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Planning & Development Committee Meeting

Agenda
Monday, March 2, 2015
Council Chambers
7:00 pm

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Linda Roberts
Phone: 905.420.4660 extension 2928
TTY: 905.420.1739
Email: lroberts@pickering.ca

Planning & Development


Committee Agenda
Monday, March 2, 2015
Council Chambers
7:00pm
Chair: Councillor Pickles
Delegations
1.

Erick Joyner
Preserve Pickering
Re: Seaton Development

Pages

Part "A"
Information Reports
Subject:

Information Report No. 01-15


Draft Plan of Subdivision Application SP-2014-03
Draft Plan of Condominium Application CP-20 14-03
Zoning By-law Amendment Application A 10/14
Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
356 & 364 Kingston Road

1-17

Part "B"
Planning & Development Reports

1.

Director, City Development, Report PLN 01-15


18-33
Invitation to Participate in ISO 37120: "Sustainable Development of
Communities- Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life"

World Council on City Data


A new global standard .on City Indicators
Recommendation
1.

That Report PLN 01-15 of the Director, City Development regarding the ISO
37120 Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life certification program,
be received;

Accessible - -

PICKE~G

For information related to accessibility requirements please contact


Linda Roberts
Phone: 905.420.4660 extension 2928
TTY: 905.420.1739
Email: lroberts@oickerino.ca

Planning & Development


Committee Agenda
Monday, March 2, 2015
Council Chambers
7:00pm
Chair: Councillor Pickles

(II)

2.

That staff be authorized to further investigate the feasibility, resource and


financial implications of participating in ISO 37120, and report back in the
fall of 2015; and

3.

Further, that a copy of Report PLN 01-15 be forwarded to Global City


Indicators Facility and the World Council on City Data.

Other Business

(Ill) Adjournment

Information Report to
Planning & Development Committee
Report Number: 01-15
Date: March 2, 2015

From:

Catherine Rose, MCIP, RPP


Chief Planner

Subject:

Draft Plan of Subdivision Application SP-2014-03


Draft Plan of Condominium Application CP-2014-03
Zoning By-law Amendment Application A 10/14 .
Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
356 & 364 Kingston Road

1.

Purpose of this Report


The purpose of this report is to provide preliminary information regarding
applications for a Draft Plan of Subdivision, a Draft Plan of Condominium and a
Zoning By-law Amendment, submitted by Grand Communities (Pickering)
Corporation, to permit the development of a common element condominium
consisting of 28 three-storey townhouse units, accessed by a private road. This
report contains general information on the applicable Official Plan and other
related policies, and identifies matters raised to-date.

This report is intended to assist members of the public and other interested
stakeholders to understand the proposal. Planning & Development Committee
will hear public delegations on the applications, ask questions of clarification and
identify any planning issues. This report is for information and no decision on
these applications are being made at this time. Staff will bring forward a
recommendation report for consideration by the Planning & Development
Committee upon completion of a comprehensive evaluation of the proposal.

2.

Property Location and Description

the subject properties are located at the northwest corner of Kingston Road
and Rougemount Drive, in the Rougemount Neighbourhood (see Location
Map, Attachment #1)
the subject lands comprise 2 properties which have a combined area of
approximately 0.6 of a hectare with approximately 77 metres of frontage
along Kingston Road and approximately 44 metres of frontage along
Rougemount Drive
356 Kingston Road. currently contains a vacant sales trailer; 364 Kingston
Road is occupied by two vacant one-and-a-half storey buildings and a
detached garage

Information Report No. 01-15

3.

in 2011, the applicant previously submitted a zoning by-law amendment


application to facilitate the development of a three-storey mixed-use building
containing approximately 1,350 square metres of commercial-retail floor
space on the ground floor, and 34 apartment units on the second and third
floors with 101 at-grade parking spaces (see Applicant's Previous Submitted
Plan, Attachment #2)
the applicant has informed City Development staff that the previous proposal
was unmarketable and therefore decided to revise their proposal
the City has received a letter from the applicant requesting to officially
withdraw the previous rezoning application

Applicant's Current Proposal

surrounding uses include low density residential development consisting of


two-storey detached dwellings fronting Dalewood Drive to the north; a
commercial plaza to the east across Rougemount Drive; Blaisdale Montessori
School and industrial-commercial uses to the south across Kingston Road;
and a vehicle repair and service station establishment with associated
outdoor storage immediately to the west

Applicant's Previous Proposal

4.

Page 2

the applicant's proposal is to develop a common element condominium


consisting of a total of 28 three-storey townhouse units accessed by a private
road; the proposal also includes 11 visitor parking spaces and an outdoor
amenity area (see Submitted Plan and Submitted Building ElevationsAttachments #3, #4, #5 and #6)

the proposal consists of three residential blocks:


Block 1 is traditional townhouses consisting of 10 units with parking at the
front of the units
Blocks 2 and 3 are rear-lane townhouses containing a total of 18 units
fronting Kingston Road and Rougemount Drive with parking at the rear of
the dwelling units
vehicular access is provided through a private condominium road off of
Rougemount Drive
the applicant has also submitted a draft plan of subdivision application to
create a single development block; this is a technical requirement to allow the
applicant to create the privately:-owned parcels and the parcels for the
common elements of the development through a process called "lifting part lot
control" (see Submitted Draft Plan of Subdivision, Attachment #7)
the applicant has also submitted a draft plan of condominium application to
create the tenure of the parcels in the development; common element
features include, but are not limited to: the private road and visitor parking;
community mailboxes; and water meter room (see Submitted Common
Element Condominium Plan, Attachment #8)

Information Report No. 01-15

5.

