
Dynamic behaviour of first, Second and higher-order systems,
Introduction to feedback control, Concept of feedback control,
Types of feedback controllers, Black diagrams, Dynamic behaviour of

111

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

feedback-controlled process, Frequency response analysis, Stability


analysis of feedback systems, Selection criteria for type of feedback
controllers, Controller tuning, Cascade Control, Feed Forward
Control, Ratio Control, Split Range Control, Design of control system,
Process control simulation and computer control system.
CH453 Process Equipment Design and Specs.(0-3-1): Introduction,
Significance and scope of technical standards concerning design
and fabrication of miscellaneous equipment, Flow sheet synthesis
and development, Analysis and evolution of flow sheet, Material and
fabrication selection, Heuristics of process equipment design, A
comprehensive design practice, Selection and cost estimation of
material handling equipment; Pumps, Compressors, Agitators,
Mixers, Solids handling and transporting equipment, Heat and Mass
transfer equipment(Boilers, Heavy duty exchangers, cooling towers,
evaporators, distillation column, absorption and extraction
equipment).Design and performance evolution of reactors,
auxiliaries, utilities, and instrumentation. Other process equipment
designing; vessels (drums, tanks, pressure vessels). Air conditioning
and Refrigeration.
Pre-requisite(s): CH312,CH313,CH341
CH412 Transport Phenomena(3-0-3): Transfer processes; A review of
the mechanisms of momentum, Energy and mass transport,
Momentum transport; Derivation of equations of continuity and
motion (Navier-Stoke's equation) at molecular level, Equations of
change both for isothermal, Nonisothermal and multi component
systems, Velocity distribution, Application in laminar and turbulent
flow problems. Energy transport; Derivation of energy equation,
Mechanism of energy transport at molecular level, Temperature

112

distributions in flow, Application to heat transfer problems involving


conduction, Forced and free convection, Application in laminar and
turbulent flow problems. Mass transport: Derivation of species
conservation equations for binary and multicomponent mixtures,
Application to mass transfer problems with and without chemical
reaction, Application in laminar and turbulent flow problems. Prerequisite(s): CH341, CH411
CH441 Chemical Engineering Plant Design(3-0-3): Process design
and development. General design considerations, Health and
safety, HAZOP study, Contingency plans, Design codes & standards,
Economics and optimization, Materials selection for various services,
Fabrication of desired component to facilitate processes, Vessel
design; Low, medium and high pressure storage and transportation
vessels, Cryogenic vessels. Design of mass transfer equipment;
Material transport, Material handling. Heat transfer equipment
including furnaces and refrigeration units, Piping and pipeline
design, Basic Concepts of Optimization, Optimization of
Unconstrained Functions, Linear Programming Applications, NonLinear Programming with Constraints,and Application of computer
aided design, Engineering Ethics, Local, and Global Impact Analysis.
Pre-requisite(s): CH341, CH411, MS291
CH431 Process Modelling & Simulation (2-0-2): Finite difference and
theory of interpolation, Iterative methods, Taylor series, Newton
series, Approximation zeros (roots) numerical integration and
differentiation, Iterative methods for solution of linear systems,
Design value problems, Numerical solutions of ordinary differential
equations,MATLAB Primer; Introduction to MATLAB, Linear algebra
applications,Matrix calculations, Solution of linear equations, Eigen

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

value calculation, Plotting of various types of graphs using ezplot


and plot functions, Symbolic differentiation and solution of
differential equations, Calculation of integrals, Derivatives and
differential equations, Transfer function manipulation and study of
transient response of various first and second order systems,
Plotting Bode and Root Locus diagrams. Introduction to Simulink,
Simulation of a typical feedback control loops in Simulink. Hierarchy
of process design, Process synthesis and design strategy, Pinch
design method, Heat and power integration, Reactor network
design, Separation system selection and design, Design of heat
exchanger networks, Optimization, Introduction to various design
and simulation software, Development of process flow diagrams
for various process industries and de bottlenecking using simulation
software such as HYSYS/ASPEN, Economic evaluation of processes,
Strategies for decision making. Pre-requisite(s): CH322, CH341
CH371 Maintenance Engineering & Industrial Management (3-0-3):
Maintenance:Preventive, predictive, Break down and total
productive maintenance, Individual versus group replacement,
Internal versus external maintenance, Scheduling of maintenance,
computerized maintenance, organization of maintenance
force.Design considerations, Layout and construction, Maintenance
of rotary and stationery equipment, Inspection techniques, Nondestructive testing techniques, Basics of rigging and lifting,
Lubrication and lubricants, Industrial management, Process layout
analysis and comparison, Material handling considerations in layout,
Production planning methods,Material requirementplanning,
Material resource planning. Capacity planning and control;
Production control systems, Job shop scheduling, Quality Control,
Production control charts, Scheduling techniques,Software for
project management, Purchasing and procurement, Inventory
control, EOQ/EPQ models, Time and Motion study, Organizational
structure, Human resource management< Project management
principles, PERT/CPM, Total quality management, ISO standards,
Labour and engineering laws, Labour problems, Labour
organizations, Prevention andsettlement of disputes.
CH413 Food Technology (3-0-3): Application of bio- technology in
chemical Industry, Bio degradation, Bio mass productivity & activity,
Aerobic & anaerobic processes, Bio-chemical processes involved in
the production of food products, Beverages, Organic Acids,
Industrial solvents, Various pharmaceutical products and antibiotic
and commercial enzymes, Fermentation Industries: Industrial
alcohol, Biodiesel and industrial solvents, Waste treatment from
Food and pharmaceutical Industry, Bioremediation, Food
preservation, Health hazards, Hygiene and sanitation, Important

food industries in Pakistan and Food legislation.


Pre-requisite(s): CH211
CH414 Petroleum Refining Engineering (3-0-3): Introduction, Origin,
Formation & composition of petroleum, Indigenous and world
resources, Refinery products, Properties, Standard tests,
Characterization and evaluation of crude oil stocks, Crude pre
heating and preliminary treatment, Pipestill heaters, Desalting,
atmospheric and vacuum distillation, Steam stripping, Arrangement
of towers, Calculation of number of trays, Types of reflux employed,
Packie's approach, Processing plans, schemes and product patterns
of refineries, Modern separation, Conversion and treatment
processes, Thermal & catalytic cracking and reforming,
Hydrocracking, Auxiliary processes and operations, refinery
corrosion and metals,Blending plants, Product design and
marketing, Use of linear programming techniques to solve refinery
blending and production problems, Overview of petroleum act. Prerequisite(s): CH212
CH471 Industrial Waste Management (3-0-3): Environmental
Management ISO 14001, EMAS, Environmental auditing,
responsible Care, Environmental Policies & regulations, Different
types of ecolabelling, Material Recycling, mechanical, Biological &
chemical methods to treat liquid waste streams, Production of biogas, Anaerobic digestion and other stabilization methods,
Dewatering, Drying, treatment of solid waste including separation,
Incineration & composting and treatment of radioactive waste. Prerequisite(s): CH361
CH419 Water Treatment& Purification (3-0-3): Primary & secondary
treatment of the fresh feed water to the plant, Clarification,
Sedimentation, Flocculation &Coagulation, Filtration, ion exchange,
Membrane separation & reverse osmosis, Advance technologies,
Cooling water treatment, Use of biocides & shock dosage, bacterial
count and their importance, Treatment of sea water, Desalination,
Treatment of various waste waters and biological waste water
treatment.
Pre-requisite(s): CH361
CH420 Enzyme Technology (3-0-3): Basics of Microbiology, Enzyme
classification, Enzyme reaction kinetics (Single- substrate Reactions)
and energy patterns in biological system, Enzyme Inhibition, Nonideal enzyme kinetics, isolation of enzymes and immobilized enzyme
technology, Applications of enzyme catalysis (Biocatalysis),
Transport phenomenon in microbial system, Design and analysis of
biochemical reactors (fermentators), Anaerobic and aerobic

113

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

metabolism photosynthesis and bio-synthesis, Biochemical and


microbiological application to commercial and engineering. Prerequisite(s): CH322

Fabrication of fuel, Reprocessing of irradiated fuel, Fuel cycle


performance, In-core fuel management & fuel management
strategies and handling of nuclear waste. Pre-requisite(s): CH322

CH421 Statistical Thermodynamics (3-0-3): Boltzmann Hypothesis &


distribution, Entropy at statistical level, Partition function,
Degeneracy, Maxwell-Boltzmann & Fermi-Dirac distributions,
Effusion, Diffusion, Various types of solid defects, Surfaces and
interfaces, Transformations, Kinetics and non-equilibrium
thermodynamics. Pre-requisite(s): CH321

Laboratory Courses

CH422 Heterogeneous Catalysis (3-0-3): Introduction and basic


concepts, Adsorption, Rates and kinetic models of catalytic
reactions, Catalyst preparation and manufacture, Characterization of
physicochemical properties, Surface characterization, Supported
metal catalysts, Acid-base catalysts and zeolites, metal oxide
catalysts and catalytic oxidation, Examples of important
heterogeneous catalytic reactions.
Pre-requisite(s): CH322
CH442 Piping Design (3-0-3): Process plant layout & equipment, Oil
& gas pipeline design per ASME B31.4 / B 31.8, Piping stress analysis,
Process piping drafting, Liquid pipeline hydraulics, Fire safety piping
and use of various design software related to the field e.g. Piping
Systems Fluid Flow.
Pre-requisite(s): CH341
CH461 Environmental Impact Assessment (3-0-3): Principles and
purposes of IEE and EIA and its significance for the society, Cost and
benefits of EIA, Main stages in EIA process, Public consultation and
participation in EIA process, EIA methods and techniques for impact
prediction and evaluation.
Pre-requisite(s): CH361
CH417 Pharmaceutical Engineering (3-0-3): Engineering principles
to pharmaceutical and life sciences related to industries, Process
engineering in the drug discovery, High throughput characterization
and optimization of new chemical entities, Solid-state engineering
and intelligent pharmaceutical manufacturing systems.
Prerequisite(s): CH241
CH418 Nuclear Engineering (3-0-3): Role and importance of nuclear
energy, Nuclear reactors cross-sections, Reaction rates, Nuclear
fission and chain reaction, Critical conditions, Conversion and
breading, Reactor components and their characteristics,
Classification and design features, Production and power reactors,
Fast and fusion reactor systems, Fuel cycles, Uranium enrichment,

114

CH251L Chemical Lab I (0-3-1): Experiments related to the solid


handling in addition to size reduction & enlargement and
subsequent characterization Co-requisite(s): CH241
CH252L Chemical Lab II (0-3-1): Experiments related to fuel & its
properties and the quantitative analysis of water, milk and soap
samples. Co-requisite(s): CH211, CH212
CH351L Chemical Lab III (0-3-1): The experiments in this laboratory
are designed to demonstrate various phenomena of fluid flow &
environmental engineering. Co-requisite(s): CH341, CH361
CH352L Chemical Lab IV (0-3-1): The laboratories for this course are
equipped with heat & mass transfer experimental benches, along
with chemical reactors pilot versions. Co-requisite(s): CH312, CH322
CH451L Chemical Lab V (0-3-1): Experiments in this course will
demonstrate various characters of plant instruments and some
simultaneous heat & mass transfer phenomena like drying. Corequisite(s): CH411, CH415
CH452L Chemical Lab VI (0-3-1): Introduction of Aspen HYSYS and
MATLAB SIMULINK for chemical engineering process modeling and
simulation.
Co-requisite(s): CH431

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


Design and Manufacturing Engineering
Thermo Fluid Engineering
System Dynamics and Control

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Faculty
Javed A. Chattha, Ph.D (University of Birmingham, UK), Director (CEES)
Mykola Bannikov, Ph.D (USSR)
G. Hussain, Ph.D (Nanjing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics, Nanjing, China)
Khalid Rehman, Ph.D (Jeju National University South Korea)
Taqi Ahmad Cheema, Ph.D (Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea)
Sohail Malik, Ph.D (University of Politecnica Delle Marche, Ancona, Italy)
Massab Junaid, MS (KAUST, Saudi Arabia)
Babar Khan, MS (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
Ahmad Abbas, MS (GIK, Pakistan)
Mujahid Naseem, MS (GIKI, Pakistan)
Ayesha Khan, MS (GIK, Pakistan)
Shahbaz Mahmood Khan, MS (GIK, Pakistan)
Shoukat Alim Khan, MS (Politecnico di Torino, Italy)
Faculty on Study Leave for Ph.D
Arshad Khan
Shoaib Naseem
Shakeel Afzal
Engineers
Noman Iqbal, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Usman Javed, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Muhammad Tayyab, BSc, University of Lahore
Yasir Ali, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Iftikhar Ahmad, BSc (UET, Peshawar)
Ihtisham Ali, BSc (UET, Peshawar)
Nasib Akram, BS (GIK Institute, Pakistan)
Graduate Assistants
Muhammad Rizwan Siddiqui
Muhammad Abdul Ahad
Syed Ehtisham Gillani
Nayab Ghani
Muhammad Abbas
Shehryar Ishaque
Nouman Hanif
Shoukat Khan
Mohammad Shakeel
Mohammad Sohail Gohar

116

Dean
S. M. Ahmad
PhD, University of Sheffield,
UK, Chartered Engineer,
MIMechE

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

117

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


and the related fields of Manufacturing Systems Engineering
and Design, because of the impasse of Computer-Aided
Engineering and Information Technology. Traditional
boundaries have been surmounted as these new technologies
require multi-disciplinary skills. Courses in the above areas
must take a fresh approach and accept the challenge of
producing a new type of engineers, willing and able to keep
abreast of the advances that will come in the next few decades.
FME offers a 4-year Bachelors degree program in mechanical
engineering. As a cross-disciplinary program, it gives its
students a foundation of engineering principles and promotes
communication and practical skills that will be needed by
industry now and in the future. Furthermore, by emphasizing
engineering as a practical subject and using design as
teaching method, Faculty aims to establish a mode of thinking
which allows students, as engineers, to interact with the
developing technologies in an innovative and creative
manner.

