Sei sulla pagina 1di 128

Annual Report

lR;eso t;rs

Department of Animal Husbandry,


Dairying & Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India, New Delhi

Printed at: Chandu Press: 9810519841

2013-14

lR;eso t;rs

Department of Animal Husbandry,


Dairying & Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India, New Delhi

ANNUAL REPORT
2013-14

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY, DAIRYING & FISHERIES


MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE
GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
NEW DELHI

Contents
Sl. No.

Contents

Page

1.

OVERVIEW OF ACHIEVEMENTS
Livestock Production
Fisheries Production
Governments Initiative and Assistance to States
Eleventh Five Year Plan
Twelfth Five Year Plan
Annual Plan 2012-13 & 2013-14

2.

ORGANISATION
Structure
Functions
Subordinate Offices
National Dairy Development Board
National Fisheries Development Board
Coastal Aquaculture Authority
Veterinary Council of India
Grievances Cell
Liaison Officer for SC/ST
Vigilance Unit
Progressive Use of Hindi
Animal Production and Health Information
Implementation of Right to Information (RTI) Act, 2005
Reservation for Scheduled Castes (SCs), Scheduled Tribes (STs), Other
Backward Castes (OBCs) and others
Prevention of Harassment of Women Employees

11-16

3.

Animal Husbandry

17-40

4.

Dairy Development

41-54

5.

Overview of Indian Fisheries

55-68

6.

Trade Matters

71

7.

Scheduled Castes Sub-Plan (SCSP) and Tribal Sub-Plan (TSP)

72

8.

Empowerment of Women

73

9.

International Cooperation

74

10.

Special Livestock Sector and Fisheries Package for the Suicide Prone
Idukki and Kuttanad Districts in the State of Kerala

75-76

11.

Results Framework Document (RFD)

77-94

1-10

Annexures
I.

Total Number of Livestock & Poultry-2007 Livestock Census

97

II.

Production of Major Livestock Products-All India

98

III.

State-wise Fish Production during the Period 2006-07 to 2013-14

99

IV.

Marine Fisheries Resources of India

100

V.

Inland Water Resources of India

101

VI.

Fish Seed Production

102

VII. Financial Allocation & Expenditure during 2012-13 and 2013-14

103-105

VIII. Organizational Chart and Work Allocation

106

IX.

List of the Subjects Allocated to the Department

107

X.

List of the Attached/Subordinate offices

108

XI.

State-wise Number of Veterinary Institutions

109

XII. Import/Export report of Livestock and Livestock Products of



AQCS Stations in India during the year 2013-14

110-111

XIII. Species-wise Incidence of Livestock Diseases in India during 2013



(January -December)

112-114

XIV. List of 300 Selected Districts under the Scheme



Livestock Insurance

115-117

XV. Audit Paras

118

Chapter 1

Overview
of
achievement

Chapter
Overview of achievement
1.1 Animal Husbandry, Dairying and
Fisheries activities, along with agriculture,
continue to be an integral part of human life
since the process of civilization started. These
activities have contributed not only to the
food basket and draught animal power but
also by maintaining ecological balance. Owing
to conducive climate and topography, Animal
husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries Sectors have
played prominent socio-economic role in India.
Traditional, cultural and religious beliefs have
also contributed in the continuance of these
activities. They further also play a significant
role in generating gainful employment in the
rural sector, particularly among the landless,
small and marginal farmers and women,
besides providing cheap and nutritious food to
millions of people.
1.2 Livestock production and agriculture
are intrinsically linked, each being dependent
on the other, and both crucial for overall food
security. Livestock sector is an important subsector of the agriculture of Indian economy.
It forms an important livelihood activity for
most of the farmers, supporting agriculture
in the form of critical inputs, contributing to

the health and nutrition of the household,


supplementing incomes, offering employment
opportunities, and finally being a dependable
bank on hooves in times of need. It acts
as a supplementary and complementary
enterprise.
1.3 According to NSSO 66th Round Survey
(July 2009 June 2010), total number of
workers in farming of animals is 20.5 million
as per usual status (principal status plus
subsidiaries status irrespective their principal
activity status). Farmers of marginal, small and
semi-medium operational holdings (area less
than 4 ha) own about 87.7% of the livestock.
Hence development of livestock sector would
be more inclusive.
1.4 India has vast resource of livestock and
poultry, which pay a vital role in improving the
socio-economic conditions of rural masses.
There are about 71.6 million sheep, 140.5
million goats and about 11.1 million pigs as
per 18th Livestock Census in the country. The
species wise population of animals in Livestock
and Poultry population during the inter census
period (2003-2007) is given in table 1.1.

Table 1.1: Livestock and Poultry Population


S. No. Species
1

Cattle

Buffalo

Livestock Census 2003


(no. in millions)

Livestock Census 2007


(no. in millions)

Growth
Rate (%)

185.2

199.1

7.5

97.9

105.3

7.58

Yaks

0.1

0.1

27.69

Mithuns

0.3

0.3

-5.04

Total Bovines

283.4

304.8

7.52

Sheep

61.5

71.6

16.41

Goat

124.4

140.5

13.01

Pigs

13.5

11.1

-17.64

Other animals

2.2

1.7

-22.9

Total Livestock

485

529.7

9.22

Poultry

489

648.8

32.68

C h apter-1

Annual Report 2013-14

The State-wise breakup of different species of


livestock and Poultry is given at Annexure-I.

1.5

Livestock Production:

1.5.1 Livestock production and agriculture


are intrinsically linked, each being dependent
on the other, and both crucial for overall food
security. According to estimates of the Central
Statistics Office (CSO), the value of output
from livestock sector at current prices was
about `5,37,535 crore during 2012-13 which
is about 25.63% of the value of output from
total agricultural, fishing, and forestry sector
at current price and 26.02% at constant prices
(2004-05).

1.5.2 Milk Production: India continues


to be the largest producer of milk in world.
Several measures have been initiated by the
Government to increase the productivity of
livestock, which has resulted in increasing the
milk production significantly from the level of
102.6 million tonnes at the end of the Tenth
Plan (2006-07) to 127.9 million tonnes at
the end of the Eleventh Plan (2011-12). Milk
production in the beginning of Twelfth Plan
(2012-13) is 132.43 million tonnes with an
annual growth rate of 3.54%. The per capita
availability of milk is around 296 grams per
day in 2012-13.The production of milk from
2005-06 to 2012-13 is shown in the following
chart:

Chart 1.1
1: Milk Pro
oduction
Milk in million tonnes

140
120
100

97.10

102.60

107.90

112.20

16.40
11

121.8
80

127.90

132.43

80
60
40
20
0

Year

Egg
Production:
Poultry
production
1.5.2.1
Yield
for Milk:
The 1.5.3
1.5.2.1
A Average
Average
Yielld
RateRate
for Milk:
The aaverage
yielld of
milk
per day per
a
animal
in milk
m at
average yield of milk per day per animal in milk in India has taken a quantum leap in the last
Nationall level from
m different sp
pecies durin
ng 2012-13 is given belo
ow:
at National level from different species during four decades, emerging from an unscientific
farming practice to commercial production
2012-13 is given below:
Table 1.2: Averrage Yield Rate for M
Milk
system with state-of-the-art technological
Table
1.2: Average
Rate
for Milk
interventions.
EggBuffalo
production at theGo
end
at of
Exot
tic/Crossbre
ed YieldIn
ndigenous/
/Non-Descri
ipt
the
Tenth
Plan
(2006-07)
was
50.7
billion
Co
ws (Kg/day
y)
(Kg/
g/day)
day)
(Kg/day)
(Kg/d
Exotic/
Indigenous/
Buffalo Goat
numbers as compared to 66.45 billion at
7.02 Non-Descript
2.36
0.443
4.80
Crossbred
(Kg/
(Kg/
the end of the Eleventh Plan (2011-12). The
Cows (Kg/
(Kg/day)
day)
day)
egg production in the beginning of 12th Five
day)
1.5.3 Egg
E Producttion: Poultrry productio
on in India
a quantum
l billion
leap
in the
llastanfour
Year has
Plantaken
(2012-13)
is 69.73
with
7.02
2.36
4.80
0.43
annual
growth
rate of 4.94%.
decades,, emerging from an unscientific
u
to co
ommercial
p The current
production
farming
prractice
system
with statte-of-the-artt technolog
gical interventions. Egg
g production
n at the end
d of the Ten
nth Plan
Cha p7)
t ewas
r-1 50.7 billion
(2006-07
b
numb
bers as com
mpared to 66
6.45 billion aat the end of the Eleven
nth Plan
t Five Year
(2011-122). The egg production
p
in the begin
nning of 12th
r Plan (2012-13) is 69.733 billion
with an annual grow
wth rate of 4.94%. The current perr capita avaailability is around
a
57 eeggs per

decades,, emerging from an unscientific


u
ommercial production
p
farming prractice to co
system
with statte-of-the-artt technolog
gical interventions. Egg
g production
n at the end
d of the Ten
nth Plan
(2006-077) was 50.7 billion
b
numb
bers as com
mpared to 66
6.45 billion aat the end of the Eleven
nth Plan
t Five Year
(2011-122). The egg production
p
in the begin
nning of 12th
r Plan (2012-13) is 69.733 billion
with an annual grow
wth rate of 4.94%. The current perr capita avaailabilityAnnual
is around
a Report 2013-14
57 eeggs per
year dur
ring
2012-13
3. The poult
try meat57prroduction
iss estimated
to be 2.68of
m the country
million
tonn
nes. Egg
Egg production
per
capita
availability
is around
eggs tonnes.
to
is
shown in the
per
year
during
2012-13.
poultrytomeat
producti
ion
of the
co
ountry
from
mThe
2005-06
2012-13from
is shown
s 2005-06
in th
he 2012-13
following
g chart.
following chart.

production is estimated to be 2.68 million

66.45

2011-12

9.73
69

2012 13
2012-13

63.02

2010-11

55.56

6
60.27

2009-10

53.58
8

2008-09

50.66

2007-08

46.24

2006-07

70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

2005-06

Eggs in 

Chart 1.2
2: Egg Pro
oduction

1.5.3.1 Averag
ge Yield Ratte for Egg: The
T averagee Year
yield of egg per year aat National level
l
from
diffferent speciies during 2012-13
2
is giv
ven below:

: Average
Yield
RateWool
for Egg
1.5.4
Production: Wool production
1.5.3.1 Average Yield RateTable1.3
for Egg:
The Y
declined marginally
at the end of Eleventh
average yield of egg per
year
Fowl
l at National level
Du
uck
Five
Year
Plan
(2011-12)
from different species(nos./ye
during
2012-13
is
given
ear)
(noss./year) to 44.7 million kg
from 45.1 million116.32
kg in the end of Tenth
below:
206.888
Five Year Plan (2006-07). Wool production
Table1.3:
Average
Yield
Rate foroduction
Egg decclined
in themarg
beginning
Twelfth
(2012-13)
1.5.4 Wool Production
P
n: Wool pro
ginally atofth
he
end of Plan
E
Eleventh
Fiv
ve is
46.05
million
kgs.
The
Annual
growth
rate
Yea
ar Plan (20111-12) toDuck
44..7 (nos./year)
million kg from 45.11 million kg in the end of Tenth Fiive Year Plaan for
Fowl
(nos./year)
production
of wool isis 46.05
2.95%
in 2012-13.
(20
006-07). Woo
ol productio
on in the beginning of T
Twelfth
Plan
n (2012-13)
milllion
kgs. Th
heThe
production
of
wool
from
2005-06
to
2012-13
An
nnual
growtth rate for production
p
o wool is 2.95%
2
in 20112-13. The p
production of
o wool from
m
206.88
116.32 of
is
shown
in
the
following
chart:
200
05-06 to 2012
2-13 is show
wn in the folllowing chaart:

Wool (Million Kgs.)

Chart 1.3: W
Wool Produ
uction
46.5
46
45.5
45
44.5
44
43.5
43
42.5
42
41.5
41

46
6.05
44.90
0

45.10

44.73
43.90
42
2.80

0
43.10

43.00

Year

1.5.4.1 Averag
ge Yield Ratte for Wool:: The averag
ge yield of wool
w
per seaason at Natiional Clevel
h apter-1
from different category off Sheep during 2012-13 is given beelow:

Table 1.4: Average Yield


Y
Rate for
f Wool

Annual Report 2013-14

1.5.4.1 Average Yield Rate for Wool: The


average yield of wool per season at National
level from different category of Sheep during
2012-13 is given below:

production has registered a healthy growth


from 2.3 million tonnes at the end of Tenth
Five Year Plan (2006-07) to 5.5 million
tonnes at the end of the Eleventh Five Year
Plan (2011-12). Meat production in the
beginning of Twelfth Plan (2012-13) is 5.95
million tonnes. The Annual growth rate for
production of meat is 7.87% in 2012-13. The
production of meat from 2005-06 to 201213 is shown in the following chart:

Table 1.4: Average Yield Rate for Wool


Ewes
(Kg/
season)

Ram/
Weather
(Kg/
season)
1.09

Lamb
(Kg/
season)

0.73

1.5.5 Meat

1.5.5.1 Average Yield Rate for Meat: The


average yield of meat per Animal/Bird at
National level from different species and
Poultry during 2012-13 is given below:

0.42

Production:

The

Meat

Chart 1.4: Meat Production


55.00

Meat (Lakh Tonnes)

60
50

40.00

43.00

4
46.00

59.00

0
48.00

40
30

23.00

23
3.00

20
10
0

Year

Table 1.5: Average Yield Rate for Meat


resources. As per the estimates of CSO, the
1.5.5.1 Average
A
Yieeld Rate forr Meat: The average
yield
meattfrom
per Anima
al/Bird
National
value
of of
output
fisheries
sectorat
at N
current
Cattle
Sheep
Pig (Kg/ Poultry
level
from Buffalo
different
speciesGoat
and
d Poultry
du
uring 2012-1
13
is
given
b
below:
price was about `91,541 crore during 2012(Kg/
(Kg/
(Kg/
(Kg/
Animal) (Kg/
13 which is about 4.36% of the value of
Animal) Animal) Animal) Animal)
Bird)
Table 1.5: Averrage Yield
Rate for
M
Meat
agricultural
and
allied sector output at current
102.43 122.43 12.91
10.74
38.56
1.24
price.
Pou
B
Buffalo
Sheep
G
Goat
Pig
ultry
Cattlle
(Kg/Ani
imal) (Kg/
/Animal)
Animal)
(Kg/B
Bird)
(Kg/Anima
1.6.2
India is ((Kg/Animal
the secondl)largest
producer
The production
of major
livestock
productsal)
since (Kg/A
of 10
fish
1950-51
102.443 to 2012-13
1 is given at Annexure-II.
122.43
12.91
0.74and the second
38.56 largest producer
1..24 of
fresh water fish in the world. Fish production
1.6 Fisheries Production
has increased from 41.57 lakh tonnes (24.47
Th
he production of majo
or livestock
k products
since for
19550-51
20012-13
is gitonnes
iven at
lakhs tonnes
marinetoand
17.10 lakh
1.6.1
The
Country
has
vast
potential
for
Annexurre-II.
for inland fisheries) in 1991-92 to 90.40 lakh
fisheries in view of our long coastline of
tonnes (33.21 lakh tonnes for marine and
about 8,118 kms apart from the inland water
6

1.6

F
Fisheries
Production
P
n

Cha p t e r-1

1.6.1 The
T Country
y has vast po
otential for fisheries in view of our long coasttline of abou
ut 8,118
kms apaart from thee inland watter resourcees. As per th
he estimatees of CSO, th
he value off output
from fish
heries secto
or at curren
nt price wass about `91,541 crore during
d
2012--13 which iis about

Annual Report 2013-14

and enhancement of production and


profitability of livestock and fisheries
enterprises.

57.19 lakh tonnes for inland fisheries) in 201213. The State-wise details of fish production,
marine fisheries resources and inland water
resources are given at AnnexureIII, IV & V
and the year-wise production of fish seeds is
given in Annexure-VI.

1.7

1.8

Eleventh Five Year Plan

1.8.1 The approach for the 11th Five


Year Plan for the livestock sector is aimed
at achieving an overall growth between 6
to 7 percent per annum for the sector as a
whole, with milk group achieving a growth
of 5% per annum and meat and poultry
achieving a growth of 10% per annum. The
growth of value of output from the livestock
sector during Eleventh Plan was about 4.8
% per annum and from fisheries was about
3.6% per annum.

Governments Initiative and


Assistance to States

1.7.1 As Agriculture, including Animal


Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries is a State
subject; the emphasis of the Department has
been on supplementing efforts of the State
Governments in the development of these
sectors. The Department has been providing
assistance to the State Governments for
the control of animal diseases, scientific
management and upgradation of genetic
resources, increasing availability of nutritious
feed and fodder, sustainable development
of processing and marketing facilities

1.8.2 As against the outlay of `8,174 crore


has been provided to this department for
the 11th Five Year Plan, year-wise financial
achievements are given below:

Table 1.6: Year-wise BE, RE and Actual Expenditure during 11th Plan
(` in crore)
Year

Approved BE

Revised
Estimate (RE)

11th Plan (200712)

8174.00

2007-08

910.00

810.00

784.09

96.80

86.16

2008-09

1000.00

940.00

865.27

92.05

86.53

2009-10

1100.00

930.00

873.38

93.91

79.40

2010-11

1300.00

1257.00

1104.68

87.88

84.98

2011-12

1600.00

1356.52

1243.11

91.64

77.70

Total

5910.00

5293.52

4870.53

92.01

82.41

1.8.3 In addition to the approved outlay


of the Department of Animal Husbandry,
Dairying and Fisheries, an amount of about
`5,406.38 crore was allocated for animal

Actual
Exp.

% of
Utilization
w.r.t. RE

% of
Utilization
w.r.t. BE

husbandry, dairying and fisheries sector


under Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana and
National Mission for Protein Supplements
during 11th Plan.
C h apter-1

Annual Report 2013-14

Allocation
of `14,179
crore for the
Department
for 12th Five
Year Plan.

1.8.4 During the Eleventh Five Year


Plan, Department had initiated several new
programmes/schemes like Establishment
of Veterinary Hospitals and Dispensaries,
National Control Programme on Brucellosis,
National Control Programme of Peste des
Petits Ruminants (PPR) and expansion of Foot
& Mouth Disease Control Programme from 54
to 221 districts for strengthening the efforts for
animal disease control. To meet the shortage
of fodder, several new components were
incorporated in the Feed and Fodder scheme.
Further, Dairy Entrepreneurship Development
Scheme was initiated in the 11th Plan with
the objective of increasing investment in
dairy sector for increasing milk production in
the country while creating self-employment
opportunities.

1.9

Twelfth Five Year Plan

1.9.1The Department has received in-principle


approval of an allocation of `14,179.00 crore
from the Planning Commission (including
`1,584.00 crore as External Aid) for 12th Five
Year Plan. This includes an amount of `7,628
crore for Animal Husbandry, `4,976.00 crore
for Dairy Development and `2,483.00 crore
for the Fisheries sector, `35.00 crore for
Secretariat and Economic Services and `51.00
crore for Special Package for Development
of Kuttanad Eco-System and Mitigation of
Agrarian Distress in Idukki district in Kerala.
1.9.2 Livestock sector which recorded a
growth in value of output about 4.8 percent
per annum in Eleventh Five Year Plan has
excellent potential for higher growth in
Twelfth Five Year Plan. The increased
demand for protein foods in the country is
the main driver for such growth, which is
also more inclusive since small holders and
landless farmers account for major share in
ownership of livestock. Similarly, the fisheries
8

Cha p t e r-1

sub-sector, which has recorded a growth of


about 5 percent per annum previously, can
grow at more than 6 percent per annum
during Twelfth Five Year Plan.
1.9.3 Major challenges of animal husbandry
sectors are effective control of animal
diseases, shortage of feed and fodder, breed
improvement while preserving diverse genetic
resources and dissemination of technology,
skills and quality services to farmers for
improving productivity, which need to be
addressed.
1.9.4 Department has restructured its
Centrally Sponsored Schemes (CSSs) for
implementation during Twelfth Five Year
Plan and accordingly, allocate funds from the
available resources to achieve the growth
targets in following manner :
a)

In order to boost the growth of the


livestock sector, the National Livestock
Mission (NLM) has been launched
during Twelfth Five Year Plan, with the
main objective of achieving sustainable
development of the sector by providing
greater flexibility to states in formulating
and implementing the schemes as
per the local needs for benefit of the
farmers. The National Livestock Mission
will have an important component
to promote availability of feed and
fodder to substantially reduce the
gap between availability and demand.
The Mission also supports initiatives
relating to development of poultry,
piggery, small ruminants and other
minor livestock species as per the agroclimatic conditions of different regions/
states. An amount of `2,800 crore has
been allocated for carrying out above
activities under National Livestock
Mission for the 12th Five Year Plan.

Annual Report 2013-14

b)

c)

Taking into account the importance of


effective control of animal diseases,
which adversely affect productivity
of the livestock, Department has
launched National Control Programmes
for major animal diseases like FMD,
PPR and Brucellosis. The FMD Control
Programme has been expanded in
February, 2014 and being implemented
in 313 districts of the country which also
includes State of Rajasthan and all the
districts of Uttar Pradesh. The whole
country under FMD-CP will be covered
in a phased manner depending on the
availability of vaccine and funds during
12th Plan period. A new component
namely Classical Swine Fever Control
Programme has also been included
in the existing Scheme of Livestock
Health and Disease Control. An amount
of `3,114 crore has been allocated
for the Livestock Health and Disease
Control Programme for the 12th Five
Year Plan.
There is a need to further expand the
artificial insemination programme
from the present level of coverage
from about 25% to 50% of breedable
bovine population by end of Twelfth
Plan in order to improve productivity of
milk by genetic improvement. Efforts
for conservation of quality indigenous
breeds will be strengthened further. The
cooperative sector has made substantial
contribution towards modernizing the
dairy industry. For strengthening the
efforts of the dairy cooperatives to
increase productivity and income of
the milk producers/farmers through
improved management of breeding
and feeding, Government has launched
the National Dairy Plan (Phase-I) with
effect from 2011-12 to be implemented

during Twelfth Plan with an outlay of


`1,756 crore.
d)

The combined activities in respect of


breeding and dairying will be more
effective in extension of artificial
insemination services, feed management
and marketing of good quality of milk
which are essential for improving
productivity and income of farmers.
The scheme for bovine breeding will be
merged with dairy development schemes
to create synergies of resources. National
Programme for Bovine Breeding and
Dairy Development (NPBB&DD) scheme
is having two main components namely,
National Programme for Bovine Breeding
(NPBB) and Dairy Development. States
have established Livestock Development
Boards to implement the breeding
programme for bovines with a focus
on development and conservation
of important indigenous breeds. The
component for the dairy development
will mainly focus in states/areas not
covered under NDP. Convergence in
service delivery for breeding, dairying
and extension through dairy cooperatives
will be attempted in a phased manner.
An amount of `1,800 crore has been
allocated for NPBB&DD for the Twelfth
Five Year Plan.

e)

The National Fisheries Development


Board (NFDB), which was launched in
the year 2006 for fostering integrated
development of fisheries sector, is being
strengthened further by bringing almost
all schemes relating to development
of fisheries into its fold with focus on
management of fish diseases and creation
of related infrastructure. An amount of
`1,880 crore has been allocated for NFDB
for the Twelfth Five Year Plan.
C h apter-1

Annual Report 2013-14

1.10 Annual
2013-14

Plan

2012-13

&

1.10.1 The Department was allocated `1,910


crore for the Annual Plan 2012-13, which was
revised to `1,800 crore at the RE stage. The
final expenditure for 2012-13 was `1,737.32
crore. For the year 2013-14, the Department

10

Cha p t e r-1

has been allocated `2,025 crore which has


been reduced to `1,800 crore in RE. By the end
of March, 2014, the Department has incurred
an expenditure of `1,751.07 crore.
1.10.2 The scheme-wise BE, RE and
Expenditure for 2012-13 and 2013-14 is
given at AnnexureVII.

Chapter 2

OrganiZation

Chapter

Organization
2.1

Structure

2.1.1 The
Department
of
Animal
Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries is one
of the Departments under the Ministry
of Agriculture. It came into existence on
February 1, 1991 by merger of two Divisions
of the Department of Agriculture and
Cooperation viz. Animal Husbandry and Dairy
Development into a separate Department.
The Fisheries Division of the Department
of Agriculture & Cooperation and a part of
the Ministry of Food Processing Industries
was later transferred to this Department on
October 10, 1997.
2.1.2 The Department is under the overall
charge of Shri Sharad Pawar, Honble
Minister of Agriculture. He is assisted by Dr.
Charan Das Mahant, Minister of State for
Agriculture and Food Processing Industries.
The administrative head of the Department
is the Secretary (Animal Husbandry, Dairying
& Fisheries).
2.1.3 Secretary of the Department
is
assisted
by
Animal
Husbandry
Commissioner, four Joint Secretaries and
one Adviser (Statistics), in discharging the
responsibilities assigned to this Department.
The organization chart of the Department
and work allocation among various Divisions
is given at Annexure-VIII.

2.2

Functions

2.2.1 The Department is responsible for


matters relating to livestock production,

preservation, protection & improvement of


stocks, dairy development, matters relating
to the Delhi Milk Scheme and the National
Dairy Development Board. It also looks
after all matters pertaining fisheries, which
includes inland and marine sectors and
matters related to the National Fisheries
Development Board.
2.2.2 The Department advises the State
Governments/Union Territories in the
formulation of policies and programmes
in the field of animal husbandry, dairy
development and fisheries. The main focus
of the activities is on (a) Development
of requisite infrastructure in States/UTs
for improving animal productivity; (b)
Promoting infrastructure for handling,
processing and marketing of milk and milk
products; (c) Preservation and protection of
livestock through provision of health care;
(d) Strengthening of central livestock farms
(Cattle, Sheep and Poultry) for development
of superior germplasm for distribution to
States; and (e) Expansion of aquaculture in
fresh and brackish water, development of
marine fisheries infrastructure & post harvest
operations and welfare of fisherfolk, etc.
2.2.3 The list of the subjects allocated to
the Department is given at Annexure-IX.

2.3

Subordinate Offices

2.3.1 The Department looks after the


administration of the following field /
subordinate Offices spread all over the
country (Table 2.1).

C h apter-2

13

Annual Report 2013-14

Table 2.1: Subordinate Offices


Sl.
No.

Subordinate Offices

Number

(i)

Central Cattle Development Organizations

12

(ii)

Central Poultry Development Organizations

(iii)

Central Sheep Breeding Farm

(iv)

Central Fodder Development Organizations

(v)

National Institute of Animal Health, Baghpat

(vi)

Animal Quarantine Certification Centres

(vii)

Delhi Milk Scheme

(viii)

Central Institute of Coastal Engineering for Fishery, Bangalore

(ix)

Central Institute of Fisheries, Nautical and Engineering Training, Kochi

(x)

National Institute of Fisheries Post Harvest, Technology and Training, Kochi

(xi)

Fishery Survey of India, Mumbai

Total

2.3.2 A list of the aforesaid subordinate


offices is given at Annexure-X.

2.4

National Dairy Development


Board (NDDB)

2.4.1 National Dairy Development Board,


located at Anand, Gujarat, set up in 1965 and
declared as a statutory body corporate in 1987
under the NDDB Act, is a premier institution
to accelerate the pace of dairy development
on cooperative lines in the country. Shri T.
Nand Kumar has taken over as the Chairman
of NDDB w.e.f. 3rd March, 2014.

2.5

National Fisheries
Development Board (NFDB)

2.5.1 National Fisheries Development Board


(NFDB) was set up in September, 2006, with
its head quarter at Hyderabad to realize the
untapped potential of fisheries sector in inland
and marine fish capture, culture, processing
& marketing of fish, and overall growth of
fisheries sector with the application of modern
tools of research & development including
biotechnology for optimizing production and
productivity from fisheries. The activities of
14

Cha p t e r-2

38

the Board are focused towards increasing


the fish production and productivity in the
country, to enhance the exports of fish and
fishery products and to generate employment
opportunities in fisheries sector. It also acts as
a platform for public-private partnership for
fisheries.

2.6

Coastal Aquaculture Authority

2.6.1 The Coastal Aquaculture Authority


(CAA) was established under the Coastal
Aquaculture Act, 2005 vide Gazette
Notification dated 22nd December 2005. The
aims and objectives of the Authority are to
regulate Coastal Aquaculture activities in
the areas notified by the Central Government
as coastal areas and for matters connected
therewith or incidental thereto. The Authority
is empowered to make regulations for the
construction and operation of aquaculture
farms in coastal areas, registration of
aquaculture farms and hatcheries, inspection
of farms and hatcheries for L. vannamei to
ascertain their environmental impact, removal
or demolition of coastal aquaculture farms
which cause pollution, fixing standards for all

Annual Report 2013-14

coastal aquaculture inputs, viz., seed, feed,


growth supplements, chemicals, etc. used
in coastal aquaculture in order to facilitate
environmentally responsible and socially
acceptable coastal aquaculture for the socioeconomic benefits of the various stakeholders
involved in the activity.

2.8

2.7

2.9.1 An officer of the rank of Deputy


Secretary in the Department has been
designated as Liaison Officer for SC/ST
employees of this Department as well as for its
subordinate offices.

Veterinary Council of India

2.7.1 Veterinary Council of India is a statuary


body constituted under the provision of India
Veterinary Council Act, 1984. Veterinary
Council is responsible for regulating veterinary
practices as well as for maintaining uniform
standard of veterinary education through
Minimum Standard of Veterinary Education
Regulation in all veterinary institutes across the
country.
2.7.2 Veterinary Council of India is
consisting of 27 Members - five Members
nominated by the Central Government from
amongst the Directors of Animal Husbandry
of those States to which the Act extends,
four Members from amongst the heads of
Veterinary Institutions in the States to which
the Act extends, one Member nominated by
the Indian Council of Agricultural Research,
one Member to represent the Ministry of
the Central Government dealing with Animal
Husbandry, one Member nominated by the
Indian Veterinary Association, one Member
nominated from amongst the Presidents of
the State Veterinary Councils of those States
to which this Act extends and one Member
nominated from amongst the Presidents of the
State Veterinary Associations of those States
to which this Act extends. Eleven members are
elected from amongst the persons enrolled in
the Indian Veterinary Practitioners Register.
Animal Husbandry Commissioner, Government
of India and Secretary, Veterinary Council
of India are the Ex-officio Members of the
Council.

Grievances Cell

2.8.1 A Grievances Cell has been set up in


the Department to look into grievances of the
public. The cell is headed by a Deputy Secretary
level officer.

2.9

Liaison Officer for SC/ST

2.10 Vigilance Unit


2.10.1 Vigilance Unit processes vigilance
cases pertaining to the Department and its
subordinate offices. The Chief Vigilance Officer
monitors the vigilance cases on a regular basis.
The Department along with its field units
observed Vigilance Awareness Week from 28th
October, 2013 2nd November, 2013. Secretary
(ADF) administered the oath on vigilance to
the officers and staff in the headquarters at
New Delhi.

