Sei sulla pagina 1di 23

SCHOOL OF CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN

TECHNOLOGIES

Electrical Technology
Electrical Occupations
Electromechanical -Maintenance
Technology
REV. 3/7/05

SCHOOL OF CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGIES

Electrical Technology (EL)


Electrical Occupations (EO)
Electromechanical Maintenance
Technology (MT)

Pennsylvania College of Technology


One College Avenue
Williamsport, PA 17701

School of Construction and Design Technologies


Telephone: 1-570-327-4518
FAX: 1-570-327-2406
Email: construction@pct.edu

The Pennsylvania College of Technology operates on a non-discriminatory basis.

Table of Contents
ABOUT

T HE

CAREER
GOALS

MAJO R

OPPORT UNITIES
A ND

OBJE CTI VES

ACCREDI TATION

OR

ENDO RSEMEN T

3
5
8

C U R R I C U LUM

FA C I LI T I E S

10

T O O LS

11

C O U R S E

LI S T I N G S

ADVANC ED

CRED I T/CO-OP

CONTINU I NG
CONTAC T

13

YOUR

EDUCA TION

INFORMATION

18
19
20

Pennsylvania College of Technology


Williamsport, PA

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

About the Major

he two year Electrical Technology associate degree (A.A.S.) major prepares


students for entry-level jobs in industry as electrical technicians. Students
develop the practical skills needed to work with residential, commercial,
and industrial wiring and equipment installations, electrical machinery, electric and
electronic machine control devices and other electronic equipment. The program
emphasizes electrical and electronic basics and includes theory and lab experience
in troubleshooting, circuitry, industrial electronics, electrical machinery and
electrical construction practices.
Electrical work is a dynamic and diverse
industry, which requires specialized skills.
The electrician must be able to layout,
install, repair, and test entire electrical
systems. Along with electrical training, the
electrician must have a complete working
knowledge of blue print reading and know
the National Electric Code and local codes.
Electricians must be mechanically inclined,
physically fit and be able to work with
mathematical relationships.
The Electrical Occupations certificate
curriculum offers the skills and theoretical
background needed for a variety of careers.
Graduates may work as electricians in
electrical construction, or in electrical
maintenance, where they would work with electrical machinery. The major
emphasizes electrical and electronic basics and the development of skills through
laboratory practice. Courses in communication, math, and science improve
students' employment prospects.
The Electromechanical Maintenance Technology associate degree (A.A.S.) major
prepares students for a wide variety of employment opportunities in commercial
and industrial settings. The major emphasizes skills and knowledge in
troubleshooting and repair of electrical/electronic and mechanical equipment.
Specialized coursework will include programmable logic control and its use in
commercial and industrial applications.

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Statement of Mission
The Electrical Technologies program was designed to provide students with the
knowledge and skills that will lead to employment and advancement in the
residential, commercial, or industrial electrical industry. The technical, hands-on
coursework emphasizes the practical skills needed in electrical and electronic basics,
and includes theory and lab experience in troubleshooting, circuitry, industrial
electronics, electrical machinery, and electrical construction practices. The program
will enable the graduate to work in related electrical areas or work towards an
advanced degree in a related field.

Student Organizations
VICA
Students in technical programs have the opportunity to join Skills USA-VICA
(Vocational Industrial Clubs of America). VICA is a national organization serving
more than 250,000 high school and college students who are enrolled in training
programs in technical, skilled, and service occupations, including health
occupations.
Skills USA programs include local, state and national competitions in which
students demonstrate occupational and leadership skills. During the annual
national-level Skills USA Championships, more than 4,100 students compete in 73
occupational and leadership skill areas.
Penn College supports VICA as a means for students to enhance and utilize the
skills they have gained in their programs.

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Career Opportunities
Excellent prospects await the successful graduate. The reward for academic perseverance is a
satisfying and challenging career in a dynamic industry. The electrical industry has shown consistent
growth and stability over the last decade, and opportunities for successful graduates will continue to
increase.

