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Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City
Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City
Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City
Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City
Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City
Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City
Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City
Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City
Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City

Joburg

2010 FIFA World Cup TM Host City

Joburg 2010 FIFA World Cup T M Host City A World Class African Host City

A World Class African Host City

Foreword

Introduction

P6-7

2010 Office

P8-10

Facilities

Training grounds

P11-13

Infrastructure

P14-15

Safety and security, soccer

Legacy projects

legends, public viewing areas, Football for Hope and IBC

P16-19

2010 FIFA World Cup

TM

Match Schedule

P20-23

P24

Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23
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Cup TM M a t c h S c h e d u l e P20-23

Prioritising the people who make it happen

Prioritising the people who make it happen Fifa President Sepp Blatter and Spanish Fifa Executive Council

Fifa President Sepp Blatter and Spanish Fifa Executive Council Member Angel Maria Villar Llona (right) present a coin commemorating Joburg’s hosting of the Confederations Cup to Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo last year.

A World Class African Host City

Clr Amos Masondo last year. A World Class African Host City Joburg – 010 FiFA World

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

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Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

Host City

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup

TM

Foreword

Hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM is a once-in-a- generation opportunity for any city. Johannesburg’s time will come in 2010 when the cream of the football- playing world and their supporters arrive in the City.

Johannesburg will be a proud and worthy host of the festival. Our track record over the years shows that we are capable and qualified to manage an event of this magnitude.

But our readiness goes way beyond technical require- ments and brick and mortar elements of moving peo- ple, accommodating them and hosting them in world- class stadiums.

Johannesburg also brings an enthusiasm and a wel- coming spirit to this event. The people of our City love soccer and we can hardly wait for the first whistle to blow.

Johannesburg’s readiness owes much to the support it has received from the national and provincial gov- ernments and departments responsible for the prepa- rations and planning for the event.

President Jacob Zuma set the example by inspiring our people to use this opportunity to celebrate our growth as a nation, while Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe continued to commend the City on the progress it was making.

The event will bear testimony to the dedication and hard work of the Mayoral Committee of Johannesburg,

the City Manager, his senior executives and every per- son working for the City – from its top management to people responsible for construction and maintenance.

When we started out with our preparations we made a commitment to the people of Johannesburg that the money spent on the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM will not be funding a once-off event. Our objective has been to leave a lasting legacy to the City that will be enjoyed by residents long after the cheers in the stadiums have been heard.

This publication shows that we have kept our prom- ises. We have utilised the momentum generated by hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM to accelerate a number of infrastructure projects and initiate many others.

Thus, after 2010 the people of Johannesburg will con- tinue to benefit from a cleaner environment, greener city, safer urban setting and better facilities in terms of transport, commerce, health and leisure.

Our preparations for the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM are well on track and on schedule. Many of our key facili- ties have already been completed and are waiting for the arrival of our visitors.

Ke nako. South Africa is ready. Johannesburg is ready.

Clr Amos Masondo Executive Mayor

The City of Johannesburg is in the final stag- es of its preparations to host

The City of Johannesburg is in the final stag- es of its preparations to host the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM . What started off as a dream

a mere four years ago has now become a reality.

For a long time the City resembled a mas- sive construction site as stadiums rose from the rubble and roads had to be diverted to make way for earth-moving machinery and giant trucks. Now that the final product is tak- ing shape our residents, who have endured inconvenience and disruptions in their daily lives, are able to see the bigger picture.

Hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM is

a major project for any city, more so for

Johannesburg as an emerging metropolitan region that has to deal with the legacy of decades of skewed planning, wrong priorities and the marginalisation of the majority of its population.

Thus, the initiatives that we have identified as Legacy Projects will enable us to address the backlogs and leave in their wake a better, more efficient and more inclusive City.

To host an event of this magnitude requires more than technical expertise and manage- ment skills. It requires vision, drive, commit- ment and passion. Johannesburg has been

Introduction

fortunate to have the Executive Mayor, Clr Amos Masondo, at the helm throughout the planning and implementation stages of this project.

Without his visionary leadership, ably sup- ported by his Mayoral Committee and execu- tive management, Johannesburg’s hosting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM would not have been possible. We also extend our apprecia- tion to every official of the City who has made a contribution to our efforts.

Over the past four years we have seen the “best and the brightest” that South Africa can produce work together towards a common objective. We want to thank our private sector partners, our contractors, our fin- anciers and our colleagues in the Local Organising Committee and FIFA for their contributions. This is, indeed, a job well done.

With most of the hard miles behind us, it is almost time to relax and enjoy the excitement of the world’s greatest sporting festival – the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

Clr Bafana Sithole Member of the Mayoral Committee Community Development

A World Class African Host City

Community Development A World Class African Host City Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host
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Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup
TM
Host City •
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Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

2010 Office

The City of Johannesburg is looking forward to hosting the nations of the world during the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

As the premier host city of this global tournament, we are keenly aware of our responsibility to deliver a quality event and to present visitors with quality infrastructure and services.

The City is at present in the final stages of its preparations and there should be no doubt that we will be ready well ahead of June 11 – the day the first ball of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM will be kicked at Soccer City.

This booklet provides a comprehensive overview of Johannesburg’s successes in preparing for the tournament – from our magnificent stadiums and training grounds to the legacy projects that will make our City a better place to live in long after the excitement of the event has died down.

The hosting of 2010 FIFA World Cup TM is the result of a massive team effort. It will come about because of the visionary leadership of the Executive Mayor, Clr Amos Masondo, and his mayoral team, provincial and national government, support of the full Council, the cooperation between all departments and agencies in the City, the hard work of dedicated officials and the exceptional partnerships we have developed with the private sector, contractors, FIFA and the 2010 Local Organising Committee (LOC).

For the people of Johannesburg this will be an unprecedented event. Our local residents will be able to interact with visitors from across the world and have the opportunity to expose them to the City’s hospitality, friendly attitudes and world-class service.

We are determined to deliver the best World Cup ever. This will be an event that will make the people of Johannesburg truly proud of our world-class African City.

Ms Sibongile Mazibuko Executive Director: 2010

A World Class African Host City President Jacob Zuma and FIFA President Sepp Blatter lead
A World Class African Host City President Jacob Zuma and FIFA President Sepp Blatter lead

A World Class African Host City

A World Class African Host City President Jacob Zuma and FIFA President Sepp Blatter lead the

President Jacob Zuma and FIFA President Sepp Blatter lead the proceedings at the draw for the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM in Cape Town in December 2009. Blatter hands the official 2010 ball Jabulani to CEO of the 2010 Fifa Local Organising Committee Danny Jordaan. Football celebrities Doctor Khumalo, Phil Masinga, Roger Milla and Kalusha Bwayla were among those present for the event.

