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PEM VHisHieicHiAeNM eg itrc ili en &) Steve Beawel aXe SCHTICK ! Where have you been all my life? How would you like to have hidden in your deck a device that would enable you to: * control single or multiple cards in a manner so convincing that you'll fool yourself? perform double lifts that will deceive your fellow magicians? force cards from the center of the deck without looking at the cards or holding a break? * perform other classic card sleights in a far more casual and open fashion? Intrigued? The thick card is a wonderful utility device that can be used to achieve all of these goals. Over the last few years it has dramatically transformed the overall look of my professional card work. I sincerely believe card magicians of all abilities will find something of value in this booklet. Because a thick card can be used in a wide variety of situations, I would encourage the reader to review their current card repertoire and consider how incorporating a thick card might improve routines they already perform. Finally, to those who don’t consider themselves card magicians at all, please try some of these ideas - you might just amaze yourself! Thick Schtick Introduction It’s even cheap to make! TC Controls Single Card Control Multiple Card Control False Triple Cut . TC Maltiple Lift Ambitious Card Sequence . Bluff Pass Pop Up Move TC Dribble Force CARDiac Emergency Misdirection Side Steal Stacked Thoughts .........00....00000ceeeeeeeeeees 2 Hollariz False Shufile Sneak Peek Bibliography Acknowledgements Introduction A thick card (TC) consists of two cards stuck together in perfect alignment. Because it is stiffer than the other cards it can be located rapidly and without looking whilst the deck is in dealing position or as the cards are spread between the hands. A TC never requires end for end orientation and is easier to locate than a comer short or a crimped card. Furthermore, unlike many of the more esoteric key cards, (with lumps of glue, scotch tape, etc.) it is impossible to spot from the edge of the deck and both faces of the card appear completely normal, effectively eliminating the curse of bad angles. Utilizing a TC has enabled me to maintain control of both single and multiple cards whilst handling the deck in a very casual fashion. I’m able to relax my hand and let the cards rest, gently cradled and naturally beveled, in the curve of my left fingers. Coupled with an open posture, this position conveys a complete lack of guile, Please keep this ‘relaxed dealing position’ illustration in mind as you read the text. ni When utilizing a TC I can place the deck down on a table or even ribbon spread the cards without losing control of the selection(s). In view of all these readily apparent advantages I have never understood why the TC isn’t more popular, especially when its use as a key card has been well documented in publications dating back to 1858 and probably before. Furthermore, there are 3 many situations, other than to control selected cards, in which a ‘TC can be employed and I have yet to find a reference in which its full potential has been explored. For example, a TC makes multiple lifts, the bluff pass, the dribble force and other assorted sleights substantially easier to perform. I shall begin by sharing a few tips on the construction of a TC, followed by a number of TC techniques I've discovered or developed. Because it can be used in a wide variety of situations, I would encourage the reader to review their current card repertoire and consider how incorporating a TC might improve routines they already perform, I'll conclude by detailing three effects which demonstrate how I’ve integrated a TC into routines from my existing repertoire. Along the way I'll also describe other sleights I use in conjunction with TC techniques but which are just as valuable in other contexts. These include a false triple cut, a misdirection side-steal and a false shuffle. It’s even cheap to make!!! I make a TC by sticking a joker to the back of the six of diamonds. I always use the same face card to prevent any potential confusion between shows. Obviously, avoid cards you might wish to use for other routines such as aces, tens and picture cards. Check that the cards from the deck you are intending to use have parallel and straight long edges, this is especially relevant for the TC multiple lifts. Also, a TC made from one deck may not necessarily work as well when used with another deck. For this reason I routinely make a new TC from virtually every deck I open. Using a glue stick, wipe a layer of glue across the face of the joker. Then scrape across the surface of the joker with the edge of the spare advertising card to remove excess glue and ensure a thin, even layer. Stick the joker to the back of the six of diamonds and tap each of the four edges against a flat surface to 4 ensure the cards are in perfect alignment, Place them between the pages of a hardback book and then put the book under a weight. After a few minutes remove the TC and tap all four edges on a flat surface as before. Then place it back between the pages of the book and under the weight. Allow 12 hours for the glue