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JAMAICA

EVANGEL
A Christian Quarterly from the Caribbean
i1'''"^1 12 i \

SPRING
1971

'Let them give glory unto the Lord, and declare his praise in the islands"
Isaiah 42:12

VOL 17

THE

JAMAICA

EVANGEL

NO. 5

DIRECTORS:

Mr. and Mrs. James Heiget, Managing Directors


Mr. E. A. Woodstock, Mr. V. S. Reid
Mr. Solomon Levy, (Chairman)
OO-WORKERS:

Mr. Guy Whitley, Mrs. Ada Walker


FORWARD AND PROMOTIONAL:
Mr. and Mrs. Don Wheeler

2713 Sheringham Road, Orlando, Fla. 32808


JAMAICA RETREAT (Camp Jamaica): PROMOTION:
Gene Stinson, Minister

450 N.E. 51st Street, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432


MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMnTEE: Jamaica

Mr. Douglas Fletcher, Mr. Ramon Albeiga


Mr. A. Lionel Levy, Mrs. Qaire ShiOetto
Dr. Arthur Wmt, Mr. Hal Glave, Mr. A. C. FoDces,
Mr. Glaister Duncan

CHRISTL^ CfflLDREN'S CUNIC:

Mrs. Patsy Alberga, Nurse in charge


OXFORD PREPARATORY SCHOOL:

Mr. Ramon Alberga, (Chairman Board of (governors


Mr. Ken Collins, Mr. Vic Reid
Mr. P. Ossie Smith, Mrs. Carol Herget

NINE PALMS CHRISTIAN CAMP: Estate Supervisor:

Mr. Guy Whitiey

CHRISTIAN EVANGEUZING ASS'N:

Mt Nimrod Townsend, Evangelist


CANDY-TOP DOLL SHOPPF:

Mrs. Patsy Alberga,


Mrs. Bess Lumsden, Port (Tharlotte, Fla.
DOCTORS:

Dr. Noel T. March, Dr. Terrence Mair,


Dr. M. H. Beaubrun, Dr. Henry Lopez, Dentist
FOOTBALL COACH:

Mr. P. Ossie Smith.

CARPENTER AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGER: Mr. Henry Nixon


PHOTOGRAPHY:
?4r. (Juito Bryan, Mr. Garth Morgan,
Mr. Errol Harvey
AUDITORS:

Price Waterhouse & Co.

THE JAMAICA EVANGEL: EDITOR,


Editorial Board:

V. S. Reid

Jamaica

U.S.A.

Solomon Levy

Donald Wheeler

Quito Bryan
Mrs. C. Herget

Elvin Gray, Minister

HOW m

CAN HELP !

1. Pray for us.

2. Support or partially support a boy


in the Home ($25.00 per month).
3. Send boxes of new useful clothing,

audited financial report and the Ja


maicaEvangel mailedto you.)
6. Send used clothing of all kinds, and

and other items, for boys. Ask us for


a list.

Bible School materials.


7. Send typewritten Scripture labels for

4. Support financially any of our projects.

medicine bottles for the Clinic.


8. Sendschooland ciaft supplies.

5. Become a MEMBER of the HOME.

9. Help us to plant new churches by

(A subscription of 75 cents a year

supporting the Christian Evangelizing

helps to defray postal charges for our

Association.

WAUe il6: P.O. Box 5, Hat^ Uay TA.ee, JamcUca, ft/.I.

m-

'

ifsMSaa

CHILDREN OF GOD
Boys are in many ways look-alikes at play.
The quick hard bounce of their bodies already
sporting the trace-material of muscles, the
competitive grunts and shouts, the loud infec
tious laughter, the male assertion on their
faces. Yet, they are so different when you
come to know them. Each guy has his own
genes.

Our boys come from all over this land


a land not so small when you think of it.

True, from stem to stern, its overall length


is 144 miles. But with mountains thrusting
7,000 feet into the sky and great valleys so
stashed away that there is absolutely no
sense of sea, the feel is of a large land. You
1

r.

may motor many hundreds of miles inside


mountain country. In other words, what we

are getting at is that, when you're on it, its


a large land. And talking about it the other
day, we suddenly realised that our boys come
from all ends of this land. Come visit with us.

These are the brothers, Leonard & Anthony


who come from that lovely named parish,
St. Thomas-in-the-East (to define it from an
even lovelier named old parish, St. Thomasin-the-Vale).
In Jamaica, "parish" is about the equiva
lent of "state."

St. Thomas-in-the-East is famous for its

great cane and coconut plantations. Our two


roly-polys, Leonard, 4 and Anthony, 3 first
lived on a sugar estate overlooking the very
blue waters at Bowden but now they miss
it ndt a bit for they are very happy at Oxford
Road. Incidentally, St. Thomas also contains
the highest mountain peak on the island, the
Blue Mountain Peak.

Andrew, the "baby" of the Home is only


2 years old but already you can make out that
he is a Manchester-man. He hardly ever loses
his cool just like his parish which is full of
cool uplands and very popular with Jamaicans
as a holiday resort. Being the baby of the
family he often rules the roost tries his
'influence' but melts into smiles and coyness
when Mommy appears!

Frankie hails from St. James, a parish


famous the world over for Montego Bay, the
island's second city. Frankie, who is six,
is already a personality, funny-wise grin and
all. While St. James, on the northwest shoul

der of the island, is very advanced in agricul


ture and industry, its main economy is
tourism. To its international airport come the
well known people from everywhere.

Tony & Michael are St. Mary lads. Tony,


15, is our Mr. Brains and is doing well in high
school. Michael is a quiet 8-year-old, shy but
with a large capacity for affection. Their
home-parish is small but noted for its beauty
and bananas. Port Maria is its capital and one
of the most visited by American holidayers.
As most of the northside, its beaches are not

short of magnificent.

Bobby

Robert

Wayne

^ec//f/e ^c/'f/oefa ^
IINCORPQRATINQ

MEDICAL

SUPPLIES

CO.)

12-14 DARLINQ STREET.


KINGSTON.

TELEPHONE

23911-2

Westmoreland is, as the name suggests, the


westernmost parish of the island, famed for
fishing, golfing and great sugarcane planta
tions. This is our Bobby's parish. One of these
days it may become famed for its Thespians
too, since Bobby, 15, is our best Home comic
and all-round Camp performer. Recenlty he
was hilarious in the Cross Roads market when

we went on our weekly Friday-night shop


ping and Bobby decided he would be an
American tourist for the evening. Our Westmorelander's "accent" was as perfect as his
ignorance of what a piece of sugarcane looked
like. After all, who grows sugarcane in Bridge
port, Connecticut?
Robert & Wayne once called St. Elizabeth
home, a parish renowned through the island
for its horses, mules and donkeys. Much vege
tables are farmed there too. Like most South-

coast parishes, the tourist business is decidely


second. Bauxite, the alumina ore, is extensive

ly mined. We don't know whether Robert &


Wayne will grow up to be geologists and
discover other profitable "crops" for their
parish. At the moment, Robert, 9, is keener
on athletics and Wayne, 8, on football (soccer).
The ancient capital-parish of St. Catherine
is the birthplace of Donovan, a fellow as full
of tricks as two coneys in a coolshade. Coneys
are small, active Jamaican indigenous animals
somewhat like squirrels. Donovan's activities
were mostly confined to books-beating these
days, since he has been studying hard for the
Common

Entrance examinations

a test

which directs whether a child will enter cer

tain secondary schools on free scholarship.