Types of Jobs
The Electrical Technology (EL)
program prepares graduates for a
variety of careers in the electrical
industry such as: industrial
maintenance, field service technician,
residential or commercial/industrial
electrician, electronic apparatus
troubleshooter, electrical laboratory
technician, electrical engineering
technologist, design assistant, electrical
layout facilitator, and technical writer.
The Electrical Occupations (EO) program prepares graduates for careers such as:
industrial maintenance, electrical troubleshooter, utility company employee,
construction union apprentice, electrical tester or inspector, or self-employment in
residential and commercial wiring.
The Electromechanical Maintenance Technology (MT) program prepares
graduates for careers such as: maintenance technician in commercial and industrial
settings such as utilities, hospitals, schools, and manufacturing facilities; building
superintendent and maintenance supervisory positions.

Placement Results for Our Graduates


The placement rate for the 2002/2003 graduates are as follows:
Electrical Technology 100%. The average annual starting salary was $34,333 with
a reported high of $50,000 and a low of $22,000. The expected starting salary can
vary widely depending on the geographic location of the job, with higher salaries
usually reported for more urban areas. Companies hiring our graduates include
Wise Foods, Honeywell, Corning Asahi, Northrop-Grumman, West
Pharmaceutical Services Co., and other well-known firms.

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Electrical Occupations 85.7%. The average annual starting salary was $23,480,
with a reported high of $24,400 and a low of $22,000. The expected starting salary
can vary widely depending on the geographic location of the job, with higher
salaries usually reported for more urban areas.
Electromechanical Maintenance Technology 80%. The average annual starting
salary was with a reported high of $30,611 . The expected starting salary can vary
widely depending on the geographic location of the job, with higher salaries usually
reported for more urban areas. Companies hiring our graduates include Hanne
Electric, S. Clyde Weaver, Inc. and other well-known firms.
A career fair every year brings hundreds of potential employers to meet prospective
graduates. There is also a no-cost on-line system called eRecruiting for Penn
College students and graduates to aid in finding the best opportunities. This system
allows students to post their resumes and read about position openings and
company information at their convenience. Companies may post job openings
directly to the eRecruiting system, and review resumes of potential candidates in all
of the majors.

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Goals and Objectives


Electrical Technology (EL) Program Goals: This major equips students with
the skills needed to understand and apply electrical/electronics technology theory.
The major includes practical skills and theoretical aspects of the trade. Graduates
should also have the background needed to transfer to a four-year bachelor of
technology program. Graduates of this major should be able to

demonstrate the ability to use algebra, trigonometry, and physics in the


design, development, and analysis of electrical and electronic circuits and
systems.

interpret and develop blueprints, schematic diagrams, wiring diagrams, and


transform them into functioning systems that comply with the National
Electrical code and/or other specifications.

evaluate technical information and communicate verbally and/or in writing


to others in or out of the field.

demonstrate basic knowledge of construction procedures and electrical


wiring techniques.

demonstrate knowledge of advanced electrical/electronic theory through


the use of complex numbers and network theorems.

demonstrate knowledge of the theory and mechanics of rotating


machinery, Programmable Logic Control (PLC) circuitry, transformer
banks, and instrumentation.

troubleshoot microprocessor-based industrial control devices such as PLC


and electro-mechanical systems.

demonstrate the ability to use test equipment and instrumentation to


analyze, troubleshoot, repair, and operate electrical/electronic circuits,
systems, and equipment.

demonstrate technical skills in a variety of electrical fields and apply


accepted OSHA safety standards.

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Electromechanical Maintenance Technology (MT) Program Goals:


Graduates of this major should be able to

demonstrate safe work habits in performance of maintenance tasks.

use knowledge of troubleshooting techniques to identify and solve


problems with electromechanical devices found in industry.

read blueprints, electrical and mechanical drawings; interpret related


specifications.

demonstrate knowledge of electrical principles and laws; apply


mathematical formulas to solve electrical problems in both direct and
alternating current equipment and systems.

apply knowledge of electrical codes.

demonstrate knowledge of general and OSHA safety practices.

demonstrate basic skills in arc welding; oxy-acetylene welding and cutting;


gas tungsten arc welding; gas metal arc welding.

communicate in both written and verbal forms to successfully interact with


peers and subordinates.

write clear, concise, accurate technical reports.

work with others in a cooperative and team effort in the solution of


maintenance problems.

demonstrate skill in the use of basic diagnostic and test equipment and
measuring devices to analyze and problem solve.

demonstrate knowledge in programmable logic control (PLC) and motor


control.

apply algebra and physics in the analysis and solution of maintenance


problems.