Milla and Kalusha Bwayla were among those present for the event. Joburg – 010 FiFA World
Milla and Kalusha Bwayla were among those present for the event. Joburg – 010 FiFA World

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

Facilities Soccer Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues
Facilities Soccer Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues
Facilities Soccer Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues
Facilities Soccer Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues
Facilities Soccer Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues
Facilities Soccer Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues
Facilities Soccer Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues

Facilities

Facilities Soccer Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues for

Soccer

Johannesburg is the only host city in the country that provides two venues for the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM – namely Soccer City, where both the opening ceremony and final match will take place; and Ellis Park.

The decision by FIFA and the Local Organising Committee (LOC) to allocate 15 out of the 64 matches to Johannesburg not only confirms confidence in the ability of the City’s infrastructure, transport, electricity, water and accommodation to cater for a large number of visitors, but it is also an acknowledgement of the City’s proven track record in staging events of this mag- nitude.

Since 1994 Johannesburg has played host to a number of important global sporting and cultural events, includ- ing:

important global sporting and cultural events, includ- ing: • 1995 Rugby World Cup • 1996 Africa

• 1995 Rugby World Cup

• 1996 Africa Cup of Nations

• 1998 IAAF Athletics World Cup

• 1999 All Africa Games

• 2003 Cricket World Cup

• 2004 World Summit on Sustainable Development

• 2005 World Petroleum Conference

• 2009 IPL Cricket Tournament

Soccer City

Think about the world’s most iconic soccer stadiums … the Nou Camp in Barcelona, the largest stadium in Europe; Yokohama Stadium in Japan that hosted the 2002 FIFA World Cup TM finals between Brazil and Germany; New Wembley in London the home of the tra-

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

dition-rich FA Cup finals; Aztec Stadium in Mexico City; the Olympiastadion in Berlin, built in 1936 and reno- vated for the 2006 FIFA World Cup TM Final …

Now, add Soccer City in Johannesburg, the 11th larg- est stadium in the world with a seating capacity of more than 90 000.

Its striking calabash design will be one of the iconic symbols of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM … unique, distinct and unashamedly African. This is where the nations of the world will do battle for the ultimate prize in football. This is the image that will be seen by billions of television viewers across the globe that will focus their attention on South Africa in 2010.

Also known as FNB Stadium, Soccer City was built in 1987 and had distinctive blue and white plastic bucket seats for 80 000 people. A two-metre wide “moat” ran around the entire field to protect players from pitch inva- sions by spectators.

The first football game to be played here was, appro- priately, a Soweto derby between Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates, two of the most popular teams in Johannesburg and South Africa. Subsequently, it staged some of the most memorable football matches in the country, hosting numerous cup finals, charity matches and internationals involving the national team, Bafana Bafana.

Besides being the premier venue for football matches, the stadium will be remembered for the mass rally held

in 1990 to welcome the release of Nelson Mandela from prison. About 100 000 people swarmed into the stadium to hear Mandela, who was later to be elected as the country’s first democratically-elected president, call for a united South Africa.

The stadium has been completely redesigned and almost rebuilt from scratch at a cost of R2, 3 billion. The upgrades involved extending the upper tier around the stadium to increase its capacity to 94 700; adding 99 more suites to bring the present number to 184; providing easy access and designated seating for the disabled; constructing an encircling roof; adding new change room facilities and providing new floodlighting.

In addition, private boxes, VIP suites, eight television presentation studios, a soccer museum and a 300-seat- er restaurant are being built. New public parking for 15 000 cars is being added and a VIP underground parking for 4 055 cars has been provided. The design of the new stadium is inspired by the African calabash, and its aesthetic appeal will be heightened when the stadium is lit up at night to resemble a tradi- tional African cooking pot.

The calabash was selected as it is one of the most recognisable objects associated with the continent. The “calabash” stadium sits on a “pit of fire”, a depression that demarcates the security and line of turnstiles sepa- rating the outer areas and secure inner areas.

Strategically located near Soccer City is SAFA House, where the offices of FIFA and the 2010 FIFA World

A World Class African Host City City Cup T M Organising Committee South Africa are

A World Class African Host City

City

Cup TM Organising Committee South Africa are housed. With its distinctive football-shaped dome, the building is already one of the legacies of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

The area around Soccer City Stadium is also undergoing a major upgrade. Running north of the stadium is the Soweto Highway, which has been wid- ened and forms part of the City’s Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system. More than R120 million is being pumped into the Nasrec precinct, in which the stadium falls. Here the upgraded Expo Centre will house the International Broadcast Centre (IBC), the nerve centre for all television operations and the world’s news agencies for the four-week duration of the World Cup.

Construction at Soccer City in June 2009

As part of the upgrades, the precinct will have a fully-functional transport hub, including a railway station. The rail system will serve future industrial, commercial and resi- dential developments planned for the area after the soccer tournament.

Besides the rail station, the transport hub will have taxi, bus and rail drop-off and pick-up points. The total public transport capacity of the hub is projected at 23 280 an hour. Soccer City is, clearly, the “jewel in the crown” of South Africa’s hosting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM . For generations to come it will be a sym- bol of a nation that dared to dream big and claim its rightful place among the nations of the world.

FAST FACTS

Name: Soccer City Stadium

Owner: City of Johannesburg

2010 Venue: Opening ceremony, four first-round matches, one second-round match, one quarter final and the final

Capacity: 94 700

Where: Off Nasrec Road, Nasrec, on the outskirts of Soweto

Completed: Stadium Bowl October 2009

Scope of work: Three seating tiers; new management offices, change rooms, four tunnels and basement; 230 private boxes; 184 suites; two VIP suites; one VVIP suite; one

super suite; media section with 2 451 seats; eight TV presentation studios; new roof and cladding all round; 32 turnstiles; 71 concession kiosks; soccer museum; an "African Pot" museum and 300-seat restaurant.

Parking: 15 000 at parking area around stadium and 4 055 VIP underground parking.

Jobs created: 1 300 workers working full-time on site. More than 1 000 000 working hours completed without a single injury.

than 1 000 000 working hours completed without a single injury. Joburg – 010 FiFA World
than 1 000 000 working hours completed without a single injury. Joburg – 010 FiFA World
than 1 000 000 working hours completed without a single injury. Joburg – 010 FiFA World
than 1 000 000 working hours completed without a single injury. Joburg – 010 FiFA World

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s

Ellis Park

Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most
Ellis Park Ellis Park For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most

Ellis Park

For decades Ellis Park was known as one of the world’s most recognisable rugby stadiums and the venue for leg- endary clashes between the South African Springboks, the All Blacks of New Zealand and the British Lions.

In 2010 its fame will spread to the supporters of the “beautiful game” as thousands of soccer fans will flock to the stadium in the centre of Johannesburg to cheer on the teams participating in the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM . The first rugby games in the City were played at the old Wanderers Club, whose grounds are today Johannesburg’s Park Station. But a stadium dedicated to rugby was needed and in 1927 an area was identified in Doornfontein for that purpose.