to dry. In my experience, a TC prepared in this manner will last as long as the deck from which it was constructed. TC Controls We'll begin our discussion of TC technique by considering an approach to controlling single and multiple cards. ‘Single Card Control. Place the TC onto the face of the deck. Spread the deck face down between the hands and invite a spectator to make a selection. After the spectator has removed a card, close the spread and cradle the deck in the left hand in a relaxed dealing position, as per the previous illustration. The selection will now be replaced directly under the TC. When the spectator is ready to return his selection, hold the face down deck by the short edges between the right thumb and middle finger. The right hand should be arched over the cards. Swing cut the top half of the deck into the left hand by picking off about half of the cards with the tip of the right forefinger and swinging them to the left. The right thumb acts as a pivot point. Grasp the ‘outer left comer of this block of cards in the left thumb crotch. Separate the hands until the two packets are clear of each other and then allow the cards in the left hand to settle into a relaxed dealing grip. Invite the spectator to replace his card on top of those in the left hand. As the selected card is replaced, the left hand should remain relaxed and loose. After the selected card has been replaced, toss the cards in the 5 right hand onto those in the left hand, thereby placing the TC immediately above the selection. This tossing action conveys an air of finality, a sense that the selected card is truly Jost. Its very important that the left hand remains relaxed rather than immediately contracting around the deck to square it. Indeed, it is easier for the performer to genuinely relax because there isn’t a pinky break to lose and despite looking very fair it is virtually impossible to lose control of the selected card. On occasions I reinforce the perception that the card is truly lost by gripping a block of cards above the TC with the right hand and dribbling them back onto those in the left hand. (See the ‘TC Dribble Force’ section of this booklet.) A pinky pull-down is used to locate the TC. Place the thumb across the outer left comer of the deck and riffle down the inner right comer with the pinky until the TC snaps past the tip of this finger. cr Regardless of the position of the TC in the deck, it can be readily located in this fashion. Using the little finger to locate the TC is an important element in the deceptiveness of these controls and vastly preferable to running the right thumb up the back of the deck. It should be noted that this technique doesn’t require the delicate touch necessary for a pinky count. The pinky pull-down is done under cover of the right hand as it grasps the cards above the break in preparation for a triple cut. The triple cut masks the fact that the position to which the 6 selected card is returned and the position at which the deck is subsequently cut are one and the same. To perform the triple cut, begin by gripping the cards above the pinky break between the right thumb and middle finger at the right inner and outer comers respectively. Pick off the upper half of the cards above the break with the right forefinger allowing the left thumb to be inserted between the right hand packets. Move the left hand packet towards the right until it can be gripped by the short edges between the right thumb and ring finger. Simultaneously grasp the middle packet with the left thumb crotch and withdraw it from between the other two. In essence, the two lower packets have been exchanged between the hands. Once the block of cards in the left hand is clear of the packets in the right, relax the left hand allowing the cards it holds to settle into a loose dealing grip. Immediately move the left hand back towards the right and grasp the top packet in the left thumb crotch. Withdraw the center block with the right hand allowing the packets remaining in the left hand to coalesce. Complete the triple cut by tossing the cards in the right hand on top of those in the left. The control is now complete with the selection on top and the TC back on the face of the deck. The ult One popular approach to controlling multiple cards is to peek or riffle force adjacent cards from the centre of the deck. After each card is forced a fresh pinky break is taken above or below it. Therefore the next card forced will lie above or below the previously forced card. This procedure is repeated thereby forcing every card within a block of cards located in the centre of the deck. In my experience a pinky break maintained con- tinuously whilst a large number of cards are chosen is difficult to conceal from all the relevant angles if one is, for example, moving around a banquet table. Also, if the pinky break is lost, 80 too are all the selected cards! After having a large number of cards selected and replaced, the performer's reputation is at stake. This factor alone accounts for much of the impact of this effect, Another approach to controlling multiple cards is to covertly displace each card as it is selected using, for example, repeated side steals or