118

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


Faculty Mission
The faculty is focused on achieving a high standard of
engineering education and research credentials and
producing graduates with sound mechanical engineering
knowledge base. The graduates would be well qualified to
work in industry, research and development/multinational
organizations or embark on their own engineering start-ups.
The faculty also aspires to attain leadership position in the
fields of thermal fluids, design and manufacturing, modeling
& simulation and system dynamics and controls through high
quality education and research. Above all to provide
conducive and intellectually stimulating environment for
cognitive learning that would enable graduates to keep
abreast of the technological advances in their chosen
specialization. Graduates are able to appreciate and execute
their social, environmental, ethical, moral and corporate
responsibilities.
Program Educational Objectives(PEOs)(NEEDS REVISION)
PEO_1. To produce practicing engineers who have sound
theoretical foundation and excellent practical capabilities in

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


the field of mechanical engineering.
PEO_2. To produce engineers equipped with sound knowledge of
problem solving techniques and usage of modern tools to solve
complex design problems in multidisciplinary fields of mechanical
engineering.
PEO_3. To produce engineers who not only can comprehend the
social, cultural, ethical, environmental and contemporary aspects
of their work but also who can have good leadership skills and can
work collaboratively and effectively in a team.
PEO_4. To produce graduates with specialization in Thermal Fluid
Engineering, Design & Manufacturing, Modeling & Simulation
and Systems Dynamics & Control Engineering, who can keep
themselves abreast with the technological advances in their
chosen domain through on the job training.
Program Learning Objectives (PLO's)
i.
Engineering Knowledge: Students shall have an ability
to apply knowledge of mathematical science and solve
fundamental to complex mechanical engineering
problems.
ii. Problem Analysis: Students shall have an ability to
identify, formulate and solve practical/complex
engineering problems.
iii. Design/Development of Solutions: Students shall
have an ability to design components, processes and
systems to meet the desired needs.
iv. Investigation: Students shall have an ability to conduct
engineering experiments to study different engineering
systems, including various modes of operation,
performance evaluation, properties of materials and
manufacturing techniques, as well as to use laboratory
instruments and computers to analyze and interpret
data.
v. Modern Tool Usage: Students shall have an ability to
use modern tools, techniques, and skills necessary for
practicing mechanical engineering including
computational tools, statistical techniques, and

vi.

instrumentation.
The Engineer and Society: Students shall have an ability
to work in a professional engineering environment, and
to understand the associated economical and
societal needs.

vii. Environment and Sustainability: Students should


understand the environmental impact of the solution
and its sustainable improvement.
viii. Ethics: Students shall have an understanding of the
professional and ethical responsibilities of engineers.
ix. Individual and Team work: Students shall have an
ability to work effectively in teams including
multidisciplinary teams to solve engineering
problems relevant to their field.
x. Communication: Students shall have an ability to
communicate effectively in written, oral, and graphical
forms, including the use of professional quality visual

119

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

aids.
Project Management: Students shall have
managerial skills and shall learn how to lead a
team to run different projects.
xii. Lifelong Learning: Students shall have
recognition of the need and an ability to engage
in lifelong learning of engineering.
xi.

120

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

A student majoring in Mechanical Engineering must complete the


following courses:
CH
Course Titles
Course Code
a) General Education Requirements (55 Credit Hours)
Computer Science and Engg
Humanities

GIKI was a dream before I came to it. Reality


is a great experience, may it be education,
environment or extra- curricular activities.
The competitive atmosphere, pressured
environment, and sound mentorship brought my
potentials to the best and help me thrive. Today I
see myself on the way to be a capable mechanical
engineer with deeper interest further in the field.
Long live GIKI.
HUNSA HASHIM
3rd Year

CS101, CS101L,CS102L, CS342


HM101, HM102, HM211
HM321, HM322
Basic Engineering Courses
MM101, MM141, MM102
Me101, ME102, MS291
Mathematics
MT101, MT102, MT201, ME201
Sciences
PH101, PH101L, PH102, PH102L
(b) Core Requirements (65 Credit Hours)
Electronics Courses
EE211/221, EE231/222
EE211L/221L, EE231L/222L
Mechanics (Statics, Dynamics)
ME211, ME212
Mechanics of Solids, Stress Analysis
ME213, ME416
Thermodynamics
ME231, ME332
Fluid Mechanics
ME321, ME422
Theory of Machines
ME313
Heat Transfer
ME333
Engineering Design, Machine Design
ME361, ME362
Manufacturing Technology
ME351, ME352
Mechanical Vibrations
ME417
Design Project
ME481, ME482
Mechanical Engg. Lab. Courses
ME241,ME242, ME343
ME344, ME445

7
15
13
12
8
8
6
6
6
6
3
3
6
6
3
6
6

(c) Technical Electives (9 Credit Hours)


Design and Manufacturing Engineering
CAD/CAM
Introduction to Automobile Engg.
Introduction to Finite Element Methods

ME418
ME465
ME466

3
3
3

Thermo Fluid Engineering


Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
Gas Dynamics
Combustion

121

ME423
ME424
ME434

3
3
3

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Course Titles

Course Code CH

Refrigeration & Air-Conditioning


Power Plants
Gas Turbines
I.C. Engines
Energy Management & Conservation

A gathering of students from diverse cultural


background coupled with a stimulating environment
is what makes GIKI the finest learning grounds
within the country. Living so far from home makes
one feel imprisoned but the shoulders of strangers,
soon turns into life-long friends, makes life in GIKI
a unique experience. The Faculty of Mechanical
Engineering lives up to its reputation as GIKI's best
with extensive practical and theoretical knowledge
provide platform that keep the students occupied
throughout the year. Extra-curricular activities
organised by the student body is another exceptional
quality of GIKI that cannot be matched by any
other university in Pakistan.
GIKI teaches us how to live our lives while
surviving at our highest potential. Memories of
friends, birthday surprises and all-nighters will
all be cherished as I strive on for more.
BURHAN SHABIR
3rd Year

122

System Dynamics and Control Engineering


Robotics
System Dynamics & Control
Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
Introduction to Finite Element Methods

ME439
ME471
ME473
ME474
ME475
ME452
ME464
ME423
ME466

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

(d) Management Electives (6 Credit Hours).


Operation Management
Industrial Safety
Total Quality Management
Maintenance Management
Project Management

MS492
MS493
MS494
MS495
MS496

3
3
3
3
3

(e) Summer Internship (Pass/Fail grade; NIL Credit).


Every student is required to participate in a Compulsory training programme
during the summer of Junior Year and submit a formal written report.

(f) Total Requirements (135 Credit Hours).


For the B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering, a student has to complete
135 credit hours.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

1st SEMESTER
No.

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

MT101
PH101
CS101
HM101
MM101
PH101L
CS101L
ME101

Calculus I
Mechanics
Introduction to Computing
English and Study Skills
Industrial Chemistry
Mechanics Lab
Computing Lab
Workshop Practice

MT102
CS102L
PH102
HM102
MM102
ME102
PH102L
MM141

Calculus II
Intensive Programming Lab
Electricity & Magnetism
Technical Report Writing
Introduction to Engg Materials
Engineering Graphics
Electricity & Magnetism Lab
Materials Lab I

MT201
HM211
EE211/221
EE211L/221L
ME211
ME231
ME241

Differential Equations
Pak. & Islamic Studies
Circuit Analysis I/Logic Design
Circuit Analysis I Lab/Logic Design Lab
Statics
Thermodynamics I
Mechanical Eng. Lab. I

ES202
EE231/222
EE231L/222L
ME212
ME213
MS291
ME242

Engineering Statistics
Electronics/Computer Architecture
Electronics Lab /Computer Architecture Lab
Dynamics
Mechanics of Solids
Engineering Economy
Mechanical Eng. Lab.II

Lab. Hrs

CH

3
3
2
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
3
2
3
3
1
1
1

3
0
3
3
3
1
0
0

0
3
0
0
0
3
3
3

3
1
3
3
3
2
1
1

3
3
3
0
3
3
1

0
0
0
3
0
0
3

3
3
3
1
3
3
2

3
3
0
3
3
3
0

0
0
3
0
0
0
3

3
3
1
3
3
3
1

2nd SEMESTER

3rd SEMESTER

4th SEMESTER

123

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

5th SEMESTER
No.

Course Titles

Lec. Hrs

ME351
HM321
ME321
ME332
ME361
ES341/CS442
ME343

Manufacturing Tech I
Sociology and Human Behaviour
Fluid Mechanics I
Thermodynamics II
Design of Machine Elements
Numerical Analysis I
Mechanical Eng. Lab III

Lab. Hrs

CH

3
3
3
3
3
3
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
1

3
3
3
3
3
0

0
0
0
0
0
3

3
3
3
3
3
1

3
3
3
3
0
0

0
0
0
0
9
3

3
3
3
3
3
1

3
3
3
3
0

0
0
0
0
9

3
3
3
3
3

6th SEMESTER
HM322
ME333
ME313
ME352
ME362
ME344

Ethical and Legal Dimensions of Engineering


Heat Transfer
Theory of Machines
Manufacturing Technology II
Mechanical Eng. Design
Mechanical Eng. Lab IV

MM/MS49X
ME4XX
ME416
ME422
ME481
ME445

General Management Elective


Tech. Elective I
Stress Analysis
Fluid Mechanics II
Design Project
Mechanical Eng. Lab V

MM/MS49X
ME417
ME4XX
ME4XX
ME482

General Management Elective


Mechanical Vibration
Technical Elective II
Technical Elective III
Design Project

7th SEMESTER

8th SEMESTER

124

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Course Description
ME101 Engineering Shop Practice (0-3-1): Principles and
practice of machine tools of the mechanical engineering metal
shop. Measurements, Filing and Fitting; Drilling; Welding; Bench
work, Grinding and sheet metal operations are covered.
Conventional turning and milling operations are included.

ME212 Dynamics (3-0-3): Fundamentals of dynamics.


Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies, Newton's second law of
motion, Dynamics of particles, System of particles and rigid
bodies, Methods of energy and momentum, Vibrations.
Pre-requisite(s): ME211.

ME102 Engineering Graphics (1-3-2): Role of graphics in


engineering, Introduction to geometric and solid modeling,
Viewing computerspace, Drawing 2-D lines, Changing Line
types, Changing text, Drawing 2-D primitives, Editing 2-D
primitives, 2-D transformations, Tangency construction, Threepointcircle, conic sections, Splines, Curved lines, Loading solid
model, Changing 3-D viewpoint, Hidden line removal, Shading
solid model, Color hardcopy, 3-D primitives, Unary operations,
Boolean operations, 3-D Transformations, Extrusion operations,
Revolution Operations, 3-D Editing operations, Changing
primitives, Redesigning the model, Mass properties of a solid
model, Multi view layout of a model, Editing visible profile lines,
Generating a drawing, Cut section operations, Sectioning
conventions, Generating section drawing, Dimensioning
conventions, Generating dimensioned Engineering drawing.

ME213 Mechanics of Solids (3-0-3): Concepts: Normal and


shear stress, Strain, Material, Factor of safety, Stress
concentration. Pressurised thin-walled cylinder, Simple loading
tension, Torsion and bending, Deflection with simple loading,
Superposition techniques, Statically indeterminate member,
Thermal stresses, Combined stresses, Mohar circle, Combined
loading, Buckling, Energy method.
Pre-requisite(s): ME211

ME201 Engineering Statistics and Measurement (3-0-3):


Measurement, Uncertainty and errors in measurement,
Propagation of errors, Systematic Vs Random Error; Data
collection and analysis, Frequency distribution and histograms;
Graphical representation; Descriptive statistical measures of
central tendency, Standard deviation; Probability, Probability
distribution and special probability distributions; Curve fitting,
Regression and Correlation.
Pre-requisite: Mt102

ME231 Thermodynamics-I (3-0-3): Basic concepts and


definitions, Properties of a pure substance, Equation of state,
Work and Heat, First law of Thermodynamics, Internal energy
and enthalpy, Second law of Thermodynamics, Carnot cycle,
Entropy, Irreversibility and availability.
Pre-requisite(s): Mt101.
ME313 Theory of Machines (3-0-3): Linkages: Fundamentals;

ME211 Statics (3-0-3): Idealization and principles of


mechanics, Important vector quantities, Classification and
equivalence of Force systems, State of equilibrium, Elements of
Structures; Trusses, Beams, Cables and chains, Friction, Elements
of statics of fluids, Variation methods: Principle of virtual work
and minimum potential energy.
Pre-requisite(s): Ph101.