Negotiations were held between the union and the Johannesburg City Council’s JD Ellis, after whom Ellis Park was named, and 13 acres were set aside. The sta- dium was built in eight months and in June 1928 the first test was played against the All Blacks. The old stadium was demolished in March 1979 to make way for a bigger, more modern facility. A decision was taken to place Ellis Park Stadium under the management of a trust. In 1987 it was listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, the JSE.

On 24 June 1995 it hosted the Rugby World Cup Final, and then President Nelson Mandela came out of the tunnel wearing the Number 6 jersey. South Africa won the Cup against New Zealand and Ellis Park became a symbol of a united South Africa.

tional seating. Ellis Park seats 62 000 fans, an increased capacity of almost nine percent from the previous 57 000. The stadium sports a row of disabled-friendly seats on its east and south stands.

Other work included upgrades to the change rooms, VIP, media and medical facilities and a new north entrance.

A stage has also been added to the bottom of the north

stand for other events. Beautification of the area has also been undertaken, making it fan-friendly and easing the flow of pedestrian traffic.

The general area around the precinct is benefiting from

a R2 billion refurbishment, complementing the upgrades at Ellis Park.

refurbishment, complementing the upgrades at Ellis Park. Ellis Park successfully hosted the Confederations Cup in

Ellis Park successfully hosted the Confederations Cup in 2009.

The City of Johannesburg owns the land on which the stadium has been constructed. In 2005 it became the first black-owned stadium in South Africa when the Golden Lions Rugby Union handed the management of Ellis Park Precinct to a company with 51 percent black ownership. Interza Lesego, Orlando Pirates FC and Ellis Park Stadium (Pty) Ltd make up the new management.

Today Ellis Park is the home ground of both Orlando Pirates Football Club and the Golden Lions Rugby franchise. While Soccer City is a

completely new construction, Ellis Park required only a major revamp for the 2010 FIFA World

Cup

TM .

The changes involved the construction of a five- level car park with 1 200 parking bays and addi-

Regeneration is taking the form of a multi-developmental project, with plans focusing on education, sports and manufacturing across Ellis Park and its neighbouring suburbs of Doornfontein, Bertrams, Bezuidenhout Valley, Troyeville, Judith’s Paarl and Lorentzville. The multi-billion rand transformation of the area is expected to reverse inner city decline and attract invest- ment. The greater Ellis Park precinct is home to three international sports complexes – Johannesburg Stadium, Ellis Park Stadium and an Olympic-size swimming pool.

The Doornfontein and Ellis Park railway stations are being upgraded to cope with the expected increase in the number of visitors and the City’s new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system, Rea Vaya, is already servicing Ellis Park. All work on the stadium has been completed and Ellis Park has already survived its “baptism of fire” with the successful hosting of the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup TM .

10 Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

A World Class African Host City A section of Orlando Stadium Training grounds In addition

A World Class African Host City

A World Class African Host City A section of Orlando Stadium Training grounds In addition to

A section

of Orlando

Stadium

Training grounds

In addition to the two primary match venues, Johannesburg will provide three training grounds to be used by some of the teams to prepare for their 2010 FIFA World Cup TM matches.

These stadiums have been tried and trusted venues for local sports events over many years, each with its own history and tradition and a comfortable familiarity for sports fans.

The 2010 FIFA World Cup TM has afforded the City the opportunity to revitalise these stadiums and conduct sig- nificant upgrades that will make them valuable assets for the people of Johannesburg.

Like the match stadiums, these training grounds will form an integral part of City life after the global tournament and will continue to serve their surrounding communities. Long-term management plans are being put in place to ensure the economic viability of the stadiums and encour- age public access to their facilities.

Orlando Stadium

Designed and rebuilt from scratch, the “old lady”, as it is affectionately known among its loyal patrons, will continue to draw crowds after the completion of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM . The new Orlando Stadium, completed in 2008 is, by any standard, a world-class football venue. The R280 million stadium was rebuilt after the original venue was demol- ished in 2006 to make way for a brand new, 40 000-seater structure.

Built exactly half a century ago, Orlando Stadium has for many years served as the home of the Johannesburg Bantu Football Association and two famous Soweto foot-

ball clubs – Orlando Pirates and Moroka Swallows. Years later, the stadium became a venue for political meetings. It rose to prominence during the Soweto stu- dents’ uprising of June 1976 when it became the preferred venue for a mass meeting of schoolchildren. They had planned to march from Orlando West Secondary School in Vilakazi Street to Orlando Stadium in protest against the teaching of Afrikaans in Soweto schools.

On the sporting side, Orlando Stadium is best remem- bered by locals for hosting Soweto derbies involving Orlando Pirates, Kaizer Chiefs and Moroka Swallows that were characterised by intense rivalry.

The new stadium boasts 120 suites that can be turned into hospitality venues. It also has conference facilities, meeting rooms, a gymnasium, fan shop and offices. In addition, it has two VIP suites, one VVIP suite, a 200- seater auditorium and 60 concession kiosks. A new underground parking facility can accommodate up to 2 500 cars. A parking area for buses is situ- ated at the stadium’s north end.

The stadium has a contemporary design with an encircling roof that cov- ers 70 percent of spectators. Lighting is provided by 272 floodlights, which are located on the roof.

The three seating tiers comprise 40 000 blue seats. The VIP and VVIP suites are serviced by two lifts. The City’s Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system runs to the east of the sta-

dium, while rail transport complements the BRT on the west- ern side.

The community at large has benefited from the construction, especially people living in its vicinity. More than 2 200 jobs have been created and training was provided in the fields of carpentry, bricklaying, plastering and painting. Fifty percent of the people who worked on the stadium came from the townships of Orlando, Mzimhlophe, Diepkloof and surrounding areas. Half of the workers were women and youth.

surrounding areas. Half of the workers were women and youth. Soccer legends during the official opening
surrounding areas. Half of the workers were women and youth. Soccer legends during the official opening
surrounding areas. Half of the workers were women and youth. Soccer legends during the official opening

Soccer legends during the official opening of Orlando Stadium in 2009

A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November
A section of Rand Stadium

A section of Rand Stadium

Speaking at the opening of the new stadium in November 2008, the Executive Mayor of Johannesburg, Clr Amos Masondo, said: “Joburg does it again. Mintirho ya vula vula, sekuya ngamagama enkehli reflects the work done thus far. What we see today is one of the first key 2010 milestones. We have transformed the ‘old lady’, Orlando Stadium, into a fully FIFA compliant, world-class stadium.”

Rand Stadium

One of the City’s oldest soccer venues, Rand Stadium, has undergone a R76 million revamp in preparation for the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

Located just a few kilometres from the central busi- ness district and a stone’s throw from the Turffontein Racecourse, Rand Stadium was completed well ahead of the arrival of the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup TM teams that used its facilities as a training ground.

First constructed in 1951, the stadium was one of the

premier soccer venues in Johannesburg and has host- ed some of the biggest names in world football, includ- ing Real Madrid, Newcastle United and Arsenal. The National Football League (NFL), which was launched in 1959 as the country’s first professional club league, reserved for whites, set up home at the stadium.