Policy Framework

5.1

Durham Regional Official Plan

Page 3

the Regional Official Plan designates the subject lands as "Urban SystemsLiving Areas"; lands in this designation shall be developed to incorporate the
widest variety of housing types, sizes and tenure to provide living
accommodations that address social-economic factors; these lands are
encouraged to be developed in compact urban form through higher density
uses, particularly along arterial roads supporting public transit, such as
Kingston Road
the Regional Official Plan also designates a "Regional Corridor" along
Kingston Road
Regional Corridors with an underlying Living Areas designation shall support
an overall, long-term density target of at least 60 residential units per gross
hectare and a floor space index of 2.5
'
Regional Corridors shall provide efficient transportation links to the Urban
Growth Centres, Regional Centres as well as other centres in adjacent
municipalities
Kingston Road is designated as a "Type B Arterial Road" and a "Transit
Spine"
"Type B Arterial Roads" are designed to carry moderate volumes of traffic at
moderate speeds, have some access restrictions, and generally have a
right-of-way width ranging from 30 to 36 metres; rights-of-way may be wider
at certain locations to accommodate intersection improvements and other
facilities such as transit, utilities, noise attenuation installation, bikeways and
landscaping

"Transit Spines" are recognized corridors where higher levels of transit


service is to be encouraged
these applications will be assessed against the policies and provisions of the
Region of Durham Official Plan during the further processing of the
applications

5.2

Pickering Official Plan

the subject lands are within the Rougemount Neighbourhood of the Official
Plan and are designated "Mixed-Use Areas- Mixed Corridors"; lands in this
designation are intended primarily for residential, retail, community, cultural
and recreational uses at a scale serving the community
for lands located on the north side of Kingston Road that are designated
Mixed-Use Areas and abut low density development, the Rougemount
Neighbourhood policies establish a maximum residential density of 55 units
per net hectare; the proposal provides for a net residential density of
approximately 46 units per net hectare
as part of the City's Official Plan Review, the City has initiated the South
Pickering Intensification Study to identify .appropriate locations and policies for
intensification, including the Kingston Road Corridor

Information Report No. 01-15

5.3

the Kingston Road Corridor Urban Design and Development Guidelines,


adopted by Council in 1997, established a general design framework for the
Kingston Road Corridor, that supports the long-term vision for the
transformation of Kingston Road from a highway to a "mainstreet"
the subject properties are situated within the Rougemount Village precinct
the Guidelines envision an "urban village" for the precinct that provides a mix
of compatible, people oriented, street-related uses (such as retail and
resturants)
low rise buildings (minimum two storeys}, promoting pedestrian friendly uses
are encouraged within the precinct; taller buildings (of a low rise form) are
permitted in strategic locations provided they do not have an adverse impact
on abutting residences
shade, street furniture and transit shelters should be provided within the
precinct
the Guidelines also encourage the redevelopment of under-utilized properties
the applicant's proposal will be reviewed in detail to ensure compliance with
the urban design vision for the Kingston Road Corridor

Zoning By-law

this work may result in future changes to the designations, prescribed


densities, and other policies pertaining to the subject lands
the applications will be assessed against the policies and provisions of the
City's Official Plan during the further processing of this proposal

Kingston Road Corridor Urban Design Development Guidelines

5.4

Page 4

the subject properties are zoned "CO/(H)RM1"- Commercial Office/Multi


Residential Zone within Restricted Area Zoning By-law 3036, as amended by
By-law 2658/88
this zone permits the following uses, subject to a Holding provision:
business office
professional office
multiple.dwelling horizontal (townhouses) and multiple dwelling vertical
(residential units attached by an above grade wall/floor or walls/floors) at a
density of 22.5 to 55 units per net hectare
the Holding provision is intended to prevent residential development until
appropriate agreements are entered into with the Regional Municipality of
Durham and the City of Pickering for the provision of municipal services and
site plan approval
the current zoning by-law requires a minimum of 48 resident and 9 visitor
parking spaces; it also requires a front yard setback of 14.0 metres
the applicant's proposal provides for 56 parking spaces (2 spaces for each
unit) and 11 visitor parking spaces; it also provides for a reduced front yard
setback of 4.5 metres
the purpose of the zoning by-law amendment is to establish appropriate
performance standards to facilitate the development a common element
condominium development consisting of freehold townhouses

Information Report No. 01-15

6.

Comments Received

6.1

Open House Meeting

an Open House meeting was held on January 15, 2015 to allow the area
residents to learn more about the revised proposal, as well as review and
comment on the plans that the applicant has submitted
a total of 6 area residents attended the meeting
area residents noted a number of key concerns with the development which
included the following:.

