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AIRWORTHINESS LIMITATIONS

AIRWORTHINESS LIMITATIONS 1. General The Airworthiness Limitations section specifies mandatory Rotor Component Service

1. General

The Airworthiness Limitations section specifies mandatory Rotor Component Service Life Limits required for type certification. The Airworthiness Limitations section is approved by the Canadian Minister of Transport and specifies maintenance required by any applicable airworthiness or operational rule unless an alternative program has been approved by the Canadian Minister of Transport.

2. Compliance Airworthiness regulations require the operators to record accumulated cycles of critical components as

2. Compliance

Airworthiness regulations require the operators to record accumulated cycles of critical components as described in subsequent paragraphs. When the engine is returned to a repair facility, if the accumulated cycles can not be established using either of the approved methods, the affected parts must be discarded.

NOTE:

To always permit reverting to the manual counting method, it is recommended the operator records the number of starts and flights at regular run time intervals.

3. Automatic Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) Counting

A. General

(1) Automatic LCF counting is used on the PT6C-67C engines to count the accumulated cycles on the critical components. The cycles are counted in proportion to the actual severity of engine use where cyclic usage may not conform to a single reference flight cycle.

(2) The engine rotating components listed in Table 2 are subject to low-cycle fatigue (LCF) due to cyclic operation of the engine. As a result, these parts must be replaced when the cycle limit is reached.

(3) When one of the engine rotating components (Ref. Table 2 ) is replaced by another one, all related documents must be updated with the appropriate information. Similarly, the accumulated cycles of the new engine rotating component must be entered in the Data Collection Unit (DCU) using the Engine Health Monitoring System (EHMS) (Ref. 77-40-01, MAINTENANCE PRACTICES).

NOTE:

For preventive action, the counter for an assembly should always be updated to reflect the component with the highest accumulated cyclic usage.

(4) Operators must periodically record the accumulated cycles for each critical component. This data is obtained from the DCU or the aircraft Central Maintenance Computer (CMC) (Ref. Rotorcraft Maintenance Manual). The maximum recording interval is 50 hours

CAUTION:

IF AUTOMATIC COUNTING BECOMES INOPERATIVE, USE MANUAL METHOD.

(5) At 50 hours ±10 hours, the operators must enter the accumulated cycles for each LCF component counter in

the engine logbook and perform a consistency check. This data is obtained directly from the DCU using the Ground Based Software (GBS).

(6) Do the consistency check by calculating the percentage difference of accumulated cycles between Engine No.1 and Engine No.2

(7) Make sure the cycles for each LFC component counter (Compressor, CT and PT discs) increase at rate of a least 0.3 cycles per mission (start - flight(s) - shutdown).

(8) Compare the cumulative LCF cycle counts for each component counter between the two engines.

(9) Calculate cycles used since last consistency check for each engine as follows:

• Cumulative LCF (engine #1) = (LCF count) this check = CLCF1

• Cumulative LCF (engine #2) = (LCF count) this check = CLCF2

• Delta LCF (engine #1) = (CLCF1 count) this check - (CLCF1 count) previous check = DLCF1

• Delta LCF (engine #2) = (CLCF2 count) this check - (CLCF2 count) previous check = DLCF2

(10) Calculate cycle differences between engines no.1 and no.2:

• Eng.1/Eng.2 delta = DLCF1 - DLCF2 = D1D2 (if number is -ve ignore - sign)

(11) Percentage Difference = 100 X (D1D2) / (greater of DLCF1 or DLCF2) = PD (%)

(12) If the cycle count check (PD) per the step (11) above shows a calculated delta LCF for each component cycle within 10% between the two engines, continue with normal operation.

(13) Example calculation of the compressor LCF (Ref. Table 1 ):

Example calculation of the compressor LCF (Ref. Table 1 ): Table 1 Example of Consistency Check

Table 1 Example of Consistency Check Calculation

(14) If the consistency check shows a calculated accumulated percentage difference outside of the range of 10% that cannot be explained by the operation (OEI Training, rapid take-off, etc), refer to Para. B.

(15) Automatic Mode Accumulated Total Cycles are calculated using the factors provided in Table 2. To illustrate the calculation an example is provided using the following formula:

Accumulated Total Cycles (Auto. Mode) = [No. of Cycles Recorded in the DCU] × Flight Count Factor

Example:

 

Part No.

3055309-01 Impeller

Flight Count Factor

1.0

Total Cycle Limit

20000

No. of Cycles Recorded in DCU or CMC

6000

NOTE: To establish total remaining life it is always necessary to add all portions of usage in both Manual and Automatic modes (see Manual Mode counting method, Para. 4.).

Accumulated Automatic Total Cycles = [6000 × 1.0] = 6000

(16) Total remaining cycles is calculated as:

Total Cycle Limit - Accumulated Automatic Total Cycles per previous example:

Total Cycles Remaining = 20000 - 6000 = 14000

(17) The values that are necessary for the algorithm that the Electronic Engine Control (EEC) uses to calculate the accumulated cycles on the critical components are in the memory module of the DCU. Therefore, the DCU and the critical components are "linked". Table 2 lists the critical component part numbers and the related DCU part number.

component part numbers and the related DCU part number. Table 2 PT6C-67C Engines, Part Numbers for

Table 2 PT6C-67C Engines, Part Numbers for Life Cycle Counting

B. Unserviceability of the Automatic LCF Counting

(1) If a fault code on the cockpit display indicates that the automatic LCF counting is not serviceable or if the consistency check is not successful (Ref. Para. 3. A. (14), the recording of the cycles must be done manually (Ref. Para. 4.). This is necessary until such time that a corrective action is taken to make the automatic LCF counting serviceable again. The following lists the steps to do when a fault code is displayed:

(a) If the fault code is displayed during a mission, the LCF counting for the mission will be reset to zero. That means that the manual recording must start from this point on.

NOTE:

If the cumulative value is not available in the DCU or rotorcraft CMC, manual recording must

start from the last logbook entry.

(b)

If the engine consistency check is not successful, the manual counting method must be used from the last successful consistency check.

(c)

After the automatic LCF counting is made serviceable again, the DCU must be programmed with the new accumulated cycle values for each critical component (Ref. 77-40-01, MAINTENANCE PRACTICES).

4. Manual Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) Counting

A. General

(1) The engine rotating components listed in Table 3 are subject to low-cycle fatigue (LCF) due to cyclic operation of the engine. As a result, these parts must be replaced when the cycle limit is reached.

(2) When one of the engine rotating components (Ref. Table 3 ) is replaced by another one, the engine logbook and all related documents must be updated with the appropriate information.

(3) Operators shall record all flights, starts and accumulated total cycles (which must be calculated) in the applicable document for each component.

NOTE:

For the purpose of Accumulated Total Cycle calculation:

• A full cycle is an engine start followed by one flight then by a shut-down.

• A start is an engine start followed by one or more flights.

• A Flight Count Factor is a multiplying factor that can be used to credit or debit life to the components listed in Table 3 to reflect the aircraft application of the engine. This factor can also be specific to an operator that diverges from the missions described in step .

• An abbreviated cycle is an engine start followed by multiple flights and one shut-down (i.e. abbreviated cycles are equivalent to the number of flights minus the number of starts).

(4) The service life values listed in Table 2 are incorporated in the Type Approval as issued by Transport Canada. Changes to rotor component cyclic lives must be approved by Transport Canada.

(5) For continued operation in manual mode:

• Operators which have many touch-and-go flights, or frequent scheduled in-flight shutdowns, such as used within training missions; or which include more than 10 flights per hour must submit their mission profiles to Pratt & Whitney Canada for life cycle analysis.

• Operators making scheduled or frequent use of the engine's highest allowable normal rated power must submit their mission profile to Pratt & Whitney Canada for analysis.

(6) When engine starts are not recorded, each flight is considered to have been preceded by one start (i.e.:

each flight is equivalent to a full cycle) (Ref. Example No. 1).

(7) An abbreviated cycle is less severe than a full cycle. To benefit from this an abbreviated cycle factor is listed in Table 3 and used in the formula which determines accumulated total cycles (Ref. Example No. 2).

determines accumulated total cycles (Ref. Example No. 2). Table 3 PT6C-67C Engine Rotor Components - Service

Table 3 PT6C-67C Engine Rotor Components - Service Life: Manual Life Cycle Counting

(8) Accumulated Total Cycles are calculated using the factors provided in Table 3 . To illustrate the difference in calculation of Accumulated Total Cycles between an engine operated with full cycles versus an engine operated using a combination of full and abbreviated cycles, two examples are provided using the following formula:

Accumulated

Manual

Total Cycles

=

[

No. of

Starts

 

No. of Flights - No. of Starts

No. of OEI Rating Excursions

 

Ext'd

Flight

+

(

 

)

+

(

×

Cycle

)

]

×

Count

 
 

Abbreviated Cycle Factor

 

Factor

Factor

(a) Example No. 1 (Full cycles only and includes flights where starts are not recorded):

Part No.