Although apartheid laws separated blacks from whites in all social activities, football matches involving black and white teams were staged at Rand Stadium.

Football was not the only sport played at the venue. On 13 September 1975, a record crowd of 45 000 watched Argentinean boxer Victor Galindez defeat local hero Pierre Fourie over 15 rounds. Although the stadium was being used consistently, it needed serious attention. In 2006, the old stadium was demolished and a new R76 million stadium built in its place.

Building of the stadium started in January 2007 and involved constructing a new grandstand. Seating around the stadium has also been refurbished, with the old steel stands replaced and new chairs added. Now completed, the stadium has seating for 25 000 fans.

The old scoreboard, in the eastern corner, has been retained for its heritage status, but has been given a revamp to complement the refurbishments done on the rest of the stadium.

The pitch is up to FIFA standards and will be similar to those at Soccer City and Ellis Park stadiums. According to FIFA regulations, all training venue pitches must be of the same standard as World Cup host stadiums.

Ruimsig Stadium

Originally designed and constructed as a world-class athletics stadium, Ruimsig has been refurbished to com- ply with stringent FIFA requirements. All-time athletic greats such as double-world record holder Michael Johnson and Namibian sprint star Frankie Fredericks set world-class times on the Ruimsig tartan track.

Located in Roodepoort, on the western side of Johannesburg, Ruimsig only needed minor upgrades to ensure its readiness to serve as a training venue. The conference hall, irrigation system and change rooms were revamped and the pitch was over-seeded to com- ply with international standards and more lighting put up.

The stadium precinct is being upgraded to create addi- tional parking space. The stadium has already earned its spurs. During the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup TM Asian champions Iraq used it for their preparations. The team was full of praise for the quality of the facilities.

Situated in a tranquil area, away from the hustle and bustle of the city, Ruimsig will certainly be a favourite “home away from home” for many 2010 FIFA World Cup TM teams.

Dobsonville Stadium

Tucked away in the township of Dobsonville is one of Soweto’s famous football venues, Dobsonville Stadium.

Situated on Main Road, between Montlahla and Majova streets, the stadium has undergone refurbishments to the tune of R69 million in preparation for the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

1 Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

Work on the stadium started in January 2006 and was completed by March 2009. It

Work on the stadium started in January 2006 and was completed by March 2009. It now seats up to 24 000 fans.

Originally constructed in 1975, the stadium became the focal point of football in the township and many big pre- miership matches were played there.

However, a slump in soccer fever led to it being under- utilised in the ensuing years and the wall around it was vandalised, leading to the theft of fittings in the change rooms. Its glory was restored in 1985 when a high pre-cast wall was erected around the venue and it was spruced up. And one of the big teams in South Africa

it was spruced up. And one of the big teams in South Africa A syntheic athletics

A syntheic athletics track at Dobsonville Stadium has ensured its future use for track and field events.

– Moroka Swallows – made Dobsonville Stadium their home ground. For the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM , the old stadium has been completely revamped, with a new grandstand and world-class facilities added. Costing R69 million, the refurbishments include new seating and a roof covering the western grand- stand. The original stadium consisted of embankments on the eastern, southern and northern sides, but these have now been converted into stands.

Dobsonville Stadium now has a contemporary design with a roof covering spectators on the grandstand. Lighting is provided by four floodlight towers at each of the four corners of the stadium.

The grandstand boasts new suites, media facilities, change rooms and a gym with state-of-the-art computer- ised equipment to get players into shape. Because the stadium will also be used as a track and field venue in future, a synthetic athletics track was built and new polycarbonate seats installed around it.

The precinct around the stadium has also been spruced up. Construction of pedestrian walkways on the east, north and west of the stadium is complete and turnstiles have been added on the northern and eastern sides. A number of local people were employed during the con- struction process.

After the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM the stadium will benefit the local community and schools. It will offer the use of the gym to the community at low rates. The athlet- ics track will benefit local schools. Office facilities will

A World Class African Host City

The completed grandstand at Dobsonville Stadium.
The completed grandstand at
Dobsonville Stadium.

also be offered to Soweto-based sports organisa- tions.

Speaking after

a recent visit to

Dobsonville Stadium, the Executive Mayor of Johannesburg, Clr Amos Masondo, said: “I am confident that the com- munity over here will use the stadium even after the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM . It is very important that as we move into the future, we create quality facilities that will stand the test and are up to standard.”

He added that the stadium was the pride of Soweto, one

of the townships that previously lacked quality infrastruc-

ture.

“People must remember that the work that we are doing has also to do with restoring the dignity of our people. The stadium is a very good intervention and this is an indicator of where we are going as South Africans,” said Masondo.

of where we are going as South Africans,” said Masondo. Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg
infrastructure Infrastructure The 2010 FIFA World Cup T M is an important catalyst for Johannesburg

infrastructure

Infrastructure

The 2010 FIFA World Cup TM is an important catalyst for Johannesburg to upgrade existing infrastructure and introduce services that will bring lasting benefits to the residents of the City.

The majority of these projects are part of the City’s medium- to long-term planning but their implementation has been brought forward to ensure Johannesburg’s state of readiness for 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

Delivering his State of the Nation Address on 3 June 2009, President Jacob Zuma said the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM should be regarded as “a long-term investment that seeks to accelerate the construction of infrastruc- ture whose legacy will outlive the actual football event”. “We have, as government and the nation at large, pledged that the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM will leave a proud legacy from which our children and our communi- ties will benefit for many years to come,” he said.

Johannesburg Medium-Term Budgets in recent years have reflected these priorities. In its preparations for

2010 FIFA World Cup TM the City has to ensure that it has dependable infrastructure that will meet the needs not only of the residents, but also of an estimated 500 000 visitors who will be in Johannesburg at one or other stage of the tournament.

An ongoing project to upgrade the City’s water and electricity infrastructure is in progress and there should be no concerns that the increase in demand for these services will not be met.

Electricity provider Eskom has entered into agreements with the local industry to manage the demand for power during expected peak periods. Back-up power and generators have been provided at all 2010 FIFA World Cup TM venues in the unlikely event of power failures.

The City’s road transport network is being upgraded as part of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project. Large sections of the new highway system that con- nects Johannesburg with Tshwane and the OR Tambo International Airport will be completed by the start of the

tournament, thus easing the congestion on the roads. The Gautrain Project was not designed with 2010 in mind, but there is still optimism that the link between Sandton and OR Tambo International Airport might be opened in time for the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

The starter service of the Rea Vaya Bus Rapid Transit System became operational on September 1, 2009. The trunk route connects Soweto via the inner city to Ellis Park – the venue for seven of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM matches.

The objective of Rea Vaya is to provide a faster, cheap- er and safe public transport system as an alternative to private cars. The service will cut down on traffic vol- umes, decrease traffic jams and gridlock and drastically reduce travelling times between various destinations in the City.