6.2

a preference for the previous mixed-use proposal over the current


proposal (less of an impact on the abutting properties to the north fronting
Dalewood Drive)
the proposed location of Block 1 and the water meter building are located
too close to the existing residential development to the north
concern regarding the compatibility of the proposed three-storey townhouse
units adjacent to existing two-storey detached dwellings to the north
privacy concerns, as a result of rear yard lighting and second-storey
balcony projections overlooking into the rear yards of the existing
residential properties to the north
removal of existing trees situated along the rear lot line that abut
residential properties to the north
the revised proposal will result in increased traffic
requested further information regarding fencing details (i.e., height and
type/proposed materials), as well as whether additional landscaping will be
provided to screen the proposed development

Other Resident Comments

6.3

Page 5

none received in response to the circulation to-date

Agency Comments
Region of Durham

the proposal comprising low/medium density


residential is not entirely consistent with the vision set
out for arterial roads in the Regional Official Plan
a 4.5 metre road widening is required across the
Kingston Road frontage to accommodate the
Region's Long-Term Transit Strategy and future
transit platform fronting the site
connections to existing municipal water and sanitary
sewers are available to the subject properties
Durham Region Transit (DRT) acknowledges that the
proposed developm~nt will be serviced by its Bus
Rapid Transit (Pulse) service
DRT suggests a minimum target density of
60 residential units per hectare along the Kingston
Road corridor be achieved

Information Report No. 01-15

6.4

Region of Durham
(continued)

DRT requests that a sidewalk be provided across the


frontages of the subject properties, connecting into
the existing sidewalk located on the west side of
Rougemount Drive, south of Dalewood Drive
the submitted Noise Study appears to meet the
requirements of the Region of Durham and the
Guidelines of the Ministry of Environmental and
Climate Change (MOECC)
the Region requires the applicant to submit a Record
of Site Condition (RSC) to MOECC and that it receive
an "Acknowledgement Letter" from the Ministry
the applicant must provide the Region with a
clearance letter from the Ministry of Tourism, Culture
and Sport in support of their Stage 1-2 Archaeological
Assessment

Durham Catholic
District School
Board

no objections to the proposal


primary and secondary students generated from this
development will attend St. Monica Catholic
Elementary School and/or St. Mary Catholic
Secondary School, respectively

Durham District
School Board

no objections to the proposal


approximately 14 elementary pupils could be
generated by this development and will be
accommodated within existing school facilities

Ontario Ministry of
Transportation
(MTO)

no objections to the proposal


the Ministry requires a Storm Water Management
Report/Plan for their review and approval
the Report/Plan should be made as a condition of
draft plan of subdivision

City Departments Comments


Engineering &
Public Works

Page6

the proposed vehicle access from Rougemount Drive


is required to be reconfigured to the City's standard
the applicant is required to submit a tree preservation
plan; financial compensation for canopy loss will be
required
vegetative screening should be maintained/enhanced
between this development and existing homes on
Dalewood Drive
internal works will be reviewed through the Site Plan
Approval process

Information Report No. 01-15

Engineering &
Public Works
(continued)

7.

Page 7

the applicant is required to enter into a subdivision


agreement with the City of Pickering concerning the
provision of works external to the site such as
securities, insurance, installation of a storm sewer on
Rougemount Drive, sidewalk extensions and the
urbanization of the Kingston Road frontage
the City will cost share a portion of works (such as the
proposed sidewalk) on Kingston Road
fencing will be required along the west side of the
property as per the requirements of the Noise Study
on-site works prior to Draft Plan of Subdivision
Approval will not be permitted, unless the City has
issued a permit under the Fill and Topsoil
Disturbance By-law
the applicant will be required to enter into an
agreement with Canada Post Corporation for the
provision of a Community Mailbox and its location
prior to tbe commencement of any works, the owner
will be required to erect temporary fencing around the
entire perimeter of the subject lands during
construction

Planning & Design Section Comments

The following matters have been identified by staff for further review and
consideration:

ensuring conformity with the intent of the Regional Official Plan and that
the proposal does not contribute an underutilization of a key redevelopment
property along Kingston Road
exploring opportunities to increase the density within the allowable range
ensuring conformity with the intent of the City's Official Plan and the
Kingston Road Corridor Urban Design and Development Guidelines
considering whether the lands should be developed on their own in the
absence of the inclusion of the parcel to the west
ensuring the proposal does not preclude or prejudice future redevelopment
opportunities for the abutting property immediately to the west
(340 Kingston Road)
considering whether the proposed development is compatible with the
vehicle repair and service station use to the west
ensuring the Regional Municipality of Durham's requirements for a road
widening is met; identifying an appropriate revised site design on the
reduced lot area
ensuring appropriate building setbacks, building heights and massing, and
landscaped areas are provided along Kingston Road and Rougemount
Road, and within the proposed development
considering whether the traditional townhouses in Block 1 should be wider
in light of the garages in the front

Information Report No. 01-15

8.

Page 8

reviewing the configuration of the proposed outdoor open space to ensure


passive and active recreational activities can be accommodated within this
space
ensuring appropriate private outdoor amenity area is provided for the units
within Blocks 2 and 3
reviewing the location of functional site design matters such as visitor
parking, community mailboxes, water meters, amenity space, landscaping,
sidewalks and private road access into the development
identifying site design elements to be included as part of the common
elements of the condominium
ensuring the applicant submits a tree inventory and preservation plan to
the satisfaction of the City and that a tree compensation plan and/or a
financial contribution is provided to compensate for the loss of existing
significant vegetation

ensuring the proposed development contains appropriate sustainable


development components
ensuring all required technical submissions and reports meet City
standards

the City Development Department will conclude its position on these


applications after it has received and assessed comments from the circulated
departments, agencies and public

Information Received
Full scale copies of the plans and studies listed below are available for viewing at
the offices of the City of Pickering, City Development Department:

9.

