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5051A

Monitoring and Troubleshooting


Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007
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Product Number: 5051AT

Part Number: X13-55145

Released: 02/2007

Version 1.2
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Contents xi

Table of Contents
Introduction
Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... iii
Workshop Materials ......................................................................................................................... iv
Microsoft Learning Product Types.................................................................................................. vii
How to Get the Most Out of a Workshop..........................................................................................x
Microsoft Learning ........................................................................................................................... xi
Microsoft Certification Program ..................................................................................................... xiii
Facilities........................................................................................................................................ xvii
About This Workshop ...................................................................................................................xviii
Prerequisites................................................................................................................................... xx
Workshop Outline .......................................................................................................................... xxi
Introduction to the Workshop Business Scenario.........................................................................xxiii
Virtual Machine Environment....................................................................................................... xxiv
Demonstration: Using Microsoft Virtual Server ...........................................................................xxvii

Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting


Overview....................................................................................................................................... 1-1
Introduction to Microsoft Operations Manager ............................................................................. 1-2
Introduction to Troubleshooting Exchange Server 2007 .............................................................. 1-4
Demonstration: Using MOM to Monitor Exchange Servers.......................................................... 1-7
Lab: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting ...................................... 1-9

Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and


Connectivity
Overview....................................................................................................................................... 2-1
Tools for Monitoring Client Performance and Connectivity .......................................................... 2-2
Process for Troubleshooting MAPI Clients................................................................................... 2-5
Process for Troubleshooting Client Access Server Clients.......................................................... 2-7
Lab Scenario............................................................................................................................... 2-10
Lab Outcomes ............................................................................................................................ 2-11
Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity ............................. 2-12
Lab Discussion ........................................................................................................................... 2-18

Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages


Overview....................................................................................................................................... 3-1
How Public Folder Access Works................................................................................................. 3-2
How Calendaring Works............................................................................................................... 3-4
Process for Troubleshooting Client Access Server Issues .......................................................... 3-6
Lab Scenario................................................................................................................................. 3-9
Lab Outcomes ............................................................................................................................ 3-10
Lab: Troubleshooting Access to Messaging Contents ............................................................... 3-11
Lab Discussion ........................................................................................................................... 3-16
xii Contents

Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow


Overview....................................................................................................................................... 4-1
Discussion: Tools for Monitoring Mail Flow .................................................................................. 4-2
Demonstration: Troubleshooting Message Transport Using Exchange Server 2007 Tools ........ 4-4
Process for Troubleshooting Internal Mail Flow ........................................................................... 4-6
Process for Troubleshooting External Mail Flow .......................................................................... 4-8
Lab Scenario............................................................................................................................... 4-10
Lab Outcomes ............................................................................................................................ 4-11
Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow......................................................................... 4-12
Lab Discussion ........................................................................................................................... 4-20

Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers


Overview....................................................................................................................................... 5-1
Tools for Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers......................................................... 5-2
Process for Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers.............................................................................. 5-4
Demonstration: Troubleshooting Mailbox Server Performance Issues ........................................ 5-6
Lab Scenario................................................................................................................................. 5-8
Lab Outcomes .............................................................................................................................. 5-9
Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers .............................................................. 5-10
Lab Discussion ........................................................................................................................... 5-16

Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services


Overview....................................................................................................................................... 6-1
Discussion: External and Additional Services Required by Exchange Server 2007.................... 6-2
External Services Required for Unified Messaging in Exchange Server 2007 ............................ 6-4
Monitoring External Services with MOM 2005 ............................................................................. 6-7
Lab Scenario................................................................................................................................. 6-9
Lab Outcomes ............................................................................................................................ 6-10
Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services.................................... 6-11
Lab Discussion ........................................................................................................................... 6-17

Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System


Overview....................................................................................................................................... 7-1
Tools for Identifying Trends in a Messaging System.................................................................... 7-2
Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack MOM Reports .......................................................... 7-4
Discussion: Information Required to Identify and Resolve Trends .............................................. 7-7
Lab Scenario................................................................................................................................. 7-9
Lab Outcomes ............................................................................................................................ 7-10
Lab: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System......................................................................... 7-11
Workshop Evaluation.................................................................................................................. 7-19
Trainer Preparation Checklist for
Workshop 5051A: Monitoring and
Troubleshooting Microsoft®
Exchange Server 2007
Trainer Preparation Checklist for Workshop 5051A 1

Courses or Workshops
It is highly recommended that you audit the following courses or workshops:
• Course 5047A: Introduction to Installing and Managing Microsoft
Exchange Server 2007
• Course 5049A: Managing Messaging Security Using Microsoft
Exchange Server 2007
• Course 5050A: Recovering Messaging Servers and Databases Using Microsoft
Exchange Server 2007
Or
• Course 3938A: Updating Your Skills from Microsoft Exchange Server 2000 or
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 to Microsoft Exchange Server 2007

Exams
To identify your technical proficiency with the content of this clinic, it is highly
recommended that you pass Exam 70-236, TS: Exchange Server 2007, Configuring.

Technical Preparation Activities


It is highly recommended that you complete the following technical preparation
activities:
• Read the Additional Readings included on the Trainer Materials DVD.
• Practice using the Microsoft product(s) and tools associated with this course.
• Practice setting up the classroom by following the instructions in Microsoft Virtual
PC Classroom Setup Guide or the Virtual Machine Build Guide.
• Review the documentation available on the Microsoft Exchange Server TechCenter
site at http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/exchange/default.mspx. This
site contains the latest information about Exchange Server 2007.
• Review the course error log, which is available in the Microsoft Download Center.
2 Trainer Preparation Checklist for Workshop 5051A

Instructional Preparation Activities


It is also highly recommended that you complete the following instructional preparation
activities:
Preparation activities
… ....... Read the Introduction session at the beginning of the course.
… ....... Read the Instructor Notes.
… ....... Practice presenting each demonstration.
… ....... Practice presenting each session.
o Anticipate the questions that students may have.
o Identify the key points for each topic and demonstration.
o Identify how each demonstration supports the session
topics and reinforces the session objectives.
o Identify examples, analogies, demonstrations, and
additional delivery tips that will help to clarify module
topics.
o Note any problems that you may encounter during a
demonstration and determine a course of action for how
you will resolve them in the classroom.
o Identify ways to improve a demonstration to provide a
more meaningful learning experience for your specific
audience.
… ....... Customize and print your instructor notes.
… ....... Consult the MCT Community Center for additional tips and
strategies—posted by your fellow MCTs—for teaching this clinic.
… ....... Review the updated information about the Microsoft Certification
Program on the Microsoft Learning Certifications Web site.
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

Microsoft Virtual PC Classroom


Setup Guide

Table of Contents
Introducing Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 1
Setup Overview 2
Classroom Requirements 3
Classroom Configuration 4
Instructor Computer Checklist 5
Instructor Computer Setup 6
Student Computer Checklist 14
Student Computer Setup 15
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otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights
covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from
Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,
copyrights, or other intellectual property.

The names of manufacturers, products, or URLs are provided for informational purposes only and Microsoft
makes no representations and warranties, either expressed, implied, or statutory, regarding these
manufacturers or the use of the products with any Microsoft technologies. The inclusion of a manufacturer or
product does not imply endorsement of Microsoft of the manufacturer or product. Links may be provided to
third party sites. Such sites are not under the control of Microsoft and Microsoft is not responsible for the
contents of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes or updates to such sites.
Microsoft is not responsible for webcasting or any other form of transmission received from any linked site.
Microsoft is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply
endorsement of Microsoft of the site or the products contained therein.

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Active Directory, Internet Explorer, MSDN, MS-DOS, Outlook, PowerPoint, SharePoint, Windows,
Windows NT, Windows Server, and WinFX are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Product Number: 5051AT

Version 1.0
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 1

Introducing Microsoft Virtual Server 2005


This course is designed using Microsoft® Virtual Server 2005. Virtual Server is a
technology that allows a single computer to act as a host for one or more virtual machines.
The virtual machines use a set of virtual devices that might or might not map to the
physical hardware of the host computer.
The software that is installed onto the virtual machine is unmodified, full-version, retail
software that operates exactly as it does when it is installed onto physical hardware.
The following definitions will help you with the remainder of this document:
• Virtual Server: A server application from Microsoft that allows you to install and
run other operating systems as a background service. Virtual Server does not ship
with this course, but it can be acquired from your MSDN® subscription, or it can be
ordered or downloaded from http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserversystem
/virtualserver/software/default.mspx.
• Virtual Server Administration Web site: This is the administrative Web site that
can be used to create, configure, start, stop, and manipulate virtual machines. You
can access the Virtual Server Administration Web site from the Programs Menu.
• Virtual machine remote control client (VMRC): An application that allows you to
connect and control virtual machines. You can access Virtual Machine Remote
Control Client from the Programs Menu. To connect to a virtual server, type
vmrc://localhost:5900 in VMRC, connect to server prompt, and then double-click
the virtual machine to which you wish to connect.
• Host computer: The physical computer onto which an operating system and the
Virtual Server application have been installed.
• Host operating system: The operating system that is running on the physical
computer.
• Virtual machine: The computer that is running inside of Virtual Server. In
this document, “Virtual Server” refers to the service running on the host, while
“virtual machine” refers to the guest operating system and any software that is
running inside of the Virtual Server service.
• Guest operating system: The operating system that is running inside the virtual
machine.
• Host key: The key that is designated to take the place of the CTRL+ALT
combination when logging on to Microsoft Windows®. By default, the host key is
the ALT key on the right side of the keyboard. HOST+DELETE means RIGHT-
ALT+DELETE. The host key can be changed in Virtual Machine Remote Control
Client (VMRC) by clicking Set Host Key on the Remote Control menu.
2 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

By default, the virtual machine will run inside a Virtual Server Remote Control Client
window on the host computer’s desktop. However, you can run the virtual machine in full
screen mode by pressing HOST+ENTER. Using the same key combination, you can
return to a windowed view.

Note: Pressing CTRL+ALT+DELETE while working with a virtual machine will


display the Windows Security dialog box for the host operating system. If this is
not desired, press ESC. To access the Windows Security dialog box for a guest
operating system, press HOST+DELETE. This is the only difference in the way the
software works in a virtual machine.

You can configure virtual machines to communicate with the host computer, other virtual
machines on the same host computer, other host computers, virtual machines on other
host computers, other physical computers on the network, or any combination thereof.
The setup instructions that you will follow as a part of this classroom setup guide will
configure Virtual Server and the virtual machines that will run on the host computer.
Changing any of the configuration settings might render the labs for this course unusable.

Setup Overview
The host computers must be set up with a default installation of Microsoft Windows 2000
Professional, Windows XP Professional, or Windows Server® 2003 Standard Edition.
For the purposes of this learning product, it is not necessary for the host computers to
be able to communicate with one another on the network. However, allowing them
to communicate with each other is recommended to make setup easier. The setup
procedures below assume that the host computers can communicate with each other for
setup purposes. You should note the administrator’s user name and password for the host
computers and provide this information to the instructor.

Important: It is highly recommended that you read the Partner Deployment Guide
on the Virtual PC page of the Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT) secure site. This
document contains valuable information on Microsoft Learning’s virtual machine
implementation and activation, in addition to tips on improving virtual machine
performance and troubleshooting.
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 3

Classroom Requirements
This learning product requires a classroom with a minimum of one computer for
the instructor and one for each student. Before class begins, use the following
information and instructions to install and configure all computers.

Hardware
The classroom computers require the following hardware and software configuration.

Hardware Level 5
• Pentium IV 2.4-gigahertz (GHz) processor
• PCI 2.1 bus
• 2 gigabyte (GB) of random access memory (RAM)
• 40 GB hard disk, 7200 RPM
• DVD drive
• Non–Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) network adapter: 10/100-megabit-per-
second (Mbps) required full duplex
• 16-MB video adapter (32 MB recommended)
• Super VGA (SVGA) 17-inch monitor
• Microsoft Mouse or compatible pointing device
• Sound card with amplified speakers
• Projection display device that supports SVGA 800 x 600, 256 colors

In addition, the instructor computer must be connected to a projection display device that
supports SVGA 800 x 600 pixels, 256 colors.

Software
Please note that, unless otherwise indicated, this software is not included in the Trainer
Materials disc. This learning product was developed and tested on the following software,
which is required for the classroom computers:
• Windows XP Professional, Windows 2000 Professional, or Windows Server 2003
Standard Edition
• Virtual Server 2005 R2
• Microsoft Office PowerPoint® 2003 (instructor computer only)
4 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

Classroom Configuration
Estimated time to set up the classroom: 180 minutes
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 5

Instructor Computer Checklist


… 1. Install Internet Information Services (IIS).
… 2. Install Virtual Server 2005 R2.
… 3. Install the virtual disk files.
… 4. Create a desktop shortcut for VMRC.
… 5. Add virtual machines.
… 6. Activate virtual machines.
… 7. Configure virtual machines to discard changes at shutdown.
… 8. Set VHDs to read-only.
… 9. Create a setup share.
… 10. Install courseware fonts.
… 11. Install the PowerPoint slides.
… 12. Install the most current Macromedia Flash Plug-in (if needed).
6 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

Instructor Computer Setup


Use the instructions in the following section to set up the classroom manually. Before
starting the installation of the instructor computer, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows
XP Professional, or Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition must be installed on the
computer. PowerPoint 2003 must also be installed.

Important: The operating systems installed on the virtual machines in this learning
product have not been activated. To receive product keys that will activate the
virtual machines, you must contact Microsoft Learning at mslpkd@microsoft.com,
including your program ID number in your e-mail message. It might take up to 24
hours to receive a response. (It is not necessary to contact Microsoft Learning if
you have already done so for another learning product.) You will use the product
keys to activate all virtual machines that you receive from Microsoft Learning. You
will need only one key for each operating system. For more information, please see
the “Virtual PC Deployment Guide” section of the following MCT secure site:
https://mcp.microsoft.com/mct/vpc/default.aspx.
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 7

1. Install Internet Information Services (IIS)


Note: If Internet Information Services is already installed, you can skip this
procedure.

1. On the instructor computer, click Start, and then click Control Panel.
2. In Control Panel, if the Control Panel is configured for Classic View, double-click
Add or Remove Programs. If the Control Panel is configured for Category View,
click Add or Remove Programs, and then on the Add or Remove Programs page,
click Add or Remove Programs.
3. In the Add or Remove Programs window, click Add/Remove Windows
Components.
4. In the Windows Components Wizard, click Internet Information Services (IIS)
and then click Details.
5. In the Subcomponents of Internet Information Services (IIS) list, select World
Wide Web Service and then click OK.
6. In the Windows Components Wizard, click Next.
7. If the Files Needed dialog box appears, insert the Windows XP CDROM. Click
Browse and browse to the CDROM. Click Open, and then in the Files Needed
dialog box, click OK.
8. When the wizard has completed, click Finish.
9. Close the Add or Remove Programs window and close Control Panel.

2. Install Virtual Server 2005 R2


Note: If Virtual Server 2005 R2 is already installed, you can skip this procedure.

1. Insert the Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 compact disc (CD) into the CD-ROM drive.
2. If autorun is disabled, navigate to the root of the CD, and double-click Setup.exe.
3. On the Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 Setup screen, click Install Microsoft
Virtual Server 2005 R2.
4. In the License Agreement page, select I accept the terms in the license agreement,
and then click Next.
5. In the Customer Information page, enter a User Name, Organization, and the
product key for your version of Virtual Server, and then click Next.
6. On the Setup Type page, click Complete and then click Next.
8 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

7. On the Configure Components page, click Next.


8. On the second Configure Components page, click Next.
9. On the Ready to Install page, click Install.
10. On the Setup Complete page, click Finish.

3. Install the virtual disk files


In this task, you will install the virtual disks and configuration files by running the self-
extracting executable files in the Drives folder in the Trainer Materials disc.

Note: If you are downloading from the MCT Download Center, copy the learning
product files and run the executable file. Copy the entire learning product contents
to a DVD or to your local hard disk.

The base virtual hard disks are available separately and can be downloaded from
the MCT Download Center. You can find them under Base Virtual Hard Disks in the
Learning products list.

1. Double-click Base05D.exe in the \Setup\Drives folder of the Trainer Materials disc.


2. In the Official Microsoft Learning Product End-User License Agreement window,
click Accept to indicate that you accept the terms in the license agreement.
3. In the WinRAR self-extracting archive window, in the Destination folder text box,
ensure that C:\Program Files\Microsoft Learning\Base is listed, and then click
Install.
Please wait while the base virtual hard disk file is extracted. This might take a few
minutes.
4. Repeat steps 1-3 for the Base05A.exe file.
5. Double-click 5051A-MTL-EX1.exe in the \Setup\Drives folder of the Trainer
Materials disc.
6. In the Official Microsoft Learning Product End-User License Agreement window,
click Accept to indicate that you accept the terms in the license agreement.
7. In the WinRAR self-extracting archive window, in the Destination folder text box,
ensure that C:\Program Files\Microsoft Learning\5051\Drives is listed, and then
click Install.
Please wait while the base virtual hard disk file is extracted. This might take a few
minutes.
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 9

8. Repeat steps 4–6 to install the following files:


• 5051A-MTL-SRV1.exe
• 5051A-MTL-EX2.exe
• 5051A-MTL-MOM1.exe
• 5051A-MTL-Edge1.exe
• 5051A-TOR-EX1.exe
• 5051A-MTL-CL1.exe
• 5051A-Allfiles.exe

4. Create a desktop shortcut for VMRC


1. Navigate to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Virtual Server\VMRC Client.
2. Right-click and drag vmrc.exe to the desktop.
3. From the Context menu, select Create Shortcuts Here.

5. Add virtual machines


1. Click Start, click All Programs, click Microsoft Virtual Server, and then click
Virtual Server Administration Website.
2. Log on the Virtual Server Administration Website using the username and password
for an administrator on the local computer.
3. On the Virtual Server Administration Website, on the left, click Server Properties.
4. In Servername Properties, click Search paths.
5. In Search paths box, type C:\Program Files\Microsoft Learning
\5051\Drives\ and click OK.
6. In Servername Properties, click Virtual Machine Remote Control (VMRC)
Server.
7. In VMRC server section, click to select Enable and then click OK.
8. On the menu on the left, under Virtual Machines, click Add.
9. In the Known configuration files list select C:\Program Files\Microsoft
Learning\5051\Drives\5051A-MTL-EX1.vmc and click Add.
10 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

10. In the virtual machine configuration section, click Network adapters. On the
network adapter properties page, ensure that each network adapter is connected to the
Internal Network. Click OK.

Important: Do not change the RAM allocation for the virtual machine. Doing so
may cause the lab exercises or practices to become unstable or to cease
functioning.

11. Repeat steps 8–10 for the following virtual machines:


• 5051A-MTL-SRV1.vmc
• 5051A-MTL-EX2.vmc
• 5051A-MTL-MOM1.vmc
• 5051A-MTL-Edge1.vmc
• 5051A-TOR-EX1.vmc
• 5051A-MTL-CL1.vmc

6. Activate virtual machines


In this task, you will activate Windows operating systems within the virtual machines.

Important: In some rare cases, a virtual machine might stop responding sometime
between its first launch and first shutdown. This is due to a known issue in Virtual
PC 2004 and its interaction with newer processors.

If this occurs, close the virtual machine and select Turn Off and Save Changes,
ensuring that the Commit Changes to the Virtual Hard Disk check box is
selected. The problem will rectify itself and not recur the next time the virtual
machine is started.

It is recommended that you save the virtual machines after activating them, so that
in the future you can set up the classroom without needing to activate them again.

This section requires the use of the product keys supplied by Microsoft Learning.
For instructions on obtaining these product keys, see the Important note at the
beginning of the Instructor Computer Setup section.

1. Click Start, click All Programs, click Microsoft Virtual Server, and then click
Virtual Machine Remote Control Client.
2. In Connect to server box, type vmrc://localhost:5900 and then click Connect.
3. If a dialog box appears asking if you want to continue with an unencrypted
connection, select the Don’t ask me again check box, and then click Yes.
4. In the Administration Console on localhost window, double-click 5051A-MTL-
EX1.
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 11

5. Log on to the virtual machine as Administrator, with a password of Pa$$w0rd.

Note: Pressing CTRL+ALT+DELETE while working with a virtual machine will


display the Windows Security dialog box for the host—not the guest—operating
system. To log on to the guest operating system running in the virtual machine,
press HOST+DELETE (generally RIGHT-ALT+DELETE).

6. In the Windows Product Activation alert box, click Yes.


7. On the Let’s activate Windows page, select the Yes, I want to telephone a
customer service representative to activate Windows option, and then click Next.
8. On the Activate Windows by phone page, click the Change Product Key button.

Note: You might need to scroll down the window to see this button.

9. On the Change Product Key page, enter the learning product-specific product key
provided by Microsoft Learning, and then click Update.
10. On the Activate Windows by phone page, in the Step 1 list, select your location.
11. Dial the telephone number that is displayed in Step 2.
12. Follow the telephone instructions to activate Windows. This will take a few minutes.

Note: You should confirm that the D: drive is mapped to the Allfiles drive for each
VPC that requires an Allfiles drive. To do this, open Windows Explorer and confirm
that the D: drive is listed. If it is not listed, open Computer Management from the
Administrative Tools folder and click Disk Management. Right-click the space
beside Disk 1 and click Change Drive Letter and Paths. Click Add, ensure that D
is listed beside Assign the following driver letter and click OK. Close Computer
Management.