Laurie

Ian & Larry are brothers born in England


of Jamaican parents, and so our Jamaican
and American accents have been enriched
with a shot of the "Queen's English," I say,
rawthah! But they are anyway all trans

Atlantic zip & zing. Latry, 9, is a great reader,

usually very quiet. Ian, 7, is young man of


rollicking ways who likes his fun.

Another pair of brothers are Philip & Mike,


although Philip is a city-of-Kingston born
and Mike first saw light in Trelawny parish,
half-way down the island. Trelawny is a sugar

parish, its fields climbing all over the hills.


Philip, 7, is very "fatherly" to Philip - they
room together and Mike keeps Philip care
fully "in line."

With the Compliments of

G. G.

KALPHAT

GENERAL

IMPORTERS

Haberdasher ies

Rad ios

Sewing Machines
Etc.

lOA Orange Street


Phone Z5776

V->

David

And then there are the city boys, the

Kingstonians, or as the local saying goes, boys


"born under the clock." Four of them, really

five including Mike whom we have mentioned


before.

Eddie-Paul, 17, David, 11, Darren, 4, and


Baby John, 3.
A word about Kingston. The official name
of the city is "The Corporate Area" and com

prises two parishes, Kingston & St, Andrew


and about 500,000 people. In topography,

the city is as up-and-down as is Eddie-Paul,


our eldest, and Baby John. At sections of the
city, you can snuggle into a sweater in summer
because you are 6,000-feet up a mountain,
yet all year round you can walk the beaches
in sunlight.

David is our "sweetsinger." His soprano voice


in school chapel is something you should hear.
He is now a "grown-up" so he has joined the

junior choir at Meadowbrook. Darren is a


small wiggly-tricky bundle from the city's
east with a grin that really twinkles.

With the Compliments

of

TROPICAL GAS CO. INC.


411 Half-way Tree Road

Phone 69191
11

THE HOUSE OF FINE REFRESHMENTS


DESNOES & GEDDES LIMITED

tke (^ompiimentA

THE SHELL COMPANY

(W.L) LIMITED
GET SHELL-THE GOOD MILEAGE GASOiJlNE

But in a deeper sense, all our boys are


brothers and all from the same parish, the

parish of God's world. A wonder-filled world.


Even if on the face of it, they seem of dif
ferent races, black, white, brown, and even if
the names appearing on their birth certificates
assume a difference, w. know that they are

of OQe race, the human race, and share one


name, Children of God; and here, in the
Home, they share also a blessing denied so
many more "fortunate" children, the blessing
of having so many, many parents, you out

there who have with prayers and material


made this Home, a home.

News From ''Home'


CAMP JAMAICA
A SUCCESS
Once again beautiful Nine Palms was host
for a "Camp Jamaica" this Spring; and once
again it was voted a wonderfully unforgettable
experience by all our visitors from Stateside.
A spiritual feast given in such surroundings
has a particular benefit to our spiritual wellbeing. By discussion, preaching, praying and
praising in song, our faith was refreshed and
our hearts strengthened for the earthly tasks.
At "Camp Jamaica" there is always fun
and healthy relaxation too: horseback rides,

"GRANDMA WALKER"
IN FLORIDA
"Grandma Walker" has taken off for a

Florida visit. Chief purpose is to continue


medical treatment which she began receiving
last year; but she will also be doing some
talking at as many churches as her time will
allow. She has just finished working very
hard on "Camp Jamaica" and really deserves
a rest. But if we know her (and we think we
do since she's Carol's mother and has been

our colleague for 11 years) then there will


be little rest.

swims in the blue Caribbean and good

old-fashioned chats around the fireplace of


our mountain-top retreat.

Addition At The

Mrs. Claire Shilletto


A dear friend of the Home passed on last
month. She is Mrs. Claire Shilletto who for

many years was a member of our Management


Advisory Committee. A plaque in memory of
her

faithfulness

to

the

work

among our

children will be put up in the Home.

Nursery School
The All-Day Care children's centre at the
Home is getting a new sleeping room at the
Nursery School. The room is being put up in
memory of Mrs. Sarah McNees of Canton,
Ohio who had been a loving supporter of the
Home for many years.
13

THE JAMAICA

JUNIOR

place for him here in the Boys' Home


yard. And sure enough, we found a place
and the dear old man came to live in our
yard. Sometimes he is too sick to work

and sometimes he helps around the yard


UNCLE

ALFRED

Now once upon a time long long

or buildings. The boys have learned to


love the old man and they are very kind
to him.

Now he is known as Uncle

years ago someone planted nine royal


palm trees along a beautiful wide drive

Alfred and is a new member of Meadowbrook Chapel.

way leading up to an old house on top


of the hill. Just seven years ago we be
gan having camps at this lovely place

the truck, we began talking about the

and we named the camp Nine Palms


Christian Camp. Many times we have

looked at the stately trees towering far


above our heads and wondered just who
it was that planted them. One day Aunt
Patsy (Mrs. Alberga) heard about an old
man who was very ill and had been

One day as we were driving along in


country and we told Uncle Alfred about

the Nine Palms Christian Camp. He was


so surprised and happy! Can you guess
why? He told us that he was the yard
boy for the family who had once lived
there and that when he was just a boy
he had planted ten patm trees by the
driveway but one had died. Now, can

turned out of the room he rented be

you imagine our surprise? He told us all

cause he couldn't pay the rent. The old

about the house in the days of long ago


and now he is hoping we will take him
for a ride there next time we go for

man was in trouble! He had nowhere to

go and no one to care for him. Aunt


Patsy didn't know what to do. Finally
she called to see if we could find a little

camps. He would like to see the trees he


planted.

YOUTH CORNER

BATA SHOE PARTY

Frankie hugged his new shoes as he


slipped off into dreamland. They were a
real comfort and especially for this sad
afternoon. For Frankie had measles and

he missed that lovely Bata Shoe Co.


party that was held for the boys of the
Home. They had such a nice time. On
arrival they were taken on a tour through
the factory to see the exciting work of
making shoes and tennis shoes. They
especially enjoyed the moulding of the
rubber

on the bottom of the tennis

shoes. From there, they went to the


canteen for a delicious "tea party".

There were sandwiches, fruit punch,


cookies, peanuts, and ice cream oh,
they were just filled almost to over
flowing. Then they were taken to a com
fortable room for a movie on mountain

climbing. It was an exciting picture


made 'specially for boys!
Following the movie, balloons were

given out, a pen and pocket holder, and


then a final surpi-ise. Can you guess?

Each boy was given a beautiful pair of


shiny black leather shoes! It was a happy
busload of boys who climbed out an
xiously looking for Grandma to tell her
the good news. And that's how dear
little Frankie got the shoes to hug up in
his

measles

sick-room.

There

was a

rousing song that day for their friends


at Bata Shoe Co., ending with a hip hip
hooray!
And Mom and Dad thanked God that

night for His wonderufi love in providing


for our family of boys.

HOME(S)PUNS

Donovan was watching seri


ously as Mommy mixed the
powdered milk to a paste be
fore adding the water when he
suddenly looked up and said:

"Mommy, that milk is very


thick, it looks like you haven't
polluted it yet!'.'
Peter, one of our little friends
of the Home, had heard his
daddy tell at breakfast how
their bank had been robbed the

day before. Now Peter had a

few dollars in a savings account


there so he sat thoughtfully
until breakfast was finished

Then he said firmly: "Daddy,


please take my money out of
the bank and put it back in my
savings box. It's much safer
there."