Procedurallnformation

9.1

General

Planning Rationale Report (which includes Sustainable Development, Urban


Design Brief and Draft Zoning)
Archaeok>gical Assessment
Transportation Impact Study
Environmental Noise Assessment
Elevation Plans and Architectural Renderings
Floor Plans
Functional Servicing Report (which includes Drainage and Stormwater
Management Study and Construction Management details)
Phase I and II Environmental Site Assessment
Site Plan

written comments regarding this proposal should be directed to the City

Development Department
oral comments may be made at the Public Information Meeting
all comments received will be noted and used as input to a Planning Report
prepared by the City Development Department for a subsequent meeting of
Council or a Committee of Council

Page 9

Information Report No. 01-15

10.

any member of the public who wishes to reserve the option to appeal
Council's decision must provide comments to the City, either orally or in
writing, before Council adppts any by-law or makes a decision for this
proposal
any member of the public who wishes to be notified of Council's decision
regarding this proposal must request such in writing to the City Clerk

Owner/Applicant Information

the Owner of Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation is Peter Plastina,


and his agent is Macroplan Limited

Attachments

1.
2.
3.

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Location Map
Original Submitted Plan
Submitted Plan
Submitted Building Elevations- Block 1
Submitted Building Elevations- Block 2
Submitted Building Elevations- Block 3
Submitted Draft Plan of Subdivision
Submitted Common Element Condominium Plan

1
(~1~

App. ro.ved/Endorse~

Catherine Rose, MCIP, RPP


Chief Planner

Niles Surti, MCIP, RPP


Manager, Development Review
& Urban Design
AY:Id
Date of Report: February 12, 2015
Copy: Director, City Development

City Development
Department
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Original Submitted Plan


FILE No: A 6/11
APPLICANT: Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: 356 & 364 Kingston Road (Pt. Lt. 3 & 4,
Plan 228, Part of Part 1, 40R-8966)
FULL SCALE COPIES OF THIS PLAN ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AT THE CITY OF PICKERING
CITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT.

DATE: Feb. 9, 2015

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Submitted Plan
FILE No: SP-2014-03, CP-2014-13 & A 10/14
APPLICANT: Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
City Development
Department

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: 356 & 364 Kingston Road (Pt. Lt. 3 & 4,
Plan 228, Part of Part 1, 40R-8966)
FULL SCALE COPIES OF THIS PLAN ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AT THE CITY OF PICKERING
DATE:Feb.9,2015
CITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT.

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FRONT ELEVATION

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City Development
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Submitted Building Elevations - Block 1


FILE No: SP-2014-03, CP-2014-03 ~A 10/14
APPLICANT: Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: 356 & 364 Kingston Road (Pt. Lt. 3 & 4, Plan 228, Part of Part 1, 40R-8966)
FULL SCALE COPIES OF THIS PLAN ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AT THE CITY OF PICKERING
CITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT.

DATE: Feb. 9, 2015

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City Development
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Submitted Building Elevations - Block 2


FILE No: SP-2014-03, CP-2014-03 & A 10/14
APPLICANT: Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: 356 & 364 Kingston Road (Pt. Lt. 3 & 4, Plan 228, Part of Part 1, 40R-8966)
FULL SCALE COPIES OF THIS PLAN ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AT THE CITY OF PICKERING
CITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT.

DATE: Feb. 9, 2015

BLOCK3
FRONT ELEVATION

BLOCK 3
REAR ELEVATION

City Development
Department

Submitted Building Elevations - Block 3


FILE No: SP-2014-03, CP-2014-03 & A 10/14
APPLICANT: Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: 356 & 364 Kingston Road (Pt. Lt. 3 & 4, Plan 228, Part of Part 1, 40R-8966)
FULL SCALE COPIES OF THIS PLAN ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AT THE CITY OF PICKERING
CITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT.

DATE: Feb. 9, 2015

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Submitted Draft Plan of Subdivision


FILE No: SP-2014-03, CP-2014-03 & A 10/14
APPLICANT: Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: 356 & 364 Kingston Road (Pt. Lt. 3 & 4,
City Development
Department

Plan 228, Part of Part 1, 40R-8966)


FULL SCALE COPIES OF THIS PLAN ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AT THE CITY OF PICKERING
CITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

DATE:Feb.9,2015

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Submitted Common Element Condominium Plan


FILE No: SP-2014-03, CP-2014-13 & A 10/14
APPLICANT: Grand Communities (Pickering) Corporation
City Development
Department

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: 356 & 364 Kingston Road (Pt. Lt. 3 & 4,
Plan 228, Part of Part 1 , 40R-8966)
FULL SCALE COPIES OF THIS PLAN ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AT THE CITY OF PICKERING
DATE:Feb.9,2015
CITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT.

17

Report to
Planning & Development Committee
Report Number: PLN 01-15
Date: March 2, 2015

From:

Thomas Melymuk
Director, City Development

Subj~ct:

Invitation to Participate in ISO 37120: "Sustainable Development of


Communities- Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life"
World Council on City Data
A new global standard on City Indicators

Recommendation:

1.

That Report PLN 01-15 of the Director, City Development regarding the ISO 37120
Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life certification program, be received;

2.

That staff be authorized to further investigate the feasibility, resource and


financial implications of participating in ISO 37120, and report back in the fall of
2015; and

3.