2.11 Progressive use of Hindi


2.11.1 The Department has made concerted
efforts during the year for promotion of
Hindi in Official work. The Hindi Section
was actively involved in translating various
important documents like the Annual Report,
Performance Budget, Parliament Questions,
documents related to Parliamentary Standing
Committee and Cabinet notes, etc. as well as
in implementing the Official Language Policy
of the Government.
2.11.2 An Official Language Implementation
Committee is functioning in the Department
under the Chairmanship of Joint Secretary (APF).
In accordance with the prescribed rules, four
meetings of the Committee were held during
the year. The progress in use of Hindi in the
Department was reviewed in these meetings.
C h apter-2

15

Annual Report 2013-14

Suggestions were given to promote the use


of Hindi in official work. As a result of these
suggestions, the percentage of correspondence
in Hindi has increased considerably.
2.11.3 Circular letters were also issued from
time to time from the Secretary, Department
of Animal Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries
and Joint Secretary concerned to all Officers/
Sections emphasizing need for proper
implementation of the Official Language Policy
of the Government.
2.11.4 All letters received in Hindi were replied
in Hindi. Similarly letters originated from the
Department to States located in region A and
B were also sent in Hindi. Provisions of Section
3(3) of the Official Language Act, 1963 were
also fully complied with.
2.11.5 Hindi Fortnight was observed in the
Department from 2nd to 16th September, 2013
during which various competitions such as
Hindi essay writing, Hindi noting drafting, Hindi
Rajbhasha Gyan and debate were organized. A
large number of officials participated in these
competitions and cash awards were given to
successful candidates in a function presided
over by the Joint Secretary.

2.12 Animal Production and Health


Information
2.12.1 The website of the Department
(http://dahd.nic.in) was maintained and
updated regularly, particularly on the status
of Avian Influenza. The website has been
enriched by publishing information under the
Right to Information Act. The Department has
developed a web-based system for Livestock
Statistics.

16

Cha p t e r-2

2.13 Implementation of Right to


Information (RTI) Act, 2005
2.13.1 For the purpose of providing
information of public interest, Department has
designated Central Public Information Officers
(CPIOs) under the relevant provision of the RTI
Act. Similarly, separate CPIOs under RTI Act
have been designated for various subordinate
offices and autonomous organizations of the
Department.

2.14 Reservation for Scheduled


Castes (SCs), Scheduled Tribes
(STs), Other Backward Castes
(OBCs) and others:
2.14.1 Department of Animal Husbandry,
Dairying & Fisheries (DAHD&F) continued its
endeavor for strict implementation of the
orders issued by the Government of India from
time to time, regarding reservation in services
for SCs, STs, OBCs, minorities, ex-servicemen,
and physically disabled persons.

2.15 Prevention of Harassment of


Women Employees
2.15.1 A Complaints Committee for prevention
of sexual harassment of women at their work
place was reconstituted by the Department. The
committee is chaired by a senior lady officer of
the Department. The committee is represented
by 4 members, which comprises of 3 women
members, (one of these belongs to an NGO)
and one male member of the Department.
Three meetings of the Committee were held
during the year. No complaint alleging sexual
harassment was received from any women
employees at headquarter in the Department
during this period.

Chapter 3

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

Chapter
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
3.1
The Department has been operating
18 Central Livestock Organizations and allied
institutions for production and distribution of
superior germplasm to the State Governments
for cross-breeding and genetic upgradation of the
stocks. Besides, the Department is implementing
various central sector and centrally sponsored
schemes for the development of requisite
infrastructure and supplementing efforts of the
State Governments in achieving accelerated
growth of animal husbandry sector.

3.2

Central Cattle
Organizations

Development

3.2.1 These organizations include seven


Central Cattle Breeding Farms, one Central Frozen
Semen Production and Training Institute and
four Central Herd Registration Units established
in different regions of the country to produce
genetically superior breeds of bull calves, good
quality frozen semen and for identification of
superior germplasm of cattle and buffaloes, so
as to meet the requirement of bull and frozen
semen in the country.
3.2.2 Central Cattle
(CCBFs)

Breeding

Farms

3.2.2.1 There are seven Central Cattle Breeding


Farms (CCBFs) located at Alamadhi (Tamil Nadu),
Andeshnagar (UP), Chiplima & Sunabeda (Orissa),
Dhamrod (Gujarat), Hessarghatta (Karnataka)
and Suratgarh (Rajasthan) which are engaged
in scientific breeding programmes of cattle and
buffaloes and production of high pedigreed
bulls for upgradation of genetic potential of
cattle and buffalo population besides providing
awareness training to the farmers and breeders.
These farms are producing high pedigreed bull
calves of indigenous and exotic breeds of cattle
and important buffalo breeds for distribution
to States Government, Breeding Agencies,
NGOs, Co-operatives, Gram Panchayats, Private
Farms and individual farmers. The bull calves
are produced from Indigenous breeds viz.
Tharparkar, Red Sindhi, Exotic Breeds viz. Jersey,

Holstein Friesian, Buffalo breeds viz. Murrah and


Surti and Cross breeds of Jersey X Red Sindhi
and H.F. X Tharparkar.
3.2.2.2 These farms produced 360 numbers
of bull calves and trained 3,560 nos. of the
farmers in dairy farm management during the
year 2013-14.
3.2.3

Central Frozen Semen Production and


Training Institute (CFSP& TI)

3.2.3.1 Central Frozen Semen Production &


Training Institutes (CFSP&TI) is a premier institute
located at Hessarghatta, Karnataka producing
frozen semen of indigenous, exotic (HF & Jersey),
crossbred cattle and Murrah buffalo bull for use
in Artificial Insemination (AI). The institute also
provides training in frozen semen technology
to technical officers of the State Governments,
Universities, Milk Federations and other Institutes.
It also acts as one of the centre for testing of
indigenously manufactured frozen semen and AI
equipments. The Institute has State of Art Frozen
Semen Laboratory and follows the procedure as
laid in Minimum Standard Protocol (MSP). The
Central Monitoring Unit (CMU) has awarded it
A Grade. The laboratory also has been certified
ISO9000-2008 Quality Management System.
3.2.3.2 The institutes produced 14.05 lakh doses
of frozen semen and provided training to 349
persons in the field of Frozen Semen Technology
& Andrology during the year 2013-14.
3.2.4 Central Herd Registration Scheme
(CHRS)
3.2.4.1 Central Herd Registration Scheme is for
registration of elite cows and buffalo breeds
of national importance and provides incentive
for rearing of elite cows and male calves. The
main objectives of the scheme are identification
& location of superior germplasm, using the
data for production of superior germplasm,
preservation of indigenous germplasm and milk
recording of cattle and buffaloes for improving
dairy farming.
C h apter-3

19

Annual Report 2013-14

3.2.4.2 There are four CHRS Units under this


scheme located at Rohtak, Ahmadabad, Ajmer
and Ongole. The Milk Recording Centres
located in the States of Gujarat, Maharashtra,
Rajasthan, Haryana, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh and
Andhra Pradesh are functioning for recording
the milk yield of indigenous breeds of Gir,
Kankrej, Haryana and Ongole of Cattle and
Murrah, Jaffrabadi, Surti and Mehsana breeds
of buffalo for confirmation of their phenotypic
breed characteristic and milk production level.
The primary registration of 13,698 cows and
buffaloes was done during 2013-14.

3.3

S e m e n
Production in
the country
has increased
from
22
million straws
(1999-2000)
to 81 million
straws (20122013) and the
number of
inseminations
has increased
from
20
million
to
62
million.
O v e r a l l
conc e p t i o n
rate
has
increased
from 20% to
35%.

20

National Project for Cattle &


Buffalo Breeding

3.3.1 Genetic improvement in bovines is a long


term activity and Government of India has
initiated a major programme National Project
for Cattle and Buffalo Breeding (NPCBB) from
October, 2000 over a period of ten years, in two
phases each of five years, with an allocation of
`402 crore for PhaseI. In order to consolidate
gains made during Phase-I, Phase-II has been
initiated from December, 2006 with an allocation
of `914.89 crore. The NPCBB envisages genetic
upgradation on priority basis with a focus on
development and conservation of important
indigenous breeds. The project envisages 100%
grant-in-aid to Implementing Agencies.
3.3.2 Approval of the Planning Commission has
been obtained for continuation of NPCBB for
first two years during the 12th Plan in order to
complete spill over activities of the project. A

Cha p t e r-3

new scheme National Project on Bovine Breeding


will be initiated from 12th Plan.

3.3.3 Objectives
3.3.3.1 The objectives of the scheme are:
(i)
to arrange delivery of vastly improved
artificial insemination (AI) service at the
farmers doorstep;
(ii)
bring all breedable females among
cattle and buffalo under organized
breeding through artificial insemination
or natural service by high quality bulls
within a period of 10 years;
(iii)
undertake
breed
improvement
programme for indigenous cattle and
buffaloes so as to improve the genetic
makeup as well as their availability.
3.3.4 Components
(a)
streamlining storage and supply of
Liquid Nitrogen by sourcing supply from
industrial gas manufacturers and setting
up bulk transport and storage systems
for the same,
(b)
introduction of quality bulls with high
genetic merit at semen stations,
(c)
promotion of private mobile AI service
for doorstep delivery of AI,
(d)
conversion of existing stationary
government A.I. centres into mobiles
centres,
(e)
quality control and certification of bulls
and services at sperm stations, semen
banks and training institutions,
(f)
induction of high genetic merit bulls for
natural service in the areas not under AI
coverage , and
(g)
institutional restructuring by way
of entrusting the job of managing

Annual Report 2013-14

(v)

(vi)

(vii)
production and supply of genetic inputs
as well as Liquid Nitrogen to a specialized
autonomous and professional State
Implementing Agency.
3.3.5 Constitution of State
Implementing Agencies (SIAs)
3.3.5.1 Since inception of the project in
October, 2000, 27 SIAs have been constituted
under the project in 28 States. These agencies
have professional approach in implementing
the project. In case of small States, which are
unable to constitute viable SIAs, funds have
been released to the State Governments for
implementation of the project.

(viii)

(ix)

(x)

3.3.6 Progress of the Scheme:


3.3.6.1 At present 28 States and one UT are
participating in the project. Financial assistance
to the tune of `1118.00 crore has been released
to these States/UT up to 2013-14.

3.3.7 The notable achievements under


NPCBB since inception are:
(i)
Semen production increased from 22
to 81 million doses & number of AI
increased from 21.80 to 62 million (22
million animals under AI coverage).
Overall conception rate increased from
20% to 35%;
(ii)
54,369 Government Stationary AI
centres have been converted into mobile
AI centres;
(iii)
31,676 Private AI centres have been
established or under establishment.
(iv)
28,400 breeding bulls with high genetic
merit have been inducted or under
induction.

(xi)

(xii)

(xiii)

(xiv)

55,927 existing AI workers have been


trained in all the aspects of frozen semen
technology (including funds released for
training of existing AI workers during
current year);
20,244 professionals have been trained
outside and inside the State at reputed
training centres;
49 frozen semen bull station have been
strengthened as per Minimum Standard
Protocol (MSP) for semen production;
In order to improve quality of semen
production in the country MSP for
semen production has been formulated
and implemented at all semen stations
in the country;
Central Monitoring Unit (CMU) has
been constituted for evaluation of
semen stations one in two years and
implementation of Minimum Standard
Protocol (MSP) for semen production in
the country;
30 semen stations are graded as A,
14 as B during 2012-13 against 11 as
A, 16 as B and 7 as C during 200708. A and B graded semen station has
increased to 44 against 27 in earlier
evaluation.
42 semen stations in the country have
acquired ISO certification against 3
during 2004;
Number of animals in milk has increased
from 62 million during 2000 to 83.15
million during 2012 i.e. about 18 million
improved milch animals has been added
to milch herd of the country;
Crossbred cattle population has
increased from 20 million (1997) to 33
million (2007) and
MSP (Minimum Standard Protocol) for
progeny testing and standard operating
procedures for AI (artificial insemination)
technicians has been formulated and
circulated among all the States.

The performance of AI centres and Semen


stations are given in Table 3.1 and 3.2
C h apter-3

21

Annual Report 2013-14

Table 3.1: Performance of AI Centres


Agency
Government
Private AI workers
Cooperative
NGO
Total

No of AIC
48794
22364
17530
6000

AI (Million)
39.78

No of AI (per year)
559

14.88
7.34

848
1223

94688

62.0

655

Table 3.2: Performance of Semen Stations


Agency

Semen
Stations

No of
Bulls

Semen
Production
(million)

Bulls per
Station

Doses
Produced per
Station (lakh)

Government
NDDB, Dairy Cooperative,
NGO and Private

38

2029

40.69

54

10.99

13

1292

40.28

117

36.61

Total

51

3321

80.97

69

15.88

3.3.8 Liquid Nitrogen (LN) Transport and


distribution system:
3.3.8.1 Before initiation of NPCBB, small
stand alone plants were used by the State
Departments of Animal Husbandry and
most of the plants were facing frequent
breakdowns. The unit cost of production was
very high ranging from `30 to `35 per litre.
Concept of procurement of liquid nitrogen
from private sources was introduced for the
first time in the country under NPCBB. The unit
cost of liquid nitrogen procured from private
sources is in the range of `6 to `10 per litre.
Under the scheme, LN storage, transport and
distribution system has been strengthened
and streamlined through establishment of
semen banks and silos at strategic locations
and providing vehicles for distribution of LN
up to AI centres.
3.3.9 Evaluation of Semen Stations:
3.3.9.1 In order to attain qualitative and
quantitative improvement in semen production,
Central Monitoring Unit (CMU) was constituted
on 20.5.2004 by the Department for evaluation
and grading of semen stations once in two
years. The CMU has since undertaken evaluation
on four occasions. Improvement in grading of
semen stations after constitution of CMU is
22

Cha p t e r-3

presented in table 3.3 and state wise grading


of semen station is given at table 3.4.
Table 3.3: Improvement in Grading of
Semen Stations
Grades 2004-05 2008-09 2010-11 2012-13
A
2
12
20
30
B
12
15
17
40
C
12
7
3
NG
33
13
7
5
NE
2
2
2
Total
59
49
49
51

3.3.10 Development of Minimum Standard


Protocol (MSP) for Semen Production
3.3.10.1 In order to produce frozen semen of
uniform quality, a Minimum Standard Protocol
(MSP) for semen production was developed
in consultation with experts from BAIF, NDDB,
NDRI (Karnal) and CFSPTI and the same was
made effective from 20th May, 2004.

3.3.11 ISO Certification of Semen Stations


3.3.11.1 42 Semen stations are ISO certified. 7
Semen station located at Mattupatty, Dhoni,
Kulathupuzha (Kerala), Haringhata (West
Bengal), Salboni, Beldanga (West Bengal) and
Bhadbhada (Madhya Pradesh) are also HACCP
certified semen stations.

Annual Report 2013-14

Table 3.4: State-wise distribution of Semen Stations with the Grades Awarded
(As per semen evaluation report 2010-2011)

Sl.
No.

State

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Andhra Pradesh
Assam
Chhattisgarh
Gujarat
Haryana
Himachal Pradesh
J& K
Karnataka

Grade
A
80 & above
3
1
5
4
1
3

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Kerala
Madhya Pradesh
Maharashtra
Meghalaya
Orissa
Punjab
Rajasthan
Tamil Nadu
Uttarakhand
Uttar Pradesh
West Bengal
Total

3
2
1
2
2
1
2
30

Grade
B
66 to 79
1
1
2

Grade
C
50 to 65
-

Not
Graded
Below 49
-

Not
Evaluated
NE
1
1
-

Total
Stations

1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
14

1
1
1
2
5

3
1
5
1
1
3
2
4
1
4
3
51

3.3.12 Training and Capacity Building


3.3.12.1 The most important reason for low
conception rate before inception of NPCBB
was lack of access to good training facilities
and ill-trained government AI workers. Under
NPCBB, 55,927 existing AI workers and 20,244
professionals have been trained. This has led to
improvement in quality of breeding services.

3.3.13 Development and Conservation of


Recognized Indigenous Breeds:
3.3.13.1 Indigenous breeds are specially known
for qualities of heat tolerance, resistance to
diseases and ability to thrive under extreme
nutritional stress. Considering the importance
of recognized indigenous breeds in the National
economy, Government has undertaken the
following steps for their development and
conservation:

4
1
1
5
4
1
2
5

3.3.13.2 National Project for Cattle and


Buffalo Breeding has focus on development
and conservation of indigenous breeds. The
cattle and buffalo genetic resources of India
are represented by 37 indigenous breeds of
cattle including Rathi, Gir, Kankrej, Tharparkar,
Sahiwal, Deoni, Hallikar, Khillar Hariana etc.
and 13 breeds of buffaloes including Murrah,
Jaffarabadi, Mehsani, Surti etc. Indigenous
animals are sturdy, endowed with quality of
heat tolerance, resistance to diseases and have
ability to thrive under extreme nutritional stress.
Global warming is likely to increase incidences of
animal diseases particularly viral and protozoan
diseases in crossbred animals. Therefore, there
is a need to take programmes for development
and conservation of indigenous breeds.
3.3.13.3 Funds have been released to the
participating States for procurement of quality
C h apter-3

23

Annual Report 2013-14

bulls for natural service, initiating bull production


programmes, strengthening of bull mother farms
and establishment of ONBS farms for important
indigenous breeds (Bhadawari, Sahiwal, Gir,
Deoni, Kankrej, Hariana, Kenkatha, Hallikar,
Khillar etc.) for their further development.
During Phase-I of the project an amount of
`58 crore has been released exclusively for
development and conservation of indigenous
breeds. An amount of `477.30 crore has been
kept exclusively for development of indigenous
breeds under Phase-II of NPCBB. Out of this, an
expenditure of `350 crore has been made under
the scheme till 31st December, 2013. In addition
to this, strengthening of field AI network, semen
stations, establishment of private AI workers
and organization of fertility camps etc. have also
lead to development of indigenous breeds.

3.4

Feed and Fodder Development

3.4.1 India with only 2.29% of the land area of


the world, is maintaining about 10.71% of the
livestock population. Country is facing shortage
of feed and fodder, to feed the present livestock
population. As estimated by NABCONS in 2007,
availability, requirement and shortage of feed
and fodder is as under:-

(Dry matter in million tonnes)

S.
No.

Type of
fodder

Availability

Gap

1.

Dry
Fodder

416

253

163
(40%)

2.

Green Fodder

222

143

79
(36%)

3.

Concentrate

53

23

30
(57%)

Source: NABCONS-2007.

24

Demand

Cha p t e r-3

3.4.2 The nutritive value of feed and fodder


has a significant bearing on productivity of
livestock.
3.4.3 The area under fodder cultivation is
only about 4% of the cropping area, and it has
remained static for the last four decades. Owing
to the importance of food crops and other cash
crops, it is unlikely that the area under fodder
cultivation would increase. The major reasons
for shortage of feed and fodder are: increasing
pressure on land for growing food grains,
oil seeds and pulses, adequate attention not
been given to the production of fodder crops,
diversified use of agriculture residues, grazing
lands diminishing, area under fodder cultivation
is also limited and majority of the grazing lands
have either been degraded or encroached upon
restricting their availability for livestock grazing.
3.4.4 Though the availability of feed and
fodder has improved in the last decade, still a lot
is required to be done to bridge the gap between
the demand and availability of fodder in the
country, particularly during the lean periods and
crisis situations.
3.3.5 To overcome the shortage of feed and
fodder and to improve the nutritive value, this
Department is implementing two schemes viz.1)
Central Sector Scheme namely Central Fodder
Development Organization and 2) Centrally
Sponsored Scheme - Centrally Sponsored
Fodder and Feed Development Scheme - under
which assistance is provided to States for Feed
and Fodder Development. The details of physical
progress of both schemes is as under:

3.5

Central
Sector
SchemeCentral Fodder Development
Organization

3.5.1 It is comprised of three components


namely (i) seven Regional Stations for Forage
Production & Demonstration, (ii) one Central
Fodder Seed Production Farm, Hessarghatta,
Bangalore and (iii) Central Minikit Testing
Programme on Fodder Crops. The component
wise details are as under:

Annual Report 2013-14

(a)

Regional Stations for Forage


Production & Demonstration and
Central Fodder Seed Production
Farm, Hessarghatta

3.5.2 For production and propagation of


certified seeds of high yielding varieties of fodder
crops and pasture grasses/legumes, Government
of India has established 7 Regional Stations at
Mamidipally, Hyderabad (Andhra Pradesh),
Dhamrod (Gujarat), Hissar (Haryana), Suratgarh
(Rajasthan), Sahema (Jammu & Kashmir),
Alamadhi (Tamil Nadu), Kalyani (West Bengal)
and one Central Fodder Seed Production Farm
at Hessarghatta. These stations are catering to
the requirement of fodder seeds of the farmers
of different agro-climatic regions. These stations
are also carrying out extension activities through
field demonstrations and farmers fairs / field days.
These stations have produced 398.50 tonnes of
fodder seeds, conducted 8,965 demonstrations,
and organized 199 training programmes and
194 farmers fairs/field days, during the financial
year 2013-14.
(b)

improved agronomic package of practices to


increase production of green fodder. Seeds of
high yielding fodder crops/grasses/legumes
produced at Regional Stations and Central
Farm, Hessarghatta, Milk Federations or other
Government fodder seed producing agencies
are distributed under this scheme. Kits are
allotted to state Animal Husbandry Directorate
and Milk Federation for onward distribution to
the farmers at free of cost. During the year
2013-14, total 0.72 lakh minikits of various
fodder seeds of legume and non legume
varieties have been allotted to States against
the target of 0.5 lakh.

3.6

Centrally Sponsored Scheme on


Fodder and Feed Development

3.6.1 This is a Centrally Sponsored Scheme


under which assistance is provided to states

Central Minikit Testing Programme


on Fodder Crops

3.5.3 Minikit demonstrations on fodder


crops aim at creating farmers awareness
through field demonstrations about recent
high yielding varieties of fodder crops and
Table 3.5: Component-wise Physical achievement under Centrally Sponsored Fodder and
Feed Development Scheme during the year 2013-14.
S.
No.

Name of
Components

State/
Coverage

Beneficiaries

Pattern of
Assistance

Physical
Achievement
upto 31.03.14

1 Establishment
of Fodder Block
Making Unit

All States

Public or Private entrepreneurship


including Cooperatives and Self
Help Group.

50:50

--

2 Grassland
Development
including Grass
Reserves

All States

Department of Animal Husbandry


and State Department of Forest.
However, NGOs/Village Panchayats
would be involved for development
of grass land on Panchayat land
and other common property
resources. On an average Rs.7.00
lakh per unit of 10 hectare.

100:00

3,126
(hectare)

C h apter-3

25

Annual Report 2013-14


S.
No.

Name of
Components

State/
Coverage

Beneficiaries

Pattern of
Assistance

3 Fodder Seed
Procurement
and Distribution

All States

Department of Animal Husbandry


of the States. The State Govt. may
involve the SIA/Cooperative/ NGO
for implementation of the project.
Average rate of Rs.5000 per quintal
of fodder seeds

75:25

82,953.5
(qtls)

4 Strengthening
of Feed Testing
Laboratories

All States

Milk
Federations/Research
Institutes/ Existing Soil Testing
Laboratories to take up Feed
testing, Laboratories working in the
field of feed and fodder research
and development.

50:50

3 Nos.

5a Introduction
of hand driven
chaff cutter

All States

Members of Milk Cooperatives

75:25

14196 Nos.

5b Introduction of
power driven
chaff cutter

All states

Members of Milk Cooperatives

75:25

10450 Nos.

6 Establishment
of silage making
Units

All States

Milk Cooperatives

100:00

2090 Nos.

7 Demonstration
of Azolla
cultivation and
production units:

All States

NGOs/ Self
Cooperatives

Group/Milk

50:50

2270 Nos.

8 Establishment of
by-pass protein
production units

W.B, M.P.,
U.P, Punjab,
Haryana,
Kerala,
Maharashtra, Andhra
Pradesh,
Karnataka
& Tamil
Nadu

Dairy Federations/ Private Entrepreneurs.

25:75

--

9 Establishment
of Area Specific
Mineral
Mixture / Feed
Pelleting/ Feed
manufacturing
Unit

All States

Public or Private entrepreneurship


including Milk Cooperatives and
Self Help Group.

25:75

--

to supplement their efforts in feed and


fodder development. The Centrally Sponsored
Fodder and Feed Development Scheme is
26

Cha p t e r-3

Help

Physical
Achievement
upto 31.03.14

being implemented from 01.04.2010 with 9


components. The funds of `89.12 crore have
been released to various States till 31.03.2014.

Annual Report 2013-14

The details of nine components and Physical


achievement upto 31.03.2014 are mentioned in
following table:

3.7

Development of Poultry

3.7.1 Poultry Development has been a


household activity in India. Through policy
interventions by Government and enterprise of
private players, poultry farming has transformed
into a very scientific operation. Poultry is one
of the fastest growing subsectors of Animal
Husbandry. Annual growth rates of eggs in both
10th and 11th Plan were around 5.6%.
3.7.2 These achievements and growth rates
are being sustained despite the ingress of avian
influenza which was a severe setback for the
industry, showing the resilience of poultry sector,
perseverance of the private sector and timely
interventions by the Government. A General
Guidelines for Biosecurity on Poultry Farms has
been compiled and circulated to all States in the
country for taking preventive measures against
ingress of diseases.

can supplement household grain-based diets.


Family poultry have a special place as they are
mostly looked after by women and require low
investment.
3.7.4 The Department of Animal Husbandry,
Dairying and Fisheries, Government of India
facilitated celebration of the World Egg Day
on 11th October, 2013. This is first such event
organized by the Department to increase
awareness on the nutritive value of eggs and
highlight its importance in human nutrition
coordinating with the stakeholders involving
National Egg Coordination Committee, Poultry
Federation of India etc. among the private
players and the State Governments. The event
was celebrated with grand success at New Delhi,
Pune and Bengaluru.
3.7.5 Following are the schemes related to
Poultry implemented by the Department and
all of them are being subsumed under National
Livestock Mission:

3.7.3 Poultry products, especially eggs,


continue to be one of the cheapest protein
sources. Indias unorganized and backyard
poultry sector is also one of the potent tools
for subsidiary income generation for many
landless/ marginal farmers and also provides
nutritional security to the rural poor. In village
poultry systems the production of poultry meat
and eggs is extremely efficient in terms of feed
and water inputs. These nutritious products
Aseel Kala

3.8

World Egg Day Celebrations

Central Poultry Development


Organizations

3.8.1 The CPDOs located at four regions


viz. Chandigarh, Bhubaneswar, Mumbai and
Hessarghatta have been playing a pivotal
role in the implementation of the policies of
the Government with respect to poultry. The
mandate of these organizations has specially
been reoriented to focus on improved indigenous
birds, which lay on an average 180-200 eggs
per annum and have vastly improved Feed
C h apter-3

27

Annual Report 2013-14

Conversion ratio in terms of feed consumption


and weight gain.

Hessarghatta is restocking its population of


ducks with new egg laying stocks of Khaki
Campbell and meat-type Vigova Super -M.

Turkey (Broad Breasted White Large)

3.8.2 In these CPDOs, training is also imparted


to the farmers to upgrade their technical skills.
A new training module for a week has been
devised with better and deeper understanding of
various poultry management practices and this
will also cover the requirement of small holder
entrepreneurs and farmers, besides backyard
poultry rearers. CPDO & Training Institute,
Hessarghatta is also imparting trainers training
to in-service personnel from within the country
as well as overseas. The training calendar for
2014-15 has already been prepared and is being
shared with various States and Embassies of
various Countries.

White Pekin Duck

3.8.4 The Central Poultry Performance Testing


Center (CPPTC), located at Gurgaon is entrusted
with responsibility of testing the performance
of layer and broiler varieties. This Centre gives
valuable information relating to different genetic
stock available in the country.
3.8.5 Department
is
contemplating
developing technology for egg vending machine
and the prototype prepared in collaboration
with Vellore Institute of Technology was recently
been launched at Central Poultry Development
Organization, Chandigarh.

Class Room Training


Guinea Fowl (Pearl variety)

3.8.3 CPDOs are also promoting diversification


with species other than poultry, like ducks,
Japanese quail etc. CPDO& Training Institute,
28

Cha p t e r-3

3.8.6 During the year 2013-14, around 1.03


lakh & 12.30 lakh numbers of parent chicks
and commercial chicks respectively have been
supplied by the CPDOs. Around 2,326 numbers
of farmers and trainers have been trained and

Annual Report 2013-14

around 5,256 numbers of feed samples have


been analyzed.

3.9

Centrally Sponsored Scheme:


Poultry Development

3.9.1 The scheme has three components


namely, Assistance to State Poultry Farms, Rural
Backyard Poultry Development and Poultry
Estates.
(a)

Assistance to State Poultry Farms

3.9.2 It aims at strengthening existing State


poultry farms so as to enable them to provide
inputs, mainly in terms of providing improved
stocks suitable for rural backyard rearing.
This is a continuing scheme which is being
implemented in all the States and UTs. The
assistance provided is 100% in the case of the
North Eastern States, including Sikkim and 80%
in respect of other States. The limit of assistance
provided is `85.00 lakhs for each farm. One
time assistance is provided to strengthen farms
in terms of hatchery, brooding and rearing
houses, laying houses for birds with provision
for feed mill and their quality monitoring and
in-house disease diagnostic facilities and feed
analysis laboratory. In 2013-14, 19 farms have
been assisted (13 partly) taking the total tally of
assisted farms since inception to 239.

nutritional support. During 2013-14, around `40


crore has been released covering for assistance
to nearly 1.66 lakh BPL beneficiaries. Under
Rural Backyard Poultry Development program,
since inception in 2009-10, till date funding
has been done to cover around 6.13 lakh BPL
beneficiaries.
(c)

Poultry Estates

3.9.4. Entrepreneurship skills are to be improved


through exploratory pilot component of Poultry
Estates wherein two estates are proposed for
establishment at this stage. It is meant primarily
for educated, unemployed youth and small
farmers with some margin money for making
a profitable venture out of various poultry
related activities in a scientific and bio-secure
cluster approach. Two poultry estates have
been selected on pilot basis, in Sikkim for broiler
farming and in Odisha for layer farming.

Field Training

Egg Vending Machine (Prototype)

(b)
Rural Backyard Poultry Development
3.9.3 This component is expected to cover
beneficiaries from Below Poverty Line to mainly
enable them to gain supplementary income and

3.9.5 Chicks have been introduced in the broiler


estate in Sikkim. However after some more
infrastructure and setting-up of input services it
will become fully operational.
C h apter-3

29

Annual Report 2013-14

3.10 Poultry Venture Capital Fund


3.10.1 The main objective of the scheme is to
encourage entrepreneurship skills of individuals
in various poultry activities. The scheme is being
implemented from 2011-12 on capital subsidy
mode. New components like hybrid layer and
broiler poultry units, technology up-gradation
with revision of unit costs of some components,
extension of component of breeding farms
for low technology input birds to individuals
are included besides the existing items like
establishing poultry breeding farms with low
input technology birds and also for ducks/
turkey/ guinea fowl/ Japanese quail/ etc, feed
go-down, feed mill, feed analytical laboratories,
marketing of poultry products (specialized
transport vehicles, cool room storage facilities
and retention sheds for birds etc), egg grading,
packing and storage for export capacity etc.
3.10.2 Around 1,729 units are covered under
PVCF in 2013-14. Since inception in 2011-12
under back-ended subsidy, 2,692 units are
covered.

3.11 Conservation of Threatened


Breeds of Livestock
3.11.1 The Centrally Sponsored Scheme
initiated during the Tenth Plan covers all livestock
species except cattle and buffalo and aims at
conserving and protecting threatened breeds of
livestock whose population is about 10,000 and
shows a declining trend in the native breeding
tract. Poultry breeds with a population below
1,000 are considered as threatened.

3.11.2 XI Plan allocation for this scheme has


been enhanced from `16 crore to `45 crore
with threshold number for the threatened
breed of livestock remaining the same. Major
modifications made in the revised scheme are as
under:
(i)

Strengthening of policy and institutional


framework and linkages with research
agencies are provided for, besides
setting up nucleus breeding units.

(ii)

Variable project period allowed for small


and large animals.

(iii)

The States are required to prepare


an inventory of livestock breeds and
varieties.