13. Close Virtual Machine Remote Control client.


14. After logon is completed, switch to Virtual Server Administration Web site, hold
your mouse over 5051A-MTL-EX1 and click Shut Down Guest OS and Commit
Undo Disks.
15. Repeat steps 1–13 for the following virtual machines:
• 5051A-MTL-SRV1
• 5051A-MTL-EX2
• 5051A-MTL-MOM1
• 5051A-MTL-Edge1
• 5051A-TOR-EX1
• 5051A-MTL-CL1
12 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

7. Configure virtual machines to discard changes at


shutdown
In this task, you will configure the virtual machines to discard changes when shut down
between modules.

Note: After the virtual machines are activated, configure them to discard changes
at shutdown to enforce modularity. Saving state between modules might cause
errors. Discarding changes between modules also speeds up shutdown of the
virtual machines.

1. In the Virtual Server Administration Web site, in Master Status view, select 5051A-
MTL-EX1, and then click Edit Configuration.
2. Click Hard Disks and, in the Hard Disk Properties page, confirm that Enable Undo
Disks is selected. If the option is not selected, select it.
3. Click OK.
4. Repeat steps 1-3 for the following virtual machines:
• 5051A-MTL-SRV1.vmc
• 5051A-MTL-EX2.vmc
• 5051A-MTL-MOM1.vmc
• 5051A-MTL-Edge1.vmc
• 5051A-TOR-EX1.vmc
• 5051A-MTL-CL1.vmc

8. Set VHDs to read-only


In this task, you will set the read-only attribute on the VHD files.
1. Navigate to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Learning\Base.
2. Right-click the Base05D.vhd file, and then click Properties.
3. Under Attributes, select the Read-only check box, and then click OK.
4. Right-click the Base05A.vhd file, and then click Properties.
5. Under Attributes, select the Read-only check box, and then click OK.
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 13

9. Create a setup share


In this task, you will Share virtual machine files for installing on student computers.
1. In Windows Explorer, right-click C:\Program Files\Microsoft Learning\Base, and
then click Sharing (on Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003) or Sharing and
Security (on Windows XP).
2. On the Sharing tab, select Share this Folder, type Base_Drives in the Share name
box, and then click OK.
3. In Windows Explorer, right-click C:\Program Files\Microsoft Learning
\5051\Drives, and then click Sharing (on Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003)
or Sharing and Security (on Windows XP).
4. On the Sharing tab, select Share this Folder, type 5051_Drives in the Share name
box, and then click OK.

10. Install courseware fonts


In this task, you will install courseware fonts by running Fonts.exe.
1. In the Trainer Materials disc, in the \Setup folder, double click Fonts.exe and then
click OK.
2. In the Courseware fonts dialog box, click Yes.
3. In the Courseware fonts message box, click OK.

11. Install the PowerPoint slides


In this task, you will install the PowerPoint slides for the learning product by running
5051_ppt.msi.
• In the Trainer Materials disc, in the \Setup folder, double-click 5051_ppt.msi and
then click OK.

12. Install the most current Macromedia Flash Plug-in


(if needed)
In this task, you will install the most current Flash plug-in by running Flash7.exe.
1. On the Trainer Materials disc, in the \Setup folder, double-click Flash7.exe, and then
click OK.
2. In the Flash 7 ActiveX Control Installer dialog box, click Yes to install the control.
3. When installation is complete, click OK.
14 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

Student Computer Checklist


… 1. Install Internet Information Services (IIS).
… 2. Install Virtual Server.
… 3. Install the virtual disk files.
… 4. Create a desktop shortcut for VMRC.
… 5. Add virtual machines.
… 6. Configure virtual machines to discard changes at shutdown.
… 7. Set VHDs to read-only.
5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 15

Student Computer Setup


To set up the student computers, complete the items in the Student Computer Checklist.

Caution: These instructions assume network connectivity between the instructor


computer and the student computers. If you do not have connectivity, we
recommend copying the activated virtual machines to the student computers by
means of a burned DVD or universal serial bus (USB) drive, for example, to avoid
the need to activate the virtual machines on each student computer. If you use the
original virtual machines from the Trainer Materials disc, you will need to activate
them on each student computer.

1. Install Internet Information Services (IIS)


Note: If Internet Information Services is already installed, you can skip this step.

• See detailed instructions in the Instructor Computer Setup section.

2. Install Virtual Server


Note: If Virtual Server 2005 is already installed, you can skip this step.

• See detailed instructions in the Instructor Computer Setup section.

3. Install the virtual disk files


1. Copy the entire contents of the Base_Drives folder from the
\\InstructorComputer\Base_Drives share to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Learning
\Base.
2. Copy the entire contents of the \5051_Drives folder from the \\InstructorComputer
share to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Learning\5051\Drives.

4. Create a desktop short cut for VMRC


• See detailed instructions in the Instructor Computer Setup section.

5. Add virtual machines


• See detailed instructions in the Instructor Computer Setup section.
16 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007

6. Configure virtual machines to discard changes at


shutdown
• See detailed instructions in the Instructor Computer Setup section.

7. Set VHD to read-only


• See detailed instructions in the Instructor Computer Setup section.
Introduction

Table of Contents
Introduction iii
Workshop Materials iv
Microsoft Learning Product Types vii
How to Get the Most Out of a Workshop x
Microsoft Learning xi
Microsoft Certification Program xiii
Facilities xvii
About This Workshop xviii
Prerequisites xx
Workshop Outline xxi
Introduction to the Workshop Business Scenario xxiii
Virtual Machine Environment xxiv
Demonstration: Using Microsoft Virtual Server xxvii
Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, is subject to change
without notice. Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names,
e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any
real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or
should be inferred. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting
the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval
system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights
covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from
Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,
copyrights, or other intellectual property.

The names of manufacturers, products, or URLs are provided for informational purposes only and Microsoft
makes no representations and warranties, either expressed, implied, or statutory, regarding these
manufacturers or the use of the products with any Microsoft technologies. The inclusion of a manufacturer or
product does not imply endorsement of Microsoft of the manufacturer or product. Links may be provided to
third party sites. Such sites are not under the control of Microsoft and Microsoft is not responsible for the
contents of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes or updates to such sites.
Microsoft is not responsible for webcasting or any other form of transmission received from any linked site.
Microsoft is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply
endorsement of Microsoft of the site or the products contained therein.

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Microsoft Press, Active Directory, ActiveSync, BizTalk, Internet Explorer, Outlook, PowerPoint,
SharePoint, SmartScreen, Visual Studio, Windows, Windows Mobile, Windows NT, Windows PowerShell, and
Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
and/or other countries.

All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Version 1.0
Introduction iii

Introduction
iv Introduction

Workshop Materials

The following materials are included with your kit:


• Student workbook. The student workbook contains the material covered in class, in
addition to the hands-on lab exercises.
• Resource Toolkit. The Resource Toolkit is an online interface that contains
resources that you will use in this workshop’s scenario-based labs. The lab scenario
information and resources, such as procedures and annotated screenshots, will help
you complete the labs. In addition, the resources are printed in a separate book.
• Student Materials CD. The Student Materials CD contains a Web page that provides
you with links to resources pertaining to this workshop, including additional readings,
lab files, multimedia presentations, and workshop-related Web sites.

Note: To open the Web page, insert the Student Materials CD into the CD-ROM
drive, and then in the root directory of the CD, double-click StartCD.exe.

• Workshop evaluation. At the end of the workshop, you will have the opportunity to
complete an online evaluation to provide feedback on the workshop, training facility,
and instructor.

To provide additional comments or feedback on the workshop, send e-mail to


support@mscourseware.com. To inquire about the Microsoft Certification Program, send
e-mail to mcphelp@microsoft.com.
Introduction v

Student Materials CD Contents


The Student Materials CD contains the following files and folders:
• Autorun.inf. When the CD is inserted into the CD drive, this file opens StartCD.exe.
• Default.hta. This file opens the Student Materials Web page. It provides you with
resources pertaining to this clinic, including additional reading, review and lab
answers, lab files, multimedia presentations, and clinic-related Web sites.
• Readme.txt. This file explains how to install the software for viewing the Student
Materials CD and its contents and how to open the Student Materials Web page.
• StartCD.exe. When the CD is inserted into the CD drive, or when you double-click
the StartCD.exe file, this file opens the CD.
• StartCD.ini. This file contains instructions to launch StartCD.exe.
• Fonts. This folder contains fonts that may be required to view the Microsoft® Word
documents that are included with this clinic.
• Webfiles. This folder contains the files that are required to view the workshop Web
page. To open the Web page, open Microsoft Windows® Explorer, and in the root
directory of the CD, double-click StartCD.exe.
• Wordview. This folder contains the Word Viewer that is used to view any Word
document (.doc) files that are included on the CD.
vi Introduction

Document Conventions
The following conventions are used in clinic materials to distinguish elements of the text:
Convention Use
Bold Represents commands, command options, and syntax that must be typed
exactly as shown. It also indicates commands on menus and buttons,
dialog box titles and options, and icon and menu names.
Italic In syntax statements or descriptive text, indicates argument names or
placeholders for variable information. Italic is also used for introducing new
terms, for book titles, and for emphasis in the text.
Title Capitals Indicate domain names, user names, computer names, directory names,
and folder and file names, except when specifically referring to case-
sensitive names. Unless otherwise indicated, you can use lowercase letters
when you type a directory name or file name in a dialog box or at a
command prompt.
ALL CAPITALS Indicate the names of keys, key sequences, and key combinations —for
example, ALT+SPACEBAR.
monospace Represents code samples or examples of screen text.
[] In syntax statements, enclose optional items. For example, [filename] in
command syntax indicates that you can choose to type a file name with the
command. Type only the information within the brackets, not the brackets
themselves.
{} In syntax statements, enclose required items. Type only the information
within the braces, not the braces themselves.
| In syntax statements, separates an either/or choice.
X Indicates a procedure with sequential steps.
... In syntax statements, specifies that the preceding item may be repeated.
. Represents an omitted portion of a code sample.
.
.
Introduction vii

Microsoft Learning Product Types

Microsoft Learning offers the following instructor-led products. Each is specific to a


particular audience type and level of experience. The different product types also tend to
suit different learning styles. These types are as follows:
• Courses are for information technology (IT) professionals and developers who are
new to a particular product or technology and for experienced individuals who prefer
to learn in a traditional classroom format. Courses provide a relevant and guided
learning experience that combines lecture and practice to deliver thorough coverage
of a Microsoft product or technology. Courses are designed to address the needs of
learners engaged in planning, design, implementation, management, and support
phases of the technology adoption life-cycle. They provide detailed information by
focusing on concepts and principles, reference content, and in-depth, hands-on lab
activities to ensure knowledge transfer. Typically, the content of a course is broad,
addressing a wide range of tasks necessary for the job role.
• Workshops are for knowledgeable IT professionals and developers who learn best
by doing and exploring. Workshops provide a hands-on learning experience in which
participants use Microsoft products in a safe and collaborative environment based on
real-world scenarios.
viii Introduction

• iWorker courses or Information Worker Courses are scenario-based courseware


lines to compete in the desktop applications market. This scenario-based courseware
line will fill a need for applications training that supports on-the-job performance
improvement with business and productivity solutions (rather than feature-based
training). The purpose of an iWorker course is to promote skills/ knowledge transfer
in the context of business scenarios to accomplish business objectives by working
individually or collaboratively to find answers. iWorker courses are aimed at users
who have working knowledge of the technology and are interested in applying that
knowledge in specific business scenarios.
Introduction ix

Microsoft Learning Product Types (continued)

• Clinics are for IT professionals, developers, and technical decision makers. Clinics
offer a detailed “how to” presentation that describes the features and functionality
of an existing or new Microsoft product or technology, and that showcases product
demonstrations and solutions. Clinics focus on how specific features will solve
business problems.
• First Look Clinics are products specifically designed to deliver early content
or critical information that Product Groups or other internal customers need
communicated quickly and broadly. The First Look products convey knowledge-
based (not skills-based) information to an audience profile identified as high-level
Business Decision Makers.
• Hands-On Labs provide IT professionals and developers with hands-on experience
with an existing or new Microsoft product or technology. Hands-on labs provide a
realistic and safe environment to encourage knowledge transfer by learning through
doing. The labs provided are completely prescriptive so that no lab answer keys are
required. There is very little lecture or text content provided in hands-on labs, aside
from lab introductions, context setting, and lab reviews.
x Introduction

How to Get the Most Out of a Workshop

The workshop is a fast-paced learning format that focuses on labs rather than lecture.
In a workshop, lecture time is kept to a minimum so that students have the opportunity
to focus on hands-on, scenario-based labs. The workshop format enables students to
reinforce their learning by performing tasks and solving problems.
Because the lecture focuses only on a topic’s most important or difficult elements,
the labs include a Resource Toolkit that contains information such as procedures,
demonstrations, job aids, and other resources that provide you with the information
that you need to complete a lab. Your instructor also can answer questions to help you
complete the lab. The instructor will lead discussions after the lab and will review best
practices.
Introduction xi

Microsoft Learning

Microsoft Learning develops Official Microsoft Learning Product (OMLP) courseware


for computer professionals who use Microsoft products and technologies to design,
develop, support, implement, or manage solutions. These learning products provide
comprehensive, skills-based training in instructor-led and online formats.

Messaging Technology Specialist Curriculum for Microsoft


Exchange Server 2007
The Messaging Technology Specialist curriculum is designed to enable professionals
to target specific technologies and distinguish themselves by demonstrating in-depth
knowledge and expertise in the broad range of specialized technologies. Microsoft
Technology Specialists are consistently capable of implementing, building,
troubleshooting, and debugging a particular Microsoft technology.
It is recommended that you take the following learning products in this order:
• Course 5047A: Introduction to Installing and Managing Microsoft
Exchange Server 2007
• Course 5049A: Managing Messaging Security Using Microsoft
Exchange Server 2007
• Course 5050A: Recovering Messaging Servers and Databases Using Microsoft
Exchange Server 2007
• Workshop 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft Exchange Server 2007
xii Introduction

Other related learning products may become available in the future. For up-to-date
information about recommended learning products, visit the Microsoft Learning Web site.

Microsoft Learning Information


For more information, visit the Microsoft Learning Web site at
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/.
Introduction xiii

Microsoft Certification Program

Microsoft Learning offers a variety of certification credentials for developers and IT


professionals. The Microsoft Certification Program (MCP) is the leading certification
program for validating your experience and skills, keeping you competitive in today’s
changing business environment.

Related Certification Exams


This course helps students to prepare for Exam 70-236, TS: Exchange Server 2007,
Configuring.
Exam 70-236 is a core exam for the Technology Series.

MCP Certifications
The MCP program includes the following certifications.
MCITP
The new Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP) credential allows IT professionals
to distinguish themselves as experts in their specific area of focus. There is a
straightforward upgrade path from the MCDBA certification to the new MCITP
credentials. There are currently three IT Professional certifications—database
development, database administration, and business intelligence:
• Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Database Developer
• Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Database Administrator
• Microsoft Certified IT Professional: Business Intelligence Developer
xiv Introduction

MCPD
The Microsoft Certified Professional Developer (MCPD) credential highlights developer
job roles, featuring specific areas of expertise. There is a straightforward upgrade path
from the MCAD and MCSD for Microsoft .NET certifications to the new MCPD
credentials. There are three MCPD certification paths—Web application development,
Windows development, and enterprise applications development:
• Microsoft Certified Professional Developer: Web Developer
• Microsoft Certified Professional Developer: Windows Developer
• Microsoft Certified Professional Developer: Enterprise Applications Developer

MCTS
The Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) credential enables professionals
to target specific technologies and distinguish themselves by demonstrating in-depth
knowledge of, and expertise in, the technologies with which they work. There are
currently five MCTS certifications:
• Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: .NET Framework 2.0 Web Applications
• Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: .NET Framework 2.0 Windows
Applications
• Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: .NET Framework 2.0 Distributed
Applications
• Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: SQL Server™ 2005
• Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist: BizTalk® Serve

MCDST on Microsoft Windows


The Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) certification is for
professionals who successfully support and educate end users, and who troubleshoot
application and operating system issues on desktop computers running the Windows
operating system.
MCSA on Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003
The Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) certification is designed
for professionals who implement, manage, and troubleshoot existing network and
system environments based on the Windows Server 2003 platform. Implementation
responsibilities include installing and configuring parts of systems. Management
responsibilities include administering and supporting systems.
Introduction xv

MCSE on Microsoft Windows Server 2003


The Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) credential is the premier certification
for professionals who analyze business requirements and design and implement
infrastructure for business solutions based on the Windows Server 2003 platform.
Implementation responsibilities include installing, configuring, and troubleshooting
network systems.
MCAD for Microsoft .NET
The Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD) for Microsoft .NET credential
provides industry recognition for professional developers who use Microsoft Visual
Studio® .NET and Web services to develop and maintain department-level applications,
components, Web or desktop clients, or back-end data services, or who work in teams
developing enterprise applications. The credential covers job tasks ranging from
developing to deploying and maintaining these solutions.
MCSD for Microsoft .NET
The Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (MCSD) for Microsoft .NET credential is
the top-level certification for advanced developers who design and develop leading-edge
enterprise solutions by using Microsoft development tools and technologies as well as the
Microsoft .NET Framework. The credential covers job tasks ranging from analyzing
business requirements to maintaining solutions.
MCDBA on Microsoft SQL Server 2000
The Microsoft Certified Database Administrator (MCDBA) credential is the premier
certification for professionals who implement and administer SQL Server 2000 databases.
The certification is appropriate for individuals who derive physical database designs,
develop logical data models, create physical databases, create data services by using
Transact-SQL, manage and maintain databases, configure and manage security, monitor
and optimize databases, and install and configure SQL Server.
MCP
The Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) credential is for individuals who have
the skills to implement successfully a Microsoft product or technology as part of an
organization’s business solution. Hands-on experience with the product is necessary to
successfully achieve certification.
MCT
Microsoft Certified Trainers (MCTs) demonstrate the instructional and technical skills
that qualify them to deliver Official Microsoft Learning Products through a Microsoft
Certified Partner for Learning Solutions (CPLS).
xvi Introduction

Certification Requirements
Certification requirements differ for each certification category and are specific to the
products and job functions that the certification addresses. To earn a certification
credential, you must pass rigorous certification exams that provide a valid and reliable
measure of technical proficiency and expertise.

Additional Information: See the Microsoft Learning Web site at


http://www.microsoft.com/learning/. You can also send e-mail to
mcphelp@microsoft.com if you have specific certification questions.

Acquiring the Skills Tested by an MCP Exam


Official Microsoft Learning Products can help you develop the skills that you need to
do your job. They also complement the experience that you gain while working with
Microsoft products and technologies. However, no one-to-one correlation exists between
Official Microsoft Learning Products and MCP exams. Microsoft does not expect or
intend for the courses to be the sole preparation method for passing MCP exams.
Practical product knowledge and experience are also necessary to pass MCP exams.
To help prepare for MCP exams, use the preparation guides that are available for each
exam. Each Exam Preparation Guide contains exam-specific information, such as a list
of the topics on which you will be tested. These guides are available on the Microsoft
Learning Web site at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/.
Introduction xvii

Facilities
xviii Introduction

About This Workshop

This section provides you with a brief description of the workshop, objectives, and target
audience.

Description
This two-day workshop teaches messaging specialists to monitor and troubleshoot an
Exchange Server 2007 messaging system. You will learn how to correlate client and
server issues and resolve those issues. You also will learn how to monitor systems and
create reports from the monitoring data.

