Sei sulla pagina 1di 5

Topic: SCATTER DIAGRAM

Topic: SCATTER DIAGRAM “Development of a Problem Solving Model for the Hong Kong Textiles and Clothing

“Development of a Problem Solving Model for the Hong Kong Textiles and Clothing Industries” Project

the Hong Kong Textiles and Clothing Industries” Project HKRITA Ref. No. : RD/PR/001/07 ITC Ref. No.
the Hong Kong Textiles and Clothing Industries” Project HKRITA Ref. No. : RD/PR/001/07 ITC Ref. No.

HKRITA Ref. No. : RD/PR/001/07

ITC

Ref. No. : ITP/033/07TP

Copyright © 2009 – HKRITA. All rights reserved.

Project HKRITA Ref. No. : RD/PR/001/07 ITC Ref. No. : ITP/033/07TP Copyright © 2009 – HKRITA.

Scatter Diagram

Purpose:

– To identify/measure possible relationship or correlationbetween two factors or variables

Application:

– Provide data to confirm a hypothesis that two variables are related

– Evaluate the strength of a potential relationship

– Follow-up to cause-and-effect analysis

Type of relationship:

– No correlation

– Positive correlation

– Negative correlation

– Curvilinear correlation

Steps to Draw a Scatter Diagram

– Collect the data

– Draw the axes of the diagram.

X - axis

• The first variable (the independent variable) is usually located on the horizontal axis.

• The vertical axis usually contains the second variable (the dependent variable)

Y- axis

Illustration on Scatter Diagram

Illustration on Scatter Diagram Remarks: Scatter diagram show a first view on the relationship between two

Remarks:

Scatter diagram show a first view on the relationship between two variable. The degree of the correlation is performed by correlation analysis (Chapter 4.3)

(3) The detail of the linear relationship requires Simple Linear Regression (Chapter 4.4)

(1)

(2)

Interpretation:

Car Age and price is of negative correlation, i.e. the older the car, the lower its price.

Scatter Diagram : Using Minitab

You are interested in how well your company's camera batteries are meeting customers' needs. Market research shows that customers become annoyed if they have to wait longer than 5.25 seconds between flashes. You collect a sample of batteries that have been in use for varying amounts of time and measure the voltage remaining in each battery immediately after a flash (VoltsAfter), as well as the length of time required for the battery to be able to flash again (flash recovery time, FlashRecov). Create a scatterplot to examine the results. Include a reference line at the critical flash recovery time of 5.25 seconds.

1) Open the worksheet BATTERIES.MTW. 2) Choose Graph > Scatterplot. 3) Choose Simple, then click OK.

4)

5) Click Scale, then click the Reference Lines tab. 6) In Show references lines for Y positions, type 5.25. Click OK in each dialog box.

Under Y variables, enter FlashRecov. Under X variables, enter VoltsAfter.

enter FlashRecov . Under X variables , enter VoltsAfter . Interpreting the results As expected, the
enter FlashRecov . Under X variables , enter VoltsAfter . Interpreting the results As expected, the

Interpreting the results As expected, the lower the voltage in a battery after a flash, the longer the flash recovery time tends to be. The reference line helps to illustrate that there were many flash recovery times greater than 5.25 seconds.

- THE END -