125

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Synthesis & Analysis; Position, Velocity and Acceleration
Analysis; Cams; Gear Trains; Machine Dynamics: Introduction,
Dynamic analysis, Balancing, Engine balancing, Flywheel.
Pre-requisite(s): ME212
ME321 Fluid Mechanics I (3-0-3): Basic concepts and
definition. Fluid statics. Elementary fluid dynamics; Bernoulli
equation. Fluid kinematics. Conservation of mass and energy
and Newton's second law of motion applied to finite control
volume. Dimensional analysis, similitude and modelling. Viscous
flow in pipes; general characteristics, fully developed laminar
and turbulent flows, losses, Moody chart.
Pre-requisite(s): MT 101, ME 212
ME332 Thermodynamics II (3-0-3): Vapour power and
refrigeration cycles. Air standard power and refrigeration cycles.
Thermodynamic relations. Ideal gas mixtures. Gas and vapour
mixtures. Chemical reactions. Chemical equilibrium.
Pre-requisite(s): ME231.
ME333 Heat Transfer (3-0-3): Heat conduction in solids,
Steady and transient states, Finned surfaces. Heat and
momentum transfer associated with laminar and turbulent flow
of fluids in forced and free convection. Mass transfer in
stationary systems. Mass transfer associated with laminar and

126

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


turbulent flows. Condensation. Boiling. Heat exchanger design.
Radiative heat transfer.
Pre-requisite(s): ME231, ME321.
ME351 Manufacturing Technology-I (3-0-3): Introduction to
manufacturing processes; Plastic deformation; Metal forming
processes: Forging, Rolling, Extrusion, Drawing, Sheet metal
forming; Temperature and strain-rate effect, Friction and
lubrication effect; Approximate methods of analysis; Tooling;
Heat Treatment; Quality inspection and measurement;
Computer Numerical Control of machine tools, Flexible
Manufacturing System.
Pre-requisite(s): ME102, ME213
ME352 Manufacturing Technology-II (3-0-3): Introduction;
Metal Cutting processes; Mechanics, Cutting forces, Heat
generation, Turning, Drilling, Boring, Milling, Shaping, Planing,
Sawing & Broaching, Tool designing; Metal joining Methods:
Metallurgical and Mechanical Quality Inspection and
Measurement, Clean production..
Pre-requisite(s): ME351.
ME361 Design of Machine Element (3-0-3): Design principles
and methodology, Standardisation. Design of shafts and joints;
fasteners and connectors; springs; bearings; gears; clutches and

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


brakes; power transmission components.
Pre-requisite (s): ME101, ME213
ME362 Mechanical Engineering Design (3-0-3): Philosophy
and concept of engineering design. Engineering creativity.
Phases and procedures in design. Management of engineering
projects. Computer aided design (CAD). Case studies in design
with emphasis on system modelling, optimisation and reliability.
Application of industrial design codes.
Pre-requisite(s): ME361.
ME416 Stress Analysis (3-0-3): Analysis of stress and strain in
two and three dimensions. Equilibrium, Compatibility and strain
relations. Analysis of torsion. Saint-Venant's theory. Thick walled
cylinders, Thin shells. Rotating disks and flat plates. Symmetrical
and asymmetrical loading, Secondary stresses, Energy theorems.
Statically indeterminate problems.
Pre-requisite(s): ME212, ME213.
ME417 Mechanical Vibrations (3-0-3): Free vibration; Viscously
damped free vibration; Harmonically excited vibration; Rotating
unbalance, vibration isolation, vibration measuring elements;
Transient vibration, Multi-degree of freedom systems; Vibration
absorbers, Vibration of continuous systems; Approximate
methods; Rayleigh method, Dunkerly's equation, matrix iteration,
Holzer method.
Pre-requisite(s): MT201, ME212.
ME418 CAD/CAM (2-3-3): Introduction and history. Geometric
modelling; Feature based design. CAD hardware and software; 2D
and 3D graphics and transformations; assembly modelling;
analysis. Concurrent engineering; axiomatic design; DFM; DFA;
Taguchi method; group technology; value engineering; CE tools.
Process Planning; manual, variant, generative and hybrid
approaches; tolerance charts. Manufacturing Planning and
Control. Cellular and JIT manufacturing; MRP II. Numerical
Control; NC programming; CNC; DNC. Robotics. ComputerIntegrated Manufacturing.
Pre-requisite(s): ME101, CSE101.
ME422 Fluid Mechanics II (3-0-3): Fluid element kinematics.
Differential forms of continuity equation and equations of
motion. Euler and Navier-Stokes equations and their methods of
solution. Flow over immersed bodies; boundary layer, drag and

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


lift. Introduction to gas dynamics; one-dimensional isentropic
flow of ideal gas. Introduction to turbomachines; basic energy
and angular momentum considerations. Centrifugal pumps,
system characteristics and pump selection. Impulse and reaction
turbines. Affinity laws of pumps and turbines.
Pre-requisite(s): ME 321
ME423 Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (3-03): Types of partial differential equations; Boundary and initial
value problems; Control volume approach; Time stepping;
Accuracy; Stability; Consistency; Linearization; Diffusion,
dispersion, vorticity stream function and primitive variable
formulations. Turbulence modeling. Examples from internal and
external flows, and heat transfer.
Pre-requisite(s): ME333, ME422.
ME424 Gas Dynamics (3-0-3): Flow of compressible fluids; Onedimensional flows including basic concepts; Isentropic flow;
Normal and oblique shock waves; Rayleigh line; Famno flow and
simple waves; Multidimensional flows; Small perturbation theory
for linearized flow; Method of characteristics for nonlinear flows.
Pre-requisite(s): ME322, ME321
ME434 Combustion (3-0-3): Combusion thermodynamics;
Chemical kinetics; reaction rate; Explosion in gases; Detonation;
Laminar and turbulent flames in pre-mixed gases; Diffusion
flames; Liquid droplet combustion; Theory of thermal ignition;
Combustion of particles; Propellant and rocket
propulsion.
Pre-requisite(s): ME332,ME333
ME439 Refrigeration & Air-conditioning (3-0-3):
Psychrometric; Principles and design of air-conditioning
equipment and ducts; Consideration of human comfort in
heating and cooling; Heating and cooling calculations and
design; Principles of refrigeration; Cycles; Refrigerants;
Absorption refrigeration; Multi-pressure systems.
Pre-requisite(s): ME332, ME333
ME452 Robotics (3-0-3): An overview of Robotics; Forward
kinematics; Inverse kinematics; Denavit-Hartenberg coordinate
transformations; Motion kinetics; Force/torque relations;
Trajectory planning, Lagrange equations; Position control; PID
control; Inverse dynamics feed forward control; Nonlinear

127

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

control.
Pre-requisite(s): ME212, ME313

testing characteristics of different types of engines.


Pre-requisite(s): ME321, ME332

ME464 System Dynamics and Control (3-0-3): Introduction to


control systems; Mathematical models of systems; Laplace
transformation, transfer function, block diagrams; Feedback
control system characteristics; Performance of feedback control
system; Test input signals; The stability of linear feedback
systems; Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion; The root Locus
method, Frequency response method; classical control design.
Pre-requisite(s): MT201.

ME475 Energy Management & Conservation (3-0-3): Energy


and Environment, Fuels and Materials, Energy Auditing and
Surveying, Energy Consumption in Manufacturing, Heat
Transfer, Heat Balance and Energy Flow Charts, Heat Recovery,
Energy Technologies, Instrumentation and Measurements,
Sustained Reductions in Energy Use, Economics. Waste Heat
Recovery.

ME465 Introduction to Automobile Engineering (3-0-3):


Introduction, Layout and components; Power generation
(Engine, Engine Systems and Testing), Transmission, Wheel and
Tyre, Chassis frame and body, Suspension system, Control
systems (Steering, Brake); Vehicle design (Performance, Axle
loading, Chassis design, Vehicle mechanics); Ergonomics,
Legislation, Automobile Industry in Pakistan.
Me466 Introduction To Finite Element Methods (2-3-3)::
Introduction; Stress Analysis by FEM; energy, variational
principles and Ritz method; Co-ordinate transformation;
Isoparametric Formulation; Solution of Eigen value, boundary
value, discretized time dependant problems.
ME471 Power Plants (3-0-3): Energy and Environment, Gas
Power Plants, Hydroelectric Power Plants, Vapour Power Plants,
Nuclear Reactors, Fuels, Combustion, Turbines, Compressors,
Pumps, Boilers, Exhaust Analysis, Renewable Energy Resources
(Geothermal, Wind, Biomass, Solar, etc.), Waste Water
Treatment, Environmental Impacts, Feasibility, Cost Analysis.
Pre-requisites: ME321, ME332, Me333
ME473 Gas Turbines (3-0-3): Thermodynamic analysis and
analytical design of gas turbine engines; Topics in combustion,
internal compressible flow, Boundary layer, Thrust
determination for ramjets and turbojets, Axial and centrifugal
compressor, Axial and centripetal turbines.
Pre-requisite(s): ME321, ME332
ME474 Internal Combustion Engines (3-0-3): Fundamentals
of internal combustion engines. Study of fluid flow,
Thermodynamics, Combustion, Heat transfer, friction
phenomenon, and fuel properties relevant to engine power,
efficiency and emissions. Examination of design features and

128

Lab Courses
ME241 Mechanical Engineering Lab-I (1-3-2): Principles of
Engineering Measurements. Experiments related to principles of
Statics and Metrology.
Pre-requisite(s): ME102, Co-requisite(s): ME211
ME242 Mechanical Engineering Lab-II (0-3-1): Experiments
related to Dynamics and Mechanics of Solids.
Co-requisite(s): ME 212, ME 213
ME343 Mechanical Engineering Lab III (0-3-1): Laboratory
experiments related to Thermodynamics, and Fluid Mechanics.
Co-requisite(s): ME321 and ME332
ME344 Mechanical Engineering Lab-IV (0-3-1): Laboratory
experiments related to Heat Transfer and Machine Design.
Pre-requisite(s): ME361 and Co-requisite(s): ME333
ME445 Mechanical Engineering Lab-V (0-3-1): Laboratory
experiments related to Design, Manufacturing and Vibration.
Pre-requisite(s): ME332, ME333,ME 212
Co-requisite(s): ME422

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCES


Supply Chain Management
Entrepreneurship

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Head of Department
Dr. Wasim A. Khan
Ph.D, CEng, FIMechE

Faculty Members
Noor Muhammad, PhD (University of Huddersfield, UK)
Muhammad Sabir, PhD (Vrije Universitiet Amsterdam, the
Netherlands)
Cedric Aimal Edwin, PhD (University of Liverpool, UK)
Ali Gohar, PhD (Hefei University of Technology, People
Republic of China)
Sadaf Javed, LLM (University of Nottingham, UK)
Abrar Ahmed, M. Phil (IIU, Islamabad)
Senior Research Officer
Mr. Waqar Ahmed Khan, M.A. (IIU, Islamabad)
Research Officers
Mr. Bakhat Rehman, M.A. (IIU, Islamabad)
Ms. Sabahat Orakazi, M.S. (COMSATS, Abbottabad)
Ms. Saadia Ayaz Khan, M.S (UET, Taxilla)
Mr. Abrar Ahmed, M.Phil (IIU, Islamabad)
Mr. Shahzeb Fayyaz, MBA (IMS, Peshawar)
Mr. Muhammad Abdullah Khalid, B.E (NED University)
Graduate Assistant
Ms. Mamoona
Graduate Students
Mr. Muhammad Aamir Zeb
Mr. Saifullah
Ms Mamoona
P.S to Head of Department
Mr. Hamid-ur-Rehman

130

Department of Management Sciences

No organization is immune from changes in the world economy.