3.11.3 During the financial year 2012-13,


against an allocation of `250.00 lakh, a total of
`78.25 lakh had been released for conservation
of Berari Goat (`20.00 lakh) to Government of
Maharashtra and (`40.00 lakh) for conservation
of Muzaffarnagri sheep in Uttar Pradesh and
(`18.25 lakh) for conservation of Nilgiri sheep in
Tamil Nadu.
3.11.4 The RE under the scheme during the
financial year 2013-14 is `100.00 lakh against
which `100.00 lakh has been released up to
31.03.2014. Assistance provided during the
current year for Conservation of Kacchi Camel
(`18.00 lakh) to Government of Gujarat, (`40.00
lakh) for conservation of Ramanad white sheep
in Tamil Nadu, for conservation of Attapaddy
goat in Kerala (`10.00 lakh), Conservation of
Berari Goat in Maharashtra (`12.00 lakh) and
Naked Neck of Poultry in Tripura (`20.00 lakh).

3.12 Central Sheep Breeding Farm,


Hissar (Haryana)
3.12.1 The farm was established during
the Fourth Five Year Plan with the objectives
of producing acclimatized exotic rams for
distribution to various State Sheep Farms and
training of personnel in mechanical sheep
shearing. In course of time and in accordance
with recommendation of experts, the breeding
30

Cha p t e r-3

Annual Report 2013-14

programme of the farm was changed to produce


crossbred rams (Nali X Rambouilett and Sonadi
X Corriedale) as well as Beetal goats.

3.12.2 During 2012-13, the farm has supplied


725 Rams and 122 Bucks. A total of 135
farmers were trained in mechanical sheep
shearing and 562 farmers were trained in sheep
management.
3.12.3 During 2013-14, up to 31st March, 2014,
the farm supplied 646 rams and 82 bucks. A
total of 132 farmers were trained in mechanical
sheep shearing and 531 farmers were trained in
sheep management.

3.13 Integrated Development of


Small Ruminants and Rabbits
3.13.1 Under this scheme Integrated
Development of Small Ruminants and Rabbits,
there is a provision for establishment of individual
sheep/goat farms through NABARD. The scheme
aimed for unemployed youths especially women
beneficiaries, poor and marginal farmers.
3.13.2 The scheme is being implemented
through NABARD for individual beneficiaries
for setting up of commercial / private units for
sheep/goat farming/rearing.
3.13.3 During the financial year 2012-13,
against an allocation of `1,200 lakh, a total
of `1,470.85 lakh had been released towards
strengthening of Government sheep/goat
breeding farms to the State of Arunachal Pradesh
(`37 lakh), Himachal Pradesh (`49.24 lakh),

Madhya Pradesh (`5.58 lakh), Maharashtra


(`210.00 lakh), Nagaland (`22.85 lakh), Tamil
Nadu (`221.20 lakh) and Uttar Pradesh (`75
lakh). `875.00 lakh were released to NABARD,
against which 1,759 beneficiaries were assisted
for establishment of sheep and goat rearing
units in various States during the year.
3.13.4 There was a RE of `964.00 lakh
during 2013-14 and till 31st March, 2014, a
total of `928.39 lakh has been released to
assist 1,159 beneficiaries for establishment
of sheep/goat units in the State of Andhra
Pradesh (497), Chhattisgarh (2), Haryana
(2), Himachal Pradesh (87), J & K (13),
Jharkhand (1), Karnataka (97), Kerala (54),
Madhya Pradesh (1), Odisha (2), Punjab (2),
Rajasthan (14), Uttarakhand (257), Arunachal
Pradesh (1), Assam (129). Till 31st March,
2014, an amount of `928.39 lakh has been
released to NABARD (`614.40 lakh) and for
strengthening of state farms in the states
of Tripura (`20.00 lakh), Tamil Nadu (`8.00
lakh), Andhra Pradesh (`54.05 lakh), Nagaland
(`25.00 lakh), Gujarat (`43.31 lakh), Jammu
& Kashmir (`21.99 lakh), Uttarakhand (`47.40
lakh), Arunachal Pradesh (`25.00 lakh) and
Tamil Nadu (`69.24 lakh).

3.14 Salvaging and Rearing of Male


Buffalo Calves
3.14.1 The scheme intends to rear male buffalo
calves for meat production and to develop
linkages with export oriented slaughterhouses in
Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand,
Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa,
Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab and West
Bengal.
3.14.2 The scheme is being implementing by
NABARD and is expected to generate substantial
quantity of meat, hides and by-products and
also provide direct part employment and
indirect employment to people in feed, fodder,
meat leather and various input services. The
scheme envisages for organization of farmer
training and publicity through NABARD. During
C h apter-3

31

Annual Report 2013-14

the current financial year, the Scheme has been


retained with a token allocation of `1.00 lakh.

3.15 Establishment /Modernization


of Rural Slaughter Houses
3.15.1 The slaughterhouses are aimed to be
established/ modernized in rural areas and
smaller towns to produce wholesome and
hygienic meat for supplying to the cities/towns.
This way, the loss in the meat sector due to
transportation of live animals, shrinkage of meat
and environmental pollution in the cities will
be prevented. The employment opportunities
for further use of fresh hides and skins in the
tanneries in vicinity of the slaughterhouses
will boost production of quality leather. This
scheme is being implemented in three states:
Uttar Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh and Meghalaya,
initially on pilot basis. The main objectives of the
scheme are:
a)
b)

Ensure
scientific
and
hygienic
slaughtering of animals/ birds
Establish slaughterhouses, which can
be operated by private entrepreneurs
in rural and semi-urban areas with
population of less than 50,000

c)

Encourage value addition to products in


rural areas so that livestock owners get
better income with proper utilization of
by-products

d)

Ensure hygiene in meat production from


slaughterhouses to consumers table by
establishing network of cold chains and
distribution on commercial basis

3.15.2 The scheme is being implementing by


NABARD and is expected to generate substantial
quantity of meat, hides and byproducts and also
provide direct and indirect employment to people
in feed, fodder, meat leather and various input
services. The scheme envisages organization of
farmer training and publicity through NABARD.
During the current financial year, the Scheme
has been retained with a token allocation of
`4.00 lakh.
32

Cha p t e r-3

3.16 Utilization of Fallen Animals


3.16.1 The meat importing countries insist for
creating facilities for proper disposal of slaughter
house waste and fallen animals as a sanitary
measure. The Central Leather Research Institute
(CLRI), Chennai has reported annual mortality
of 24 million large animals and 17 million small
ruminants. The estimated colossal loss is `985
crore per annum due to non-recovery/partial
recovery of hides/skins and other by-products
from the fallen animals. This scheme proposes
to establish carcass utilization centres in animals
density matrix areas and is expected to provide
employment to poorest of the poor. The main
objectives of this scheme are:
a)
b)

c)

d)

To prevent environmental pollution and


spread of livestock diseases
Provide opportunity of employment to
rural poor engaged in carcass collection,
flaying and by-product processing
Produce better quality hides and skins
through timely recovery, better handling
and transport
Prevent bird-hit hazards to civil and
defence aircrafts.

3.16.2 The scheme is being implementing by


NABARD and is expected to generate substantial
quantity of meat, hides and by-products and
also provide direct part employment and
indirect employment to people in feed, fodder,
meat leather and various input services. The
scheme envisages for organization of farmer
training and publicity through NABARD. During
the current financial year, the Scheme has been
retained with a token allocation of `5.00 lakh.

3.17 Pig Development


3.17.1 This scheme is aimed to assist farmers/
landless labourers/cooperatives and Tribal
particularly in North-Eastern States by rearing
pigs under stall fed condition for quality pork
production and organized pork marketing in
rural and semi-urban areas. The main objectives
of the scheme are:

Annual Report 2013-14

(a)

(b)
(c)
d)
e)

Encourage commercial rearing of pigs


by adopting scientific methods and
creation of infrastructure
Production and supply of improved
germ plasm
Organizing stakeholders to popularize
scientific practices
Create supply chain for the meat
industry
Encourage the value addition for better
income

3.17.2 The scheme is being implemented by


NABARD and is expected to generate substantial
quantity of meat, hides and by-products and
also provide direct part employment and indirect
employment to people in feed, fodder, meat
leather and various input services.
3.17.3 During the financial year 2012-13, a
total of `1,000.00 lakh had been released to
NABARD against which, 1,712 beneficiaries
were assisted for establishment of pig rearing &
breeding unit in various States during the year.
3.17.4 In the financial year 2013-14, a total
amount of `780.00 lakh has been released,
through which a total of 1,097 beneficiaries
have been assisted under the scheme. The
scheme envisages for organization of farmer
training and publicity through NABARD.

3.18

Livestock Health

3.18.1 With the improvement in the quality of


livestock through cross-breeding programmes,
the susceptibility of these livestock to various
diseases including exotic diseases has increased.
In order to reduce morbidity and mortality,
efforts are being made by the States/Union
Territories Governments to provide better health
care through Polyclinics/Veterinary Hospitals,
Dispensaries and First-Aid Centers including
Mobile Veterinary Dispensaries. In order to
provide referral services, over and above the
existing disease diagnostic laboratories in the
States, one Central and five Regional Disease
Diagnostic Laboratories have been established

which are now fully functional. Further, for


control of major livestock and poultry diseases
by way of prophylactic vaccination, the required
quantity of vaccines are being produced in the
country at 27 veterinary vaccine production units
including 20 in public sector.
3.18.2 While efforts are made to ensure better
livestock health in the country, efforts are also
being made to prevent ingress of diseases from
outside the country, and to maintain standards
of veterinary drugs and formulations. At
present, the Drugs Controller General of India
regulates the quality of veterinary drugs and
biologicals in consultation with this Department.
The following schemes are being implemented
in respect of Livestock Health and control of
animal diseases.

3.19 Directorate of Animal Health


(a)

Animal Quarantine and Certification


Service

3.19.1 The objective of this service is to


prevent ingress of livestock diseases into
India by regulating the import of livestock
and livestock related products, and providing
export certification of International Standards
for livestock and livestock products which are
exported from India. There are six quarantine
stations in the country, out of which, four
located at New Delhi, Chennai, Mumbai and
Kolkata are operating smoothly from their
own premises, which also include a small
laboratory. Two other new Animal Quarantine
Stations at Hyderabad and Bangalore are
currently operating from the airport offices,
where the imported Grand Parent (GP) stock
of poultry, pets, laboratory animals and
livestock products are cleared after physical
verification. The establishment of Quarantine
Station at Hyderabad is under construction and
Bangalore station is near to the completion
stage. The scheme helped to prevent the entry
of exotic diseases like Mad-Cow Disease (BSE),
African swine fever and contagious equine
metritis. Details of the activities of the Animal
Quarantine and Certification Service Stations
during 2013-14 are given at Annexure-XII.
C h apter-3

33

Annual Report 2013-14

(b)

National
Veterinary
Biological
Products Quality Control Centre,
Baghpat

3.19.2 The National Institute of Animal Health


(NIAH) has been established at Baghpat, Uttar
Pradesh to undertake the testing of vaccines
and biologicals for their quality.
The Institute has started functioning and is
carrying out the following activities:

The virology laboratory is functional with


facilities for testing of quality assurance
of FMD vaccine by way of testing of
serum samples by LPB-ELISA and sterility
of vaccines. Institute has tested the FMD
vaccine for sterility, safety and potency

Facilities for starting animal experiments


for quality control of FMD vaccines have
been put in place and the animal house
facilities have been registered with
Committee for the Community for the
purpose of control and supervision of
experiment in animals (CPCSEA)

The bacteriology laboratory is also


functional to carry out the sterility test
of bacterial vaccines and testing of BQ,
HS and enterotoxaemia vaccines has
been carried out

The Poultry vaccine-testing laboratory has


been established with standardization of
tests for the Newcastle disease vaccine
(Live) and Infectious Bursal Disease
vaccine (IBD)

The Pathology laboratory including


Clinical pathology is also functional

(c)

Central/Regional Disease Diagnostic


Laboratories

3.19.3 In order to provide referral services over


and above the 250 existing disease diagnostic
laboratories in the States, one Central and five
Regional Disease Diagnostic Laboratories have
been set up by strengthening the existing state
diagnostic facilities. The Centre for Animal
Disease Research and Diagnosis (CADRAD)
34

Cha p t e r-3

of Indian Veterinary Research Institute,


Izatnagar is functioning as Central Laboratory.
The Disease Investigation Laboratory, Pune,
Institute of Animal Health and Veterinary
Biologcials, Kolkata, Institute of Animal Health &
Biologcials, Bangalore, Animal Health Institute,
Jallandhar and Institute of Veterinary Biologicals,
Khanapara, Guwahati are functioning as referral
laboratories for Western, Eastern, Southern,
Northern and North-Eastern Region, respectively.
The laboratories at NRDDL (Jallandhar), SRDDL
(Bangalore), ERDDL (Kolkata), and CDDL
(Izatnagar) have been strengthened with prefabricated BSL-III laboratories while a mobile
BSL-III laboratory has been provided to NERDDL,
Guwahati. These RDDLs have been of great help
to the country for surveillance and diagnosis of
various livestock and poultry diseases including
Avian Influenza.

3.20 Livestock
Control

Health

&

Disease

3.20.1 In order to effectively tackle the issue of


livestock health, the Department is supplementing
the activities of the state Governments by
way of providing assistance through Centrally
Sponsored Scheme Livestock Health & Disease
Control having following major components:
(a)
Assistance to States for Control of
Animal Diseases (ASCAD)
(b)
Professional Efficiency Development
(PED)
(c)
National Project on Rinderpest
Surveillance and Monitoring (NPRSM)
(d)
Foot and Mouth Disease Control
Programme (FMD-CP)

Annual Report 2013-14

(e)

(f)
(g)
(h)

Establishment
and
Strengthening
of existing Veterinary Hospitals and
Dispensaries (ESVHD).
Brucellosis
Control
Programme
(Brucellosis CP)
Peste des Petits Ruminants Control
Programme (PPRCP)
National Animal Disease Reporting
System (NADRS)

The details of the components are as under:


(a)

Assistance to States for Control of


Animal Diseases

3.20.2 Under this component, assistance is


provided to State/Union Territory Governments
for control of economically important diseases
of livestock and poultry by way of immunization,
strengthening of existing State Veterinary
Biological Production Units, strengthening of
existing Disease Diagnostic Laboratories and
in-service training to Veterinarians and Paraveterinarians. Under this programme, during
2012-13, about 342.49 million vaccinations
were carried out against the target of 190
million. During 2013-14, about 360.65 million
vaccinations have been carried out against
the target of 250 million. Besides this, the
programme envisages collection of information
on the incidence of various livestock and poultry
diseases from States and Union Territories and
compiling the same for the whole country. The
information compiled at headquarter is notified
to World Organization for Animal Health (OIE)
on every six monthly basis. Incidence of diseases
of livestock and Poultry in India during year 2013
is at Annexure- XIII.
(b)

Professional Efficiency Development

3.20.3 Professional Efficiency Development


envisages establishment of Veterinary Council
of India at Centre and State Veterinary Council
at State level in those States/Union Territories,
which have adopted the Indian Veterinary
Council Act, 1984. The objective of the Scheme is
to regulate veterinary practice, the maintenance
of Register of veterinary practitioners. Towards

this purpose, there is a provision of setting up of


Veterinary Council of India in centre and State
Veterinary Councils in all States/UTs where
Indian Veterinary Council Act, 1984 have been
extended. Presently, all States except Jammu &
Kashmir and all UTs have adopted the Indian
Veterinary Council Act, 1984.
3.20.4 Subsequent to enactment of the Act, the
Central Government (Ministry of Agriculture)
vide Gazette Notification S.O. No. 2051 dated
2nd August, 1989, for the first time constituted
the Veterinary Council of India by nominating
the Members as per the provisions of Section 3
of the IVC Act, 1984 read with Section 4 thereof
and rule 23 of Indian Veterinary Council Rules,
1985 as per notification dated 23rd April, 1985.
(c)

National Project on Rinderpest


Surveillance and Monitoring

3.20.5 The main objective of the scheme is to


strengthen the veterinary services to maintain
required vigil to sustain the countrys freedom
from Rinderpest & Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) infection secured in May
2006 and May 2007 respectively.
3.20.6 Physical surveillance through village,
stock route & institutional searches to detect
any re-occurrence of Rinderpest and Contagious
Bovine Pleuro-pneumonia (CBPP) is being
undertaken throughout the country to maintain
Indias freedom status from these diseases. This
physical surveillance is done with the help of
the staff of Animal Husbandry Department of
the States & Union Territories to maintain the
freedom status.
3.20.7 The name of the component has been
changed as National Project for Rinderpest
Surveillance and Monitoring (NPRSM) vide
Administrative approval dated 27.02.2014.
(d)

Foot & Mouth Disease Control


Programme

3.20.8 To prevent economic losses due to


Foot and Mouth Disease and to develop
herd immunity in cloven-footed animals, a
C h apter-3

35

Annual Report 2013-14

location specific programme called Foot and


Mouth Disease Control Programme (FMDCP) is being implemented in 221 specified
districts with 100% central funding as cost of
vaccine, maintenance of cold chain and other
logistic support to undertake vaccination.
The State Governments are providing other
infrastructure and manpower. The scope of
the programme has been extended to cover
55 remaining districts of Uttar Pradesh and
33 districts of Rajasthan during 2013-14 vide
Administrative Approval issued on 27.02.14.
3.20.9 During 2012-13, about 140.96 million
vaccinations were carried out in the districts
covered under FMD-CP and about 97,000 (pre
and post vaccination) serum samples were
collected. During 2013-14, as against target
of 155 million vaccinations, about 193 million
vaccinations have been carried out. During
2013-14, against the BE of `250 crore and RE
of `223.79 crore, the funds of `223.70 crore
were released under the programme.
(e)

Establishment and Strengthening


of Existing Veterinary Hospitals
and Dispensaries

3.20.10 There are about 10,901 veterinary


hospitals/ polyclinics and 22,402 veterinary
dispensaries in the country. In order to help
the states to set up infrastructure for new
veterinary hospitals and dispensaries and
to strengthen/equip the existing ones, the
department is providing funds on 75:25
(Centre: State) sharing basis except NE States,
where the grants are provided on 90:10
basis.

36

Cha p t e r-3

3.20.11 During 2012-13, against the BE of


`91.00 crore and RE of `46.87 crore, a sum
of `51.76 crore has been released to States/
UTs for construction of new veterinary
Hospitals/ Dispensaries and strengthening
of existing ones. Funds have been released
for construction/renovation of about
274 veterinary hospitals 931 veterinary
dispensaries during 2012-13. A sum of `60.00
crore and `50.03 crore was provided as BE &
RE respectively for the year 2013-14 against
which a sum of `54.15 crore has been released
to States/UTs for the construction/renovation
of 416 hospitals and 363 dispensaries under
the scheme.
(f)

Brucellosis Control Programme

3.20.12 Brucellosis, an economically important


zoonotic disease has become endemic in most
parts of the country. It causes abortions and
infertility in animals. Prevention of abortions
will add new calves to the animal population
leading to enhanced milk production. This
new component has started in 2010 and
100% central assistance is provided to States/
UTs for mass vaccination of all female calves
between 6-8 months in the areas where
incidence of the disease is high.
3.20.13 The name of the component
has been changed as Brucellosis Control
Programme vide Administrative Approval
dated 27.02.2014.
3.20.14 During 2012-13, against BE of
`11.00 crore and RE of `6.58 crore, a sum
of `6.01 crore was released to the States
to undertake various activities under this
component. A sum of `12.00 crore has been
provided as BE for the year 2013-14 and
RE of `6.20 crore, against which a sum of
`4.19 crore has been released to States/UTs
till 31st March, 2014 under this component.
About 11.06 lakh vaccinations of eligible
females calves have been carried out in
the States like Gujarat, Assam, Karnataka,
Punjab, Arunachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh,
Sikkim, Nagaland etc.

Annual Report 2013-14

(g)

Peste des Petits Ruminants Control


Programme

3.20.15 The Peste des Petits Ruminants


(PPR) is a viral disease characterized by high
fever, inflammation of the gastro-intestinal
tract leading to necrosis and ulceration of
the mucous membrane and diarrhea. The
PPR infection causes huge losses in the
rural economy, both in terms of morbidity
and mortality in sheep and goats. The PPR
Control Programme involving intensive
vaccination of susceptible animals has been
started in 2010 on 100% Central assistance
basis. The programme involves vaccinating
all susceptible goats & sheep and three
subsequent generations. The first phase
covers the States of Kerala, Tamil Nadu,
Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra,
Goa and UTs of Lakshadweep, Daman & Diu,
Dadra & Nagar Haveli, Andaman & Nicobar
Islands and Puducherry. The PPR Central
programme has been extended to cover all
the remaining States/UTs during 12th Plan
Period in February, 2014.
3.20.16 The name of the component has been
changed as Peste des Petits (PPR) Control
Programme vide Administrative Approval
dated 27.02.2014.
3.20.17 During 2012-13, against BE of
`10.00 crore and RE of `5.83 crore, a sum
of `5.09 crore has been released under this
component. About 340 lakh vaccinations have
been carried out during 2012-13. A sum of
`22.00 crore has been provided as BE for the
year 2013-14 and RE of `7.26 crore against
which a sum of `4.58 crore has been released
to States/UTs till 31st March, 2014 under
this component. During 2013-14, about 25
million vaccinations were carried out under
the programme.
(h)

National Animal Disease Reporting


System

3.20.18 In order to streamline the system


of animal disease reporting from States/

UTs a web based IT system for reporting


the diseases from the field level has been
implemented known as National Animal
Disease Reporting System (NADRS). It is an IT
based system under theCentrally Sponsored
Scheme LH & DC, and has been executed
through National Informatics Centre (NIC).
The main objective of NADRS is to record
and monitor livestock disease situation in the
country with a view toinitiate preventive and
curative action in a timely and speedy manner.
The NADRSinvolves a computerized network,
linking each Block, District and the State/
UTHeadquarters in the country to the Central
Project Monitoring Unit in the DADF atNew
Delhi. NADRS is a web based System which
will report the occurrence of animaldiseases
data from the Block & District level Veterinary
Units.
3.20.19 Central Project Monitoring Unit
(CPMU) for analyzing the animal disease data
received through NADRS has been established
at New Delhi. The scheme was formally
inaugurated in February, 2013. The training
of field level Veterinarians in the NADRS
software continued. The data reporting
under NADRS is under stabilization phase. In
the year 2013-14, approved outlay for NADRS
was `14.97 crore and RE of `12.00 crore, out
of which `9.45 crore have been released.

3.21 Avian Influenza: Preparedness,


Control, and Containment
3.21.1 Department has evolved an Action Plan
for Prevention, Control & Containment of Avian
Influenza (AI), known as Bird Flu. States/UTs are
provided financial assistance under ASCAD for
above activities. Department has recently issued
a revised surveillance plan for robust efforts in
prevention of Avian Influenza in the country.
There was one outbreak of Avian Influenza
reported in August, 2013 in Chhattisgarh State
which was successfully contained and the
country was declared free from Avian Influenza
on 11.11.2013. During the year 2013, Avian
Influenza has been reported in 22 countries.
C h apter-3

37

Annual Report 2013-14

Table 3.5: Outbreaks of Avian Influenza upto March, 2014


Episode

Period

Feb Apr, 2006

State
Affected

Number of
Epicenters

Maharashtra

28

9.4

270.00

Compensation
paid
(in INRs
lakhs)

1st

Feb, 2006

Gujarat

0.92

32.00

2nd

Mar, 2006

Madhya Pradesh

0.09

3.00

3rd

July, 2007

Manipur

3.39

94.00

4th

Jan May, 2008

West Bengal
(1st episode)

68

42.62

1229.00

5th

Apr, 2008

Tripura

1.93

71.00

6th

Nov Dec, 2008

Assam

18

5.09

170.00

7th

Dec, 2008 May, 2009

West Bengal
(2nd episode)

11

2.01

36.00

8th

Jan, 2009

Sikkim

0.04

3.00

9th

Jan, 2010

West Bengal (3rd


episode)

12

1.56

68.80

10th

Feb Mar, 2011

Tripura

0.21

2.40

11th

8th September, 2011

Assam

0.15

6.52

12th

19th September, 2011

West Bengal

0.49

19.29

13th

11th January, 2012

Odisha

0.32

24.71

14th

13th January, 2012

Meghalaya

0.07

7.89

15th

17 January, 2012

Odisha

0.11

5.87

16th

28th January, 2012

Tripura

0.06

1.20

17th

4th February, 2012

Odisha

0.38

2.86

18th

15th March, 2012

Tripura

0.05

0.09

19th

28th April, 2012

Tripura

0.02

0.72

20th

25th October, 2012

Karnataka

0.33

Nil

21st

8th March, 2013

Bihar

0.06

2.06

22nd

5th August, 2013

Chhattisgarh

0.31

Nil

160

69.61

2050.41

th

Total

38

No. of birds
culled
(in lakhs)

3.21.2 The following measures have been


taken up by the Government of India for control
and containment of current Avian Influenza
outbreak as well as to prevent its ingress into
the country.

(ii)

(i)

(iii)

The Surveillance Plan on Avian Influenza


in the country has been prepared in
November, 2013 and circulated to
the State/UT Governments/ Regional
laboratories etc. for implementation.

Cha p t e r-3

(iv)

The Action Plan on Preparedness,


Control and Containment of Avian
Influenza was revised in 2012 and
circulated to the State/UT Governments
for implementation.
Culling of entire poultry population in
the affected zone of 0-1 Km is being
carried out.
Continuous
strengthening
of
preparedness to tackle any future

Annual Report 2013-14

(viii)

(ix)

(x)

(xi)

(xii)

(v)

(vi)

(vii)

eventuality in terms of upgradation of


laboratories, training of manpower,
stockpiling of materials for control and
containment etc.
Training veterinary personnel in
preparedness, control and containment
is continuing. About 90% veterinary
workforce in the country has been
trained to handle control and
containment
operations.
Besides,
44,395 number of community workers
have been trained on reporting of Avian
Influenza expeditiously.
To strengthen the diagnosis of Avian
Influenza, four pre-fabricated Bio-Safety
Level 3 (BSL 3) laboratories have been
established at Jallandhar, Kolkata,
Bangalore & Bareilly. The laboratories
are already functional. A mobile BSL-III
laboratory has also been provided to
NERDDL, Guwahati which is functional
too.
23 State Disease Diagnostic
Laboratories are being upgraded to
BSL 2 level, out of which eighteen
laboratories are already functional.
The remaining are at various stages of
completion.
Reserve of essential material for control
operations have been developed and
are being expanded further.

(xiii)

(xiv)

Sensitization of general public on


Avian Influenza through Information,
Education and Communication (IEC)
campaigns.
Transparent approach towards reporting
not only outbreaks but also information
of unusual sickness/mortality in poultry
and results of laboratory diagnosis.
All the state governments have been
alerted to be vigilant about the outbreak
of the disease, if any.
Imports of poultry and poultry products
have been banned completely from
HPAI positive countries.
Border check posts with neighboring
countries have been alerted.
Advisories are issued to the states for
further guidance of poultry farmers
from time to time on various aspects
of disease control, surveillance and
importance of biosecurity.
With an aim to build capacity to
improve surveillance and epidemiology
of Avian Influenza in both domestic
and wild birds, the Department had
been implementing FAO project on
Immediate technical Assistance to
strengthen emergency preparedness
for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza
(HPAI) in India, which has ended in
September, 2013.

3.22 Animal Husbandry Statistics


3.22.1 The production of major livestock
products (MLP), namely, milk, eggs, meat &
wool are estimated on the basis of annual
sample surveys conducted under the Central
Sector Scheme Integrated Sample Survey
(ISS). All the States and Union Territories
are implementing the Scheme with Central
Assistance to the tune of 50%, 90% and 100%
to the States, NE States and UTs respectively for
the expenditure on salary for the entitled posts.
100% Central Assistance is also provided for (i)
TA/DA to the Enumerator and Supervisor for
the conduct of the survey at a prescribed rate
(ii) studies and development of methodologies
in livestock sector (iii) Information Technology
C h apter-3

39

Annual Report 2013-14

(IT) solutions and (iv) refresher training on ISS


methodology.
3.22.2 The annual surveys are conducted from
March to February. The Technical Committee on
Direction for Improvement of Animal Husbandry
Statistics (TCD) guides the Department in the
conduct of the scheme. Directors of Animal
Husbandry/SheepHusbandryofalltheStates/UTs,
Directors of Directorate of Economics & Statistics
(DE&S) of 4 selected States, representatives of
CSO & NSSO, Ministry of Statistics & Programme
Implementation, representative of Directorate
of Economics & Statistics (DE&S), Ministry of
Agriculture, representative from Ministry of
Rural Development and representatives from
other independent agencies such as National
Dairy Development Board (NDDB), Anand, NDRI,
IASRI and Indian Statistical Institute are the
members of the Committee. Director General,
Central Statistics Office, Ministry of Statistics &
Programme Implementation is the Chairman of
the Committee. States/UTs compile season-wise
as well as annual estimates of MLP which are
discussed and finalized in the meeting of the
TCD. The last TCD was held on 4-5th July, 2013
at Amritsar, Punjab under the chairmanship of
Dr. T.C.A. Anant, Secretary and Chief Statistician
of India, Ministry of Statistics & Programme
Implementation. The estimates are accordingly
published in Annual Publication Basic Animal
Husbandry and Fishery Statistics (BAH&FS) of
the Department. Till 2012, the publication was
brought on biannual basis which has now been
made annually and Basic Animal Husbandry and
Fishery Statistics (BAH&FS)-2013 is published
and uploaded in the official website of the
Department.

3.23 Livestock Census


3.23.1 The first Livestock census was
conducted during 1919-1920 and since then it
is being conducted quinquennially by all States/
UTs in India. It is the only source, which gives
disaggregated information on various species of
farm animals and poultry birds. The Department
has launched 19th Livestock Census on 15th
September, 2012 in the country through Animal
Husbandry Departments of the States/UTs
40

Cha p t e r-3

with 15.10.2012 as the date of reference. The


enumeration, post enumeration, Scrutiny, data
entry and validation of data of 19th Livestock
Census have been completed and reports are
being generated.
22.23.2 Breed Census was undertaken for
the first time in the country along with 18th
Livestock Census 2007 and provisional result
of 18th Livestock Census was released in 2010.
Experiencing abnormal problems in data
compilation during 18th Census, the Technical
Committee has recommended to conduct 19th
Livestock Census and Breed Survey separately.
Accordingly, a Breed Survey was initiated after
19th Livestock Census in 15% sample villages
in every sub districts. The field work and data
entry of the survey is completed and the data
validation is in progress.

3.24 Livestock Insurance


3.24.1 For promotion of the livestock sector,
it is important that along with providing more
effective measures for disease control and
improvement of genetic quality of animals, a
mechanism of assured protection to the farmers
and cattle rearers is required against eventual
losses of such animals. The scheme covers 300
selected districts from 10.12.2009.
3.24.2 This CSS has twin objectives: providing
protection mechanism to the farmers & cattle
rearers against any eventual loss of their animals
due to death; and to demonstrate the benefit of
the insurance of livestock. The scheme benefits
the farmers and cattle rearers having indigenous/
crossbred milch cattle and buffaloes. Benefit of
subsidy is to be restricted to two animals per
beneficiary per household. The funds under
the scheme are being utilized for payment of
premium subsidy, honorarium to the Veterinary
Practitioners and publicity campaign for creation
of awareness. 50% of the premium of insurance
is paid by the beneficiary and the rest 50% is
paid by the Government of India.
3.24.3 The list of districts covered under this
scheme is at Annexure-XIV. An amount of
`47.65 crore has been released to States and
10.88 lakh animals have been insured during
2013-14 up to March, 2014.