3055309-01 Impeller

Abbreviated Cycle Factor

3

Extended Cycle Factor

2

Flight Count Factor

1.0

No. of OEI Rating Excursions

3

Total Cycle Limit

20000

No. of Starts

6000

No. of Flights

6000

Accumulated

6000 - 6000

Manual

Total Cycles

=

[

6000

+

(

3

)

+

(

3

×

2

)

]

×

1.0

=

[ 6000 + 0 + 6 ] × 1.0

=

6006 × 1.0

=

6006

Total Cycles Remaining = 20000 - 6006 = 13994

(b) Example No. 2 (Full cycles plus Abbreviated Cycles):

Part No.

3055309-01 Impeller

 

Abbreviated Cycle Factor

 

3

Extended Cycle Factor

 

2

Flight Count Factor

 

1.0

No. of OEI Rating Excursions

 

3

Total Cycle Limit

 

20000

 

No. of Starts

4000

No. of Flights

6000

Accumulated

6000 - 4000

 

=

4000

+

+

3

×

2

×

Total Cycles

[

(

3

)

(

)

]

 

=

[ 4000 + 667 + 6] × 1.0

=

4673 × 1.0

 

=

4673

5. Service Life Marking Method

Total Cycles Remaining = 20000 - 4673= 15327

1.0

At overhaul or major refurbishment all rotor components must be marked in accordance with the applicable Overhaul Manual P/N 3045333.

The same component (e.g. disk, impeller, etc.) can be installed in different models, providing the part number is authorized to be installed in the specific engine models (Ref. applicable Airworthiness Limitations).

The cyclic limit for the component will be the same irrespective of the model. However, the flight count factor (FCF) can be different. Therefore, the accumulated total cycles of a component is calculated by adding the individual cycles accumulated on the different models, taking into consideration the different factors.

6. Mandatory Inspection/Maintenance Intervals for Single or Twin Engine Operation (at OEI ratings)

A. General

The following requirements apply to the engine that did not become inoperative. The engine that became inoperative will require inspection/repair in accordance with the applicable engine manuals.

B. Rating Structure

The engine rating structure has two different One Engine Inoperative (OEI) power ratings defined as follows:

• The 2½ minute OEI power rating provides a short burst of high power to complete the takeoff, or effect a rejected takeoff, if an engine failure happens at a critical decision point, so that the rotorcraft can lift clear of any obstruction in the flightpath and climb out, or alternatively, to reject takeoff. Similarly, this rating also provides adequate power for the rotorcraft to make a safe landing or a balked landing if an engine fails at any point down to and including the landing decision point.

• The Continuous OEI power rating provides for increased continuous power on the remaining operative engine when one engine fails, and will permit the completion of the flight in accordance with the Aircraft Flight Manual.

C. Mandatory Requirements Following Operation at OEI Power Ratings

(1) 2½ Minute OEI Power Rating

Each excursion into the 2½ minute OEI power rating must be limited in duration to 2½ minutes. Each engine may accumulate up to a total of 15 minutes of operation at the 2½ minute OEI power rating.

If flight operation continues after excursion into the 2½ minute OEI power rating, then do mandatory inspections and maintenance in accordance with Chapter 05-10-00, Engine Operating Limits.

If flight operation continues after accumulating a total of 15 minutes of excursions into the 2½ minute OEI power rating, then do mandatory inspections and maintenance in accordance with Chapter 05-10-00, Engine Operating Limits.

(2)

Continuous OEI Power Rating

Each engine may be operated at the Continuous OEI power rating in accordance with Chapter 05-10-00, Engine Operating Limits.

If flight operation continues after excursion into the Continuous OEI power rating, then do mandatory inspections and maintenance in accordance with Chapter 05-10-00, Engine Operating Limits.

If flight operation continues after accumulating the maximum allowable time into the Continuous OEI power rating, then do mandatory inspections and maintenance in accordance with Chapter 05-10-00, Engine Operating Limits.

(3) Power Assurance Checks

To make sure of the availability of the 2½ minute OEI power rating, power assurance checks must be done in accordance with the Aircraft Flight Manual.

TIME LIMITS/MAINTENANCE CHECKS

1. Maintenance Philosophy

The PT6C-67C engine is certified with a basic TBO (Time Between Overhaul) - refer to chapter 05-20-00. For recommendations on individual operator TBO extensions and engine accessory maintenance refer to Chapter 05-20- 00, Time Between Overhaul Recommendation.

The Hot Section Inspection (HSI) is "on condition" based on the results of the Power Assurance check (Ref. 71-00- 00 POWER PLANT - FAULT ISOLATION and Rotorcraft Flight Manual).

NOTE:

Power Assurance (PA) checks form an integral part of the Aircraft Continued Airworthiness requirements and are covered in the Aircraft Flight Manual. However, P&WC recommends that a record be kept of successive PA checks, either electronically or on paper, to permit trending of the data for the purposes of meeting the HSI "on condition" maintenance requirements.

2. Chapter Breakdown

A. The Engine Operating Limits Section (Chapter 05-10-00) contains the Overtemperature, Overtorque and Overspeed limits. It also contains the engine data and leading particulars.

B. The Scheduled Maintenance Checks Section (Chapter 05-20-00) contains checks which are specified by Pratt & Whitney Canada. Compliance to these checks is necessary unless an alternative program was approved for the aircraft on which the engine is installed or if an alternative program was approved for the operator by their local regulatory authority.

C. The Unscheduled Maintenance Checks Section (Chapter 05-50-00) consists of inspection for engine problems that fall outside of normal Scheduled/Maintenance Checks. These checks are recommended by Pratt & Whitney Canada and must be followed in the event of any such occurrence during normal engine operation.

ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS

1. General

The Operating Limits section lists operating limits, overspeed limits, overtorque limits, overtemperature limits and leading particulars for PT6C-67C engines.

The P&WC Ground Based Software (GBS) may be used to assist in determining the nature of an exceedance event (Ref. Chapter 72-00-00, ENGINE - FAULT ISOLATION)

2. Limits and Leading Particulars

A. Operating Limits

For engine operating limits, refer to Table 1 and 2 .

The approved power and fuel consumption when measured on a calibration stand having no installation losses and with no air bleed or airframe accessory power absorption at Standard Day Sea Level static conditions (Ref. Table 1 and 2 ).

Day Sea Level static conditions (Ref. Table 1 and 2 ). Table 1 Operating Limits -

Table 1 Operating Limits - PT6C-67C Engines (Pre-SB41011, Pre-SB41012 and Pre-SB41013)

Operating

Thermal

Maximum

Maximum

Gas

Output

Oil

Oil

Condition

(SHP)(1)

Output

Observed

Generator

Shaft

Pressure

Temp.

Torque

ITT

Speed

Speed

(psig/bar)

(MOT)

(lb. ft.)

(°C)

(RPM)

(RPM)

(°C)

(2)

2 1/2 min. OEI

1872

400

835

40,500

21,420

90

to 130

10

to 140

(160%)

(106%)

(102%) (6)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(7)(8)

Continuous

1679

350

775

39,100

21,420

90

to 130

10

to 140

OEI

(140%)

(102.3%)

(102%) (6)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(7)(8)

Take-off

1679

275

775

39,100

21,420

90

to 130

10

to 140

(110%)

(102.3%)

(102%) (6)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(7)(8)

Maximum

1531

250

735

38,200

21,420

90

to 130

10

to 140

Continuous

(100%)

(100%)

(102%) (5)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(7)(8)

(6)

No Load

       

23,100

90

to 130

10

to 140

(110%) (3)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(15)(7)(8)

Ground Idle

     

20,980

 

60

min.

10

to 140

(MIN)

[4.2 min.]

(15) (7)(8)

(55%)

Starting

   

870

(17)

   

220

max.

-50 min.

 

[15.1

max.]

(4)

Normal

 

440

847

(10)

40,900

23,310

145

max.

150 (16)

Operating

(176%)

 

(107%)

(111%)

[10.0 bar

Transient

(9)

(11)

(12)

max.]

(14)

60

min.

[4.2 bar min.]

(13)

NOTE: 1.

The output powers are for reference. Rated at sea level, standard day, static.

NOTE: 2.

Output speed must be set so as to not exceed power limitations.

NOTE: 3.

The output speed is limited. The required action in the event of an inadvertent overspeed is shown on Figure 5.

NOTE: 4.

May apply during extremely cold starting conditions. It reduces as oil temperature increases and is not expected to endure for more than 5 minutes.

NOTE: 5.

Normal engine operation is permitted between Nf speeds from 98% to 100%.

 

NOTE: 6.

Engine operation Nf = 100% 102% permitted for Category A Take-off only.

NOTE: 7.

Maximum MOT limit of 145°C (295°F) applicable to Type II oils. MOT will vary as a function of air inlet temperature (Ref. 72-00-00 DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION).

NOTE: 8.

Maximum permissible MOT shall not exceed 113°C (235°F) when using Type I oils (Ref. 72-00-00 DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION).

NOTE: 9.

This value is time limited (Ref. Fig. 1).

NOTE: 10.

OEI allowable is 847°C; this value is time limited (Ref. Fig. 3).

NOTE: 11.

OEI allowable is 40900 RPM; this value is time limited (Ref. Fig. 4.)