Objectives
After completing this workshop, you will be able to:
• Use the Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack for Microsoft
Operations Manager (MOM) 2005 to monitor Exchange servers.
• Monitor and troubleshoot client performance and connectivity.
• Identify and resolve issues related to access of resources and messages.
• Monitor and troubleshoot mail flow.
• Monitor and troubleshoot Mailbox servers.
• Monitor and troubleshoot external and additional services.
• Identify trends in a messaging system.
Introduction xix

Audience
The audience for this course includes people with experience with Exchange Server 2007
or previous versions of Exchange Sever. These people will have experience installing and
configuring Exchange Server, configuring recipients and mailboxes, and supporting
Exchange Server clients. People coming into the course are expected to have at least
three years experience working in the Information Technology field—typically in the
areas of network administration or Windows Server administration—and one year of
Exchange Server administration experience.
xx Introduction

Prerequisites

This workshop requires that you meet the following prerequisites:


• Fundamental knowledge of network technologies including DNS and firewall
technologies.
• Experience administering Exchange Server 2007.
• Experience with the Windows Server 2003 operating system.
• Experience with Active Directory® directory service in Windows Server 2003.
• Experience with managing backup and restore on Windows Servers.
• Experience using Windows management and monitoring tools such as Microsoft
Management Console, Active Directory Users and Computers, Performance Monitor,
Event Viewer, and IIS Administrator.
• Experience using Windows networking and troubleshooting tools such as Network
Monitor, Telnet, and NSLookup.
Introduction xxi

Workshop Outline

Unit 1, “Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting,” provides


an overview of how to use the Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack
for Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) 2005 to monitor Exchange servers. The
information gathered while performing this unit’s monitoring and troubleshooting tasks
will help you to determine the next logical troubleshooting step. After completing this
unit, you will be able to monitor Exchange servers using MOM and explain an Exchange
troubleshooting model.
Unit 2, “Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity,”
introduces the tools for monitoring client performance and connectivity that are used for
Exchange Server 2007. The information in this unit will assist you in troubleshooting
client-access issues and using the appropriate tools to restore service to users as quickly
as possible. After completing this unit, you will be able to monitor and troubleshoot client
performance and connectivity.
Unit 3, “Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages,” describes troubleshooting
issues that are related to client access to resources and messages. The information in this
unit includes an explanation of how public folder access works and how calendaring
works in Exchange Server 2007 and describes the process for troubleshooting client-
access server issues. After completing this unit, you will be able to identify and resolve
issues related to access of resources and messages.
xxii Introduction

Unit 4, “Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow,” describes troubleshooting issues


that are related to mail flow issues. This unit introduces the tools for monitoring mail
flow and describes the troubleshooting processes for both internal and external mail flow.
After completing this unit, you will be able to monitor and troubleshoot mail flow.
Unit 5, “Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers,” describes troubleshooting
issues that are related to configuration errors or failures on a messaging server. This unit
introduces the tools for monitoring Exchange Mailbox servers, and describes the process
for troubleshooting Exchange Mailbox servers and the troubleshooting guidelines. After
completing this unit, you will be able to monitor and troubleshoot Mailbox servers.
Unit 6, “Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services,”
describes troubleshooting issues that are related to external and additional services that
are required by Exchange Server 2007. This unit introduces the external and additional
services required by Exchange Server 2007, the external services required for Unified
Messaging in Exchange Server 2007, and the tools for monitoring external services. After
completing this unit, you will be able to monitor and troubleshoot external and additional
services.
Unit 7, “Identifying Trends in a Messaging System,” discusses how to proactively
address issues in an Exchange Server 2007 environment by identifying and addressing
trends in a messaging system. This unit describes the tools for identifying trends in a
messaging system and discusses how to apply considerations for identifying and
addressing these trends. After completing this unit, you will be able to identify and
address trends in a messaging system.
Introduction xxiii

Introduction to the Workshop Business Scenario

This topic introduces a fictitious business scenario, your role in that scenario, and one
potential solution to the business problem presented in the scenario. Your instructor will
demonstrate one solution. You will be able to create your own solution upon completion
of this workshop.

Introduction to A. Datum Corporation


A. Datum Limited is a medium sized research company based in Sydney, Australia, with
several other locations worldwide. The company has recently transitioned from running
Exchange Server 2003 to running Exchange Server 2007.

Your role in A. Datum Corporation


You are the messaging administrator at A. Datum Corporation. You are responsible for
monitoring and troubleshooting issues with the messaging environment. You also are
responsible for identifying and addressing trends within the messaging environment.
xxiv Introduction

Virtual Machine Environment

This section provides the information for setting up the classroom environment to support
the workshop’s business scenario.

Virtual Machine Configuration


In this workshop, you will use Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 to perform the hands-on
practices and labs.

Important: Throughout this workshop, when you start the virtual machines, ensure
that you start 5051A-MTL-EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any
other virtual machines. If you receive a notification that one or more services failed
to start when starting a virtual machine, open the Services console on the virtual
machine and ensure that all Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to
start automatically are started.
Introduction xxv

The following table shows the role of each virtual machine used in this workshop:
Virtual machine Role
MTL-MOM1 Member server running Microsoft Operations Manager 2005 with Service
Pack 1.
MTL-EX1 Domain controller in the Adatum.com domain with Exchange Server 2007
installed and running the Mailbox server, the Client Access server and Hub
Transport server roles.
MTL-EX2 Member server in the Adatum.com domain with Exchange Server 2007
installed and running the Mailbox server role.
TOR-EX1 Second domain controller in the Adatum.com domain with Exchange
Server 2007 installed and running the Mailbox server, the Client Access
server and Hub Transport server roles.
MTL–CL1 Client computer running Windows XP with Service Pack 2 and
Outlook 2007.
MTL–EDGE1 Stand-alone server with Exchange Server 2007 installed and running the
Edge Transport server role.
MTL-SRV1 Stand-alone server running Routing and Remote Access and the POP3
and SMTP services.

Important: At the end of each lab, you must close the virtual machine and must
not save any changes. To close a virtual machine without saving the changes,
perform the following steps:

1. On the host computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft
Virtual Server, and then click Virtual Server Administration Website.

2. Under Navigation, click Master Status. For each virtual machine that is
running, point to the virtual machine name, and in the context menu, click Turn off
Virtual Machine and Discard Undo Disks. Click OK.

Software Configuration
The following software is installed on the VM:
• Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 1, or Windows XP with Service Pack 2
• Exchange Server 2007
• Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 (on MTL-CL1 only)

Classroom Setup
Each classroom computer will have the same virtual machine configured in the same way.
xxvi Introduction

Workshop Hardware Level


To ensure a satisfactory student experience, Microsoft Learning requires a minimum
equipment configuration for trainer and student computers in all Microsoft Certified
Partner for Learning Solutions (CPLS) classrooms in which Official Microsoft Learning
Product courseware are taught.
This workshop requires that you have a computer that meets or exceeds hardware level 5,
which specifies a 2.4–gigahertz (minimum) Pentium 4 or equivalent CPU, at least 2
gigabytes (GB) of RAM, 16 megabytes (MB) of video RAM, and a 7200 RPM 40-GB
hard disk.
Introduction xxvii

Demonstration: Using Microsoft Virtual Server

In this demonstration, your instructor will help familiarize you with the Virtual Server
environment in which you will work to complete the practices and labs. You will learn:
• How to connect to the Virtual Server Administration Website.
• How to configure virtual machine configurations using the Virtual Server
Administration Website.
• How to connect to a virtual machine using the Virtual Machine Remote Control
Client.
• How to shut down a virtual machine without saving any changes.

Keyboard shortcuts
While working in the Virtual Machine Remote Control Client environment, you might
find it helpful to use keyboard shortcuts. All Virtual Server shortcuts include a key that is
referred to as the HOST key or the RIGHT-ALT key. By default, the HOST key is the
ALT key on the right side of your keyboard. Some useful shortcuts include:
• RIGHT-ALT+DELETE to log on to the Virtual PC.
• RIGHT-ALT+ENTER to switch between full-screen and window modes.

For more information about using Virtual Server, see Virtual Server Help.
Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server
Monitoring and Troubleshooting

Table of Contents
Overview 1-1
Introduction to Microsoft Operations Manager 1-2
Introduction to Troubleshooting Exchange
Server 2007 1-4
Demonstration: Using MOM to Monitor Exchange
Servers 1-7
Lab: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring
and Troubleshooting 1-9
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and/or other countries.

All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Version 1.0
Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting 1-1

Overview

This unit provides an overview of using the Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007
Management Pack for Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) 2005 to monitor
Exchange servers. The information gathered while performing this unit’s monitoring and
troubleshooting tasks will help you determine the next logical step in the troubleshooting
process.

Objectives
After completing this unit, you will be able to:
• Monitor Exchange servers using MOM.
• Explain an Exchange troubleshooting model.
1-2 Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting

Introduction to Microsoft Operations Manager

A complex, distributed information technology (IT) infrastructure includes hundreds of


computers and dozens of servers. To effectively administer these computers, MOM 2005
offers management tools and agents to keep close track of the network infrastructure. To
specifically monitor and manage targeted applications, such as Exchange, you can load a
management pack for Exchange into a MOM 2005 server. MOM 2005 management
packs provide predefined settings that configure agents to monitor a specific service or
application. In a typical IT environment, management packs do not require significant
customizations and can be deployed easily.

What a Management Pack Contains


A management pack is made up of modules. Each module includes:
• Rules that determine the operations data that the agents collect and the actions that
agents must take based on the collected data.
• List of groups for organizing managed computers that are running the same services.
• Knowledge base that contains troubleshooting information specific to the service or
application.
• Tasks that you can run to diagnose and resolve problems.
• Service-specific or application-specific reports.
Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting 1-3

MOM 2005 ships with the Base Management Pack. This pack is used to monitor core
Windows services, such as the Active Directory® directory service, Domain Name
System (DNS), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), and Internet Information
Services (IIS).

Note: You can use the MOM Administrator console to import a management
pack to a MOM management server. When you import a management pack,
the configuration settings contained in the management pack are copied to the
management server. The management server then uses these settings to organize
managed computers into groups and to configure agents to monitor these
computers.

Tip: To properly manage Exchange Server 2007, you must load the latest
management pack for Exchange Server 2007. The management pack is available
on the “Management Pack for Exchange Server 2007 for MOM 2005” page on the
Microsoft Download Center Web site.
1-4 Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting

Introduction to Troubleshooting Exchange


Server 2007

In complex messaging infrastructures, problems may arise that can cause e-mail service
disruptions or failures. Although the symptoms may be easily identified based on user
feedback or interface error messages, the root of the problem may be more difficult to
determine. By using an efficient troubleshooting logic, you can examine potential causes
for a problem and quickly identify the exact source of the error.
When a problem arises, you must be able to first identify what is not the source of
the problem. By eliminating potential sources of a problem, you can move closer to
identifying and resolving the actual software error or hardware issue. This method
of troubleshooting a problem depends on your knowledge about what is required for
Exchange Server 2007 to function correctly and your ability to recognize symptoms.

Example of Efficient Troubleshooting Logic


A user named Zachary complains that he cannot open his mailbox when using Microsoft
Office Outlook®. He receives an error message that the mailbox cannot be found on the
server. The information contained in this error message is enough for you to determine
that the user was able to contact an Exchange server. This information should help you
reduce the time needed to troubleshoot the problem.
Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting 1-5

First, you must determine whether the user has previously been able to log on or if the
user is new to the organization. If the user has not been able to log on previously or if
the user is new, the mailbox may not have been created for the user or it may have been
configured incorrectly with missing configurations or access rights. If the user has been
able to log on previously, troubleshoot the problem by asking the following questions:
• Are other users with mailboxes stored on the same server experiencing the problem?
• If the answer is no, this indicates that the Exchange server is running on the
network, that the Exchange Information Store service is running, that the mailbox
database is mounted, and that Active Directory authentication is functioning.
Therefore, you must:
• Verify that the Outlook profile is pointing to the correct server.
• Verify that a mailbox-enabled user exists on that server.
• Verify that the user account has permissions to that mailbox.
When you have finished the verification process, the problem may be resolved. If
the problem persists, continue with troubleshooting by moving on to the next
question.
• If the answer is yes, that means other network users are experience the same
problem, and you must continue with troubleshooting by moving on to the next
question.
• Are other users hosted on other mailbox databases on the same server experiencing
the problem?
• If the answer is no, only users from the same mailbox database are experiencing
the problem and you must investigate issues specific to that particular mailbox
database. Therefore, you must:
• Verify that the database is mounted.
• Look in the application log to find errors or warnings specific to that mailbox
database.
When you have finished, the problem may be resolved. If the problem persists,
continue with troubleshooting by moving on to the next question.
• If the answer is yes, that means users from other databases on the server are
experiencing the same problem and it is not specific to the mailbox database.
Thus, it’s more likely to be a global server issue. Therefore, you must:
• Verify that all databases are mounted.
• Verify that all required services are started on the server.
When you have finished, the problem may be resolved. If the problem persists,
continue with troubleshooting by moving on to the next question.
1-6 Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting

• Are domain controllers, global catalog servers, or DNS servers experiencing


problems?
• If the answer is no, and no other clients on the network are experiencing this
problem, then the client computer’s network settings may be configured
incorrectly. Therefore, you must verify the TCP/IP settings, including the
DNS server assignment. At this point, the problem should be resolved.
• If the answer is yes, you must resolve the problems immediately because
Exchange Server 2007 depends upon these services.
Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting 1-7

Demonstration: Using MOM to Monitor Exchange


Servers

In this demonstration, you will see how you can use MOM 2005 to assist in the
troubleshooting process.

Key Points
The key points of this demonstration include how to:
• Verify the Exchange Server 2007 services.
• Install a MOM Management Pack.
• Explore the MOM Administrator console and Operator console.
• Troubleshoot an Exchange error discovered by MTL-MOM1.

Discussion Questions
Briefly discuss your answers to the following questions with the class:
Q If you have not seen MOM 2005 before, what are your first impressions?
A Answers will vary.
1-8 Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting

Q How does MOM functionality compare to how you currently monitor your Exchange
servers?
A Answers will vary.
Q What are the benefits of using a monitoring solution for your Exchange servers?
A Answers will vary. In most organizations, e-mail is a critical service so it is important
to be aware of any issues with the messaging system as soon as possible.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting 1-9

Lab: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and


Troubleshooting

In this lab, you will discuss how to develop a monitoring and troubleshooting process.

Scenario
A. Datum Corporation is a medium-size organization with several locations. The
organization’s chief information officer (CIO) has organized a meeting with the entire
Exchange administration team. The meeting’s purpose is for the team to define a
monitoring and troubleshooting process for the Exchange Server 2007 servers that the
organization has just implemented.
1-10 Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting

Exercise: Developing a Monitoring and Troubleshooting Process


In this exercise, you will work in small groups to develop flow charts what will
provide a step-by-step process for monitoring and troubleshooting the Exchange Server
environment A. Datum Corporation. You will then discuss the questions and answers
with the entire class and present your solution as a group.

Documenting a Troubleshooting Process


In this exercise, you will work in small groups to create a flow chart to document a
troubleshooting process. With your small group, develop a flow chart that provides
details on how you would troubleshoot the problem that the instructor assigned to your
group. Be prepared to present your flow chart to the entire class.
The flow charts should include:
• The questions that you would ask at each point in the troubleshooting process.
• The options in the troubleshooting process based on the answers to each
troubleshooting question.

The following diagram provides a simple example of what the troubleshooting flow chart
should look like. This is a simplified version of the troubleshooting process that you
might follow if a user reports that they cannot access the Internet.
Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting 1-11

When you finish the flow chart, review the other two scenarios and be prepared to
provide feedback on the flow charts that other groups prepare.
Scenario 1: A user calls the Help desk. The user states that they are unable to send or
receive e-mail from their messaging client. The user is inside the organization and is
using Outlook 2007 to access their mailbox.
Scenario 2: A user calls the Help desk. The user states that they are unable to send or
receive e-mail from their messaging client. The user is outside the organization and is
using Outlook Web Access to access their mailbox.
Scenario 3: A user calls the Help desk. The user states that they have been trying to send
a message to another user in the organization and to an external recipient, and neither
message has arrived.

Discussion Questions
Review and answer the following questions in small groups:
Q What components running on an Exchange server do you need to monitor?
A Answers may vary. Use the following as basic guidelines: All Exchange services
need to be monitored, as well as additional components such as hard-disk free space
availability and available memory. An administrator also may want to monitor
critical services for a specific server role. For example, the Microsoft Exchange
Information Store service on Mailbox servers or the Microsoft Exchange Transport
service on Hub Transport servers. Other relevant monitoring settings can be seen on
the MOM Administrator and Operations consoles.
Q What are Exchange dependency services that are required, and which, if unavailable,
can affect the A. Datum messaging system?
A Answers may vary, but should include Internet Information Services (IIS), Active
Directory, and DNS. Note that the SMTP service is no longer required on Exchange
Server 2007.
Q How will the services that A. Datum Exchange servers provide be impacted if the:
• Exchange Transport service is stopped?
A Mail delivery inside and outside the server will stop functioning.
1-12 Unit 1: Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and Troubleshooting

• Hard disk maintaining the databases runs out of free space?


A The Microsoft Exchange Information Store service will stop.

• Hard disk maintaining the transaction logs runs out of free space?
A The Microsoft Exchange Information Store service will stop.

• Global catalog server becomes unavailable on the network?


A Many features that depend on global catalog queries will fail, including the
listing of recipients in address lists and the categorization process that occurs
during message transport.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Client Performance and Connectivity

Table of Contents
Overview 2-1
Tools for Monitoring Client Performance and
Connectivity 2-2
Process for Troubleshooting MAPI Clients 2-5
Process for Troubleshooting Client Access
Server Clients 2-7
Lab Scenario 2-10
Lab Outcomes 2-11
Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client
Performance and Connectivity 2-12
Lab Discussion 2-18
Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, is subject to change
without notice. Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names,
e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any
real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or
should be inferred. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting
the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval
system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights
covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from
Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,
copyrights, or other intellectual property.

The names of manufacturers, products, or URLs are provided for informational purposes only and Microsoft
makes no representations and warranties, either expressed, implied, or statutory, regarding these
manufacturers or the use of the products with any Microsoft technologies. The inclusion of a manufacturer or
product does not imply endorsement of Microsoft of the manufacturer or product. Links may be provided to
third party sites. Such sites are not under the control of Microsoft and Microsoft is not responsible for the
contents of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes or updates to such sites.
Microsoft is not responsible for webcasting or any other form of transmission received from any linked site.
Microsoft is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply
endorsement of Microsoft of the site or the products contained therein.

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Microsoft Press, Active Directory, ActiveSync, BizTalk, Internet Explorer, Outlook, PowerPoint,
SharePoint, SmartScreen, Visual Studio, Windows, Windows Mobile, Windows NT, Windows PowerShell, and
Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
and/or other countries.

All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Version 1.0
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-1

Overview

Troubleshooting issues for Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 often are related to client
connectivity and performance, or with objects in the user’s mailbox. In this unit, you will
monitor and troubleshoot client performance and connectivity. This unit’s information
will assist you in troubleshooting client-access issues and using the appropriate tools to
restore service to users as quickly as possible.

Objectives
After completing this unit, you will be able to:
• Identify tools for monitoring client performance and connectivity.
• Describe the process for troubleshooting MAPI clients.
• Describe the process for troubleshooting Client Access server clients.
• Configure Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) to monitor client connectivity
issues.
• Identify the cause for an Autodiscover issue and resolve the issue.
• Identify the cause for a remote client connectivity issue and resolve the issue.
2-2 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

Tools for Monitoring Client Performance and


Connectivity

The first sign of a problem in most messaging environments may be detected on a client
computer, such as when a user is unable to open Microsoft Office Outlook® or log on to
Outlook Web Access. Users may report these problems to the organization’s help desk
before any alerts are generated from server monitoring tools. Problems also may occur
in dependent servers or services that client computers access, and may not be detected
earlier by an administrator. In many cases, these problems lead to first-level
troubleshooting on a client computer or client-focused troubleshooting on an
administrator console.

Troubleshooting Tools
Messaging administrators must understand, and have experience with, the
troubleshooting tools that are used for Microsoft Exchange Server 2007. The tools that
are used to troubleshoot client performance and connectivity problems are categorized
into one of the following types:
• Windows networking tools
• General troubleshooting tools
• Monitoring tools
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-3

Windows Networking Tools


Windows networking tools are used to verify or test network connectivity from a
Microsoft Windows® client to a computer running the Microsoft Windows Server®
operating system. The following list provides examples of Windows networking tools:
• Ping. Used to test general IP configuration and connectivity.
• Telnet. Used to connect to a specific IP port and validate the availability of a
listening service on a computer running Windows Server.
• RPCPing. Used to test the availability of a remote procedure call (RPC) connection
from a Windows client to a computer running Windows Server. RPCPing is
particularly useful in troubleshooting connectivity problems from an Outlook client
to an Exchange server.
• Nslookup. Used to connect to a Domain Name System (DNS) server to verify the
availability of DNS database records. Nslookup is particularly useful to verify the
availability of mail exchange (MX) records for a destination server when users report
problems in sending mail outside the Exchange organization.

General Troubleshooting Tools


General troubleshooting tools are used to troubleshoot client-based problems, such as
connectivity and authentication issues. The following list provides examples of general
troubleshooting tools:
• Microsoft Exchange Server ActiveSync® Certificate-Based Authentication Tool.
Provides several utilities that assist an Exchange administrator in configuring
and validating client certificate authentication for Exchange Server ActiveSync.
Certificate authentication is an integral part of ensuring security when mobile devices
are accessing messages from an Exchange server.
• Event Viewer and protocol logs. Allows an administrator to review the information
that a service or protocol logs. These tools are useful in determining the error codes
that an application or service provides and in determining which protocol or
component is causing an error on a server.
• MAPI Editor. Replaces the Information Store Viewer (MDBVU32) and provides
access to the MAPI mailbox stores through a graphical user interface (GUI).

Note: When you install Exchange Server 2007, the Messaging API (MAPI) client
libraries and Collaboration Data Objects 1.2.1 are not installed on the server. The
MAPI Editor tool requires these APIs. You must download and install the Microsoft
Exchange Server MAPI Client and Collaboration Data Objects 1.2.1 from the
“Microsoft Exchange Server MAPI Client and Collaboration Data Objects 1.2.1”
page on the Microsoft Download Center Web site before running the MAPI Editor
on a computer running Exchange Server 2007.
2-4 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

• Exchange Troubleshooting Assistant. Programmatically executes troubleshooting


steps to identify the root cause of performance, mail flow, and database-mounting
issues. This tool automatically determines the set of data that is required to
troubleshoot the identified symptoms and collects configuration data, performance
counters, event logs, and live tracing information from an Exchange server and other
appropriate sources. This tool analyzes each subsystem to determine individual
bottlenecks and component failures, and then aggregates the information to provide
root cause analysis.

Note: The Exchange Troubleshooting Assistant is accessible in the Toolbox work


area in Exchange Server 2007 Exchange Management Console. All general
troubleshooting tools listed here can be downloaded from the “Downloads for
Exchange Server 2007” page on the Microsoft TechNet Web site.