spread culls. I find that, for me, these approaches are either too slow or prone to angle problems. During the TC multiple control the cards are freely chosen and apparently returned to different parts of the deck. In addition, the selection process is very fast, takes place entirely in the hands and is angle proof. Furthermore, the cards are chosen, one at a time, using a dribbling action which subtly reinforces the notion that the previous selections are really lost. The entire control has a very loose and relaxed look. In fact, it’s the only multiple control I’ve tried where the cards even seem lost to the performer! Try it, I think you'll see what I mean, 8 The principle behind this multiple control is that freely selected cards are returned to the deck by slip cutting them below the TC. Because the location of the TC changes every time a card is selected, the impression created is that the cards are retumed to different parts of the deck. As the TC, with all the selected cards underneath it, moves towards the top of the deck it is reposition- ed using the triple cut described on pages 7-8. Begin with the deck resting face down in the left hand with the TC on the face. Lift off the top half of the deck with the right hand and dribble the cards back onto those in the left hand in a slow steady stream, inviting a spectator to call “Stop”. Cut the deck at the point where the spectator stops you, placing the cards in the left hand on top of those remaining in the right. Take the deck into a relaxed left hand dealing grip and pick up the top card between the right thumb and fingers. Raise the card so that the spectator can see the face of his selection and ask him to remember it. Simultaneously locate the TC with the left hand using the pinky pull-down technique described above, Note that displaying the selected card with the right hand directs audience attention away from the left pinky as it locates the TC. Clip the selected card face down between the right first and second fingertips. Continue by resting the selection on top of the deck in an outjogged position, holding it in place with the left thumb. 9 Release the selection with the right fingers and grip the cards above the pinky break at the right inner and outer comers between the right thumb and second finger respectively. Slip cut the chosen card under the TC by sliding the block held by the right hand out from under the selection. Replace the block of cards in the right hand on top of those in the left and then push the outjogged selection square into the deck. Several more cards may be selected and controlled by repeating the above procedure. On each occasion prepare for the dribble by lifting a block of cards from above the TC. This prevents a noticeable break in rhythm and change in sound as the TC leaves the right hand and falls into the left and also avoids the possibility of the same card being chosen twice. As each card is chosen the TC moves progressively towards the top of the deck and the selected cards collect, in order, immediately below it. Eventually, as the TC moves closer to the top of the deck, insufficient cards remain for the dribbling action. When this ‘occurs perform the triple cut, (described on pages 7-8), to move the TC and the stack below it towards the bottom of the deck. There will now be sufficient cards above the TC to enable the selection procedure to continue. 1 intermittently punctuate the above handling with a false triple cut, performed after some of the slip cuts. The false triple cut and 10 genuine triple cut are very similar in appearance which enhances the loose and flowing look of the control. False Triple Cut This false triple cut, (ie. a cut which retains the entire order of the deck), is very similar to a flourish false cut published by Aldo Colombini. Grip the face down deck at the right inner and outer comers between the right thumb and middle finger. The right hand should be arched over the cards. Swing cut the top third of the deck with the right forefinger and grasp the outer left comer of these cards in the left thumb crotch. Separate the hands until the packets clear each other and then allow the cards in the left hand to settle into a relaxed dealing grip. With the right forefinger pick off half of the cards remaining in the right hand and insert the left thumb into the gap between these packets. It will be noted that this position is identical to midway through the genuine triple cut described on pages 7-8. The false triple cut may now be completed by following the text for the genuine triple cut from the second paragraph onwards. Remember to keep the hands relaxed and to foss the final packet onto the cards resting in the left hand. ul TC Multiple Lift 1 am really excited about sharing this simple idea which I hope will assist some readers conquer, what I believe to be one of the hardest sleights in card magic, the multiple lif. Using a TC it is possible to perform a relatively simple and very convincing “break-free’ double, triple or even quadruple lift without any hesitation. Furthermore, after the card(s) has been tumed face up, it is possible to flip it face down again without relying on the natural curvature of the