NOTE: 12.

Limited to 10 sec. at each occurrence. Establish cause of overspeed and take corrective action.

NOTE: 13.

One minute maximum.

NOTE: 14.

Transient limit to cover condition when engine is accelerated to take-off power at OAT<0°C (32°F). MOP will return in green band when oil reaches operating temperature.

NOTE: 15.

Operation with MOT up to 145°C (295°F) permitted for 30 minutes, for each occurrence at torque below 150 ft. lb. If MOT of 145°C (295°F) is reached on the ground prior to take-off, take-off is allowed.

NOTE: 16.

Transient limit of between 145°C (295°F) and 150 °C (300°F) is allowed for up to one minute and should only occur during fast acceleration.

NOTE: 17.

Starting allowable is 870°C (1598°F). This value is time limited).

allowable is 870°C (1598°F). This value is time limited). Table 2 Operating Limits - PT6C-67C Engines

Table 2 Operating Limits - PT6C-67C Engines (Post-SB41011, Post-SB41012 and Post-SB41013)

Operating

Thermal

Maximum

Maximum

Gas

Output

Oil

Oil

Condition

(SHP)(1)

Output

Observed

Generator

Shaft

Pressure

Temp.

Torque

ITT

Speed

Speed

(psig/bar)

(MOT)

(lb. ft.)

(°C)

(RPM)

(RPM)

(°C)

(2)

2 1/2 min. OEI

1872

400

835

40,500

21,420

90

to 130

10

to 140

(160%)

(106%)

(102%) (6)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(7)(8)

Continuous

1679

350

775

39,100

21,420

90

to 130

10

to 140

OEI

(140%)

(102.3%)

(102%) (6)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(7)(8)

Take-off

1679

275

775

39,100

21,420

90

to 130

10

to 140

(110%)

(102.3%)

(102%) (6)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(7)(8)

Maximum

1531

250

735

38,200

21,420

90

to 130

10

to 140

Continuous

(100%)

(100%)

(102%) (5)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(7)(8)

(6)

No Load

       

23,100

90

to 130

10

to 140

(110%) (3)

[6.2 to 8.9 bar]

(15)(7)(8)

Ground Idle

     

20,980

 

60

min.

10

to 140

(MIN)

[4.2 min.]

(15) (7)(8)

(55%)

Starting

870 (17)

220 max.

-50 min.

           

[15.1

 

max.]

(4)

Normal

 

440

847 (10)

40,900

23,310

145 max.

150 (16)

Operating

(176%)

(107%)

(111%) (12)

[10.0 bar

Transient

(9)

(11)

max.]

(14)

60 min. [4.2 bar min.]

(13)

NOTE: 1.

The output powers are for reference. Rated at sea level, standard day, static.

 

NOTE: 2.

Output speed must be set so as to not exceed power limitations.

NOTE: 3.

The output speed is limited. The required action in the event of an inadvertent overspeed is shown on Figure 5.

NOTE: 4.

May apply during extremely cold starting conditions. It reduces as oil temperature increases and is not expected to endure for more than 5 minutes.

NOTE: 5.

Normal engine operation is permitted between Nf speeds from 98% to 100%.

   

NOTE: 6.

Engine operation Nf = 100% 102% permitted for all ratings for Category A operation for engines Post-SB41011, Post-SB41012 and

Post-SB41013.

NOTE: 7.

Maximum MOT limit of 145°C (295°F) applicable to Type II oils. MOT will vary as a function of air inlet temperature (Ref. 72-00-00 DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION).

NOTE: 8.

Maximum permissible MOT shall not exceed 113°C (235°F) when using Type I oils (Ref. 72-00-00 DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION).

NOTE: 9.

This value is time limited (Ref. Fig. 1).

 

NOTE: 10.

OEI allowable is 847°C; this value is time limited (Ref. Fig. 3).

 

NOTE: 11.

OEI allowable is 40900 RPM; this value is time limited (Ref. Fig. 4)

 

NOTE: 12.

Limited to 10 sec. at each occurrence. Establish cause of overspeed and take corrective action.

NOTE: 13.

One minute maximum.

 

NOTE: 14.

Transient limit to cover condition when engine is accelerated to take-off power at OAT<0°C (32°F). MOP will return in green band when oil reaches operating temperature.

NOTE: 15.

Operation with MOT up to 145°C (295°F) permitted for 30 minutes, for each occurrence at torque below

150 ft. lb. If MOT of 145°C (295°F) is reached on the ground prior to take-off, take-off is allowed.

 

NOTE: 16.

Transient limit of between 145°C (295°F) and 150 °C (300°F) is allowed for up to one minute and should only occur during fast acceleration.

NOTE: 17.

Starting allowable is 870°C (1598°F). This value is time limited (Ref. Fig. 4).

 

B. Overtemperature Limits

Overtemperature conditions are usually preceded by an excessively rapid rise in Ng and ITT. Several momentary high overtemperatures affect engine service life just as seriously as a single prolonged lower overtemperature condition. The higher the temperature, the sooner serious engine damage occurs. When an engine

overtemperature condition has occurred, perform a normal engine shutdown. Avoid an emergency shutdown unless it is obvious that continued operation will result in more than overtemperature damage.

For action to be taken in the event of overtemperature conditions, refer to Figures 2 and 3.

C. Overtorque Limits

For action to be taken in the event of overtorque condition, refer to Figure 1.

D. Overspeed Limits

For action to be taken in the event of Ng overspeed condition, refer to Figure 4.

For action to be taken in the event of Nf overspeed condition, refer to Figure 5.

E. One Engine Inoperative (OEI) Limits

The manner in which OEI limits affect the operation of the engine is described in the airworthiness section of the manual. The steps to be taken following an OEI event are as follows:

Refer to Table 1 and 2 for the Engine Operating Limits and do the actions listed in the following figures:

Figure 3:

Overtemperature Limits - All Conditions, except Starting .

Figure 1:

Overtorque Limits - All Conditions.

Figure 4:

Gas Generator Overspeed Limits - All Conditions.

Figure 5:

Power Turbine Overspeed Limits - All Conditions.

The permissible cumulative time for engines that run at a 2½ minute OEI power only, as per Figure 3, 1 and 4, have a workscope given in applicable exceedance charts.

If the workscope requires a replacement of compressor and power turbine blades, reset the cumulative time to zero in the logbook and in the Data Collection Unit (DCU), for these components.

F. Recording of One Engine Inoperative (OEI) Information

Excursions into the OEI power ratings must be recorded in the engine logbook. The log entry should contain the following:

• Date and time of the event

• Appropriate engine run and usage data

• Nature of the event

• Details of the exceedance(s) (duration and peak value of all exceeded parameters)

• Details of the corrective action

In the case of DCU failure, excursions into OEI power ratings must be recorded from the EEC before engine depower, or from the aircraft Central Maintenance Computer.

G. Engine Leading Particulars

For the engine leading particulars, refer to Table 3 .

For the engine leading particulars, refer to Table 3 . Table 3 PT6C-67C Engine Leading Particulars

Table 3 PT6C-67C Engine Leading Particulars

Description

Specification

Type

Free Turbine Turboshaft

Combustion Chamber Type

Annular

Engine Dimensions (Basic at room temperature)

Length

64.31

inches (1634 mm)

Diameter

25.28

inches (642 mm)

Output Shaft:

21000 rpm

- Rotation

CW (as viewed from AGB)

- Configuration

Internally Splined

- Gearbox

Direct Drive Section

- Compressor Pressure Ratio

12:1

Total Oil Consumption (Measured over 10 hours period)

0.20

lb./hr (91 cc/hr)

or 1 US Quart in 10 hours

 

(0.9 Liter in 10 hours)

Specification Weight (Dry)

419.5

lb (190.3 kg)

Additional Equipment

26.6 lb (12.1 kg)

Fuel and Oil to Wet System and Full Tank

21.7 lb (9.8 kg )

Total Weight of Engine - approx.

467.8

lb (212.2 kg)

Oil Tank Capacity (to maximum on oil sight glass)

8.45

US quarts (8 Litres)

Oil Quantity (minimum to maximum on oil sight glass)

2.33

US quarts (2.2 Litres)

Starter AGB Oil Seal

3

cc/hr Max.

Output Shaft Oil Drain

1

cc/hr Max.

Fuel pump AGB Oil Seal

3

cc/hr Max.

External Surfaces

0

cc/hr

All other oil seals without a specific leakage rate

3

cc/hr Max. per Seal

H. Accessory Drives Leading Particulars

For the rear accessory drives refer to Table 4 and Figure 6.

the rear accessory drives refer to Table 4 and Figure 6 . Table 4 Accessory Drives

Table 4 Accessory Drives

Drive Pad

 

Rotation

Ratio

Max. Torque

 

(in.lb.)

     

Continuous

Static

1

Starter-generator

CW

0.2899:1

213

1780

(See Note)

NOTE:

100% Ng is 38,200 rpm.