Monitoring Tools
Monitoring tools are used to monitor performance and specific components on an
Exchange server to ensure that all features are functioning as expected and that enough
resources are available to enable Exchange to adequately service all users. The following
list provides examples of monitoring tools:
• Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack for MOM 2005. Provides MOM tools that
are used to monitor client connectivity and availability of services on an Exchange
server.

Note: For more information about the Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack
for MOM 2005, see Unit 1, “Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and
Troubleshooting” in Workshop 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft
Exchange Server 2007.

• Exchange Server User Monitor. Used to gather real-time data to help you better
understand current client-usage patterns, and to plan for future system modifications
that may be required. Administrators can view several items, including IP addresses
used by clients, versions and modes of Microsoft Office Outlook, and resources such
as CPU usage, server-side processor latency, and total latency for network and
processing with the Outlook 2003 version of MAPI.
• Performance console. Provides counters that are used to monitor performance.
During the Exchange Server 2007 installation, the available counters for the
Performance console on a Windows Server are modified to include Exchange-related
counters. An administrator can use these counters to ensure availability of physical
resources, validate activation of an anti-spam agent, monitor the number of SMTP
messages relayed, and verify the connectivity status of Outlook clients.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-5

Process for Troubleshooting MAPI Clients

Client connectivity for Exchange Server 2007 can occur over multiple protocols and
from many different client applications. The Outlook client is the most common client
application that is used to connect to an Exchange server. The Outlook client is versatile
and can connect to an Exchange server over multiple protocols.
MAPI over RPC is the recommended method for connecting Outlook clients to an
Exchange server. A MAPI client can use the full range of Exchange Server functionality
and provides a rich feature set for client connectivity. More users connect to an Exchange
server using Outlook with MAPI than any other client connectivity method. As an
Exchange administrator, you must know how to troubleshoot MAPI connectivity.
2-6 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

Troubleshooting MAPI Connectivity


When troubleshooting Outlook with MAPI connectivity to an Exchange server, use the
following steps:
1. Identify network connectivity issues. If the Outlook client or the Exchange server is
experiencing problems connecting to the network, Outlook will show a status of
Disconnected, and no new messages can be transferred between the client and the
server.
2. Identify client configuration issues. A client configuration issue can occur in Outlook
or Windows configurations. An improperly configured client can prevent the
computer from connecting to the Exchange server or create intermittent connectivity
problems. You may need to troubleshoot the client computer to rule out any
configuration errors before investigating a server-based issue.
3. Identify name resolution issues. Outlook clients must be able to resolve the name of
the Exchange server they are connecting to. By default, Outlook 2007 clients use
DNS host-name resolution to resolve the name of the Exchange server to its IP
address. If DNS servers are not available on the network or if the records in DNS
are incorrect, Outlook clients are unable to connect to the Exchange server.
4. Identify server configuration or service-availability issues. A configuration error can
prevent some or all users from connecting to the Exchange server. Based on the
symptom that the user is experiencing, you can verify configuration by using the
Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer Tool or examine server properties by using
the Exchange Management Console.

Important: To reduce the time necessary for troubleshooting MAPI connectivity


issues, use Active Directory Group Policy to standardize client configuration. If you
are using Outlook 2007, you can also use the Autodiscover feature of Exchange
Server 2007 to automate client configuration and reduce the likelihood of human
errors.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-7

Process for Troubleshooting Client Access Server


Clients

In Exchange Server 2007, a Client Access server role is required whenever non-MAPI
clients are used. A Client Access server role also is required for some MAPI client
features. Clients such as POP3, IMAP4, Outlook Web Access, Exchange ActiveSync,
and Outlook Anywhere always connect to a Client Access server. Requests that these
clients make to the Client Access server are forwarded to the Mailbox server to read and
send messages.

Troubleshooting Client Access Server Issues


When managing a Client Access server in the Exchange organization, an Exchange
administrator may have to troubleshoot Client Access server clients by using the
following process:
1. Identify any connectivity issues on the remote client. Most clients that connect to a
Client Access server do so from a remote Internet connection. When troubleshooting
user complaints about Exchange services being unavailable, you should first ensure
that the remote client can properly connect to Internet resources.
2-8 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

2. Identify network connectivity and name resolution issues. As with other Exchange
servers, Client Access servers require stable network connectivity to Mailbox servers
and rely on name resolution to communicate with Mailbox servers. A connectivity
or name resolution issue between a client and a Client Access server, or between a
Client Access server and a Mailbox server, can prevent users from accessing their
mailboxes.
3. Identify client certificate issues. When standardizing a client configuration
environment, most administrators will opt to use the Exchange Server 2007
Autodiscover feature to automatically configure Outlook profiles. Autodiscover,
Outlook Anywhere, and Exchange ActiveSync all rely on valid server certificates to
provide secure communication with the server. Invalid names on certificates, expired
certificates, or non-trusted certificates can cause connectivity issues between these
clients and an Exchange Server 2007 Client Access server.
4. Identify server configuration issues. Autodiscover requires that you configure
Exchange server by using the Exchange Management Shell. For example, you must
verify that all Autodiscover features have been enabled, such as the Outlook Provider.
Outlook user profiles will not be configured automatically during the first logon if the
Autodiscover features have not been configured properly on the Exchange server.
You also must use the Exchange Management Shell to configure the Availability
service (accessed as a Web service) with the necessary settings to ensure that
calendaring information is available to all users.
5. Identify client configuration issues. Client configurations can affect connectivity,
depending on the type of client application that connects to a Client Access server.
For example, with Outlook Web Access clients, proxy settings or Internet security
settings may affect connectivity to the Client Access server. With Outlook Anywhere
clients, connectivity issues may be caused by networking configuration problems or
settings that are configured within the Outlook profile. Users can test connectivity to
Autodiscover and Outlook Anywhere by using the Connection Status and Test
E-Mail AutoConfiguration commands. These commands are located on the Outlook
menu that appears when you right-click the Outlook icon in the notification area.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-9

Tip: To ensure that a valid server certificate is trusted and can be used for
connecting with RPC over HTTP, connect to the RPC virtual directory on the
Exchange server from a Web browser. If the user is prompted with a warning
message about the certificate authenticity, there is an issue with the certificate
configuration that will cause a problem with Outlook Anywhere, Autodiscover, and
Exchange ActiveSync.

Note: To minimize the risk of encountering server configuration issues with a Client
Access server, you can run the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer and
create a baseline for server configurations. From this baseline, you can easily
detect configuration changes that may cause a connectivity issue.
2-10 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

Lab Scenario

Background Information
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. You are responsible for
monitoring and troubleshooting client performance and connectivity issues.

Current Situation
You are working in the messaging environment and reviewing the ticketing queue. One
ticket shows that a user cannot access other users’ availability information when trying to
book a meeting. Another ticket shows that a mobile user is not able to access the user's
mailbox on an Exchange server using Outlook Web Access.

Requirements
You must configure MOM to monitor client connectivity issues. You also must identify
and resolve the cause of a MAPI connectivity issue and the cause of a remote-client
connectivity issue.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-11

Lab Outcomes

You have completed this lab successfully when you have:


• Configured MOM to monitor client-connectivity issues.
• Identified and resolved the cause of an AutoDiscover issue.
• Identified and resolved the cause of a remote-client connectivity issue.
2-12 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client


Performance and Connectivity

After completing this lab, you will be able to:


• Configure MOM to monitor client-connectivity issues.
• Identify the cause for an AutoDiscover issue, and resolve the issue.
• Identify the cause for a remote client-connectivity issue, and resolve the issue.

Estimated time to complete this lab: 75 minutes.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual
machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine and ensure that all
Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started.

Lab Setup
For this lab, you will use the available Microsoft Virtual PC environment. Before you
begin the lab, you must:
• Start the 5051A-MTL-EX1, 5051A-MTL-MOM1, and 5051A-MTL-CL1 virtual
machines.
• Log on to the virtual machines as Adatum\administrator using the password
Pa$$w0rd.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-13

Exercise 1: Monitoring Client Connectivity


In this exercise, you will configure MOM to monitor client connectivity issues.

Scenario
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. Recently, members of
your information technology (IT) staff have been complaining that they have had to
troubleshoot several issues related to client connectivity to the Exchange servers. An
increasing problem is that users are notifying the IT staff about the problem and IT staff
has reacted based on the trouble tickets generated by users. You must find a more
proactive solution to handling connectivity problems with Exchange Server 2007. You
decide to use MOM 2005 and Microsoft Exchange Server User Monitor to manage
Exchange Server 2007.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Configure MOM Exchange • On MTL-MOM1, use the MOM 2005 Administrator console to
Management counters to add MTL-EX1 to the Exchange Server 2007 Mailbox servers
monitor MAPI client computer group.
connectivity. • Verify that MOM is monitoring the results of the Test-
MAPIConnectivity test.

Note: See “How to Configure MOM to Monitor Client


Connections” in the Resource Toolkit.

2. Use MOM 2005 to test the • On MTL-EX1, dismount a mailbox database from the Exchange
monitoring results of a Management Console.
dismounted mailbox • On MTL-MOM1, verify the events logged in MOM 2005 after a
database. failed MAPI connectivity test.
• On MTL-EX1, mount the mailbox database from the Exchange
Management Console.

Note: See “How to Configure MOM to Monitor Client


Connections” in the Resource Toolkit.

3. Install the Microsoft • On MTL-EX1, install the Microsoft Exchange Server User
Exchange Server User Monitor. The installation file is located in the D:\Unit02\Labfiles
Monitor and monitor MAPI folder.
client connections. • Start Microsoft Exchange Server User Monitor.
• On MTL-CL1, open Outlook and send a message to several
users. Monitor the activity in Microsoft Exchange Server User
Monitor.

Note: See “How to Use Microsoft Exchange Server User


Monitor” in the Resource Toolkit.
2-14 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

Exercise 2: Troubleshooting AutoDiscover Issues


In this exercise, you will identify the cause for an AutoDiscover issue and resolve the
issue.

Preparation
Complete the following step to prepare for this exercise:
• On 5051A-MTL-EX1, open the Exchange Management Shell. Type
D:\Unit02\Labfiles\Lab2prepA.ps1, and then press ENTER.

Scenario
Mike, a desktop support technician for A. Datum Corporation, is reporting that a new
employee named Alice Ciccu cannot view the availability information for other users in
the organization when she tries to book a meeting using Outlook 2007. You must identify
the reason why Alice Ciccu cannot view the information and resolve the problem. Use
the Resource tabs to assist in your troubleshooting process.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Ensure that the Outlook client • On MTL-CL1, log on as Alice using a password of Pa$$w0rd.
has network connectivity to • Use the IPConfig utility to verify the TCP/IP settings on MTL-CL1.
the Exchange Server and can
• Use the Ping utility to validate that MTL-CL1 can communicate
connect to the Exchange
over the network with MTL-EX1.
server using RPCs.
• Use the Nslookup utility to verify that the service (SRV)
records pointing to the domain controllers are listed in DNS.
You will need to search for all types of records in the
_ldap._tcp.dc._msdcs.Adatum.com zone.
• Use the RPCPing utility to validate that MTL-CL1 can connect to
the MTL-EX1 Exchange server. The RPCPing utility is located in
the D:\Unit02\Labfiles folder.

Note: See “How to Use RPCPing to Troubleshoot Connectivity


Between Outlook and Exchange” in the Resource Toolkit.

2. Ensure that Alice’s mailbox is • On MTL-EX1, use the Exchange Management Console to verify
configured properly to allow that Alice’s mailbox is configured properly.
connectivity from an Outlook
client. Note: See “Managing Mailbox Connectivity Protocols” in the
Resource Toolkit.

3. Ensure that Alice has the • Use the Exchange Management Shell to verify the permissions
necessary permissions to on Alice’s mailbox.
access her mailbox.
Note: See “Mailbox Permissions CMDLETS” in the Resource
Toolkit.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-15

Tasks Supporting information

4. Verify the Autodiscover • Use the IIS Manager to verify the virtual directories for
configurations on MTL-EX1 Autodiscover.
and on MTL-CL1. • On MTL-CL1, open Outlook and configure a profile for Alice
Ciccu.
• Try to book a meeting with Gregory Weber. Confirm that Gregory
Weber’s availability information is not available.
• Use the Test-E-mail AutoConfiguration tool to check the
Autodiscover settings.
• Configure the required AutoDiscover settings on MTL-EX1.
• Ensure that Alice can access Gregory’s availability information.

Note: See “Understanding and Configuring Autodiscover for


Outlook 2007” in the Resource Toolkit.
2-16 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

Exercise 3: Troubleshooting a Client Access Server Issue


In this exercise, you will identify the cause for a remote client connectivity issue and
resolve the issue.

Preparation
Complete the following step to prepare for this exercise:
• On 5051A-MTL-EX1, open the Exchange Management Shell. Type
D:\Unit02\Labfiles\Lab2prepB.ps1, and then press ENTER.

Scenario
You are opening a trouble ticket from a user named Ben Smith, in which he reports that
he is not able to connect to Outlook Web Access from his portable computer. Soon, other
organizational users are filing similar trouble tickets. You must troubleshoot and resolve
this problem quickly. Use the resources in the Resource tabs to resolve the problem.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. You need to ensure that the • On MTL-CL1, log on as Adatum\Ben using a password of
problem is not caused by a Pa$$W0rd.
mistyped URL on the client • Use Microsoft Internet Explorer® to validate that
computer. https://MTL-EX1.adatum.com/owa is unavailable.
• To rule out name resolution issues, test access to
http://10.0.0.10/owa.

2. Ensure that Ben Smith has • Use the Exchange Management Console to validate Ben Smith’s
the necessary rights to connectivity access to his mailbox.
access his mailbox from
Outlook Web Access. Note: See “Managing Mailbox Connectivity Protocols” in the
Although other users have Resource Toolkit.
reported a similar problem,
you cannot yet confirm those
reports. Therefore, you
decide to investigate Ben
Smith’s mailbox at this point
in the troubleshooting
process.

3. Identify whether the problem • Use the Exchange Management Shell to test connectivity to the
is with the Client Access Client Access server and the Mailbox server.
server or with the Mailbox • Resolve the issue and test that OWA access now works.
server that is accessed by
the Client Access server. Note: See “Exchange Management Shell Test Commands” in
the Resource Toolkit.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-17

Lab Shutdown
1. On the host computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft
Virtual Server, and then click Virtual Server Administration Website.
2. Under Navigation, click Master Status. For each virtual machine that is running,
click the Virtual Machine Name, and, in the context menu, click Turn off Virtual
Machine and Discard Undo Disks. Click OK.
3. Start the 5051A-MTL-EX1, 5051A-MTL-SRV1, 5051A-TOR-EX1 and 5051A-
MTL-CL1 virtual machines.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual
machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine and ensure that all
Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started.
2-18 Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity

Lab Discussion

Briefly discuss your answers to the following questions with the class:
Q What were the issues that caused the connectivity problems in each exercise?
A In Exercise 2, the problem was caused by an error in the configuration of the
Microsoft Outlook 2007 Autodiscover service connection point (SCP). The
Autodiscover SCP had been configured to use an incorrect Client Access server to
download availability information.
In Exercise 3, the problem of connectivity by Outlook Web Access clients could be
caused by Client Access server issues or by Mailbox Server issues. In this case, you
could eliminate the Mailbox server issue by validating that MAPI connectivity was
not the problem. This meant that you could focus on troubleshooting the Client
Access server. The World Wide Web Publishing service was not running on the
Mailbox server.
Unit 2: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Client Performance and Connectivity 2-19

Q What other problems could have caused the same symptoms in Exercise 2 and
Exercise 3?
A Answers may vary but could include a:
• Missing or untrusted certificate.
• Unavailable Windows or Exchange service.
• Problem with name resolution.
• Disabled user account.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to
Resources and Messages

Table of Contents
Overview 3-1
How Public Folder Access Works 3-2
How Calendaring Works 3-4
Process for Troubleshooting Client Access
Server Issues 3-6
Lab Scenario 3-9
Lab Outcomes 3-10
Lab: Troubleshooting Access to Messaging
Contents 3-11
Lab Discussion 3-16
Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, is subject to change
without notice. Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names,
e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any
real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or
should be inferred. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting
the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval
system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights
covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from
Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,
copyrights, or other intellectual property.

The names of manufacturers, products, or URLs are provided for informational purposes only and Microsoft
makes no representations and warranties, either expressed, implied, or statutory, regarding these
manufacturers or the use of the products with any Microsoft technologies. The inclusion of a manufacturer or
product does not imply endorsement of Microsoft of the manufacturer or product. Links may be provided to
third party sites. Such sites are not under the control of Microsoft and Microsoft is not responsible for the
contents of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes or updates to such sites.
Microsoft is not responsible for webcasting or any other form of transmission received from any linked site.
Microsoft is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply
endorsement of Microsoft of the site or the products contained therein.

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Microsoft Press, Active Directory, ActiveSync, BizTalk, Internet Explorer, Outlook, PowerPoint,
SharePoint, SmartScreen, Visual Studio, Windows, Windows Mobile, Windows NT, Windows PowerShell, and
Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
and/or other countries.

All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Version 1.0
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-1

Overview

You must determine the next logical step in troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange
Server 2007, based on the results of the first unit’s monitoring and troubleshooting steps.
Troubleshooting issues may be related to client access to resources and messages. In this
unit, you will identify and resolve issues related to access of resources and messages.

Objectives
After completing this unit, you will be able to:
• Describe how public folder access works.
• Describe how calendaring works.
• Explain the process for troubleshooting client access server issues.
3-2 Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages

How Public Folder Access Works

A public folder is an information repository and can includes such information types as
e-mail messages, text documents, and multimedia files, which can be shared with users
who are in an Exchange organization. Public folders are accessed by MAPI clients, such
as Microsoft Office Outlook® 2007.

Note: Public folders in Exchange Server 2007 can no longer be accessed by


Outlook Web Access and the Microsoft Exchange IMAP4 service. Additionally,
Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) access has been removed from this latest
version of Exchange Server.

Public Folder Location


In an Exchange organization, all Exchange servers access a single public folder tree (also
known as public folder hierarchy). The public folder hierarchy is replicated to each
Exchange Server 2007 Mailbox server that is configured with a public folder database.
By default, the content of these public folders exists only on the public folder database
where the public folder was created, unless the public folders have been replicated to
other public folder databases.

Important: In Exchange Server 2007, there is no graphical user interface (GUI) to


create or manage public folders. You must use the Exchange Management Shell
for all public folder-related tasks, or use the Exchange System Manager from
Exchange Server 2003.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-3

Public Folder Access


When a client attempts to access public folder data, the client must be able to connect to
a server that contains a replica of that data. This server can reside in the same Active
Directory® directory service site as the client or in a different Active Directory site. The
Active Directory site is the boundary that the Exchange client uses to locate a copy of a
public folder.
When multiple replicas of a public folder exist in remote Active Directory sites, you can
configure the Exchange server to refer the client to an Exchange server in another site.
This process is called public folder referral. By default, public folder referrals are enabled
between Active Directory sites in Exchange Server 2007. You can modify public folder
referrals by using the following Cmdlets in the Exchange Management Shell:
• Set-PublicFolderDatabase –id databasename –PublicFolderReferralServerList
‘Servername:Cost’ – UseCustomReferralServerList $True. This command
enables public folder referrals to the specified servers in different Active Directory
sites. If you set the UseCustomReferralServerList parameter to true, and do not add
servers to the PublicFolderReferralServerList parameter, all public folder referrals
are disabled.

Note: Public folder databases will not be created in Exchange Server 2007 if you
specify during installation that you do not have any Outlook clients with versions
earlier than Outlook 2007. In this scenario, if you want to create public folders, you
can create a new public folder database on a Mailbox server. Additionally, even if
you choose to have the public folder database configured during installation, only
the first Mailbox server in the organization is configured with a public folder
database. Before you can configure public folder replication, you must configure
additional public folder databases on other Mailbox servers.
3-4 Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages

How Calendaring Works

The Availability service is responsible for providing free/busy information to the


Outlook 2007 client and Outlook Web Access clients. It is part of the Exchange
Server 2007 programming interface and runs as a Web service. Outlook 2007 clients
only connect to the Availability service when accessing the free/busy information that
is necessary for scheduling meetings.

Free/Busy Information
Exchange Server 2007 supports live free/busy information using the Availability service.
The Availability service retrieves calendaring information directly from the user mailbox.
As a result, the free/busy information is always current and is not affected by replication
delays.

Note: Outlook 2007 uses the Availability service to retrieve free/busy information
from Exchange Server 2007, but will revert to accessing the free/busy public folder
when connecting to a mailbox on Exchange Sever 2003.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-5

Availability Service
The Availability service is published as a URL on the Client Access server. Outlook 2007
discovers the Availability service URL by using the Autodiscover service, which is the
same service that Outlook 2007 clients use to automate discovering a user’s mailbox
server and profile configurations. Exchange Server 2007 calendaring functionality for
free/busy information, meeting suggestions, and Out of Office replies depends on the
Availability service.