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Electrical Occupations (EO) Program Goals: This major prepares graduates


for jobs in residential, commercial or industrial electrical settings. Graduates of this
major should be able to

demonstrate technical skills in a variety of electrical fields, apply accepted


safety standards, and meet work quality standards.

demonstrate and apply knowledge in electrical theory and mathematics in


the construction and operation of electrical systems.

use and care for electrical tools and materials and demonstrate the ability to
requisition these items from a stockroom or supplier.

read and develop blueprints and use this information in performing


installation, which comply with the National Electrical Code.

interpret ideas and develop plans through communicating with others.

operate, maintain, and repair rotating electrical machines.

demonstrate working knowledge of electrical construction procedures in


residential, commercial, and industrial installations.

demonstrate the use of troubleshooting equipment and standard testing


procedures.

set up ladder relay logic systems and convert them to electronic


programmable control systems.

operate and maintain electrical and electronic programmable control


systems.

demonstrate knowledge of basic electronic control circuitry, devices, and


schematic diagrams.

troubleshoot microprocessor-based industrial control devices such as


robots.

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Accreditations
The Pennsylvania College of Technology is a fully accredited member of the
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.

Curriculum
The required credit distribution of the AAS Core includes the following (all courses must be at the
100 level or above):
Communications
Mathematics
Science
Humanities, Soc. Science, Art
Fitness
Computer Science

6 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
1 credit
3 credits

Total

19 credits

ENL 111 and ENL 201 or ENL 121


MTH 180 (EL also requires MTH 182)
PHS 114
CSC 110

The following courses are required for students in Electrical Technology (EL) and
Electromechanical Maintenance Technology (MT):
ELT 111
ELT 113
ELT 116
ELT 122
ELT 234
ELT 235
ELT 245

Direct Current Fundamentals


Accident Prevention
Construction Lab I-Residential
Alternation Current Fundamentals
Electrical Motor Control & Programmable Logic Control I
Industrial Electronics
Electrical Motor Control & Programmable Logic Control II

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

ELT 248

Electrical Systems Analysis

Electrical Technology students must also take these additional courses:


EDT 120 Electrical Drawing and Print Reading
ELT 120 Construction Lab II-Commercial
ELT 244 Advanced Electrical Theory
ELT 249 Programmable Logic Control Input/Output Devices
Electromechanical Maintenance Technology students must also take these additional
courses:
EDT 110
or
ELT 128
IMT 221
MTT 106
WEL 100

Mechanical Drawing
Drawing and Print Reading
Commercial/Industrial Equipment Installation & Troubleshooting
Manufacturing Process Survey
Introduction to Welding

Students in the Electrical Occupations program must take the following courses:
ENL 010 Communications
MTH 120 Technical Algebra and Trig I
ELT 113 Accident Prevention
ELT 116 Construction Lab I
ELT 117 Direct Current Fundamentals
ELT 120 Construction Lab II-Commercial
ELT 126 Technical Algebra and Trig I
ELT 127 Motor Maintenance and Repair
ELT 128 Electrical Drawing and Print Reading
ELT 231 Industrial Motor Control
ELT 237 Construction Lab III-Industrial
ELT 238 Basic Electronics for Industry
ELT 240 Construction Lab IV-Practical
ELT 243 Programmable Control
ELT 246 Electrical Machinery Analysis
ELT 247 Industrial Control and Troubleshooting

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Facilities

Our faculty works closely with students on their professional development and class
selections. Students in the major work with each other in dynamic group situations,
simulation exercises and field exercises. Our
class size ranges from 16-22 students.
Most of our courses are taught by our full-time
faculty. Our continued growth has necessitated
the hiring of some qualified adjunct faculty. Our
adjunct faculty has significant work experience
in electrical-related fields.
We are committed to providing modern
facilities with the most recent equipment and
software releases. We are also committed to
creating the opportunity for students to learn
the fundamental concepts used in the practice of
all aspects of the electrical field, so that
graduates have a wide variety of career options.