Chapter 4

DAIRY DEVELOPMENT

Chapter

DAIRY DEVELOPMENT
4.1 The Dairy sector in India has grown
substantially over the years. As a result of
prudent policy intervention, India ranks first
among the worlds milk producing nations,
achieving an annual output of 132.43 million
tonnes of milk during the year 2012-13 as
compared to 127.9 million tonnes in 2011-12
recording a growth of 3.5%. The anticipated
milk production in the country for the year 201314 is about 138 million tonnes. This represents
a sustained growth in the availability of milk
and milk products for growing population.
4.2 Dairying has become an important
secondary source of income for millions of
rural families and has assumed the most
important role in providing employment and
income generating opportunities particularly
for women and marginal farmers. The per
capita availability of milk has reached a level
of 296.5 grams per day during the year 201213, which is more than the world average of
294 grams per day. Most of the milk in the
Country is produced by small, marginal farmers
and landless labourers. About 15.1 million
farmers have been brought under the ambit
of 1,55,634 village level dairy corporative
societies up to March 2013. The cooperative
milk unions have procured an average of 32.8
million kgs of milk per day during the year
2012-13 as compared to 28.7 million kgs in the
previous year recording a growth of 14.3%.
The sale of liquid milk by cooperative sector
has reached 23.7 million litres per day during
the year 2012-13 registering a growth of 3.7%
over the previous year.
4.3 The efforts of the Department in the
dairy sector are concentrated on promotion
of dairy activities including non-operation
flood areas with emphasis on building up
cooperative infrastructure, revitalization of sick
dairy cooperative milk unions and creation of
infrastructure in the States for production of

quality milk and milk products. The National


Dairy Development Board (NDDB) continues
its activities for overall development of Dairy
Sector in Operation Flood areas. The brief
details of Dairy Development Schemes being
implemented by this Department are as
follows:

4.4

Intensive Dairy Development


Programme (IDDP)

4.4.1 The scheme Integrated Dairy


Development Programme (IDDP) in NonOperation Flood, Hilly and Backward Areas
was started in 1993-94 with 100% grantsin-aid basis. The scheme was modified in
March, 2005 and renamed as Intensive Dairy
Development Programme (IDDP) in March,
2005 with the following objectives:


Development of milch cattle


Increase milk production by providing
Technical Inputs services
Procurement,
Processing
and
Marketing of milk in a cost effective
manner
Ensure remunerative prices to milk
producers
Generate additional employment
opportunities
Improve social, nutritional and
economic status of residents of
comparatively more disadvantaged
areas

4.4.2 The scheme has been implemented in


hilly & backward areas and also in the districts,
which had received less than `50 lakh for dairy
development activities under Operation Flood
programme. The projects are implemented
by the State Cooperative Milk Federations/
District Cooperative Milk Unions in view of
their expertise & professionalism and the
funds under the revised scheme are released
C h apter-4

43

Annual Report 2013-14

directly to the implementing agencies. There


is no discrimination of gender and class under
the scheme. (The scheme has been subsumed
under the new scheme titled National
Programme for Bovine Breeding and Dairy
Development approved on 19.12.2013).
4.4.3 Since inception of the scheme, 114
projects have been approved. Out of these,
60 projects are under implementation and 54
projects have been completed. 261 districts
have been covered in 27 States and a UT with
a total cost of `716.40 crore upto 31.03.2014,
including four projects for Special Livestock
Sector and Fisheries Package for the Suicide
Prone Districts in the States of Andhra Pradesh,
Maharashtra, Karnataka and Kerala. A total
sum of `577.88 crore has been released to
the concerned state govt and Milk Union/
Federations for implementation of projects up
to 31.03.2014. These projects have benefited
about 27.90 lakh farmers in 38,817 villages in
various States procuring over 38.91 lakh kgs
of milk per day and marketing milk of about
28.12 lakh litres per day. Milk chilling capacity
of 34.38 lakh litres per day and milk processing
capacity of 42.90 lakh litres per day has been
created under this scheme.

4.5

Assistance to Cooperatives

4.5.1 Assistance to cooperative Scheme was


launched as Central Sector Scheme in January,
2000 with the objective to rehabilitate the sick
dairy cooperatives. It provides grants in aid
on 50:50 sharing basis between Central and
the State Government to loss making Milk
Unions. It has been implemented by NDDB
and the revival plans of the sick Milk Unions
are prepared by NDDB in consultation with the
concerned Milk Union. The rehabilitation plan
is prepared in such a manner that the net worth
of the sick cooperative will become positive
within a period of seven years from the date
of approval. (The scheme has been subsumed
under the new scheme titled National
Programme for Bovine Breeding and Dairy
Development approved on 19.12.2013).
44

Cha p t e r-4

4.5.2 Since inception of the scheme, the


rehabilitation plans for 42 Milk Unions have
been approved at the total cost of `289.64
crore with 50% Central share of `144.81
crore. Out of it, an amount of `127.66 crore
as Central share has been released under the
scheme upto 31th March, 2014. As on March,
2013, the rehabilitation period of seven years
is over with respect to 27 milk unions, out of
these, 8 milk unions have achieved positive net
worth while 6 milk unions are earning profits
but have not yet achieved positive net worth.
13 Milk Unions continue to incur losses and
have negative net worth. Of the remaining 15
Milk Unions, 11 are likely to achieve positive net
worth before completion of the rehabilitation
period of seven years.

4.6

Strengthening Infrastructure
for Quality & Clean Milk
Production

4.6.1 In order to improve the quality of milk


& milk products in Domestic market and to
increase the export of milk products in the

Annual Report 2013-14

International market, the Department had


started a Centrally Sponsored scheme namely
Strengthening Infrastructure for Quality &
Clean Milk Production in October, 2003 with
the following objectives:
i.

To provide infrastructure facilities for


production, testing and marketing
of quality milk & milk products
from farmers level to the point of
consumption

ii.

To create mass awareness by providing


training to the milk producers and
facilities for clean milk production

iii.

To improve the quality of raw milk


produced by installation of Bulk Milk
Coolers at village level milk collection
centres for immediate chilling of raw
milk

4.6.2 The Pattern of funding is 75% Grantsin-aid for all components to profit making
Milk Unions (accumulated profit above `1.00
crore as on 31st March of previous financial
year) and 100% Grants-in-aid for all other Milk
Unions. The scheme has been implemented
through the District Level Coop Milk Unions/
State Level Coop Milk Federations. (The
scheme has been subsumed under the new
scheme titled National Programme for Bovine
Breeding and Dairy Development approved
on 19.12.2013).
4.6.3 Since inception, the Department has
approved 176 projects spread over 22 States
and one UT at a total cost of `346.94 crore
with a Central share of `289.96 crore till
31.03.2014. Out of total 176 projects,
111 projects have been completed and
remaining 65 projects are at various stages
of implementation. An amount of `234.55
crore has been released upto the year 201314 (till 31st March, 2014) for implementation
of approved projects. About 7.24 lakh
farmer members have been trained, 2,271
Bulk Milk Coolers (BMCs) with a total milk
chilling capacity of 47.47 lakh litres installed

and 1,796 existing laboratories have been


strengthened.

4.7

Dairy
Entrepreneurship
Development Scheme

4.7.1 Dairy Entrepreneurship Development


Scheme (DEDS) was launched in September,
2010 with the objective for promotion of
private investment in dairy sector in order to
increase the Milk Production in the country
and helping in poverty reduction through self
employment opportunities. This scheme is
being implemented through NABARD which
provides financial assistance to commercially
bankable projects with loans from Commercial,
Cooperative, Urban and Rural banks with
a back ended capital subsidy of 25% of the
project cost to the beneficiaries of general
category and 33.33% of the project cost to
SC & ST beneficiaries. The cabinet Committee
of Economic Affairs (CCEA) in its meeting held
on 12.12.2013 has approved for continuation
of the scheme with certain modifications and
the budget provision of `1,400 crore during
12th Plan.

4.7.2 Since inception, against the total release


of `724.70 crore, NABARD has disbursed
`677.05 crore as back ended capital subsidy
to the beneficiaries for setting up of 1,86,325
dairy units upto 31st March, 2014.

4.8

National
Programme
for
Bovine Breeding and Dairy
Development (NPBB&DD)

4.8.1 After merger of four ongoing schemes


namely Integrated Dairy Development
C h apter-4

45

Annual Report 2013-14

Programme
(IDDP),
Strengthening
Infrastructure for Quality & Clean Milk
Production (SIQ-CMP), Assistant to Cooperatives
(A to C) and National Project for Cattle &
Buffalo Breeding (NPCBB), a new Scheme titled
National Programme for Bovine Breeding and
Dairy Development (NPBB&DD) has been
launched on 27.02.2014. NPBB&DD has been
provided budgetary provision of `1,800 crore
for implementation during 12th Five Year
Plan. NPBB&DD will have two components
(a) National Programme for Bovine Breeding
(NPBB) and (b) National Programme for
Dairy Development (NPDD). The Scheme has
following objectives:
4.8.2 National Programme for Bovine
Breeding:

To strengthen dairy cooperative


societies/Producers Companies at
village level

(e)

To increase milk production by


providing technical input services like
cattle feed and mineral mixture etc.

(f)

To assist in rehabilitation of potentially


viable milk federations/unions

4.9

National Dairy Plan

4.9.1.1 The National Dairy Plan Phase I (NDP-I),


a central sector scheme with a total outlay of
about `2,242 crore, is implemented by the
National Dairy Development Board through
End Implementing Agencies (EIAs) in 14 major
dairying states with the following objectives:

To bring all breedable females under


organized breeding through Artificial
Insemination or natural service using
germplasm of high genetic merits

To help increase productivity of


milch animals and thereby increase
milk production to meet the rapidly
growing demand for milk

(c)

To conserve, develop and proliferate


selected indigenous bovine breeds of
high socio-economic importance

To help provide rural milk producers


with greater access to the organized
milk processing sector

4.9.1.2 Major Activities being financed under


NDP-I include:

(d)

To provide quality breeding inputs


in breeding tracts of important
indigenous breeds so as to prevent
the breeds from deterioration and
extinction

(a)

To arrange quality Artificial Insemination


services at farmers doorstep

(b)

4.8.3 National Programme


Development:
(a)

46

(d)

for

Dairy

To create and strengthen infrastructure


for production of quality milk including
cold chain infrastructure linking the
farmer to the consumer

(b)

To create and strengthen infrastructure


for procurement, processing and
marketing of milk

(c)

To create training infrastructure for


training of dairy farmers

Cha p t e r-4

Activity

Key Outputs

Production of
High Genetic
Merit (HGM)
cattle and buffalo
bulls

Production of 2,500
HGM bulls
Import of 400 exotic
bulls/ equivalent
embryos

Strengthening
of A and B
graded Semen
Stations

Production of 100
million semen doses
annually in the terminal
year

Pilot Model for


Viable Doorstep
AI delivery
Services

3000 MAITs carrying


out 4 million doorstep
AIs annually by the
terminal year

Ration Balancing
Programme

Coverage of 2.7 million


milch animals in 40,000
villages

Annual Report 2013-14

Activity

Key Outputs

Fodder
Development
Programme

Production of 7,500
tonnes of certified/
truthfully labeled fodder
seed
1350 silage making/
fodder conservation
demonstrations

Strengthening
and Expanding
Milk Procurement
System at Village
level

23,800 additional
villages and 1.2
million additional milk
producers to be covered

Project
Management &
Learning

Monitoring, Learning
and Evaluation system
for collection of
data, its analysis and
interpretation

4.9.1.3 All the 14 major dairying states which


are focus area of NDP-I and Uttarakhand
have complied/committed to a timeline for
compliance to undertake key policy/regulatory
measures to create an enabling environment
for successful implementation of NDP-I.
4.9.1.4 Till March, 2014, 171 sub project
proposals (SPPs) have been approved with a
total outlay of `1,146.63 crore which includes
nine projects of Project Management and
Learning. Out of the total approvals, `991.90
crore would be grant assistance and `154.73
crore would be contributed by the EIAs.
4.9.1.5 The Department of Animal Husbandry,
Dairying and Fisheries (DADF) has released
`266.79 crore for NDP-I till March, 2014, of
which `139.79 crore was received during 201314. Till March, 2014, `204.55 crore has been
released to EIAs for implementation of the sub
projects and undertaking Project Management
and Learning activities.
4.9.2 Animal Breeding Activities
4.9.2.1 To meet the demand for disease free
HGM bulls of different breeds for production
of high quality disease free semen doses,

Progeny Testing (PT) and Pedigree Selection


(PS) programmes are being implemented under
NDP-I. These programmes aim to produce/meet
the entire requirement of HGM bulls for frozen
semen stations across the country by the end
of the project period. Existing semen stations
are also being strengthened to produce high
quality disease free frozen semen doses.
4.9.2.2 Under PT programme, 13 sub projects
from 10 states have been approved which are
expected to make available more than 2,000
bulls to semen stations across the country.
4.9.2.3 For conservation of indigenous breeds
of cattle and buffalo, six sub projects from four
states have been approved for bull production
through PS. These sub projects are expected
to make available about 360 bulls to semen
stations across the country.
4.9.2.4 Nineteen sub projects for strengthening
of semen stations have been approved from
12 states. These semen stations together are
expected to produce more than 85 million
doses per annum by the end of the project.
4.9.2.5 Two sub projects for undertaking pilot
model for viable doorstep AI delivery service has
been approved wherein 4,868 villages would
be covered by 730 Mobile AI technicians. A
proposal to import 2,400 embryos of HF and
Jersey has also been approved.
4.9.3 Animal Nutrition Activities
4.9.3.1 To ensure that milch animals produce
milk commensurate with their genetic potential,
Ration Balancing Programme (RBP) and Fodder
Development Programme (FDP) are being
implemented. Under RBP least cost balanced
ration is formulated at the farmers door step
by the local resource person (LRP) using userfriendly software called Information Network
for Animal Productivity and Health (INAPH),
developed by NDDB using locally available feed
resources. Under fodder development, field
demonstrations of mowers, biomass bunkers,
silage making are being undertaken along
with promotion of certified/truthfully labeled
fodder seeds.
C h apter-4

47

Annual Report 2013-14

4.9.3.2 Under RBP, 34 sub projects have been


approved covering 12 states in which about 11
lakh milch animals in 14,000 villages would be
covered by LRPs.
4.9.3.3 Twenty nine sub projects, approved
under FDP spread across 12 states, provide
support for setting up five new seed processing
plants, one crop residue enrichment and
densification plant, 985 demonstrations for
silage making, 318 demonstrations for use of
mowers and 60 demonstrations for use of biomass bunkers.
4.9.4 Village Based Milk Procurement
System
4.9.4.1 To expand coverage/enable milk
producers have greater market access, village
level infrastructure for milk collection are being
provided to ensure collection of milk in a fair
and transparent manner including support for
Bulk Milk Cooler, Data Processor Based Milk
Collection Unit, Automated Milk Collection Unit,
Milk Cans, Milk Collection Accessories etc.

Tribes and small holders across beneficiaries


and functionaries. During preparation of the
sub projects, necessary consultations and
disclosures are being carried out to identify
environment and social issues and mechanisms
for its enhancement/mitigation.

4.10 Post Operation Flood and


Consolidation of Cooperative
Movement by NDDB
4.10.1 The National Dairy Development Board
(NDDB), set up in 1965, has its headquarters
at Anand (Gujarat). NDDB was declared
an institution of national importance and
a statutory body in 1987. NDDB promotes
plans and organizes programmes for the
development of dairy and other agriculture
based and allied industries along cooperative
lines and also provides assistance in the
implementation of such programmes.

4.9.4.2 The approved 58 sub projects spread


over 12 states are expected to cover more
than 18,000 villages. About 5.4 lakh new
members are expected to be enrolled in these
sub projects.
4.9.5 Training and Capacity Building
4.9.5.1 Various training and capacity building
programmes have been organized for farmers,
field functionaries and EIA personnel to
upgrade the knowledge base and the skill sets
required for the successful implementation
of the sub projects. It is expected that during
the project period about 20 lakh participants
would be trained/oriented under NDP-I. These
training programmes are being organized
either by NDDB or by EIAs.
4.9.6 Environment
Management

and

Social

4.9.6.1 The project also focuses on inclusion


of women, Scheduled Castes, Scheduled
48

Cha p t e r-4

4.10.2 Strengthening the Cooperatives


4.10.2.1 During 2013-14, NDDB continued to
provide technical and financial support to dairy
cooperatives in the areas of strengthening
cooperative
business,
productivity
enhancement, quality assurance, building
dairy infrastructure and for creation of national
information network. Up to 31st March,
2014, plans of about 100 dairy cooperatives
with a total outlay of `2,898 crore had been
approved by NDDB under the Perspective Plan.
Of this, NDDBs financial assistance was to the
tune of `2,329 crore. Due to non-utilization
of the approved financial assistance by dairy

Annual Report 2013-14

cooperatives, the financial outlay approved


under Perspective Plan stands revised to `1,952
crore, of which NDDBs financial assistance is
to the extent of `1,479 crore.
4.10.3 Animal Breeding
4.10.3.1 Subsequent to the launch of NDP-I in
April, 2012, a number of EIAs submitted SPPs
to Project Management Unit (PMU) of NDP-I
for production of HGM bulls of various cattle
and buffalo breeds through PT and PS and for
strengthening of their Frozen Semen Stations
(FSSs).
4.10.3.2 Till date, 13 PT projects for production
of HGM bulls of different breeds have been
approved.
4.10.3.3 SPPs
for
development
and
conservation of Indigenous breeds of cattle
and buffaloes through PS of different breeds
namely, Kankrej, Hariana, Rathi and Gir breeds
of cattle and Jaffarabadi and Pandharpuri
breeds of buffalo which have been approved
would be implemented by Banaskantha
Milk Union, HLDB, URMUL Trust, SAG and
Maharashtra Livestock Development Board
(MLDB).
4.10.3.4 To meet the growing demand of
quality frozen semen for providing quality
AI services, projects for strengthening of 19
A and B graded semen stations have been
approved.
4.10.3.5 To meet the urgent need of bulls of
exotic breeds, viz. Jersey and Holstein Friesian
by various semen stations, it is proposed to
import bulls and embryos for production of
breeding bulls. Four participating agencies
have been identified for production of bull
calves from these embryos. International
Competitive Bidding procedures have been
initiated for import of bulls.
4.10.3.6 Sabarmati Ashram Gaushala, Bidaj,
Animal Breeding Centre, Salon and Rohtak
semen stations managed by NDDB Dairy
Services (NDS) together produced about

191 lakh doses of frozen semen during the


financial year up to 31st March, 2014. During
the same period, the eight dairy cooperative
semen production stations in the country
produced another 141.7 lakh frozen semen
doses (provisional).
4.10.3.7 NDDB organized a workshop where
national and international experts shared
their experiences in implementing breeding
programmes in their respective countries. NDDB
also organized a trainers training programme
on typing of cattle and buffaloes for functional
traits to provide exposure to coordinators of
PT projects on body typing of animals.
4.10.4 Animal
Nutrition
Technology

&

Feed

4.10.4.1 Promotion of bypass protein & fat


supplements, area specific mineral mixtures
and calf starter continued during the year. Two
more mineral mixture plants, each of 12 tonnes
per day capacity, were set up in Shahabad milk
union in Bihar and Sabarkantha milk union in
Gujarat. During the year, one bypass protein
plant of 50 tonnes per day capacity was also
set up in Patna, Bihar for production of bypass
protein supplement.
4.10.4.2 NDDB has formulated a supplement
to reduce the incidence of mastitis, which
when fed daily, four weeks prior to calving, to
high yielding crossbred cows with a history of
clinical and sub-clinical mastitis in the previous
lactation, resulted in reduction of mastitis in
these cows by 80 per cent, as confirmed by
Mastect and California Mastitis Tests.
4.10.4.3 NDDB continued its field studies
in various regions to evaluate the impact of
feeding a nutritionally balanced ration on
enteric methane emission, milk production
and metabolic profile in lactating cows and
buffaloes. Feeding a nutritionally balanced
ration reduced methane emission (gm per kg
of milk yield) by 19 and 13 per cent in cows
and buffaloes, respectively.
C h apter-4

49

Annual Report 2013-14

4.10.4.4 Dairy cooperatives were assisted


to produce about 5,340 tonnes of certified/
truthfully labeled fodder seeds of maize,
sorghum, berseem, lucerne, oats, cowpea,
pearl millet and cluster bean for enhancing
green fodder production. About 9.63 tonnes
of breeder seeds of improved high yielding
varieties of fodder crops were arranged by
NDDB from Indian Council of Agricultural
Research for dairy cooperatives.
4.10.5 Animal Health
4.10.5.1 NDDB has initiated a field pilot project
on brucellosis control to create awareness on
the disease and the control measures to be
adopted by the farmers in suspect cases of
brucellosis. The main components of the project
are: (i) calf hood vaccination of female calves
(ii) identification of vaccinated calves through
ear-tagging, (iii) sero-monitoring (iv) Milk Ring
Test (MRT) to identify positive villages, and (v)
Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT) and ELISA to
identify individual positive animals.
4.10.5.2 The programme is for a period of five
years with a total outlay of `169.06 lakh with
NDDB contributing `104.95 lakh.
4.10.5.3 Till March, 2014, 4,429 cattle and
buffalo calves between 4 to 8 months of age
have been vaccinated since the commencement
of the programme in April, 2013. Data relating
to each vaccinated animal has been captured
in INAPH system.
4.10.6 Research and Development
4.10.6.1 Usefulness of FTA card for safe
transport of clinical samples from field to the
laboratory is being investigated for diagnosis
of brucellosis by real-time PCR. Among various
types of clinical samples genus Brucella could
be identified most frequently from milk samples
when spotted on FTA cards.
4.10.6.2 Bovine Genital Campylobacteriosis
(BGC) is caused by Campylobacter fetus
venerealis (CFV) and Campylobacter fetus
fetus (CFF). A laboratory protocol for cultural
50

Cha p t e r-4

identification of BGC has been standardized. A


real-time PCR has also been designed, which
detected DNA from reference strains of CFF and
CFV. The assay is under further evaluation for
detecting the organism in clinical specimens.
4.10.6.3 To support diagnosis of Bluetongue
(BTV) infection in cattle, a nested RT-PCR
targeting the highly conserved NS1 gene of the
virus has been standardized on the lines of the
OIE protocol. The test has been validated with
five serotypes of BTV (Serotypes 1, 2, 10, 16
and 23) and with a positive plasmid construct
harboring the target gene (NS1).
4.10.6.4
A
Loop-mediated
isothermal
amplification (LAMP) assay for detection of
Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (BHV-1)
from bovine semen is being validated targeting
gB and gC gene of the virus which can detect
the virus in the semen of IBR sero-positive bulls.
Sensitivity and specificity of the assay is under
evaluation.
4.10.6.5 The laboratory continued to provide
diagnosis for bovine brucellosis, bovine
tuberculosis, paratuberculosis, IBR and BGC.
Screening of extended bovine semen from IBR
sero-positive bulls for BHV-1 by real-time PCR
has also been regularly undertaken.

4.10.7 Quality Assurance


4.10.7.1 NDDB assists dairy cooperatives
and producer institutions through suitable
technological and capacity building interventions
for improving their operations aimed at
ensuring quality and food safety of milk and
milk products.

Annual Report 2013-14

4.10.7.2 NDDB also participates in the


development process of appropriate food
regulations and other regulatory matters
relevant to dairy sector at the national and
international level.

4.10.9.2 NGC operations continue in Andhra


Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Punjab. Collectively,
they are procuring about 8 lakh litres per day
from 1.4 lakh milk producers spread across
about 4,500 villages.

4.10.8 Milk Procurement and Marketing

4.11 Details of funds allocated


and utilized under Dairy
Development Schemes

4.10.8.1 During 2013-14, the average milk


procurement by dairy cooperatives was about
344 lakh kg per day (provisional) as compared
to about 335 lakh kg per day during the
same period last year, registering an increase
of 2.6 per cent. During the same period, the
cooperatives marketed an average of about
247 lakh litres of milk per day (provisional)
as against about 238 lakh litres per day,
registering a rise of about 3.8 per cent over
the corresponding period last year.
4.10.9 New Generation
(NGC) initiatives

` in Crore

Sr. No.

Fund
Utilized

11th plan

582.00

571.82

12th plan (for


Year 2012-13)

543.30

522.35

12th plan (for


Year 2013-14)

570.00
(BE)/516.14
(RE)

498.88

Cooperatives

4.10.9.1 The two producer Companies namely


Paayas and Maahi, incorporated last year,
collectively operate in around 3,000 villages
and procure on an average more than 9 lakh
kg per day from about one lakh members out
of which 15 percent are women members
and 54 percent are small holder milk producer
members. Together they a have paid up share
capital of about `32 crore subscribed by their
members and are likely to have a combined
turnover of about `1,300 crore for 2013-14.
They have also initiated supply of cattle feed
& area specific mineral mixture to the milk
producers.

Fund
Allocation

4.12 Creation
facility

of

Milk

Chilling

4.12.1 The Prime Minister Office is monitoring


the creation of Cold Chain infrastructure in
Agriculture including Dairy Sector on monthly
basis. Based on the information collected
from various State Government/ State Milk
Federation, milk chilling capacity of 1,705 TLPD
against the target of 1,500 TLPD was created
during the year 2012-13 and an additional
Milk Chilling capacity of 1,844 TLPD has been
created against the target of 1,750 TLPD during
the year 2013-14 in Cooperative dairy sector.

4.13 Deficit Monsoon and its Impact


on Dairying
4.13.1 The impact of deficit monsoon on
livestock sector will be manifested in many
forms, such as: scarcity of crop residues and
other feed ingredients because of reduced
crop production and increasing crop failure;
decline in reproductive efficiency; increase
in incidences of animal diseases particularly
viral and protozoan in animals in milk and
decline in milk production. Reproductive
C h apter-4

51

Annual Report 2013-14

efficiency among breedable bovines decline


substantially due to deficiency of green
fodder and quality concentrates. The decline
in milk production and reproductive efficiency
will be highest in crossbred cattle followed
by buffaloes.

4.14 Milk Situation in the Country


4.14.1 Price trend
4.14.1.1 The yearly inflation rate of milk (base
year 2004-05=100) as on March, 2014 was
9.47% as against 4.42% in the previous year.
Most State Milk Federations and Metro Dairies
have increased the procurement and selling
price of milk over the last one year and the
average increase is about `4.02 per litre and
`3.73 per litre respectively. The increase in
price is attributed to the increase in input cost
of milk production.

4.15 Delhi Milk Scheme (DMS)


4.15.1 Delhi Milk Scheme (DMS) was set
up in 1959 with the primary objective of
supplying wholesome milk to the citizens
of Delhi at reasonable prices as well as
for providing remunerative prices to milk
producers. The initial installed capacity of
Delhi Milk Scheme was for processing /
packing of 2.55 lakh litres of milk per
day. However in order to meet increasing
demand for milk in the city, the capacity
was expanded in phases to the level of 5.00
lakh litres of milk per day. The Department
has developed a web site http://dms.gov.in
for use by related users.

4.14.2 Steps taken to increase availability of


milk in the country
4.14.2.1 The measures taken in relation to milk
during last two years are as under:
i)

ii)

iii)

52

Ministry of Commerce vide its


notification No.31(RE2012)/20092014, dated 04.02.2013 has
exempted the export of processed
and/or value added agricultural
products from any restriction/ ban
even in the event of restriction/ ban
on the export of basic farm produce
including milk products viz. casein
& casein products (HS code 3501),
butter and other fat derivatives from
milk, dairy spread etc. (HS 0405) and
Cheese & curd (HS Code 0406)
Department of Revenue vide its
Notification
No.30/2013-Customs,
dated 21.05.2013 had decided to
continue the waiver on import of oil
meals
Department is regularly monitoring the
milk situation in the country through
review meetings held bi-monthly

Cha p t e r-4

4.15.2 I.S.O.22000-2005 &


2004 - Certification

I.S.O.14001-

4.15.2.1 DMS has been awarded ISO 220002005 Certification (Raw milk procurement,
processing, packaging, storage & distribution
of liquid milk and milk products) valid
up to 05.05.2015 and ISO 14001 - 2004
certification (Environmental Management
System) valid up to 30.03.2016 by M/s IRQS,
Mumbai.
4.15.3 Procurement of Milk
4.15.3.1 Delhi Milk Scheme has been procuring
raw/fresh milk from the State Dairy Federations
of the neighboring States of Punjab, Haryana,
U.P. Rajasthan and Bihar and from the Cooperative Societies/ Producers Companies &
other companies. The details of Milk procured

Annual Report 2013-14

supplies Milk to about 172 Institutions such


as Hospitals, Government Canteens, Hostels
and Defence Units etc. In addition, DMS also
supplies milk to the consumers through milk
distributors.

by DMS from 2010-11 to 2013-14 is indicated


below:
(In lakh Kgs)
Year

Total Qty. of
milk procured

Average/
per day

2010-11

792.05

2.17

2011-12

870.13

2.38

2012-13

1077.60

2.95

2013-14

485.32

1.33

4.15.4.3 The milk booths are allotted to


Ex-servicemen, retired Government/SemiGovernment servants, physically handicapped
persons, widows, unemployed persons.
4.15.5 Performance /Capacity Utilization
4.15.5.1 The sale of DMS and custom
packing of Mother Dairy milk by DMS taken
together has reached 2.73 lakh litres per day
(LLPD) (Upto October, 2013). The custom
packing of Mother Dairy milk has been
discontinued with effect from 01.11.2013
and custom packing for Bihar Federation has
been started with effect from 12.12.2013.
The cost of production of milk is as given
below:

4.15.4 Production and Distribution of Milk


4.15.4.1 Delhi Milk Scheme is processing liquid
Milk (Full Cream, Toned and Double Toned)
and manufacturing value added milk products
like Yoghurt, Ghee, Butter, Paneer, Chhach
and Flavored Milk for the supply to the citizens
of Delhi.
4.15.4.2 DMS has a network of over 1,056
outlets (including All Day Milk Stalls). The DMS
Year

Capacity
Utilization (%)

Milk Sale (lakh


litres)

Variable cost
(` per litre)

Fixed cost
(` per litre)

Total cost
(` per litre)

2009-10

73.10

1,332.77

19.86

3.05

22.91

2010-11

65.20

1,183.49

21.75

3.24

24.99

2011-12

62.00

1123.62

27.08

3.40

30.48

2012-13

60.20

1096.92

25.52

3.60

29.12

2013-14

54.00

973.28

30.70

4.25

34.95

4.15.6 Financial Outlay


4.15.6.1 Expenditure on all head of accounts
including the expenditure on inputs like raw milk,
SMP, Butter, Butter Oil etc. and capital items is
made from consolidated fund of Government
of India through annual budget allocation of
Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Animal

Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries. Sale proceeds


of milk and milk products are credited to the
revenue account of the Government.
4.15.6.2 The details of funds allocated and
expenditure incurred during 2012-13 and
2013-14 are given below:
(` in Crore)

2012-13
Head / Scheme
I. NON-PLAN
II. PLAN
(including Civil/
Electrical works)

2013-14

B.E.

R.E.

Expenditure
incurred

370

366.64

340.83

451.05

371.40

Expenditure
incurred
(Prov.)
323.35

2.00

2.00

1.56

10.00

3.65

2.70

B.E.

R.E.

C h apter-4

53

Annual Report 2013-14

4.15.7 Reduction in the Staff Strength of


DMS

4.15.8.2 Imparting Computer training to


DMS Employees

4.15.7.1 In pursuance of the instructions


issued by Ministry of Finance to down size
the Government machinery and to reduce the
administrative expenses, DMS has reduced its
working Staff strength from 837 to 779 as on
31.03.2014.