Note: To connect to the Availability service, a Service Connection Point or a


Domain Name System (DNS) record for the AutoDiscover service that points to
the Client Access server must be configured. The DNS record is required on the
company’s public DNS servers if the remote users need to connect to Autodiscover
and the Availability service.
3-6 Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages

Process for Troubleshooting Client Access Server


Issues

The Client Access server role accepts client connections to an Exchange Server 2007
server from a variety of clients, including:
• POP3 and IMAP4 clients, such as Microsoft Outlook Express and Eudora that
communicate with a Client Access server for mailbox access.
• Outlook Web Access connections that occur over HTTP or HTTPS to the Client
Access server.
• Mobile clients, such as those running Microsoft Windows Mobile® 5.0 with
Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync®, that communicate with a Client Access server.
• Microsoft Outlook clients configured to connect using Outlook Anywhere
(previously known as RPC over HTTPS). Microsoft Outlook clients also connect
to the Client Access server to access services including the Autodiscover and
Availability Web services.

Note: Microsoft Outlook, when configured as a MAPI over TCP client,


communicates directly with a Mailbox server to access mailbox contents.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-7

Process for Troubleshooting the Client Access Server


There is a strong dependency on the Client Access servers in an Exchange Server 2007
organization. For all remote clients and some local clients, the Client Access server is the
user’s single point of contact. Therefore, you must ensure that Client Access servers are
always available on the network and that their services can be restored quickly if they
become unavailable.
The process for troubleshooting Client Access server issues involves checking the
following:
1. Client Access server availability
2. Client Access server connectivity to other server roles
3. Client Access server services
4. Client Access server virtual directory configuration

Exchange ActiveSync Connections


If an Exchange ActiveSync mobile user cannot connect to an Exchange server, perform
the following tasks:
• If the device is connecting over HTTPS, verify that the port is open on the corporate
firewall.
• If the device is connecting over HTTPS, verify that the server certificate is
configured properly and is trusted by the client device.
• If the device is running a version earlier than Windows Mobile 5.0, verify that the
AllowNonProvisionableDevices setting in the ActiveSync mailbox policy is set to
TRUE.
• Use the Get-ActiveSyncDeviceStatistics cmdlet in the Exchange Management Shell
to verify that the device ID is not blocked by the Exchange administrator.

Outlook Anywhere Connections


If an Outlook Anywhere client (also known as RPC over HTTPS) cannot connect to the
Exchange server, perform the following tasks:
• Verify that the server certificate is configured properly and trusted by the client.
• Verify that the necessary ports are open on the firewall (port 80 or 443).
• Use the Enable-OutlookAnywhere cmdlet in the Exchange Management Shell to
verify that Outlook Anywhere is enabled on the Client Access server.
• If Autodiscover is used, verify that the necessary DNS records have been created.
3-8 Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages

Outlook Web Access Connections


If an Outlook Web Access client cannot connect to the Client Access server, perform the
following tasks:
• Verify that the necessary ports are open on the firewall (port 80 or 443).
• Verify proper configuration of the virtual directory that the Outlook Web Access
clients use and include your organization’s domain configurations.
• Verify that the user is enabled for Outlook Web Access by using the Exchange
Management Console or the Exchange Management Shell.

POP3 or IMAP4 Connections


If a POP3 or IMAP4 client cannot connect to the Client Access server, perform the
following tasks:
• Verify that the POP3 or IMAP4 services have been enabled and started on both the
Client Access server and the Mailbox server.
• Verify that the user is enabled for POP3 or IMAP4. You must use the Exchange
Management Shell Set-PopSettings and Set-ImapSettings cmdlets to configure user
settings for these protocols.

Other Connections
If clients cannot connect to the Client Access server with any connectivity device or
protocol, perform the following tasks:
• Verify that the network connectivity is functioning on the Client Access server.
• Verify that the Client Access server services are running on the Client Access server
by using the Test-ServiceHealth –Server CAS_SERVER_NAME command.
• Verify that the Mailbox server is running on your network, by using the Test-
ServiceHealth –Server MBX_SERVER_NAME command.
• Verify that the Client Access server can communicate with other network Exchange
Server computers.
• Verify that the Client Access server can communicate with Active Directory domain
controllers and global catalog servers.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-9

Lab Scenario

Background Information
You are a messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. You are responsible for
identifying and resolving issues with user access to messaging contents.

Current Situation
A. Datum is experiencing connectivity problems with remote users. Your help desk is
receiving an increasing amount of trouble tickets that you must resolve.

Requirements
You must identify and resolve the reasons why a:
• User is unable to access a public folder.
• Resource booking failed.
• User cannot access resources through Outlook Web Access.
3-10 Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages

Lab Outcomes

You completed this lab successfully if you identified and resolved:


• An issue in which a user at one location is unable to access a public folder.
• A resource-booking issue.
• An issue in which a user cannot access resources through Outlook Web Access.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-11

Lab: Troubleshooting Access to Messaging Contents

After completing this lab, you will be able to:


• Troubleshoot a public folder access issue.
• Troubleshoot a calendaring issue.
• Troubleshoot an Outlook Web Access issue.

Estimated time to complete this lab: 75 minutes.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual
machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine and ensure that all
Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started.

Lab Setup
For this lab, you will use the available Microsoft Virtual PC environment. Before you
begin the lab, you must:
• Start the 5051A-MTL-SRV1, 5051A-MTL-EX1, 5051A-TOR-EX1, and 5051A-
MTL-CL1 virtual machines.
• Log on to 5051A-MTL-SRV1, 5051A-MTL-EX1, and 5051A-TOR-EX1 with the
user name administrator and the password Pa$$w0rd.
3-12 Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages

Exercise 1: Troubleshooting a Public Folder Access Issue


In this exercise, you will identify why a user at one location is unable to access a public
folder and resolve the issue.

Scenario
A. Datum Corporation recently opened a branch office in Toronto. A user of the Toronto
office named Arlene Huff is complaining that she cannot view messages in a public
folder named General Regulations from her Outlook client. You verify that the folder
exists. You must resolve the issue as soon as possible.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Verify that the Administrator • On MTL-CL1, log on as Administrator and use Microsoft Outlook
can view messages in the to view the contents of the General Regulations public folder.
General Regulations public • On MTL-CL1, log on as Arlene and use Microsoft Outlook to try to
folder but Arlene Huff cannot. access the General Regulations public folder.

2. Verify that the public folder • From MTL-EX1, use the Exchange Management Console to check
database that is used by which mailbox database is hosting Arlene Huff’s mailbox.
Arlene Huff is online. • Check the default public folder database configured for the mailbox
database.
• Verify that the public folder database is mounted.

3. Verify that Arlene Huff has • From TOR-EX1, verify that Arlene Huff has the necessary
permissions to access the permissions to access the General Regulations public folder.
General Regulations public
folder. Note: See “How to Configure Public Folder Permissions” In the
Resource Toolkit.

4. Verify that the General • Use the Exchange Management Shell to verify that the replication
Regulations public folder of public content has occurred between MTL-EX1 and TOR- EX1.
has replicated properly to • If required, correct the replication issue.
TOR-EX1.
• On MTL-CL1, confirm that Arlene can access the General
Regulations public folder.

Note: See “Managing Public Folders and Hierarchies” In the


Resource Toolkit.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-13

Exercise 2: Troubleshooting a Calendaring Issue


In this exercise, you will identify the reason for a resource booking failure and resolve the
issue.

Scenario
A. Datum uses resource mailboxes to manage meeting-room bookings. A user named Jae
Pak is complaining that when he attempts to book a meeting room, the conference room
does not acknowledge his meeting requests. He also says that a meeting room often gets
double booked because it will accept all meeting requests unless if a user logs on to the
mailbox and accepts the meetings for the meeting room. He wants to ensure that all
meeting rooms are always booked properly when he sends a meeting request.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Ensure that the Conference • On MTL-EX1, as the Administrator, use Outlook Web Access to
Room resource mailbox is book a meeting with the Conference Room resource mailbox.
configured to not • Confirm that the meeting is not acknowledged.
acknowledge meetings.

2. Ensure that Jae Pak can • On MTL-EX1, from Jae Pak’s mailbox, use Outlook Web Access to
automatically book meetings book a meeting with the Conference Room resource mailbox at the
in the Conference Room same time as the meeting booked by the Administrator.
resource mailbox but that the • Confirm that Jae did not receive a meeting acceptance message
resource mailbox accepts from the resource mailbox and that the resource mailbox allowed
duplicate meetings. the double booking.

3. Configure the resource • Configure the resource mailbox to automatically accept meetings
mailbox auto acceptance and block conflicting meeting requests.
settings.
Note: See “How to Configure Resource Mailboxes” In the
Resource Toolkit.

4. Confirm that the resource • Confirm that the Conference Room resource mailbox will now
mailbox will automatically acknowledge meetings and block conflicting requests.
accept meetings and block
conflicting meeting requests.
3-14 Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages

Exercise 3: Troubleshooting an Outlook Web Access Issue


In this exercise, you will identify the reason why a user cannot access resources through
Outlook Web Access and resolve the issue.

Preparation
Complete the following step to prepare for this exercise:
• On 5051A-MTL-EX1, open the Exchange Management Shell. Type
D:\Unit03\Labfiles\Lab3prep.ps1, and then press ENTER.

Scenario
You recently configured a Client Access server to provide remote connectivity services to
clients. A user named Holly Holt is complaining that she cannot connect to her mailbox
from Microsoft Internet Explorer®. You must resolve this issue as soon as possible.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Ensure that Holly Holt has • From MTL-CL1, try accessing OWA and logging in as Holly with a
the necessary permissions to password of Pa$$w0rd.
access Outlook Web Access. • Use the Exchange Management Console to check Holly Holt’s user
configuration.

2. Confirm that Outlook Web • Use the Exchange Management Shell to ensure that all Outlook
Access is available on the Web Access services are functioning correctly.
Exchange server. • Use the Exchange Management Console to verify that the Outlook
Web Access virtual directories are configured correctly.
• Address any issues you identify and confirm that Holly has access
to OWA.

Note: See “Understanding Outlook Web Access Virtual


Directories” In the Resource Toolkit.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-15

Lab Shutdown
1. On the host computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft
Virtual Server, and then click Virtual Server Administration Website.
2. Under Navigation, click Master Status. For each virtual machine that is running,
click the Virtual Machine Name, and, in the context menu, click Turn off Virtual
Machine and Discard Undo Disks. Click OK.
3. Start the 5051A-MTL-EX1 and 5051A-MTL-MOM1 virtual machines.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual
machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine and ensure that all
Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started.
3-16 Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages

Lab Discussion

Briefly discuss your answers to the following questions with the class:
Q What caused the client-connectivity issue in each exercise?
A The answers for each exercise are as follows:
• Exercise 1: A public folder replication error caused the problem. The problem’s
cause was that public folder replication had been disabled for the entire
organization.
• Exercise 2: The conference room mailbox was not configured to automatically
accept meeting requests.
• Exercise 3: The user was not allowed to connect to Microsoft Outlook® Web
Access. Additionally, the Outlook Web Access virtual directory had been
configured to not support any authentication methods.

Q How did you fix the issue?


A All problems were fixed through the steps in the labs, which modified permissions
and modified configurations of objects.
Unit 3: Troubleshooting Access to Resources and Messages 3-17

Q What other issues could have been the problem?


A Answers will vary, but may include other permission issues, an unmounted mailbox
or public folder database, and network access issues.
Q What information did you learn in this lab that should be added to the
troubleshooting model?
A Answers will vary.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Mail Flow

Table of Contents
Overview 4-1
Discussion: Tools for Monitoring Mail Flow 4-2
Demonstration: Troubleshooting Message
Transport Using Exchange Server 2007 Tools 4-4
Process for Troubleshooting Internal Mail Flow 4-6
Process for Troubleshooting External Mail Flow 4-8
Lab Scenario 4-10
Lab Outcomes 4-11
Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-12
Lab Discussion 4-20
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Version 1.1
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-1

Overview

You must determine the next logical step in troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange
Server 2007, based on the results of the first unit’s monitoring and troubleshooting steps.
Troubleshooting issues may be related to mail-flow issues. In this unit, you will monitor
and troubleshoot mail flow.

Objectives
After completing this unit, you will be able to:
• Identify tools for monitoring mail flow.
• Describe how to troubleshoot message transport using Exchange Server 2007 tools.
• Describe the process for troubleshooting internal mail flow.
• Describe the process for troubleshooting external mail flow.
• Configure Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) to monitor message flow.
• Identify and resolve the reason that messages are not being delivered to and from the
Internet.
• Identify and resolve the cause for spam filters blocking messages.
4-2 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Discussion: Tools for Monitoring Mail Flow

In this discussion, you will learn about the tools that can be used to monitor mail flow.

Discussion Questions
Read and answer the discussion questions. When you are finished, you will discuss your
answers as a group. Consider the following questions:
Q What are the possible first signs of message-flow problems?
A Answers will vary but may include:
• Users are complaining that messages they send are not reaching recipients.
• Public folder content is not being replicated.
• You are receiving alerts from a monitoring tool.

Q What tools have you used to track messages as they flow through a messaging
environment?
A Answers will vary but may include:
• Queue Viewer.
• Mail Flow Troubleshooter.
• SMTP logs.
• Message Tracking tool.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-3

Q What types of information can tracking tools provide?


A The types of information include:
• The time a message was sent
• The message sender
• The message recipient
• The message size
• The components of a server that are handling a message
• The errors encountered during message delivery
• The path that the message took to reach its destination

Q What type of information about the existing messaging environment should


Exchange administrators use to assist them in troubleshooting message flow?
A Answers will vary but should include:
• Configuration information for all SMTP Send and SMTP Receive connectors.
• Active Directory site link and cost information.
• Configuration information for all anti-spam agents.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
4-4 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Demonstration: Troubleshooting Message Transport


Using Exchange Server 2007 Tools

Hub Transport servers store messages in queues while they are processed. When
messages are stuck in a queue, it indicates that there is a delivery problem. To view
and manage the queues, you can use Queue Viewer, Exchange Management Console
commands, and the Mail Flow Troubleshooter.
The Exchange Management Shell cmdlets that you can use for queue management are:
• Freeze-Queue and UnFreeze-Queue
• Retry-Queue
• Freeze-Message and UnFreeze-Message
• Remove-Message

To further track message delivery, you can use message tracking, which is enabled
by default on Hub Transport servers with subject logging enabled. Use the Set-
TransportServer cmdlet to modify message tracking configuration.
In this demonstration, you will learn how to use the Queue Viewer to see different types
of queues and filter queues, and how to use the Mail Flow Troubleshooter to diagnose the
reason why messages are not delivered.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-5

Discussion Questions
Answer the following questions in your class discussion:
Q When will Queue Viewer be most useful?
A Queue Viewer will be most useful when messages cannot be delivered from one
server to another or from one server to the Internet.
Q What types of issues will you not be able to troubleshoot using Queue Viewer?
A Queue Viewer will not enable you to troubleshoot any issue where the message is not
in the queue. The following are examples where Queue Viewer cannot help:
• A problem with format conversion that prevents a message from being placed
into the Submission queue.
• A problem with the Microsoft Exchange Mail Submission service, such that
messages are never placed in the Submission queue.
4-6 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Process for Troubleshooting Internal Mail Flow

Internal mail flow is the term used to define message delivery between Exchange servers
within the same organization. Internal mail flow occurs between Exchange servers,
through Hub Transport servers and Mailbox servers.
A large number of components are involved in delivering a message to its destination.
When troubleshooting a message-delivery problem, administrators must analyze the
multiple components involved in the process. You can use a series of tools to review
information collected during the mail-flow process. However, the administrator must
consider a list of potential issues and eliminate potential causes to ultimately identify the
problem’s root cause.

Troubleshooting Internal Mail Flow


Use the following information to assist in troubleshooting internal mail flow.
1. Identify whether the problem is isolated to an individual user or to multiple users:
a. If the problem is isolated to a specific user, investigate client configuration issues
or mailbox problems. For example, if a user’s mailbox size has exceeded its
configured limit, the user may no longer be able to send messages.
b. If the problem is not isolated to a single user, continue to investigate the problem.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-7

2. Identify whether the problem is isolated to a single server or to multiple servers:


a. If the problem is isolated to a single server, investigate issues related to services
and server configuration. Even though the problem is limited to a single server,
you will need to investigate whether the problem is related to the Mailbox server
role or the Hub Transport server role.
b. If the problem is not isolated to a single server, verify what routes messages are
taking and which component, or server, is responsible for delaying the message.
Use tools like the Mail Flow Troubleshooter and the Queue Viewer to identify
the location of the undelivered message.
3. If the problem is not with a particular server, but related to communication between
servers, attempt to resolve network or connectivity issues between the servers. Use
tools such as Nslookup, Ping, or TracePing to identify if a configuration error or
networking component is causing the message delivery failure.

Important: The Hub Transport server performs all message delivery, even for
messages destined to a user in the same server or database as the message
sender. You must ensure that a Hub Transport server is always present in every
Active Directory® directory service site where a Mailbox server is installed on the
network to ensure mail delivery functions properly.
4-8 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Process for Troubleshooting External Mail Flow

External mail flow is the term used to define message delivery to a recipient outside an
Exchange organization. Hub Transport and Edge Transport servers can deliver SMTP
messages to servers outside an Exchange organization.

Troubleshooting External Mail Flow


Use the following information to assist in troubleshooting external mail flow:

Note: Before messages are routed out of an Exchange organization, they are
routed between organizational components. Before attempting the troubleshooting
steps defined in this topic, you should attempt to troubleshoot internal mail flow by
attempting the steps defined in the previous topic, Troubleshooting Internal Mail
Flow.

1. If message delivery is destined to an Internet recipient, verify that the Internet


connectivity is functioning properly. You should test basic connectivity to Internet
hosts:
a. If connectivity to the Internet is functioning properly and delivery to an external
recipient is not functioning, attempt to connect to the SMTP server of the
external recipient over port 25.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-9

b. If connectivity to the remote SMTP host is functioning properly and delivery to


an external recipient is not functioning, attempt to resolve Domain Name System
(DNS) records to the external server. Use Nslookup to verify the information
contained in mail exchange (MX) and A records for the remote domain.
2. Verify the configurations of the Edge Transport servers or the Internet-facing Hub
Transport servers. All mail delivery to the Internet flows through those servers.
Verify that all configurations will allow for SMTP mail to flow to and from the
servers:
a. If the problem is with inbound message delivery, verify that the SMTP Receive
connectors are properly configured. Verify the configurations of the anti-spam
agents and ensure that the servers performing filtering are not identifying the
inbound messages as spam.
b. If the problem is with outbound message delivery, verify the configurations of
the SMTP Send connectors. Ensure that an invalid SMTP relay is not specified
for outbound delivery.
If you have EdgeSync configured between the internal Hub Transport servers and
the Edge Transport servers, the SMTP connectors for Internet message delivery
are automatically configured. However, ensure that the edge synchronization is
functional and ensure that the SMTP Send connectors are configured correctly on
the Hub Transport servers.
If you are using a Hub Transport server to route messages to the Internet, either
directly to the Internet or to a smart host, you must configure SMTP Send and
SMTP Receive connectors on the Hub Transport server.
4-10 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Lab Scenario

Background Information
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. You are responsible for
identifying and resolving messaging environment issues.

Current Situation
You are implementing an Edge Transport server to provide additional security for e-mail
flow to and from the Internet. However, after installing the server role, you notice that
you cannot send messages to the Internet nor are messages from the Internet reaching the
internal test user that you are using to test e-mail flow. Additionally, after you fix this
problem so that messages can flow to and from the Internet, you need to ensure that the
spam-filtering configuration on the Edge Transport server meets your company
requirements.
Shortly after you resolve the Internet message flow issues, users again report that they
cannot send e-mail to Internet e-mail recipients. You must address this issue.

Requirements
You must identify and resolve the reasons why:
• Message flow is not being monitored.
• Messages are not being delivered to and from the Internet.
• Messages are being blocked by spam filters.
• Messages are not being sent to the Internet.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-11

Lab Outcomes

If you complete this lab successfully, you should have:


• Configured MOM to monitor message flow.
• Identified and resolved the cause of messages not being delivered to and from the
Internet.
• Identified and resolved the cause of messages being blocked by spam filters.
• Identified and resolved the cause of messages not being delivered to Internet
recipients.
4-12 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

After completing this lab, you will be able to:


• Configure monitoring of message queues.
• Troubleshoot message delivery for Internet recipients.
• Troubleshoot messages blocked by spam filters.
• Troubleshoot message delivery for messages sent to the Internet.

Estimated time to complete this lab: 100 minutes.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start, open the Services
console on the virtual machine and ensure that all Microsoft Exchange services
that are configured to start automatically have indeed started.

Lab Setup
For this lab, you will use the available Microsoft Virtual PC environment. Before you
begin the lab, you must:
• Start the 5051A-MTL-EX1 and the 5051A-MTL-MOM1 virtual machines.
• Log on to the virtual machines with the user name administrator and the password
Pa$$w0rd.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-13

Exercise 1: Configuring MOM to Monitor Message Flow


In this exercise, you will configure MOM to monitor message flow.

Scenario
You have recently installed a MOM 2005 server in your organization to monitor services
running on the enterprise servers. You have recently encountered an increasing amount of
trouble tickets issued by users about message delivery delays. You must configure the
MOM 2005 server to trigger alert messages when messages are being delayed within the
messaging infrastructure.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Configure MTL-MOM1 to • Use the Microsoft Operation Manager 2005 Administrator


monitor message queues on console to configure a performance rule for MTL-EX1. Specify
MTL-EX1. performance counter thresholds that will alert you when the
unreachable message queue is greater than 2.
• Configure alerts to be directed to the Administrator mailbox.
• Configure the sending SMTP server for MTL-MOM1 to use
MTL-EX1.
• Configure the default SMTP server on MTL-EX1 to accept
anonymous connections.