From

KINGSTON INDUSTRIAL GARAGE

34 CHURCH STREET
TELEPHONE 22191

16

.1

L*iotjui^1

FOR TABLES AROUND JAMAICA

with the compliments of


ALCAN JAMAICA UMITED

Produced and publlshod^ quarterly by the Jamaica Christian Boys' Home at No. 7 Oxford
Road. Kingston 5. Jamaica, West Indies. Phones: Kingston 66243, 69037, 64863.

Printed hy the Oxford Christian Press 7 Oxford Road, Kingston S.

cspg

1"^

AMAICA

A Christian Quarterly from the Caribbean

SUMMER 1971

'Let them give glory unto the Lord, and declare his praise in the islands '
Isaiah 42:12

VOL.18

THE JAMAICA

EVANGEL

NO. 6

DlRECroRS:

Mr. and Mrs. James Heiget, Managing Directon


Mr. E. A. Woodstock. Mr. V. S. Reid
Mr. Solomon Levy, (Chairman)

OO-WORKEIRS;:
Mr. Guy Whitley, Mrs. Ada Walker

FORWARD AND PROMOTIONAL:

Mr. and Mrs. Don Wheeler

2713 Sherittgbam Road, Orlando, Fla. 32808


JAMAICA RETREAT (Chmp Jamaica): PROMOTION:
Gene Stinson, Minister
450 N. S 1st Street, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432
MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMTFTEE: Jamaica

Mr. Douglas Fletcher. Mr. Ramon Alboga


Mr. A. Lionel Levy, Mrs. Claire ShiOetto
Dr. A^hor Wint, Mr. Hal Glave, Mr. A. C. Folkes,
Mr. Qaister Duncan
CHRISTIAN CHILDREN^ OJNIC

Mrs. Pat^ Alberga, Nurse in charge


OXFORD PREPARATORY SCHOOL:

Mr. Ramon Albeiga, Chairman Board of Govetnon


Mr. Ken Cbtlins, Mr. Vic Reid

Mr. P. Ossie Smith, Mrs. Carol Herget

NINEPALMS CHRISnAN CAMP: Estate Supexviaor:

Mr.Guy Whitley

CHRISTIAN EVANGEUZING ASST^:

M( NiauodTownscnd, Evangelist
CANDY-TOP DOLL SHOPPF.:

Mrs. Patsy Albetga,


Mrs. Bess Lumsden, Port Charlotte, Fla.
IXKTORS:

Dr. Noel T. March, Dr. Tenence Mair,


Dr. M. H. Beaubrun. Dr. Henry Lopez, Dentist
FOOTBALL COACH:

Mr. P. Ossie Smith.

CARPENTER ANDOONSTRUCTION MANAGER: Mr.Henry Nixon


PHOTOGRAPHY:
Mr. QuitoBryan. Mr. GarthMorgan.
Mr. Errol Harvey
AUDITORS:

Price Wateriiouse & Co.

THE JAMAICA EVANGEL: EDITOR,


Editorial Board:

V. S. Rejd

Jamaica
Solomon Levy
Quito Bryan
Mrs. C. Herget

U.SJL
Donald Wheeler
Elvin Gray. Minister

HOW VOU CAW HELP I


1. Play for us.

2. Support or partially support a boy


in the Home ($25.00 per month).
3. Send boxes of new usefol ctothing.
' and other items, for boys. Adc us for

a list4. Support financially any of our pro-

j^.

. .

5. Become a MEMBER of the HOME.


(A subscription of ^ cents a year
helps to defray postal chaigts for our

audited finanrfai report and the Ja


maicaEvangelmailedto you.)
6. Send used clothing of all kinds,and
Bible ScImoI materials.

7. Send typewritten Scripture labelsfor


medicine bottles for the Clinic,

8. Send sdKwl pd cnftsupplies.

9. Help us to plant new (lurches by


suppcoting the Christian Evangdiztng
Association.

liPuXe 126: P.O. Box. 5, Half Way Tnzt, JancUcA, W.J.

tVe try to get their full attention

THE SCHOOL STORY

We got intothe school business back in 1956

because our boys turned ready for nurseryschool. It would have been time- and moneyconsuming to make our way to the nearest
kindergarten each morning and to collect them
later, so we began teaching them ourselves.
We opened our own "verandah school" as

Jamaicans call it, home-teaching on the gallery


of the Oxford Road home.

But our first two boys were growing, and


we were growing in numbers too. So we moved

from the verandah and opened ^shop in the


nice old coach house at the Norwood Avenue

end of the compound.


As the boys grew out of one class, we set

up a higher one to- accommodate them. By


this time we, of course, were hiring part-time
teachers and were being very happy indeed
to see any volunteers who cared to call.

Which was alright; but were those boys


growing fast?

So we had to change gear again and think of


even higher schooling, the preparatory school

which, in Jamaica, is the next step to Secon


dary or high school.

I-V

THE SCHOOL STORY

Now, It takes a big bushel of courage to


even think of establishing a "prep" school.
This being -big league stuff.
A prep school means college trained staff
and equipment, for the children have to be
prepared for the national Common Entrance
examinations. The island-wide C.E. exams

decide which children will get full free scholar


ships or grant-aided plac^ in the excellent
Secondary schools. So, after several kneeldowns and lots of Matt. 7:7, we launched

FUN AT JAMES MOUNTAIN

Our friends in Jamaica and you in the States


really rallied around. We never looked back

after the first cornerstone. And on September


10, 1956, Oxford Prep was opened.
Oxford today is a highly reputable school,
praised by Governors and Cabinet Ministers
for its success in the field. And what we are

prayerfully thankful for, is that despite our


academic gains, the school has not shifted an

inch from its Christ-centred establishment.

Each morning our children, black, white,


Indian, Chinese, file out from the modern
two-storey schoolbuilding and cross the court

yard to Memorial Chapel for morning devo


tions. "How beautiful the races in little

children's faces!" The Christian religion is a


strong plank in the school curriculum. We
teach them to observe the advice in Ecclesiastes 12:1.

THE

SCHOOL COMPOUND

In summer-long Jamaica, school could be

kept outdoors from January to December except for rainy days. On the higher moun
tains it gets real cool.

Our school compound is a compact com


plex of main building, nursery school, assem
bly hall, canteen and the beautiful Memorial

Chapel. The main, building is a two-storey


reinforced concrete construction, containing
classrooms and sanitary areas on both floors.

The classrooms are commodious and airy,


with wide windows and high ceilings to dttract
and hold the cool air from mountain and sea.

Individual desks and carefully located instruc


tion areas make for relaxed but concentrated
attention from the students. Downstairs also
contain the principal's office and the school
library.

l7

\t>r

5
5^

Fun-time in the games hall

The nursery school is in its own ijidependent


building, gaily painted and offering such
particular luxuries as bunks for the small folk

who require their pdst-lunch nap.


The assembly hall is a very large open pavi
lion, with stage and dressing room for concerts
etc.

ffm'imfK

A well stocked canteen is very well patro


nised. Indeed, cnateen time (around 10.30

a.m.) is considered by the patrons a highlight


of the school day.

Memorial Chapel stands in its own quiet,


tree-shaded corner. Over the years, hundreds

of adults and children, Jamaicans, Americans


and many other nationalities, have worshipped
and meditated in its beautiful precincts. All
have grown to love it.