PRATT & WHITNEY CANADA

MAINTENANCE MANUAL

MANUAL PART NO. 3045332 REVISION NO. 16

05-10-00

Figure 1 Overtorque Limits (SHEET 1 OF 1)

NO. 16 05-10-00 Figure 1 Overtorque Limits (SHEET 1 OF 1) c74726e Printed on: 14 APR/15

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05-10-00

Figure 2 Overtemperature Limits - Starting Conditions (SHEET 1 OF 1)

MANUAL PART NO. 3045332 REVISION NO. 16 05-10-00 Figure 2 Overtemperature Limits - Starting Conditions (SHEET

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PRATT & WHITNEY CANADA

MAINTENANCE MANUAL

MANUAL PART NO. 3045332 REVISION NO. 16

05-10-00

Figure 3 Overtemperature Limits - All Conditions Except Starting (SHEET 1 OF 1)

Limits - All Conditions Except Starting (SHEET 1 OF 1) c74725f Printed on: 14 APR/15 P&WC

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Figure 4 Overspeed Limits - Gas Generator (SHEET 1 OF 1)

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Figure 5 Overspeed Limits - Power Turbine (Nf) (SHEET 1 OF 1)

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Figure 6 Engine Accessory Drives (SHEET 1 OF 1)

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1. Starter Generator

2. PMA

3. FMM

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SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE CHECKS

1. General

This section contains scheduled maintenance requirements consisting of overhaul requirements, scheduled maintenance checks, turbine blade creep usage counting and compressor, turbine and external wash requirements.

Hours or Engine Hours means Engine Flight Hours. Engine flight hour is defined as the engine operating time between aircraft takeoff (weight-on-wheels/skid off) and landing (weight-on-wheels/skid on).

A. Tolerances

NOTE: The following tolerance is established for maintenance scheduling convenience only and must be approved by the governing civil aviation authority. Unless otherwise stated, the tolerance for periodic or scheduled inspections is (Ref. Table. 1 ):

for periodic or scheduled inspections is (Ref. Table. 1 ): Table 1 Tolerance - Periodic or

Table 1 Tolerance - Periodic or Scheduled Inspections

Intervals

Tolerance

Hourly

Ten percent (10%), or up to a maximum of 100 hours operating time, whichever is less.

Calendar

Ten percent (10%), or up to a maximum of 30 days calendar time, whichever is less.

Subsequent intervals will be adjusted to re-establish the original schedule. When an inspection is done more than 10% early, subsequent inspections will be advanced as required to not exceed the maximum tolerance. Concurrence and final approval of the inspection interval tolerance by the governing civil aviation authority is the responsibility of the owner/operator.

2. Time Between Overhaul Recommendation

A. General

The Time Between Overhaul (TBO) recommendations (based on flight hours or calendar times) take into consideration the average effect of the many variables which affect the overhaul life such as; average flight duration, percentage of time at any given power level, climatic conditions and environment, maintenance practices, utilization and engine modification standard.

B. Definitions

The basic industry TBO is the P&WC recommended TBO per this chapter of the Maintenance Manual which is applicable to all operators.

The fleet TBO is the TBO level which individual operators have attained for engines of the same model in their possession only.

The engine TBO is the TBO applicable to a specific engine per the industry TBO or fleet TBO or a recommended TBO by P&WC for a particular set of conditions.

C. Life Limitations

Rotor component life limitations outlined in the latest AIRWORTHINESS LIMITATIONS section of this manual override the TBO considerations.

The engine DCU should always accompany the engine when it is returned for refurbishment or overhaul as it is required to assess engine usage and exceedance data.

D. Engine Time Between Overhaul

The engine is certified with a basic TBO of 5,000 hours.

E. Accessories Time Between Overhaul

All engine accessories with the exception of the ones specified below must be returned with engines returned for overhaul to undergo a functional inspection prior to return to service, per the requirements of the engine Overhaul Manual and Accessory Component Maintenance Manuals (Ref. INTRODUCTION, TABLE 1).

TBO recommendation for the Fuel Management Module (FMM) is engine TBO plus 500 hours. TBO recommendation for the Fuel Cooled Oil Cooler (FCOC) is engine TBO plus 500 hours.

F. Technical Recommendations for fleet TBO extension

(1) General considerations:

(a) Extension to fleet TBO may only be granted with the approval of the applicable regulatory agency.

Before granting a fleet TBO extension, regulatory agencies normally requests a technical recommendation from the engine manufacturer based on the satisfactory results of a sampling program. The sampling program to obtain a technical recommendation from P&WC is described below. Regulatory agencies may require a stricter sampling program in accordance with their standards and/or requirements. In such case, P&WC must be informed up front of this program.

(b)

Recommendation for fleet TBO extension may be limited to the operating environment or geographic location of the sample engine(s).

Example:

An operator with helicopters operating in separate desert and urban environments is required to submit the required amount of TBO escalation sample engines from both locations in order to obtain a recommendation for his complete fleet. If submitting sample engines from a single location only, the recommendation may be applicable to that location only. If necessary, consult P&WC for verification prior to proceeding with the escalation process.

NOTE: 1.

The customer is responsible to submit the documents to local Airworthiness Authority for approval of the recommended TBO extension.

NOTE: 2.

TBO Extensions, recommended by P&WC, do not affect the applicable Warranty and Service Policy originally supplied with the engine. P&WC will continue to use the basic industry TBO to calculate the pro-rata credit and the benefits per the Primary Parts Service Policy and/or the Extended Engine Service Policy.

(c)

TBO escalations are normally granted in maximum increments of 500 hours.

(d)

An engine maintains its TBO extension recommendation as long as it is operated within the limitations of the relevant engine and aircraft operating manuals and is maintained in accordance with the appropriate P&WC maintenance manual.

NOTE: 1.

A P&WC recommendation is null and void in instances where engine abuse or non- compliance with this recommendation are reported.

NOTE: 2.

A P&WC recommendation is null and void on individual engines in instances where overhaul or repair by non P&WC recognized shops after receipt of the TBO escalation have occurred.

(e)

If the engine was put in storage or was unused for an extended period in the time since its last overhaul (or since new if not previously overhauled), there must be documented evidence that the engine has been preserved per the engine maintenance manual.

(f)

Recommendations are transferable between operators under circumstances described in Step (4) .

(g)

For engines operated in aircraft engaged in crop dusting and other chemical applications, flying conditions vary to such a degree that a sampling program for each particular application is desirable. Operators are requested to contact P&WC Customer Engineering Department for specific recommendations.

(h)

Service Bulletin Standard:

1

Applicable P&WC Service Bulletins (SB) with Category 1 to 6 must be accomplished in accordance with the compliance section of the SB in order for a TBO extension recommendation to become or remain valid for a specific engine. As part of a TBO extension recommendation, P&WC may specify that the extension is only applicable to engines meeting a minimum SB standard.

(i)

Assembly and Components Records

1 TBO extensions incorporate limitations on the life of certain components. The operator or the maintenance organization (M.O.) selected by the operator must have a system to log the following:

• Engine time and cycles since new and since last overhaul

• Accessories time since new or since last overhaul

• Total cycles of life limited rotors (Ref. P&WC EMM Airworthiness section).

2 Configuration Records

a P&WC makes available product improvements through issuance of Service Bulletins. The operator or the maintenance organization selected by the operator must have a system to log the SB that is incorporated into each engine. In particular, entries must be made into the engine log books.

(j)

TBO extension recommendations from P&WC are subject to fees per S.I.L. No. PT6C-018.

(2) Steps and guidelines to obtain a recommendation for fleet TBO escalation:

(a) Near expiration of the applicable TBO on an engine considered as a suitable sample as per Step (3) , the operator completes a TBO Evaluation Information Form (Ref. Fig 1). The completed form is to be forwarded to:

Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.

1000 Marie-Victorin Blvd. Longueuil, Quebec Canada J4G 1A1

Attention:

Manager, Turboshaft Engines Customer Service Engineering

Email: CFirst@pwc.ca

NOTE: 1.

This form is only to obtain a confirmation from P&WC that the engine is suitable for sampling purpose before requesting a TBO evaluation. It is the operator’s responsibility to request a TBO evaluation through the overhaul facility that is accomplishing the engine overhaul.

NOTE: 2.

P&WC will only accept fully completed form.

(b)

At expiration of the applicable TBO, the operator returns engine to a P&WC Overhaul Facility or P&WC Designated Overhaul Facility (DOF). On the purchase order, request that a TBO evaluation report is to be completed.

(c)

The evaluation consists of two stages. Stage 1, consists of a complete review of the engine logbooks and maintenance or operational history over the current TBO period. Upon successful confirmation, the engine components are subjected to a thorough visual examination prior to cleaning in order to assess whether the hardware appears capable of 500 hours of further operation. The TBO sample can be rejected at this point if the engine components are deemed to be in an unsatisfactory condition.

(d)

Stage two of the evaluation is commenced after satisfactory completion of stage one. A detailed examination of components to the requirements of the P&WC Overhaul manual is performed. Upon completion, the P&WC Service Center or P&WC DOF will forward the completed TBO evaluation report to the Manager, Turboshaft Service Engineering for approval. Once approved, P&WC will issue a letter to the operator stating that a TBO extension is recommended to the next applicable level, subject to the approval of the operator’s Airworthiness Authority.