Embracing evolving technologies, leadership models and
appreciating the unique ways in which an organization can use
all the global resources available to it is one way for companies
and individuals to remain successful. The Bachelors in
Management Sciences Program will focus on exploring
business models from a societal and economic perspective, with
particular emphasis on national, regional and international
Supply Chain Management systems, and innovative
entrepreneurial models in order to enable students to become
pioneering icons in the corporate world. With so much attention
being given to environmental concerns by world leaders and
industry giants, another niche of this program will be teaching
students recent developments and discussions about
sustainability in a long-term business context, especially for
South Asia and Pakistan specifically.
This unique Program in Management Sciences at the
Department of Management Sciences, Ghulam Ishaq Khan (GIK)
Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology would offer
students a once in a lifetime experience focused on
interdisciplinary study, experiential learning and unforgettable
co-curricula skills. Combining a solid academic foundation in
management with multiple courses in the development of
leadership and interpersonal skills in cross cultural contexts will
ensure that students become successful in adapting both
personally and professionally to changes in the global economy.
Our Program stands apart from those offered by other local
universities because of the combination of courses focusing on
business leadership and sustainability with a technology
perspective. The students will excel at making economic,
societal, ecological and legal decisions from a managerial
perspective once they join the workforce.
Aspects of the Program that students will value include:

Extensive contact with lecturers

Intellectual environment

Case Methodology

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Individual attention
Executive grooming

Program's Educational Objectives


The objectives of the Program are as follows:
1. To provide state of the art knowledge and understanding of
management with specialization in Supply Chain
Management and Entrepreneurship.
2.

To facilitate and promote educational experience that


enhances students' intellectual development and
professional capabilities.

3.

To provide lifelong learning skills and augment awareness


of the merits and complexities of management.

4.

To inculcate an appreciation of the association between


theory and practice.

5.

To apprise students of creative, bold ideas in the art of


entrepreneurship.

Program Outcomes
1.

In-depth understanding of Supply Chain Management and


Entrepreneurship and how to lead and adapt in these
contexts.

2.

Gained skills in all the functional areas of Entrepreneurship


and Supply Chain Management.

3.

Ability to think holistically and provide analysis from a


culturally diverse perspective.

4.

Demonstrated ability in analyzing and formulating


strategies that enable companies to have competitive edge.

5.

Enhanced leadership and managerial confidence which will

inform and enable future success.


HEC Accreditation
The Program proposal has been approved by NBEAC for
accreditation.
Innovative Features
The innovative features of the Program include both academic
and experiential aspects. Academically, the Program has a
business development component and a number of specially
designed courses emphasizing the role of technology and
environment. The high-level curricular programming and the

Department of Management Sciences


experiential learning embedded in the Program are particularly
strong and also unique in the context of undergraduate
management education in Pakistan. No other Program provides
such an emphasis on innovation, sustainability and
entrepreneurship, while simultaneously maintaining a
quantitative and analytical focus.
Degree Nomenclature
a) The Undergraduate Program in Management Sciences is of 4years duration, spread over 8 regular semesters, and consisting
of 135 credit hours after completing twelve years of higher
secondary school certificate or equivalent.
b) The BS (Management Sciences) degree would require
successful completion of a minimum of 42 courses (3 or 2 cr. hr.
each) picked from the following streams. It specifies the
minimum and maximum range in each category. The course
titles are suggestive and not mandatory.
c) Summer internship: Every student is required to participate in
a compulsory internship/training program during the summer
of junior year and submit a formal written report.
Mode of Delivery
The courses will be delivered in the format normal to all GIK
undergraduate courses. That is, typically, courses will be taught
in small lecture sections permitting active involvement of
students. Many of the courses will require group assignments
and group work. In a number of courses the cases will be used to
complement normal teaching by topics. That is, students will be
presented with cases in advance of the classes, and these cases
will integrate what they have learned both in the course in
question and in other courses. Students will come to class
prepared to discuss the cases. Alumni and guest speakers will be
invited to lectures to add relevance and real life application to
our courses. Some courses will provide students with the
experience of actively engaging in situations that are simulated
to reflect a variety of different work cultures. The simulations will
require the students to incorporate theoretical knowledge
gained in their current course and from other courses in the

Program.

131

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


General Education Requirements (33 Credit Hours)
Course Title

Department of Management Sciences

Course Code

CH

English Language & Communication Skills

HM101

Business and Technical writing

HM102

Islamic Studies

HM111

Pakistan Studies

HM 112

Business Communication

HM 203

Technology & Society

HM 212

Intro to Sociology

HM121

Corporate Law

MS261

Business Ethics

MS111

Introduction to Environmental Science

MS271

Introduction to Computing

CS101

Core Requirements (75 Credit Hours)


Course Title
Business Mathematics
Business Statistics
Fundamentals of Management
Principles of Marketing
Micro Economics
Human Resource Management
Business Research Methods
Business Policy
Marketing Management
Macro Economics
Financial Accounting I & II
Technology Management
Production Management
Organizational Behavior
Strategic Management
New Product Development
Issues in Global Economy
Financial Management
Entrepreneurship
Supply Chain Management
Operations Management
Project Management
Management Information System (MIS & DSS)
Final Project

132

Course Code
MS101
MS102
MS121
MS131
MS141
MS222
MS223
MS224
MS232
MS242
MS251/MS252
MS325/MM494
MS326
Ms327
MS328
MS329
MS343
MS344
MS381
MS391/MM 496
MS421/MS492
MS422
CS435
MS489

CH
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Department of Management Sciences

Specialization Requirements (21 Credit Hours)


1)Entrepreneurship
Course Title

Course Code

CH

International Strategic Partnerships

MS483

Entrepreneurial Finance

MS484

Small and Medium Enterprises

MS382

Business Plan for New Ventures

MS486

Innovation and Emerging Technology


Global Entrepreneurship

MS487
MS485

3
3

Legal and Taxation Issues

MS488

Course Title

Course Code

CH

Planning and Control Systems

MS391

Global Supply Chain Management

MS492

Procurement Management

MS493

Business Logistics Strategy

MS494

Green Supply Chain Management

MS495

Modern Technologies for Supply Chain Management

MS496

Lean and Six Sigma Quality Management

MS497

1)Supply Chain Management (21 Credit Hours)

Elective (06 Credit Hours)


Course Title

Course Code

CH

Corporate Social Responsibility

MS423

Business and Economic Forecasting

MS424

Business Process Design and Analysis

Ms425

Consumer Behavior

MS433

Financial Econometrics

MS445

Industrial Economy

MS446

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Department of Management Sciences

First Semester
Course Title

Course Code

CH

English Language and Communication Skills

HM101

Intro to Sociology

HM321

Islamic Studies

HM111

Introduction to Computing

CS101

Fundamentals of Management

MS121

Business Mathematics

MS101

Course Title

Course Code

CH

Business and Technical Writing

HM102

Pakistan Studies

HM 112

Business Ethics

MS111

Business Statistics

MS102

Principles of Marketing

MS131

Micro Economics

MS141

Second Semester

Third Semester
Course Title

Course Code

CH

Introduction to Environmental Science

MS271

Business Communication

HM 203

Financial Accounting I

MS251

Macro Economics

MS242

Human Resource Management

MS222

Marketing Management

MS232

Course Code
MS261
HM 212
(MIS & DSS) CS 435
MS252
MS223
MS224

CH
3
3
3
3
3
3

Fourth Semester
Course Title
Corporate Law
Technology and Society
Management Information System
Financial Accounting II
Business Research Methods
Business Policy

134

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Department of Management Sciences

Fifth Semester
Course Title
Issues in Global Economy
Financial Management
Technology Management
Entrepreneurship
Supply Chain Management

Course Code
MS343
MS344
MS325/MM494
MS381
MS391/MM 496

CH
3
3
3
3
3

Specialization in Entrepreneurship
Sixth Semester
Course Title

Course Code

CH

Production Management

MS326

Organizational Behavior

MS327

Strategic Management

MS328

New Product Development

MS329

Small and Medium Enterprises

MS382

Seventh Semester
Course Title

Course Code

CH

Operations Management

MS421/MS492

International Strategic Partnerships

MS483

Entrepreneurial Finance

MS484

Global Entrepreneurship

MS485

Elective Management Course I

MS4XX

Senior Year Project I

MS488

Eighth Semester
Course Title

Course Code

CH

Project Management

MS422/MS496

Business Plan for New Ventures

MS486

Innovation and Emerging Technology

MS487

Legal and Taxation Issues

MS488

Elective Management Course II

MS4XX

Senior Year Project II

MS489

135

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Department of Management Sciences

Specialization in Supply Chain Management


Sixth Semester
Course Title
Production Management
Organizational Behavior
Strategic Management
New Product Development
Planning and Control Systems

Course Code
MS326
MS327
MS328
MS329
MS391

CH
3
3
3
3
3

Course Code

CH

Seventh Semester
Course Title
Operations Management

MS421/MS492

Global Supply Chain Management

MS492

Procurement Management

MS493

Business Logistics Strategy

MS494

Elective Management Course I

MS4XX

Eighth Semester
Course Title

Course Code

CH

Project Management

MS422

Green Supply Chain Management

MS495

Modern Technologies for Supply Chain Management

MS496

Lean Six Sigma Quality Management

MS497

Elective Management Course II

MS4XX

Senior year Project II

MS489

Total Requirements (135 Credit Hours)


For the award of BS in Management Sciences along with the options taken from specializations a student has to complete 135 credit hours.

Introduction: Minors in Management for Engineers


Globalization has brought new challenges of sustainability,
health, environmental protection and a new breed of managers is
required by companies and organizations. Ghulam Ishaq Khan
Institute of Engineering and Technology offers Minors in
Management geared towards helping engineers/technologists
develop planning, decision making and managerial skills while
receiving advanced technical knowledge. It is intended to
prepare graduates with the management skills needed to provide
engineering leadership in today's multi-disciplinary business
environment. The primary focus of the program is on
management and the application of business skills to
engineering leadership situations. The Management Sciences

136

outlook and approach is interdisciplinary within the variety of


engineering pursuits.
Educational Objectives
The courses have been specifically designed to:
1. Prepare managers and leaders for engineering and industrial
organizations by exposing students to modern concepts of
economics, production sciences, and enable them to
manage important human as well as financial resources
within the enterprises.
2. Familiarize students with the fundamental principles of
manufacturing, risk management, project management,
and maintenance management.
3. Teach them innovative techniques which can be utilized to

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

4.

5.

manage modern industries.


Instill the spirit of entrepreneurship, which will enable them to
forge new avenues in the modern economy, and provide
them with better foresight, and greater financial flexibility.
Equip students with English Language and communication
Skills with special emphasis on business communication,
and technical writing. Reintroduce them to their history,
religion and culture.

Professional Outcomes
The courses prepare students in effectively managing the
financial, human, and physical resources within the modern
economy. They are designed to impart strategic, tactical and
operational level knowledge to students, in order to enable them
to be better managers, analysts, entrepreneurs, and
intrapreneurs.
The courses also prepare them for academic reading and accurate
Elective Courses

Department of Management Sciences

professional writing. Their presentation skills are improved


through class seminars and group discussions to enable them to
exchange their views and communicate their experience in
research with professional colleagues and potential employers.
Seminars
A series of seminars dealing with wide-ranging issues of topical
significance are organized in which students have opportunities
to hold brainstorming sessions and interact with eminent scholars
in various disciplines. The seminars aim at arousing interest of
students in current problems, helping them form enlightened
opinions about them, and develop skills for rational discourse and
argumentation.
Total Requirements (135 Credit Hours) For the award of BS in
Management Sciences along with the options taken from
specializations a student has to complete 135 credit hours.