During the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup TM , Johannesburg introduced “iTransie 2 Ellis Park”, a dedi- cated bus service to ferry passengers between park-

a dedi- cated bus service to ferry passengers between park- Member of the Mayoral Committee Rehana

Member of the Mayoral Committee Rehana Moosajee, Bus Rapid Transit system steering committee official Eric Motswane, Gauteng MEC for Transport Bheki Nkosi, Gauteng MEC for Public Safety Khabisi Mosunkutu, Joburg MMC Tshidi Mfikoe and BRT steering committee member Boyboy Mogorosi at the launch of the BRT in August 2009.

1 Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

Joburg Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo, Sports and Recreation Minister Stofile Makhenkesi and Public Works
Joburg Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo, Sports and
Recreation Minister Stofile Makhenkesi and Public Works
Minister Geoff Doidge on a site visit to Soccer City.
Minister Stofile Makhenkesi and Public Works Minister Geoff Doidge on a site visit to Soccer City.

Orlando Stadium

its Soweto Highway with dedicated BRT bus lane and-ride facilities and the match venue. The
its

its

Soweto

Highway

with

dedicated

BRT bus

lane

and-ride facilities and the match venue. The buses were introduced in partnership with the taxi industry and Gauride, a provin- cial initiative to shuttle people from across province to the City on big match days.

Other important City infrastructure projects that have

benefited from the 2010 planning process

A World Class African Host City

 

includ-

• The Bara Link development node, including significant upgrades to its transport capacity and the creation of commercial and retail space;

ing projects in the suburbs

• The revitalisation of the Ellis Park precinct through the re- alignment of roads, the upgrading of public transport facilities and the construction of pedestrian walkways and bridges;

of Bezuidenhout, Bertrams and Berea.

• Significant upgrades to the road system in the Nasrec precinct and the development of new commercial, leisure and residen- tial infrastructure near the new Soccer City Stadium;

• The development of an International Transit and Shopping Centre in Joubert Park to accommodate the needs of long-dis- tance travellers and day-visitors to Johannesburg.

• The reconstruction of the eastern gateway into the City,

• The reconstruction of the eastern gateway into the City, Following a recent visit to the

Following a recent visit to the City to evaluate the progress made in the upgrading of infrastructure, Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe said he was exceptionally impressed by what he saw. “Other 2010 host cities can do well to follow the example of what Johannesburg is doing in its preparations to host the football spectacular,” the Deputy President said.

A BRT

station

at

Charlton

Terrace

the Deputy President said. A BRT station at Charlton Terrace Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe joins Executive
the Deputy President said. A BRT station at Charlton Terrace Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe joins Executive

Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe joins Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo on a tour of the 2010 Legacy Projects in 2009.

Street furniture in the inner city

Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M
Legacy projects From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup T M

Legacy projects

From the outset Johannesburg decided that the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM should be used to create facilities, improve infrastructure and mobilise resources that would leave a lasting legacy for the people of the City.

Legacy

government programmes? How do we ensure that we work in such a way that long after the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM spectacle has come and gone we are able to point at various quality legacy projects that will continue to benefit our residents and citizens? What should these legacy projects be and how should we

Speaking at a function to launch the City’s legacy projects in January 2007, Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo set his administration a number of ambi- tious targets: “How should we utilise the pressure that comes with the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM to deepen all the work we are already doing through various

Joburg Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo plants a tree at the Pennyville housing development in

Joburg Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo plants a tree at the Pennyville housing development in Soweto.

identify them?”

Two years after this event it is quite clear that the legacy projects introduced are all nearing completion and hold the prospect of significantly improving the quality of life of Johannesburg com- munities.

Modern Sports Complex

Quality sports facilities in Soweto have always lagged behind what has been available to resi- dents in other parts of the City. The new sports complex will go a long way to addressing these imbalances.

The facility currently being constructed in Orlando

consists of an Olympic-size swimming pool

and an indoor sports complex that will be used as a gymnastics hall.

The area has been chosen because it forms part of a major sports and education precinct being developed. There is also excellent transport avail- ability and it is close to Orlando Stadium and the community hall.

Communities affected by the development of the sports complex will be provided with housing near the new Jabavu Sports precinct.

1 Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

Upgrading of Street Furniture Street furniture in the inner city is being upgraded or replaced

Upgrading of Street Furniture

Street furniture in the inner city is being upgraded or replaced and additional litter bins are being provided. Areas being covered include the Ellis Park precinct, Hillbrow and the inner city.

Through this initiative the number and position of dust- bins will be increased; the type, number and position of informal traders’ stalls will be improved; and uniform street lighting introduced.

The style, detail and quantities of the proposed street furniture are currently being determined to finalise budg- et options. This is one project that could be investigated as a public-private partnership.

In partnership with the private sector, Johannesburg approved an Inner City Regeneration Charter, a strate- gic document outlining how to address issues of urban regeneration and economic development. One of the ways identified for achieving this strategy is to create high quality public spaces.

More than R241 million has been spent on the greater Ellis Park area through the Johannesburg Development Agency over the past seven years. This has included beautifying the whole area with street furniture, artwork and lighting and the provision of additional infrastruc- ture.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

The first phase of Johannesburg’s modern new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system was introduced in August 2009. Rea Vaya – as the service is known – puts Johannesburg on par with some of the world’s most

modern cities such as Toronto in Canada, Bogotá in Colombia and Boston in the USA, which have all utilised BRT to address their transport challenges.

The new system involves modern buses travelling along dedicated median bus lanes with safe and attractive bus stations situated about 500m apart. Cutting-edge tech- nology has been introduced to ensure pre-board fare collection and fare verification.

Phase 1A, which incorporates a trunk route service from Soweto to Ellis Park Stadium on the eastern edge of the inner city, is already completed and operational.

Visitors to Johannesburg and residents will be able to use Rea Vaya to travel to and from matches played at the main venues.

Soweto Theatre

The new Soweto Theatre is expected to be completed after the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM . Speaking at the sod-turning ceremony for the impressive new complex, the Executive Mayor of Johannesburg, Clr Amos Masondo, said: “This theatre was conceptualised to take into account our commitment to use the pressure of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM to ensure that a lasting legacy is left behind for the benefit of the residents of Johannesburg. When the soccer spectacle has come and gone there must be something of value there for all to see and point at.”

The Soweto Theatre is being built in a zone of public space within the high density, mixed-use Jabulani CBD. Known as “the cultural heart”, it also includes the refur- bished Jabulani Amphitheatre, as well as a parkland,

A World Class African Host City

public art and other amenities. When completed the theatre will consist of:

• A 420-seater main venue with an end-stage, fully provided with wings, orchestra pit, fly tower and buttress;

• Two smaller "black box" venues of 180 and 90 seats;

• An indoor foyer area with circulation to all three venues;

• Multi-level change rooms, storage rooms and "green room"; and

• An outdoor covered plaza, which will serve as an additional informal performing space.