Classrooms and Labs


There are program specific classrooms dedicated to the electrical field programs. The
program also uses specialized electrical labs for training. There are 9 dedicated electrical
laboratories and seven classrooms the Electrical Technologies Center building.

Major Equipment

Allen-Bradley Programmable
Logic Control computer stations.
Fluke Scopemeters, Tektronix
Digital Oscilloscopes
Machinery analysis and
transformer workstations
Heavy-duty conduit bending
equipment.

10

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Tools
Students do not need to purchase tools prior to the start of the semester. Faculty can
advise students which tools are required first and sources where they can be acquired.
PROGRAM TOOL LIST
for
Electrical Occupations (EO)
Electrical Technology (EL)
Quantity
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
OR
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
OR
1
1
1
1
OR
1
1
OR
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
OR
1
1
1

IDEAL
35-309
35-316

KLEIN
5164 or 5165
5207
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each

Tool
Electricians tool pouch
Belt for tool pouch with hammer holder
Awl
Hacksaw
Electricians hammer
Electricians knife
Pliers, Arc joint, 10 (channel locks, pump pliers)
Pliers, diagonal cutting, offset

Each
Each

Pliers, long nose, 7


Folding rule

Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each

Tape measure, 10 minimum


3/16x6 Cabinet tip screwdriver
4 standard screwdriver w/wirenut tool
8 sq. shank heavy duty screwdriver
#2 Phillips screwdriver
screw holding screwdriver
Wire strippers

Each
Each
Each
Each

Wire stripper bolt cutter combo


Protective eye wear (clear lens only)
9 magnetic torpedo level
3 in 1 tap tool 6/32, 8/32, 10/32

Each
Each

6 IN 1 TAP TOOL above taps plus 10-24, 12/24, 1/4-20


Continuity tester (GB GCT 304A, Fluke T2)

Each
Each
Each

*** VOL/CON voltage & continuity tester


Black & White electrical tape
Wood chisel 3/4

Needed for Second Semester


Each
Each
Each
Each

Pliers, Arc joint, 10 (channel locks second pair)


***digital multimeter (Craftsman 982139)
Hex key set 3/16, 7/32, 1/4, 5/16, 3/8
Hex key set .05, 1/16, 5/64, 3/32, 7/64, 1/8, 9/64, and 5/32
3/8 drive socket set

Each
Each
Each

7 piece nut driver set


8 adjustable wrench
Voltage tester

Estimated total price for tools $600-$750


***Takes the place of continuity tester and voltage tester.
Part numbers are for Ideal or Klein brand. (unless indicated)
Other brandsT&B, GB, Channel Lock, Snap-On and Craftsman are acceptable.
Students receiving certain types of financial aid or grants may be required to purchase their tools through the College
Bookstore.

11

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

PROGRAM TOOL LIST


for
Electromechanical Maintenance Technology (MT)
Quantity
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
OR
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
OR
1
1
1
1
OR
1
1
1
OR
1
OR
1

Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each

Tool
Electricians tool pouch
Belt for tool pouch
Awl
16 hacksaw
Electricians hammer
Electricians knife
Pliers, Arc joint, 10 (channel locks)
Pliers, diagonal cutting, 7 offset
Pliers, linemans, 9
Pliers, long nose, 7
Folding 6 rule

Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each

Tape measure, 12x1


3/16x6 Cabinet tip screwdriver
4 standard screwdriver w/wirenut tool
8 sq. shank heavy duty screwdriver
#2 Phillips screwdriver
8 screw holding screwdriver
Wire strippers

Each
Each
Each
Each

Wire stripper bolt cutter combo


Protective eye wear (clear lens only)
9 magnetic torpedo level
3 in 1 tap tool 6/32, 8/32, 10/32