Course Title

Course Code

CH

Engineering Economy
Industrial Management
Operations Management
Industrial Safety
Total Quality Management
Maintenance Management
Project Management
Corporate Law
Accounting and Finance
Macro and International Economics
Entrepreneurship and Marketing
Technology Management
Lean Enterprise Management
Supply Chain Management
Human Resource Management
Pakistan and Islamic Studies
Ethics
Impact of Science and Technology on Society
Sociology and Human Behavior
Corporate Law and Professional Ethics

MS291
MS311
MS492
MS493
MS494
MS495
MS496
MM392
MM490
MM492
MM493
MM494
MM495
MM496
MM497
HM211
HM211
HM211
HM321
HM322

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
137

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Department of Management Sciences

Course Description
MS121 Fundamentals of Management (3-0-3) Fundamentals of
Management is an introductory course about the management of
organizations. It provides guidelines on principles of management
that are applicable to all types of enterprises; basic management
philosophy and decision making; principles involved in planning,
organizing, leading, and controlling; and recent concepts in
management. The course contents include general introduction to
management, four phases of management including planning,
organizing, leading and controlling; global environment; managing
change and innovation; human resource management
introduction; organizational behavior; power politics, conflict, and
stress; leading with influence; communication and information
technology; control systems; and operations management. The
contents learned in this course will allow students to work
effectively with others in an organization. The course will also
encourage students to explore the applicability of western
management principles and theories in local settings.
MS101 Business Mathematics (3-0-3) Business Mathematics
presents math skills and knowledge that students can apply to solve
financial problems. The course provides step-by-step guidance
through sample problems and solutions related to banking, credit,

138

basic finance and investment. Students will also gain an


understanding of financial instruments and terminology used in
business finance such as compound interest, annuities and
promissory notes. The course will cover topics like: elements of
Algebra; functions and their graphs; ratios, proportions and
percentages; interest and annuities; basic statistical measures; and
stocks and bonds.
HM101 English Language and Communication Skills (3-0-3)
The purpose of this course is to equip students with language and
communication skills required to cope with their academic and
professional needs. The course prepares the students for academic
reading, and writing, oral presentations, reference skills and
grammar. The students are given practice in communication skills
and are introduced to the principles of effective writing from the
sentence level to full-length texts with emphasis on logical
organization of materials. Oral communication is improved through
class seminars and group discussions.
HM102 Business and Technical Writing (3-0-3) The course aims
at imparting to the students competence in scientific and technical
report writing. The mechanics and conventions of writing process

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

are introduced through communicative activities and tasks. The


course focuses on technical report writing and correspondence
related to the corporate world. The course also deals with issues and
problems of planning and designing technical presentations for
varying situations and audiences. Main topics to be covered in this
course are: introduction to communication in technical and
intercultural workplaces; identification of purpose of writing;
techniques for the preparation for writing a document such as
brainstorming, outlining, drafting, editing and proofreading;
technical writing style and strategies; use of brevity, politeness and
accuracy in writing; formatting and writing documents; writing
emails, letters, memos, short reports, formal reports, executive
summaries, abstracts, progress reports, white papers, and proposals;
and presentation of information in oral and written format.
HM111 Islamic Studies (3-0-3) The course of Islamic Studies
presents Islam as a balanced mode of life by incorporating basic
human rights, rule of law, brotherhood, respect of other religions and
equality of mankind, and harmony between religion and practical
aspects of life.
HM112 Pakistan Studies (3-0-3) This is an introductory course for
examining the political behavior, processes and government
institutions. The course aims to give students an awareness of political
ideas, theories, national systems and public policies. There would be a
special emphasis on critical analysis of the political issues in national
and international level.
HM121 Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3) The purpose of the
course is to familiarize the students with the definition of sociology,
founders of early sociology, three theories given by early sociologist,
definition of culture and its development, elements of culture, cultural
integration and cultural variation. The course also conveys to the
students the components of society, social interaction, groups, social
role, role of conflict, institutions, verbal and non-verbal
communication, social group, bureaucracy, deviance, conformity;
and, national and international social problems.
MS102 Business Statistics (3-0-3) The course is designed to
introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting,
analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Data and information
are integral to the operation and planning of all businesses, and as

Department of Management Sciences

businesses grow and develop there is an increasing need for the use
of formalized statistical methodology to answer business related
questions. This course will cover topics like: type of variables and data;
frequency distributions; data organization and presentation;
numerical measures; measures of dispersion; index numbers,
regression and correlation analysis; probability concepts, and
sampling methods.
MS111 Business Ethics (3-0-3) It introduces students to ethical and
moral issues, conflicts and decisions confronting citizens, groups and
communities of Pakistan. The course aims at highlighting the
necessity and importance of good character, conduct and moral life
as manifested in major world religions. The students are also
enlightened to appreciate the ethical and moral dimensions of
Pakistani culture. The course contents include introducing and
defining business ethics; social responsibility and business ethics,
development of business ethics; ethical issues in business ethics;
application of moral philosophies to business ethics; ethical decision
making framework; organizational influences on ethical decision
making; influence of significant others in organizations; role of
opportunity and conflict; development of effective ethics program;
and international business ethics.
MS131 Principles of Marketing (3-0-3) This course will focus on
developing an understanding of key marketing concepts aimed at
improving the conceptual knowledge of marketing as applicable to
decision making process with a focus on tactical marketing mix
decisions. Further, it will provide the student with a comprehensive
framework to evaluate marketing decisions and to create successful
marketing initiatives. The contents included in the course would be
definition, evolution and future of marketing; marketing strategy and
elements of marketing mix; elements and analysis of marketing
environment; ethics and social marketing; strategic marketing
planning; sales forecasting; and designing marketing plan.
MS141 Micro-Economics (3-0-3) The course would provide an
understanding of the principles of microeconomic analysis of
business decisions in competitive and noncompetitive markets. The
main topics in this course would include supply and demand analysis;
free markets; scarcity; production possibilities; the price system;
government policy; labor markets; capital, and natural resource
markets, and externalities.

139

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Ms222 Human Resource Management (3-0-3) This course is


designed to provide students basic understanding of key HRM
functions, designed to help them understand if western human
resource management theories and practices have any relevance to
local settings. The course will also discuss the Islamic perspective of
managing human resource. The students will also be encouraged to
compare and contrast the human resource practices suggested in
their text books and the practices critical for achieving success from
indigenous perspective. The course contents include human resource
planning; strategic human resource management; recruitment and
selection; interviewing candidates; training and development;
performance appraisal and performance management; career
development, retention and voluntary/involuntary turnover;
compensation; and global human resource management.
MS232 Marketing Management (3-0-3) Marketing management
course is geared toward providing an understanding of the rationale
for marketing decisions from a managerial perspective. This course
will teach student about how to integrate theory and practice.
Students will have to apply analytical techniques they have learned in
this course to make strategic marketing decisions. The course
contents include introduction to marketing; marketing environment
and market analysis, market research; buyer or consumer behavior;
consumer decision making; marketing research and analysis; market
segmentation, targeting and positioning; product concepts; product
management; service and nonprofit marketing; pricing strategy;

Department of Management Sciences

placing strategies; wholesaling and industrial distribution; retailing;


promotional strategies; and intercultural and international marketing.
MS242 Macro-Economics (3-0-3) The main objective of this course
is to give students an understanding of the working of socialist,
capitalist and mixed economy at the aggregate level. The basic
themes are extended to explore the disciplines of national income,
public finance, macro economics in closed and open economy,
macroeconomic stabilization policies, money and banking link up with
conventional macroeconomics.
MS251 Financial Accounting I (3-0-3) The course is built upon the
accounting cycle and discussion of accounting concepts and
principles. Concepts, terminology and principles would be introduced
at a basic level. Topics would include a conceptual framework of
accounting, income statement and retained earnings statement,
balance sheet and disclosure notes, cash flow statement, revenue and
expense recognition and measurement, current monetary balances,
inventory and cost of sales, capital assets, goodwill and deferred
charges, amortization and impairment and investments in debt and
equity securities.
MS271 Introduction to Environmental Science (3-0-3) The
environment impacts our way of life in many aspects (e.g., food and
fiber production, resources for building shelter and infrastructure, and
water supplies). Adverse impacts to this environment affect the wellbeing of humans and other living organisms. Therefore, the broad
topics covered will include natural environmental systems, physical
and social causes of environmental problems, and strategies to
mitigate or manage these issues.
HM203 Business Communication (3-0-3) The main objective of this
course is to give students practical awareness of activities such as
interacting, informing, instructing and persuading within the business
community. It would bring in them the personalities of business
people as communicators, who can speak, write and interact with
others effectively and professionally. The main topics of the course
include: introduction to communication, types of internal and external
communications, types of formal and informal communication,
upward, downward and horizontal communication, use of technology
in business communication; perception, adaptation and selection of
appropriate words; writing emails, memos; and listening and
speaking/talking skills in business environments. This course aims at

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giving students an advanced understanding of the concepts and


principles of professional business communication.
MS223 Business Research Methods (3-0-3) The objective of this
course is to expose students to the principles and methods of
business research and designed to encourage them to explore
application of theories that have been predominantly developed in
Western cultures by using different research method techniques. An
understanding of the relevance of Western research for local practice
would help students to explore various business related problems
and their plausible solutions from indigenous perspective. Topics
would include: introduction to research methods in business and
management disciplines; literature searching strategies; literature
review; research paradigms and approaches; theory and research;
introduction to SPSS; quantitative research design; internal and
external validity; survey based research; case study research;
quantitative and qualitative data analysis; and writing research
proposals and thesis.
MS224 Business Policy (3-0-3) This course is a capstone seminar
in general management and can only be taken upon successful
completion of the five preceding courses. It would help students
integrate knowledge, theories, skills, and techniques derived from
previous courses. This course will develop a well-defined approach
to solving the economic, technical, ethical, and human problems of
management. The contents of the course include introduction to
strategy, strategic management; industry analysis and trends, PEST
analysis; five forces analysis; blue ocean strategy; organizational
internal analysis; designing business level strategies; designing
corporate level strategies; network level strategies; network level
strategies; global strategies; strategy implementation and strategic
change; leadership and corporate governance; and corporate social
responsibility.

Department of Management Sciences

to expand beyond local borders, then international laws and treaties


also come into play. This course will look at company laws, contract
laws, buying & selling goods & services, law relating to intellectual
property, law of agency, company financial reports, elements of
employment law, and management and employment ethics.
Prudential Regulations of the State Bank of Pakistan and major
regulatory frameworks under the Securities & Exchange Commission
of Pakistan will also be discussed.
HM212 Technology and Society (3-0-3) In this course, we will
examine technological practices as cultural activities, informed by
and informing beliefs, values, social structures and institutions. Our
investigation will be positioned within frameworks of terminological
and historical analysis. The course contents include the nature of
technology, sources of technological change; scientific knowledge
and technological advancement; diffusion of technology;
technology and environment; work in non-industrial societies;
technology and jobs; technological change and life on the job;
organizations and technological change; and governance of
technology.
CS435 Management Information Systems & Decision Support
System (3-0-3) The course is designed to give students the concept
of information systems and their significance for business success. It
offers an approach to address different IT applications in business.
Further, it provides support to decision makers for strategic business

MS252 Financial Accounting II (3-0-3) This course is built upon the


Financial Accounting Course in the sense that it provides advanced
treatment of basic techniques learned in the earlier course. It mainly
focuses upon company accounts and their understanding in the
context of the IAS and companies ordinance 1984. Accounting
software like Peachtree or Quick books will be taught in this course.
MS261 Corporate Law (3-0-3) No business enterprise can function
without following a country's legal processes; nor its own. If it wishes

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decisions. Different applications like corporate information systems,
business information systems, control systems, and transaction
process systems would be discussed.
MS325/MM494 Technology Management (3-0-3) This course
aims to make students understand the core factors of technology
and society including industrial networks, business community and
new generations of managers, fundamentals of product and process
development, knowledge and experience in new technological
inventions, use of multidisciplinary science based knowledge,
problem-solving, teamwork, outreach activity, and major steps in
proof of concept to intellectual property protection.
MS343 Issues in Global Economy (3-0-3) This course aims to make
students understand the contemporary issues in global economy in
in trade, industry and financial sectors. It intends to give students a
comprehensive knowledge about the outlook and comparision of
developing and developed economies. Some of the topics are the
modern trade theories, balance of payments, regional and global
trading blocs, financial crisis, human development, environment and
economic tradeoffs.
MS344 Financial Management (3-0-3) The purpose of this course
is to provide students with basic concept of corporate finance,
investment and financing concepts, which are important to most
managerial people. Students will learn the content and scope of
financial management and the vital role-played by a financial
manager. The course includes topics like: an overview of financial
management and the financial environment; time value of money;
financial statements; cash flow, and taxes, risk and return; portfolio
theory and asset pricing models; securities and their valuation;
projects and their valuation; corporate governance; financing
decisions; derivatives and risk management, bankruptcy,
reorganization, and liquidation, mergers, lbos, divestitures, and
holding companies, multinational financial management.
MS381 Entrepreneurship (3-0-3) This course focuses on identifying
business opportunities and developing them into a business. The
management functions of accounting, finance, and marketing as well
as legal and economic considerations are also applied. Student are
taught to take business responsibilities and encouraged to take
initiatives as business strategies are created. Through the process of
developing the business plan, students acquire skills necessary to
operate a successful business. Topics of discussion will be history of

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entrepreneurship, idea generation, technology and ideas, sources of


finance, elevator pitch, patents and formulation of business plan.
MS391/MM 496 Supply Chain Management (3-0-3) Supply Chain
Management includes the materials and information flow among all
firms that contribute significantly to a product, from the point of
scratch to final product. Elements of supply chain management have
been studied and practiced for some time in marketing, logistics, and
operations management. This course will integrate different
perspectives from various functions of management to develop a
broad understanding of how to manage a supply chain. Topics
include Value Chains, Supply chains, Supply chain lifecycle, Supply
chain strategy, Resource planning, Procurement, Inventory models,
Inventory management, Automated Inventory Tracking System,
Sales & Operations Planning, Forecasting, Scheduling, logistics,
Contracts, Supply Chain Technology, Distributed Requirement
Planning.
MS326 Production Management (3-0-3) This course introduces
the theory and practice of production management as a functional
area in the management of business enterprise. This course will
discuss the principles, concept and basic problems affecting
manufacturing and non-manufacturing firms. Topics covered will
explore Tangible & intangible functions of production, Discrete &
continuous manufacturing processes & systems, Conventional &
system approach to Design, Production planning & Control, Process
planning, Quality control, Quality assurance, Assembly methods,

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Packaging, Production work measurements, Production standards,
Production philosophies.
MS327 Organizational Behavior (3-0-3) The knowledge of
individuals' perceptions, motivational attitudes and behavior enable
students to not only understand themselves better, but also to adopt
appropriate managerial policies and leadership styles to increase their
effectiveness. The focus of instruction will move progressively
through the individual, group and organizational levels of behavior
and will examine the interrelationships of behavioral phenomena
among these levels. Specific topics include leadership, motivation,
teamwork, career issues, work roles, job enrichment, employee
participation, and work and non-work integration.
MS328 Strategic Management (3-0-3 The course focuses on
corporate policy formulation and implementation. The knowledge
and techniques learned in earlier courses will be applied in an
integrated fashion to the process of strategic decision making and
organizational change. Among the topics considered in the course
will be relationships of organizations to their environments, the
hierarchy of organizational objectives, structured as well as informal
approaches to strategic planning, the integration of business
functions, organizational structure, and policy implementation and
evaluation. A significant aspect of the course is devoted to assessing
the competitive dynamics of firms.
MS329 New Product Development (3-0-3)
This course offers an in-depth examination of the strategic
importance of understanding customers and their needs, including
both theoretical and practical analyses of the rationale and limits of
the marketing concept, marketing planning, segmentation and
positioning, and the long-term value of customers. The course
contents include product development processes and organization,
product planning, high functioning teamwork; CAD/solid modeling,
customer/user needs assessment, personas and empathic design;
translating the 'voice of the customer'; concept generation, selection
and development; decision analysis, concept testing, taguchi method
and experimental design, product architectures; design for assembly/
manufacture prototyping; information technologies; design
optimization; universal design and entrepreneurship; and innovation
and intellectual property.