OXFORD CONTRIBUTES
TO THE COUNTRY

Education has always held pride of place


among Jamaicans. Many famous native sons
have come from the simple one-room village
schools of the old days. Today, its primary and
secondary, schools, some of them centuries

old, continue to send sons and daughters into


every branch of service to their country. The
University of the West Indies has its main
campus at Mona, near Kingston; its degrees

Children may attend chape! each morning

SCRIPTURES

IN

SCHOOLS

The sun of the scriptures still shines bright


in Jamaican schools. In state and private
schools, Bible knowledge is an important item
in the schools' curricula, whether of sects or
non-denominational.

Oxford Prep is a Cnhstian day school, with


a non-denominational approach to Bible teacning. Chapel services are held each morning as
the business of the day begins and are atten
ded by teachers and pupils.
The services take a simple form, with the

singing of hymns, prayers, scripture, and a


lesson based on a Bible story.
The interest and commencement of under

standing on those eager young faces is a


source of joy to us who teach. And we pray

that the foundation of faith planted in these


tender lives will bear rich fruit in due season.

Schooling starts early in


Jamaica. Children are in school

from four years old in the


"Infant" or "Kindergarten".
From there they move up
to the next stage known vari
ously as elementary, primary
or preparatory.
Secondary
schooling may commence from
11 years old and continue
through to 17 or 18. The

University confers all degrees,


of a very high standard, in the
sciences and arts medicine,
engineering,
law,
history,
English, social sciences, geoggraphy, etc.
In the picture is a typical
Infant school scene.

'

TOP MANAGEMENT

One thing God will not do and that is,


impose His will on us. For man was made by
God like God. Created by Him in His own

image and .likeness with the potential to be


like Him, insofar as being children of God.
Let us notice that when God. in the
beautiful terror of the Damascus day. reached

for that greatest of converts, Saul of Tarsus,


He did not impose His will on Saul. He
asked only, "Saul, why do you persecute
me?"

He did not say, "Stop harassing me."


There was no imposition.
God did not invoke His unstoppable will
which could have turned that temple soldier
into a pillar of salt.

Also, at this most perfect of meetings


between Creator and created since Moses

ascended Sinai, Saul did not query the


question.
Saul did not say, "I am not persecuting
you."
Nor did Saul say, "I am persecuting you
because..."

Instead, Saul acc^ted the will. He asked,


"What should I do?"

He let go. Immediately.


We are the heirs of Moses and Saul. In

possession of wills from God.


We must learn to release those wills unto
God.

Consciously, we must practise losing our


selves into God's management. It is the top
most management.

Christ gave us the strongest or hints to


this great hidden truth when He taught us in
His prayer that the single solitary solus goal
we should seek is that God's will tfe done on
earth, in us, as in heaven.
EDITORIAL

10

From

THE SEPROD
GROUP OF COMPANIES

With the Compliments


of

KINGSTON INDUSTRIAL
GARAGE
34 - 42 Church. Street,

Phone 22194

11

Jamaican foods

J
a

FOR TABLES AROUND JAMAICA

With the Compliments


of

TROPICAL GAS CO. INC.


4H Half-woy Tree Road
Phone 69)91

THE HOUSE OF FINE REFRESHMENTS

DF.5;N0ES & GEDDES LIMITED

THE JAMAICA JUNIOR


VOL 2J , NO. 3

FUN AT JAMES MOUNTAIN

The fun has just begun at


Sun
Mountain where we are planning a new
Our work crew at Sun Mountain
and lovely Camp site for children of
Jamaica. Yes, this is the surprise that
It Started like this. First we bougnt
we have been wanting to tell you for this lovely piece of land more than two
several months now, boys and girls. But years ago for a very small amount of
we couldn't tell you until
were sure money. And it was there waiting pa
that work had begun on the road that tiently for God to show us just how to
leads to our new Camp Sun Mountain use It, Then one day something wonder
not far from the city of Kingston.
ful happened and we found out just
exactly what we were to do. (We will
teij you that story another day.)
So we tooK our boys up to dedicate
the piece of land. There is a small and
very dear little house on the land with
a lovely big stone water tank. After the
boys helped to sweep and clean the
house and rake the yard, we made a
little fire and cooked our very first
lunch. Then, before we ate we gathered
in a circle on the broad stone patio of
the house and knelt down to pray. There
in the lovely morning sunshine on top of
Sun Mountain we talked to the Lord.
We thanked Him for our new land and

for all the hopes and dreams that we had


and we asked Him to bless the land we

knelt upon. Then we asked him to bless

the boys and girls that would ever come


there to learn of the love of God for His

Bobby and Tony mix white-wash

children. Each boy prayed and asked


God to help us in our work with the
new camp. It was a wonderful time

together as we sang "Praise God from


whom all blessings flow."

YOUTH CORNER
FUN AT SUN MOUNTAIN

After lunch work continued. The big


boys mixed white-wash to make the
outside walls fresh and clean while the

smallfer boys moved stray stones and


tangled weeds. It was great fun and when
we were finished the place looked
sweet and

clean.

A few weeks later we planted yams,


beans and pumpkin in a lovely big
garden. And in lickity split time we were
back up there picking pounds and pounds
of beans for our Home kitchen pots.

Oh'ihey tasted so very very good!


Bat the real work had only begun.
There is a road to build into the camp
site and first we had to have men plan
it out. It is a half mile long and straight
up a steep hill. Now some monster-sized

bulldozers are hard at work making the


road and in a little while a big roller will
be going up there. Then many truckloads of tar and stone will go on top to
make a nice black hard-top road. Our
friends in Jamaica are giving us th'*

Wayne checks The Sun Mountain Cook-Out

Doesn't that sound exciting? We can

hardly wait to get the first building


started! Next time you read the Jamaica

Evangel we hope to tell you more about

the new building and our progress at


Sun Mountain. Our boys are excited
and are making big plans about what

they will do when they grow up at


Sun Mountain. (P.S. I'll tell you one
thing, they already plan to have a horse

nice road.

SUMMER CAMP

there).

Boys and Girls, Nine Palms is our


summer camp. Sun Mountain camp is
to be an all-year 'round camp close
enough to Kingston to be used constant
ly for picnics and youth meetinas.

Here you see a picture of the entrance


to Nine Palms Camp where we will be

this summer with lots and lots of boys


and girls. Michael, Phillip and Ian are
old enough this year to go to boyscamp
and they are very happy about it. We
hope to have a wonderful summer. And

we hope you will too. Thank you very


much for helping our boys and girls to
have a good camp and a place to study
and learn about Jesus.
Entrance to Nine Palms Camp

CHRISTIAN WRITERS CLUB


iviany times a small, compact, easy-to-read tract, can bringa wonderful
message to the hearts of men.
And many times we have a message on our hearts that we would love

to pass along. But there seems no place to begin . . no easy procedure


for conveying this message.

Here is an opportunity for you. Write your message, prepare your tract,
and send it to
OXFORD CHRISTIAN PRESS
P. O. Box 5

Half Way Tree


Jamaica, W.I.
and if our committee feels it can be used in the work here, w will
print it. Also, if the tract is printed by us, we will print an extra ?.5
for you free of cost.

Write now . . . help us in proclaiming the Good News by joining The


Christian Writers Qub.

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JAMAICA
EVANGEL
A Christian Quarterly from the Caribbean

FALL 1971

7 ot them ii'v' nlory unto the Lorrl, and declare his praise in the islands
lsr)uih 4? ;.?