NOTE:

Should a TBO sample be rejected, P&WC will not consider further TBO escalation samples unless the operator defines the actions taken to correct the observed conditions. On a case by case basis, this may result in a calendar period delay in order for complete validation of the revised actions.

(3) Exhibit engines for TBO Escalation (sample engines)

(a)

Amount of exhibit engines required:

1 For recommendation up to 6500 hours fleet TBO (in 500 hours increment), P&WC recommends two satisfactory exhibit engines operated to the established TBO.

2 For recommendation above 6500 hours (in 500 hours increment), P&WC recommends three satisfactory exhibit engines operated to the established TBO.

NOTE:

It may be required to submit two valid samples per operating regions as per the example provided in section F. (1) ((b)).

(b)

Engines which have been subjected to refurbishment prior to TBO may not be accepted unless:

1 Repairs are due to a known condition that is addressed and corrected by a service bulletin or conditions that were as a result of overhaul shop workmanship.

2 Prime cause for refurbishment was not directly attributed to self- induced malfunction or of mechanical integrity.

3 Refurbishment components have a satisfactory prior history beyond the established TBO level.

4 Main line bearings must not have been replaced during this TBO period except for instances described above.

(c)

Engines must incorporate only new or P&WC approved repair components provided by P&WC owned or P&WC recommended distributors or shops.

(d)

Engines must be factory built, overhauled or repaired at a P&WC Service Center or a P&WC Designated Overhaul Facility (DOF).

(e)

Engines must have been operated in the participating fleet for not less than 90% of the current TBO interval.

(f) The exhibit engines must be within 150 hours of the current TBO interval.

(4) Transfer of TBO Extension Recommendations

(a) TBO escalation recommendations are valid only as long as the operator, the maintenance provider, and the typical mission remain unchanged.

1

For changes limited to the selection by the operator of a new maintenance provider, the change will have no effect if the maintenance plan remains unchanged.

2 For changes for an engine operating, or to be operated, under a fleet extended TBO, P&WC recommends to use a pro-rating formula. The time remaining to overhaul for an engine in these circumstances is the average of the fleet TBO formerly applicable and the fleet TBO separately established for the new combination of operator, M.O. and mission for the same engine models. It is then weighted on the basis of the time remaining to overhaul under the original operation. The formula for this purpose is:

X = Y ×

a

b

Where

X = Time remaining to overhaul on new program (buyer's TBO)

Y = Time remaining to overhaul on previous program (seller's TBO)

a = TBO interval on new program (buyer's TBO)

b = TBO interval on previous program (seller's TBO)

Example 1: Example 2:
Example 1:
Example 2:

An aircraft is transferred (by sale or lease) between two operators. The previous operators's engine TBO

is 8000 hours and the new operators's engine TBO is

5000 hours and the engine has a time since overhaul (TSO) of 6000 hours

Time remaining to overhaul on the previous program:

Y = 8000 - 6000 = 2000 hours.

Time remaining to overhaul on the new program:

X = Y ×

a

b

X = 2000 ×

5000

/

8000

= 1250 hours

Therefore this engine may be operated to a one time TBO interval of 7250 hours. After overhaul, the engine TBO will revert to the new owners TBO, which

is 5000 hours in this example.

An operator obtains a recommendation from P&WC for a TBO extension from 5000 to 5500 hours, but one of the engines was purchased from an operator with a TBO of 8000 hours and the engine is currently running to a one time TBO of 7250 hours (Ref. Example 1). The new TBO interval will be calculated using the pro-rating formula and the TSO of the engine at entry to the new operator's fleet (6000 hours).

Time remaining to overhaul on the previous program:

Y = 8000 - 6000 = 2000 hours.

Time remaining to overhaul on the new program:

X = Y ×

a

b

X = 2000 ×

5500

/

8000

= 1375 hours

Therefore this engine may be operated to a one time TBO interval of 7375 hours. After overhaul, the engine TBO will revert to the new owners TBO, which

3. Maintenance Checks

A. General

is 5500 hours in this example.

This section contains the minimum Pratt & Whitney Canada approved engine maintenance inspection checks (based on flight hours or calendar times) and are intended to coincide with airframe inspection intervals (not to exceed the listed frequencies). Detailed procedures are provided, where applicable, in the relevant INSPECTION/CHECK sections of subject chapters in this manual.

B. Maintenance Check Intervals

Do the scheduled maintenance checks at the intervals outlined in Table 2 .

maintenance checks at the intervals outlined in Table 2 . Table 2 Scheduled Maintenance Checks Component

Table 2 Scheduled Maintenance Checks

Component

Action

Interval

ENGINE EXTERNALS

 

Exhaust Duct

Visually check for cracks, distortion and corrosion.

900

hours or

12

months whichever comes

 

first.

Gas Generator Case

Visual check for cracks, distortion and corrosion.

900

hours or

12

months whichever comes

 

first.

P2.8 Check Valve

Visual inspection and dimensional inspection (Ref. 72-30-04, Gas Generator Maintenance Practices). NOTE: For valves (Post-SB41042) which are over 300 hours, do the inspection within 100 flight hours from Jan 31/2012.

300

hours

Air Inlet Screen

Visual check for cleanliness, distortion, corrosion and overall condition (Ref. 72-20-

900

hours or

12

months whichever comes

00).

first.

Electrical Wiring Harnesses

Visual check for evidence of chafing, cracks, corrosion and wear. Do a security check to verify connector security (Ref. 73-20-40, Electrical Wiring Harness - MAINTENANCE PRACTICES)

900

hours or

12

months whichever comes

first.

Tubing and Painted Casings

Visual check for cracks, distortion, corrosion, and security of connections, clamps, and brackets. Check for evidence of chafing, cracks, corrosion and wear. Check for evidence of fuel or oil leaks as applicable.

900

hours or

12

months whichever comes

first.

OIL SYSTEM

 

Oil Quantity

Visual check of oil level. Replenish as required (Ref. 72-00-00, SERVICING and Rotorcraft Flight Manual).

12

flight hours

Oil Filter impending Bypass Indicator

Check status of oil filter impending bypass pop-out indicator (Ref. 79-20-02, Inspection/Check).

12

flight hours

Chip Detectors

Remove and do an operational check. Clean using lint free cloth (Ref. 79-30-01).

900

hours

Oil Filter Inspection

Remove and inspect oil filter (Ref. 79-20-02).

150 hours NOTE: Individual operators may elect to escalate this interval to a maximum of 900 hours if operating experience

   

shows less frequent inspection to be adequate. For operators having no experience and having engines past this interval at the time of Engine Maintenance Manual revision 11, do within 150 hours of receipt of Engine Maintenance Manual revision. For engines in aircraft being re-located in an area having a significantly higher average OAT, the initial interval should be re- established at 150 hours.

Oil Filter Replacement

Remove oil filter element and replace with a new one (Ref. 79-20-02).

900

hours or 36 months

whichever comes first.

Oil Change Interval

Replace oil

For engines having large amount of carbon in the oil filter on a regular basis, replace oil at every 900 hours. Otherwise, no oil change is required.

Fuel Cooled Oil Cooler (FCOC)

Visual check for cracks, distortion, corrosion, security of connections, clamps and brackets. Check for evidence of fuel or oil leaks. Verify that the FCOC holding bracket is tightly mounted on the AGB. If the FCOC holding bracket is not tight in place, remove the FCOC (Ref. 79-20-00) and torque the three bolts 85 to 95 lb.in. that attaches the bracket to the AGB.

600

hours

FUEL SYSTEM

   

Fuel Filter

Remove fuel filter and replace with a new one (Ref. 73-20-00).

900

hours or 36 months

whichever comes first.

Fuel Nozzles

Remove fuel nozzles to clean and do a functional check as per Chapter 73-10-05

 

Standard interval applicable to all operators, do full set of fuel nozzles.

600

hours

 

Specific interval for short mission operations or where the engine is exposed to high OAT operations or where fuel quality is questionable (see definitions and Notes 1, 2 &

300

hours

3).

 

Definitions:

Short mission operations: average of three starts or more per flight hour (do not include starts for maintenances purposes). High OAT: a monthly average of the maximum daily temperature (at base altitude) of 30° C (86° F) or higher for a duration of 3 months or more in one year.

NOTE: 1.

It is acceptable to remove, clean and do a functional check on only the four top positioned nozzles at location 1, 2, 13 & 14 per Chapter 73-10-05. Example: At first 300 hours clean and do a functional check for the four top nozzles, at 600 hours clean and do a functional check for all fuel nozzles and continue this sequence for the life of the engine.

NOTE: 2.

For engines used in mixed mission operations or an environment where the short mission operations or high OAT definition is met for more than 50% of flight time, the short operation/high OAT interval should be selected.

NOTE: 3.

Contact P&WC for recommendations if averaging 5 starts or more per flight hours.