Note: See “Understanding MOM Rules Created by Management


Packs” and “Configuring Message Flow Monitoring with MOM” in
the Resource Toolkit.

2. Test the message queue • Send three test messages to Carol@contoso.com. The
monitoring feature Contoso.com domain is unreachable.
• Confirm that MOM sends an e-mail alert to the administrator.

To prepare for the next exercise


• Shut down the 5051A-MTL-MOM1 virtual machine and discard all changes.
• Start the 5051A-MTL-Edge1 and the 5051A-MTL-SRV1 virtual machines.
• Log on to the virtual machines with the user name administrator and the password
Pa$$w0rd.

Important: If you receive a notification that one or more services failed to start
when starting a virtual machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine
and ensure that all Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start
automatically are started.

For this lab, the MTL-SRV1 server will operate as an external SMTP server.
4-14 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Exercise 2: Troubleshooting Internet E-Mail Delivery


In this exercise, you will identify and resolve the issue that is resulting in messages not
being delivered to and from the Internet.

Preparation
Before you begin this exercise, you must:
• On MTL-Ex1, open the Exchange Management Shell. At the prompt, type
Set-ReceiveConnector ‘Default MTL-EX1’ –PermissionGroups
‘ExchangeUsers,ExchangeServers,ExchangeLegacyServers’ and press ENTER.

Scenario
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. You have just deployed
an Edge Transport server and, during testing, you determine that e-mail is not being sent
to the Internet nor is it being sent to your organization from the Internet. You need to
ensure that e-mail can flow in both directions.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Confirm that e-mail flow to • On MTL-EX1, open OWA as an Administrator and send a
and from the Internet is not message to Carol@Contoso.com.
working. • On MTL-SRV1, open Outlook Express and send a message to
Administrator@Adatum.com.
• Confirm that the messages are not received.

2. Determine where the • On MTL-Edge1, check the message queues to see if the
message flow to the Internet messages are not being delivered from MTL-Edge1.
is failing • On MTL-EX1, check the message queues to see if the messages
are not being delivered from MTL-EX1.

Note: See “Understanding Message Queues and the Queue


Viewer” in the Resource Toolkit.

3. Test basic network • Use the Windows TCP/IP tools to verify connectivity between
connectivity between the MTL-EX1 and MTL-EDGE1.
Exchange Hub Transport • Use the Windows TCP/IP tools to verify connectivity between
server and the Edge MTL-Edge1 and MTL-SRV1.
Transport server, and the
Edge Transport server and
the Internet SMTP server.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-15

Tasks Supporting information

4. Test SMTP connectivity and • Use Telnet to verify that the SMTP service is functioning over the
configuration on the Hub default SMTP port 25 on each of the three servers.
Transport server, the Edge • Test whether each of the servers will accept messages for the
Transport server, and the SMTP domains associated with the server.
Internet SMTP server.
Note: See “Troubleshooting SMTP Connectivity” in the
Resource Toolkit.

5. Check the DNS records for • Use NSLookup to check the MX records for the Adatum.com
the SMTP domains. domain and the Contoso.com domain.

6. Check the SMTP connector • Check the SMTP connectors configured on MTL-EX1 and MTL-
configuration on the Hub Edge1.
Transport server and Edge • Check the Accepted Domain setting on MTL-Edge1.
Transport server.
• Correct the SMTP connector configuration, if required.

Note: See “Implementing Edge Synchronization” in the


Resource Toolkit.

7. Confirm that e-mail flow to • On MTL-EX1, open OWA as an Administrator and send a
and from the Internet is now message to Carol@Contoso.com.
functioning • On MTL-SRV1, open Outlook Express and send a message to
Administrator@Adatum.com.
• Confirm that the messages are received.
4-16 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Exercise 3: Troubleshooting Spam Filtering


In this exercise, you will identify the cause of spam filters blocking messages.

Preparation
Before you begin this exercise, you must:
• On MTL-Edge1, open the Exchange Management Shell. At the prompt, type
d:\Unit04\Labfiles\Lab4_PrepA.ps1 and press ENTER. This command configures
several spam filtering options on MTL-Edge1.
• On MTL-SRV1, open a command prompt. At the command prompt, type
d:\Unit04\Labfiles\Lab4_PrepB.bat and press ENTER. This script sends 7 e-mail
messages from MTL-SRV1 to users in the A. Datum organization.

Scenario
Users at A. Datum are concerned that the spam filtering rules are not configured correctly.
Over the last few weeks, since you have configured the Edge Transport server, they say
that messages have not been delivered to the appropriate mailboxes.
One of the users, Katarina Larsson, has provided the following list of e-mails that she did
not receive, but was able to receive on an external e-mail account. The info@adatum.com
address is monitored by Katarina and is used as a general mailbox for all inquires about
the company’s products and services. This mailbox should not have any filtering rules
applied to it.
Recipient Sender Comments
Katarina@adatum.com msg1@contoso.com Includes an attachment with
a .doc extension.
Katarina@adatum.com Msg2@contoso.com Includes an attachment with
a .zip extension.
Katarina@adatum.com Msg3@Tailspintoys.com Includes an attachment with
a .doc extension.
Info@adatum.com Msg4@contoso.com Contains spam-like text.
Katarina@adatum.com Msg5@contoso.com Contains the term Poker in the
subject and body.
info@adatum.com Msg6@contoso.com Contains no filtered terms.
Katarina@adatum.com Msg7@contoso.com Includes an attachment with
a .exe extension.

Katarina says that all of these messages should be delivered to the user mailboxes. The
e-mail from msg7@contoso.com should be delivered even if it is delivered without an
attachment.
When you configured the Edge Transport server, you created a mailbox with an e-mail of
Quarantine@adatum.com and configured it to receive all quarantined messages.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-17

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Examine the required • On MTL-EX1, use Outlook Web Access to access the
mailboxes to determine Quarantine mailbox. Document any messages in the mailbox.
which messages did not • Use Outlook Web Access to access the Info mailbox. Document
get delivered. any messages in the mailbox.
• Use Outlook Web Access to access Katarina Larsson’s mailbox.
Document any messages in the mailbox.
• On MTL-Edge1, use the Get-AgentLog command to determine
why messages were blocked.

2. Identify and resolve the • Identify and resolve the issue for why the message from
issue for why each of the Msg1@contoso.com was not delivered.
messages that were not • Identify and resolve the issue for why the message from
delivered did not arrive. Msg2@contoso.com was not delivered.
• Identify and resolve the issue for why the message from
Msg3@TailspinToys.com was not delivered.
• Identify and resolve the issue for why the message from
Msg4@contoso.com was not delivered.
• Identify and resolve the issue for why the message from
Msg5@contoso.com was not delivered.
• Identify and resolve the issue for why the message from
Msg6@contoso.com was not delivered.
• Identify and resolve the issue for why the message from
Msg7@contoso.com was not delivered.

Note: See “Understanding Spam Filtering on Edge Transport


Servers” in the Resource Toolkit.

3. Confirm that all messages • On MTL-SRV1, open a command prompt. At the command
are now delivered. prompt, type d:\Unit04\Labfiles\Lab4_PrepB.bat and press
ENTER.
• On MTL-EX1, use Outlook Web Access to access the Info
mailbox. Document any messages in the mailbox.
• Use Outlook Web Access to access Katarina Larsson’s mailbox.
Document any messages in the mailbox.
• If necessary, use Outlook Web Access to access the Quarantine
mailbox. Document any messages in the mailbox.
4-18 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Exercise 4: Troubleshooting Outbound Internet E-mail Delivery


In this exercise, you will troubleshoot outbound Internet e-mail delivery.

Preparation
Complete the following step to prepare for this exercise:
• On 5051A-MTL-Ex1, open the Exchange Management Shell. Type
D:\Unit04\Labfiles\Lab4_prepC.ps1, and then press ENTER.

Scenario
Shortly after you configure Internet message delivery, users again report that they cannot
send e-mail to Internet recipients. When they try to send messages to the Internet, they
receive a non-delivery report indicating that the messages were not delivered. You need
to ensure that e-mail can flow to the Internet.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Confirm that messages • On MTL-EX1, open OWA as an Administrator and send a


cannot be sent to the message to Carol@Contoso.com.
Internet. • On MTL-SRV1, open Outlook Express and confirm that the
message was not received.

2. Determine the cause for the • On MTL-EX1, use the Get-Queue command to determine why
message delivery failure. the message is not being delivered.
• Review the SMTP send connector configuration.

Note: See “Configuring SMTP Send Connectors” In the


Resource Toolkit.

3. Resolve the issue and test • On MTL-EX1, modify the required settings.
message flow. • Confirm that you can send a message to Carol@Contoso.com.
Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow 4-19

Lab Shutdown
1. On the host computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft
Virtual Server, and then click Virtual Server Administration Website.
2. Under Navigation, click Master Status. For each virtual machine that is running,
click the Virtual Machine Name, and, in the context menu, click Turn off Virtual
Machine and Discard Undo Disks. Click OK.
3. Start the 5051A-MTL-EX1 and 5051A-MTL-EX2 virtual machines.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual
machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine and ensure that all
Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started.
4-20 Unit 4: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mail Flow

Lab Discussion

Briefly discuss your answers to the following questions with the class:
Q What other issues could have caused similar problems and message-delivery failures?
A Answers will vary but may include:
• Internet connectivity may be unavailable.
• Message transport services could be stopped.
• Configuration between Edge Transport and Hub Transport servers may be
incorrect.
• MX records may be configured incorrectly or may be missing.
• The SMTP port may be closed on a corporate firewall.

Q What other troubleshooting tools could have helped you in the troubleshooting
process?
A Answers will vary but may include:
• Mail Flow Troubleshooter
• SMTP protocol log

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Mailbox Servers

Table of Contents
Overview 5-1
Tools for Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Mailbox Servers 5-2
Process for Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-4
Demonstration: Troubleshooting Mailbox Server
Performance Issues 5-6
Lab Scenario 5-8
Lab Outcomes 5-9
Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox
Servers 5-10
Lab Discussion 5-16
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Version 1.2
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-1

Overview

You must determine the next logical step in troubleshooting Microsoft® Exchange
Server 2007, based on the results of the initial monitoring and troubleshooting steps. The
root cause of a client or mail-flow issue may be a configuration error or failure on a
messaging server. In this unit, you will monitor and troubleshoot Mailbox servers.

Objectives
After completing this unit, you will be able to:
• Identify the tools for monitoring Exchange Mailbox servers.
• Implement a process for troubleshooting Exchange Mailbox servers.
• Describe the guidelines for resolving performance issues for Exchange Server roles.
• Configure Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) to monitor Mailbox servers.
• Identify the cause for users not being able to log on to their mailboxes and resolve the
issue.
• Identify the reasons why a mailbox store cannot be mounted and resolve the issue.
• Identify the reasons why a user cannot access a message and resolve the issue.
5-2 Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

Tools for Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox


Servers

Exchange administrators will typically allocate special attention to the status and
performance of Mailbox servers. The principal Microsoft Exchange Server service that
runs on Mailbox servers is the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service. The
Microsoft Exchange Information Store service consumes more memory than any other
Exchange service and typically consumes more memory than any Microsoft Windows®
operating system service. In addition to the need for a large amount of physical memory,
Mailbox servers also generate a large amount of disk access, which demands high output
from the disk subsystem. The physical demands on Mailbox servers are important enough
to convince many administrators in medium and large organizations to install the
Exchange Server 2007 Mailbox server role on dedicated hardware.

Monitoring and Troubleshooting Tools


There are many tools available for monitoring Mailbox servers that can assist you in
troubleshooting user access to, and the performance of, a Mailbox server. The following
list describes some of these tools:
• Microsoft Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer Tool. This tool can be
used to detect problems that are caused by tampering or human error. This tool
programmatically collects settings and values from data repositories such as the
Active Directory® directory service, the registry, the metabase, and Performance
Monitor. The collected information is compared against a database of best practices
that Microsoft maintains.
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-3

You can use the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer to determine the overall
health of an Exchange server, regardless of the roles that are running on that server.
With this tool, you can identify any configuration issue that does not conform to
Microsoft best practices. This tool can assist you during the troubleshooting of a
Mailbox server by identifying configuration errors on the server.
• Microsoft Exchange Server Profile Analyzer Tool and Microsoft Exchange Server
Performance Troubleshooter. These tools detect problems that are caused by a
performance bottleneck or a computer virus. These are wizard-based tools that use
a mechanism that is similar to the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer. They
gather performance data and statistical information about mailbox databases or
Mailbox servers in an organization.
You can use these tools to identify problems that are caused by a performance issue
or a lack of available resources on an Exchange server. These tools also identify a
process or Exchange component that is utilizing more than its share of server
resources. These tools can also be used for capacity planning on a Mailbox server.
• Microsoft Exchange Server Database Recovery Management and Database
Troubleshooter. These tools can be used to troubleshoot mailbox database corruption.
These wizard-based tools assist you through the steps of troubleshooting and
recovering a mailbox database.
You can use these tools to troubleshoot a problem with a database that cannot mount,
or when users cannot connect to a database.
• Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack for Microsoft Operations
Manager (MOM) 2005. This tool can be used to troubleshoot problems that are
related to performance or availability issues. This tool can be used to monitor
preconfigured parameters on Exchange servers in your organization and alert you
when performance or availability parameters enter critical states.
You can use this tool to effectively monitor the availability of Exchange servers and
track server performance data. The Exchange 2007 management pack is configured
with performance counters, alert settings, and reports that can be used to monitor and
troubleshoot Exchange servers.

Note: For more information on the Exchange Server troubleshooting tools, see the
topic “Don't forget to use the Exchange Troubleshooting Assistant tools suite!” on
the Microsoft Exchange Team Blog Web site.
5-4 Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

Process for Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

In Exchange Server 2007, the Mailbox server role manages mailbox databases and MAPI
over remote procedure call (RPC) client connectivity. In this role, an Exchange 2007
Mailbox server has the most client-facing role in the messaging environment and is the
most critical to user satisfaction. When a Mailbox server is experiencing any problem or
issue, the end users are typically the first to complain about a functionality loss.

Note: When troubleshooting mailbox servers, you must understand the


connectivity requirements with other Exchange servers on the network. For
example, a mailbox cannot deliver mail messages if a Hub Transport server is not
available in the same Active Directory site or if the mailbox server is experiencing
connectivity problems with the Hub Transport servers. When troubleshooting
message delivery from a mailbox server, ensure that the mailbox server can locate
Hub Transport servers in the site by using DNS and that the server can
communicate with those Hub Transport servers by using RPC.

Mailbox Server Problems


Examples of problems that can occur on an Exchange Mailbox server include:
• User cannot open his or her mailbox.
• Database is not mounted.
• Database will not mount.

The following procedures include the recommended steps for resolving these problems.
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-5

User Cannot Open Mailbox


Use the following process to troubleshoot Mailbox server problems in which a user
cannot open his or her mailbox:
1. Verify that the mailbox exists on the Exchange server.
2. Verify that the user account is enabled in Active Directory.
3. Verify that the user profile is configured to the appropriate server. If the user used
Autodiscover to configure the Microsoft Office Outlook® profile, ensure that
Autodiscover is configured properly.
4. Verify that Active Directory and the Domain Name System (DNS) are available on
the network and are configured properly on the client computer.
5. Verify that the mailbox database that is hosting the mailbox is mounted. If the
mailbox database is not mounted, perform the steps in the “Database Is Not
Mounted” procedure.

Database Is Not Mounted


Use the following process to troubleshoot Mailbox server problems in which the database
is not mounted:
1. Verify that the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service and all dependent
services are started.

Note: Use the Test-ServiceHealth cmdlet from the Exchange Management Shell.

2. Attempt to mount the database manually. If the database is not mounting correctly,
perform the steps in the “Database Will Not Mount” procedure.

Database Will Not Mount


Use the following process to troubleshoot Mailbox server problems in which the database
will not mount:
1. Verify that there is enough free space on the disk where the database is stored.
2. Review the application log in Event Viewer to identify any causes or error codes that
are associated with the database mount error.
3. Use the Exchange Server Disaster Recovery Analyzer to perform the troubleshooting
steps for repairing or restoring the mailbox database.

Note: As a best practice, always attempt to restore an Exchange Server database


rather then repairing the database. When you use tools like ESEUtil and ISInteg to
repair an Exchange database, you run the risk of losing data.
5-6 Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

Demonstration: Troubleshooting Mailbox Server


Performance Issues

In this demonstration, you will learn how to use the Performance Troubleshooter to
troubleshoot Mailbox server performance issues.

Discussion Questions
Read and answer the discussion questions. When you are finished, you will discuss your
answers as a group:
Q What are the bottlenecks to performance on a computer running the Microsoft
Windows Server® operating system? What are the primary indicators for each of
these bottlenecks?
A Answers will vary but should include:
• Disk subsystem
• Memory
• Network card
• CPU
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-7

Q What are the most common bottlenecks for computers running Windows Server and
Exchange Server?
A The most common performance bottleneck on an Exchange server is the disk
subsystem. However, other components that can cause bottlenecks in Exchange
include insufficient physical memory or inadequate processing speed on the CPUs.
Q How does Exchange Server 2007 address some of the performance issues
encountered in previous versions of Exchange Server?
A By using a 64-bit architecture, Exchange Server 2007 is no longer limited by the
32-bit memory limitations or to three gigabytes of addressable memory. Also, it is
estimated that the changes in Exchange Server 2007 have reduced the demands on
the disk subsystem by 70 percent.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
5-8 Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

Lab Scenario

Background Information
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. You are responsible for
identifying and resolving issues with the messaging environment.

Current Situation
The help desk has contacted you because there are a number of problems with Exchange
Server mailbox access. You look at the ticket queue created by support technicians and
help-desk personnel, and notice three new trouble tickets. One ticket shows that a user is
having a mailbox logon issue. Another ticket shows that a mailbox database cannot be
mounted and the issue appears to be a hard-disk failure. The third ticket shows that a
mailbox database cannot be mounted.

Requirements
You must resolve the following issues:
• The monitoring of Mailbox servers is not configured.
• A user is unable to log on to his or her mailbox.
• A hard disk fails.
• A mailbox database cannot be mounted.
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-9

Lab Outcomes

You have completed this lab successfully if you have done the following:
• Configured Performance Console to monitor Mailbox servers
• Identified and resolved the cause of a user not being able to log on to his or her
mailbox
• Recovered from a hard disk failure
• Identified and resolved the reason why a mailbox store cannot be mounted
5-10 Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox


Servers

After completing this lab, you will be able to:


• Configure the monitoring of Mailbox servers.
• Troubleshoot a mailbox logon issue.
• Troubleshoot a hard disk failure.
• Troubleshoot a mailbox database mounting issue.

Estimated time to complete this lab: 120 minutes.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual
machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine and ensure that all
Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started.

Lab Setup
For this lab, you will use the available Microsoft Virtual PC environment. Before you
begin the lab, you must:
• Start the 5051A-MTL- EX1 and 5051A-MTL-EX2 virtual machines.
• Log on to the virtual machines with the user name administrator and the password
Pa$$w0rd.
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-11

Exercise 1: Configuring the Monitoring of Mailbox Servers


In this exercise, you will configure Performance Console to monitor Mailbox servers.

Scenario
You need to create a more proactive approach to managing your Exchange Server 2007
Mailbox servers, and you decide to use the Performance console provided with Windows
Server 2003. The Windows Server administrators have configured a counter log settings
file that includes a selection of the most important counters to monitor on a Windows
Server. You must modify this counter log settings file to monitor key performance
components that are running on your Mailbox servers.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

• Modify the provided counter • Open the Performance Console and open the counter log
log settings file to monitor settings file located at D:\Unit05\Labfiles.
performance for Mailbox • Modify the counter log settings file to add counters that
servers. need to be monitored on a Mailbox Server.
• Test the counter log settings.

Note: See “Monitoring Mailbox Servers Using


Performance Console” in the Resource Toolkit.
5-12 Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

Exercise 2: Troubleshooting a Mailbox Logon Issue


In this exercise, you will troubleshoot a mailbox logon issue.

Preparation
Before you begin this exercise, complete the following step:
• On MTL-EX1, open a command prompt. At the command prompt, type
d:\Unit05\Labfiles\Lab5_PrepA.bat and press ENTER.

Scenario
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. A user named Bob Kelly
is complaining that he cannot log on to his mailbox using Microsoft Outlook Web Access.
You must ensure that Bob can log on to his mailbox and receive e-mail messages.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Validate that Bob Kelly • Use Microsoft Internet Explorer® to verify that Bob Kelly
cannot log on to his mailbox cannot log on to Outlook Web Access.
and that his mailbox exists • Use the Exchange Management Shell or the Exchange
on MTL-EX1. Management Console to verify that a mailbox exists for
Bob Kelly and to verify the mailbox location.

2. Verify that the Microsoft • Use the Exchange Management Shell to verify that the
Exchange Information Store Microsoft Exchange Information Store service is started.
service is started.
Note: See “How to Use the Test-ServiceHealth Cmdlet” in
the Resource Toolkit.

3. Verify that the mailbox • Use the Exchange Management Shell or the Exchange
database that hosts Bob Management Console to verify that the mailbox database
Kelly’s mailbox is mounted. that contains Bob Kelly’s mailbox is mounted. If it is not
mounted, attempt a mounting procedure.