Each
Each
Each

6 IN 1 TAP TOOL above taps plus 10-24, 12/24, 1/420


Continuity tester
Voltage tester

Each

*** VOL/CON voltage tester

Each

22-185 or 22-194 multimeter, digital (Radio Shack or


equiv., 2nd semester)
Wood chisel 3/4

1
***takes the place of continuity
Needed for second semester
1
1
1

Each
tester and voltage tester

1
OR
1
1
1
ESTIMATED TOTAL PRICE

Each

Pliers, Arc joint, 10 (channel locks) (Second pair


Hex key set 3/16, 7/32, 1/4, 5/16, 3/8
Hex key set .05, 1/16, 5/64, 3/32, 7/64, 1/8, 9/64, and
5/32
3/8 drive socket set

each
each
each
FOR TOOLS

7 piece nut driver set


8 adjustable wrench
3 or 4 x 1/8 blade pocket screwdriver
$400-$500

Each
Each
Each

12

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Course Listings
ELT110
Electricity for the Trades
Theory and laboratory assignments in
electrical design. Symbols used on building
construction blueprints. Explanation of
electrical diagrams. The use of the National
Electrical Code as a governing agent which
establishes wiring requirements. Residential
wiring, switching, lighting, receptacles, and
service entrances in the laboratory. 3 Credits
(2 Lecture -3 Lab) Fall Only.
ELT111
Direct Current Fundamentals
Basic principles of electricity and the laws and formulas which are used to solve
electrical problems. Principles of magnetism and their relationship to direct current
generators and motors and other electrical machinery. Laboratory work trains students
to connect equipment and instruments. 5 Credits (4 Lecture -3 Lab) Corequisite(s):
MTH006. Fall Only.
ELT113
Accident Prevention
Principles of accident prevention in industry. Electrical safety procedures in all human
activities; lifesaving techniques. 2 Credits (2 Lecture -0 Lab)
ELT116
Construction Lab I-Residential
An introduction to residential wiring, plans, specifications and codes. Theory and lab
assignments in developing wiring diagrams, wiring basic lighting and receptacle
currents, low voltage switching and control circuits. Blueprint reading and the N.E.C.
are included in the course. 5 Credits (3 Lecture -6 Lab) Fall Only.
ELT117
Applied Direct Current Fundamentals
Basic electrical laws, electrical terms, batteries, electrostatics, electrical meters and
instruments. 6 Credits (4 Lecture -6 Lab) Corequisite(s): MTH120 or MTH124. Fall
Only.
ELT120
Construction Lab II-Commercial
Theory and laboratory assignments in commercial wiring, blueprint reading, and
N.E.C. as it applies to commercial circuits. Students will plan, layout, and install circuits
and devices used in commercial buildings. 5 Credits (3 Lecture -6 Lab) Prerequisite(s):
ELT116. Spring Only.
13

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

ELT122
Alternating Current Fundamentals
The fundamental principles of the behavior and flow of alternating current electricity.
Includes problem solving current, voltage, impedance, reactance and power factor in
series and parallel circuits. The above AC principles are developed to form a
foundation of the fundamentals which are needed to better understand the operating
principles of AC motors, generators and control equipment. 5 Credits (4 Lecture -3
Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT111. Spring Only.
ELT126
Applied Alternating Current Fundamentals
Alternating current electricity as it relates to residential, commercial, and industrial
power use. Laws and formulas used to solve problems in the use of AC electrical
principles. Practical experiences in the use of equipment and instruments. 6 Credits (4
Lecture -6 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT117. Spring Only.
ELT127
Motor Maintenance and Repair
Electrical and mechanical feature of various single phase motors; lab work;
development of knowledge and skills in rewinding and repairing single phase motors. 3
Credits (1 Lecture -6 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT117. Spring Only.
ELT128
Electrical Drawing and Print Reading
An introduction to preparation and interpretation of residential and commercial
electrical drawings, diagrams, and schematics. Provides an introduction to drafting
instruments, orthographic projection, sectional views, axonometric projection, and
technical sketching. Included is the interpretation of construction drawings, electrical
symbols, wiring diagrams, schedules, notation, technical information, and electrical
specifications used on electrical drawings. (Formerly EDT 120) 2 Credits (1 Lecture -3
Lab)
ELT231
Industrial Motor Control
This course represents a practical and theoretical approach to the understanding,
designing, development and use of relay logic diagrams in the installation, operation,
and maintenance of industrial logic control systems. 6 Credits (4 Lecture -6 Lab)
Prerequisite(s): ELT117. Fall Only.