If significant carbon build-up or signs of

 

distress is observed, do a borescope check for damage to the combustor and the CT vane (Ref. Chap. 72-00-00, Inspection). Additional inspections are required for engines using restricted use or emergency fuels (Ref. Chapter 72-00-00 Description and Operation). Inspect the inlet screen of the Fuel Nozzles. If contamination is present, follow the Fuel Impending By-Pass Indication fault isolation chart (Ref. 72-00-00). NOTE 5: The fuel nozzle inlet screen should be inspected for debris. Significant amount of debris must be investigated for cause (Ref. 72-00-00 FAULT ISOLATION - Fuel Impending By-Pass Indication).

 

Fuel Manifold

Visual check for manifold condition and leakage.

600

hours

IGNITION SYSTEM

   

Ignition Cables

Visual check for chafing, wear and security.

600

hours

Igniter Plugs

Remove and check for cleanliness and erosion (Ref. 74-20-00). Do a functional check to verify operating capabilities (Ref. 74-00-00).

600

hours

POWER MANAGEMENT

   

EEC/Fuel Management Module

CAUTION: THE MANUAL MODE TESTS ARE NECESSARY TO MAKE SURE THE ENGINE CONTROL SYSTEM FUNCTIONS PROPERLY IN MANUAL MODE AND BECAUSE THE ENGINE RESPONSE IS CONTROLLED BY THE PILOT, CAUTION IS NECESSARY TO PREVENT EXCEEDING OPERATIONAL LIMITS.

900

hours

Do a manual mode response check by verifying smooth control response to PLA inputs and do an operational check of the alternate (PLA) engine shutdown system (Ref. applicable Rotorcraft Manual).

 

DCU/Exceedance Indication (For Pre-SB41081 engines only)

From the EEC live data stream (RTD) or the DCU data, make sure that the parameter SETLEXPIND is at zero. Refer to chapter 73- 20-10 for EEC live data stream access and to chapter 77-40-01 for DCU data access. Refer to chapter 77-40-01 and 05-10-00 for proper maintenance action if parameter SETLEXPIND is not at zero.

50 flight hours (can be done in conjunction with recording of LCF counting (Ref. AIRWORTHINESS)).

TURBINE BLADES

 

Compressor Turbine Blades

Send compressor turbine disk assembly to an approved overhaul facility for blade replacement (Ref. Creep Usage Counting, Paras. 4. and 5.).

60% creep or 10,000 hours, which ever comes first.

Power Turbine Blades

Send first and second power turbine disk assembly to an approved overhaul facility for blade replacement (Ref. Creep Usage Counting, Paras. 4. and 5.).

50% creep or 15,000 hours, which ever comes first.

4. Automatic Turbine Blade Creep Usage Counting

A. Compliance

Operators are required to record accumulated blade creep as described in subsequent paragraphs. The

accumulated blade creep data is obtained from the DCU or the rotorcraft's Central Maintenance Computer (CMC). When the engine is returned to a repair facility, if the accumulated blade creep can not be established using either of the approved methods, the affected blades must be discarded.

To always permit reverting to the manual counting method, it is recommended the operator records the number of starts and flights at intervals not to exceed 300 operating hours.

NOTE:

If automatic creep counting becomes inoperative, then the interval may have to be adjusted to ensure compliance with creep limits.

B. General

Automatic turbine blade creep usage counting is used on the engines to monitor the accumulated usage on the compressor and power turbine blades. The creep usage of both compressor and power turbine blades is calculated in proportion to the actual severity of engine use.

The turbine blades listed in Table 3 are subject to creep damage due to the severity of engine use. The usage or blade creep life damage relate directly to a rotational speed and temperature measurement for each set of blades. The creep life limit may be expressed in hours or in percent:

Creep life limits expressed in hours vary for different sets of blades. Creep life limits expressed in percent are the same for all sets of blades.

expressed in percent are the same for all sets of blades. Table 3 Part Numbers for

Table 3 Part Numbers for Automatic Turbine Blade Creep Counting

Data Collection

     

Unit

Creep Life

Part Number

Part Name

Part Number

Limit

3045795

Compressor

3055671-01

60% creep or 10,000 hours, whichever comes first.

Turbine Blade

(Pre-SB41004)

3058991-01

 

(Post-SB41004)

3075491-01

( Post-SB41051)

3045795

Power Turbine Blade, 1st Stage

3045412-01

50% creep or 15,000 hours, whichever comes first.

3045795

Power Turbine Blade, 2nd Stage

3045433-01

50% creep or 15,000 hours, whichever comes first.

When one of the turbine blade sets (Ref. Table 3 ) is replaced by another one, the engine log book and all related documents must be updated with the accumulated percentage of creep life consumed and the new engine component must be entered in the Data Collection Unit (DCU) (Ref. 77-40-01, MAINTENANCE PRACTICES). Replacement of individual blades must be tracked by blade P/N and S/N. If the life of individual blades can not be established, then the whole set must be replaced based on the life of the oldest blade.

The operator must record the accumulated percentage of creep life consumed for each blade. The data is obtained from the DCU or the aircraft Central Maintenance Computer (CMC).

The values that are necessary for the algorithm that the Electronic Engine Control (EEC) uses to calculate the accumulated blade creep lives on the components are "linked". Table 3 lists the component part numbers and the related DCU part number.

C. Unserviceability of the Automatic Turbine Blade Creep Counting

Operators must record the accumulated creep usage for each component. This data is obtained from the DCU or the aircraft Central Maintenance Computer (CMC). If a fault code on the cockpit display indicates that the automatic creep counting is not serviceable, the recording of the cycles must be done manually (Ref. Para. 5.). This is necessary until such time that a corrective action is taken to make the automatic creep counting serviceable again. The following lists the steps to do when a fault code is displayed:

If the fault code is displayed during a mission, the creep counting for the mission will be reset to zero. That means that the manual recording must start from this point on.

After the automatic creep counting is made serviceable again, the Data Collection Unit (DCU) must be programmed with the new accumulated cycle values for each critical component (Ref. 77-40-01, MAINTENANCE PRACTICES).

5. Manual Turbine Blade Creep Usage Counting

A. General

The compressor and power turbine blades listed in Table 4 are subject to creep due to rotational speed and operating temperatures within the engine. The recommended blade service lives are listed in Table 4 and are derived using manual method creep life formula in Subpara. B.

using manual method creep life formula in Subpara. B. Table 4 Turbine Blade Service Life Description

Table 4 Turbine Blade Service Life

Description

Part No.

Creep Life Limit

Compressor Turbine Blade

3055671-01

60% creep life usage or 10,000 hrs, whichever occurs first.

Power Turbine Blade, 1st Stage

3045412-01

50% creep life usage or 15,000 hrs, whichever occurs first.

Power Turbine Blade, 2nd Stage

3045433-01

50% creep life usage or 15,000 hrs, whichever occurs first.

B. Components and Creep Life

When one of the listed engine components or a complete set (Ref. Table 4 ) is replaced by another one, the engine log book and all related documents must be updated with the appropriate information.

Operators must record the accumulated percentage of creep life consumed for each blade set (or highest XXX blade). In manual mode percentage of creep life is calculated as follows. Accumulated creep life is calculated by adding creep usage in both automatic and manual counting methods.

Percent Blade

Creep Used

=

(

Flight Hours

Creep Life Limit(hrs)

)

X

(Calculated to the nearest 0.001%)

100%

6. Recommended Maintenance Tasks Based on Operating Environment

A. Compressor and Turbine Wash

Perform compressor and turbine washes as scheduled in Table 5 .

compressor and turbine washes as scheduled in Table 5 . Table 5 Compressor and Turbine Wash

Table 5 Compressor and Turbine Wash Schedule

Environment

Wash

Frequency

Continuously

Compressor desalination wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Daily

salt laden

Turbine desalination wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Twice per week

External wash (Ref. 71-00- 00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Daily

Frequently salt-laden operating environment

Compressor desalination wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Daily

Turbine desalination wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Weekly

External wash (Ref. 71-00- 00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Twice per week

Remarks

Frequency can also be based on turbine component condition (See Note 4).

Frequency can be adjusted to suit engine condition.

Frequency can be adjusted to suit engine condition.

Frequency can also be based on turbine component condition (See Note 4).

Frequency can be adjusted to suit engine condition.

Occasionally

Compressor desalination wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Weekly

Frequency can be adjusted to suit operating location and engine condition.

salt laden

 

Turbine desalination wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Twice per month

Frequency can also be based on turbine component condition (See Note 4).

 

External wash (Ref. 71-00- 00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Weekly

Frequency can be adjusted to suit operating location and engine condition.

Polluted

Performance recovery wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Weekly

Environment

 

Turbine desalination wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

Frequency to be based on turbine component condition (See Note 2).

All

Performance recovery wash (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - CLEANING)

On Condition

Performance recovery washes are required less frequently. Adjust the frequency to suit engine operating conditions as shown by WebECTM®. Motoring wash for light soiling and multiple motoring for heavy soiling is recommended.

NOTE: 1.

Desalination washes done after last flight of the day provides maximum efficiency.

NOTE: 2.

Multiple motoring washes should be performed to the extent permitted by starter operating limitations. Observe starter cooling period (Ref. Starter Manufacturer's Manual).

NOTE: 3.