Further, that a copy of Report PLN 01-15 be forwarded to Global City Indicators
Facility and the World Council on City Data.

Executive Summary: In August 2014, the Global City Indicators Facility and the World
Council on City Data invited the City of Pickering to apply for an International
Organization for Standardization (ISO) 37120 certification. ISO 37120 is the first
international standard on city metrics, and provides a data platform of globally
standardized indicators to assist cities in measuring their performance and to draw
comparative lessons from one another. The indicators address a variety of topics
including energy consumption, education, health, safety and housing.
A city that is certified under ISO 37120 is required to report on the indicators on an
annual basis. Although there is merit in attaining ISO 37120 certification, participation in
this program will have implications in terms of staff resources and funding. Accordingly,
it is recommended that staff further investigate the feasibility, resource and financial
implications of pursuing certification, and report back to Council later this year.

18

Report PLN 01-15

March 2, 2015

Subject: Invitation to Participate ih ISO 37120: "Sustainable Development of


Communities- Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life"

1.

Page 2

Introduction
In August 2014, a letter was received from Senator Art Eggleton, the Chair of the
Global City Indicators Facility (GCIF), and Professor Patricia McCarney, Director
of GCIF, and President and Chief Executive Officer of the World Council on City
Data (WCCD), inviting the City of Pickering to apply to become a certified city
under ISO 37120 (see Letter of Invitation, Attachment #1).
ISO 37120 is thefirst international standard on city metrics, and includes
100 indicators consisting of 46 core indicators and 54 supporting indicators. To
participate in the program, cities are required to submit annual monitoring
reports. After the reports have been reviewed by the WCCD, a level of
certification may be awarded. The level of certification a city receives is based on
the number of core and supporting indicators the City reports on.

2.

Background
ISO 37120 was developed using the GCIF framework. The GCIF is a project
that was launched in 2008 by Professor Patricia McCarney from the University of
Toronto with funding from the World Bank and the Ministry of Municipal Affairs
and Housing. The lack of information and comparable data on cities and their
larger metropolitan areas, and the greater role cities play in a country's economic
competitiveness, knowledge base and its citizen's quality of life gave birth to the
GCIF initiative.
The main objective of the GCIF was to develop a data platform of globally
standardized indicators to assist cities in measuring their performance, and to
draw comparative lessons from other cities globally in terms of a set of indicators
such as aging, education, health, safety and housing. The GCIF program is
structured around themes organized into two broad categories: city services; and
quality of life.
Following an initial pilot phase with nine cities testing certain city indicators and
methodologies, membership to the GCIF was opened to all cities globally, and in
November 2010, the City of Pickering became a participating member of.the
GCIF. The GCIF has since grown its data network to host over 80 countries and
250 cities, including cities across North America, Europe, Asia, the Middle East,
Africa and Latin America.
In 2011, the GCIF began working with the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and
Housing, the Ontario Growth Secretariat and a group of Greater. Toronto Area
(GTA) municipalities, including the City of Pickering, on a pilot exercise that
would facilitate the regional aggregation of GCIF municipal data. Part of the
purpose of the aggregation exercise was to showcase the GTA's economic
competitiveness globally.

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Page 3

The working group identified the need to limit the geographic area for
aggregation to a cluster of 25 lower- and single-tier municipalities- referred to as
the "Toronto Urban Region". The combined data from the 25 municipalities was
used as a proxy to represent the results for the Toronto Urban Region. The GCIF
also repeated similar pilot exercises in other urban regions such as Sao Paulo,
Melbourne .and Helsinki, and provided a mechanism to draw comparisons
between the Toronto Urban Region and its global peers.
Parallel to the aggregation pilot exercises, the GCIF showcased the Ontario pilot
and advanced this tool at the United Nations World Urban Forum, World Bank
and the World Business Council. The GCIF also made a submission to the
International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to obtain an internationally
recognized standard to measure the sustainable development of communities by
using in.dicators for city services and quality of life, based on the GCIF
framework. Subsequently ISO granted the GCIF the first international standard
on city indicators: ISO 37120- "Sustainable Development of CommunitiesIndicators for City Services and Quality of Life".
On May 15, 2014, at the Global Cities Summit in Toronto, the GCIF launched
ISO 37120 as well as the WCCD. The WCCD will host the global registry for
ISO 37120 certified cities.

3.

Discussion

3.1

What are the standardized ISO 37120 city indicators?


The ISO 37120 city indicators are grouped.into twenty themes covering topics
such as education, economy, energy, safety, finance, fire and emergency, health,
transportation, wastewater and water, and sanitation. In total, ISO 37120
provides 100 indicators to measure the delivery of city services and quality of life.
These indicators are divided into 46 core indicators and 54 supporting indicators
(see Table A -ISO 37120 City Indicators, Attachment #2).
Reporting on the 46 core indicators is required, and is considered essential for
steering and assessing the performance management of city services and quality
of life. Cities are also encouraged to report on the supporting indicators in order
to promote best practices.

3.2

Why is an international standard on city indicators important?


The ISO 37120 Briefing Note (see Attachment #3) provides information on the
importance of an international standard on city indicators. The main reasons can
be summarized under the following points:

20

ISO 37120 indicators have the potential of providing the necessary statistical
evidence base to support policy formulation and decision making.