Department of Management Sciences

and obstacles to growth, including the regulatory regime, finance,


training/technical assistance, market linkages and business
development services. Through case studies, exposure to
practitioners' best practices, and an operational approach, the course
will evaluate alternative solutions regarding their scalability,
sustainability, and their return on investment. Topics to be covered
are strategic management in SMEs; life cycle concept of SMEs;
interventions into the development processes of SMEs; innovation
management; variation of innovation theme; innovation and SMEs;
nature and extent of entrepreneurship; and women's role in
entrepreneurship.
MS492 Operations Management (3-0-3 Operations as a
competitive weapon, Operations Strategy, Managing Processes,
Process Strategy, Process Analysis, Process Performance & Quality,
Constraint Management, Process Layout, Managing value chains,
Forecasting, Sales & Operations planning, Resource planning, Linear
Programming, Scheduling, Production philosophies.
MS483 International Strategic Partnerships (3-0-3) This course
provides the manager's perspective in the fields of international
payments, international trade, and the analysis of investments.
Emphasis is given to the materials and concepts that illuminate the
strategies, structure, practices, and effects of multinational
enterprises. The topics to be covered are nature of international
business management; marketing to customers with diverse cultural
backgrounds; operations in diverse political and legal environments;

MS382 Small and Medium Enterprises (3-0-3) The course will


begin with an introduction to the economics and dynamics of the
sector as well as basic theory, and then it will focus on foundations of,

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finance in the international marketplace; human resources and
employees of diverse cultural backgrounds; and strategy and structure
of international or global enterprises.
MS484 Entrepreneurial Finance (3-0-3) In the wake of recent
financial crisis, monetary systems are growing and adapting out of
historical circumstances. Economic analysis convinces us that to some
extent our institutions cannot be other than what they used to be. For
example, we may not have to use paper currency, but clearly some kind
of medium of exchange is essential to run any economic system. Once
conventions establish themselves as institutions, they dictate what
purposes in fact can be served. An important objective of this course is
to investigate the principal financial institutions involved in our macro
economy. This course provides an overall perspective on the monetary
and financial institutions. Monetary institutions can only be
understood if one knows the magnitudes of the economic variables
associated with them.
MS485 Global Entrepreneurship (3-0-3) This course is a practical
course for students who may someday start, join or hold a stake in a
global enterprise venture. In addition, one of the newly emphasized
themes will be that of the global entrepreneur, in recognition of the
fact that increasingly, ventures are global from inception; and
opportunities, resources, uncertainties, customers, and exits can come
from anywhere, anytime. Thus, Global Entrepreneurship is targeted
toward aspiring international and entrepreneurs and their investors.
Topics to be included are: understanding the role of culture;
communication across cultures; cross cultural negotiation and
decision making; global alliances and strategy implementation;
staffing, training and compensation for global operations; and
developing a global management cadre.
MS422 Project Management (3-0-3) This course will explore the
fundamental principles of project management. It will include topics
Definition of Project, Definition of Project Management, Body of
Knowledge and Competency based Standards, Selection and
Evaluation of Project Management, Screening and Discounted Cash
Flow Models for Project Selection, PMBOK Knowledge Areas and
Process Components, Project Management Process Group, Closing
Process Group, Project Integration Management, Project Scope
Management, Project Time Management, Project Cost Management,
Project Quality Management, Project Human Resources Management,
Project Communication Management, Project Risk Management,
Project Procurement Management, Project Stakeholder Management,

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Project Planning & Scheduling, Project Teams and Successful


Completion of Projects, Project Management Software.
MS486 Business Plan for New Ventures (3-0-3) Developing a
business plan for a new venture and the entrepreneurial process of
executing the first phases of new venture creation can be daunting.
This course will explore areas like idea conception, entrepreneurship,
business planning, market research, entrepreneurial opportunities and
strategies, venture analysis and strategy, industry and competitor
analysis, marketing plan and risk assessment. Emphasis is placed on
high growth business opportunities. The final deliverable will be a
complete business plan for a high growth venture and formal
presentation of the plan to mock investors. Some individual offcampus travel will be required.
MS487 Innovation and Emerging Technology (3-0-3) This course
will provide an opportunity for students to identify research, gain a
basic knowledge of, discuss and evaluate IT-related new and emerging
technologies and their impact on information systems, business, and
society. The topics include: new technologies such as
telecommunications, nanotechnologies, robotics and artificial
intelligence, diffusion, substitution and convergence of new
technologies, politics and economics of innovation.
MS488 Legal and Taxation Issues (3-0-3) This course is designed to
give students a familiarity of various forms of organizations and the
rights and responsibilities of its officers, employees, and shareholders;

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


taxation of the various organizational forms; patent and other forms of
intellectual property issues; contract law particularly as it applies to
licensing, leases, employees and insurance; and ways to mitigate
various forms of risk.
MS391 Planning and Control Systems (3-0-3) This course includes
the design and management of planning and control systems within
the organization and across the supply chain. It covers business
planning; master production scheduling; material requirements
planning; just-in-time and theory of constraints, Enterprise resource
planning (ERP) and business-to-business (B2B) systems; impact of
information technologies on planning and control systems.
MS492 Global Supply Chain Management (3-0-3) The main
content of this course aims at delivering a thorough, applicable
understanding of the fundamentals of global supply chain
management and the whiplash effect. During the course, students will
learn how to design and implement supply chain concepts in the
context of international cooperation, process chains, workflows, and
global IT systems. Specific topics include Supply chains, Supply chain
lifecycle, Global Supply Chain Management, Customer Service,
Warehousing, Material Handling Systems, Material Storage Systems,
Inventory Management, Transportations, Logistical Packaging,
Logistics Information Systems, Logistics Design for Distribution
Channel, Logistics Outsourcing, Logistics type & control, Logistics
costing, Quantitative Techniques. Furthermore, through practical case
studies they will learn to understand outsourcing, cooperation and

Department of Management Sciences

networking strategies; cost-benefit sharing models; and global


sourcing, production and distribution strategies.
MS493 Procurement Management (3-0-3) The course will explore
the central concepts of organizational procurement and its interface
with other areas of an organization. It will provide opportunities to
examine issues such as organizational procurement process, supplier
selection process, supplier management and other strategic issues.
Topics to be covered in the course are: fundamentals of public
procurement, tendering and contracting procedures, monitoring and
evaluation, procurement planning, bidding documents, bidding
procedures, bid opening and evaluation procedures, methods of
procurement, project cycle management, ethical considerations in
procurement, fraud detection and control, contract management, and
legal aspects of procurement.
MS494 Business Logistics Strategy (3-0-3) Logistics and
distribution are core components of supply chain management.
Logistics management plans, implements, and controls efficient,
effective forward and backward flow and storage of goods and
services. It also predicts and circulates timely related information
between the point of origin and the points of production, purchase
and consumption in order to meet customers' requirements. Logistics
decisions are typically classified into: 1) strategic: dealing with
decisions that have a long-lasting effect on the firm; 2) tactical:
including decisions that are updated anywhere between once every
quarter and once every year; 3) operational: referring to day-to-day
decisions. For this course, the focus will be on strategic and tactical
decisions in logistics management.
MS495 Green Supply Chain Management (3-0-3) Green supply
chain management is a modern concept of management practices
attempting to integrate environmental concerns to all stages up and
down the supply chain. In a globalised market, the environmental
performance criteria extend beyond the single firm to its entire supply
chain network across national borders. Topics covered will include
closed-loop supply chains; reverse logistics systems; carbon foot
printing; water foot printing; life-cycle analysis; and supply chain
sustainability strategy.
MS496 Modern Technologies for Supply Chain Management (30-3) Emerging technologies have significant implications for
individuals, at the same time they also have profound consequences
for firms, markets, governmental policy, and society in general.

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Whether you are an inventor who is developing a new technology, a
manager who is considering using an emerging technology within your
organization, an analyst who wants to predict the impact of an emerging
technology on an industry, or a policy-maker charged with helping
society benefit from emerging technologies, knowing how to analyze
emerging technologies is critical. This course will help develop the skills
to identify and analyze emerging technologies and their impact on firms,
markets, policy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the
information collected and transmitted by new technologies and the
opportunities and challenges associated with this information. Topics
explore under this course include Supply chains, Supply chain lifecycle,
Need for technology, Automated Identification Technology, Bar Coding,
Radio Frequency Identification, Memory Buttons, Radio Frequency Tags,
Voice Interactive Systems, Communication Technology, Electronic Data
Interchange, E-Tracking, Very Small Aperture Terminal, Graphical
Positioning System, Graphical Information System, Highway
Automation system, Web-Based Tracking, Virtual Supply Chain,
Warehouse Simulation.
MS497 Lean and Six Sigma Quality Management (3-0-3) In addition
to covering the fundamentals of Lean and Six Sigma, this course will
equip students with other important tools and strategies to improve the
performance of business processes. Students will practice solving
business problems and improving processes through case studies, team
exercises and simulations, self assessments, and guest lectures. Topics
covered will include: overview of quality management; philosophies of
quality management; project quality management; quality planning for

Department of Management Sciences

inputs, tools and outputs; quality assurance, quality control


mechanisms; statistical techniques for assessing quality; analysis of
contract management systems; normal and premature project close out;
six sigma improvement methodology and tools, lean manufacturing
tools and approaches, dashboards and other business improvement
techniques. Students will also gain an understanding of the strategic
importance of business improvement, the need for fact based
management, the significance of change management, and how to
deploy these tools in different parts of the value chain.
MS423 Corporate Social Responsibility (3-0-3) This introductory
course will include the principles of private businesses supporting
communities and people. The challenge is often to find a balance
between doing good and leveraging these practices to benefit business
as well as the community and its constituents. This course covers CSR
methods, tools, principles, and practices at the organization and society
level. The course is designed to give students a general knowhow of
what CSR is and how it is generally implemented and managed in an
organization. The contents to be covered in course are legal and
economic perspectives on CSR; ownership theory; market and
stakeholders analysis; contemporary public and social issues involving
business; global natural environmental issues; technological issues
influencing economy and society; community relations and strategic
philanthropy; role of government in CSR; and social audit.
MS424 Business and Economic Forecasting (3-0-3) This course will
examine a more rigorous approach to various financial, econometric and
time series approaches for predicting the effects of future corporate
planning decisions and policies. The course would include topics of
forecasting methods with single equation models, predicting with
quantitative as well as qualitative choice models, and simulation with
single and multi-equation models. The techniques are used to predict
product sales, economic variables, and financial indicators. The course
will be useful for recipients and users of forecasts and for those who may
be involved in conducting business and economic forecasts.
MS425 Business Process Design and Analysis (3-0-3) This course
includes identification, development, analysis, controlling,
enhancement and management of business processes. Examples from
different industries and functional areas within firms would be employed
in the course to identify similarities and differences of well run processes.
MS433 Consumer Behavior (3-0-3) Consumer Behavior (CB) is a
course designed to enhance students understanding of how and why