Operators can adjust frequency based on their experience and abilities to meet the interval on a regular basis. However, it must be noted that a lower frequency may result in a higher component replacement rate at HSI, repair or overhaul due to corrosion.

NOTE: 4.

Turbine (desalination) wash is particularly important to prevent corrosion due to sulfidation of turbine components like blades and stator airfoils. Recommendations for frequency based on turbine component condition are found in Chapter 72-00-00, Engine - Inspection. Take note that frequency based on turbine component condition recommendations may allow for less frequent wash without compromising the integrity of the turbine components but may result in higher turbine components replacement rate at HSI, repair and overhaul.

B. External Wash and Corrosion Prevention

For operations in corrosive environments it may be necessary to perform more frequent periodic preventative maintenance including application of corrosion inhibitors (Ref. 70-00-00, MAINTENANCE PRACTICES: Corrosion Inhibition). Where such preventative measures are necessary, it is also recommended to borescope the compressor turbine when performing Scheduled Maintenance Checks. Such intervals should be established and adjusted by the operator based upon the operator's experience.

Refer to 71-00-00, CLEANING.

C. Operations in Sandy Environments

For operations in sandy environments, it may be necessary to perform periodic inspections for compressor erosion (Ref. to 05-50-00). Such intervals should be established and adjusted by the operator based upon the his experience to ensure compliance within service limits.

D. Bleed Valve (BOV) Filter Cleaning

For operations in sandy or polluted environments or where frequent compressor washes are required, it may be necessary to perform periodic inspections and cleaning of the compressor BOV screen cartridge (Ref. to 75-30- 00). Such intervals should be established and adjusted by the operator based upon his experience to ensure compliance within service limits.

E. Electrical Contact Enhancer

P

DELETED.

PRATT & WHITNEY CANADA

MAINTENANCE MANUAL

MANUAL PART NO. 3045332 REVISION NO. 16

05-20-00

Figure 1 TBO Evaluation Sample Request Form (SHEET 1 OF 3)

MANUAL MANUAL PART NO. 3045332 REVISION NO. 16 05-20-00 Figure 1 TBO Evaluation Sample Request Form

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(SHEET 2 OF 3)

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Printed on: 14 APR/15 P&WC Proprietary - subject to restrictions in Technical Data Agreement

UNSCHEDULED MAINTENANCE CHECKS

1. Engine Unscheduled Inspection

Unscheduled inspection is done when the engine is subjected to unusual stress or operating conditions, or exceeds operating limitations or gives unsatisfactory performance or handling.

If as a result of the inspection, engine removal is required, a written report stating cause of removal in detail (e.g., overspeed, overtemperature, etc.) must be sent with the engine to an approved overhaul facility.

If engine must be removed, a performance/ground power check is recommended before removal to determine the extent of damage, and therefore repairs required. A performance/ground power check must not be done on an engine if it has exceeded operating limits (e.g., overspeed in excess of transient, overtemperature, etc) or if it has defects that may increase with engine running (i.e., oil system contamination, etc.).

2. Foreign Object Damage (FOD)

A. Procedure

(1) Do a detailed visual inspection of the first stage blades and of the compressor inlet case for damage (Ref. 72-00-00, ENGINE-INSPECTION and 72-30-05, COMPRESSOR ROTOR- MAINTENANCE PRACTICES).

NOTE:

You must do an investigation of each instance of FOD to determine the cause and the circumstance.

(2) If the damage exceeds the serviceable limits, send the engine to an approved overhaul facility for light overhaul in accordance with the Overhaul Manual (Ref. 72-00-00, Engine - Light Overhaul).

3. Erosion Damage

A. Procedure

(1) Do a detailed visual inspection of the first stage blades and of the compressor inlet case for damage (Ref. to 72-00-00, ENGINE - INSPECTION and to 72-30-05, COMPRESSOR ROTOR - MAINTENANCE PRACTICES).

(2) If the damage exceeds the serviceable limits, send the engine to an approved overhaul facility for light overhaul in accordance with the Overhaul Manual (Ref. to 72-00-00, ENGINE GENERAL - LIGHT OVERHAUL).

(3) Where the rate of erosion is high, it is also recommended to borescope the compressor turbine vane and blades for signs of erosion or heat distress due to build up of fine dust on blades and vane cooling exit (trailing edge) passages (Ref. to 72-00-00, ENGINE - INSPECTION).

NOTE:

4. Oil System

A. Loss of Oil

Under certain circumstances, sand may mix with corrosive pollutants and cause premature deterioration of turbine blade and vane protective coatings.

Determine the cause of the oil loss or of the high oil consumption and rectify it (Ref. 72-00- 00, ENGINE, GENERAL - FAULT ISOLATION). Refer to paragraph C. if the oil pressure went below the operating limits.

B. Chip Detector Light On

If chip detector light is “ON”, please refer to 72-00-00, ENGINE, GENERAL, FAULT ISOLATION.

C. Unusual Oil System Conditions

(1) Do steps (a) to (e) for the following conditions:

Oil temperature of the engine exceeds the limits specified in Tables 1 and 2 (Ref. 05- 10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS).

Oil mixed with different oil types or with unapproved oil brands or with other chemical substances.

(a)

Inspect the oil filter (Ref. 79-20-02, OIL FILTER AND IMPENDING BYPASS INDICATOR - MAINTENANCE PRACTICES) and the chip detector (Ref. 79-30-01, CHIP DETECTOR AND OIL STRAINER- MAINTENANCE PRACTICES) for evidence of debris. If debris is found, refer to the fault isolation chart for debris in oil (Ref. 72-00-00). If no debris is found proceed with the next step.

(b)

Drain the oil, flush the oil system and fill the oil tank (Ref. 72-00-00, ENGINE, GENERAL - SERVICING).

(c)

Do an engine ground run for 10 minutes at sufficient power to have the aircraft where applicable either light on skids or on front nose landing gear wheel (Ref. applicable Aircraft Manual).

(d)

Inspect the oil filter and the chip detector again for evidence of debris. If debris is found, refer to the fault isolation chart for debris in oil (Ref. 72-00-00).

(e)

If no debris is found and the oil pressure is within operating limits (Ref. 05-10-00, ENGINE - OPERATING LIMITS), the engine is serviceable.

(2) Do the following steps if the oil pressure is not within the recommended operating range (Ref. 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS).

(a)

For a newly installed engine, adjust the oil pressure (Ref. 71-00-00, POWER PLANT - ADJUSTMENT/TEST).

(b)

For an engine in service, do the fault isolation for the engine lubrication problems (Ref. 72- 00-00, ENGINE, GENERAL - FAULT ISOLATION). If the oil pressure is still not within limits, contact the P&WC service representative.

(3) Do the following steps if the engine has been subjected to low oil pressure or loss of oil pressure:

NOTE: 1.

Low or loss of oil pressure is defined as running the engine below the minimum limits. See CAUTION below and Ref. 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS.

NOTE: 2.

During the start sequence, if the oil pressure does not increase to an acceptable value and the engine is shut down within time interval required to comply with aircraft flight/maintenance manuals, the engine is not considered to have been subjected to “low or loss of oil pressure”.

CAUTION:

IF THE ENGINE WAS KEPT RUNNING AT HIGH POWER WITH LOW OR NO OIL PRESSURE LONGER THAN NECESSARY TO COMPLY WITH THE FLIGHT MANUAL, IT MUST BE REMOVED AND RETURNED TO AN OVERHAUL FACILITY FOR AN INSPECTION TO BE CARRIED OUT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE OVERHAUL MANUAL INSTRUCTIONS.

(a) Check engine/aircraft oil pressure indicating system. If satisfactory and the engine power was reduced and/or engine was shutdown as per flight manual, carry out the following:

1 Rotate the compressor from the starter gearshaft using wrench (PWC64054) or (PWC34941) and listen for unusual noises coming from the turbomachine.

2 Rotate the output shaft and listen for unusual noises from the power turbine area.

3 If unusual noises coming from the engine are heard, remove the engine.

4 Inspect the chip detector (Ref. 79-30-01, CHIP DETECTOR AND OIL STRAINER- MAINTENANCE PRACTICES) and the oil filter (Ref. 79-20-02, OIL FILTER AND IMPENDING BYPASS INDICATOR - MAINTENANCE PRACTICES). If debris is found, refer to the fault isolation chart for debris in oil (Ref. 72-00-00). If no debris is found proceed with the next step.

NOTE: 1.

Cause of low or loss of oil pressure must be determined and corrected before the engine is run (Ref. 72-00-00, ENGINE, GENERAL - FAULT ISOLATION).

NOTE: 2.

Ensure that the oil level is above the minimum mark before the engine is run (Ref. 72-00- 00, ENGINE, GENERAL - SERVICING).

5 If no debris is found, reinstall the chip detector and the oil filter and do an engine ground run for 10 minutes to have the aircraft light on skids or light on front nose wheel (Ref. applicable Aircraft Manual). Follow the normal shutdown procedure and make sure that the N1 and N2 run down times are normal.

6 Re-inspect the oil filter and the chip detector. If debris is found, refer to the fault isolation chart for debris in oil (Ref. 72-00-00). If no debris is found, proceed with next step.