4. Identify and resolve the • Use Event Viewer to determine the issue.
issue. • Resolve the issue and confirm that Bob Kelly can gain
access to his mailbox.

Note: See “How to Move Storage Groups and Mailbox


Databases” in the Resource Toolkit.
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-13

Exercise 3: Troubleshooting a Hard Disk Failure


In this exercise, you will troubleshoot a hard-disk failure.

Preparation
Before you begin this exercise, complete the following steps:
1. On MTL-EX2, on the Start menu, point to All Programs, point to Accessories,
point to System Tools, and then click Backup.
2. On the Welcome to the Backup or Restore Wizard page, click Next.
3. On the Backup or Restore page, click Next.
4. On the What to Back Up page, click Let me choose what to back up, and then
click Next.
5. On the Items to Backup Up page, in the Items to back up area, expand Microsoft
Exchange Server, expand MTL-EX2, expand Microsoft Information Store, select
the ExecutiveSG check box, and then click Next.
6. On the Backup Type, Destination, and Name page, click Browse.
7. In the Save As dialog box, browse to drive D.
8. In the Save As dialog box, in the File name box, type BackupExchange, and then
click Save.
9. On the Backup Type, Destination, and Name page, click Next.
10. On the Completing the Backup or Restore Wizard page, click Finish.
11. Wait until the backup finishes and then close the Backup Progress dialog box.
12. On MTL-EX1, open a command prompt. At the command prompt, type
d:\Unit05\Labfiles\Lab5_PrepB.bat and press ENTER.
13. On MTL-EX2, open a command prompt. At the command prompt, type
d:\Unit05\Labfiles\Lab5_PrepC.bat and press ENTER.
5-14 Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

Scenario
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. On a Monday morning, a
large number of trouble tickets are sent by users having trouble accessing their mailboxes.
All of the users who are experiencing problems are executives within the company.
The first executive to call the help desk was Heidi Steen. Your support technician has
identified that the problem is with the ExecutiveDB mailbox database that is dismounted
on the Exchange server. The support technician confirms that the mailbox could not be
mounted from the Exchange Management Console.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Identify the problem that is • Use the Exchange Management Console to try to mount
preventing the mailbox the ExecutiveDB mailbox database.
database from mounting. • Use Event Viewer to identify the error returned when you
cannot mount the database.
• Use Windows Explorer to confirm that the E: drive is not
functional.

2. Restore the failed hard • Use Computer Management to restore the failed drive.
drive.

3. Restore the Exchange • Ensure that the current transaction logs for the storage
database files. group are accessible.
• Restore the Exchange database.
• Confirm that the database can be mounted and that Heidi
Steen can access her mailbox.

Note: See “Restoring Exchange Databases” in the


Resource Toolkit.
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-15

Exercise 4: Troubleshooting a Mailbox Database Mounting Issue


In this exercise, you will identify and resolve the issue preventing a mailbox database
from mounting.

Scenario
A user named Aaron Con has called the help desk stating that he cannot access e-mail
messages in his mailbox. The help-desk technician has determined that the TempDB
mailbox database cannot be mounted in Exchange Management Console. You need to
ensure that Aaron Con can access his mailbox.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Verify that Aaron Con • On MTL-EX1, use OWA try to access Aaron’s mailbox.
cannot access his mailbox.

2. Identify the reason why the • On MTL-EX2, attempt to mount the TempDB mailbox
mailbox database cannot be database.
mounted. • Review the Event log for reasons why Aaron cannot read
the message in his inbox.

3. Resolve the problem for • Use the Database Recovery Management in the Exchange
why Aaron cannot access Management Console to repair the database.
the message in his mailbox. • Confirm that Aaron can access all of the messages in his
mailbox.

Note: See “Repairing Exchange Databases” in the


Resource Toolkit.

Lab Shutdown
1. On the host computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft
Virtual Server, and then click Virtual Server Administration Website.
2. Under Navigation, click Master Status. For each virtual machine that is running,
click the Virtual Machine Name, and, in the context menu, click Turn off Virtual
Machine and Discard Undo Disks. Click OK.
3. Start the 5051A-MTL-EX1, 5051A-MTL-EX2, and 5051A-MTL-MOM1 virtual
machines.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual
machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine and ensure that all
Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started.
5-16 Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers

Lab Discussion

Briefly discuss your answers to the following questions with the class:
Q What was the issue that resulted in the issue in each exercise?
A Answers will vary but may include:
• Size issue on the disk
• Database corruption issue
• Hard-disk failure

Q What other issues could have been the problem? That is, what other problems could
have had the same symptoms that were reported in each exercise?
A Answers will vary but may include:
• Problems with the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service.
• Problems contacting or accessing the Active Directory® directory service.
• Missing or corrupted transaction log files.
Unit 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers 5-17

Q What information did you learn in this lab that should be added to the
troubleshooting model?
A Answers will vary but may include:
• Steps that should be performed to repair a corrupted database.
• How to move a mailbox database in Exchange Server 2007.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting
External and Additional Services

Table of Contents
Overview 6-1
Discussion: External and Additional Services
Required by Exchange Server 2007 6-2
External Services Required for Unified Messaging
in Exchange Server 2007 6-4
Monitoring External Services with MOM 2005 6-7
Lab Scenario 6-9
Lab Outcomes 6-10
Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and
Additional Services 6-11
Lab Discussion 6-17
Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, is subject to change
without notice. Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names,
e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any
real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or
should be inferred. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting
the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval
system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights
covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from
Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,
copyrights, or other intellectual property.

The names of manufacturers, products, or URLs are provided for informational purposes only and Microsoft
makes no representations and warranties, either expressed, implied, or statutory, regarding these
manufacturers or the use of the products with any Microsoft technologies. The inclusion of a manufacturer or
product does not imply endorsement of Microsoft of the manufacturer or product. Links may be provided to
third party sites. Such sites are not under the control of Microsoft and Microsoft is not responsible for the
contents of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes or updates to such sites.
Microsoft is not responsible for webcasting or any other form of transmission received from any linked site.
Microsoft is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply
endorsement of Microsoft of the site or the products contained therein.

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Microsoft Press, Active Directory, ActiveSync, BizTalk, Internet Explorer, Outlook, PowerPoint,
SharePoint, SmartScreen, Visual Studio, Windows, Windows Mobile, Windows NT, Windows PowerShell, and
Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
and/or other countries.

All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Version 1.0
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-1

Overview

Exchange Server problems may be caused by external and additional services that
Exchange Server 2007 requires. In this unit, you will learn how to monitor and
troubleshoot external and additional services.

Objectives
After completing this unit, you will be able to:
• Identify external and additional services that Exchange Server 2007 requires.
• Identify external services required for Unified Messaging in Exchange Server 2007.
• Identify the MOM 2005 tools for monitoring external services.
• Configure monitoring for external services required for Exchange Server 2007.
• Identify why Exchange Server 2007 services failed to start and resolve the issue.
• Troubleshoot scenarios in which the failure of external services results in Exchange
Server 2007 failures.
6-2 Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services

Discussion: External and Additional Services


Required by Exchange Server 2007

In this discussion, you will identify the external services that Exchange Server 2007
requires.

Discussion Questions
Read and answer the discussion questions. When you are finished, you will discuss your
answers as a group:
Q What external services does Exchange Server 2007 require to ensure that it functions
correctly?
A Answers will vary but should include the following.
Exchange Server 2007 requires the following services to function correctly:
• Active Directory® directory service
• Internet Information Services (IIS)
• Domain Name System (DNS)
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-3

Q What issues might arise in Exchange Server 2007 if an external service fails?
A Answers will vary but the following examples should be included:
• If Active Directory is not available on the network, Exchange services will not
start.
• If global catalog servers are not available, mail flow will be interrupted.
• If DNS servers are not available, mail flow will be interrupted. Additionally,
because Exchange Server depends on DNS to locate domain controllers and
global catalog servers, Exchange services cannot start or users may not be able to
open Microsoft Outlook®.
• If IIS is not available on a Client Access server, users will not be able to use
scheduling functions, remote users of Outlook Anywhere will not be able to open
Outlook, or Outlook Web Access users will not be able to access their e-mail.

Q How can you determine when an external service is the cause of problems with
Exchange Server services?
A Administrators should use Event Viewer to identify the source of a problem. When
an Exchange service becomes unavailable, the administrator can identify the source
of the problem by locating the first string of error messages in Event Viewer. For
example, an Exchange server may be unable to mount a database, but the problem
may actually originate from an Exchange server that cannot contact or locate a
domain controller on the network.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
6-4 Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services

External Services Required for Unified Messaging in


Exchange Server 2007

Unified Messaging enables the convergence of voice messaging, fax, and e-mail
messaging into one location, which is accessible from both the telephone and the
computer. The goal of Exchange Unified Messaging is to integrate Exchange with
telephony networks and bring Unified Messaging features to the core of Exchange. For
Exchange Server 2007, Unified Messaging is an integral set of features associated with
the core product. However, there are a few dependencies that exist between the Unified
Messaging component of Exchange Server 2007 and external services or components.

Unified Messaging Requirements


Unified Messaging depends on the following requirements:
• Communication requirements:
• RTC. The Unified Messaging service will use real-time communications (RTC)
extensible Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) stack, which has an RTC Signaling
and Media application programming interface (API) for providing voice prompts
and playing voice messages.
• SAPI. The Unified Messaging service uses Microsoft® Speech API (SAPI),
which is a managed API for text-to-speech processing using the ScanSoft text-to-
speech engine.
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-5

• MAPI. Exchange Server 2007 Unified Messaging uses MAPI over RPCs to
communicate with the Exchange mailbox database.
• LDAP. The Unified Messaging service uses Lightweight Directory Access
Protocol (LDAP) to contact Active Directory domain controllers to locate a
user’s mailbox database and other user information, such as the user’s phone
extension number.
• Telephony requirements:
• IP/PBX. An IP/PBX is a Private Branch Exchange (PBX) that supports the IP
protocol to connect telephones using an Ethernet or packet-switched local area
network (LAN) and sends voice conversations in IP packets. A hybrid IP/PBX
supports the IP protocol for sending voice conversations in a packet but also
connects traditional analog and digital circuit-switched telephones. An IP/PBX is
telephone switching equipment that resides in a private business instead of the
telephone company.
• VoIP gateway. A Voice over IP (VoIP) gateway is a third-party hardware device
or product that is used to connect a legacy PBX to your LAN. The VoIP gateway
is used so that the PBX system that is using a circuit switched network can
communicate with your Exchange Server 2007 Unified Messaging server that is
using a packet switched network. If your organization is running a legacy PBX,
you must install a VoIP gateway on your network to provide all features and
functions of the Unified Messaging server role.

Understanding the Active Directory Interaction of Unified Messaging


in Exchange Server 2007
The Unified Messaging server role accesses Active Directory to retrieve global
configuration information, such as dial plans, IP gateways, and hunt groups. When a
Unified Messaging server receives a voice-mail message, it searches for Active Directory
recipients to match the telephone number to a recipient address. When it has resolved this
information, the Unified Messaging server can determine the location of the recipient’s
mailbox store and then submit the message to a Hub Transport server for submission to
the mailbox.
6-6 Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services

After installing the Unified Messaging server role, you must create Active Directory
objects to enable the Unified Messaging functionality found in Exchange Server 2007.
The following objects must be created after the successful installation of the Unified
Messaging server role:
• Dial plan objects
• IP gateway objects
• Hunt group objects
• Mailbox policy objects
• Auto attendant objects—Auto attendant objects are optional
• Unified Messaging server objects—the server objects are created by default, but they
must be associated with one or more dial plans

The Active Directory Unified Messaging objects provide the configuration information
required to integrate Exchange Server 2007 Unified Messaging into the existing
telephony infrastructure.
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-7

Monitoring External Services with MOM 2005

Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) 2005 capabilities are extended through the use
of management packs. Management packs are sets of preconfigured MOM management
settings that Microsoft creates to monitor specific network services or components.
With MOM 2005 and the available management packs, you can monitor the critical
components of Exchange Server 2007 and the components of any external services.

Management Packs
The following list describes some of the management packs that you should use with
MOM 2005 to monitor external services for Exchange Server 2007:
• Windows Server Base Operating System Management Pack. Monitors hardware and
services that are on a server running on a Microsoft Windows Server® operating
system. This management pack is preconfigured with settings that are focused on
monitoring the availability of basic server components.
• Active Directory Management Pack. Monitors Active Directory and the external
components that are related to Active Directory to ensure that they are functioning
correctly.
• Windows DNS Management Pack. Monitors DNS service availability, configuration
issues, and DNS zone transfer issues. This management pack also collects
performance data that can be used for capacity planning.
6-8 Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services

Note: Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack for Microsoft


Operations Manager (MOM) 2005 should be used with all deployments of
Exchange Server 2007 with MOM 2005. This management pack is discussed
in more detail in Unit 1, “Introduction to Exchange Server Monitoring and
Troubleshooting” in Workshop 5051A: Monitoring and Troubleshooting Microsoft
Exchange Server 2007.
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-9

Lab Scenario

Background Information
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. You are responsible for
monitoring and troubleshooting issues with the external and additional services that are
required by Exchange Server 2007.

Current Situation
You recently installed and configured Exchange Server 2007 on your network. The
installation completed successfully. Users were communicating through your Exchange
servers for months, until you started to encounter problems with Exchange Server. You
have noticed that the problems coincided with recent changes on your network.

Requirements
In this lab, you must:
• Configure monitoring of external services.
• Troubleshoot an external services dependency for Exchange Server 2007.
• Determine the impact of external and additional services on Exchange environments.
6-10 Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services

Lab Outcomes

Successful completion of this lab results in the following outcomes:


• You have configured monitoring of external services.
• You have resolved issues with an external services dependency for
Exchange Server 2007.
• You have identified scenarios for troubleshooting external and additional services in
an Exchange Server 2007 environment.
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-11

Lab: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and


Additional Services

After completing this lab, you will be able to:


• Configure monitoring of external services.
• Troubleshoot an external services dependency for Exchange Server 2007.
• Describe scenarios for troubleshooting external and additional services.

Estimated time to complete this lab: 65 minutes.


6-12 Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services

Lab Setup
For this lab, you will use the available Microsoft Virtual PC environment. Before you
begin the lab, you must:
• Start the 5051A-MTL-EX1, 5051A-MTL-EX2, and 5051A-MTL-MOM1 virtual
machines.
• Log on to the virtual machines with the user name Administrator and the password
Pa$$w0rd.

Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 5051A-MTL-
EX1 first and that it is fully started before starting any other virtual machines. If you
receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual
machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine and ensure that all
Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started.
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-13

Exercise 1: Configuring the Monitoring of External Services


In this exercise, you will use MOM 2005 to monitor Active Directory and DNS services.

Scenario
You are currently been experiencing some problems with your company’s Active
Directory services. You want to be alerted as soon as problems occur with Active
Directory or its required services. You decide to add the Active Directory Management
Pack and the Windows Server DNS Management Pack to MOM in order to monitor these
two services.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

• Use Microsoft Operations • On MTL-MOM1, install the Active Directory Management Pack
Manager 2005 to monitor and the Windows Server DNS Management Pack.
Active Directory and DNS • The setup files are located on D:\Unit06\Labfiles.
services.
• Add MTL-EX1 as an included computer to the Microsoft
Windows Server 2003 DNS Servers computer group and the
Windows Server 2003 Domain Controllers computer group.
• Open the MOM Operator console and view the Active
Directory replication alerts.

Note: See “How to Add Management Packs for MOM” In the


Resource Toolkit.
6-14 Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services

Exercise 2: Troubleshooting an External Services Dependency


for Exchange Server 2007
Exercise preparation
Before you begin this exercise, you must:
• On MTL-EX1, click Start, and then click Run. At the Open text box, type
d:\Unit06\Labfiles\Lab6_PrepA.bat and press ENTER.
• On MTL-EX2, click Start, and then click Run. At the Open text box, type
d:\Unit06\Labfiles\Lab6_PrepB.bat and press ENTER.

In this exercise, you will troubleshoot issues with external services that are required for
Exchange Server 2007.

Scenario
Users are complaining that they cannot log on to their mailboxes on MTL-EX1. You
open the Exchange Management Console and notice that the mailbox stores are not
mounted. You attempt to mount your mailbox stores and receive an error message. You
must resolve the problem quickly and ensure that users can log on to your mailboxes.

Note: The answers to the practices and labs are on the Student Materials CD.

Tasks Supporting information

1. Identify the error preventing • On MTL-EX2, attempt to start the Microsoft Exchange
Exchange Services from Information Store service and the Microsoft Exchange System
starting. Attendant service.
• Use Event Viewer to identify the errors generated when the
services could not start.
• Open the Exchange Management Shell and review the error
messages that are displayed.

2. Verify that MTL-EX2 has the • Use the IPConfig utility to verify the TCP/IP settings necessary
correct IP address to connect to Active Directory.
configuration.

3. Identify why the Exchange • On MTL-MOM1, in the MOM Operator Console, review alerts
Server cannot locate a with a source of NETLOGON.
domain controller and correct • Correct the configuration error that is stopping the services
the problem. from starting.
• Confirm that MTL-EX2 is configured to use the correct domain
controller.

Note: See “How to Use the Exchange Management Shell to


Configure Active Directory Connectivity to the Exchange
Server” In the Resource Toolkit.

4. Test the issue resolution. • On MTL-EX2, start the required Microsoft Exchange services.
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-15

Exercise 3: Discussion: Impact of External and Additional


Services on Exchange Environments
Instructions
In this exercise, you will work in small groups to create a flow chart to document a
troubleshooting process. With your small group, develop a flow chart that provides
details on how you would troubleshoot the scenario that the instructor assigned to your
group. Be prepared to present your flow chart to the rest of the class.
The flow charts should include:
• The questions that you would ask at each point in the troubleshooting process to try
to identify the problem.
• The steps that you would take to isolate and resolve the problem.
• The tools you would use, at each step, to troubleshoot the problem.

Scenario 1
Blue Yonder Airlines is an organization with offices in five North American cities.
The messaging system has recently been transitioned from Exchange Server 2003 to
Exchange Server 2007. They are running Active Directory on Windows Server 2003
domain controllers. They recently acquisitioned a smaller company in San Diego and
have integrated their users and computers into their Active Directory infrastructure. To
facilitate this task, the organization has installed new domain controllers in the San Diego
office. These domain controllers were pre-installed at the company’s headquarters, and
then shipped to San Diego. Concurrently, a new Exchange Server 2007 computer was
installed at the company’s headquarters, and then shipped to San Diego.
The first users that were migrated to the new Exchange server in San Diego soon
complained that they were not able to retrieve the addresses of some newly hired users
in the company’s global address list.

Scenario 2
Northwind Traders is a small manufacturing company with an office in northern
Europe. They recently migrated their complete network infrastructure from a Microsoft
Windows NT® 4.0 environment to a network running only the Windows Server 2003
operating system. During this upgrade, they migrated the Windows NT 4.0 domain to
Active Directory and migrated from Exchange version 5.5 to Exchange Server 2007.
Since the recent migration, some users are complaining that they are losing connectivity
to the Exchange server and other resources on the network. After they restart their
computers, users are once again able to open their mailboxes on the Exchange server.
This problem is intermittent and affects all users.
6-16 Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services

Scenario 3
A. Datum Corporation is a large software distributor with offices in multiple countries
around the world. They are running a complex messaging environment that sees more
than 1,000 e-mail messages entering the transport pipeline every minute.
Even though the company’s network administration is centralized in the company’s
Miami headquarters, the administration of the messaging infrastructure is distributed
between the Miami office and the Paris office. In both of these offices, messages are
entering the organization through load-balanced Edge Transport servers.
Recently, users in all offices are complaining that some e-mail messages that they are
expecting from clients and suppliers are not received in their mailboxes. The messaging
administrators from the Miami office perform some tests and verify that some messages
originating from SMTP servers on the Internet are not being received by users. However,
the problem is intermittent, and some messages originating from the same server are
being received.

Lab Shutdown
1. On the host computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft
Virtual Server, and then click Virtual Server Administration Website.
2. Under Navigation, click Master Status. For each virtual machine that is running,
click the Virtual Machine Name, and, in the context menu, click Turn off Virtual
Machine and Discard Undo Disks. Click OK.
Unit 6: Monitoring and Troubleshooting External and Additional Services 6-17

Lab Discussion

Briefly discuss your answers to the following questions with the class:
Q What was the issue that created the problem in Exercise 2?
A The problem was the result of a lack of connectivity to a functioning Active
Directory domain controller that was caused by an incorrect DNS resource record.
Q How did you fix the issue?
A The problem was fixed by configuring the DNS zone to accept dynamic updates and
then refreshing the domain controller records.
Q What other issues could have been the problem? That is, what other problems could
have had the same symptoms for each exercise?
A Problems directly associated with Active Directory can cause similar issues in
Exchange Server 2007. Problems with DNS servers or any Active Directory
dependent services can cause similar issues in Exchange Server 2007.

Note: The answers to the discussion questions are on the Student Materials CD.
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a
Messaging System

Table of Contents
Overview 7-1
Tools for Identifying Trends in a Messaging
System 7-2
Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack MOM
Reports 7-4
Discussion: Information Required to Identify and
Resolve Trends 7-7
Lab Scenario 7-9
Lab Outcomes 7-10
Lab: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-11
Workshop Evaluation 7-19
Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, is subject to change
without notice. Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names,
e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any
real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or
should be inferred. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting
the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval
system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights
covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from
Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,
copyrights, or other intellectual property.