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Page 4

ISO 37120 establishes globally standardized definitions, methodology and a


set of city indicators that provide a uniform approach to what is measured and
how that measurement is to be done.
ISO 37120 enables cities to assess their performance for improving service
delivery and the quality of life, to track performance over time, to draw
comparisons to other cities locally and globally, and to share best practices.
ISO 37120 provides information that could potentially strengthen cities'
pledges for more federal and provincial funding to deliver services and to
create a quality of life for its residents more effectively.

Other potential benefits of participating in ISO 37120 include: showcasing service


delivery and the quality of life of our community; local benchmarking;
transparency and open data for investment attraction and promotion; and to give
cities a reliable source of globally standardized data that will assist them in
building core knowledge for policy formulation and decision-making.

3.3

How does the application for ISO 37120 certification work?


A city that decides to apply for certification may target one of the following levels
of certification:

Aspirational : 30- 45 core indicators reported


Bronze: 46- 59 reported (46 core plus 1 to 13 supporting)
Silver: 60- 75 reported (46 core plus 14 to 29 supporting)
Gold; 76- 90 reported (46 core plus 30 to 44 supporting)
Platinum: 91 - 100 reported (46 core plus 45 to to 53 supporting)

.
.
"Aspirational" is a certification level the WCCD has developed for cities that are
only able to report on 30-45 of the core indicators with the hope that the city will
be able to attain Bronze or higher levels in the future years.
'

As part of the process, the WCCD receives applications and fees for ISO 37120
certification, and awards a level of certification based on the number of indicators
reported. Applications fees are based on a city's population, and generally range
from $5,000.00 to $10,000.00. Once certified, the city is entered into, and has
access to, the WCCD Global City Indicators Registry.

3.4

If certified, how often must the ISO 37120 indicators be reported?


Certification is valid for one year from the date of certification. Cities are required
to submit an annual report to renew their certification. However, there may be
instances where data remains unchanged (e.g. Census data is only available
every 5 years). A renewal fee would be required with the submission of the
annual report.

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3.5

Page 5

Are there means by which municipalities lacking resources and capacity


can be assisted to participate in ISO 37120?
During the aggregation pilot exercise for the GTA, working group members
expressed frustration with the lack of central coordination of municipal data. It
was found that many municipalities lack the resources and capacity to coordinate
and gather data, either as part of a voluntary .compilation of data or as part of a
mandatory data requirement by the Province. Municipal data is also collected at
a variety of levels and across various government levels and ministries, and
municipalities have difficulty identifying data sources and coordinating the
collection of the multiple data sets from various agencies and ministries on an
annual basis.
In recognition of these challenges, GCIF has proposed the establishment of an
Ontario Municipal Open Data Platform (Ontario MODP). The Ontario MODP
would: coordinate data on Ontario municipalities; coordinate requests for
information on an annual basis from regional, provincial and national data
sources; facilitate municipal data requirements for Ontario municipalities for a
number of GCIF indicators; and pool resources for the collection of data from
other sources.

3.6

What data does Pickering already collect?


The City collects a wide range of data for a variety of programs, in a number of
platforms (e.g. GIS, OnPoint, AMANDA, Environics), including:

Municipal Performance Management Program (annual reporting to the


Minister of Municip~l Affairs and Housing on efficiency and effectiveness
measures for 13 service areas provided by municipalities)
Measuring Sustainability (a report that establishes a baseline for 55 key
indicators for sustainability in Pickering)
Building Permit reporting to inform the Region's quarterly Building Permit
Statistics Report and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Housing Market Information Portal
Demographic and housing statistics and forecasts
Economic and employment profiles and opportunities; and
Data cataloguing and mapping

Data from these programs could potentially assist the City in achieving
certification.

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Subject: Invitation to Participate in ISO 37120: "Sustainable Development of


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4.

Page 6

Conclusion
Although there are benefits to becoming certified under ISO 37120, participation
in this initiative will have implications in terms of staff resources and funding.
Staff resources will be required to prepare annual reports to the GCIF and WCCD.
The benefits of certification will have to be carefully weighed against the financial
implications.
As such, it is recommended that Council authorize staff to further investigate the
opportunity of participating in ISO 37120 and bring back a recommendation in
fall 2015. This investigation would also examine the level of certification that can
be realistically targeted and achieved, given available data sources.

Attachments:
1.
2.
3.

Letter of Invitation to the City of Pickering


Table A- ISO 37120 City Indicators
The ISO 37120 Briefing Note

Prepared By:

Approved/Endorsed By:

'

/~;1'v--Catherine Rose, MCIP, RPP


Chief Planner

Jeff Brooks, MCIP, RPP


Manager, Policy & Geomatics

~{1Z.
t~~elopment
Thomas Mely
Director, City

MCIP, R

DJ:Id
Recommended for the consideration
of Pickering City Council

;;J.3.Zoi.S

Tony Prevedel, P.Eng.


Chief Administrative Officer

23

. I
TO
'H..N 01-15

ATTACHMENT#

RE:PORH

August 7, 2014

Mayor David Ryan


Pickering, Canada

'?

Dear Mayor David Ryan,


Since 2008, the Global City Indicators Facility (GCIF) has been driven by its mandate:
"... [to provide] an established set of city indicators with a globally standardized
methodology that allows for global comparability of city performance and knowledge
sharing."