deck. The technique is similar to the Daley strike double lift. A TC makes it much easier to ‘strike’ the appropriate number of cards. The lift can be made whilst the deck rests in the performer’s relaxed hand, from the table or, as, my friend Charlie Justice has pointed out, whilst a spectator holds the deck! To prepare for a double lift, insert the TC third from the top of the face down deck. Then place the left thumb across the outer eR comer of the deck and lightly brush the tip of the right forefinger against the right long edge of the top cards. The top two cards will gently bend along their longitudinal axis, whilst the stiffer TC will remain on top of the deck. Take the right inner comer of the cards between the right thumb and forefinger and gently flip them face up onto the top of the deck. The cards should remain in perfect alignment. The left hhand should remain relaxed and open as the double card is 12 displayed to the audience. The double card can be tumed face down once more by repeating the above moves. Triple and quadruple lifts can be performed by inserting the TC forth or fifth from the top and proceeding in a similar manner. Ambitious Card Sequence The purpose of this section is not to describe some radical new “Ambitious Card’ sleights but to demonstrate how the handling of some of the sleights frequently associated with this classic plot can be facilitated by a TC. To begin, position the TC third from the top of the face down deck. One way of achieving this is to overhand shuffle the TC to the top of the deck, shuffle two indifferent cards on top of it, injog the next card and then shuffling off. By shuffling to the injog and throwing the balance of the deck on top, the TC will be in the required position. The deck begins face down in left hand. Turn the wrist so that the deck faces toward the left and the thumb is uppermost. Curl the left forefinger under the deck and riffle down the comer with the left thumb. Begin the riffle below the TC so as not to get a thud as the thumb passes over it. Invite the spectator to call “Stop”. Lift the talon above the thumb break with the right hand, simultaneously turing both hands counterclockwise so that the deck becomes orientated as per the illustration. The finger positions of both hands are very important in this 1B illustration because they mimic those of the bluff pass which will be performed when the selected card is replaced. Note that the right forefinger is curled on top of the deck and the remaining three fingers are positioned along the front of the right hand talon, effectively blocking the front edge of this packet from view. Note also that the left fingers allow the cards they hold to bevel making it difficult for the spectators to gauge the thickness of this packet. Push the top card off the left hand packet and offer it to the spectator, with the request that he write his initials on the face. Then return the cards in the right hand on top of those in the left. LePaul’s bluff pass.is now performed so that the selected card is replaced third from the top of the deck. It should appear to the audience that the spectator’s card is replaced into the deck using a sequence of moves that are similar to those employed during the selection process. As before, the left thumb riffles down the outer comer of the deck until the spectator calls “Stop”, Three actions are now performed simultaneously. Turn the left wrist counterclockwise, relax the left thumb allowing the break to close and lift the top two cards with the right hand. Because the TC is directly below them it’s possible to lift the top two cards without hesitation. They are held by the short edges so that the right fingers conceal that fact that only two cards have been lifted. This grip mimics the one illustrated on page 13. The left fingers relax allowing the block of cards in the left hand to bevel, making it difficult to gauge the thickness of this packet. To the audience it appears that the deck has simply been cut in preparation for the retum of the selected card. The selected card is replaced onto those in the left hand, directly on top of the TC. Slap the two cards in the right hand onto the cards in the left hand. Then immediately grip the top half of the deck with the right hand and dribble it back onto the lower half. 14 This finesse, conceived by Daryl, enhances the illusion of the spectator’s card being lost in the middle of the deck. Whilst the bluff pass appears very bold, a few trials will show that it is incredibly deceptive. Using the TC multiple lift described on page 12, triple lift to show that the selected card has retuned to the top of the deck. ‘Tum the triple card face down and then insert the top card into the middle of the deck. Double lift to show that the selection has retumed to the top once more. Note that all of the multiple turnovers are greatly facilitated by the TC. The double card will now be bent across its width, the indifferent card slip cut into the deck and the selection, which remains on top, allowed to pop up. This classic sequence originated by Fred Braue enables the performer to create the illusion that the selection has jumped visibly back to the top and is facilitated, once