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consumers purchase (or do not purchase) goods and services. It will
combine both the theoretical concepts of consumer behavior and its
application for marketing strategies related to private, public and nonprofit sections. At the conceptual level, it will seek to present an
integrated framework around which major areas of consumer behavior
can be understood and applied. This course will explore and identify
market identities and various sources of influence with the way
consumers think and learn from market related information. The
knowledge and understanding gained from this course can be utilized
in the market place to make rational decisions to satisfy consumer
needs and wants and remain loyal to products. Specific topics to be
covered include: cognition process, consumer motivation, emotions;
consumer cultural theories; consumption, meaning and identities; and
role of market and consumer ideologies.
Ms445 Financial Econometrics (3-0-3) This course focuses on
techniques for estimating regression models, on problems commonly
encountered in estimating such models, and on interpreting the
estimates from such models. The goal of the course is to teach students
the basics of the theory and practice of econometrics and to give them
experience in estimating econometric models with actual data. The
course covers the topics like: single equation regression models,
regression analysis, two-variable and multiple regression analysis;
econometrics modeling, and time series econometrics.
MS446 Industrial Economy (3-0-3) Industrial Economy focuses on the
study of firms, industries and markets. When analyzing decision making

Department of Management Sciences

at the levels of the individual firm and industry, Industrial Economics


helps in understanding issues like: the levels at which capacity, output
and prices are set, the extent that products are differentiated from each
other, how much firms invest in research and development (R&D), how
and why firms advertise. Industrial economy will cover the topics like:
size and structure of firms, separation of ownership and control, shortrun price competition, dynamic price competition, entry deterrence and
entry accommodation, product differentiation and non-price
competition, price discrimination, vertical relations, the determinants of
market structure, competition and industrial policy, regulations.
MS291 Engineering Economy (3-0-3): Cost concepts, Money time
relationships, Measures of worth, Performance analysis form final
accounts, Decision-making, Brief introduction of the quantitative
techniques and of the behavioural aspects.
MS311 Industrial Management (3-0-3): The course deals with the
principles of industrial management. It focuses on effective and
innovative ways of managing physical, human, financial and time
resources of industrial and business organizations. It aims at preparing
the students, to develop a greater awareness of the contemporary
trends in organizational management. The course makes an attempt to
equip the students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills
necessary for a good manager.
MS492 Operations Management (3-0-3): Basics of managing
manufacturing and Service organization, Strategic decision making,
Facility location and layout, Job design and work compensation,
Demand forecasting, Capacity and material planning, Scheduling in
various environments, Emerging trends in managing operations, focus
on selection and use of quantitative management tools after
introducing the fundamental concepts.
MS493 Industrial Safety (3-0-3): Safety regulations and safety
management, office safety and manual handling safety of chemical, Fire
safety, Radiation safety, Shop floor safety, Machine guarding and
robotics safety, Construction safety, Electrical and pressure safety,
Environmental protection, Occupational health, First aid basics, and
Risk evaluation and management.
MS494 Total Quality Management (3-0-3): Fundamental principles
of quality, Standards, Techniques for quality analysis and
improvements, Statistical methods to measure quality, and SPC
(Statistical Process Control). Acceptance sampling; QFD (Quality

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Function Deploying), Value engineering, Cross functional management,
and benchmarking. ISO-9000 application, clauses and implementation
issues.
MS495 Maintenance Management (3-0-3): Organization and control
of maintenance systems, Maintenance policies and strategies,
Preventive maintenance, Predictive maintenance and condition
improvement, Total productive maintenance, Reliability and failure
analysis, Scheduling maintenance, Unique challenges of software
maintenance, Maintenance performance measure benchmarking and
improvement.
MS496 Project Management (3-0-3): Fundamental principles, Project
life cycle, Project organizations and human resource management, PM
planning, Work breakdown structure, Estimating time and cost,
Precedence relationships, Project scheduling and control technique,
Project risk analysis, Time compression and resource levelling,
Computerized project management, Special issues in software projects.
MM392 Corporate Law (3-0-3): Framework of business, company law,
contract law, buying and selling goods and services, mercantile law and
product liability, law relating to intellectual property, workshop, law of
agency, company financial reports, Elements of employment law,
organizational behaviour, Management and employment, HRD (Human
Resources Development)
MM490 Accounting and Finance (3-0-3): Financial reporting,
Financial Statements, Financial statements as management planning
tool, Statements of cash flows, Revenue and expense reorganization,
Account receivables, Inventories, Tangible and intangible assets,
Liabilities, Bonds, Income taxes, Shareholder's equity, Accounting
control, EVA, LIFO, FIFO.
MM492 Macro and International Economics (3-0-3): International
fiscal policies, Macro-environment for firms and organizations, Basic
tools of macro-economic management, Monetary policy, Exchange rate
policy. Evaluation of the different strategies for economic development
including, Trade policy, Industry policy, and Natural resource policy.
Market crises, Risk management and strategies for future. Major
challenges in developed and under developed countries for global
integration, Inequality and asset price bubble.
MM493 Entrepreneurship and Marketing (3-0-3): Industrial
economic strategy, Preparation of a business plan for new ventures and

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financing options for start-up business, Barrier to entry, Corporate


governance, Mergers information gained through environmental scans
on new business opportunities, Case studies, Sharing the experiences of
entrepreneurs and investors, Consulting for inventing start-up or
entrepreneurial businesses and for professionals.
MM494 Technology Management (3-0-3): Industrial networks,
Fundamentals of product and process development, Business
community and new generations of managers, Practical skills,
Knowledge and experience in commercialization of new technological
innovations, Use of multidisciplinary science based knowledge,
Problem-solving, Teamwork, Outreach activity, Major steps in proof of
concept to intellectual property protection, Prototype development,
Fabrication and assembly routes, Materials procurement, Identification
and Creation of new markets, Development of business plan,
Appropriate technology and marketing, Distribution and financing,
Routes and strategies for specific technology under development.
MM495 Lean Enterprise Management (3-0-3): Addresses some of all
important issues involved with the planning, development, and
implementation of lean enterprises. The dimensions of People,
Technology, Process, and Management of an effective learn
manufacturing company are considered in a unified framework.
Particular emphasis is on the integration of these dimensions across the
entire enterprise, including Product development, Production, and
Extended supply chain. Analysis tools as well as future trends and
directions are explored. A key component of this subject is a team
project.
MM496 Supply Chains Planning (3-0-3): Focuses on effective Supply
chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on
how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated
system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in
Supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena.
The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as Risk pooling, and
Inventory placement, Integrated planning and collaboration, and
Information sharing. Lectures, Computer exercises and Case discussions
introduce various methods for supply chain design, analysis, and
optimization.
MM497 Human Resource Management (3-0-3): Design and
execution of Human resource management strategies, Systematic and
strategic thinking about aspects of managing an organization's human
assets, Implementation of policies to achieve competitive advantages,

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


Reward systems, Performance management, High-performance
human resource systems, Training and development, Recruitment,
Retention, Equal employment, Opportunity laws, Work force diversity,
and Union management relationships.
HM101 English Language and Communication Skills (3-0-3): The
course aims at equipping the students with the necessary language and
communication skills to cope with their academic and professional
needs. The course prepares the students for academic reading,
academic writing, oral presentations, reference skills and grammar. The
students are given practice in communication skills and are introduced
to the principles of effective writing from the sentence level to fulllength texts with emphasis on logical organization of materials. Oral
communication is improved through class seminars and group
discussions.
HM102 Technical Writing (3-0-3): The course aims at imparting to
the students competence in scientific and technical report writing. The
mechanics and conventions of writing process are introduced through
communicative activities and tasks. The course focuses on technical
report writing and correspondence related to the profession of
Engineering. The course also deals with the issues and problems of
planning and designing technical presentations for varying situations
and audiences.
HM211 Pakistan and Islamic Studies (3-0-3): The course introduces
students to the origins and development of Muslim nationalism in
South Asia and the struggle for freedom in the wider historical
perspective. It also examines the political, socio-cultural and economic
aspects of the state and society of Pakistan with reference to the ideals
and concepts of its founding fathers. A study of select original
documents also forms part of the course.

Department of Management Sciences


Islamic Studies presents Islam as a rational code of life with emphasis on
Islamic perspectives on fundamental human rights, rule of law,
brotherhood and equality of mankind, empirical and rational basis of
knowledge and harmony between the religious and the scientific
domains of experience.
HM211 Ethics (3-0-3): The course is offered to Non-Muslim students
in place of Islamic Studies. It introduces students to ethical and moral
issues, conflicts and decisions confronting the citizens, groups and
communities of Pakistan. The course aims at highlighting the necessity
and importance of good character, conduct and moral life as
manifested in major world religions. The students are also enlightened
to appreciate the ethical and moral dimensions of Pakistani culture.
HM211 Impact of Science and Technology on Society (3-0-3): This
course, too, is offered to non-Muslims students in place of Islamic
Studies as a second option. They are given sociological perspectives on
cultural changes and the role played by scientific and technological
innovations affecting such changes. The main topics dwelt upon are the
holistic character of cultures, the phenomenon of cultural lag and the
resultant socio-cultural dislocations, the social order and technology
nexus, and the impact of technological advancements on social
institutions.
HM321 Sociology and Human Behavior (3-0-3): The purpose of the
course is to familiarize students with Pakistani parameters with factors
that shape a society, theories about personality development, cultural
change, socialization, functioning of normative systems, cultural
diffusion, social mobility, sub-cultures and counter-cultures, cultural
relativism, social stratification, and social institutions.
HM322 Corporate Law and Professional Ethics (3-0-3): The course
introduces students to the ethical and moral issues they are likely to
confront as engineers such as the vital impact their work has on health,
safety and welfare of people, major theories of moral development and
codes of ethics prescribed by professional bodies, and case studies
illustrating ethical and moral dilemma engineers have to cope with. The
legal component deals with the constitutional provisions regarding
fundamental human rights, principles of natural justice, basic aspects of
contract law, arbitration, partnership, evidence law, labor laws, and
drafting legal documents used in contractual transactions.
ws, and drafting legal documents used in contractual transactions.

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Student Affairs Office

Dean Student Affairs


Sirajul Haq
Ph.D (University of Liverpool, UK)
Sumira Siddique, Student Welllness Counselor
Arshia Shehzadi, Hostel Warden

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Student Affairs Office

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Student Affairs Office

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Student Affairs Office

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015


coverage of various events within the Institute and also organizes
the very popular annual movie competition at the campus.
12. Sports Society: Sports Society comprises of the coordinators
of various sports clubs of the Institute. It promotes and regulates
sports and games on the campus. The existing facilities include a
sports complex, which houses Swimming Pool, Squash, Basketball,
Volleyball & Badminton Court and a Gymnasium. Outdoor
facilities include cricket, hockey, football fields, tennis courts,
beach soccer, and beach volleyball. Students' hostels have ample
provision for the indoor games, such as table tennis, carom and
chess. The Society organizes friendly matches throughout the year
culminating in annual interfaculty tournaments and competitions.
The sports society also organizes fixture tournaments with other
educational institutions and provides the forum for sportsmen to
take part in various national sports events.
Following students societies are functional in the
Institute:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

ACM GIK Chapter: Association of Computing


Machinery
Adventure Club: (Includes Sailing, Hiking and Aero
Tech)
ASME GIK Chapter: American Society of Mechanical
Engineers
ASM/TMS GIK Chapter: American Society of
Materials/the Materials, Mineral and Metal Society
ASHRAE GIK Chapter: American Society of Heating,
Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers
CDES: Cultural, Dramatic and Entertainment Society
GMS: GIKI Mathematic Society
GSS: Graduate Student Society
IET GIK Chapter: Institute of Engineering and
Technology
IEEE GIK Chapter: Institute of Electrical and Electronic
Engineering
LDS: Literary and Debating Society
Media Club: Includes GIKI Vision, Photography and
Desktop Publishing

Student Affairs Office


13.
14.

15.

16.

17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.

26.

27.

Naqsh Art Society: NAQSH promotes and


propagates art in GIK Institute.
Netronix: NETRONIX is the caretaker of the hostel
network which consists of over 600
workstations.
Project Topi: Project Topi is a student run volunteer
society which runs many projects for the welfare of
Topi community.
Web Team: The GIKI Webteam is an in-house team of
students that voluntarily design and manage the GIKI
website and its related affairs, with their services being
officially recognized by the Institute.
Science Society: Science society deals in
contemporary developments in scientific field.
SOPHEP: Society for the Promotion of Higher
Education in Pakistan
Sports Society: Sports society maintains the sports
facilities and organizes events with wide participation.
SPIE GIK Chapter: Society for Photo-Optical
Instrumentation Engineer
SMEP GIK Chapter: Society of Mechanical Engineers
of Pakistan
TiE/YES GIK Chapter: The Indus Enterpreneurs (TiE),
GIKI Chapter
WES: Women Engineers Society
AIAA GIK Chapter: American Institute of Aeronautic
& Astronomic.
AIESEC: Its agenda primarily includes sending youth
for exchange programs, belonging to different
cultures to other countries. It is an attempt to develop
and consolidate friendly ties between countries.
IAESTE GIK Chapter: The International Association
for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience
(IAESTE)
IMechE GIK Chapter: The Institution of Mechanical
Engineers.