7 Return the engine to service and proceed with the next step.

NOTE:

If the low or loss of oil pressure was caused by a low oil level condition refer to the fault isolation chart for excessive oil consumption. If the cause of the high consumption could not be determined, monitor the oil consumption for the next 65 Flight Hours.

8 Re-inspect the oil filter and the chip detector after 10 flight hours and after 25 flight hours. If debris is found, carry out the procedure for debris in oil system (Ref.72-00-00, FAULT ISOLATION). If no debris is found, return to routine inspection intervals.

(4) Do the following steps if the oil is darker or evidence of carbon particles exist:

(a)

Inspect the oil filter (Ref. 79-20-02, OIL FILTER AND IMPENDING BYPASS INDICATOR - MAINTENANCE PRACTICES).

(b)

If significant amount of carbon particles are found, refer 79-20-02, OIL FILTER AND IMPENDING BYPASS INDICATOR - MAINTENANCE PRACTICES.

(c)

If no carbon particles are found or if only small quantities of carbon particles are found (Ref. Fig. 1), no specific action is required.

5. Fuel System

A. High Fuel Temperature Indication

(1) Refer to 72-00-00, FAULT ISOLATION: Fault Isolation Problems for Fuel Problems.

B. Low Fuel Temperature Indication

(1) Refer to 72-00-00, FAULT ISOLATION: Fault Isolation Problems for Fuel Problems.

C.

Fuel Impending By-Pass Indication

(1) Refer to 72-00-00, FAULT ISOLATION: Fault Isolation Problems for Fuel Problems.

NOTE:

An impending by-pass indication does not necessarily mean that the fuel filter was by-passed. An assessment of the amount of contamination together with the steps outlined in 72-00-00, Fig. 160 can indicate whether a by-pass has actually occurred.

D. Unusual Fuel System Conditions

(1) Loss of fuel - Determine the source and rectify.

(2) Metal particles in the fuel filter - Determine the source and rectify.

6. Other Conditions

A. Lightning Strike

(1) Visual check engine externals and wiring harness for damage.

(2) Check EEC display for any fault codes. Rectify any fault codes (Ref. 72-00-00, FAULT ISOLATION).

(3) Inspect the oil filter and the chip detector for metal particles (Ref. 72-00-00, SERVICING).

(4) If there are no metal particles, the engine is serviceable. Check the oil filter every five hours or once a day for the next 25 flight hours.

(5) If there are metal particles, drain the oil and fill the oil tank (Ref. 72-00-00, SERVICING).

(6) Do an engine ground run for 20 minutes at moderate power (Ref. applicable Rotorcraft Manual).

(7) Inspect the oil filter and the chip detector again for metal particles (Ref. 72-00-00, SERVICING).

(8) If there are no metal particles, the engine is serviceable. Check the oil filter every five hours or once a day for the next 25 flight hours.

(9) If there are metal particles, send the engine to an approved overhaul facility for light overhaul in accordance with the Overhaul Manual (Ref. 72-00-00, Engine - Light Overhaul). Indicate lightning strike.

B. Immersion in Water

(1) Send engine to an approved overhaul facility for light overhaul in accordance with the Overhaul Manual (Ref. 72-00-00, ENGINE - LIGHT OVERHAUL). Indicate immersion in water and give details on the circumstances (i.e. was the engine stationary and cold, stationary and hot or rotating at the time of the immersion in water).

C. Engine Dropped During Handling

(1) Send engine to an approved overhaul facility for light overhaul in accordance with the Overhaul Manual (Ref. 72-00-00, ENGINE - LIGHT OVERHAUL). Indicate dropped engine.

D. Hard Landing

(1) Inspect all mounting pads for cracks or misalignment.

(2) Inspect gas generator case for warping or buckling.

(3) Inspect all attachment hardware at engine flanges for shearing or other obvious damage.

(4) Inspect fireseals for warping or buckling.

(5) Inspect all external tubes for damage.

(6) Inspect exhaust area for cracks, warping or distortion.

(7) Inspect accessory gearbox case adjacent to the starter and fuel control pads for cracks.

(8) Inspect intake case struts at intersection with rear wall for cracks.

(9) Inspect fuel control components, lines and fittings for damage.

(10)If any of the above conditions are found, engine must be sent to an approved overhaul facility for light overhaul in accordance with the Overhaul Manual (Ref. 72-00-00, ENGINE - LIGHT OVERHAUL). Indicate Dropped Engine or Hard Landing. If none of the above conditions are found, engine may remain in service subject to a satisfactory ground test (Ref. applicableRotorcraft Manual.

(11)Check EEC display for any fault codes. Rectify any fault codes (Ref. 72-00-00, FAULT ISOLATION).

E. Sudden Stoppage

(1) If the helicopter main rotor blades have suffered damage after a major collision which required the replacement of one or more main rotor blades, return the engine to an overhaul facility for inspection/repair in accordance with the overhaul manual.

(2) If the damage to the main rotor blade(s) does not require their replacement or if any part of the

transmission system between the engine output shaft and the main rotor has seized while the engine was in operation, do the inspections which follow:

(a)

Inspect engine mounts and vibration insulators for distortion or damage.

(b)

Inspect exhaust duct for buckling or rippling.

(c)

Inspect oil filter and chip detector for metal particles (Ref. 72-00-00, ENGINE - SERVICING).

(d)

Send engine to an overhaul facility for light overhaul (Sudden Stoppage) if any of the preceding conditions are found. If none of the conditions can be found, inspect power turbine shroud for evidence of rub (Ref. step (e)).

(e)

Inspect power turbine shroud for evidence of rub. If rub has occurred the engine must be sent to an overhaul facility for light overhaul (Sudden Stoppage). If there is no evidence of rub, the engine may remain in service subject to a satisfactory ground test (Ref. applicable Rotorcraft Manual) and an oil filter inspection every 25 hours for the next 100 hours of operation.

F. Contamination by Fire Extinguishing Agents

(1) In the event of engine contamination by fire extinguishing agents perform cleaning procedures as follows:

(a)

Perform dry motoring run to remove any residual deposits (Ref. Chapter 71-00-00, ADJUSTMENT/TEST).

(b)

Wash engine externally using fresh water only (Ref. 71-00-00, CLEANING).

(c)

Perform engine motoring performance recovery wash omitting dry motoring run (Ref. 71-00-00, CLEANING).

(2) Engines contaminated by Halon fire extinguishing agent (aircraft onboard fire extinguishing system) require no engine maintenance.

G. Fuel Pump Filter

(1) When a component located upstream of the filter is replaced, do a check of the fuel filter after the first engine run.

(2) When the <FUEL FILT> indication is “ON”, replace the fuel pump filter before the next flight (Ref. 73-20-00, FUEL MANAGEMENT MODULE (FMM) - MAINTENANCE PRACTICES).

(3) If the indication comes back “ON” within 10 hours of running time, refer to (Ref. 72-00-00, ENGINE GENERAL - FAULT ISOLATION).

H. Extended Use of Restricted Fuel

(1) When TS-1 fuel from the Commonwealth of the Independent States (CIS) is used for more than 1000 hours (continuously or intermittently), the fuel nozzles must be removed, cleaned, inspected then a nozzle functional check must be performed before reinstallation and return to service (Ref. 73-10-05, FUEL MANIFOLD AND FUEL NOZZLES - MAINTENANCE PRACTICES).

I. Aircraft Flown Through Volcanic Ash or Smoke

(1) Wash compressor and turbine (Ref. 71-00-00, CLEANING).

(2) Drain and refill oil system with new oil (Ref. SERVICING).

(3) Clean or change main oil filter (Ref. 79-20-02).

(4) Examine compressor for damage (Ref. INSPECTION/CHECK).

(5) Do a power assurance check per applicable Rotorcraft Manual.

(6) Return engine to service if no damage is found.

(7) Drain and refill oil system with new oil (Ref. SERVICING) 50 ± 10 flight hours after original oil change (Ref. Step ).

7. Maintenance Action For Engine Overtemperature, Overtorque and Overspeed Conditions

A. Engine Overtemperature (Ref. 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS)

(1) Do a functional check of the aircraft engine temperature indicating system (Ref. applicable RotorcraftManual). If serviceable, refer to 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS for the required maintenance actions.

(2) For excursions in specific areas of the OEI rating charts, refer to 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS for the required maintenance actions.

B. Engine Overtorque (Ref. 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS)

(1) Do a functional check of the aircraft engine torque indicating system (Ref. applicable Rotorcraft Manual). If serviceable, refer to 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS for the required maintenance actions.

(2) For excursions in specific areas of the OEI rating charts, refer to 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS for the required maintenance actions.

C. Engine Overspeed (Ref. 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS)

(1) Do a functional check of the aircraft engine speed indicating system (Ref. applicable Rotorcraft manual). If serviceable, refer to 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS for the required maintenance actions.

(2) For excursions in specific areas of the OEI rating, refer to 05-10-00, ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS for the required maintenance actions.

8. Power Assurance Check Was Not Within Specified Limits

A. Procedure

(1) Refer to 71-00-00, FAULT ISOLATION.