4.15.8.2.1 DMS employees have been imparted


Computer training in batches of 20 persons
for 20 working days by engaging an outside
training agency and around 300 employees
have been imparted the computer training.

4.15.8 Upgradation and Modernization of


DMS plant
4.15.8.1 Presently, the Dairy plant is
processing about 2.75 lakh litres of milk per
day. During the current financial year 201314, the Ammonia Diffusers, 4 TPH Boiler, 60
KL Milk Silo, Poly pack Machines for milk and
Chhach packing, 750 KVA Transformers and
Atmospheric Ammonia Condensers have been
installed. The present capacity utilization of
DMS is about 54%. Efforts are being made
to utilize its capacity by increasing the sale of
milk and milk products leading to reduction in
losses.

54

Cha p t e r-4

2.2.9 Corporatization of DMS


2.2.9.1 The activities of DMS are purely
commercial in nature and therefore, in order
to run it as a commercial entity and make
it financially viable, the Union Cabinet has
given in principle approval to the proposal
for corporatization of DMS. After completion
of all formalities, the Department of Animal
Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries has prepared
a comprehensive proposal for consideration
of the Union Cabinet. The same would be
submitted to the Cabinet after formation of
the new Government.

Chapter 5

FISHERIES

25.00

Growth
h (%) in FFish Prod
duction

20.00

25.00

5.1

20.00

Growth Rate

15.00
10.00

Chapter

OVERVIEW of Indian FISHERIES

5.00

Growth
h (%) in FFish Prod
duction
Introduction
0.00

Growth Rate

5.1.1 Constituting about 5.4% of the global


2003-04 2004
4-05 2005-06
6 2006-07 20
007-08 2008-0
09 2009-10 20
-5.00
fish
production,
India
today
is
the
second
15.00
largest fish producing nation in the world.
-10.00
India is also a major producer of fish through
10.00
Year
aquaculture and ranks second in the world
Marine
Inland
Total
after China. The total fish production during
5.00
2012-13 (provisional) is at 9.04 million tonnes
(MT) with a contribution of 5.72 MT from5.1.3 The secto
or contribu
utes about 1 percent to
o the overalll GDP and
d 4
0.00
inland
sector and 3.32 MT from marine sectorGD
DP. Fish pro
oducts also
o form a significant co
ommodity for overseaas
2003-04 2004
4-05 2005-06
6 2006-07 20
007-08 2008-0
09 2009-10 2010-11 2011
1-12 2012-13
3
respectively.
Chapt
C
ter
5
exp
port aggreg
gated to 9,2
28,215 tonnees in volum
me and valued at `18,,85
-5.00
dominated fisheries to a scenario where inland
gro
owth
of 13.66% over prev
fiscal.
5.1.2
The
fish
production
has
shown
a
OVE RVIEW OF
F IND IAN FISHE
F
ERIES
S
fisheries
has emerged vious
as a major
contributor
consistent
increase
since
1990-91.
From
to
the
overall
fish
production
in
the
country.
-10.00
5.1 3.84
Inttroduction
n
Year
5.1
.4
The
his
storical
scen
nario
of
In
ndian
fisheeries revealls a paradiig
MT in 1990-91, the fish production has As seen in the following figure, inland fisheries
5.1.1 Consstituting abo
out 5.4% of the global ffish producttion, India today is the second larg
gest fish
presentlyfish
has
a share
in total
fishffisheries haas emerged as
increased
9.04
MT
2012-13.
growth
inure
dom
minated
heries
to a scenario
s of 63.3%
wh
here
inland
a
fish
throug
producing
g nation in the
t to
world.
I
India
is also
oin
a major
producer
p
ofThe
gh aquacultu
and
Marine
Inland
Total
ranks seco
ond in the world
w
after China.
C
The total fish prroduction during
d
2012--13 (provisiional) is production of the country.
fish production, however, has shown
a cyclical
thee overall fissh productio
on in the country.
c
As seen in th
he following
g f
at 9.04 milllion tonness (MT) with a contributtion of 5.72 MT from in
nland sectorr and 3.32 MT
M from
marinepattern
secctor respecttively.
with an increasing long term trend. Apreesently has a share of 633.3% in totaal fish produ
5.1.5 Within inland fisheries, there is a shiftuction of thee country.
5.1.2 The fish
f
producction has sho
own a conssistent increase since 19
990-91. From
m 3.84 MT in
i 1990been
in ini marine
5.1.3 91,The
or
contribu
utes
1he growth
percent
to
o
thefrom
overal
ll GDP
and
d to
4.6%
of th
he agricultu
MTabout
in 2012-13.
theconstant
fisshsecto
producti
ongrowth
has
incrreasedhas
to
9.04
2observed
Th
fish prod
duction,
capture
fisheries
aquaculture
during ural
however, has shown a cyclical pattern
p
with
h an increassing long teerm trend. A constant growth
sector
since
2008-09.
GD
DP.has Fish
pro
oducts
form a significant co
ommodity for overseaas trade. Du
uring 2012--13,
been observed
o
in
marine secttor also
since o
200
08-09.

0-91 crorre recording


Fish Production
(Million
Tonnes)
exp
port aggreg
gated
to 9,2
28,215
tonne
es in volum
me and valued at 1990
`18,,856.26
g a
FISH
H PRODUC
CTION (MIILLION TO
ONNES)
10 6% over prev
gro
owth of 13.6
vious fiscal. 9.04

201
12

8.23

9
8

5.66nario
5.1.4 The his
storical scen
of In
ndian fisheeries revealls400.%a paradiigm shift from marin
ne
6
5
3.84
dom
minated 4fish
heries
to a scenario
s
wh
here inland ffisheries haas emerged as
a a major
c Marine to
60% contributor
thee overall 3 fissh productio
on in the country.
c
As seen in th
he following
g figure, inllandInland
fisheriies
2
1
preesently has
a share of 633.3% in tota
al fish produ
uction of thee country.

Production (MT)
( )

63.30
0%

0
1990-91

2000-0
01

2010-11

2012-13

Year

1990
0-91
201
12-13
5.1.3 The sector
contributes
about 1 percent5.1.5 Within in
nland fisher
ies, there is a shift from
m capture fissheries to aq
qu
to the overall GDP and 4.6% of the agriculturaltwo
o and a halff decade. Frreshwater aquaculture
a
with a sharre of 34 perrce
GDP. Fish products also form a significantmid
d-1980s hass increased to about 80
8 percent iin recent yeears. It has em
commodity for overseas trade. During 2012pro
oducing sysstem in Indiaa36.70%
as a resultt of the goveernmental initiatives
i
taak
13, export
to 9,28,215 tonnes
40
0.% aggregated
55
deccades. Fish
h Farmers Developme
D
ent Agenciees (FFDAs)) were set u
in volume and valued at `18,856.26 crore
Marine
63.30
0%
p
off technologiies, practices, training
g and exten
ns
Marine dellivering a package
60% over previous
recording a growth of 13.6%
Inland
ancial assisstance to th
he beneficia
aries. So farr 429 FFDA
As function
nin
fiscal.
Inland fina
5.1.4 The historical scenario of Indian
fisheries reveals a paradigm shift from marine

5
56

C h apter-5

nland fisheries, there is a shift from


m capture fissheries to aq
quaculture during the last
l
5.1.5 Within in
o and a halff decade. Frreshwater aquaculture
a
with a sharre of 34 perrcent in inlaand fisheriess in
two
mid
d-1980s hass increased to about 80
8 percent iin recent yeears. It has emerged as
a a major ffish

57

Annual Report 2013-14

the last two and a half decade. Freshwater


aquaculture with a share of 34 percent in inland
fisheries in mid-1980s has increased to about
80 percent in recent years. It has emerged
as a major fish producing system in India as
a result of the governmental initiatives taken
during the past three decades. Fish Farmers
Development Agencies (FFDAs) were set up
in each district for delivering a package of
technologies, practices, training and extension
and for providing financial assistance to the
beneficiaries. So far 429 FFDAs functioning in
the country have brought about 0.65 million ha
of water area under fish farming and reached
out to 1.1 million beneficiaries and imparted
training to about 0.8 million. Currently, the
average annual yield is around 2.9 tonnes/ha.

5.2

5.2.3 Reservoirs, which are largely untapped


in India, have great potential for development
of fisheries. Reservoir Fisheries Development
is therefore a thrust area of the Department.
By promoting technologies like cage culture,
the productivity of the reservoirs can be

Thrust areas

5.2.1 It has been observed that inland fishery


today is dominated mainly by the freshwater
fishery. In order to enhance production, there
is a need for diversification of fish production
in other areas like integrated fish farming,
cold water fisheries, riverine fisheries, capture
fisheries, brackish water fisheries etc. The recent
measures therefore have targeted Intensive
Aquaculture in ponds and tanks through
integrated fish farming, carp polyculture,
freshwater prawn culture, running water fish
culture and development of riverine fisheries.
5.2.2 Expansion of area under aquaculture
has to become an important option to boost
fish production. In this context, derelict water
bodies could be immensely useful and could be
an important source to boost fish production
for meeting the future fish demand of the
country. There are about 1.3 million hectares
of beels and other derelict water bodies in
the countries. Coastal Orissa for instance, is
endowed with large areas of unutilized water
bodies like derelict canals and drains. Similarly,
Brahmaputra basin of Assam has enormous
beels lying idle. Bringing these water bodies
into the ambit of fisheries will boost fish
production tremendously and hence, expansion
58

of fisheries in these water bodies is one of the


focus areas of the Department for increasing
fish production.

Cha p t e r-5

Beel fishery in Assam

enhanced manifolds. Due to large initial


investment, this technology has so far not
been successfully implemented in India as has
been done in countries like China. The States of
Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh have successfully
developed the cage culture technology by
availing assistance under the schemes of the
Department.
5.2.4 The Government recognizes the need
for availability of quality seed and feed, if the
growth in inland fish production has to be
sustained in the long run. As per estimates, the
total fish seed required for optimal stocking in
the existing ponds, new ponds and reservoirs
is about 48,000 million fry. As against this,
the current seed production is about 34,900
million fry. Thus, there is a gap of about
13,000 million fry. Setting up of brood banks
and hatcheries across the country is a priority
area for the Department.
5.2.5 Responsible aquaculture and prevention
and management of aquatic diseases, organic
farming and induced breeding are some of the
other challenges to be addressed in this sector
for improving productivity.

Annual Report 2013-14

Cage Culture in Chhattisgarh


Cage Culture in medium water bodies was
started in Chhattisgarh in 2012-13 with the
assistance availed under National Mission for
Protein Supplements (NMPS). A battery of 4
cage unit consisting of 48 cages at Saroda
Sagar and Kshirpani reservoir of Kabirdham,
Ghongha Reservoir of Bilaspur, Dudhava
Saroda Sagar Reservoir, Chhattisgarh
Reservoir of Dahmtari district are established
in Chhattisgarh. These cages are of dimension 6m x 4m x 4m. Pangesius fish seed are cultured
in cages. Production has started in these cages. The average size of Pangesius fish have been
in the range of 1.00-1.20 kg. Production of fish in one cage (72 m3) has been 3.5 MT, which is
projected at 4 to 5 M.T. per cage next year. 150 members of 4 societies are engaged in these
cages for Pisciculture. Expenditure involved per cage is about `2,10,000 and the current profit
is `70,000.

5.3

On-going Schemes on Fisheries


of the Department:

5.3.1 Development of Inland Fisheries and


Aquaculture
5.3.1.1 The Centrally Sponsored Scheme
on Development of Inland Fisheries and
Aquaculture is being implemented through the
State Governments/UTs. The scheme covers
all the inland fishery resources available in the
country in the form of fresh water, brackish
water, cold water, water logged areas, saline/
alkaline soils for aquaculture and capture
fisheries including reservoirs. This scheme has
the following seven different components:

Development
of
Freshwater
Aquaculture
Development of Brackish water
Aquaculture
Coldwater Fisheries and Aquaculture
Development of Waterlogged Areas
Productive Utilization of Inland Saline/
Alkaline soils for Aquaculture
Integrated Development of Inland
Capture Resources (reservoirs/rivers
etc)
Innovative Projects

5.3.1.2 Since the inception of the scheme,


8,69,661 hectares of freshwater bodies and

45,702 hectares of brackish water bodies have


been developed till 31.3.2014 benefitting
14,66,737 and 39,496 fishers respectively.
During 2013-14, 22,000 hectares of freshwater
bodies and 2,100 hectares of brackish water
bodies have been developed benefitting
26,000 fishers and 2,400 fishers respectively.
As against RE of `33 crore, a sum of `31.03
crore was spent under the scheme during
2013-14.
5.3.2 Development of Marine Fisheries,
Infrastructure and Post-Harvest
Operations
5.3.2.1 The Department has continued to
extend financial assistance for the development
of marine sector and for improving the
socio-economic conditions of the traditional
fishermen. The scheme has three major
components viz., Development of Marine
Fisheries, Development of Infrastructure
and Post Harvest Operations and Innovative
activities. Various components of the schemes
are as follows:
5.3.2.2 Development of Marine Fisheries

Motorization of Traditional Craft


Safety of Fishermen at Sea
C h apter-5

59

Annual Report 2013-14

Fishermen Development Rebate on


HSD Oil

provided. The scheme is being operated with


the following four components:

Introduction of Intermediate Craft


of Improved Design including prototype study of new intermediate vessel
design

Development of Model Fishermen


Villages - provides for low cost hoses
to Below Poverty Line fishermen

Establishment and operation of Vessel


Monitoring System

Group Accident Insurance for Active


Fishermen

Saving-cum-Relief-provides
financial
support to fishermen during fishing
ban period

Training & Extension

Promoting
fuel
efficient
and
environment friendly fishing practices

Management of Marine Fisheries

5.3.2.3 Development of Infrastructure and


Post Harvest Operations

Establishment of Fishing Harbours and


Fish Landing Centres

Strengthening
Infrastructure

Assistance for maintenance, dredging


of fishing harbours and fish landing
centres

of

Post

Harvest

5.3.2.4 During 2012-13, 2,370 crafts were


motorized, 8 minor fishing harbours and
one fish landing centre was constructed, 27
infrastructure and marketing projects were
approved and 1,400 safety kits were distributed
to fishermen. During 2013-14, 6,260 crafts
were motorized, 14 fish landing centres and 6
minor harbours was approved for construction,
27 infrastructure and marketing facilities were
approved and 500 safety kits were distributed
to fishers.
5.3.3 National Scheme for Welfare of
Fishermen
5.3.3.1 Under the scheme, National Scheme
for Welfare of Fishermen, basic amenities such
as housing, drinking water, construction of
community hall and tube wells are provided
for fishermen in their fishing village. Insurance
coverage is also provided to fishermen
engaged actively in fishing. Financial assistance
to fishermen during lean fishing season is also
60

Cha p t e r-5

5.3.3.2 During 2013-14, 7,744 fishermen


houses have been approved for construction,
43,25,692 fishers provided insurance cover
under Group Accident Insurance component
and 3,57,308 fishers provided relief under
Saving-cum-Relief component. An expenditure
of `52.14 crore was incurred under the scheme
during 2013-14 as against RE of `55 crore.
5.3.4 Strengthening of Database and
Geographical Information System
for Fisheries Sector
5.3.4.1 The Central Sector Scheme
Strengthening of Database and Geographical
Information System for Fisheries Sector, with
an outlay of `65.00 crore is being implemented
with 100% central assistance during twelfth
Five Year Plan. The Scheme consists of
following components: a) Sample Survey
for Estimation of Inland Fishery Resources
and their Potential, b) Census on Marine
Fisheries, c) Catch Assessment Survey for
Inland and Marine Fisheries, d) Development
of GIS, e) Development of database of fishery
cooperatives of India, f) Mapping of smaller
water bodies and development of GIS based
fishery management system, g) Strengthening
of Statistical Unit at Headquarter, h) Evaluation
Studies/Professional services and i) Monitoring,
Control and Surveillance (MCS).
5.3.4.2 During the 11th Five Year Plan, GIS
based mapping of water bodies for 14 States

Annual Report 2013-14

were completed. During 2012-13, mapping


of water bodies for Uttar Pradesh has been
completed by CIFRI and E-Atlas thus prepared
has been sent to the State Government for
use. E-Atlas work for Chhattisgarh has also
been completed during 2013-14. Besides this,
Mapping of Smaller Water Bodies in the State
of West Bengal has also been completed.
Data regarding Primary Fisheries Co-operative
Societies for the year 2012 has been finalized.
5.3.5 National Fisheries Development
Board (NFDB)
5.3.5.1 National Fisheries Development Board
(NFDB) was set up in September, 2006 with
its headquarter at Hyderabad to realize the
untapped potential of fisheries sector in inland
and marine fish capture, culture, processing
& marketing of fish and overall growth of
fisheries sector with the application of modern
tools of research & development including
biotechnology for optimizing production and
productivity from fisheries. The activities o f
the Board are focused towards increasing
the fish production and productivity in the
country to enhance the export of fish and fishery
products and to provide employment to more
than 3.5 million persons by extending assistance
to various agencies for implementation of
activities. It also acts as platform for publicprivate partnership for fisheries.
5.3.5.2 Some of the important objectives of
NFDB include sustainable management and
conservation of aquatic resources, creation
of employment opportunities, to improve
production, processing, storage, transport and
marketing of fish products, to apply modern
tools of research and development including
biotechnology for optimizing production and
productivity from fisheries, to train manpower
and to enhance contribution of fishery towards
food and nutritional security. During 2013-14,
a total amount of `123.36 crore was released
to the States /UTs and other user agencies for
implementation of NFDB schemes.

5.3.5.3 During 2013-14, an amount of


`1,657.98 lakh has been released to 19 States
for implementation of various activities like
construction/renovation of fish ponds, supply
of inputs for setting up of 28 hatcheries and
192.05 ha of fish seed rearing units. Two
Technology upgradation projects viz., (i) Risk
and benefit assessment of an illegally introduced
fish species paccu-Piaractus brachypomus
in India, (ii) Aquaculture extension towards
enhancing fish productivity and fish farmer
livelihood in Cauvery delta region in 66.72
ha and 3 innovative projects viz., (i) Gender
Intensive Pisciculture program for development
of 66.72 ha water area through women SHGs/
individual in Baksa district of Assam, (ii) Paddy
cum Pisciculture in 561.75 ha in Manipur and
Nagaland and (iii) Pisciculture through pens in
12.50 acre area of river Mahanadi in Odisha
were undertaken.

5.3.5.4 An amount of `5,163.22 lakh was


released to 20 States for establishment of
3 processing units, modernization of 34
wholesale fish markets, setting up of 11
modern fish retail markets, setting up of
15 retail outlets, 583 mobile fish vending
vehicles to fishers, organizing 19 fish festivals,
one model fish dressing and fish handling
centre, 2 technology up-gradation projects
viz., (i) Retort pouch packaging of thermal
processed fishery products of Konkan region
in Maharashtra and (ii) Solar freezers for
storing fresh fish by women venders of
Godavari Maha Samaikya, Andhra Pradesh.
NFDB also imparted training to 1,520 fishers
C h apter-5

61

Annual Report 2013-14

on various aspects of hygienic fish handling,


value addition and marketing.

Mobile Fish Van being promoted by NFDB

Fish market at Nellore, AP

5.3.5.5 During 2013-14, NFDB spent an


amount of `383.50 lakh towards training of
20,277 farmers/fishers in various aspects of
inland, hygienic marketing, coastal and marine
fisheries and 1,459 fishery professionals on
advances on disease diagnosis and fish health
management, hygienic markets, sanitation
and hygienic practice during handling and
transportation of fish and shellfish, moving
towards sustainability, seaweed farming,
seed production technology of Asian Seabass
(Lates calcarifer), soil and water quality
management for sustainable fish culture. An
amount of `547.62 lakh was released towards
modernization of 2 fishing harbours in Tamil
Nadu and Kerala; 4 fish landing centers in Tamil
Nadu and Odisha and construction of floating
barge with dispensing units for supply of
diesel to fishing boats in Maharashtra. Mobile
fish transportation vans are being promoted

by NFDB. During 2013-14, an amount of


`906.70 lakh was released to 13 States for
purchase of 583 mobile fish transport vehicles
(384 Numbers of two wheelers, 48 Numbers
of three wheelers and 151 Numbers of four
wheelers).
5.3.5.6 During 2013-14, an amount of
`2,697.34 lakh was released to 15 States
towards seed stocking in 288 reservoirs
covering an area of 2.14 lakh ha, development
of wet lands, beel fisheries, cage culture in
reservoirs, conservation and promotion stream
fisheries and enhancement of fish production
through raceways in Nagaland.

Cage Culture promoted by NFDB

Hygienic Retail Fish Market in Karnataka

62

Cha p t e r-5

5.3.5.7 Through the National Freshwater Fish


Brood Bank (NFBB) established at Bhubaneswar,
about 52,000 brooder seeds of Jayanthi
Rohu and Mino Carps have been supplied to
Government Fish Seed Farms in various States.
About 7,000 brooder seeds of other common
carps were also supplied to States.

Annual Report 2013-14

5.4

Fisheries Institutes

5.4.1 Central Institute of Fisheries,


Nautical and Engineering Training
(CIFNET)
5.4.1.1 Advancements in deep sea fishing
necessitated great demand for qualified and
certified personnel for manning the fishing
vessels. Considering the need and importance
of organized fisheries training system at national
level, Central Institute of Fisheries, Nautical and
Engineering Training (CIFNET) was established
in 1963 at Cochin by the Ministry of Agriculture,
Government of India. Later, two more units were
established at Chennai and Visakhapatnam.
Since its inception, CIFNET is serving the nation
by creating trained manpower required for
manning the ocean going fishing vessels.
5.4.1.2 The institute conducts various courses
including (i) Bachelor of Fisheries Science
(Nautical Science) approved and affiliated by
Cochin University of Science & Technology,
Kochi recognized by UGC. (ii) Two Trade courses
(Vessel Navigator Course & Marine Fitter Course)
of duration of 2 years, approved by Ministry
of Labour, affiliated to National Council for
Vocational Training (NCVT) and (iii) short term
training programmes for the benefit of students
from professional colleges, sister organizations,
fisheries departments of the State Governments
etc.
5.4.1.3 During 2013-14, 79 students of BFSc
(NS) and 156 trainees of VNC/MFC attended
the regular courses. In addition, 648 candidates
were trained in various short term and extension
courses. There were 3 candidates in Statutory
Course. Training vessels of CIFNET have carried
out a total of 422 fishing days thereby achieving
4,013 Institutional and 4,477 Post Institutional
trainee days. During 2013-14, CIFNET has trained
a total of 891 trainees involving 536 days out at
sea and 4,013 training days.
5.4.1.4 During the year 2012-13, CIFNET
incurred an expenditure of `11.33 crore, while
an expenditure to the tune of `5.8325 crore was

incurred during 2013-14. As against revenue of


`42.9 lakh during 2012-13, `65.38 lakh was
earned during 2013-14.
5.4.2 National Institute of Fisheries Post
Harvest Technology and Training
(NIFPHATT)
5.4.2.1 Realizing the need for extending
the activities of developing post harvest
technologies along the upper east coast, the
Government of India decided to set up a unit of
Integrated Fisheries Project at Visakhapatnam.
The Integrated Fisheries Project was renamed
by the Government of India in 2008 as National
Institute of Fisheries Post Harvest Technology &
Training (NIFPHATT).
5.4.2.2 The current mission of NIFPHATT is to take
up the new challenges and opportunities in the
fisheries sector such as post harvest technology
upgradation and dissemination, human resource
development, gender development, relief and
rehabilitation programmes for the fishermen
communities and consultancy in fisheries
infrastructure and post harvest technology.
5.4.2.3 During 2012-13, the institute has
processed 158.35 MT of fish and made 106.78
MT of different fishery products from it. The
institute test marketed and popularized 107.13
tonnes of fish and fish product valued at `111.91
lakh, through stalls, mobile units, exhibitions,
trade fairs, contract sales etc. NIFPHATT imparted
training to a total of 665 trainees in various
disciplines with 9,560 trainee days. The training
programmes fetched revenue of `5.16 lakh to
the institute. During 2013-14, 113.25 MT of
fish was processed and produced 81.89 tonnes
of various fishery products from it and 101.53
MT of fish was marketed. NIFPHATT provided
training to 777 trainees with 8,125 trainee days
during the period.
5.4.2.4 Expenditure to the tune of `211.17 lakh
under Plan and `509.52 lakh under Non-Plan
was incurred during the year 2012-13. During
2013-14, `492.38 lakh was incurred on Non
Plan and `194.15 lakh under Plan.
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Annual Report 2013-14

5.4.3 Fishery Survey of India


5.4.3.1 Fishery Survey of India (FSI) is responsible
for survey and assessment of marine fishery
resources of the Indian EEZ with its headquarters
at Mumbai. The FSI has six operational Bases
at Mumbai, Mormugao and Kochi along the
West Coast, Chennai and Visakhapatnam along
the East Coast and Port Blair in the Andaman
& Nicobar Islands. A total of 11 ocean ongoing
survey vessels are deployed for fisheries resources
survey and monitoring. Besides the resources
surveys, the FSI monitors the fishery resources
for the purpose of regulation and management,
make an assessment of suitability of different
types of craft and gear for deep-sea and oceanic
fishing, imparting in-vessel training to CIFNET
trainees, disseminates information on fishery
resources through various media to the fishing
community, industry, other end users, etc. The
survey fleet of the institute undertakes bottom
trawl survey, mid-water/columnar resources
survey and long line survey for demersal,
columnar and oceanic tunas/oceanic sharks
respectively.

5.4.3.2 As a part of extension activities and


dissemination of information to the fishing
industry, fishermen, stake holders and the endusers of fishery on the finding of exploratory
resource surveys, Fishery Survey of India had
organized 5 regional workshops in Murud-Janjira,
Maharashtra; Malim Jetty, Goa; Neil Island,
South Andaman; Puducherry and Jamnagar,
Gujarat. About 504 fishermen benefited by their
active participation in the workshops.
5.4.3.3 Fishery Survey of India in collaboration
with the National Fisheries Development Board
(NFDB), Hyderabad organized few onboard
64

Cha p t e r-5

training programmes on Monofilament/


multifilament tuna longlining operated for the
benefit of fishermen. So far, 21 fishermen from
different maritime States were trained on the
latest technologies of tuna longlining onboard
the vessels MFV Matsya Vrushti (Mumbai Base
of FSI), Yellowfin (Mormugao Base of FSI), MFV
Matsya Drushti (Chennai Base of FSI) and MFV
Blue Marlin (Port Blair Base of FSI).

5.4.3.4 Besides, Fishery Survey of India jointly


with NFDB, provided training to 82 officials
by conducting four training programmes at
Chennai, Kochi, Mangalore and Mormugao
to serve as the ambassadors of sustainability
during the period under report. The participants
include officials from State Government,
scientists/officers/researchers from Indian
Council of Agriculture Research, Central Marine
Fisheries Research Institute, Central Institute of
Fisheries Technology, MPEDA, Central Institute
of Fisheries Nautical Engineering & Training,
National Institute of Oceanography, Goa
University, KUFOS, CUSAT and MSSRF.
5.4.3.5 During 2012-13, `28.47 crore was
incurred on Plan and `9.44 crore on Non Plan,
while during 2013-14, `31.5 crore was spent by
FSI for Plan and `7.91 crore on Non Plan for
undertaking various activities.
5.4.4 Central
Institute
of
Coastal
Engineering for Fishery (CICEF),
Bangalore
5.4.4.1 The Central Institute of Coastal
Engineering for Fishery (CICEF) was established
in January, 1968 under technical and manpower
assistance from the Food and Agriculture

Annual Report 2013-14

Organization (FAO) of the United Nations


Development Programme (UNDP). The main
objectives of establishing this Institute were to
identify potential fishery harbour sites existing
all along the coastline of the Country for the
development of fishery harbours, to undertake
engineering and economic investigations for
the selected fishery harbour sites and prepare
techno-economic feasibility reports (TEFR) for
the development of Fishing Harbours and Fish
landing Centres, Brackish water shrimp farms
and hatchery projects.
5.4.4.2 The Institute, till the end of March,
2014, has carried out engineering and economic
investigations at 87 sites and prepared Techno
Economic Feasibility Reports (TEFR) for 85
sites for the development of Fishery Harbours/
Fish Landing Centres. This Institute has also
reconnoitered about 66,200 ha of brackishwater
area and engineering investigations were carried
out over 15,600 ha in all the Maritime States
and Union Territories for the development of
aquaculture farms.
5.4.4.3 During 2013-14, the Institute conducted
economic investigations at Hejamadi Kodi
proposed fishery harbour and engineering
investigations for development of fish farming
centres at Arikemedu (Thengithittu), Periakalapet
and Nallavadu in Puducherry region of UT
of Puducherry. Further, pre-feasibility studies
were conducted for Arikemedu (Thengithittu),
Periakalapet and Nallavadu in Puducherry region
and T.R. Pattinam in Karaikal region of UT of
Puducherry and pre-feasibility reports were issued.
Also, pre-feasibility studies for development of
fish landing centres at Vodarevu, Juvvaladinne,
Uppada, Rallapeta and Manchineelapeta in
Andhra Pradesh, fishery harbours at Nigaon in
Maharashtra and Navabunder and Madhwad
in Gujarat were undertaken. TEFRs for the
development of fishery harbours at Kulai and
Hejamadi Kodi in Karnataka were issued. Further,
the Institute conducted a post-evaluation study
for Paradip fishery harbour in Odisha. This
Institute also prepared technical appraisals
for construction of breakwater at Gangolli
fishery harbour in Karnataka; fishery harbours

at Madhwad and Naavabunder in Gujarat;


proposed fishery harbours at Malim, Chapora,
Cutbona and Cortalim in Goa and proposed fish
landing centre at Navapada in Maharashtra.
The Institute undertook project monitoring visits
for the fishery harbour sites at Poompuhar,
Nagapattinam, Colachel and Chinnamuttom in
Tamil Nadu.
5.4.4.4 During 2012-13, `270.95 lakh was
incurred by CICEF on Non-Plan, while `262.85
lakh has been incurred during 2013-14. There is
no allocation of funds under Plan for the Institute
during 2012-13 as well as for 2013-14.
5.4.5 Coastal
(CAA)

Aquaculture

Authority

5.4.5.1 The aims and objectives of the Authority


are to regulate coastal aquaculture activities in
the areas notified by the Central Government
as coastal areas and for matters connected
therewith or incidental thereto. The Authority
is empowered to make regulations for the
construction and operation of aquaculture farms
in coastal areas, registration of aquaculture
farms and hatcheries, inspection of farms
and hatcheries for Litopenaeus vannamei to
ascertain their environmental impact, removal or
demolition of coastal aquaculture farms which
cause pollution, fixing standards for all coastal
aquaculture inputs, viz., seed, feed, growth
supplements, chemicals etc. used in coastal
aquaculture in order to facilitate environmentally
responsible and socially acceptable coastal
aquaculture for the socio-economic benefits of
the various stakeholders involved in the activity.
5.4.5.2 The major responsibility of the Coastal
Aquaculture Authority is to ensure registration
of all kinds of coastal, brackish and saline
aquaculture farms and hatcheries engaged or
going to be engaged in seed production and
farming of saline and brackish water shrimp,
fish and other aquatic organisms in the country
within the notified area i.e. within two kilometers
from the High Tide Line of the seas, creeks, rivers
and backwaters. Registration is mandatory for
all existing farms, new farms as well as for farms
that may be renovated for taking up coastal
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Annual Report 2013-14

aquaculture activities in future. Registration is


valid for a period of five years, which can be
renewed from time to time for a like period.

farms to take up L. vannamei farming and in


the inspection and monitoring of the farms and
hatcheries for the sustainable development of
this venture.