again, by the TC. To prepare for the pop up move, perform the beginning sequence of Cliff Green’s double lift. Rest the tip of the right forefinger on the face of the double and place the tip of the right thumb against the inner short end of the deck. Lightly brush the thumb up the back of the deck, slightly lifting the inner end of the top two cards, a move aided greatly by the presence of the TC. Whilst keeping the right forefinger in contact with the face of the 15 double card, push them forward with the right thumb until they are outjogged for about half their length. It appears to the audience that the card(s) is being slid forward by the right forefinger alone, subtly reinforcing it’s apparent singularity. Contact the center of the long edges of the double card between the left thumb and second finger. Then grasp the outer end of the double card between the right thumb and forefinger and sharply bend the cards widthwise as illustrated below. In a continuing action turn the crimped double card inwards end cover end and slip cut the top (indifferent) card into the deck. The selection remains on top of the deck and is held flat against the deck between the left thumb and second finger. By relaxing this grip, the selected card will ‘pop up’, creating the illusion that it has visibly jumped back to the top of the pack. The TC Dribble Force The main limitation of the classic dribble force is that, prior to forcing a card, the performer is required to take and maintain a thumb break. This thumb break can be difficult to control as the cards are dribbled and is exposed from the left side, Not only is the TC dribble force substantially easier than the classic version, but the TC removes the need for a thumb break thereby climinating the bad angle. Furthermore, unlike the classic dribble force, if the position of the TC is preset, it is possible to simply pick up the deck and begin the TC dribble force immediately. Begin with the TC positioned on the face of the deck with the force card immediately above it. Hold the deck face down and from above between the right thumb at the inner left corner and the right pinky at the outer right comer. The' right forefinger should be bent with its nail resting on the top of the deck. By gently pulling up with’the thumb and pinky finger the cards will flex diagonally, slip from between these fingers and fall in a smooth stream into the left hand. Explain that you are about to repeat this action and need a spectator to call “Stop”. Cut the cards so that the TC is positioned in the middle of the deck and repeat the dribbling action. The dribble will automatically stop after the TC has fallen into the left hand and can be readily timed to the spectator’s response. The force card is on the face of the right hand packet. The TC dribble force is so surefire that it is possible to force a card with a different back design confident that the stranger back won't be exposed. The next effect, ‘CARDiac Emergency’ utilizes this principle to great advantage. CARDiac Emergency Effect The performer displays a playing card, to the back of which has been affixed a large sticker bearing the words ‘Emergency Card’. ‘The face of this card isn’t shown. A selected card is subsequently signed and returned to the deck. After apparently failing to locate the selected card, the magician removes the ‘Emergency Card’ from his jacket pocket. When the face of this card is displayed to the audience, not only does the ‘Emergency Card’ match the spectator’s chosen card, but it even bears his signature! This plot has been published in various guises over the years including Ortiz’s ‘Dream Card’, Swain’s ‘Airmail Card’ and my personal favorite Randy Wakeman’s ‘Emergency Card’. The TC permits a very direct handling of Wakeman’s effect. a * Two ‘Emergency Cards’ I simply stick large labels on which I’ve printed the words “Emergency Card’ to the back of two blue backed cards. Only one of these cards is consumed during each performance of the trick. If you don’t want to undertake this small amount of preparation, simply remove two cards from a deck with a different back design from the cards with which you are performing and write ‘Emergency Card” across their backs. * Ared backed deck of cards and a marker pen. ‘Setup * Place one ‘Emergency Card’ in the inner left breast pocket of your jacket. Orientate the card so that it is back outwards. * Place the TC on the face of the deck with the second “Emergency Card’ directly above it. The deck should be replaced in its box. 18 Handling Begin by asking a spectator to hold the deck and the marker pen. Remove the ‘Emergency Card’ from your pocket, back outwards, and explain that you carry it everywhere in the unlikely event of an emergency. Return the ‘Emergency Card’ to the inner left breast pocket of your jacket. Take back the deck and remove it from the box. Then force the second ‘Emergency Card’ using the TC dribble force described on page 17. After the force the ‘Emergency Card’ is the face card of the right hand packet and so its altered back isn’t seen. Furthermore, the extremely open handling of the TC dribble force reinforces the notion that the card was freely selected and so why