Thanks to your efforts, and those of your colleagues from around the world, we are excited to
announce a new global standard on city Indicators published by the International
Organization for Standardization (ISO). ISO is the leading body for standardization in the
world. On May 15th, 2014, at the Global Cities Summit in Toronto, the GCIF proudly launched
ISO 377 20: "Sustainable Development of Communities -Indicators for City Services and Qualities
of Life" together with the World Council on City Data (WCCD). This World Council will. host
the global registry for ISO 371 20 certified cities. We are inviting all GCIF member cities to be
members of the weco.

ISO 37120 is the first internation-ally recognised standard for cities and municipalities,
developed using the GCIF framework. This new standard will help build more effective
governments, improve service delivery, allow for international benchmarks and targets and
provide more informed decision making for leaders. A briefing document on ISO 37120 is
appended for your reference.
As a valued member of the GCIF, your city has been contributing to this global effort for
several years. We have been working with Dean Jacobs, Principal Planner - Policy, City
Development Department and we will be sending them further information about the
170 Bloor Street West, Suite 1100
Toronto, Ontario MSS 1T9 Canada
Tel+l416-966-2368
Fax+1416-966-047B
www.cityindicators.org .
director@globalcities.ca

24
,..

......

ATTACHMENT#
/
TO
Rf:POR1 #
.i?f!::l.Q~~--

certification process and we hope that your city will seriously consider becoming an ISO
37120 certified city and be part of the World Council on City Data.
We look forward to continue working with you toward our shared and common goal of
creating dynamic, sustainable and progressive cities around the world. _
Yours Sincerely,

Senator Art Eggleton


Chair, GCIF

Patricia McCarney
Director, GCIF

CC: Dean Jacobs


End: Briefing Document for ISO 37120

170 Bloor Street West, Suite 1100


Toronto, Ontario MSS 1T9 Canada
Tel + 1 41 6-966-236B
Fax+1 416-966-0478 .
www.cityindicators.org
director@g_lobalcities.ca

25

.
Weco

ATTACHMENT#
I
TO
REPORT #
PLf\J 01-15

WORrrf-COUNCIL

ON CITY DATA

The World Council on City Data (WCCD) coordinates all efforts on city data to ensure a
consistent and comprehensive platform for standardized urban metrics. The WCCD hosts the
Global Cities Registry for ISO 37no: Sustainable Development of Communities- Indicators for
City Services and Quality of Life1 the first international standard for Cities which provides a
comprehensive set of indicators and a methodology that will enable any sized city to
benchmark its social1 economic and environmental performance in relation to other cities.
Please sign this Expression of Interest and join the new World Council on City Data and be part
of the Global Cities Registry for ISO 37no as a Certified City1 reporting on this new and
important set of globally recognized indicators.
Please visit our website www.dataforcities.org and fill out an
Expression of Interest Form or fill out and return this form by post, fax, or email.

City Name:
Country:
Name:
Title:
Email:
Phone:

Signature:
Date:
World Council on City Data
Tel: +J. 416-g66-2368 Fax: +J. 416-g66-0478
Email: director@globalcities.ca
www.dataforcities.org

Thank you very much for your interest, and we look forward to working with you.

~70

26

Bloor Street West, Suite uoo I Toronto, Ontario MsS ~T9 Canada

ISO 37120 City Indicators


Table A-- City Services and Quality of Life Indicators
Theme

Core Indicator

Supporting Indictor

Economy

City's unemployment rate

Percentage of persons in
full-time employment

Commercia Ill nd us trial


Youth unemployment rate
Assessment as a percentage of
total assessment
Percentage of city population
living in poverty

Number of businesses per


100,000 population
Number of new patents per
100,000 population per year

Education

Percentage of female schoolaged population enrolled in


school

Percentage of male school-aged


population enrolled in school

Percentage of students
completing primary education

Percentage of school-aged
population enrolled in school

Percentage of students
completing secondary
education

Number of higher education


degrees per 100,000 population

Student/teacher ratio

Energy

Total residential electrical use


per capita (kilowatt/year)

Total electrical use per capita


(kilowatt/year)

Percentage of city population


with authorized electrical
service

Average number of electrical


interruptions per customer per
year

Energy consumption of public


buildings as a percentage of
total consumption in the city

Average length of electrical


interruptions (in hours)

Percentage of total energy


derived from renewable
sources, as a share of the city's
total energy consumption

Environment

Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)


concentration

N02 (nitrogen dioxide)


concentration

27

ATTACHMENT# 2
F{EPORT #
e PLN

Theme

TO

Oi-15

Core Indicator

Supporting Indictor

Particulate Matter (PM1 0)


concentration

802 (sulphur dioxide)

Greenhouse gas emissions


measured in tonnes per capita

concentration

03 (ozone) concentration
Noise pollution
Percentage change iri number of
native species

Finance

Debt service ratio (debt service


expenditure as a percent of a
municipality's own-source
revenue)

Capital spending as a
percentage of total expenditures

Own-source revenue as a
percentage of total revenues
Tax collected as percentage of
tax billed

Fire and Emergency


Response

Governance

Number of firefighters per


100,000 population

Number of volunteer and


part-time firefighters per 100,000
population

Number of fire related deaths


per 100,000 population

Response time for emergency


response services from initial
call

Number of natural disasterrelated deaths per 100,000


population

Response time for fire


department from initial call

Voter participation in last


municipal election (as a
percentage of eligible voters)