Vol.19

THE JAMAICA EVANGEL

no 7

DlRECrOKS:

Mr. and Mrs. James Heiget, ManagingDaectois


Mr. E. A. Woodstock, Mr. V. S. Reid
Mr. Solomon Levy, (Chainnan)
OO-WORKERS:

Mr. Guy Whitley. Mrs. Ada Walker


FORWARD AND PROMOTIONAL:

Mr. and Mrs. Don Wheeler

2713 Sheringham Road, Orlando, Fla. 32808


JAMAICA RETREAT (Cunp Jamaica): PROMOTION:
Gene Stinson, Minister

450 N.E. 51st Street, Boca Raton. Ha. 33432


MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMnTEE: Jamaica

Mr. Dou^as Fletcher, Mr. Ramon Albaga


Mr. A. Lionel Levy, Mrs. Claire ShiQetto

Dr. Arthur Wint, Mr. Hal Glave, Mr. A. C. FoOces,


Mr. Giaister Duncan
CHJUSTIAN CHILDREN^ CUNIC:

Mrs. Patsy Alberga, Nurse in diarge


OXFORD PREPARATORY SCHOOL:

Mr. Ramon Alberga, Chairman Board of Govemon


Mr. Ken Collins. Mr. Vic Reid

Mr.P. OssieSmith, Mrs.CarolHerget


NINEPALMS CHRISTIAN CAMP: EsUteSupervisor: Mr.Guy Whitley
CHRISTIAN EVANGEUZING ASS'N:

M( NimrodTownsend. Evangelist
CANDY-TOP DOLL SHOPPF.:

Mrs. Patsy Alberga,


Mrs. Bess Lumsden, Port Charlotte, Fla.
DOCTORS:

Dr. Noel T. March, Dr. Terrence Mair,


Dr. M. H. Beaubrun, Dr. Henry Lopez, Dentist
FOOTBALL COACH:

Mr. P. Ossie Smith.

CARPENTER AND CONSTRUCnON MANAGER: Mr. Henry Nixon


PHOTOGRAPHY:
Mr. Quito Bryan. Mr. Garth Morgan,
Mr. Enol Harvey
AUDITORS:

Price Watertiouse & Co.

THE JAMAICA EVANGEL: EDITOR,


Editorial Board:

V. S. Reid

Jamaica
Solomon Levy
Quito Bryan
Nto. C. Herget

U.SJL
Donald Wheeler

Elvin Gray, Minister

HOW you CAN HELP I


1. Pray for us.

2. Support or partially support a boy


in the Home ($25.00 per month).
3. Send boxes of new useful clothing,
and other items, fra boys. Ask us for

audited financial report and the Ja


maica Evangel mailed to you.)
6. Send used clothing of all kinds, and
Bible School materials.

a list.

7. Send typewritten Scripture labek for

jects.

8. Sendschool and craftsupplies.

4. Support financially any of our pro5. Become a MEMBER of the HOME.


(A subscription of 75 cents a year
helps to defray postal charges for our

medicinebottles for the Clinic.

9. Help us to plant new churches by


supporting the Christian Evangelizing
Association.

(UAAXe Ua: P.O. Box 5, Hal^ Way TA.ee, JmcUca., W.l.

Bobby and Tony (right) with Daddy Herget doing something essential
to the Ford Pick-up.

OUR SECOND HARVEST


We are close to our second harvest - that

time when our boys near their coming-of-age.


And it is always a time to look around our
Home and ask ourselves; What have w/e
accomplished?

It is a difficult, searching question for any


home and much more for a foster home..
Our children have come from all over the

island, from different backgrounds, different

genes whom we have brought up together as


brothers, as our OWN children, playing to

gether, goinq to school together, learning to

OUR SECOND HARVEST


pray together, worshipping as a family,
camping together.

We have tried not to play favourites with


any of them,to give them equal opportunities
limited only by their own abilities.

We have, we hope, brought them up to be


Christians, and certainly with the awareness

of what Christian living is. And concerning


our big boys, we have taught them as best we
could, about both worlds, this and the next.

Our three oldest boys are Eddie-Paul,


Bobby and Tony.
TONY

Tony, now 15, was the only tiny baby of


our first batch of boys, cute as a button and

as quiet. He has grown into a hardworking


teenager. He is doing well in his highschool
work and hopes to go to coltege. He looks

like becoming our scientist. As all our boys,


he is good at games, especially soccer and
swimming.
BOBBY

Bobby is our man of the stage. He plays


the trumpet and is a natural stand-up comic
who regularly puts us into stitches. He has a

fine baritone voice which the Youth Choir


unashamedly exploits. Bobby seems bent on
entering Bible college. Bobby who is now 16

came to us when hewas 3 years old. He is ir)


high school and plays football (soccer) and'
cricket.

Eddie-Paul, our oldest, goes into the army


soon, into the Engineers. Eddie-Paul was a

tiny 2-year old when he came. Hegrew into


a romping happy boy with a mind of his own,
then into a ouiet 18-vear-oid and a trim

.-rfi;

ilete. Whatever he does is capably_accom-

ON COVER: Bobby on tr

shed.

Tony on guitar get toge

Eddie-Paul has had technical training and


now well into his studies of fadio and
ictrical wiring.

small session.

.K

4:

^r'-

-'^5

/6/i

Big Brother Tony teaching Ian his first tennis strokes white Andrew in
plantation jlp^ iappa hat looks on.

Sometimes a man just can't go it alone, so Bobby phones a buddy to


dbcuss a homework problem. Bobby and Tony are in high school.

Lots of boys have walked in and out of these now famous gates at
No. 7 Oxford Road.

EDITORIAL
T

The other morning wt: loi^tk to wnnd' ti'>ij h')v ni.my of us remember thegrwHt

will and testament Inli in u-; by


Siqiiilii.iiMtly oerhdps, il is mentioned
only by he "beloved disciple". John, ;it II 7!. It ipnU fx; ^tmong the shortest
wilN on record but immi'asur.ibly Tnort; iincurtHnt thiui any other. Christ said
"Peace / leave unto you."

And iis if Hh desired to undfisi iirn it. lo liM>yi- nodoubt or quesiif)n nbout His
pl)rpos^^ H iiiddf! the l;it tl^-i t'vn idi.h' .ini>l' i>ii- .t;i|(?inciit
"My peace ! GIVE unto you."

Ttie inner strunqth ot

tlif" Mit' '/..i- ihf il.soliilt' .issiji.incc iluit He wds


the Son of God. It gave Him jbsulut"'
i"fi brou'ih! with it th" powoi, iIk;
peace-power, that could mako Hini say "Mov ' lo .1 mountain <iihI it would bt;
moved. It was His secret

Have yiHJ noticed how ptMplf, wtio ai'- fo all appoarunres, at peace will)
themselves, have ,in absoluli.' belief in then own intolligence, or physical prowess,
or beauty, or wealth, 01 r.ink. 01 t.>irth. antl how vfry often, they wield great
power in their time an(f enviMinment-' It in tins wtiolly temporal pe<ice tfiere can

be strength, how miich tTH>re of il in the spiritual peace^


Moreover, this temporal strength tends tot)r.'>'d itsownsfjed of s;lt destruction
This overplus ot eyo. under the impact of mui I; success, will lose its edge to th(;
maniacal notion that like Herod, would set us up to play god and be blown apart.