14

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

ELT234
Electrical Motor Control
An introduction to the understanding, designing and development of relay logic
diagrams for use in the installation, operation, and maintenance of relay motor control
systems for industry. 4 Credits (3 Lecture -3 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT111. Fall Only.
ELT235
Industrial Electronics
Fundamentals of electronic devices, analog and digital circuits, and troubleshooting
solid-state I/O control circuits. Practical laboratory work with prewired analog and
digital circuits. 6 Credits (4 Lecture -6 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT122. Fall Only.
ELT236
Applied Power and Electronics
Laboratory analysis and theoretical aspects of control circuits, machinery and
transformers used in industry. 6 Credits (4 Lecture -6 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT122. Fall
Only.
ELT237
Construction Lab III Industrial
An introduction to industrial wiring, blueprint reading, and the N.E.C. Theory and Lab
assignments in bus systems, unit substations, panelboards, subfeeders, conduit, and
special equipment. (Formerly ELT 230) 4 Credits (2 Lecture -6 Lab)
ELT238
Basic Electronics for Industry
Basic electronic concepts as used in industrial control. Primarily a devices course,
introducing the student to discrete devices, integrated circuits (both linear and digital),
symbols, basic circuit configurations, the use of test equipment and measuring
techniques, the study of these devices in the laboratory to supplement lecture.
(Formerly ELT232) 5 Credits (4 Lecture -3 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT126.
ELT239
Fundamentals of Electronics for BBT
This course is designed to meet the needs of HVAC and transfer students that lack the
necessary basic electronics needed to complete the Building Automation Technology
(BBT) major. Topics include a review of basic electronic test instruments as well as an
introduction to semiconductor devices and their use in control systems such as Direct
Digital Controls. 5 Credits (4 Lecture -3 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT252.
ELT240
Construction Lab IV-Practical Experience
Practice in the installation of rigid conduit and other electrical wire ways. Pulling in and
wiring motor controllers and other electrical equipment. Study of blueprints for large
electrical construction jobs. 3 Credits (0 Lecture -9 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT120.

15

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

ELT243
Programmable Control
A practical and theoretical approach to the installation, programming, and maintenance
of programmable control (P.C.) equipment. The application of P.C. in manufacturing
processes. Theory covers the proper installation of P.C. equipment, especially the
correct grounding application of processor units and the development of P.C. Ladder
diagrams. The practical work includes programming and changing operational
programs to prepare the student to work as "line mechanic" on production lines using
programmable controls. 4 Credits (3 Lecture -3 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT231 and
ELT232 or ELT231 and ELT238. Spring Only.
ELT244
Advanced Electrical Theory
Solution of network problems. Problems involving Kirchoff's Laws; Mesh and Nodal
Analysis; Thevenin's and Norton's Theorems; Voltage and Current Division. Problem
sets using second and third order determinants using phasors. 3 Credits (3 Lecture -0
Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT122 and MTH180. Spring Only.
ELT245
Introduction to Programmable Logic Control
An introductory course in the understanding, programming and operation of
programmable logic control and the utilization of such controls as an aid to effective
production and quality control processes for production line industrial control systems.
The practical application includes the programming and changes of operational
programs and generated control commands which will provide a complete system for
efficient high speed production requirements. 4 Credits (3 Lecture -3 Lab) Prerequisite(s):
ELT234 and ELT235. Spring Only.
ELT246
Electrical Machinery Analysis
Theory and laboratory instruction in the use and operation of electrical machinery and
transformers, meters and metering methods used with this equipment, and
troubleshooting procedures using schematic diagrams. 3 Credits (2 Lecture -3 Lab)
Prerequisite(s): ELT126. Spring Only.
ELT247
Industrial Control and Troubleshooting
Hands-on troubleshooting of solid-state circuits used for industrial applications. 4
Credits (3 Lecture -3 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT238 or ELT232. Spring Only.
ELT248
Electrical Systems Analysis
Lecture and laboratory instruction to provide a comprehensive program through
laboratory experiments and report writing to master the principle and operation of