It will be a multi-purpose centre that can be used for music and theatre productions, dance and choir festivals as well as conferences and community gatherings.

Mayor Masondo said the development of the Soweto Theatre was symbolic of the “rise of the south”.

Soweto Theatre was symbolic of the “rise of the south”. “It is an important part of

“It is an important part of transforming Soweto from a mere dormitory into a normalised neighbourhood. We are striving to change Soweto into a sustainable human settlement that is known not just as a place where peo- ple come from but where people also go to,” he said.

Upgrading of Diepkloof Hostel

Residents of the upgraded Diepkloof Hostel will be among the primary beneficiaries of the City’s spending on 2010 Legacy Projects. A number of hostels were identified for redevelopment in Soweto and Alexandra and Diepkloof is an excellent example of what can be achieved.

The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory
The project is in line with the government’s objective of doing away with single-sex dormitory

The project is in line with the government’s objective

of doing away with single-sex dormitory units and pro-

moting integrated community development. Providing essential services and social amenities such as schools, clinics and sports fields is part of the project.

The Diepkloof upgrade introduces a fresh and innova- tive approach that could serve as a model for future developments of this nature. It has an upmarket look and feel and consists of two-bedroomed, free-standing units for both rental and allocation. People from the old Diepkloof Hostel will get first preference.

The R10 million project, which employed at least 85 percent local labour, has been built for mixed use. The

objective is to integrate hostel communities into the sur- rounding township environment. Part of the work done

at Diepkloof includes upgrades to the Jabavu Stadium

and the adjacent small business centre.

Greening of soccer fields

A key objective of the Legacy Projects is to provide

communities with decent and accessible opportunities for leisure and recreation. The game of soccer is an integral part of the culture and history of the people of Johannesburg. Daily the youth of the City can be seen playing the game in almost every available open space. To celebrate the hosting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM , the City identified 238 soccer fields for greening and upgrading. Work taking place at these venues includes grassing the fields, installing irrigation systems, plant- ing trees, marking lines, building ablution facilities and erecting fences.

Eventually, all these fields will be given formal names as

a vivid reminder to the people of Johannesburg about

1 Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

the legacy of 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

Greening of Klipspruit River

The Klipspruit River and its tributaries are a vital source of life for the people of Johannesburg. The river is one of the most important catchment areas that drain into the Vaal Dam, the primary source of water for the City.

Throughout the years the river and its surrounding wetlands have become clogged through pollution and uncontrolled growth of vegetation. The 2010 FIFA World Cup TM tournament has enabled the City to accelerate its ongoing programmes to rehabilitate the Klipspruit River and restore it to its status as a green lung to be enjoyed by all.

“We want our communities to enjoy the scenic beauty of their green landscape,” the Executive Mayor of Johannesburg, Clr Amos Masondo, said during a recent cleanup operation along the river banks.

“We want them to have contact with nature, which brings a sense of refuge, freedom, relaxation and relief from stress. Most importantly, we want our communities to have a healthy relationship with the catchment and take responsibility for its cleanliness.”

Among the work being done is the upgrading of water, sanitation and storm water infrastructure. To ensure the future sustainability of the project, the City has intro- duced awareness programmes and regular cleanup campaigns. A Soweto Klipspruit Trail will offer eco- recreational opportunities, including bird watching and hiking. The greening of the Klipspruit River will serve as a

model for future eco-developments in the south of Johannesburg, including the Lenasia Vlei Wetland Park, Orlando West Wetland Park, Mapetla Wetland Park and the Kliptown Wetlands Corridor.

A green goal

The City of Johannesburg has set itself the target of scoring some important “green goals” during the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

It not only aims to make the occasion one of the green-

est global events ever, but it also wants to leave behind

a green legacy benefiting the people of Johannesburg.

The plan is for a green 2010 FIFA World Cup TM , with as little waste generated as possible, and as small a carbon footprint as possible. In 2008 the City hosted a two-day summit on climate change with the theme: “All hands on deck: towards a low carbon economy.”

Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo launched the event, and his message was to the point. “What we are looking for are the best solutions to a challenge that might have dire consequences for our future if no solu- tions are found.”

The 2010 Legacy Projects identified by Johannesburg all have a strong environmental component attached to them. The Executive Director for 2010, Ms Sibongile Mazibuko, said the City was going for big impact projects.

“The Klipspruit project will impact on the whole of Soweto, with more than 120 kilometres of river rehabili- tated.”

The Diepkloof Hostel rehabilitation of water, sanitation and electricity net- works will likewise have a

The Diepkloof Hostel rehabilitation of water, sanitation and electricity net- works will likewise have a snowball effect on overall environmental health, minimising water loss and sewage pollution into the Soweto river systems.

But the BRT system will be the City’s biggest green legacy. “It is estimated that if 15 percent of existing car users who live within 500m of the Rea Vaya corridors switch to the new system, there will be savings of 382 940 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions by 2013,” Mayor Masondo said.

A number of 2010 specific projects have been initiated or will take shape

once the stadiums are put into use. Most of the builders’ rubble from the demolition of the old stadiums was recycled back into the new stadiums.

And, when the stadiums open their gates for the first time, visitors will experience the latest in environmental technology, with grey-water toilets, waterless urinals and emerald green soccer pitches, irrigated exclusively from non-potable water. Reduction of waste will be a major focus, with re- usable cups and limiting the use of food containers.

In September 2006 Mayor Masondo launched the “Greening Soweto”

initiative, an ambitious project to beautify the township ahead of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM . The northern parts of the City have long been known as some of the world’s largest urban forests. By extending this concept to the rest of Johannesburg sparked a major green revolution. Through the R7,6 million Greening Soweto project, the City plans to plant more than 300 000 trees.

The overall scope of the Green Goal for South Africa will be huge and will include all stadiums and fan parks; the International Broadcast Centre, transport system, accommodation and hospitality venues, FIFA and Local Organising Committee office events and various carbon offset projects.

“It is important to note that projects will not be confined to host cities. We will spread the benefit to other parts of the country not directly benefiting from the event,” Mazibuko concluded.

A World Class African Host City

Mazibuko concluded. A World Class African Host City Joburg Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo lends a

Joburg Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo lends a hand during a cleanup campaign on the banks of Klipspruit, which forms part of the City’s Legacy Projects.

Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively
Safety courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively

Safety

courts will be established at Jeppe and Booysens mag- istrates’ courts to deal effectively with offenders. Medical and emergency personnel will be on duty around the clock to attend to patients.

A

Joint Command Centre will coordinate the activities

of

the security teams as well as emergency services

to

ensure a coherent response to any emergency that

might occur.

The City can vouch that it has the resources and ability to ensure the well-being of both visitors and Johannesburg residents during the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

Soccer Legends

For decades they brought joy and cheer to soccer fans

across the City. Now, with the biggest sporting event in the history of the country about to start, Johannesburg

is showing that it will not forget its heroes.