The marvel of it is that we do not have lopray for this peace which hasalready
been willed, been GIVEN ot us. We need only, as His heirs, to affirm that this
peace is ours. The affirmation is the prayer.
Where does this take us'

We want peace. More than that. \Ne desire peace. But, like Paul, we desire one
way, and we go the other.
We go against our will
Our human will, that is.

Paul found peace, not through effort, but through grace.


He affirmed that grace was his.

He was the least of the apostles, but lie sought (prayed for) inner peace.

Let us, like Paul, seek for our heritage, the kingdom of peace, through prayer,
^ead Matt. 6 33.

7.

AN AMBASS,'

MOUNTAIN!
A cheque for $5,000 (US) was presented
to Jim & Carol by the AmericanAmbas^dor
Vincent de Roulet at the Embassy in
Kingston recently to assist in establishing

Sun Mountain Christian Camp. The cheque,


a gift from the U.S. AID fund is to be used

on the first buildings for the camp. Tractoring


of the road into the camp has already been
done. The road must now be blacktopped.
The camp is located on a mountain top,
about 2,500 feet high in the district of
James Mountain among the beautiful St.

Catherine highlands. From the main public


motor road, the Sun Mountain road will be

over half a mile long on a steep but graded


ascent.

The site is on land which is rapidly


growing in value as a resort area. A portion

of the property was acquired through a gift


from a Jamaican couple, Mr. & Mrs. Vic Reid.

The Ambassador in a brief speech praised


the work being done by the Jamaica
Christian Boys' Home and hoped for the

Home continued growth in its purpose and


work.

NEWS BITS

BataShoeCompany haspledged the payment


of our Clinic rental and has been doing so
for the past 8 months. What a great help to

of Arts & Technology in Ottawa. Canada,

our work!

and reports of his work are excellent.

Andy Hacker, the oldest boy in the first lot


of boys growing up in the Home, has now
oeen married. The couple live in Toronto,
Canada.

Douglas Prendergast. another of the older

boys, won a scholarship toAlgonquin College^,

.DORIAL BOOST FOR SUN

f " , " ' 1 : : - v ^-i

> . f'

^iWiiM i'iW

bastador de Roulet at right with Jim and Cirol.

_RT E. Stephenson, minister at Fort Lauder-

Nine Palms Christian Cajjip was a bell-ringer

dale, Fla. held a good revival in August at

this past summer! Almost 300 campers were

Meadowbrook church and as^sted with the


teen camp at Nine Palms. He,was a good
help. Now he is travelling and telling the
story of the Home and its work wherever he
goes. Write us if you would like him to visit.

registered and the spirit was great. Boys and


girls came to real grips with Bible lessons for
today's living. Many of the teen group have
given their lives to Christ and have follovkd
it up with a full devotion to the church this

fall. As for behaviour, Jamaican young people


are a wonderful example and show signs of
good home training. We are proud of them.

THE LORD'S PRAYER

It is curious how little use we make of the

one prayer which has the full authority of

Christ and which is the most complete prayer


evei devised. Some say it was put down only
as a model to follow, to bf^ sort or ad-libbed

around, putting in our own personal varia


tions and grace notes, adding here and there
so as to fill in anything the Author of the
prayer may have forgotten.
How sad.

For,think just for a moment. Let us think.


What is there that we can require which is
not taken care of in the Lord's Prayer?

Can you think of anything?


As

usual, Christ foresaw these human

squirmings to evade the simple and seek for


the involved. And so he gave us a few clues
to its usage. You will find your own clues if
you seek for them. As for me, I have one or
two I would like to mention.

The first is at Matthew 6:33. "Seek ye


first the Kingdom of God, and his righteous

ness; and all these things shall be added'unto


you."

On this premise, Christ built His prayer.


At the very outset, following the salutation,

we pray that: "Thy kingdom come, thy^ill


be done."

"kingdom" and the "righteou


That,is the "gingdom" and the "righteous

r/7af,isthe "kingdom" and the ' righteous


ness" of which our Lord spoke.

It is only after we have sought these in


the prayer, that Christ tells us to ask for our

"daily bread", i.e., food, clothes, shelter, all


the things that we strive for (and often pray
for) so hard.

10

NEWS BITS

Christ has even placed the "forgiveness and


delivery" portion of the prayer

not before,

but after these.

I know that the human heart, the seeking,

sejri hing heart often cries out in its intensity


for God. t do. You do. We sometimes find

oufs*lvt,'s III lio

et.stasy of

prayer,

'.vundtiHis. oh so beautiful reaching out for


God' Rt;<n hing/n for God! Those moments
are un<o'gettdbki and we thank God for that
moment jiy iiiui-hmg of the throne.

Other needs are ball point pens, scotch tape,


Elmers paste, white thread, and boys' briefs
sizes from 4-18. Toothpaste and brushes arf
always welcome and so are packs of dried
bleath for the laundry. And if you send a
Christmas box the boys won't mind at all if
thi.T"- are some small play items enclosed
wnii the "practical" things for the Home.
M.iv God guide you.

But ! t IIS not forget the quiet moments.


Those .-voiyday almost routine audiences
With Hr-i whi( h we call prayer. Then we can
viy tti-' i.ord's Prayer, slowly, carefully,
,ii)oui it as we say the words. For
iht'v luive been wonderfully composed to fill
.ill out needs. They declare our utter dependeiK e upon Him, and therefore our Christian

freedom. They settle the heart in its heritage.


In its rock-cleft.
The Publican

NEEDS

The loss of value of the Atneric an doll.ir is

being felt in our work in Jamaica. In fai t it


takes a big chunk out of our monthly
income. Please remember us in your prayers
in this matter of devaluation. With prices

rising constantly it is, we feel, reasotiahle to


expect missionary giving to increiise too.
Consider the need and pray about your
response.

Christmas is coming! If you would like to


send a Christmas box, please include small
sized men's shirts in solid colours with long

sleeves for our teenagers. And since it is teen


month you could send neckties, size 30 and"
32 belts, and socks of dark solid colours
for school. No small sizes are needed.

II

n-

. Donovan (right) and Robert do some kitchen duty.

HOME IS WHAT YOU MAKE IT


Home is really what you make it.
And boys that live here in this
Home have really made it a happy
place. Take a little walk with us
around our yard and you will see
what we mean. There is Wayne on
tip-toe reaching for a big red cherry
in the cherry tree. Leonard is
swinging from the low limbs of the

boys' favourite
There

corhes

fun
a

call

swing tree,
from the''

"Elephant-Ear" tree and if you will


look up cautiously you will catch 2
little scamps peeping out of their
tree house to call again, hoping not
to be seen.

Around the back are the bigger


boys, for school is over and they are
busy in the paint shop doing their

A lot of living goes on at Mo?7


Oxford Road where boys big and
little, tall and short, stout ehd.
skinny all live together in a big big
house. There are lots of smiles and
lots of dishes to wash. There are
hours for fun and hours for work.

Like the day called Saturday, when


we usually go to Sun Mountain; and
we couldn't last Saturday. Instead
we made a garden in our own back
yard and the sun was hot while we

worked. But that was all forgotten


when Mom put a cloth on the picnic
table in the yard. The cool lemonade
and juicy hotdogs would make any
one forget a tittle the work they did.

HOME IS WHAT YOU MAKE IT


daily part of the chores. Eddie is
cutting grass and thinking excitedly
about joining the army.

Let's shut the gate as we go


through,

for

toddlers

play.

this

is where the
That's Andrew

making mud pies under the dripping


hose faucet and Dave is watching.
His dirty face shows signs that he
finished his pies before Andrew
took over.