16

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

machines and devices that generate, transform and use electrical power. 3 Credits (2
Lecture -3 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT122. Spring Only.
ELT249
Programmable Logic Control Input/Output Devices
This course provides the student with the essentials needed to establish a foundation in
industrial automation and control (input/output devices). Specific product experience
with high end I/O devices includes, but is not limited to, the design and use of sensors,
final control elements, recorders, operator interfaces, and electronic controllers. The
course will present the principals, methods, and rationale on how remote sensing and
actuation are combined with modern communication techniques to effectively monitor
and control industrial processes. Automatic timing, control, and communications offer
a challenging and accelerated opportunity that will prepare the student for the needs of
industry. In addition the course will also explore the concept of front end engineering.
4 Credits (3 Lecture -3 Lab) Prerequisite(s): ELT234 and ELT235.

17

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Advanced Credit
Students have the opportunity to apply for advanced placement credit by testing out of
a specific course(s). There is no fee for entering freshman students for advanced credit
testing, and testing is arranged through the School of Construction and Design.
Returning students may wish to test out of advanced courses for which they feel
prepared. Students must contact the instructor of the specific course(s) they wish to
challenge, a test date is set up, and students pay a $50.00 non-refundable fee prior to
the exam. If the exam is completed successfully, students are awarded advanced
placement credit, and the credit is noted on the transcript/profile.
Transfer Procedures: Students transferring from associate degree majors at Penn
College or another college will have their transcripts evaluated by Penn College officials
prior to acceptance into the degree. No course for which a student received less than a
"C" grade will be accepted for transfer into the major. Courses taken more than 10
years ago will be evaluated to determine if they meet current course requirements.

18

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Continuing Your Education


Most graduates find a job with a company immediately upon graduation, or become
self-employed contractors, particularly in the residential area of the construction field.
Electrical Technology (EL) and Electromechanical Maintenance Technology (MT)
graduates have the option of enrolling in the Building Automation Technology (BBT)
baccalaureate program. This major combines electrical and electronics technologies,
computers and networking technology, and building mechanical systems (HVACR) in
a unique major for building automation professionals. Students who further their
education have the best of both worlds; the hands-on technology of the EL/MT
program, coupled with the technology and management disciplines in the BBT
program.
Associates graduates who wish to enroll in a baccalaureate program must ensure
completion of the math requirements for these majors. Students who plan to
continue in these majors should consult with an advisor as early as possible.
Electrical Occupations (EO) graduates must first complete the Electrical Technology
or Electromechanical Maintenance Technology associate degrees prior to transferring
into the four-year degree program.
Another option for our successful associate degree students is transferring to Penn
State Harrisburg for Electrical Engineering Technology.

19

P E N N S Y L V A N I A C O L L E G E O F T E C H N O L O G Y
E L E C T R I C A L T E C H N O L O G I E S

Contact Information
School of Construction & Design Technologies
Learning Resources Center, Room LRC156
Phone: (570) 327-4518
Fax: 570.320.2406
E-mail: construction@pct.edu
Other Campus Sites:
Academic Support Services
Tutoring Center
ACT101 Tutoring
Disability Services
Project Success

1-570-327-7266

Advisement Center
New Student Testing and Scheduling
Scheduling
Curriculum Changes

1-570-320-5228

College Bookstore
Textbook Questions
Class materials
Parking Passes

1-570-327-4508

College Police
Security Issues

1-570-327-4760

Counseling and Career Services


Cooperative Education Opportunities
E-Recruiting

1-570-327-4765

Financial Aid Office


Scholarships
Financial Aid Questions

1-570-327-4766

Food Services Operations


Meal Plans

1-570-327-4766

Registrars Office
SIS (Student Information System)
PIN Number for SIS
Dropping/Adding Courses

1-570-327-4772

Residence Life
On- and Off Campus Housing

1-570-320-8023

20