The names of manufacturers, products, or URLs are provided for informational purposes only and Microsoft
makes no representations and warranties, either expressed, implied, or statutory, regarding these
manufacturers or the use of the products with any Microsoft technologies. The inclusion of a manufacturer or
product does not imply endorsement of Microsoft of the manufacturer or product. Links may be provided to
third party sites. Such sites are not under the control of Microsoft and Microsoft is not responsible for the
contents of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes or updates to such sites.
Microsoft is not responsible for webcasting or any other form of transmission received from any linked site.
Microsoft is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply
endorsement of Microsoft of the site or the products contained therein.

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Microsoft Press, Active Directory, ActiveSync, BizTalk, Internet Explorer, Outlook, PowerPoint,
SharePoint, SmartScreen, Visual Studio, Windows, Windows Mobile, Windows NT, Windows PowerShell, and
Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
and/or other countries.

All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Version 1.1
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-1

Overview

You can proactively address issues in a Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 environment
by analyzing trends in a messaging system. This unit describes the tools for identifying
these trends and discusses how to apply considerations for identifying and addressing
these trends.

Objectives
After completing this unit, you will be able to:
• Describe tools for identifying trends in a messaging system.
• Describe the monitoring reports available with the Exchange Server 2007
Management Pack.
• Apply considerations for identifying and addressing trends.
• Analyze monitoring reports to identify trends.
• Create proposals for addressing identified trends.
7-2 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

Tools for Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

A major challenge for messaging administrators is identifying whether poor server


performance is responsible for user complaints about slow server response.
Troubleshooting performance issues can be extremely difficult unless you have
previously established standard messaging trends. Establishing messaging trends or
server performance baselines can help you to identify a performance bottleneck or
determine whether an Exchange server component is experiencing problems. Also, when
planning server capacity for upgrades or budget planning, you can set expectations based
on previous increases in demand.

Identifying Messaging Trends and Creating Performance Baselines


You can use the following tools to identify messaging trends or create a server
performance baseline in Exchange Server 2007:
• Reports with the Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack for Microsoft
Operations Manager (MOM) 2005
The Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack for MOM 2005 includes reports that
enable you to view system performance and data over time and in a summarized
format. This data can be viewed in tables, pie charts, and line graphs. These reports
are useful when they are compared to a baseline standard that has been previously
created.
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-3

MOM reports are created by querying the database for the requested data. MOM
reporting can summarize the data and then create an output report of formatted data.
The Exchange 2007 Management Pack includes predefined reports. You can also
create custom reports according to the needs of your organization. MOM 2005
reporting requires Microsoft SQL Server™ Reporting Services and the full version
of MOM 2005.
• Performance Console and performance counters
You can use the Performance Console to monitor a number of performance counters
that you can add during the Exchange Server installation. Performance counters are
available for basic hardware components, such as hard disk input/output (I/O),
memory utilization, and network card data transfer. Performance counters are also
available for global catalog lookup queries, user mailbox access, and message
transfers. Collecting performance data over time by using performance counters
enables you to become familiar with the baseline state of Exchange servers and more
easily identify server components with report values that are much greater or lower
than the baseline values.
• Third-party monitoring and filtering tools
Messages entering the Exchange 2007 transport pipeline are not necessarily
transported directly to an Exchange server. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
gateways, firewalls, or anti-spam filtering servers may be part of an organization’s
messaging infrastructure. These network components typically are preconfigured
with logging functionality and can provide relevant troubleshooting information.
When firewall or anti-spam log files are cataloged and tracked, you can maintain a
history of the number of messages that enter or leave the Exchange organization, the
number of spam messages that are filtered when entering the organization, and the
number of inbound SMTP connections that are established to inbound mail relay
servers. Creating baseline values for this information will ensure that peak values
are easily identified during the troubleshooting process.
7-4 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack MOM


Reports

Microsoft® Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack for Microsoft Operations Manager
(MOM) 2005 management reports provide administrators with several built-in reports for
establishing trends through the display of information, such as server uptime, specific
service availability, and performance metrics.

Report Types
There are three types of reporting classes: availability, usage (metrics), and performance
(anti-spam). Within these three reporting classes are the following individual reports:
• Service availability:
• Service Availability Summary. This summarizes the availability of
Exchange 2007 services such as Mailbox, Mail Flow, Outlook Web Access,
Exchange ActiveSync, and Unified Messaging.
• ActiveSync Internal Service Availability. This summarizes the internal service
availability of Exchange ActiveSync service.
• Mailbox Service Availability. This summarizes the MAPI connectivity
availability for Mailbox server.
• Mailflow Local Service Availability. This summarizes the availability of
Mailflow Local service.
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-5

• Mailflow Remote Service Availability. This summarizes the availability of the


Mailflow Remote service.
• Outlook Web Access External Service Availability. This summarizes the external
service availability of Outlook Web Access. This report will display, "No data
available," if the external URL has not been set up on the Client Access servers
and the test mailboxes have not been created.
• Outlook Web Access Internal Service Availability. This summarizes the internal
service availability of Outlook Web Access. For this report, an alert is issued that
tells you what steps are required to set up the test mailbox. No data is shown in
the test until the mailboxes are set up.

Note: Most of the service availability information is gathered by running an


Exchange Management Shell cmdlet running on the MOM server.

• Metrics:
• Client Performance. This shows the percentage of successful RPC client/server
operations between clients (Microsoft Office Outlook 2003 and later versions)
and Exchange 2007 during the specified time period. Any operations that take
less than or equal to two seconds are considered to be successful. The Client RPC
Latency and RPC count columns are calculated from the data generated by
clients and sent to the Exchange server.
• Mailbox Count. This shows the distribution of mailboxes across storage groups
and databases.
• RPC and Database Performance. This shows the relationship between RPC and
Database I/O performance.
• Unified Messaging Call Summary. This shows a summary of telephone calls that
the Exchange 2007 Unified Messaging servers receive and place.
• Unified Messaging Message Summary. This shows a summary of voice and fax
messages that Exchange 2007 Unified Messaging servers process.
• Anti-spam reports:
• Attached File Filter. This shows the effectiveness of the Attachment Filter agent.
This agent filters messages based on attachment file name, file name extension,
or file MIME content type. You can configure this agent to block a message and
its attachment, to strip the attachment and allow the message to pass through, or
silently delete the message and its attachment.
7-6 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

• Connection Filter Report. This shows the effectiveness of the Connection Filter
agent. This agent filters messages based on the IP address of the remote server
from which a message is sent. A variety of IP Block lists and IP Allow lists and
optional services are used to determine what action, if any, to take on a particular
message based on its source IP address. You can see statistics for connection
allowed results for all included computers over time, or results by computer.
• Content Filter. This shows the effectiveness of the Content Filter agent. This
agent uses Microsoft® SmartScreen™ technology to assess the contents of a
message. The Intelligent Message Filter is based on patented machine learning
technology from Microsoft Research. The Intelligent Message Filter learns
distinguishing characteristics of legitimate e-mail and of spam. Based on these
characteristics, the Intelligent Message Filter helps determine whether an
incoming message is spam or legitimate e-mail.
• Protocol Analysis. This shows the effectiveness of the Protocol Analysis/Sender
Reputation agent. The Sender Reputation agent is an anti-spam agent that is
enabled on computers that have the Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Edge
Transport server role installed to block messages according to many
characteristics of the sender. The Sender Reputation agent relies on persisted
data about the sender to determine what action, if any, to take on an inbound
message. Sender reputation functionality is also referred to as protocol analysis.
• Recipient Filter. This shows the effectiveness of the Recipient Filter agent.
This agent compares the recipients that are identified in the RCPT TO: SMTP
header to known recipients identified in list of blocked recipients and to the local
recipient directory which stores valid recipients that exist inside the organization
to determine what action, if any, to take on a particular message.
• Sender Filter. This shows the effectiveness of the Sender Filter agent. This agent
compares the sender identified in the MAIL FROM: SMTP header to know
senders identified in an IP block to determine what action, if any, to take on a
particular message.
• Sender Id. This shows the effectiveness of the Sender Id agent. This agent relies
on the RECEIVED: SMTP header and a query to the sending system's DNS
service to determine what action, if any, to take on a particular message.

Note: All reports are available from the Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack
installed on a MOM 2005 server with Service Pack 1 and Microsoft SQL Server™
Reporting Services.
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-7

Discussion: Information Required to Identify and


Resolve Trends

In this discussion, you will learn about the information that is required to identify trends
in a messaging system.

Discussion Questions
Read and answer the discussion questions. When you are finished, you will discuss your
answers as a group:
Q What information should you collect on a regular basis to identify messaging trends
in an Exchange Server 2007 organization?
A Answers will vary but may include:
• Server performance data, including hard disk I/O, memory utilization, paging
information, and network utilization.
• Exchange services performance data, including remote procedure call (RPC)
latency, database cache utilization, and the number of changes that were made to
the database by using write permission.
• Exchange messaging statistics, including the number of server connections made
by MAPI clients, the number of messages that are transferred by the server, and
the number of messages that are transferred between sites.
7-8 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

• Other messaging statistics, such as the number of messages that anti-spam


servers or Edge Transport servers filter, and the number of inbound SMTP
connections.
• Other network statistics, such as the number of global catalog queries and the
number of authentication requests from the Exchange server.

Q How does the type of information you collect vary by server role?
A Based on the Exchange server roles that are installed on a particular server, the
components that must be analyzed to establish trends can vary. For example, when
establishing trends on a Client Access server, you will focus mainly on Hypertext
Transfer Protocol (HTTP) or Secure HTTP (HTTPS) requests to the server and the
performance of authentication requests for remote clients. A Client Access server
would also display higher demands on CPU utilization than would a transport server.
In comparison, when you establish a baseline for an Edge Transport server, special
attention must be given to the SMTP queues and the filtering agents that are running
on that server. Although CPU utilization may be high on an Edge Transport server or
Hub Transport server, additional configurations such as transport rules can increase
the processing demands on those servers.
Q After you have collected the information, how do you decide which trend is most
important?
A Answers will vary, but you must prioritize trends based on the role of the server, the
organization’s size and business requirements, and its projected growth.

Important: Before you can use the information you collect to establish
performance trends, you must establish a performance baseline. Collect the
information for the performance baseline soon after implementing Exchange
Server 2007.
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-9

Lab Scenario

Background Information
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. You are responsible for
identifying and addressing trends within the messaging environment.

Current Situation
You are the administrator for the regional data center. The world-wide headquarters is
planning the hardware upgrade budget for the coming year. You are responsible for
providing recommendations about the messaging hardware that must be upgraded.

Requirements
To identify trends in your messaging environment and provide upgrade recommendations,
you must:
• Analyze monitoring reports to identify trends.
• Create proposals for addressing the identified trends.
7-10 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

Lab Outcomes

You have completed this lab successfully when you have:


• Analyzed monitoring reports to identify trends.
• Created proposals for addressing identified trends.
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-11

Lab: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

After completing this lab, you will be able to:


• Analyze monitoring reports to identify trends.
• Create proposals for addressing identified trends.

Estimated time to complete this lab: 60 minutes.


7-12 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

Exercise 1: Evaluating Messaging Reports


In this exercise, you will work in small groups to analyze monitoring reports to identify
trends.

Scenario
You are the messaging administrator for A. Datum Corporation. You are the lead
messaging administrator for one of the regional data centers. The following table lists
some of the servers deployed at the data center:
Server name Server role Comments
MTL-DC1 Domain controller, global
catalog server, DNS server
MTL-DC2 Domain controller, DNS server
MTL-EX1 Exchange Server 2007 – 1000 mailboxes
Mailbox server, Client Access 50 public folders
server, Hub Transport server
2 dual-core 64 bit processors
4 GB RAM
5 hard disks in a RAID 5
configuration
MTL-EX2 Exchange Server 2007 – 1500 mailboxes
Mailbox server, Hub Transport 2 dual-core 64 bit processors
server
4 GB RAM
7 hard disks (2 disks mirrored
and 5 disks in a RAID 5
configuration)
MTL-EX3 Exchange Server 2007 – Hub 2 dual-core 64 bit processors
Transport server 3 GB RAM
4 hard disks (2 sets of mirrored
disks)
This server is used to send and
receive all Internet e-mail.

A. Datum is expanding rapidly. Three months ago, the corporation acquired another
company in the Montreal area and moved 800 personnel from the other company into the
current office building. All users are using Outlook 2003 or Outlook 2007 while in the
office, and a small percentage of users use Outlook Web Access from outside the office.
Since the acquisition, users have frequently complained about poor messaging
performance. User complaints include:
• Opening Outlook takes much longer than it used to.
• Sending e-mail takes longer than it used to.
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-13

You have been capturing performance data on your Exchange servers since you upgraded
to Exchange Server 2007 six months ago. You have put together a preliminary report
based on the data. The preliminary report contains mostly raw performance and analytical
data that is being reviewed before the final report is submitted.
The messaging engineer at A. Datum headquarters has provided you with the default
performance thresholds for the Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack for MOM 2005.
He suggested that you use these performance thresholds as a means to identify
performance bottlenecks on the Exchange Servers.

Note: To view the default performance thresholds, see "MOM Performance


Thresholds" in the Resource Toolkit.

Guidelines
Use the following questions as guidelines during your analysis:
• Are the values reported indicating a performance issue on the server?
• The report shows how the server performance has changed in the past six months. If
the growth is sustained over the next six months, will there be additional concerns?
• Are the values reported indicating any problems in the configuration of the Exchange
server? What configuration change could be made to improve or optimize the
messaging infrastructure?
• Are the values reported indicating any problem in the design or server placement of
Exchange servers?
• Are the values reported indicating any problem in the configurations of external
services or the communication with additional servers on the network?
7-14 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

Performance Reports
The performance reports for the three Exchange Servers are listed below:

MTL-EX1 Performance Report


Server Role Counter 1-Feb 1-Mar 1-Apr 1-May 1-Jun
HubTransport Active Mailbox Delivery 10 18 26 24 30
Queue Length
HubTransport Active Remote Delivery 12 14 22 20 31
Queue Length
HubTransport Aggregate Delivery Queue 200 210 670 680 700
Length (All Queues)
HubTransport ESE Log Generation 50 50 80 88 85
Checkpoint Depth
HubTransport Largest Delivery Queue 60 64 90 100 110
Length
HubTransport Retry Mailbox Delivery 20 21 40 41 38
Queue Length
HubTransport Retry Remote Delivery 20 21 40 41 38
Queue Length
HubTransport Submission Queue Length 16 18 26 24 30
HubTransport Unreachable Queue Length 12 14 22 20 31
Mailbox Disk Read Latency 16 18 26 24 30
Mailbox Disk Write Latency 12 14 22 20 31
Mailbox ESE Log Bytes Write/sec 180,000 200,000 500,000 550,000 600,000
Mailbox ESE Log Generation 120 150 500 575 600
Checkpoint Depth
Mailbox Public Store: Messages 6 7 8 13 12
Queued for Submission
Mailbox Public Store: Receive Queue 7 7 11 12 14
Size
Mailbox RPC Averaged Latency 12 14 28 32 27
Mailbox RPC Requests 10 15 55 57 48
Common LDAP long running 22 34 72 76 80
operations
Common LDAP Search Time 21 32 78 80 92
Common LDAP Search Timeouts 8 6 17 20 18
Common Processor: % Processor Time 48 50 80 88 85
Common System: Processor Queue 3 3 5 6 7
Length
Common Server Work Queues: Queue 7 7 13 14 14
Length
Common Memory: Pages/sec 4 5 8 10 12
Common Memory: Available Bytes 19% 18% 6% 5% 4%
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-15

Server Role Counter 1-Feb 1-Mar 1-Apr 1-May 1-Jun


Common Physical Disk: % Disk Time 60 65 85 91 89
Common Physical Disk: Current Disk 2 3 6 5 6
Queue Length
Common Disk % Free Space 48% 50% 65% 67% 69%

MTL-EX2 Performance Report


Server Role Counter 1-Feb 1-Mar 1-Apr 1-May 1-Jun
HubTransport Active Mailbox Delivery
Queue Length 9 14 22 25 28
HubTransport Active Remote Delivery
Queue Length 11 15 24 21 32
HubTransport Aggregate Delivery Queue
Length (All Queues) 180 210 580 690 700
HubTransport ESE Log Generation
Checkpoint Depth 47 50 73 90 85
HubTransport Largest Delivery Queue
Length 62 62 88 94 130
HubTransport Retry Mailbox Delivery
Queue Length 21 19 41 40 38
HubTransport Retry Remote Delivery
Queue Length 18 21 45 39 38
HubTransport Submission Queue Length 15 18 29 27 30
HubTransport Unreachable Queue Length 13 15 21 21 31
Mailbox Disk Read Latency 10 12 14 15 16
Mailbox Disk Write Latency 11 11 13 14 17
Mailbox ESE Log Bytes Write/sec 140,000 150,000 260,000 270,000 310,000
Mailbox ESE Log Generation
Checkpoint Depth 80 90 120 130 150
Mailbox Public Store: Messages
Queued for Submission 0 0 0 0 0
Mailbox Public Store: Receive Queue
Size 0 0 0 0 0
Mailbox RPC Averaged Latency 9 10 16 18 21
Mailbox RPC Requests 9 10 15 17 20
Common LDAP long running
operations 22 34 72 76 81
Common LDAP Search Time 21 32 78 80 92
Common LDAP Search Timeouts 8 6 17 20 18
Common Processor: % Processor Time 24 27 29 45 47
Common System: Processor Queue
Length 2 2 3 5 4
7-16 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

Server Role Counter 1-Feb 1-Mar 1-Apr 1-May 1-Jun


Common Server Work Queues: Queue
Length 3 3 5 8 8
Common Memory: Pages/sec 1 1 2 2 2
Common Memory: Available Bytes 45% 44% 34% 32% 24%
Common Physical Disk: % Disk Time 32 34 64 65 70
Common Physical Disk: Current Disk
Queue Length 1 2 2 3 4
Common Disk % Free Space 69% 67% 64% 48% 46%

MTL-EX3 Performance Report


Server Role Counter 1-Feb 1-Mar 1-Apr 1-May 1-Jun
HubTransport Active Mailbox Delivery
Queue Length 9 14 22 25 28
HubTransport Active Remote Delivery
Queue Length 110 150 241 219 245
HubTransport Aggregate Delivery Queue
Length (All Queues) 556 600 1670 1680 1700
HubTransport ESE Log Generation
Checkpoint Depth 47 50 73 90 85
HubTransport Largest Delivery Queue
Length 110 150 241 219 245
HubTransport Retry Mailbox Delivery
Queue Length 21 19 41 40 38
HubTransport Retry Remote Delivery
Queue Length 38 40 145 186 189
HubTransport Submission Queue Length 15 18 29 27 30
HubTransport Unreachable Queue Length 13 15 21 21 31
Mailbox Disk Read Latency 10 12 21 25 26
Mailbox Disk Write Latency 11 11 20 24 27
Mailbox ESE Log Bytes Write/sec 0 0 0 0 0
Mailbox ESE Log Generation
Checkpoint Depth 0 0 0 0 0
Mailbox Public Store: Messages
Queued for Submission 0 0 0 0 0
Mailbox Public Store: Receive Queue
Size 0 0 0 0 0
Mailbox RPC Averaged Latency 0 0 0 0 0
Mailbox RPC Requests 0 0 0 0 0
Common LDAP long running
operations 20 21 58 63 64
Common LDAP Search Time 17 18 49 54 58
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-17

Server Role Counter 1-Feb 1-Mar 1-Apr 1-May 1-Jun


Common LDAP Search Timeouts 5 6 10 11 12
Common Processor: % Processor Time 24 27 29 45 47
Common System: Processor Queue
Length 2 2 3 5 4
Common Server Work Queues: Queue
Length 3 3 5 8 8
Common Memory: Pages/sec 1 1 2 2 2
Common Memory: Available Bytes 45% 44% 34% 32% 24%
Common Physical Disk: % Disk Time 18 21 33 42 45
Common Physical Disk: Current Disk
Queue Length 0 0 1 1 1
Common Disk % Free Space 88% 85% 78% 76% 75%

Tasks Supporting information

• Analyze the messaging • Review the performance reports and compare the
reports and identify the information to the default performance thresholds for the
performance issues. Exchange Server 2007 Management Pack.
• Identify performance issues on each of the servers.

Note: See "MOM Performance Thresholds" In the


Resource Toolkit.
7-18 Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System

Exercise 2: Recommending Configuration Changes


In this exercise, you will work in small groups to create proposals for addressing
identified trends. You will present your information to the rest of the class.

Guidelines
Use the following questions as guidelines during your analysis:
• What configuration changes would you propose for each of the Exchange Servers?
• What changes would you recommend to the Exchange Server deployment or the
server role placement for the Exchange servers?
• If you have the budget to purchase only one more server for the Montreal regional
data center, what role would you assign to the server?
• If you could purchase two servers, what role would you assign to the server?
• If you did not have any budget for new servers, how would you change the server
configuration?
• What other recommendations would you make for changes to the Montreal regional
data center?

Tasks Supporting information

• Identify recommendations for • Present your recommendations for the messaging


addressing messaging trends. environment of A. Datum Corporation.
• Compare your recommendations with the
recommendations created by the other groups.
Unit 7: Identifying Trends in a Messaging System 7-19

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