Inside. David is still doing home


work and Larry is setting the table
for supper. After our evening meal,
Daddy has a special treat for the
boys, some educational movies in

KENNETH

Robert

Many many years ago a tiny boy of

must do the dishes first. (That's


Robert on the left In the picture.)
It's their turn this week and they

almost 2 years came into our Home.


He grew up with us and some of

will hurry to get through since it is


"movie night".

vi/ell. For he was full of tricks and

color.

But

Donovan and

your teachers will remember him

fun and loved by all.

Now Kenneth is in the English

Our family teaiin is a busy one


and it keeps us happy and healthy.

army and is in Ireland in the war

There are some tears and an occa

there. But even though Kenneth is

sional quarrel for even these make


up a home. There are some anxious

now a grown up young man he still


remembers in little boy ways, his

times when fever and colds keep


even the toughest guy down. And
for the smooth "faith" running of
our Home, there is always that time
set apart for evening prayers, weekly
prayer, and Bible study at church,
and the usual happy hours at
Worship, Sunday School and Youth
meetings at Meadowbrook. Tony"

Mom and Dad. His letters ask for

knows

that when he

bakes the

Saturday cakcs. thoy will turn put


90()d if hi! puts ill till! right things.
Mr ,il'.() knows Ih^ii hoiiK! jiiriis out

when Mil' wlioli; f.irmly (nils


Htl-

Kit) > It

prayer for his safety and remind us


of his love. Here is a recent note we
have received on the back of a nice
picture of himself in his uniform:

"To my dear Mom. with all my


love to all the family. Tell Dad hello

for me. I still love you Mom. Hofse


to see you some day. Mom. is the
Meadowbrook church built? If so II
pray God's blessing be on it.

I^ove from your son. Kenny


I love you."

With the

Compliments of
With, the Compliments
of
YO^

TROPICAL GAS CO. INC.

Serving Jamaica

41 i Half-way Tree Road


Phone 936-2190

for over 10 years.


KINGSTON

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for outside

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Contact your local representative or

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229 Marcus Garvey Drive, Kingston 11. Tel: 923-7028/7407
13

CAMP JAMAICA TIME

It was a great success last Spring!


And It can be again this coming year.
The time will be different this year for
during March and April we will be busy
with a Revival Fires Crusade*.

Camp Jamaica Time is set for June - 3rd week.


Plan now for a lovely trip to Jamaica
with good fellowship, rich Bible lessons,
iightseeing, and an inside look at the
missionary's field of service.
Please write to Don Wheeler for
further information.
Don Wheeler

2713 Sheringham Road


Orlando, Fla.

With The Compliments Of


THE DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY
Corner Trafalgar &

Knutsford Boulevard
P.O. Box 223
Kingston, Jamaica.

AugustusD. DeLeon, J.P.


Branch Manager
Telephone 926-1470, 927-6251

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1 6

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FOR TABLES AROUND JAMAICA

JAMAICA
EVANGEL
n inter 1971

A Christian Quarterly from the Caribbean

^Let them give glory unto the Lord, and declare his praise in the islands'Isaiah 42: /2

NO. 4

THE JAMAICA EVANGEL

VOL. 17

Mr. and Mrs. James Herget, Managing Directors


Mr. E. A. Woodstock, Mr. V. S. Reid

DIRECTORS:

CO-WORKERS:

Mr. Solomon Levy, (Chairman)


Mr, Guy Whitley, Mrs. Ada Walker

FORWARD AND

Mr. and Mrs. Don Wheeler

2713 Sheringham Road, Orlando, Fla. 32808


JAMAICA RETREAT (Camp Jamwca)
PROMOTIONAL:

PROMOTION:

Gene Stinson, Minister

MANAGEMENT ADVISORY

450 N,E. 51st Street, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432


Mr. Douglas Fletcher, Mr. Ramon Alberga
Mr. A. Lionel Levy, Dr. Arthur Wint
Mr. Hal Glave, Mr. A. C. Folkes, Mr. Glaister Duncan

COMMITTEE: Jamaica

CHRISTIAN CHILDREN'S
CLINIC:

Mrs. Patsy Alberga, Nurse in charge

OXFORD PREPARATORY

Mr. Ramon Alberga, Chairman Board of Governors

SCHOOL:

Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.

Ken Collings, Mr. Vic Reid


P. Ossie Smith, Mrs. Carol Herget
Glaister Duncan, Mr. Geo. Bullock
Horace Campbell

NINE PALMS CHRISTIAN

CAMP: Estate Supervisor:

Mr. Guy Whitley

CHRISTIAN EVANGELIZING

Mr. James Herget, Mr. Solomon Levy, Mr. Guy Whitley,

ASS'N:

Mrs. Carol Herget, Mr. Nimrod Townsend

CANDY-TOP DOLL SHOPPE:

Mrs. Patsy Alberga


Mrs. Bess Lumsden, Port Charlotte, Fla.

DOCTORS:

Dr. Noel T. March, Dr. Terrence Mair, Dr. Roland Richmond


Dr. M. H. Beaubrun; Dr. Henry Lopez, Dentist

FOOTBALL COACH:

Mr. P. Ossie Smith

CARPENTER AND

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER:

Mr. Henry Nixon

PHOTOGRAPHY;

Mr. Garth Morgan, Mr. Quito Bryan

AUDITORS:

Price Waterhouse & Co.

Mr. Errol Harvey


THE JAMAICA EVANGEL;
EDITOR:

V. S. Reid

Editorial Board:

Jamaica

Solomon Levy
Quito Bryan
Mrs. C. Herget

UJS.A.
Donald Wheeler

Elvin Gray, Minister

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

1. Pray for us.

2. Support or partially support a boyinthe Home ($25.00 permonth).


3. Sendboxesof newusefulclothing, and other items, for boys.Askus for a list
4. Support financially any of our projects.
5. Become a MEMBER of the HOME. (A subscription of 75 cents a year helps to

defray postal charges for ouraudited fmancial report and theJamaica Evangel

mailed to you.
6. Send Bible School materials.

7. Send typewritten Scripture labels formedicine bottles for theClinic.


8. Send school and craft supplies.

9. Help us to plantnew churches by supporting theChristian Evangelizing


Association.

Write us;

p. o. Box S, Half WayTree, lamaica, W. I.


(Local address - 7 Oxford Road)

. * -

Jfc .

oj

Jr",
\

'
M

.V*'

It

Bobby & Donovan- hustling home from


school,

COVER: Our smaller boys get together


{with

David

on

the melodica)

for a

musical session. In the chorus from left

are Wayne,
Leonard.

Larry, Phillip, Mike and

Which of us would not like to gain the


approval of Christ?
That's like asking who would not want to go
to heaven. We all want the approval of Christ.
We all, as Christians, strive for it. The
imitation of Christ is the most important
purpose of our lives.

In our Christian endeavouring to be like our


Master, we can strike no richer exemplars than
His deeds and words with little children. He

made a little child, a symbol of heaven. He


related our hope of glory to them. He stated,
indeed, warned, that, unless we trusted as
little children,

we

would

not enter the

kingdom.
Further,

He

declared

that

at

the Last

Judgment, He would measure our reward by


the way we had comported with these "least
of these" while we were on earth.