L Vennamei

5.4.5.3 Coastal Aquaculture Authority has been


authorized, vide Notification dated 15th October,
2008, issued by the Department of Animal
Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries, Ministry of
Agriculture under the Livestock Importation Act,
1898, (as amended by Livestock Importation
Act, 2001) to grant permission for importing
broodstock of SPF L. vannamei and to grant
approvals for seed production in biosecured
hatcheries and farming in biosecured farms.
5.4.5.4 By the Coastal Aquaculture (Amendment)
Rules, 2009, Guidelines were issued for
regulating hatcheries and farms for introduction
of SPF L. vannamei. These Guidelines contain
the criteria for application to breed L. vannamei,
the technical requirements, procedures for
production and sale of SPF L. vannamei seeds
and specific norms and regulations for approval
and operation of farms.
5.4.5.5 To facilitate smooth operations by
the hatchery operators and shrimp farmers,
Government of India came out with further
amendments to the CAA Rules, 2005 through
a Notification in March, 2012 by permitting
import of SPF juveniles of L. vannamei up to 10g
for rearing to adult broodstock, sale of nauplii
among the permitted hatcheries and for shifting
culture of one species to another after adequate
dry out period. This Notification also strengthens
the inspection process to deal with unauthorized
seed production and farming of L. vannamei
through destruction of the unauthorized stock
by the Inspection Team of CAA.
5.4.5.6 Coastal Aquaculture Authority is following
these Guidelines in permitting hatcheries and
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Cha p t e r-5

Effluent Treatment System (ETS) in a Hatchery

5.4.5.7 A total of 27,338 shrimp farms with total


farm area of 45,309.89 ha (WSA 30,926.75 ha)
have been registered since inception (December,
2005) till March, 2014, out of which, 1329
farms with total farm area of 2,341.82 ha (WSA
1,357.13 ha) were registered during the current
year (April, 2013 March, 2014). Besides, the
registration certificates of a total of 381 farms
with total farm area of 1038.48 ha (WSA 756.59
ha) were renewed by the Authority for a further
period of 5 years.
5.4.5.8 A total of 117 SPF L. vannamei
hatcheries with production capacity of 8,776
million seeds were approved/ renewed for
importing broodstock of SPF L. vannamei from 9
broodstock suppliers short-listed by CAA during
the year. A total of 70,208 pairs of broodstock
were approved by the CAA for import during
the current year.
5.4.5.9 After scrutinizing the applications
received from the farmers, 903 SPF L. vannamei
farms with total farm area of 9,145.16 ha
(WSA 6,160.40 ha) were registered since
commencement of the programme (August2009) till March, 2014, out of which, 101 SPF
L. vannamei farms with a total area of 715.94
ha (WSA 442.76 ha) were registered during
the current year (April, 2013-March, 2014) for
culturing SPF L. vannamei.
5.4.5.10 A total of 30 visits were made by the
Inspection Team to unapproved hatcheries on

Annual Report 2013-14

receipt of complaints regarding illegal seed


production of L. vannamei.
5.4.5.11 Four awareness programmes were
conducted during the year, one at Valsad District
of Gujarat on 6th August, 2013 and three in East
Godhavari District of Andhra Pradesh, in which,
170 farmers and State Fisheries officials of these
States participated. During the programmes, Main
content of CAA Act, 2005 relevant to Farming,
Aims, Objectives, Powers and Functions of CAA,
Antibiotic Residues, Responsible Aquaculture
and Guidelines for regulating hatcheries and
farms for introduction of SPF L. vannamei were
explained and handouts in vernacular languages
were distributed.
5.4.5.12 In order to achieve the goal of
sustainable aquaculture, 2 public notices were
issued to create awareness among shrimp
farmers and hatchery operators on the need
to register farms and hatcheries with CAA
and the importance of bio security and good
culture practices in farms and hatcheries. The
importance of renewal of CAA registration for
continuing coastal aquaculture and the need
for specific approvals of SPF L. vannamei seed
production and farming from CAA and on
disease surveillance were highlighted in the
Public Notice.
5.4.5.13 The water quality monitoring laboratory
established in the Technical Section of CAA at
Vepery is equipped with instruments such as
GC-MS, CHNSO Analyzer, Spectrophotometer,
Nitrogen Keltec-Distillation Unit, Multi-parameter
water quality sondes, Millipore titration system,
BOD Incubator, COD Analyser, etc. to monitor
the quality of waste water discharged from
the ETS of hatcheries and farms to ensure that
the water quality parameters conform to the
standard specified by CAA in its guidelines.

5.5

fishers involved in fishing and allied activities.


Accordingly a Central Sector Scheme (CSS)
on Issuance of Biometric ID Cards to Marine
Fishermen at a total cost of `72 crore was
launched by the Department on 11th December,
2009. The project on issuance of Biometric
ID cards involves two major activities such as
(a) data collection and authentication by the
respective States/UTs and (b) digitization of
data, capturing of biometric details of individual
fisher, production and issuance of cards. Under
this scheme, the Government of India provides
100% financial assistance to the Coastal States
and Union Territories (UTs), besides meeting the
entire cost of consultancy. Main objective of this
project is to create a National Marine Fishers
Database (NMFD), which could be accessed to
by all authorized agencies both in the Central
and coastal States/UTs. Other objectives of this
project are to empower marine fishers through
issuance of application oriented biometric ID
card and to eliminate duplication of different
cards issued by various coastal States and UTs.
5.5.2 A consortium of three Central Public Sector
Undertakings (CPSUs) led by Bharat Electronics
Limited (BEL), Bangalore has been entrusted
the tasks of data digitization, capturing of
biometric details and other works relating to
design, production and issuance of Biometric
ID Cards to marine fishers. Other two members
of consortium are the Electronics Corporation
of India Limited (ECIL), Hyderabad and Indian
Telephone Industries Limited (ITI), Bangalore.

Issuance of Biometric Identity


Cards to Marine Fishers

5.5.1 In the backdrop of the terrorist attacks


in Mumbai on 26th November, 2008, the
Government of India felt it is necessary to
issue Biometric Identity Cards to marine

5.5.3 Under this scheme, a sum of `33 crore has


been released during 2009-2010 comprising `8
crore to the Coastal State Governments and UTs
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Annual Report 2013-14

and the remaining `25 crore to the consortium


of CPSUs. No funds were released during 201011 to 2013-14.
5.5.4 Out of 18,12,011 fishermen identified for
issuance of biometric ID card, data collection &
digitization in respect of 16,15,315 fishermen
have been completed. Till January, 2014, at
total of 11,25,237 ID cards were produced and
out of which, 11,21,814 cards were dispatched
to the States/UTs for distribution to the card
holders. The project is under implementation
in all 9 coastal States and 4 UTs to cover more
fishers.

5.6

International Cooperation in
Fisheries

5.6.1 Besides its active involvement in the


fisheries developmental initiatives of FAOs
Committee of Fisheries (COFI) and its SubCommittees, India is associated with various
other global and regional bodies dealing with
fisheries such as Commission for International
Trade on Endangered Species (CITES), Indian
Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC). Among the
regional fisheries management initiatives, India
hosts the eight-member Bay of Bengal Large
Marine Ecosystem (BOBLME) programme in
Chennai, the first phase of which has been
completed. Another four country regional
initiative, namely the Bay of Bengal Programme

First Meeting of the Joint Working Group (JWG)


between Bangladesh and India at Dhaka on March
12-13, 2014

68

Cha p t e r-5

- Inter-governmental Organization (BOBP-IGO) is


also hosted by India and is situated in Chennai.
Fisheries issues are also actively debated in other
regional forums such as SAARC, BIMSTEC-EC,
IOR-RC etc. in which India is a member. India
is partner in a number of bilateral assistance
programmes for development of fisheries.
During 2013-14, following major meetings were
held:
a)

First Meeting of the Joint Working


Group (JWG) between Bangladesh and
India on Cooperation in the field of
Fisheries was held in Dhaka, Bangladesh
on March, 12-13.

b)

Meeting with Technical Team from


Ministry of Fisheries, Government of
Republic of Mozambique was held in
New Delhi on 7.3.2014. The technical
team also visited Fishery Survey of
India (FSI), Mumbai, Central Institute
of Fisheries Education (CIFE), Mumbai
and Central Marine Fisheries Research
Institute (CMFRI), Kochi, Kerala.

c)

Meeting between Honble Agriculture


Minister and Dr. Rajitha Senaratne,
Minister of Fisheries and Aquatic
Resources Development, Government
of Sri Lanka was held on 15.1.2014 at
New Delhi.

d)

Joint Working Group (JWG) Meeting


between India and Norway was held in
New Delhi on 6th January, 2014.

e)

India hosted Ninth Meeting of the


Governing Council (GCM-9) of the Bay of
Bengal Programme - Inter Governmental
Organization (BOBP-IGO) held at New
Delhi during 16-17 December, 2013.

f)

India hosted the Asia-Pacific Fishery


Commission (APFIC) Seventy-Fourth
Session of the Executive Committee
(ExCo) held at New Delhi during 22-27
May, 2013.

Chapter 6 to 9

TRADE MATTERS
SPECIAL COMPONENT
PLAN (SCP) AND TRIBAL
SUB-PLAN (TSP)
EMPOWERMENT OF
WOMEN
INTERNATIONAL
COOPERATION

Chapter
TRADE MATTERS
6.1

Introduction

6.1.1 After the removal of Quantitative


Restrictions (QRs) on various livestock
products, the Department amended the
Livestock Importation Act, 1898 bringing
all the livestock products under its purview
for the purpose of regulating their import.
Accordingly, Notifications No. 655(E) dated,7th
July,2001 for livestock products, No.1043(E)
dated 16.10.2001 for fishery products and No.
1175(e) dated 27.11.2001 for Grand Parent
stock of poultry had been issued making it
mandatory to import livestock products against
Sanitary Import Permit( SIP). On 28.03.2008
vide Notification No.794 (E), the Department
has further amended the Notification No.655(E)
dated, 7.07.2001 whereby it has categorized
the livestock products requiring Sanitary Import
Permit (SIP) , the products that may be cleared
on the basis of No Objection from the Animal
Quarantine and Certification Services and the
products which require neither SIP nor No
objection. The SIP is issued after conducting a
risk analysis on the basis of disease situation of
the exporting country vis-avis disease situation
of this country.

6.2

Procedure for Imports

6.2.1 A Committee on Risk Analysis has been


constituted under the Chairmanship of Joint
Secretary (Trade) with all the Joint Secretaries
as its members to consider the applications
received for issuance of Sanitary Import Permit
(SIP) to import various livestock products. The
application form for the import of livestock
and fishery products is available on the website
(www.dahd.nic.in) of the Department. The
applications received are examined and a
risk analysis is undertaken by the technical
experts of the Department on the basis of
scientific evidence and OIE regulations. The
recommendations of the technical experts are
considered by the Risk Analysis Committee for
either rejecting the application or issuance of

SIP. Aggrieved applicant can seek a review of the


decision of the Risk Analysis Committee through
filing a review/representation addressed to
Joint Secretary (Trade). The meeting of the
Committee is held at 10 to 15 days interval in
every month. 19 meetings of the Committee
have been held during the year 2013-14. The
Unit issued 1658 Sanitary Import Permits during
the year 2013-14 to various firms/organizations
to enable them to import various livestock
products, including Fisheries products.
6.2.2 This Department also processes the
proposals for import/export/ manufacturing/
marketing of livestock and livestock related
commodities including vaccines, drugs & biological
received from various State Governments /firms/
organizations. The views of the Department
on these proposals are communicated to the
Directorate General of Foreign Trade (DGFT)/
Drugs Controller of India (DCI) for issuance of
necessary import license in favour of concerned
State Governments/firms/Organizations after
considering the same by a Committee on Trade
& Investment Matters. The Committee on Trade
& Investment Matters also meets under the
Chairmanship of Joint Secretary (Trade) with all
the Joint Secretaries as its members.
6.2.3 The meeting of the said committee is
held at 10 to 15 days intervals in every month.
21 meetings of the Committee were held during
the year 2013-14 and 300 numbers of No
Objection Certificates were issued in favour of
various firms/Organizations as well as to various
State Governments for the year 2013-14.
6.2.4 The Department has put in place a
system of submission of on-line applications for
issuance of Sanitary Import Permit to various
firms/Organizations engaged in activities of
import of livestock and livestock products.
The procedure for applying on-line for SIPs is
available on Departments website www.dahd.
nic.in along with application form and other
relevant information.
C h apter-6

71

Chapter

Scheduled Castes Sub-PLAN (SCSP) AND TRIBAL


SUB-PLAN (TSP)
7.1
The Department is implementing
various Central Sector and Centrally
Sponsored Schemes, mainly aimed at
strengthening the infrastructure of the State
Governments for the development of animal
husbandry, dairying & fisheries sectors. Most
of the schemes are not directly beneficiaryoriented. A large population of the country
belonging to the Scheduled Castes, Scheduled
Tribes, other weaker sections of the society
and women are engaged in activities in the
livestock and fisheries sectors. As a corollary,
the various schemes implemented by the
Department benefit these sections of the
society. However, the Department is not
maintaining a record of people belonging
to Scheduled Cates, Scheduled Tribes and
women benefiting from these schemes.
Keeping in view the nature of the schemes,
the
State
Governments/Implementing

72

Chapter-7

Agencies have also not been maintaining


such a record.
7.2
As per the guidelines issued by the
Planning Commission vide D.O. letter No.N11016/12(1)/ 2009-PC dated 15.12.2010 to
earmark 16.2% of funds under Scheduled
Castes Sub Plan (SCSP), the Department has
earmarked `309 crore in 2012-13 under
different schemes/programmes under SCSP
component. Against this, `230.68 crore had
incurred under different schemes in 201213. In the current financial year 2013-14, the
Department has earmarked `328.05 crore
under different schemes/programmes under
SCSP component.
7.3
The Department had been exempted
for earmarking of funds under Tribal Sub Plan
(TSP).

Chapter
EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN
8.1

Women in Animal Husbandry


& Dairying

8.1.1 The Department does not have any


specific scheme designated for empowerment
of women. However, the Department has
always emphasized on providing benefits to
women engaged in animal husbandry, dairying
& fisheries.
8.1.2 In the Animal Husbandry sector, men
and women work hand in hand with certain
activities like feeding the animals, milking of
animals etc. mostly performed by women.
However, role of both men and women are
complementary in the field of animal husbandry
and it is not possible to segregate the functions
into specific grouping.
8.1.3 Women have been at the fore-front
of dairy cooperative movement, which was
initially carried under the Operation Flood
Programme and later also under the Integrated
Dairy Development Programme implemented
by the Government.
8.1.4 In the poultry sector, the rural backyard
poultry is an income supplementing scheme
mostly implemented by women, priority in
training should be given to women.
8.1.5 Similarly, in the scheme for conservation
of breeds, the conservation of sheep, goat and
small ruminants are oriented in such a way that
women are being identified to take up such
schemes.

8.1.6 Women are actively involved in allied


fisheries activities like fish seed collection,
fishing of juvenile fishes, collection of mussels,
edible oysters, sea weeds, fish marketing, fish
processing and product development etc.
Training and micro finance are provided to
encourage and organizing them into groups
and capacity building which are the thrust
areas for enhancing their involvement and
participation in the fishery sector.
8.1.7 Schemes/Programmes implemented
by the Department have been beneficial to
women. All the States/Union Territories have
been requested to maintain record in this
regard.
8.1.8 A Gender Budget Cell is constituted
in the Department with the objective of
influencing and effecting a change in the
Ministrys policies, programmes in a way that
could tackle gender imbalances, promote
gender equality and development of women.
The Cell is headed by Joint Secretary (APF)
with three members. The Department has
not earmarked any specific funds for women
component, it is advising States/Implementing
Agencies for utilizing about 10 to 30% of
funds for livestock owned by women under
the existing Centrally Sponsored/Central
Sector schemes from 2013-14 onwards for
Empowerment of Women. Based on the
feedback received, the earmarking of funds
for Empowerment of Women will be increased
accordingly.

Chapter-8

73

Chapter

INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
9.1

International Memberships

9.1.1 The
Department
of
Animal
Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries, is
a regular member of the following
International Organizations related to
Animal Health and Fisheries and is paying
annual membership contribution to these
organizations:-

74

a)

Office International des Epizooties


(OIE), Paris, France.

b)

Indian Ocean Tuna Commission


(IOTC), Seychelles - an organization
under FAO.

c)

Animal Production and Health


Commission for the Asia and the

Chapter-9

d)

e)

9.2

Pacific (APHCA), Bangkok, Thailand an organization under FAO.


Bay
of
Bengal
Project/Inter
Governmental Organization (BOPPIGO) on Fisheries.
International Dairy Federation (IDF),
Belgium.

Deputation/Trainings/
Workshops abroad attended
by Officers

9.2.1 During the year 2013-14, 104


officers besides MOS (A&FPI) were deputed
abroad till 31.03.2014 for attending
various meetings/ seminars/ conferences/
trainings/ workshops etc.

Chapter 10

SPECIAL LIVESTOCK SECTOR


AND FISHERIES PACKAGE FOR
THE SUICIDE PRONE IDUKKI
AND KUTTANAD DISTRICTS IN
THE STATE OF KERALA

Chapter

10

SPECIAL LIVESTOCK SECTOR AND FISHERIES


PACKAGE FOR THE SUICIDE PRONE IDUKKI AND
KUTTANAD DISTRICTS IN THE STATE OF KERALA
10.1 The Government of India had
approved Rehabilitation Packages Mitigation
of Agrarian Distress in Idukki District in
the State of Kerala on 20/11/2008. The
packages namely, Mitigation of Agrarian
Distress in Idukki District and Development
of Kuttanad Wetland Eco-system were part
of Special Livestock Sector and Fisheries
Package for the Suicide-prone Districts in
the States of Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra,
Karnataka and Kerala which was already
ended on 30th September 2011. The total
outlay of Mitigation of Agrarian Distress in

76

Cha p t e r-1 0

Idukki District was `91.15 crore and that


of Development of Kuttanad Wetland Ecosystem was `9.50 crore. The two packages
were ended in November, 2013 and July,
2012 respectively. An amount of `8.04 crore
has been released for Kuttanad package and
`55.05 crore has been released for Idukki
package till 30th November, 2013.
10.2
Out of an amount of `63.09 crore
released during 2008-09 to 2013-14, `8 crore
was released during 2013-14 under Idukki
Package.

Chapter 11

Results Framework
Document (RFD)

Annual Report 2013-14

Chapter

11

Results Framework Document (RFD)


11.1 Ever since the introduction of the
concept of RFD in the year 2009, to measure
the performance of ministries/departments
of Government of India, the Department
of Animal Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries
(DAHD&F) has been preparing the RFDs
every year and placing them on its website
for greater transparency and public scrutiny.
The RFD of the Department for the year 201213 is enclosed herewith. The achievements
of the Department for the year 2012-13 are
also given after the RFD. The RFDs for the
Department are available on the website of
the Department.

78

Cha p t e r-1 1

11.2 The performance of the Department


against the targets set to fulfill its objectives
has been very impressive over the years as
evidenced from the following composite
scores awarded by High Powered Committee
(HPC) headed by the Cabinet Secretary:
Year Score
2010-11

92.91%

2011-12

80.27%

2012-13

95.48%

Annual Report 2013-14

Results-Framework Document of Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying


and Fisheries (2012-13)
Section 1: The Vision, Mission, Objectives and Functions
Vision: Sustainable growth of livestock, poultry and fisheries for nutritional security and economic
prosperity.
Mission: Preserve animal genetic resources, conserve indigenous breeds, protect, strengthen
and improve livestock and fish health, create employment opportunities, increase production,
productivity and value addition of livestock, fish and poultry products.
Objectives:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.

Prevention and Control of animal diseases


Development of Fodder & feed
Increase fish production & provide assistance to fishermen
Increase milk production and provide assistance to farmers
Development of Poultry
Development of small ruminants
Genetic upgradation of live stock
Development & conservation of indigenous breeds

Functions:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.

Monitoring of animal health and control of animal diseases


Enhance production of livestock products
Creating clean milk infrastructure
Maintain census of livestock population
Delivery of breed improvement services
Distribution of vaccines
The Department is responsible for matters relating to livestock production,
preservation, protection and improvement of stocks, dairy development, fishing
& fisheries. Advise the State Governments/Union Territories in the formulation
of policies and programmes in the field of animal husbandry, dairy development
and fisheries. The main focus of the activities is on: (a) Development of requisite
infrastructure in States/UTs for improving animal productivity (b) Promoting
infrastructure for handling, processing and marketing of milk and milk products
(c) Preservation and protection of livestock through provision of health care (d)
Strengthening of Central livestock Farms for development of superior germplasm
(e) regulate (through Sanitary Import Permits) import of livestock and livestock
products, establish animal quarantine centres and issue certification and health
protocols (g) formulate welfare schemes.

Chapter-11

79

80

Cha p t e r-1 1

14.00

14.00

18.00

2. Devlopement of
fodder & feed

3. Increase fish
production &
provide assistance
to fishermen

Weight

1. Prevention and
Control of animal
diseases

Objective

3.3 Development of
marine fisheries

3.2 Welfare measures &


input subsidy

3.1 Construction of new


ponds and renovation of
existing ponds

4.50
1.80

Area in
ha
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.

3.1.2 Ponds renovated


2.2.1 Extension of
insurance scheme
3.2.2 Construction of
houses
3.2.3 Impart training
for post harvest activities
3.2.4 Supply safety kits
to fishermen
3.3.1 Number of crafts
motorized

1.80

1.80

1.80

1.80

4.50

Area in
ha

3.1.1 New ponds


constructed

2.00

7.00

2.00

2.00

10.00

Weight

5.00

2.3.1 Area of grassland


developed

2.3 Development of
grassland & grass reserves

No.

No.

No.

No.

No. in
Million

Unit

Area in
ha

2.2.1 Number of
Programmes Conducted

2.2 Conduct training


programmes

1.3.1 Number of samples


collected

1.3 Collection of samples


for surveillance against
important diseases
2.1.1 Fodder seed
Production in Quintals

1.2.1 Number of
Veterinarians trained

1.2 Improvement in the


efficiency of veterinary
professionals

2.1Production of high
yielding fodder Varieties

1.1.1 Number of
vaccinations done

Success

1.1 Immunization against


important diseases

Action

5000

1000

4000

5000

4000000

18000

8000

1000

170

30000

185000

500

4500

900

3600

4500

3600000

16200

7200

900

153

27000

160000

450

270

90%

100%
300

Very
Good

Excellent

4000

800

3200

4000

3200000

14400

6400

800

136

24000

140000

400

240

80%

Good

3500

700

2800

3500

2800000

12600

5600

700

119

21000

120000

350

210

70%

Fair

Target/Criteria value

Section 2: Inter se Priorities among Key Objectives, Success Indicators and Targets

3000

600

2400

3000

2400000

10800

4800

600

102

18000

100000

300

180

60%

Poor

Annual Report 2013-14

8.2.2 Total number of


animals covered under
the scheme

8.2.1 Number of
threatened breeds
brought under the
conservation programme

8.2 Development &


conservation of other
threatened breeds

5.00

8. Development
& Conservation of
Indigenous breeds

8.1.1 Number of animal


brought under the
recording programme

7.2.1 Number of bull


calves distributed

7.2 Production &


distribution of elite bull
calves
8.1 Development &
conservation of bovine
breeds

7.1.1 Number of
artificial insemination
performed

7.1 Breed improvement


through production and
distribution of quality
semen straws

5.00

No.

1.25

1.25

2.50

No.

2.50

4.00

200

100000

350

60

1950

5.00

4000

132

22000

80000

2.50

No.

90%

180

90000

315

56

1755

72000

3600

129

19800

1350

100%
1500

Very
Good

160

80000

280

54

1560

64000

3200

128

17600

1200

80%

Good

140

70000

245

52

1365

56000

2800

127

15400

1050

70%

Fair

Target/Criteria value
Excellent

5.00

3.75

3.75

3.75

3.75

Weight

No.

No. in
million

No.

6.1.1 No. of farms to


be assisted

7. Genetic
upgradation of
livestock

No. in
thousands

5.2.1 Number of stock


produced

5.2 Production of
improved stock by state
farms
6.1 Strengthening of
State sheep/goat farms

No.

5.1.1 Number of
persons to be assisted

5.1
Rural backyard
poultry development

4.00

No.

4.4.1 No. of person


trained

4.4 Imparting Training

6. Development of
small ruminants

No in
MMT

4.3.1 Enhancement in
production of milk

4.3 Increasing production


and productivity of
livestock

10.00

No.

4.2.1 Improvement/
expansion of Dairy units

4.2 Through self


employment scheme
by providing loans to
entrepreneurs

5. Development of
poultry

No in
TLPD

Unit

4.1.1 Creation of
chilling capacity

Success

4.1 Establish chilling (bulk


milk cooling) units

Action

15.00

Weight

4. Increase milk
production and
provide assistance
to farmers

Objective

120

60000

210

50

1170

48000

2400

126

13200

900

60%

Poor

Annual Report 2013-14

Chapter-11

81

82

Cha p t e r-1 1

3.00

6.00

4.00

* Administrative
Reforms

* Improving
Internal efficiency/
responsive/service
delivery of Ministry/
Department

Weight

* Efficient
functioning of the
RFD system

Objective

Independent Audit of
implementation of Public
Grievance redressal
system

Date

On time submission

Timely preparation of
Departmental Innovation
Action Plan (IAP)

Date

Date

Unit

Independent audit of
implementation of
Citizens Charter

Area of operation
covered

Implement ISO 9001 as


per the approved Action
Plan

Implementation of
Sevottam

% of implementation

On time submission

Timely submission of
result
Implement mitigating
strategies for reducing
potential risk of corruption

On time submission

Success

Timely submission of draft


for approval

Action

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

1.0

2.0

Weight

100

100

01-052013

100

100

01-052012

05-032012

90

90

02-052013

95

95

03-052012

06-032012

90%

100%

80

80

03-052013

90

90

04-052012

07-032012

80%

Good

70

70

06-052013

85

85

05-052012

08-032012

70%

Fair

Target/Criteria value
Very
Good

Excellent

60

60

07-052013

80

80

06-052012

09-032012

60%

Poor

Annual Report 2013-14

*Mandatory Objective(s)

* Ensuring
compliance to
the Financial
Accountability
Framework

Objective

2.00

Weight

0.5

0.5

0.5

Percentage of ATRs
submitted within due
date (6 months) from
date of presentation of
Report to Parliament by
PAC off during the year.

Percentage of
outstanding ATNs
disposed off during the
year.

Percentage of
outstanding ATRs
disposed off during the
year.

Early disposal of pending


ATNs on Audit Paras of
C&AG Reports presented
to Parliament before
31.3.2012.
Early disposal of pending
ATRs on PAC Reports
presented to Parliament
before 31.3.2012.

Timely submission of ATRs


to the PAC Secretariate
PAC Reports.

Weight

0.5

Unit

Percentage of ATNs
submitted within due
date (4 months) from
date of presentation of
Report to Parliament by
CAG during the year.

Success

Timely submission of ATNs


on Audit Paras of C&AG

Action

100

100

100

90

90

90

90

90%

100%
100

Very
Good

Excellent

80

80

80

80

80%

Good

70

70

70

70

70%

Fair

Target/Criteria value

60

60

60

60

60%

Poor

Annual Report 2013-14

Chapter-11

83

84

Cha p t e r-1 1

3. Increase fish
production
& provide
assistance to
fishermen

2. Development
of fodder & feed

1. Prevention
and Control of
animal diseases

Objective

3.2 Development of marine


fisheries

3.2 Welfare measures & input


subsidy

Area in ha

3.2.1

Number of crafts motorized

No.

1338

No.

3.2.4

Supply safety kits to fishermen

No.
No.

Construction of houses

3.2.2

13938

6062

1691.50

170

29116

185000

500

310

Actual
Value
for FY
10/11

3.2.3 Impart training for post


harvest activities

No.

3.2.1 Extension of insurance scheme

Ponds renovated

3.1.2

Area in ha
Area in ha

2.3.1 Area of grassland developed

2.3
Development of grassland
& grass reserves

No.

3.1.1 New ponds constructed

2.2.1 Number of Programmes


Conducted

2.2 Conduct training programmes

3.1 Construction of new ponds and


renovation of existing ponds

4.1.1 Fodder seed Production in


Quintals

2.1 Production of high yielding


fodder Varieties
No.

No.

1.3.1

1.3 Collection of samples for


surveillance against important
diseases

Number of samples collected

No.

1.2.1 Number of Veterinarians


trained

1.2 Improvement in the efficiency


of veterinary professionals

No. in
Million

Unit

1.1.1 Number of vaccinations done

Success Indicator

1.1 Immunization against


important diseases

Action

9060

14500

6500

887

196

26308.12

194625

2620

372.50

Actual
Value for
FY 11/12

Section 3: Trend Values of the Success Indicators

5000

900

3600

4500

3600000

18000

8000

1000

170

30000

185000

500

300

Target
Value for
FY 12/13

5000

18500

8200

1200

180

30000

185000

500

300

Projected
Value for
FY 13/14

5000

18500

8300

1400

180

30000

185000

500

300

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

Annual Report 2013-14

7.1.1 Number
of
insemination performed

7.2.1 Number
distributed

7.2 Production & distribution of elite


bull calves

of

bull

calves

artificial

No. of farms to be assisted

7.1 Breed improvement through


production and distribution of
quality semen straws

6.1.1

7. Genetic
upgradation of
livestock

State

of

6.1
Strengthening
sheep/goat farms

6. Development
of small
ruminants

Number of stock produced

improved

5.2
Production of
stock by state farms

poultry

5.2.1

No.

5.1.1 Number of persons to be assisted

5.1
Rural
development

backyard

No.

No. of person trained

4.4.1

4.4 Imparting Training

5. Development
of poultry

No in
MMT

4.2.1 Enhancement in production of


milk

5.2 Increasing production


productivity of livestock

and

4.2.1 Improvement/expansion of Dairy


units

4.2 Through self employment


scheme by providing loans to
entrepreneurs

No.

No. in
million

No.

No. in
thousands

No.

No in TLPD

4.1.1 Creation of chilling capacity

4.1 Establish chilling (bulk milk


cooling) units

Unit

4. Increase milk
production
and provide
assistance to
farmers

Success Indicator

Action

Objective

51

2912

Actual
Value
for FY
10/11

54

3800

Actual
Value for
FY 11/12

315

60

1755

72000

4000

129

19800

1350

Target
Value for
FY 12/13

62

4250

Projected
Value for
FY 13/14

64

4500

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

Annual Report 2013-14

Chapter-11

85

86

Cha p t e r-1 1

*Improving
Internal
efficiency /
responsive/
service delivery
of Ministry/
Department

*Administrative
Reforms

*Efficient
functioning of
the RFD system

Date

On time submission

Timely preparation of Departmental


Innovation Action Plan (IAP)

Independent Audit of implementation


of Public Grievance redressal system

Area of operation covered

Implement ISO 9001 as per the


approved Action Plan

% of implementation

Implement mitigating strategies


for reducing potential risk of
corruption

Date

Date

Independent audit of implementation


of Citizens Charter

On time submission

Timely submission of result

Implementation of Sevottam

On time submission

Timely submission of draft for


approval

No.

8.2.2 Total number of


covered under the scheme

animals

No.

7.3.1 Number of threatened breeds


brought under the conservation
programme

7.3 Development & conservation of


other threatened breeds4

No.