Percentage of women employed


in the city government workforce

Women as a percentage of
total elected to city-level office

Number of convictions for


corruption/bribery by city officials
per 100,000 population
Citizens' representation: number
of local officials elected to office
per 100,000 population

28

ATT/\CHMENT # 2
TO
REPOR! # - flf:}. (Jf-15

Theme

Supporting Indictor

Core Indicator
'

Health

Number of registered voters as a


percentage of the voting age
population

Average life expectancy

Number of nursing and


midwifery personnel per 100,000
population

Number of in-patient hospital


beds per 100,000 population

Number of mental health


practitioners per
100,000 population

Number of physicians per


100,000 population

Suicide rate per


100,000 population

Under age five mortality per


1,000 live births
Square metres of public indoor
recreation space per capita

Recreation

Square metres of public outdoor


recreation space per capita

Safety

Number of police officers per


100,000 population

Crimes against property .per


100,000

Number of homicides per


100,000 population

Response time for police


department from initial call
Violent crime rate per 100,000
population

Shelter

Percentage of city population


living in slums

Number of homeless per


100,000 population
Percentage of households that
exist without registered legal
titles

Solid Waste

Percentage of city population


with regular solid waste
collection (residential)

Percentage of the city's solid


waste that is disposed of in a
sanitary landfill

Total collected municipal solid


waste per capita

Percentage of the city's solid


waste that is disposed of in an
incinerator

29

Theme

Core Indicator

Supporting Indictor

Percentage of city's solid waste


that is recycled

Percentage of the city's solid


waste that is burned openly
Percentage of the city's solid
waste that is disposed of in an
open dump
Percentage of the city's solid
waste that is disposed of by
other means
Hazardous waste generation per
capita
Percentage of city's hazardous
waste that is recycled

Telecommunication
and Innovation

Number of internet connections


per 100,000 population

Number of land line phone


connections per 100,000
population

Number of cell phone


connections per 100,000
population

Transportation

Kilometres of high capacity


public transport system per
100,00(') population

Modal split (percentage of


commuters using a travel mode
other than a personal v~hicle)

Kilometres of light passenger


transport system per 100,000
population

Number of two-wheel motorized


vehicles per capita

Annual number of public


transport trips per capita

Kilometres of bicycle paths and


lanes per 100,000 population

Number of personal
automobiles per capita

Transportation fatalities per


100,000 population
Commercial air connectivity
(number of non-stop commercial
air destinations)

Urban Planning

30

Green area (hectares) per


100,000 population

Annual number of trees planted


per 100,000 population

Theme

Core Indicator

Supporting Indictor
Areal size of informal
settlements as a per cent of city
area
Jobs/housing ratio

Wastewater

Percentage of city population


served by wastewater
collection
Percentage of the city's
wastewater that has received
no treatment
Percentage of the city's
wastewater receiving primary
treatment
Percentage of the city's
wastewater receiving
secondary treatment
Percentage of the city's
,wastewater receiving tertiary
treatment

Water and Sanitation

Percentage of city population


with potable water supply
service

Total water consumption per


capita (litres/day)

Percentage of city population


with sustainable access to an
improved water source

Average annual hours of water


service interruptions per
household

Percentage of population with


access to improved sanitation

Percentage of water loss


(unaccounted for water)

Total domestic water


consumption per capita
(litres/day)

..

31

City indicators for service delivery and quality of life


Currently 70 percent of global GOP is now generated by cities and 53 percent of the total world's
population resides in cities. It is estimated that 70 percent ofthe world's population will be living in cities
by 2050. This means the role of cities in enabling more sustainable futures is now more important than
ever. Cities are the cultural and economic centres ofthe world whose progress depends upon effective
management and evidence-based policy making.
In this age of urbanization, city indicators can be used as
tools for city managers, politicians, researchers,
business leaders, planners, designers and other
professionals to help ensure policies are put into practice
that promote liveable, tolerant, inclusive, sustainable,
resilient, economically attractive and prosperous cities
globally.
critic~(

Cities need indicators to measure their performance for improving quality of life and sustainability globally.
Existing indicators are often not standardized, consistent, or comparable over time or across cities. As
part of a new series of International Standards being developed for a holistic and integrated approach to
sustainable development and resilience under 150/TC 268, Sustainable development of communities,
ISO 37120 es~ablishes a set of standardized indicators that provide a uniform approach to what is
measured, and how that measurement is to be undertaken. This International Standard does not provide a
value judgement, or numeric thresholds oh what a particular city should choose as appropriate targets for
the indicators.
This International Standard defines and establishes definitions and methodologies for a set of indicators to
steer and measure the performance of city services and quality of life.

32

What are standardized


indicators?
Quantitative, qualitative or descriptive sets
of measurements and metrics that provide a .
globally standardized set of definitions and
methodologies.

Who are the users of


15037120?
This International Standard is applicable to
any city, municipality or local government
that undertakes to measure its performance
in a comparable and verifiable manner,
irrespective of size and location or level of
development.

Economy
Education
Energy
Environment
Recreation
Safety
Shelter
Solid waste
Telecommunications
and innovation
Finance
Fire and emergency
response
Governance
Health
Transportation
Urban planning
Wastewater
Water and sanitation

How can ISO 37120


help cities?
Standardized indicators enable cities to assess their performance and measure progress over time and
also to draw comparative lessons from other cities locally and globally. They also help to guide policy,
planning and management across multiple sectors and stakeholders.

33