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Student Affairs Office

Open House & Careers Fair


An Open House & Career Fair is organized at the GIK
Institute Campus every year. Its objective is to invite senior
representatives from the industry to visit the Institute,
have a view of the facilities and first hand information on
the Institute's academic and research activities. It also
provides a forum for faculty members and senior
management from the industry to exchange views and
discuss matters of mutual interest, such as, sponsoring
research projects and reviewing the academic curricula to
meet the needs of industry. Another important aspect of

154

the Open House & Career Fair is the employment for our
graduating students. The Open House & Career Fair
provides an excellent opportunity for the prospective
employers to judge the caliber of the graduating
engineers through discussions and interviews. Poster
presentations of senior year projects are also held in
conjunction with the Open House & Career Fair in which
the students have an opportunity to display their projects
to the prospective employers.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Office of Research, Innovation and


Commercialization - ORIC
Prof. Dr. Wasim Ahmad Khan, Director
The Institute has established Office of Research, Innovation
and Commercialization (ORIC) to promote research and
commercialization and to undertake following assignments
and programs:
Organizing Industrial Open House (IOH)
Supporting the Institute's strategic research direction and

policies
Increasing and diversifying external research funding
Improving recruitment and retention of top faculty
Improving integration of research and education at all

level of the Institute


Improving translation of research into the public benefit
Strengthening Institute-Industry relations
Promoting entrepreneurship, technology-transfer and

Student Affairs Office

Quality Enhancement Cell


The Quality Enhancement Cell (QEC) at GIK Institute is taking
necessary steps to achieve the highest level of quality in
education and ensure the effective learning experience of
students. Under the supervision of Pro Rector (A), Dr. Javed
Ahmad Chattha and Coordinator QEC, Dr. Zahid Halim, QEC
has advanced towards the implementation of Outcome
Based Education System. Seminars and workshops have
been conducted on OBE/OBA implementation and Bloom's
taxonomy. Self Assessment Reports of four programs have
been completed according to the PEC OBE/OBA manual and
were presented in the PEC delegation Mock visit
accompanied by Prof. Azlan Abdul Aziz, Malaysian expert on
5th-6th December, 2014. Quality Enhancement Cell of GIK
Institute has obtained 90% score and rated in the top (W
category) in the quantitative assessment of QAA, HEC for the
period ending 30th June, 2014.

commercialization activities that energize and support the


local and national industry
Promoting and enhancing cross-cutting and multidisciplinary research initiatives
The office program and activities are supervised by the ProRector (Academic) and officers including Director, Deputy
Director and Assistant Director.

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Student Affairs Office

GIK Institute Alumni (http://www.giki.edu.pk/Alumni)


Ever since I was in school, I had my heart set on going to GIKI and becoming a sort of a mad scientist/engineer. You can
imagine my delight when I was admitted in Fall of 2000. GIKI was a place where there was so much opportunity to grow.
The quiet and serene environment made me focus on my passion of creating software programs to solve problems. Over
time I worked with lots of brilliant soon-to-be engineers on problems ranging from automation to artificial intelligence.
That clear-headedness and focus helps me to this day where we work in the cutting edge of the software industry under
immense pressure. Things move at a rapid pace and you need to have focus and the know-how to keep up with the
changes. GIKI has taught me to work under pressure and be creative at the same time. The lessons you learn here always
stay with you no matter how many years pass.
Muhammad Nasrullah (Batch 10, FCSE)
Vice President Engineering, Convo
I owe a lot to GIKI. After graduating from GIKI, I got interviewed by Schlumberger and started my career with them and
after 14 years, I am still with them. I met Uzma, my wife, in GIKI as well. She also works for Schlumberger. Together we
have lived and worked in Indonesia, Scotland, Norway, Dubai and now in Houston. I spent the first five years of my career
in the field, mostly at the drilling rig locations from the hot and humid swamp jungles of Indonesia to the ice cold
offshore platforms of the North Sea, running high tech logging and drilling tools in oil-wells. Then I moved to
management and have had various roles since. My current role is that of Recruiting and Training manager for
Schlumberger, Drilling & Measurements, based in Houston, Texas. During my stay at GIKI, I think I developed an
approach to problem solving and self-confidence in communicating, which have helped me a lot in my career. On the
academic side my fondest memories include getting on the Dean's list in my 7th Semester. Otherwise I have great
memories of all the times spent in sporting events or just hanging out with friends, some of whom are still my best
friends today.
Babar Zulquernain (Batch 1, FEE)
Recruiting, Training & Development Manager - Drilling and Measurements, Schlumberger USA
Every day that I spent at GIKI with my friends contributed to my fondest memories; the late nighters, the after-classes
hang outs, and the dhood patti sessions at the tea stall up the hillock. I experienced brilliant and extremely competitive
cohort of students and the faculty. We, being the first batch, were extremely lucky. There was no real competition GIKI
was the only private university offering engineering degree those days, the faculty was extremely devoted, all involved in
the Project GIKI were running high on adrenaline and their founder spirit was running in their blood. The first batch
benefited a lot from all these positives. I enjoyed being challenged in the class every single day. Everything that we did
was the first. The first inter-faculty cricket tournament, the first basant, the first club, the first basketball competition,
the first concert, the first dramatics, the first debates competition. It was that spirit of being the first and the knowledge
of the responsibility that comes with it, that I enjoyed the most. We came from the time when students in UETs were
taking 6-8 years to complete their engineering degree. So when GIKI was instituted that was the only option we had.
Although we joined GIKI mainly through lack of any other option but in retrospect even if we had other options most of
us would still have joined GIKI. I did well in academic; graduated third in my batch from GIKI and during my MS from
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; I was awarded Siebel Fellowship for academic excellence. I have worked in
several prestigious companies (Schlumberger, Techlogix and Oracle) both in Pakistan and abroad. I have worked! in
several countries: Pakistan, Indonesia, Qatar, UAE, USA, China, UK, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, South Korea, New
Zealand, Hong Kong. The Computer Systems Engineering degree was a well rounded degree. It had a broader focus
covering computer science, mechanical, electronics etc. the degree made me a true engineer i.e. someone who solves
problems. In my career I have worked in different capacities ranging from Oil exploration to software development to
sales and project delivery. Had it not been the diversified nature of the degree I may not have done as well as I did in
whatever job I undertook. The degree gave me the confidence and ability to solve problems and that is the whole gist
of what my career has been built upon. Thank you GIKI for the friends, the memories, the skills, the education, the
teachers and the confidence that you have given me. All of these shine over me and help me excel in my profession and
my personal life.
Kashif Manzoor (Batch 1, FCSE) Senior Vice President, Confiz Limited

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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

Student Affairs Office

Gold Medalist 2014


The Institute has established Faculty Gold Medals for best academic performance in each faculty. Two Institute Gold Medals have also
been established for students with outstanding performance in the BS Degree. The Ghulam Ishaq Khan Gold Medal is awarded for the
best academic performance among all the graduates of the Institute. The Quaid e Azam Gold Medal is awarded for the best overall
performance among all the graduates of the Institute.
Quaid-e-Azam Medal EE

Faculty & GIK Medal EE

Suleman Belal Kazi

Nouman Khan

Faculty Medal CSW

Faculty Medal CS

Nauman Zeb

Sherjeel Sikandar

Faculty Medal ES

Raja Arslan Sajid

Faculty Medal ME

Faculty Medal MSE

Muhammad Azeez Sadiq

Muhammad Mudasser Khan


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UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS 2015

SOPREST OFFICE

Student Affairs Office


Rector
Jehangir Bashar
email: rector@giki.edu.pk

Co-ordinator QEC
Zahid Halim, Ph.D

email:zahid.halim@giki.edu.pk

Pro-Rector (Academic)

Director (Admissions & Examinations)

Javed Ahmed Chattha, Ph.D


email: chattha@giki.edu.pk

M. Faheem Akhtar, M.Sc.


email: coe@giki.edu.pk

Dean, Faculty of Computer Science


and Engineering

Khalid J. Siddiqui, Ph.D.


email: khalid.siddiqui@giki.edu.pk
Dean, Faculty of Electrical
Engineering

Nisar Ahmad, Ph.D.


email: nisarahmed@giki.edu.pk

Director (IT)

Ghulam Abbas, Ph.D


email: abbasg@giki.edu.pk

Director Procurement

Mohammad Yousaf
email: yousaf@giki.edu.pk

Engr. Shams ul Mulk, HI


President SOPREST

Shakil Durrani
Executive Director SOPREST

Mushtaq Ahmed

Dean, Faculty of Engineering


Sciences

Jameel Un Nabi, Ph.D.


email: jameel@giki.edu.pk
Dean, Faculty of Materials
Science and Engineering

Fida Muhammad, Ph.D.


email: mfida@giki.edu.pk

Director Administration

Muhammad Ismail
email: ismail@giki.edu.pk

Incharge Medical Center

Dr. Jehnzab Khan


email: jehnzeb@giki.edu.pk

Secretary SOPREST and BoG

SOPREST Office
House No. 4, Nazimuddin Road
Sector F-10/4, Islamabad
Ph. 051-2114062-6

Dean, Faculty of Mechanical


Engineering

Director Works
Col Tanveer Mojiz

S. M. Ahmad, Ph.D
email: smahmad@giki.edu.pk

email:tmojiz@giki.edu.pk

HoD, Management Sciences

Principal GIK College

Wasim A. Khan , Ph.D


email: wasim@giki.edu.pk

Abdul Qadeer Awan


email:principal@giki.edu.pk

Dean Graduate Studies

Director Security and Protocol

Ghulam Shabir, Ph.D


email: shabir@giki.edu.pk

Col Riaz Ahmad


email:riaz.ahmad2008@giki.edu.pk

Dean Student Affairs

Deputy Director Procurement

Sirajul Haq, Ph.D


email: dsa@giki.edu.pk

Latifullah
email: latif@giki.edu.pk

Director ORIC
Wasim A. Khan, Ph.D

Deputy Director ORIC

email: wasim@giki.edu.pk

Mohsin H. Akhtar
email: mhakhtar@giki.edu.pk

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR
Session 2015 - 2016
Freshmen Induction & Orientation
Fall Semester Begins
Classes
Mid Semester/Eidul-Azha Break
Classes
Midterm Examination
Classes
Final Examinations
End of Semester
Spring Semester Begins
Classes
Midterm Examinations
Mid Semester Break
Classes
Final Examinations
End of Semester Break
Summer Semester Begins
Classes
Eid-ul-Fitr Break
Classes
Final Examinations
Orientation of the Freshmen
Fall Semester Begins
1
2
3
4

Fall 2014
August 22, 2015
August 23, 2015
August 24, 2015
August 24, 2015
September 18, 2015
September 21, 2015
September 25, 2015
September 28, 2015
October 23, 2015
October 26, 2015
October 29, 2015
November 02, 2015
December 18, 2015
December 21, 2015
December 27, 2015
December 28, 2015
January 08, 2015
Spring 2016
January 11, 2016
January 11, 2016
March 04, 2016
March 07, 2016
March 10, 2016
March 14, 2016
March 18, 2016
March 21, 2016
May 06, 2016
May 09, 2016
May 15, 2016
May 16, 2016
June 03, 2016
Summer 2016
June 06, 2016
June 06, 2016
July 01, 2016
July 04, 2016
July 08, 2016
July 11, 2016
July 05, 2016
August 08, 2016
August 12, 2016
Fall 2016
August 20, 2016
August 21, 2016
August 22, 2016

2 days
4 weeks
1 week1
4 weeks
4 days
7 weeks
1 week
2 weeks
8 weeks
4 days
1 week
7 weeks 2
1 week
3 weeks 3
4 weeks
1 week 4
4 weeks
1 week
2 days

Eid-ul-Azha (Zul-hijja 10, 1436 A.H.) expected on Thursday September 24, 2015 A.D.
Industrial Open House & Careers' Fair is tentatively scheduled on April 07-08, 2016
Convocation is expected in first week of June 2016
Eid-ul-Fitr (Shawwal 01, 1437 A.H.) expected on Thursday July 07, 2016 A.D.

The Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology is committed to a comprehensive policy of equal
opportunities for students and prospective students in its admissions policy, in all aspects of its teaching and examining, and in its
provision of student services and related facilities.
The aim of the policy is to ensure that all students are treated equally, irrespective of race, colour, nationality, ethnic origin,
gender, age, disability, political or religious belief, or socio-economic class.
159
6

How to get to GIK Institute


PESHAWAR

The Institute is less than one and half hour drive


from Islamabad and Peshawar.
Starting from Islamabad, exiting IslamabadPeshawar Motorway M1(Point C) at Ghazi
Interchange, follow road towords Tarbela and reach
Campus after passing through Ghazi Barrage.

TOPI
ISLAMABAD

Starting from Peshawar, you should follow the


Motorway M1 (Point A) till you reach Swabi
Interchange. From there come to Topi and the
campus via Swabi.

LAHORE

QUETTA

KARACHI

GIK Institute
Swabi Interchange
C

Ghazi Interchange

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