God in Christ said, "Then shall the King say


unto them on his right hand, 'Come, ye bles
sed of my Father, inherit the kingdom pre
pared for you from the foundation of the

world: For I was an hungred, and ye gave me


meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I
was a stranger, and ye took me in: Naked, and

ye clothed me: I was sick and ye visited me: I


was in prison, and ye came unto me.'

Then shall the righteous answer him, saying,


'Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and

Homework time with Phillip


Ditto with David

fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drinks'


V\/heri saw we thee a stranger, and took thee
in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw
we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee?

"And the King shall answer and say unto


them' 'Verily I say unto you. Inasmuch as ye
have done it unto one of the least of my
brethren, ye have done it unto me."
Children, and their loving care, are of sub
lime importance in the Christian life. God
said so.

The other morning we tooirto~vvofMieang how^


many of us remember the great last will an(
testament left to us by Christ. Significantly
perhaps, it is mentioned only by the "beloved

disciple," John, at 14:27. It must be among


the shortest wills on record but immeasurably
more important than any other. It said:
"Peace I leave unto you."
And as if Christ desired to underscore it,
to leave no doubt nor question about His

purpose. He made the further more emphatic


statement:

''My peace / GIVE unto you."


The inner strength of Jesus the Man, was
the absolute assurance He had that He was the

son of God. It gave him absolute peace and


brought with it the power, the peace-power
that could make -him say "move" to a moun
tain and it would move. It was His secret.

Have you noticed how people, who are, to all


appearances, at peace with themselves, have

an absolute belief in their own intelligence, or

physical prowess, or beauty, or wealth, or


rank, or birth? And how very often they wield

great power in their time and environment?


If in this wholly temporal peace, there can be
strength, how much more strength there must
be in spiritual peace? Can there be any
comparison?
Moreover, this temporal strength tends to
breed its own seed of self destruction. This

overplus of ego, under the impact of success,


loses its edge to maniacal notions, which,as
with Herod, may set us up to play god and
explode in our bellies.
But not Christ's peace.
The marvel of it is that we have not got to

beg for this peace. It is ours. It has been willed


to us, been given to us. We need only, as His
heirs, to affirm that this peace is ours. The
affirmation is the prayer.

Paul found peace not through effort but

grace. He affirmed that grace was his. He was


the least of the apostles but he sought (prayed
for) inner peace. Let us, like Paul, seek our
heritage, the peace-power, through affirmative
prayer. (Read Mark 11:24).

The

Jamaica
Junior
OXFORD PREPARATORY SCHOOL

SCHOOL presented a lovely Christmaf.


programme this year. It was sweet to

see the children act and sing. The older


classes presented a lovely play showing
what the Spirit of Jesus and of Christmas
would help us to do and be.

CAMP JAMAICA

Once again we plan this lovely treat for


our American

friends. We had never

planned it to be a permanent annual


Retreat, but each year it is such an
inspiring time that our friends ask us to
repeat it.

In addition to a beautiful

trip to the Caribbean's most lovely


Island which includes rich sight-seemg
trips, there is planned a complete insight
into the missionary work of the Jamaica
Christian Boys' Home and a mountaintop experience of Spiritual treats at
Nine Palms Camp Grounds.

When the school bell rings there is a mass


hustling of boys, school bags flying, last
minute hair-combing and a final slam of
the back door. Three little guys look
longingly after them. They know that
the morning will now be quiet and the
house all theirs until one-thirty. So sadly
they settle back to play. Sometimes they
try to sneak through the tall green gate
and make their own visit to the school

The Camp buildings are rich in 1(3th

yard. But there are many things to do

century flavour and the site one of the

and play for they have each other. There

most beautiful in the cross-country views

is Dave who is the oldest being three in

of this mountainous island.

The date this year is June 10th to 17th.


There is limited space and some are
already registered. So let us hear from

you if you are interested in this trip,


The rates are reasonable, the beds are
good and the food is excellent. You will
meet friends and make new ones. Treat

December, Andrew our little "Cover-

I Baby" in the Christmas 1969 issue, who


will be three in April, and the newest
little guy, Derrick, who was two in late
summer. Derrick was on our Christmas

letter and Andrew is on the Christmas

Prayer Calendar this year. We are glad

yourself now to a lovely Caribbean

you love our small fry and we appreciate


your helping us care for them, boys and
girls. They are glad that you are their

vacation and a Spiritual treat.'

friends.

Write us: P. O. Box 5, Half Way Tree,


Jamaica, W. I.

THREE SMALL FRY

REAPING TIME

There was a very special kind of lightheartedness in the scurrying footsteps of


our boys early in January up Sun
Mountain road. Before we left that,
morning we had our usual prayer wher
the gang all settled down in the back o1
the blue pick-up truck. Then Mom an

nounced that we would be doing very


little planting that day for it was time to
reap. They bad missed going to Sun
Mountain the week before because it had

been Christmas and there was che very


special holiday at Nine Palms. So every
boy was eager to see what had happened
on their small farm. First there were the

peanuts. And what squeals of delight


there were on top Sun Mountain that

bright morning! The peanuts just rolled


out of the ground in good abundance.
Each had his turn of pulling up". Then

are keenly working toward having an


organ in their new church building. In

moved on to the carrots, turnips,

Sunday morning with Bryan Aikman


playing his flute. Bryan plays beautifully
and has won good prizes in the Jamaican

tomatoes, lettuce, and corn. It was great


fun.

Work has been delayed for a few months

on the road but once again the big


machinery should be rolling up and down
Sun Mountain Road making way for

the picture you see part of the choir on

Festivals. There are 18 teenagers in our


choir and they sing each Sunday morn
ing. We wish you could hear them.

some eager builders.

GROURih

THE MEADOWBROOK YOUTH

GROUP had a planning meeting last


week and the teen kids sent word to us

that they had decided to have a work


day every month at Sun Mountain.

We had encouraged them to have the


meeting on their own for they are grow
ing up nicely both in age and in their
Christian lives. They also planned to
produce an Easter play for Easter week.

The silver offering they plan to take up


will go toward their organ fund. They

' V.".

V.

' -.-i

When we pray to the Father to forgive us as


we forgive others, let us know and understand,
without a doubt, that we are asking God to
LOVE us as we LOVE others.

What we are asking God is to give us the


same measure of love as we give to others.
It is an awesome thought.
But that is how real prayer is. Real prayer
has positive value-objectives.
Each time we pray for forgiveness, we are
laying our lives on the line. For we are dead,
if God does not forgive us; and there is no
forgiveness without forgiving. Let us not'be in
doubt about that.

So what do we have? It is that when we-

pray, we are putting to the test the only link


which we have with God, the link of love; His

to us. and ours to Him. And there is only one

way of facing this peril (for peril it is; look up


Hebrews 10:31) and that is by faith. Faith in
God.

Jesus Christ said, God is tove. M we lose


our love for, our brother, we have lost God.

Christians are very fortunate


that our Lord chose children to

be the exemplars of his ministry;


for it is so easy to love children;
and so rewarding to know that
our love and care and guidance
and teaching is helping to create
a personality that is most likely
to reflect God's will.

Over the years, you have

shared with us at Oxford Road,,


the joy of raising a family. As
this year ends and a new one
begins, we give our thanks for
being able with you to share
in this special ministry so near
to the Lord's heart. And who

can pray for more than to be


10

near to our Saviour's heart?


As the children are near.

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TELEPHONE 22190

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With the Compliments


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MAIN OFFICE: 41A HALF WAY TREE RD
BHGHTON BEACH (2)
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936-2190
938-^6008
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