wouldn’t its back be the same as all the other cards? Tu the right hand palm up and invite a spectator to write his initials on the face of the ‘Emergency Card’, (Jack of Diamonds). Notice that the outer index comer of the ‘Emergency Card’ is positioned against the inner aspect of the outer pinky joint. This position is important for the next move. A hybrid of Allan Ackerman’s oujog placement move called ‘Ackerman varies Kelly’ and Ed Marlo's misdirection palm will be used to steal the ‘Emergency Card’ from the deck whilst apparently allowing the spectators to see that it has a regular back After the ‘Emergency Card” has been signed, tum the right hand 19 palm down and touch the face of this card with the tips of the left middle and ring fingers. Whilst these fingers remain in gentle contact with the ‘Emergency Card’, move the hands towards each other, anglejogging the ‘Emergency Card’ under the right palm. The ‘Emergency Card’ pivots around the outer joint of the right pinky until it can be securely held between the right pinky and the right thumb. Then contact the exposed edge of the card above the ‘Emergency Card’ with the tips of the left middle and ring fingers. Separate the hands dragging this indifferent card into a sidejogged position. Move the right hand forward bringing the indifferent sidejogged card over the left hand packet. Press the pad of the left thumb against the sidejogged card and gently clamp it on top of the left hand packet in an outjogged position. Move the right hand back, ostensibly to place the right hand cards on top of those in the left hand. As the right hand moves, 20 the indifferent card slides out from above the ‘Emergency Card” and remains outjogged on top of the left hand block. Curl the left middle and ring fingers around the right long edge of the left hand packet in order to hold the indifferent card in place and then lift the left thumb. Position the cards in the right hand over those in the left. Lay the left thumb across the back of the cards in the right hand and gently press the two packets together. As the packets coalesce, press against the exposed right long edge of the ‘Emergency Card’ with the left fingertips and push it gently into a right hand classic palm. As the ‘Emergency Card’ is pushed into the right palm, extend the right fingertips over the outjogged indifferent card and push it flush into the deck. This is a Marlo subtlety and wonderfully misdirects the side steal. Allow the right hand to swing down to your side. Keep attention focused on the deck by performing a Charlier cut. Then flip over the top card with the left fingertips. You'll be told that this isn’t the spectator’s selection. The palmed ‘Emergency Card’ is now apparently removed from the left inner breast pocket. Whilst holding the deck, open the left side of the jacket with the left hand, then reach into the left inner breast pocket with the right hand and pretend to remove the “Emergency Card’. This card is, of course, orientated with its back towards the audience. Display the ‘Emergency Card’ and then turn it around to reveal that itis the signed selection. 21 Stacked Thoughts Effect The performer dribbles the cards between his hands and invites a member of the audience to call “Stop”. Three cards are freely chosen in this fashion and handed to a spectator, who mixes them, passes a single card to the person on either side of him and retains the third card for himself. ‘The magician explains that the selected cards will be used for an experiment in mind reading. However, before undertaking this difficult feat the performer conducts a ‘warm up” exercise with one of the three spectators. His selection is lost in the deck. The cards are then spread in front of the spectator’s eyes with the request that he merely thinks ‘stop’ when he sees his card. Without looking, the performer is apparently able to detect the exact moment at which the spectator mentally stops him. All three spectators then concentrate on their selections and the magician is able to identify the card that each person is holding. During a ‘walk around’ show I often repeatedly perform the first phase of this routine for small groups of people and omit the second phase. This is because the first phase is very effective in its own right and doesn’t require resetting. To perform the second phase it is necessary for the magician to possess moderate ability with a memorized deck, by which I ‘mean that he or she is only required to know the cyclical order of the cards. I use the Joyal stack which I surprised myself by being able, as the title of Joyal’s book suggests, to memorize in six hours. However any of the other published stacks would be equally applicable. The effect achieved during the first phase was originally published by Hugard and recently popularized by Paul R. Wilson. 