8.1.1 Number of animal brought


under the recording programme

8.1 Development & conservation of


bovine breeds

8. Development
& Conservation
of Indigenous
breeds

Unit

Success Indicator

Action

Objective

02-052011

05-032010

55000

Actual
Value
for FY
10/11

30-042012

07-032011

59000

Actual
Value for
FY 11/12

95

95

06-032013

95

95

03-052012

06-032012

180

50000

Target
Value for
FY 12/13

60000

Projected
Value for
FY 13/14

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

Annual Report 2013-14

Percentage of outstanding ATNs


disposed off during the year.

Percentage of outstanding ATRs


disposed off during the year.

Early disposal of pending ATNs


on Audit Paras of C&AG Reports
presented to Parliament before
31.3.2012.

Early disposal of pending ATRs


on PAC Reports presented to
Parliament before 31.3.2012.

Percentage of ATRs submitted within


due date (6 months) from date of
presentation of Report to Parliament
by PAC off during the year.

Unit

Timely submission of ATRs to the


PAC Secretariat on PAC Reports.

Success Indicator

Percentage of ATNs submitted within


due date (4 months) from date of
presentation of Report to Parliament
by CAG during the year.

Action

Timely submission of ATNs on


Audit Paras of C&AG

*Mandatory Objective(s)

*Ensuring
compliance to
the Financial
Accountability
Framework

Objective

Actual
Value
for FY
10/11

Actual
Value for
FY 11/12

90

90

90

90

Target
Value for
FY 12/13

Projected
Value for
FY 13/14

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

Annual Report 2013-14

Chapter-11

87

Annual Report 2013-14

Section 4: Description and definition of Success Indicators and proposed Measurement


Methodology

88

1.

Improvement of animal health vaccination: Reduction in incidence or spread of animal


disease

2.

Training: To enhance the efficiency level of veterinary professionals

3.

Fodder Seed Production: Increase in yield per hectare

4.

Construction of new ponds, supply of safety kits to fishermen and construction of houses:
Increase in fish production and provide assistance to fishermen

5.

Creation of Chilling Capacity, improvement of Dairy Units and Training to employees:


Increase milk production, preserve quality of milk and provide assistance to farmers

6.

Number of persons to be assisted and number of stock supplied: Development of


poultry

7.

Number of farms to be assisted: Development of small ruminants

8.

Genetic upgradation of livestock: Breed improvement through Artificial Insemination and


production of elite bull calves for natural service

9.

Development and conservation of indigenous breeds: To conserve threatened breeds of


animals

10.

In some instances of success indicators/criteria values have been revised downwards


based on considerations like proposed revision of the scheme which will take time for
implementation, competing items within the same scheme which requires reducing the
value of one item with corresponding increase in value of another item within the overall
budget available for the scheme.

Cha p t e r-1 1

Annual Report 2013-14

Section 5: Specific Performance Requirements from Other Departments


Specific performance requirements from other Departments/Agencies:
1.

Planning Commission: Planning Commission has to give time bound approval of EFC,
Memorandum for incorporating any changes in the schemes, increasing outlays etc.

2.

Ministry of Finance: Ministry of Finance is involved in approving EFC for schemes with an
outlay of more than `150 crore. Ministry of Finance has to give time bound approval of
EFC.

3.

State Governments: State Governments are implementing various programmes through


various State Departments or are involved in transfer of funds to Implementing Agencies
like Milk Unions, Fish Farmers Development Agency etc. If there is abnormal delay in
transfer of funds, the implementation of the projects suffers.

4.

NABARD: If Milk Unions, Livestock Development Boards, Fish Farmers Development


Agencies, Fodder Development Stations, National Dairy Development Board are not
adequately staffed then the implementation suffers.

5.

NDDB: NDDB is involved in implementation of two Central Sector Schemes Assistance


to Cooperatives and National Dairy Plan. The appraisal of the projects to be assisted/
implemented is done by NDDB. Delay in appraisal of the projects will affect off take of
funds and achievements of targets set for the scheme.

6.

Implementing Agencies: If Milk Unions, Livestock Development Boards, Fish Farmers


Development Agencies, Fodder Development Stations are not adequately staffed then
the implementation suffers.

Chapter-11

89

90

Cha p t e r-1 1

State Governments

State Governments, DoAC,


Planning Commission, Dairy
Cooperatives, Ministry of
Finance

State Governments, MPEDA,


DARE

2. Increase in milk
production

3. Increase in per
capita consumption
of fish

Jointly responsible
for influencing this
outcome/impact with the
following Department(s)/
Ministry(ies)

1. Prevention and
Control of diseases

Outcome/Impact
of Department/
Ministry

Per Capital
Consumption

Production of milk

Number of
vaccinations done

Success Indicator

Kg/Year

MMT

Number (in
Million)

Unit

5.60

121.84

310

FY 10/11

5.65

127

152

FY 11/12

Section 6: Outcome/Impact of Department/Ministry

5.70

132

200

FY 12/13

5.80

138

300

FY 13/14

5.90

144

300

FY 14/15

Annual Report 2013-14

Weight

14.00

14.00

18.00

Objective

1. Prevention
and Control of
animal diseases

2.Devlopement
of fodder &
feed

3. Increase fish
production
& provide
assistance to
fishermen

Unit

Number of
Programmes
Conducted

Conduct training
programmes

Development of marine
fisheries

No.

1.80

1.80

Supply safety kits to


fishermen
Number of crafts
motorized

1.80

Impart training for post No.


harvest activities
No.

1.80

Construction of houses No.

4.50
1.80

Area in ha

Ponds renovated

4.50

5.00

2.00

7.00

2.00

2.00

10.00

Weight

No.

Area in ha

Area in ha

No.

No.

in

New ponds
constructed

Welfare measures & input Extension of insurance


subsidy
scheme

Construction of new
ponds and renovation of
existing ponds

Development of grassland Area of grassland


& grass reserves
developed

Fodder seed
Production in Quintals

No.

Number of samples
collected

Collection of samples
for surveillance against
important diseases
Production of high
yielding fodder Varieties

No.

Number of
Veterinarians trained

Number of vaccinations No.


done
Million

Success

Improvement in the
efficiency of veterinary
professionals

Immunization against
important diseases

Action

5000

1000

4000

5000

4000000

18000

8000

1000

170

30000

185000

500

14400

6400

800

136

24000

140000

400

240

80%

Good

12600

5600

700

119

21000

120000

350

210

70%

Fair

10800

4800

600

102

18000

100000

300

180

60%

Poor

16824

7211

1495.5

186

92328

198028

1233

473.46

Achievement

4500

900

3600

4500

4000

800

3200

4000

3500

700

2800

3500

3000

600

2400

3000

7370

1400

3315

4462

3600000 3200000 2800000 2400000 3984125

16200

7200

900

153

27000

160000

450

270

90%

100%
300

Very
Good

Excellent

Target/Criteria value

Performance Evaluation Report 2012-13

100.00

100.00

82.88

89.24

99.6

93.47

90.14

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

Raw
score

1.8

1.8

1.49

1.61

1.79

4.21

4.06

5.00

2.00

7.00

2.00

2.00

10.0

Weighted
score

Performance

Annual Report 2013-14

Chapter-11

91

92

Cha p t e r-1 1

Weight

No. in
million

Production & distribution Number of bull calves No.


of elite bull calves
distributed

Breed
improvement Number of artificial
through production and insemination
distribution of quality performed
semen straws

7. Genetic
upgradation of
livestock

thousands

stock No. in

State No. of farms to be No.


assisted

of

Strengthening of
sheep/goat farms

5.00

No.

poultry Number of persons to No.


be assisted

No. of person trained

Production of improved Number


stock by state farms
produced

Rural backyard
development

Imparting Training

2.50

2.50

4.00

5.00

5.00

3.75

3.75

in No
MMT

Increasing production and Enhancement


productivity of livestock
production of milk

in

3.75

No.

Through self employment Improvement/


scheme by providing loans expansion of Dairy
to entrepreneurs
units

Weight

3.75

Unit

chilling No in TLPD

of

Success

Establish chilling (bulk milk Creation


cooling) units
capacity

Action

6. Development 4.00
of
small
ruminants

5. Development 10.00
of poultry

4. Increase milk 15.00


production
and
provide
assistance
to
farmers

Objective

350

60

1950

80000

4000

132

22000

315

56

1755

72000

3600

129

19800

1350

90%

100%
1500

Very
Good

Excellent

280

54

1560

64000

3200

128

17600

1200

80%

Good

245

52

1365

56000

2800

127

15400

1050

70%

Fair

Target/Criteria value

210

50

1170

48000

2400

126

13200

900

60%

Poor

368

61

6300

142000

4200

133.79

34744

1705

Achievement

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

Raw
score

2.5

2.50

4.00

5.00

5.00

3.75

3.75

3.75

3.75

Weighted
score

Performance

Annual Report 2013-14

Weight

*Administrative 6.00
Reforms

*
Efficient 3.00
functioning of
the RFD system

8. Development 5.00
& Conservation
of Indigenous
breeds

Objective

Date

operation %

Timely preparation of On time submission


Departmental Innovation
Action Plan (IAP)

Implement ISO 9001 as Area of


per the approved Action covered
Plan

Implement
mitigating % of implementation
strategies for reducing
potential
risk
of
corruption

Date

of On time submission

Timely
result

submission

Date

2.0

2.0

2.0

1.0

2.0

1.25

Total
number
of No.
animals covered under
the scheme
Timely submission of draft On time submission
for approval

1.25

& Number of threatened No.


other breeds brought under
the
conservation
programme

2.50

Weight

Development
conservation of
threatened breeds

Unit

& Number of animal No.


bovine brought under the
recording programme

Success

Development
conservation of
breeds

Action

01-052013

100

100

01-052012

05-032012

200

02-052013

95

95

03-052012

06-032012

180

90000

90%

100%
100000

Very
Good

Excellent

03-052013

90

90

04-052012

07-032012

160

80000

80%

Good

06-052013

85

85

05-052012

08-032012

140

70000

70%

Fair

Target/Criteria value

07-052013

80

80

06-052012

09-032012

120

60000

60%

Poor

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

Raw
score

29-042013

100

100.00

0.00

100.00

2.00

0.00

2.00

1.00

2.00

1.25

1.25

2.5

Weighted
score

Performance

30/04/2012 100.00

02-032012

330

114531

Achievement

Annual Report 2013-14

Chapter-11

93

94

Cha p t e r-1 1

4.00

Weight

Action

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

Timely submission of ATRs Percentage of ATRs %


to the PAC Secretariate submitted within due
PAC Reports.
date (6 months) from
date of presentation
of Report to Parliament
by PAC off during the
year.
Percentage
of %
outstanding
ATNs
disposed off during the
year.
Percentage
of %
outstanding
ATRs
disposed off during the
year.

Early disposal of pending


ATNs on Audit Paras of
C&AG Reports presented
to Parliament before
31.3.2012.
Early disposal of pending
ATRs on PAC Reports
presented to Parliament
before 31.3.2012.

2.0

Independent
Audit %
of
implementation
of Public Grievance
redressal system

Weight

2.0

Unit

of Independent audit of %
implementation
of
Citizens Charter

Success

Timely submission of ATNs Percentage of ATNs %


on Audit Paras of C&AG
submitted within due
date (4 months) from
date of presentation of
Report to Parliament by
CAG during the year.

Implementation
Sevottam

*Mandatory Objective(s)

*
Ensuring 2.00
compliance to
the
Financial
Accountability
Framework

* Improving
Internal
efficiency/
responsive/
service delivery
of Ministry/
Department

Objective

100

100

100

100

100

90

90

90

90

90

90

90%

100%
100

Very
Good

Excellent

80

80

80

80

80

80

80%

Good

70

70

70

70

70

70

70%

Fair

Target/Criteria value

100

100

100

100

61.38

75

100

100

100

100

61.38

75.00

Raw
score

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

1.23

1.5

Weighted
score

Performance

Total Composite Score: 95.48

60

60

60

60

60

60

60%

Poor

Achievement

Annual Report 2013-14

ANNEXURES

Annexure-I
TOTAL NUMBER OF LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY2007
LIVESTOCK CENSUS
(Figs. in Thousands)
States/UTs

Andhra Pradesh
Arunachal Pradesh

Cattle

Buffaloes

Sheep

Goats

Pigs

Horses
and
ponies

11223

13272

25539

9626

439

26

Mules Donkeys
0

Camel

50

Yaks Mithun

Total
Poultry

60175

123981

503

20

292

356

Assam

10041

500

354

4320

2000

11

Bihar

12559

6690

218

10167

632

51

24

30342

11420

Chhattisgarh

9491

1604

140

2768

413

14418

14246

Goa
Gujarat

14

Total
Livestock

219

1413

1348

17227

29060

71

37

11

58

177

505

7976

8774

2002

4640

22

14

50

38

23515

13352

Haryana

1552

5953

601

538

134

26

11

39

8859

28785

Himachal Pradesh

2269

762

901

1241

13

19

5217

810

Jammu & Kashmir

3443

1050

4127

2068

167

42

24

62

10987

6683

Jharkhand

8781

1506

483

6592

732

18100

11231

Karnataka

10503

4327

9558

6153

281

11

26

30859

42068

Kerala

1740

58

1729

59

3587

15686

Madhya Pradesh

21915

9129

390

9014

193

27

20

40696

7384

Maharashtra

16184

6073

2909

10391

327

38

32

35954

64756

Manipur

342

62

51

314

10

789

2403

Meghalaya

887

23

21

365

524

1823

3093

Mizoram

35

16

267

328

1239

Nagaland

470

35

178

698

33

1419

3156

Orissa

12310

1190

1818

7127

612

23057

20600

Punjab

1777

5062

208

290

26

33

7408

10685

Rajasthan

12120

11092

11190

21503

209

25

102

422

4946

135

92

35

11189

2009

7991

9275

284

954

14

633

264

18883

23812

1188

14793

1350

122

31

Sikkim
Tamilnadu
Tripura
Uttar Pradesh

56663

270

157

30759

128108

1869

3701

84

60272

8754

Uttaranchal

2235

1220

290

1335

20

15

24

5141

2602

West Bengal

19188

764

1577

15069

815

37419

86210

A& Nicobar

49

10

67

48

174

979

Chandigarh

20

28

129

Dadra & Nagar Haveli

57

25

87

170
26

Daman & Diu

Delhi

92

278

21

20

Lakshadweep

76

84

69

Pondicherry
All India

199075 105343

4
71558

140537 11134

0
611

137

418

82

167

438

517

83

162

387

264

529698

648830

0 negligible with respect to thousands


$ Provisional results, derived from village level totals
Source: 18th Livestock Census , Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries, M/o Agriculture
Annexure-I

97

Annexure-II
Production of Major Livestock Products All India
Year

Milk
(Million Tonnes)

Eggs
(Million Nos.)

Wool
(Million Kgs.)

Meat
(Million Tonnes)

1950-51

17.0

1,832

27.5

1955-56

19.0

1,908

27.5

1960-61

20.0

2,881

28.7

1968-69

21.2

5,300

29.8

1973-74

23.2

7,755

30.1

1979-80

30.4

9,523

30.9

1980-81

31.6

10,060

32.0

1981-82

34.3

10,876

33.1

1982-83

35.8

11,454

34.5

1983-84

38.8

12,792

36.1

1984-85

41.5

14,252

38.0

1985-86

44.0

16,128

39.1

1986-87

46.1

17,310

40.0

1987-88

46.7

17,795

40.1

1988-89

48.4

18,980

40.8

1989-90

51.4

20,204

41.7

1990-91

53.9

21,101

41.2

1991-92

55.7

21,983

41.6

1992-93

58.0

22,929

38.8

1993-94

60.6

24,167

39.9

1994-95

63.0

25,975

40.6

1995-96

66.2

27,187

42.4

1996-97

69.1

27,496

44.4

1997-98

72.1

28,689

45.6

1998-99

75.4

29,476

46.9

1.9

1999-2000

78.3

30,447

47.9

1.9

2000-01

80.6

36,632

48.4

1.9

2001-02

84.4

38,729

49.5

1.9

2002-03

86.2

39,823

50.5

2.1

2003-04

88.1

40,403

48.5

2.1

2004-05

92.5

45,201

44.6

2.2

2005-06

97.1

46,235

44.9

2.3

2006-07

102.6

50,663

45.1

2.3

2007-08

107.9

53,583

43.9

4.0

2008-09

112.2

55,562

42.8

4.3

2009-10

116.4

60,267

43.1

4.6

2010-11

121.8

63,024

43.0

4.8

2011-12

127.9

66,449

44.73

5.5

2012-13

132.43

69,731

46.05

5.9

- Not Available
Note: Meat Production from Commercial Poultry Farm is included from 2007-08.

98

Annexure-II

Annexure-III
State-Wise Fish Production during the Period 2006-07 to 2013-14
(In 000 tonnes)
State/Union Territory

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14 (P)

1. Andhra Pradesh

856.93

1,010.08

1,252.78

1293.85

1368.202

1603.17

1808.08

1930.49

2. Arunachal Pradesh

2.77

2.83

2.88

2.65

3.15

3.30

3.71

2.89

3. Assam

181.48

190.32

200.15

218.82

227.242

228.62

254.27

263.09

4. Bihar

267.04

319.10

300.65

297.40

299.91

344.47

400.14

465.99

5. Chhattisgarh

137.75

139.37

158.70

174.24

228.207

250.70

255.61

281.55

6. Goa

102.39

33.43

86.21

84.33

93.27

89.96

77.88

92.66

7. Gujarat

747.33

721.91

765.90

771.52

774.902

783.72

788.49

793.11

8. Haryana

60.08

67.24

76.29

100.46

96.195

106.00

111.48

116.90

9. Himachal Pradesh

6.89

7.85

7.79

7.75

7.381

8.05

8.56

8.76

10. Jammu & Kashmir

19.20

17.33

19.27

18.94

19.70

19.85

19.95

19.98

11. Jharkhand

34.27

67.89

75.80

70.50

71.886

91.68

96.60

106.56

12. Karnataka

292.46

297.69

361.85

408.05

526.579

546.44

525.57

492.06

13. Kerala

677.63

667.33

685.99

663.12

681.613

693.21

679.74

664.45

14. Madhya Pradesh

65.04

63.89

68.47

66.12

56.451

75.41

85.17

90.17

15. Maharashtra

595.94

556.45

523.10

538.35

595.249

578.79

586.37

583.87

16. Manipur

18.61

18.60

18.80

19.20

20.20

22.22

24.50

26.92

17. Meghalaya

5.49

4.00

3.96

4.21

4.557

4.77

5.42

5.89

18. Mizoram

3.76

3.76

2.89

3.04

2.901

2.93

5.43

5.87

19. Nagaland

5.80

5.80

6.18

6.36

6.585

6.84

7.13

7.15

20. Odisha

342.04

349.48

374.82

370.54

386.185

381.83

410.14

414.64

21. Punjab

86.70

78.73

86.21

122.86

97.04

97.62

99.13

100.30

22. Rajasthan

22.20

25.70

24.10

26.91

28.20

47.85

55.16

56.31

23. Sikkim

0.15

0.18

0.17

0.17

0.18

0.28

0.49

0.46

542.28

559.36

534.17

534.17

614.809

611.49

620.40

620.51

24. Tamil Nadu


25. Tripura

28.63

36.25

36.00

42.27

49.231

53.34

57.46

60.20

26. Uttar Pradesh

306.73

325.95

349.27

392.93

417.479

429.72

449.75

461.72

27. Uttarakhand

3.03

3.09

3.16

3.49

3.818

3.83

3.85

3.85

28. West Bengal

1,359.10

1,447.26

1484.00

1505.00

1443.259

1472.05

1490.02

1636.68

29. A & N Islands

28.68

28.68

32.49

33.19

33.921

35.26

36.62

39.39

30. Chandigarh

0.17

0.21

0.24

0.24

0.242

0.10

0.05

0.09

31. Dadra & Nagar


Haveli

0.05

0.05

0.05

0.05

0.05

0.05

0.05

0.05

32. Daman & Diu

16.41

26.36

14.14

15.88

16.975

17.43

19.01

19.01

33. Delhi

0.61

0.61

0.72

0.71

0.82

0.74

0.69

0.69

34. Lakshadweep

11.75

11.04

12.59

12.37

12.372

12.37

12.37

12.37

35. Puducherry

39.66

39.01

40.30

41.94

41.949

42.40

41.07

41.17

6,869.05

7,126.83

7,616.09

7851.61

8230.71

8666.49

9040.36

9425.80

Total

P Provisional
Source: States/ Union Territories.

Annexure-III

99

Annexure-IV
Marine Fisheries Resources of India
State/Union Territory

Approx. Length
of Coast Line
(Kms.)

Continental
Shelf (000 Sq.
Kms.)

Number
of Landing
Centres

Number of
Fishing Villages

Andhra Pradesh

974

33

353

555

Goa

104

10

33

39

Gujarat

1600

184

121

247

Karnataka

300

27

96

144

Kerala

590

40

187

222

Maharashtra

720

112

152

456

Odisha

480

26

73

813

Tamil Nadu

1076

41

407

573

West Bengal

158

17

59

188

A & N Islands

1912

35

16

134

Daman & Diu

27

11

Lakshadweep

132

10

10

Puducherry

45

25

40

8118

530

1537

3432

Total
Source: Marine Fisheries Census, 2005.

100

Annexure-IV

Annexure-V
Inland Water Resources of India
Sl.
No

State/Uts

1.

Andhra Pradesh

2.

Arunachal Pradesh

3.

Assam

4.

Rivers &
Canals
(kms.)

Tanks &
Ponds
(Lakh Ha)

Flood plain
Lakes &
Derelict
Water bodies
(Lakh Ha)

Brackish
Water
(Lakh Ha)

Total
Water
Bodies
(Lakh Ha)

2.34

5.17

0.60

8.11

2000

2.76

0.42

3.18

4820

0.02

0.23

1.10

1.35

Bihar

3200

0.60

0.95

0.05

1.60

5.

Chhattisgarh

3573

0.84

0.63

1.47

6.

Goa

250

0.03

0.03

Neg.

0.06

7.

Gujarat

3865

2.43

0.71

0.12

1.00

4.26

8.

Haryana

5000

Neg.

0.10

0.10

0.20

9.

Himachal Pradesh

3000

0.42

0.01

0.43

10.

Jammu & Kashmir

27781

0.07

0.17

0.06

0.30

11.

Jharkhand

4200

0.94

0.29

1.23

12.

Karnataka

9000

4.40

2.90

0.10

7.40

13.

Kerala

3092

0.30

0.30

2.43

2.40

5.43

14.

Madhya Pradesh

17088

2.27

0.60

2.87

15.

Maharashtra

16000

2.99

0.72

0.12

3.83

16.

Manipur

3360

0.01

0.05

0.04

0.10

17.

Meghalaya

5600

0.08

0.02

Neg.

0.10

18.

Mizoram

1395

0.02

0.02

19.

Nagaland

1600

0.17

0.50

Neg.

0.67

20.

Odisha

4500

2.56

1.14

1.80

4.30

9.80

21.

Punjab

15270

Neg.

0.07

0.07

22.

Rajasthan

5290

1.20

1.80

3.00

23.

Sikkim

900

0.03

0.03

24.

Tamil Nadu

7420

5.70

0.56

0.07

0.60

6.93

25.

Tripura

1200

0.05

0.13

0.18

26.

Uttar Pradesh

28500

1.38

1.61

1.33

4.32

27.

Uttarakhand

2686

0.20

0.01

0.00

0.21

28.

West Bengal

2526

0.17

2.76

0.42

2.10

5.45

29.

A & N Islands

30.

Chandigarh

31.

Dadra and Nagar Haveli

32.

Daman and Diu

33.

Delhi

34.

Lakshadweep

35.

Puducherry
Total

11514

Reservoirs
(Lakh
Ha)

0.00

0.00

0.33

0.34

Neg.

Neg.

0.00

54

0.05

0.05

12

Neg.

Neg.

0.00

150

0.04

0.04

0.00

247

Neg.

0.01

Neg.

0.01

195095

29.26

24.24

7.98

11.55

73.03

Source: State Governments/ Union Territories.

Annexure-V

101

Annexure-VI
Fish Seed Production
Year
1973-74 (End of IV th Plan)
1978-79 (End of V th Plan)
1984-85(End of VI th Plan)
VII Plan
1985-86
1986-87
1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
Annual Plans
1990-91
1991-92
VIII Plan
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97
IX Plan
1997-98
1998-99
1999-2000
2000-01
2001-02
X Plan
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
XI Plan
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
XII Plan
2012-13
2013-14(P)
P Provisional

102

Annexure-VI

Fish Seed (In Million Fry)


409
912
5,639
6,322
7,601
8,608
9,325
9,691
10,332
12,203
12,499
14,239
14,544
15,007
15,853
15,904
15,156
16,589
15,608
15,758
16,333
19,231
20,790
22,614
31,688
24,143
32,177
29,313
34,993
36,566
34,922
39,575

Annexure-VII
Financial Allocation and Expenditure during 2012-13 & 2013-14
(` in crore)
Sl.
No.
1

Name of the Scheme


2

BE
2012-13

RE
2012-13

Exp
2012-13

BE
2013-14

RE
2013-14

Expenditure
2013-14

Animal Husbandry

Centrally Sponsored Scheme

National Project for Cattle and Buffalo


Breeding

180.39

117.66

113.98

134.99

128.30

128.30

Poultry Development

52.50

35.62

33.56

52.50

50.36

50.16

a) Assistance to State Poultry/Duck


Farms

10.00

2.90

1.94

10.00

10.00

9.80

b) Rural Backyard Poultry


Development

40.00

32.61

30.82

40.00

40.00

40.00

c) Establishment of Poultry Estates

2.50

0.11

0.79

2.50

0.36

0.36

Establishment/ Modernization of rural


slaughter houses, including mobile
slaughter Plants

0.01

0.00

0.04

0.00

0.00

Utilization of fallen Animals

0.01

0.00

0.05

0.00

0.00

Conservation of Threatened Livestock


Breeds

1.00

1.00

0.93

1.35

1.00

1.00

Centrally Sponsored Fodder


Development Scheme

50.00

74.70

74.59

90.00

89.17

89.17

Livestock Insurance

Livestock Health and Disease


Control

8.1

Assistance to States for Control of


Animal Diseases

8.2

National Project on Rinderpest


Eradication

8.3

Professional Efficiency Development

8.4

Foot & Mouth Disease Control


Programme

8.5

50.00

50.00

45.85

60.00

50.00

47.65

403.01

324.28

325.87

458.98

398.79

393.67

82.00

89.00

88.18

90.00

90.00

89.25

4.01

4.20

4.22

5.00

4.50

3.19

5.00

5.00

4.80

5.00

5.00

5.07

190.00

160.00

160.67

250.00

223.79

223.78

Strengthening of Existing Hospitals/


Dispensaries

91.00

46.87

51.63

60.00

50.03

54.10

8.6

National Control Programme of PPR

10.00

5.83

5.10

22.00

7.26

4.58

8.7

National Control Programme of


Brucellosis

11.00

6.58

6.01

12.00

6.20

4.25

8.8

National Animal Disease Reporting


System (NADRS)

10.00

6.80

5.27

14.97

12.00

9.45

8.9

National Control programme for


Classical Swine Fewer (NEW)

0.01

0.01

0.00

Livestock Extension and Delivery


Services

0.01

0.00

0.03

0.00

0.00

10

New Schemes( In 12th Plan)

1.50

0.00

0.00

0.03

0.00

0.00

Annexure-VII

103

Sl.
No.

Name of the Scheme

10.1

National Programme for Bovine


Breeding

10.2

National Livestock Mission

10.3

Managing Livestock
TOTAL CSS (ANIMAL HUSBANDRY)

BE
2012-13

RE
2012-13

Exp
2012-13

BE
2013-14

RE
2013-14

Expenditure
2013-14

0.50

0.01

0.00

0.00

0.02

0.00

0.00

1.00

0.00

738.43

603.26

594.78

797.97

717.62

709.95

Central Sector Schemes

Livestock Census

150.00

166.12

154.59

82.00

70.00

61.36

Integrated Sample Survey

13.50

12.65

12.44

18.00

15.00

14.95

Central Cattle Development


Organization

29.00

29.43

27.87

25.00

28.45

24.68

Central Sheep Breeding Farms

2.10

2.17

2.01

2.20

2.00

1.31

Central Fodder Development


Organization

25.55

17.95

16.23

25.78

14.33

9.44

Central Poultry Development


Organizations

20.00

17.04

14.76

18.50

16.00

13.00

Directorate of Animal Health

23.50

17.91

14.41

23.00

19.45

12.82

Integrated Development of Small


Ruminants and Rabbits

15.00

12.90

14.71

15.00

10.00

8.59

Piggery Development

10.00

10.00

10.00

12.00

10.00

7.80

10

Salvaging and Rearing of Male Buffalo


Calves

0.01

0.00

0.01

0.00

0.00

11

Food Safety and Traceability (NEW)

12

Poultry Venture Capital Fund

13

5.00

2.00

0.00

0.00

30.00

20.00

19.65

30.00

30.00

40.00

New Schemes( In 12th Plan)

1.01

0.00

0.00

0.03

0.00

0.00

13.1

Establishment of Veterinary Drug


Control Authority

0.01

0.00

0.01

0.00

0.00

13.2

Upgradation/Strengthening of
Infrastructure of Veterinary colleges

1.00

0.00

0.01

0.00

0.00

13.3

National Livestock Mission

0.00

0.01

0.00

0.00

TOTAL CS (ANIMAL HUSBANDRY)

324.67

306.17

286.68

253.52

215.23

193.95

TOTAL ANIMAL HUSBANDRY (CSS


&CS)

1063.10

909.43

881.45

1051.49

932.85

903.90

II

Dairy Development

Centrally Sponsored Scheme

DAIRY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

100.00

84.08

83.13

85.01

77.63

74.91

1.1

Project for Dairy Development


(including for Clean Milk Production)

100.00

84.08

83.13

85.00

77.63

74.91

1.2

National Programme for Bovine


Breeding and Dairy

0.00

0.01

0.00

0.00

100.00

84.08

83.13

85.01

77.63

74.91

TOTAL CSS (DAIRY


DEVELOPMENT)

104

B.

Central Sector Schemes

Assistance to Cooperatives

Delhi Milk Scheme

Annexure-VII

10.00

6.22

6.22

5.00

4.95

4.95

2.00

0.24

1.16

10.00

3.65

1.72

Sl.
No.

Name of the Scheme

RE
2012-13

Exp
2012-13

BE
2013-14

RE
2013-14

Expenditure
2013-14

Dairy Venture Capital Fund/Dairy


Entrepreneurship Development
Scheme

150.00

330.00

310.00

300.00

284.31

284.30

National Dairy Plan

130.00

123.00

123.00

180.00

149.26

149.26

TOTAL CS (DAIRY DEVELOPMENT)

292.00

459.46

440.38

495.00

442.17

440.23

TOTAL DAIRY DEVELOPMENT (CSS


& CS)

392.00

543.54

523.51

580.01

519.80

515.14

III

Fisheries

A.

Centrally Sponsored Scheme

Development of Inland Fisheries &


Aquaculture

40.00

32.65

31.42

40.00

33.00

31.14

Development of Marine Fisheries,


Infrastructure & Post Harvest
Operations

80.00

78.60

74.68

80.00

79.00

63.76

National Scheme of Welfare of


Fishermen

50.00

40.89

39.38

50.00

55.00

52.15

170.00

152.14

145.48

170.00

167.00

147.04

B.