The City has identified 24 soccer legends to act as ambassadors during the build-up to the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM as well as during events associated with the tournament itself.

Now, the heroes of yesteryear are often seen at events such as media briefings, marketing events and football clinics to promote the universal message of sporting friendship.

Soccer legends have been used as ambassadors and as a way of encouraging aspirant soccer players to strive to realise their dreams. The world football gov- erning body, FIFA, has used soccer legends such as Pele of Brazil and Franz Beckenbauer of Germany as

such as Pele of Brazil and Franz Beckenbauer of Germany as Safety and Security The safety
such as Pele of Brazil and Franz Beckenbauer of Germany as Safety and Security The safety

Safety and Security

The safety of visitors, residents and soccer fans who will be in Johannesburg during the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM is at the top of the City’s preparations for the tournament.

Comprehensive safety and security plans are in place and the City is well poised to tackle any eventuality that might occur. An extensive risk management strategy has been prepared to guide the planning leading up to the world’s largest sports event.

The objective is to ensure a people-friendly and inci- dent-free security environment in Johannesburg during the staging of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM . People must be able to walk around freely in all areas of the City and enjoy the hospitality and unique atmosphere that only Johannesburg can offer.

The City’s safety plans are integrated into the national 2010 security strategy and the Johannesburg Metropolitan Police Department (JMPD) is working closely with the South African Police Service (SAPS) and the national intelligence community.

Visible policing will be the frontline of the City’s 2010 strategy, especially at known crime hot spots. By the start of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM , the JMPD will have 4 000 trained officers on the ground.

The security network will rely heavily on the most mod- ern technology available and will be managed and mon- itored from 24-hour emergency control centres situated near the two main venues – Soccer City and Ellis Park.

An important development is the deployment of a City- wide closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance and

recording system that links up with a national database containing biometric data. The CCTV network consists of 231 cameras installed at strategic locations through- out the City. It is managed from a central control room at Penmore Towers, with direct communication links to JMPD reaction teams.

The main idea is to stop all crime and improve the qual- ity of life and personal safety of all people – residents, workers and soccer fans – so they can enjoy being in the City without fear of harm.

The presence of CCTV cameras in the central business district (CBD) has already created a sense of safety and security. Visitors are returning to the city centre and shops are operating later than usual.

The increased safety measures will not be confined to downtown Johannesburg. The JMPD will also raise its level of vigilance in other public areas where 2010 visi- tors are expected to go to, including shopping centres, hotels, restaurants and entertainment complexes.

To intensify its safety efforts, the City is partnering with the SAPS and private security companies to ensure a strong team of officers is deployed across the City.

The City will be ready to handle any emergency that might occur, ranging from international terrorism and organised crime to food poisoning and petty theft. Key strategic facilities such as water reservoirs, pump sta- tions and power grids have been identified for special protection. Special arrangements will be in place to guard the airspace over venues during matches.

“Community processing centres” and special 2010

0 Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

A World Class African Host City & Security Former Highlands Park, Orlando Pirates and Kaizer

A World Class African Host City

&

Security

A World Class African Host City & Security Former Highlands Park, Orlando Pirates and Kaizer Chiefs

Former Highlands Park, Orlando Pirates and Kaizer Chiefs star Jerry Sadike’s dangerous crosses and

wizardry with the ball will remain etched in the memories

of those who followed the game in the early 1980s. As

slippery as an eel, Sadike used to create many scoring chances for his strikers.

These are but three of 24 City of Joburg’s 2010 soc- cer ambassadors. The others are Buick Makwati, MacDonald “Rhee” Skhosana, Kwaito Mahlangu, Jackie Masike, Pepe Dire, Ben Mathe, Frelimo “Danger” Dibetla, Satch Modise, Gardner Seale, Sipho Sikhonde, Zero Johnson, Litre Lata, Paradise Sello, Charles Mackett, Phil “Ndoda” Venter, Scara Njokweni, Mandla Sithole, Finki Sekete, Spider Mthembu and Amos “Heel Extension” Mkhari.

Some of the City of Joburg’s 2010 soccer ambassadors

ambassadors for the sport. Locally, the South African Football Association appointed both African and South African footballers such as George Weah of Liberia, Kalusha Bwalya of Zambia, Abedi Pele Ayeuw of Ghana and South Africa’s Lucas Radebe and Mark Fish as 2010 ambassadors.

The Johannesburg heroes are all household names of the 1960s to the 1990s, who devoted most of their lives to soccer. They played for the love of the game without any incentives at all.

Like many of South Africa’s soccer legends, striker Blessing “Killer” Mgidi has endeared himself in the hearts of many soccer supporters in this country. He might not have been in the same mould or class as the late soccer maestro Patrick “Ace” Ntsoeloenge or dribbling wizard Ephraim “Jomo” Sono, but his goal-

scoring prowess is still vividly remembered by his legion of supporters.

Always lurking in dangerous scoring positions, Mgidi was a thorn in the side of many defenders, who always had to chase shadows in vain attempts to stop him from finding the net.

One of the goalkeepers who consistently found them- selves at the end of Mgidi’s deadly boots was illustrious former Kaizer Chiefs No. 1 goalkeeper, Joseph “Banks” Setlhodi, himself a soccer legend of note.

The lanky and agile Setlhodi was, however, central to his team’s success and ascendancy to the highest ech- elons of South African soccer fame and fortune with the heart-stopping saves he made during his rewarding stint with the club.

Public Viewing Areas

Not every soccer fan in the City will be so fortunate as to be able to go and watch 2010 FIFA World Cup TM games live at the stadiums. The demand for seats

at match venues will be over-

subscribed as football enthusiasts from across the globe clamour to get their hands on the prized tickets.

But that should not stop others from enjoying this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to celebrate with the rest of the world.

opportunity to celebrate with the rest of the world. A number of public viewing areas, where

A number of public viewing areas, where fans will be

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City 1

“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games
“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites able to watch games

“Diski” at one of City of Joburg’s nine public viewing sites

able to watch games live on big screens and enjoy live perform- ances by asome of the City’s top artists, have been identified.

Innes-Free Park in Sandton and Elkah Stadium in Soweto will be the official 2010 FIFA World Cup TM fan fests, while Mary Fitzgerald Square in Newtown and nine City parks have been set aside as public viewing facilities. The FIFA fan fests will be organised by the City, the 2010 Local Organising Committee (LOC) and FIFA, which will be jointly responsible for the set-up and necessary infrastruc- ture.

Fan fests, pioneered in the 2006 FIFA World Cup TM in Germany, enable fans who have not bought match tickets to watch all the action for free on high definition big screen television sets at secure venues.

Mary Fitzgerald Square was chosen as the official public viewing site because of its centrality and easy accessibility. Located in Johannesburg’s cultural hub, Newtown, it has already been used as a viewing site during local football matches.

In 2010 all 64 matches of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM tour- nament will be broadcast live at fan fests and public viewing areas. Entertainment for the whole family, food and bever- ages will be available.