22 Using a stacked deck to achieve an effect of this sort was pioneered by Ted Anneman. Ron Wilson published a version based on Anneman’s idea. Presenting the effect with multiple cards was Simon Aronson’s brainchild. Mike Close and James Swain have also published multiple card versions incorporating some interesting subtleties. My contribution is in the routining of these particular tricks, using a TC as the method for the first phase and the addition of a sneaky little peek of which I am quite proud. Handling The deck is false shuffled so that the TC remains on the face and the entire stack is retained. This shuffle is a combination of a false shuffle published by Juan Tamariz coupled with a straddle ‘strip out taught to me by Guy Hollingworth and subsequently published in ‘Drawing Room Deceptions.’ My good friend Kevin Baker suggested calling it the Hollariz false shuffle. The advantage in using a weave shuffle is that the performer is able to avoid excessive bending of the TC which might damage it or draw attention to its stiffness. Grip the upper third of the deck in the left hand and weave this packet into the cards remaining in the right hand as per the illustration. The weave does not need to be perfect, but the cards in the left band must be shuffled within the block of cards in the right hand. 23 The TC remains on the bottom and should not be included in the weave. This is because the glued cards will separate during the shufile if another card is driven between them. Re-grip the cards as in the illustration below. Notice that the left thumb and second finger are positioned either side of the interwoven part of the deck and the left pinky is positioned against the inner right corner of the cards. Also note that the right thumb and second finger are positioned at the inner and outer left comers respectively. The left forefinger is curled, with its nail resting gently on the face of the TC. These finger positions are very important for the next move. Spring the cards together by applying pressure with the right thumb and second finger. As the cards spring together, those traveling inward towards the performer will move diagonally between the other cards and end up positioned as in the figure ‘below. (The right hand has been removed for clarity) Using the right pinky, pull against the outer right comer of the angled cards, moving them into a sidejogged position and enabling the left forefinger and pinky finger to straddle them and strip them out. The overt action is that of cutting the deck after the weave shuffle. The false shuffle is completed by placing the cards in the left hand on top of those in the right. Immediately begin to dribble the cards slowly between the hands and invite a spectator to call “Stop”. As you begin the dribble tum your head to the /eft, clearly facing away from the cards. After the spectator has called “Stop”, ask if he wishes to change his mind, emphasizing his genuine freedom of choice. Cut the deck at the point where you are eventually stopped and give him the top three cards. Keep your head tumed away throughout this procedure and through your body language make it very clear that you don’t want to look at any of the cards. The card on the face of the deck will now be glimpsed. Ask the spectator to mix the cards and hand one to the person standing on either side of him. Extend your arms sideways indicating the People located to his left and right. This will enable you to slimpse the outer index of the face card of the deck between the left fingers. It is essential that you move the deck into your line of vision and don’t shift your head position. This glimpse is psychologically invisible both because of the naturalness of the arm action and because you're explaining to the spectator the 25 actions you need him to carry out. Once the face card has been identified, itis a simple matter to deduce the identity of the three cards held by the spectators from the known stack order. The Spectator Thinks ‘Stop’. The spectator’s card is replaced into the deck. Whilst holding the deck in a relaxed dealing position, pinky pull-down to locate the TC, take the cards above the break in the right hand and ask the center spectator to replace his card on top of those remaining in the left hand. Replace the right hand cards on top of those in the left, positioning the TC directly above the selection. Then perform the triple false cut described on pages 7-8. Don’t forget to keep your head tumed away throughout the replacement procedure and the false cut. Ask the other two spectators holding cards to place their selections in a pocket. Don’t be put off by the simplicity of what you are about to do. It will stop laymen dead in their tracks and set them up perfectly for the final revelations. Whilst keeping your head averted, pass the cards in front of the spectator’s eyes and ask him not to say a word but to merely think stop when he sees his card. Continue passing cards into the right hand until you feel the TC. The next card is the spectator’s selection. Pause for a moment and then, without looking at the card, return it to him. When the audience reaction subsides, ask the spectator to place his card in a pocket. Identifving All Three Cards. Whilst you know the three cards in play, you don’t know which spectator holds which card. In a parlor situation I conclude the effect using a subtlety credited to Orville Meyer and popularized by Hoy in his ‘Tossed Out Deck’ effect. I simply ask all three spectators to concentrate on their selected cards. Then I continue, “[ think I have them, if you hear