Central Sector Schemes

Strengthening of Database &


Geographical Information System of
the Fisheries Sector

6.50

4.10

3.78

6.50

7.50

5.52

Total CSS (Fisheries)

BE
2012-13

Assistance to Fisheries Institutes

54.20

49.09

42.52

57.50

42.72

42.51

2.1

Central Institute for Fisheries Nautical


& Engineering Training

15.00

14.26

11.49

15.15

6.37

5.83

2.2

Central Institute for Coastal


Engineering for Fisheries

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.3

National Institute for Fisheries Post


Harvest Technology and Training
(NIFPHATT)

2.20

2.40

2.11

2.35

2.35

1.94

2.4

Fishery Survey of India (FSI)

37.00

32.43

28.93

40.00

34.00

34.74

3.

National Fisheries Development Board

110.00

106.81

106.81

137.50

115.13

123.16

Total CS (Fisheries)

170.70

160.00

153.12

201.50

165.35

171.19

TOTAL FISHERIES (CSS & CS)

340.70

312.14

298.60

371.50

332.35

318.23

IV

Secretariat and Economic Services

7.00

6.42

5.68

7.00

7.00

5.80

Special Livestock and Fisheries


Sectors Package for Suicide-prone
Districts in A.P, Maharashtra,
Karnataka and Kerala.

35.00

28.43

28.06

15.00

8.00

8.00

VI

Externally Aided Projects


(Preparedness, Control and
Containment of Avian Influenza)

72.20

0.04

0.02

0.00

0.00

1910.00

1800.00

1737.32

2025.00

1800.00

1751.07

GRAND TOTAL

Annexure-VII

105

Annexure-VIII
ORGANISATIONAL CHART AND WORK ALLOCATION AMONG
DIVISIONS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY,
DAIRYING & FISHERIES

JOINT SECRETARY (LH)

WORK ALLOCATION

Livestock Health, Trade and Codex Alimentarius, National Institute of Animal Health, National Project on
Rinderpest Eradication, Animal Quarantine & Certification Services, Plan Coordination, Matters relating to
UTs without legislature.
JOINT SECRETARY (APF)
Admn. I, Cash and General Admin, International Cooperation, Vigilance, Poultry Development, Central
Poultry Development Organizations, Piggery, Equine & Pack animals, Feed & Fodder, Slaughterhouses,
Meat and Meat Products, Central Fodder Development Organizations, Goat, Sheep Development including
Admn. Work relating to Central Sheep Breeding Farms, Official Language and Work Study Unit, Animal
Husbandry Extension, Livestock Insurance Scheme.
JOINT SECRETARY (CDD)
National Dairy Plan, Dairy Development Schemes, NPCBB, Central Cattle Development Organization,
Admin. IV and Estt. Matter of DMS and NDDB, General Coordination, Administrative Reforms, Public
Grievances and all matters related to Dairy Division.
JOINT SECRETARY (Fy)
All matters related to policy, regulation and development of fisheries, Fisheries Institutes namely, FSI,
CIFNET, NIFPHTT, CICEF and the matters related to NFDB & CAA.
ADVISER (STAT)
Livestock Census, Integrated Sample Survey and all matters related to Animal Husbandry Statistics.
106

Annexure-VIII

Annexure-IX
List of Subjects allocated to the Department of Animal
Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries
PART - I
The following subjects falling within List I of the Seventh Schedule to the Constitution of India:1.
Industries, the control of which by the Union is declared by Parliament by law to be
expedient in public interest as far as these relate to Development of Livestock, fish
and birds feed and dairy, poultry and fish products with the limitation that in regard to
the development of industries, the functions of the Department of Animal Husbandry
and Dairying (Pashupalan aur Dairy Vibhag) do not go further than the formulation of
demand and fixation of targets.
2.
Liaison and cooperation with international organizations in matters relating to livestock,
poultry and fisheries development.
3.
Livestock Census.
4.
Livestock Statistics
5.
Matters relating to loss of livestock due to natural calamities.
6.
Regulation of Livestock importation, Animal Quarantine and Certification.
7.
Fishing and fisheries (inland, marine and beyond territorial waters).
8.
Fishery Survey of India, Mumbai.
PART - II
The following subjects falling within List III of the Seventh Schedule to the Constitution of India: 9.
10.
11.
12.

Profession of Veterinary Practice.


Prevention of the extension from one State to another of infectious or contagious
diseases or pests affecting animals, fish, birds.
Conversion of indigenous breeds, introduction and maintenance of Central Herd Books
for indigenous breeds of livestock.
Pattern of making assistance to various State Undertakings, Dairy Development Schemes
through State agencies/Co-operative Unions.

PART - III
For the Union Territories the subjects mentioned in Part I and II above, so far as they exist in
regard to these territories and in addition to the following subjects which fall within List II of the
Seventh Schedule to the Constitution of India :13.
14.
15.

Preservation, protection and improvement of stocks and prevention of diseases of


animals, fish and birds, Veterinary training and practice.
Courts of wards.
Insurance of livestock, fish and birds.

PART-IV
16.

Matters relating to cattle utilization and slaughter.

17.

Fodder Development.

Annexure-IX

107

Annexure-X
List of Attached/Subordinate Offices
I.
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)
17)
18)
19)
20)
21)
22)
23)
24)
25)
26)
27)
28)
29)
30)
31)
32)
33)

Animal Husbandry Division


Central Cattle Breeding Farm, Dhamrod, District Surat, Gujarat.
Central Cattle Breeding Farm, Andesh Nagar, District Lakhimpur, (UP).
Central Cattle Breeding Farm, Similiguda, Sunabada (Koraput) Orissa.
Central Cattle Breeding Farm, Suratgarh (Rajasthan).
Central Cattle Breeding Farm, Chiplima, Basantpur, District Sambalpur, (Orissa).
Central Cattle Breeding Farm, Avadi, Alamadhi (Chennai).
Central Cattle Breeding Farm, Hessarghatta, Bangaluru North.
Central Frozen Semen Production and Training Institute, Hessarghatta, Bangaluru North.
Central Herd Registration Unit, Rohtak (Haryana).
Central Herd Registration Unit, Ajmer.
Central Herd Registration Unit, Ahmedabad.
Central Herd Registration Unit, Santhapat, Ongole, District Prakasam (A.P.)
Regional Station for Forage Production & Demonstration, Kalyani, District Nadia, (West Bengal).
Regional Station for Forage Production & Demonstration, Srinagar (J&K).
Regional Station for Forage Production & Demonstration, Suratgarh (Rajasthan).
Regional Station for Forage Production & Demonstration, Textile Mill Hissar (Haryana).
Regional Station for Forage Production & Demonstration, Gandhinagar, (Gujarat).
Regional Station for Forage Production & Demonstration, Avadi, Alamadhi, (Chennai).
Regional Station for Forage Production & Demonstration, Mamidipally, Via Keshavagiri, Hyderabad.
Central Fodder Seed Production Farm, Hessarghatta, Bangaluru North.
National Institute of Animal Health, Baghpat (Uttar Pradesh).
Animal Quarantine & Certification Service Station, Kapashera Village, New Delhi.
Animal Quarantine & Certification Service Station, Pallikarni Village, Chennai.
Animal Quarantine & Certification Service Station, Gopalpur, District 24 Parganas (West Bengal).
Animal Quarantine & Certification Service Station, Bombay.
Animal Quarantine & Certification Service Station, Hyderabad.
Animal Quarantine & Certification Service Station, Bangalore.
Central Sheep Breeding Farm, Hissar (Haryana).
Central Poultry Development Organisation, Southern Region, Hessarghatta, Bangaluru North.
Central Poultry Development Organisation, Eastern Region, Bhubaneshwar (Orissa).
Central Poultry Development Organisation, Western Region, Aarey Milk Colony, Mumbai.
Central Poultry Development Organisation, Northern Region, Industrial Area, Chandigarh.
Central Poultry Performance Testing Centre, Gurgaon (Haryana).

II Dairy Development Division


34) Delhi Milk Scheme, West Patel Nagar, New Delhi.
III
35)
36)
37)
38)
108

Fisheries Division
Central Institute of Coastal Engineering For Fishery, Bangalore
Central Institute of Fisheries Nautical and Engineering Training, Cochin.
National Institute of Fisheries Post Harvest, Technology & Training, Cochin.
Fishery Survey of India, Mumbai.

Annexure-X

Annexure-XI
State-wise number of Veterinary Institutions
S. No.

States/UTs

Veterinary Hospitals/
Polyclinics Hospitals/
Polyclinics

Veterinary
Dispensaries

Veterinary Aid Centres,


Stockmen Centres and
Mobile Dispensaries

Andhra Pradesh

299

2330

2657

Arunachal Pradesh

93

289

3
4

Assam

21

470

739

Bihar

39

783

1595

Chhattisgarh

241

775

26

Goa

21

51

Gujarat

Haryana

23

672

587

944

1814

Himachal Pradesh

369

1762

1250

10

Jammu & Kashmir

303

1585

14

11

Jharkhand

27

424

433

12

Karnataka

364

1943

1805

13

Kerala

275

893

20

14

Madhya Pradesh

795

1666

65

15

Maharashtra

200

1745

2916

16

Manipur

55

109

34

17

Meghalaya

99

38

18

Mizoram

33

103

19

Nagaland

11

20

127

20

Orissa

540

105

2939

21

Punjab

1367

1487

45

22

Rajasthan

2134

256

1913

23

Sikkim

14

40

62

24

Tamil Nadu

167

2256

1006

25

Tripura

15

59

426

26

Uttarakhand

308

12

744

27

Uttar Pradesh

2200

268

2575

28

West Bengal

110

610

3248

29

A & N Islands

11

55

30

Chandigarh

31

D. & N. Haveli

10

32

Daman & Diu

33

Delhi

46

29

34

Lakshadweep

35

Puducherry

17

73

10901

22402

25856

TOTAL

0 Not received/Not available (As on 1/04/2013)


Source: As per latest available data from State Department of Animal Husbandry.

Annexure-XI

109

Annexure-XII
IMPORT/EXPORT REPORT OF LIVESTOCK & LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS OF
ANIMAL QUARANTINE & CERTIFICATION SERVICE STATIONS IN INDIA
DURING THE YEAR 2013-2014 W.E.F. APRIL, 2013 TO MARCH, 2014
Sl.
No.

Livestock (Nos.)

AQUATIC ANIMALS
(PRAWN, SHIRMP, CRAB ETC.)

IMPORT

EXPORT

PROGRESSIVE

PROGRESSIVE

181396

12674

BIRDS (WILD, DOMESTIC)

BUFFALOES

CAT

230

379

CATTLE

DOG

532

1335

EARTHWORMS

80000

FISHES

728380

725772

G.P. CHICKS INCLUDING DUCKLINGS

231342

347503

10

HORSES/OTHER EQUIDAES

121

59

11

LAB. ANIMAL
(GUINEA PIG, RAT, MICE, RABBIT, FROG, HAMESTER ETC.)

78330

204

12

LLAMA

13

REPTILES/SQUIRREL
(CROCODILE, TORTOISE, LIZARD, SNAKE ETC.)

10

14

SHEEP/GOAT

600

15

ZOO ANIMALS
(TIGER, GIRAFFE, WOLF, CHIMPANZEE ETC.)

28

29

74469

358780

LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS (KGS., SPECIFY OTHERS e.g. Litres., Nos., Doses etc.)

110

ANIMAL BY-PRODUCTS
(CASEIN GLUE, OX GALL, BILE ACID, OX BILE POWDER SUTURES, GOAT
BEZOUR, ACIDLAC, CHOLECALCIFEROL, CHOLIC ACID, CHONDROITIN
SULFATE ETC.)

ANIMAL FEED
(POULTRY, MICE, HORSES, CATTLE ETC.)

1431893

5345698

AQUATIC BY PRODUCTS
(CORAL, SHEELS, POWDER WASTE ETC.)

7715

75

BONE & BONE PRODUCTS


(INCLUDING CRUSHED BONES, GRIST, BUTTONS, PEARLS, HANDICRAFT
ITEMS ETC.)

467

22625523

CSASINGS
(BOVINE, SHEEP)

17381.343

51004

EGG/EGG POWDER

6994199

EGG/SEEDS OF AQUATIC ANIMALS


(INCLUDING FISH)

66438

EMBRYOS
(BOVINE)

Annexure-XII

Sl.
No.

Livestock (Nos.)

EMBRYOS
(OVINE, CAPRINE)

10

FEATHER
(INCLUDING PROCESSED, SHUTTLE COCK, BRUSHES, PILLOW ETC.)

11

IMPORT

EXPORT

PROGRESSIVE

PROGRESSIVE
-

10089

26827.13

FISH FEED/OIL/PASTE
(INCLUDING PRAWN FEED, SHRIMP FEED, ARTEMIA CYSTS, ETC.)

3197791

21353657

12.

FISH & FISH MEAT PRODUCTS


(RAW, CHILLED, FROZEN, SMOKED ETC.)

9941977

18796761

13.

FUR SKIN (TANNED/DRESSED)


(INCLUDING HEADS, TAILS, PAWS AND OTHER PIECES)

887.5

14.

GELATIN/OSSEIN/
GLUES
( PRODUCTS, CAPSULES, SHEETS, DERIVATIVES)

4807751

15.

HATCHING EGGS
(DUCK, POULTRY)

400830

16.

HOOVES, HORNS, NAILS, CLAWS, BEAK & HORN CORES


(PRODUCTS, DRIED MEAL, CORES, GRIST, BUTTONS, HANDICRAFT ITEMS
ETC.)

60132

67514873

17.

LEATHER OF BOVINE, EQUINE, SHEEP, GOAT, SWINE, REPTILE ETC.


(WETBLUE, FINISHED, TANNED CRUST, POWDER, FLOUR, LAMINATED
ETC.)

11176723

7140606

18.

MEAT & MEAT PRODUCTS (PORK.)

19.

MEAT & MEAT PRODUCTS (POULTRY.)

41429

20

MEAT & MEAT PRODUCTS (LAMB, GOAT)

27175

21.

MEDICAMENTS AND DIAGNOSTICS


(INCLUDING ALBUMIN, IN VITRO USE BLOOD/SERUM FRACTION, DRUG
OF ANIMAL ORIGIN, HEPARIN ETC.)

27900

249.99

22.

MILK & MILK PRODUCTS (CHEESE,GHEE, WHEY POWDER, CASEIN, ICE


CREAM, BUTTER, YOGURT, LACTOSEOIL ETC. )

3878762

18082059

23.

MISCELLANEOUS
(SILK, HONEY, CANDY, CHOCOLATE ETC.)

1613649

24.

PET FOOD/DOG CHEWS

4429059

11241512

25.

PIG /HOG/BOAR BRISTLES/


HAIRS
(BADGES, BRUSHES)

196399

1300

26.

RAW FUR SKIN


(INCLUDING HEADS, TAILS, PAWS AND OTHER PIECES)

27.

RAW SKIN/HIDES OF BOVINE, EQUINE, SHEEP, GOAT, SWINE


(FRESH, PICKLED, LIMED, SALTED, DRIED, PRESERVED BUT NOT
TANNED)

28.

439874
2365706

6036637

5079149

RAW SKIN/OTHER PARTS OF BIRDS


(WITH/WITHOUT FEATHERS)

90366

29.

READY TO EAT ITEMS


(BISCUITS, SNACKS,
PROCESSED FOOD ETC.)

7599041

30

SEMEN (DOSES)
(BOVINE)

110312

6000

Annexure-XII

111

Annexure-XIII
Species-Wise Incidence of Livestock Diseases in India during (JanuaryDecember) 2013
Sl.
No.
1

Disease

Species

112

75255

7736

41

7675

574

16

4004

508

Swine

10

171

25

Camel

Total

377

87109

8843

16

16

104

1172

278

79

55

Foot & Mouth Disease (Wild)


Haemorrhagic Septicaemia
Bovine

310

Buffalo

Ovine/Caprine

Death

Ovine/ Caprine

Fau
3

Attack

Foot & Mouth Disease (Domestic)


Bovine

Outbreak

Buffalo

26

465

120

Total

135

1716

453

Bovine

176

1606

370

Black Quarter
Avian

Total

177

1610

371

Bovine

24

99

70

Anthrax
Ovine/Caprine

1546

76

Total

31

1645

146

Bovine

137

802698

11

Ovine/Caprine

12

254

17

Buffalo

817

Total

157

803769

33

Fascioliasis

Enterotoxaemia
Ovine/Caprine

35

392

164

Bovine

59

Total

43

451

164

Ovine/Caprine

55

913

163

Bovine

75

12

Ovine/Caprine

13

1021

67

Ovine/Caprine

290

35

Sheep & Goat Pox

Cow Pox

10

Blue Tongue

11

C.C.P.P.

Annexure-XIII

Sl.
No.
12

Disease

Species

Outbreak

Attack

Bovine

86

10046

Ovine/Caprine

26

1066

Amphistomiasis

Buffalo
13
14
15

16

19

Fowl Cholera

20

Mareks Disease

25

26

11

Bovine

Swine

117

16507

5902

Avian

30

75485

2279

Bovine

66

Total

34

75551

2284

Coccidiosis

Fowl Pox

24

11192

Salmonellosis

18

23

80

117

Swine Fever

Ranikhet Disease

22

Total
Schistosomiasis

17

21

Death

Bovine

33

12496

667

Ovine/Caprine

13

142

Avian

387

201286

27165

Swine

25

Total

438

213949

27833

Avian

423

179218

23275

Avian

212

80449

1624

Avian

151

63118

26002

Avian

20606

256

Bovine

20

Total

20626

261

Avian

273

230820

28434

Avian

79

3526

1831

Avian

437

370531

58094

Canine

64

732

23

Bovine

31

351

351

Canine

27

130

130

Infectious Bursal Disease


Duck Plague
Chronic Respiratory Disease
Canine Distemper
Rabies

Buffalo

Total

60

487

487

Bovine

162

1696

Buffalo

188

Babesiosis

Annexure-XIII

113

Sl.
No.

27

28

29

30

31

32

33
34

Disease

Outbreak

Attack

Death

Ovine/Caprine

14

Canine

Total

181

1903

Bovine

103

8983

Mastitis
Buffalo

Ovine/Caprine

42

Canine

Swine

Total

117

9040

Trypanismiasis
Bovine

71

876

34

Equine

Buffalo

16

762

Camel

145

17

Total

89

1787

51

Mange
Bovine

16

402

Ovine/Caprine

27

1182

Canine

115

Total

48

1699

Ovine/ Caprine

Peste Des Petits Ruminant


122

4954

955

Avian

43

23

Total

123

4997

978

Anaplasmosis
Bovine

37

487

Buffalo

Total

38

492

Bovine

30

Swine

Brucellosis

Buffalo

113

Total

151

Avian

4402

3194

Avian

17

150505

492

Equine

Swine

57

10$

Coryza
Avian Influenza*

35

Glanders

36

P.R.R.S.

*20949 birds destroyed


$ 243 Swine destroyed

114

Species

Annexure-XIII

Annexure-XIV
List of 300 selected districts under the Scheme Livestock Insurance
S. Name of Districts
No.

S. Name of Districts
No.

Andhra Pradesh (22)

40

Rohtas

Adilabad *

41

Samastipur

Anantpur *

42

Vaishali

Chittoor

Cuddapah*

East Godavari

S. Name of Districts
No.

79

Hamirpur

80

Kangra

Chhattisgarh (5)

81

Mandi

43

Dhamtari

44

Durg

82

Shimla

Guntur

45

Mahsamund

Jammu & Kashmir (6)

Karimnagar

46

Raipur

83

Anantnag

Khammam *#

47

Rajnandgaon #

84

Baramulla

Krishna

Gujarat (15)

85

Jammu

10

Kurnool *

48

Ahmedabad

11

Mahboobnagar *

86

Kupwara

49

Banaskantha

12

Medak

87

Pulwama

50

Bhavnagar

13

Nalgonda

51

Dang

88

Udhampur

14

Nellore *

52

Junagadh

10

Jharkhand (4)

15

Nizamabad

53

Katchch

89

Godda

16

Prakasam

54

Kheda

90

Hazaribagh #

17

Ranga Reddy

55

Mahesana

91

Palamau #

92

Ranchi

18

Srikakulam

56

Navasari

19

Vishakapatanam

57

Panchmahal

11

Karnataka (14)

20

Vizianagaram

58

Rajkot

93

Bagalkote

21

Warangal *

59

Sabarkantha

94

Bangalore Rural

22

West Godavari

60

Surat

95

Bangalore Urban

Arunachal Pradesh (4)

61

Vadodara

96

Belgaum *

23

East Siang

62

Valsad

24

Lohit

97

Bellary

Haryana (15)

25

Lower DibangValley

63

Bhiwani

98

Dakshina kannad

26

West Siang

64

Faridabad

99

Davangere

Assam (6)

65

Fartehabad

100

Gulbarga

27

Barpeta

66

Hisar

101

Hassan *

28

Jorhat

67

Jhajjar

102

Haveri

29

Kamrup

68

Jind

103

Kolar

30

Morigaon

69

Kaithal

104

Mandya

31

Nagoan

70

Karnal

105

Mysore

32

Sonitpur

71

Kurukshetra
Mewat

Tumkur

Bihar (10)

72

106

33

Begusarai

73

Mohindergarh

12

Kerala (11)

34

Bhojpur

74

Panipat

107

Alapuzzah

35

Chhapra

75

Rohtak

108

Eranakulam

36

Gaya #

76

Sirsa

109

Idduki

37

Muzaffarpur

77

Sonepat

110

Kannur

38

Nalanda

Himachal Pradesh (5)

111

Kollam

39

Patna

78

112

Kottayam

Chamba

Contd.
Annexure-XIV

115

Annual Report 2013-14


S. Name of Districts
No.

S. Name of Districts
No.

S. Name of Districts
No.

Sangli

188

Bathinda

189

Faridkot

190

Fatehgarh Sahib

191

Ferozepur

192
193

Gurdaspur
Hoshiarpur

113 Kozhikode

151

114 Pallakad

152

Satara

115 Thrissur

153

Solapur

116 Trivandrum

154

Wardha

117 Wayanand

155

Yavatmal *

13

Madhya Pradesh (20)

15

Manipur (6)

194

Jalandhar

118 Balaghat #

119 Bhind

195
196

Kapurthala
Ludhiana

120 Bidisha

121 Chhatarpur

122 Chhindwara

123 Dewas

124 Dhar

125 Guna

126 Indore

127 Morena

197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204

Mansa
Moga
Mohali
Mukatsar
Nawan Shehr
Patiala
Ropar
Sangrur

128 Panna

129 Raisen

21

Rajasthan (22)
205 Ajmer
206 Alwar

130 Ratlam

207

Banswara

131 Rewa

156
Bishnupur
157
Imphal East
158
Senapati
159
Thoubal
160
Ukhrul
161
West Imphal
Meghalaya (4)
162
East Khasi Hills
163
Jaintia Hills
164
Ri Bhoi
165
West Garo Hills
Mizoram (4)
166
Aizawl
167
Champhai
168
Kolasib
169
Saiha
Nagaland (7)
170
Dimapur
171
Kohima

16

17

18

208

Barmer

209

Bharatpur

210
211

Bhilwara
Bikaner

172
173
174
175
176

212
213

Chittorgarh
Churu

214

Dungarpur

215
216

Jaipur
Jaiselmer

217

Jhalawar

Odisha (9)
177
Cuttack
178
Jagatsinghpur
179
Puri
180
Sambalpur #
181
Baragarh
182
Khurda
183
Mayurbhanj
184
Keonjhar

218

Jhunjhanu

219

Jodhpur

220
221

Kota
Nagaur

222
223

Pratapgarh
Sikkar

224

Sri Ganganagar

225

Tonk

226

Udaipur

22

Sikkim (4)
227 East Sikkim
228 North Sikkim
229 South Sikkim

132 Sagar

133 Satna

134 Sehore

135 Shajapur

136 Shivpuri

137 Sidhi

14

Maharashtra (18)

138 Ahmednagar

139 Auranagabad

140 Beed

19

Mokokchung
Peren
Phek
Wokha
Zunheboto

141 Bhandara

142 Gondia #

143 Jalgaon

144 Jalna

145 Kolhapur

146 Lathur

147 Nagpur

148 Nanded

185

20

Punjab(19)

149 Nashik

150 Pune

186
187

Kendrapara
Amritsar
Barnala

Contd.
116

Chapter-XIV

S. Name of Districts
No.

S. Name of Districts
No.

S. Name of Districts
No.

230 West Sikkim

254

Barabanki

281

Saharanpur

23

Tamilnadu (15)

255

Bareilly

282

Sitapur

231 Coimbatore

256

Bijnor

232 Cuddalore

257

Budayun

283

Sonebhadra #

233 Dharmapuri

258

Bulandshahar

284

Sultanpur

234 Erode

259

Deoria

285

varanasi

235 Krishnagiri

260

Etah

286

Unnao

236 Namakkal

261

Faiziabad

26

Uttarakhand (6)

237 Salem

262

Farukhabad

287

Chamoli

238 Thanjavur

263

Fatehpur

288

Dehradun

239 Thirucharapalli

264

Firozabad

240 Thiruvannamalai

289

Haridwar

265

Ghaziabad

241 Tirunelveli

266

Ghazipur

290

Nainital

242 Vellore

267

Gonda

291

Pithoragarh

243 Villupuram

268

Gorakhpur

292

Udhamsingh nagar

244 Dindigul

269

Hardoi

27

West Bengal (6)

245 Madurai

270

Jaunpur

293

24 Parganas(N)

24

Tripura (2)

271

Kashiramnagar

294

Hooghly

246 West Tripura

272

Kheri

247 South Tripura

295

Nadia

273

Mahamaya Nagar

25

Uttar Pradesh (39)

296

Jalpaiguri

274

Mainpuri

248 Auraiya

275

Mathura

297

Dakshindinajpur

249 Agra

276

Meerut

298

Murshidabad

250 Aligarh

277

Moradabad

28

Goa (2)

251 Allahabad

278

Muzaffarnagar

299

North Goa

252 Azamgarh

279

Pratapgarh

300

South Goa

253 Ballia

280

Raebareli

* Suicide prone districts


# Left Wing Extremist affected districts
Note : Figures in paranthesis indicate total number of districts covered under the scheme.

Chapter-XIV

117

Audit Paras
S.
No.

118

Year

1.

19 of
2013

2.

23 of
2013
(received
only in
last week
of April,
2014)

Annexure-XV

No. of Paras/PA Reports


on which ATNs have
been submitted to PAC
after vetting by the
Audit

Annexure XV

Details of Paras/PA Reports on which ATNs are


pending
No. of ATNs
not sent by the
Ministry even
for the first
time

No. of ATNs
sent but
returned with
observations
and Audit is
awaiting their
resubmission by
the Ministry

No. of ATNs
which have
been finally
vetted by
the Audit but
have not been
submitted by
the Ministry of
PAC

2
(Para 2.1 Financial
indiscipline in DMS &
2.3 premature release of
funds to NABARD under
Salvaging and Rearing of
Male Buffalo Calves)

1
(Para 2.2
regarding short
recovery fee by
DMS

1
(Para 2.1
regarding
unfruitful
expenditure on
establishment
of specific
Pathogen Free
Shrimp Seed
Multiplication
Centre)

Abbreviations Used
AI

Artificial Insemination

AIC

Artificial Insemination Centre

AMF

Anhydrous Milk Fat

APEDA

Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority

APHCA

Animal Production and Health Commission for Asia and Pacific

ASCAD

Assistance to States for control of Animal Diseases

BE

Budget Estimate

BFDA

Brackishwater Fish Farmers Development Agency

BGC

Bovine Genital Campylobacteriosis

BOT

Build Operate and Transfer

CAA

Coastal Aquaculture Authority

CADRAD

The Centre for Animal Disease Research and Diagnosis

CALF

Centre for Analysis and Learning in Livestock and Food

CBPP

Contagious Bovine Pleuro-pneumonia

CCBF

Central Cattle Breeding Farms

CCRF

Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries

CDDL

Central Disease Diagnostic Laboratory

CFF

Campylobacter Fetus Fetus

CFSPTI

Central Frozen Semen Production and Training Institute

CFV

Campylobacter Fetus Venerealis

CHRS

Central Herd Registration Scheme

CICEF

Central Institute of Coastal Engineering for Fishery

CIFNET

Central Institute of Fisheries, Nautical and Engineering Training

CMU

Central Monitoring Unit

CPDO

Central Poultry Development Organization

CPIO

Central Public Information Officer

CSBF

Central Sheep Breeding Farm

CSO

Central Statistical Organization

CSS

Centrally Sponsored Scheme

CVE

Continuing Veterinary Education

119

120

DCI

Drugs Controller of India

DGFT

Directorate General of Foreign Trade

DMI

Directorate of Marketing and Inspection

DMS

Delhi Milk Scheme

DVCF

Dairy Venture Capital Fund

EEZ

Exclusive Economic Zone

ETT

Embryo Transfer Technology

FAO

Food and Agriculture Organization

FFDA

Fish Farmers Development Agency

FMD

Foot and Mouth Disease

FMD-CP

Foot & Mouth Disease Control Programme

FSI

Fishery Survey of India

FSU

First Stage Unit

GDP

Gross Domestic Product

GIS

Geographical Information System

GPS

Global Positioning System

HACCP

Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point

IASRI

Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute

IBM

In Board Motor

IBR

Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis

IGFRI

Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute

INAPH

Information Network for Animal Productivity and Health

IOTC

Indian Ocean Tuna Commission

ISO

International Organization for Standardization

ISS

Integrated Sample Survey

IUU

Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported

JD

Johnes Disease

MCS

Monitoring, Control and Surveillance

MIS

Management Information System

MLP

Major Livestock Products

MMSRT

Mobile Satellite Service Reporting Terminals

MPEDA

Marine Products Export Development Authority

MSP

Minimum Standard Protocol

NABARD

National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development

NCVT

National Council for Vocational Training

NDDB

National Dairy Development Board

NDRI

National Dairy Research Institute

NFDB

National Fisheries Development Board

NGC

New Generation Cooperatives

NIC

National Informatics Centre

NIFPHATT

National Institute of Fisheries, Post Harvest Technology and Training

NIPHATT

National Institute of Post Harvest Technology and Training

NPCBB

National Project for Cattle and Buffalo Breeding

NPRE

National Project on Rinderpest Eradication

NSS

National Sample Survey

NSS

National Sample Survey Organization

OBM

Out Board Motor

OIE

Office International Des Epizooties

ONBS

Open Nucleus Breeding System

PED

Professional Efficiency Development

PRI

Panchayati Raj Institution

PTP

Progeny Testing Programmes

PVCF

Poultry Venture Capital Fund

QR

Quantitative Restriction

RDDL

Regional Disease Diagnostic Laboratory

RE

Revised Estimate

RFD

Result Framework Document

RTI

Right to Information

SHG

Self Help Group

SIA

State Implementing Agency

121

122

SIP

Sanitary Import Permit

SLBTC

State Livestock Breeding and Training Centre

SLCAnGR

State Level Committee on Animal Genetic Resources

SLSMC

State Level Sanctioning and Monitoring Committee

SMP

Skimmed Milk Powder

SOP

Standard Operating Procedure

SSCC

State Semen Collection Centre

SSU

Second stage unit

STD

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

TCD

Technical Committee of Direction for Improvement of Animal Husbandry


Statistics

TCMPF

Tamil Nadu Co-operative Milk Producers Federations

TRQ

Tariff Rate Quota

TSU

Third stage unit

UBKV

Uttar Banga Krishi Viswa Vidyalaya

VCI

Veterinary Council of India

VKGUY

Vishesh Krishi and Gram Udyog Yojna

VMS

Vessel Monitoring System

Annual Report

lR;eso t;rs

Department of Animal Husbandry,


Dairying & Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India, New Delhi

Printed at: Chandu Press: 9810519841

2013-14

lR;eso t;rs

Department of Animal Husbandry,


Dairying & Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India, New Delhi