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

Innes-Free Park will cater for fans from the north of Johannesburg, including Alexandra, Ivory Park and Diepsloot. The park is a green space closest to the centre of Sandton, where most of the big hotels are located. It is easily accessible from the M1 freeway and offers unbroken views of the Sandton skyline.

To ensure that the fan fests meet FIFA’s goals, a project group has been established by the world football organisa- tion and LOC. It will look into the overall project manage- ment and coordination of all fan fests in the country and oversee the establishment of standards and guidelines.

Football for Hope

The sprawling township of Alexandra will come alive during the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM tournament when it hosts the Football for Hope Festival.

Set to run from 3 to 10 July 2010 at Number 3 Square, the festival will be organised by the City and FIFA. Some 32 teams will be playing not only for the trophy, but for social and human development as well. Among the participating teams are organisations that use football to address landmine education in Cambodia, gang culture in Ecuador, ethnic violence in Israel and Palestine, environmental pollution in the slums of Kenya and HIV/Aids education in South Africa.

Included among these organisations are traditional football powerhouses such as Argentina, Brazil, Cameroon and Germany as well as football teams from Australia, Bosnia- Herzegovina, India, Lesotho, Rwanda, Tahiti and Zimbabwe.

The teams were selected not only for their skill on the pitch, but also for their contribution to social change in disadvantaged communities around the world. During their stay in South Africa, the teams will take part in workshops and activities in which they will learn from each other and

improve their work. The week-long festival will include a programme of cultural celebration among participants, a move that should go a long way towards writing a new chapter for the township.

Commenting on the Football for Hope Festival, FIFA presi- dent Sepp Blatter said the tournament would be a unique opportunity for organisations using football as a tool for social development to interact with one another and show- case their programmes on the same stage as the football world’s biggest sporting event – the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

“We look forward to welcoming them to South Africa and experiencing together how football is contributing to building a better future.”

Number 3 Square, located in the heart of Alexandra, will be transformed with a specially constructed stadium. Mixed teams of boys and girls aged between 15 and 18 will com- pete in a unique, fast-paced tournament – unique in the sense that there will be no referees and any disagreements between the teams will be resolved through dialogue.

The Football for Hope Festival is part of the Football for Hope Movement, a FIFA and Streetfootballworld initiative that aims to increase the impact of the sport as a tool for peace, social development and change. A FIFA delegation visited Alexandra in November 2007 to assess the viability of staging the festival in the township. They focused on key issues such as accommodation, ven- ues, facilities, and safety and security. In February 2008, FIFA formally announced that the Football for Hope Festival would indeed take place in Alexandra during the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM .

Located in the north of Johannesburg, a stone’s throw from the affluent suburb of Sandton, Alexandra is one of the City’s poorer communities. It has recently undergone

a revamp. Once a sea of shacks, Alex, as it is affectionately known, is now

a revamp. Once a sea of shacks, Alex, as it is affectionately known, is now a much more organised settlement with new, colourful residential buildings.

With its cosmopolitan nature – it is home to people with diverse cultural backgrounds – Alex is a fitting venue for the festival, which is expected to deepen the township’s already rich cultural character.

The Football for Hope Movement focuses on children and young people and uses the sport as an instrument to promote

participation and dialogue. Besides the festival, it also runs

a Football for Hope Forum every four years to tie in with the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup TM .

Another element of the movement is the Football for Hope Centres, a FIFA legacy project that uses the momentum of the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM to build infrastructure that will benefit local communities.

In 2010 African countries will benefit from Football for Hope, with 20 football academies to be built on the continent. Dubbed the 20 Centres for 2010, five will be built in South Africa, with one at Number 3 Square. The centres will each consist of a mini-pitch with surrounding grandstands as well as facilities that will provide local com- munities with access to counselling, health and education services.

International Broadcast Centre

As the teams from the top soccer nations arrive in South Africa for the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM the International Broadcast Centre (IBC), situated in the south of Johannesburg, will become the eyes and ears of the world.

From this centre the media will not only broadcast the action

of the marvellous sporting spectacle, but it will also showcase

the beauty, highly sophisticated infrastructure and spirit of the people of South Africa to global audiences.

The IBC is located at the Nasrec Exhibition Centre. It is within easy distance of both the headquarters of the LOC and Soccer City, where both the opening ceremony and final match of 2010 will take place. It is also strategically located in terms of transport, roads and other infrastructure that have been constructed to support the hosting of the event.

The IBC will operate around the clock for the period preced- ing and during the event in June and July 2010. More than 2 000 journalists supported by TV crews, technical staff and photographers will use the centre as their headquarters.

The Expo Centre itself will undergo a substantial facelift, transforming it into a more attractive and modern exhibition, convention and event venue able to attract more and larger events and activities.

With such a huge contingent of media staying and work- ing in the City for the duration of the event, it will present a number of opportunities to showcase Johannesburg as a world-class African city. It will strengthen the City’s reputation to host global sporting and cultural events and bring sustain- able benefits to its tourism industry and ability to attract new investments.

Johannesburg is already the centre of international and local television and broadcasting as well as home to almost 60% of all ICT enterprises in South Africa. The new centre will be strategically located in relation to Sentech, a South African state-owned enterprise that will be responsible for signal distribution to the global TV and radio networks.

Included in the hi-tech facilities that will be constructed at the IBC are a satellite teleport and telecommunications infrastruc- ture that will support 40 gigabytes per second capacity.

In 2006 the IBC was located in Munich, Germany, and more than 46 000 hours of broadcast hours were televised from

A World Class African Host City

were televised from A World Class African Host City The International Broadcasting Centre was launched in

The International Broadcasting Centre was launched in 2008. At the launch were MMC for Development Planning and Urban Management Ruby Mathang, Joburg Executive Mayor Clr Amos Masondo, then Gauteng Sports MEC Barbara Creecy and then Deputy Minister of Communications Roy Padayachee.

there to audiences in 190 countries. Most experts predict a significant increase in audience figures owing to the growing interest in the event and the emergence of new technology, including digital broadcasting as well as new media platforms to deliver information, visuals and sound.

media platforms to deliver information, visuals and sound. Apart from the various media networks that will

Apart from the various media networks that will be serviced from the IBC it will also relay images to the fan fests that will be located across the country, including Johannesburg and throughout the world. Those spectators who will not be able to attend the matches at the stadiums will watch the action live on high-definition big screens erected at these fan fests.

The IBC will provide an additional thrust to the many projects planned by the City of Johannesburg in its preparations for 2010. The City is looking beyond this once-off event – the legacy it will leave for the people of Johannesburg. Every rand spent on infrastructure and operations will bring about lasting benefits to Johannesburg and its residents and will bode well for its future growth and development.

Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City

2010 FIFA World Cup T M Match Schedule I n reco  • Joburg –

2010 FIFA World Cup TM Match Schedule

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Joburg – 010 FiFA World Cup TM Host City