your card please sit down.” I proceed by calling out all three cards, to which the three spectators respond by sitting down. The sight of all three spectators sitting down at the same time is a very powerful moment and rarely fails to elicit a gasp. 26 In a more intimate close up situation where the spectators are either unable to sit down or it would appear contrived for me to ask them to do so, I approach the revelations differently. First, I simply identify a characteristic that would enable me to separate one selected card from the others, a difference in color, suit, odd/even value and so forth. I invite the spectators to concentrate on their cards and, after a brief pause, I ask them “Which of you is thinking of a ....... card?” Here I insert the color, suit or value I’ve just identified. As soon as one of the spectators responds I immediately know which of the three cards is held by that person. This ploy was published by Mike Close. | continue by identifying another characteristic that would enable me to distinguish between the two remai whilst looking directly at one of the remaining spectators, I ask “You aren’t thinking of a....... are you?”. As before, I insert the difference I’ve just identified. Following the excellent advice of T. A. Waters, I ask this question with an inflection that suggests, *You’re not trying to put one over on me, are you?’ As T. A. pointed out, with this inflection the question can be taken either ‘way and interpreted as a correct statement on your part. If the spectator replies “Yes”, I’ve identified the owner of each of the three cards. If, however, the spectator replies “No”, I continue, “I didn’t think so”, turn to the other spectator and say, “But you are, aren't you!” 1 then conclude the trick by extracting as many “Yes” answers as 1 can from each spectator en route to identifying their cards. 27 Bibliography Introduction The earliest reference to the thick card that I was able to locate is ‘Gambler's Tricks With Cards’ published by J.H. Green in 1858. It was subsequently described by Henry Hay in his “Cyclopedia of Magic’, and a modified thick card is described by John Northern Hilliard in ‘Greater Magic’. Much more recently Daryl ‘mentions the thick card on volume four of his video series on card technique. The only reference I’ve located where a thick card is used for a purpose other than a simple locator card is Al Koran’s Miracle Blindfold Card Act in Lewis Ganson’s ‘Routined Manipulation, Part 2°. Multi ntrol Good sources for information on multiple card controls include: Eddie Fechter's seminal routine ‘Eight Selections’ recently republished in ‘Fechter’, pg. 190-5. ‘Seven Card Selection’, pg. 49-54, ‘Don England's Technical Knock Outs’. Martin Nash’s' ‘Nine Times Location’, pg. 124-31, ‘Ever So Sleightly’. “Nine Card Location’, pg 69-99, ‘Darwin Ortiz At The Card Table’. Steve Spill and Doc Eason’s ‘Multiple Selection Of Cards’, pg.8-24, ‘Aspen Bar Magic’. Paul Cummins’ ‘The Multiple Selection Routine’, pg. 36-41, “From A Shuffled Deck In Use’. False Triple Cut ‘The false triple cut is a minor variation of Aldo Colombini’s “false swing cut production’, pg 9-10, “Direct Hits’. is The best book for general information on ‘Ambitious Card’ sleights is Daryl’s ‘Ambitious Card Omnibus’. 28 The Daley instantaneous double lift, (more commonly known as the strike double lift), pg. 108-9, ‘Stars of Magic’. Fred Braue’s pop up card, pg. 285, ‘Expert Card Technique’. CARDiac Emergency “The Emergency Card’ pg, 4-7 ‘Randy Wakeman Presents”. Variations on the ‘Emergency Card’ plot include: “The Dream Card’, pg. 81-5, ‘Darwin Ortiz At The Card Table’. James Swain’s “The Airmail Card’, pg. 1-6, ‘Miracles With Cards’. ‘Ackerman varies Kelly was published in the Esoteri Ed Marlo’s misdirection palm, pg. 55-7, ‘The Cardician’. Stacked Thoughts ‘The Martin Joyal stack, “The Six Hour Memorized Deck’. Juan Tamariz’s false cascade shuffle, pg. 77-81, ‘Sonata’. Guy Hollingworth’s false shuffle, pg. 169-77, ‘Drawing Room Deceptions’. The effect whereby a spectator mentally stops you as they see their selected card was brought to my attention by Paul R. Wilson, on his ‘Knock ‘Em Dead’ videotape. Identifying thought of cards using a stacked deck was pioneered by Ted Anneman, ‘New $1000 Test Card Location’, pg. 275-6, “Practical Mental Magic’. Adaptations of this approach for single and multiple cards include those published by: Ron Wilson, ‘Whispering Queen’, pg. 58-60, ‘The Uncanny Scot’. James Swain, ‘A Tribute to Dunninger’, pg. 20-22, ‘21st Century Card Magic’. Mike Close, ‘Myopia’, pg. 134-7, ‘Workers 5’. Mike cites Simon 29 Aronson’s effect ‘Simon Eyes’ from ‘The Aronson Approach’. TA. Waters is cited, a reference from his excellent essay on pumping, pg. 77, ‘Mind, Myth and Magic’. Acknowledgments I would like to thank Frank Coyne for preparing a wonderful set of illustrations for this booklet. I would also like to thank Krys Bedwell, Kevin Baker, Charlie Justice and Artie Kidwell for proofreading the manuscript. The blame for any errors does, of course, still lie with me. Finally, thanks again to Artie and also to Barry Stevens for assisting me search the literature for references to the thick card. 30