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f

D E PA RT M E N T O F T H E
Headquarters Air Mobility Command
Scott Air Force Base,

AIR

FORCE

Illinois

AMC

R E G U L AT I O N

62225-5001

20

August

55-1
1992

Operations

TANKER/AIRLIFT OPERATIONS
Establishes procedures for the operation of aircraft employed by the Air Mobility Command (AMC) to accomplish
its worldwide mission. Applies to the Air National Guard (when pubUshed in the NGR (AF)0-2 and the United
States Air Force Reserve units and members. This regulation requires the collection and maintenance of
information protected by the Privacy Act of 1974. The authorities to collect and maintain the records prescribed
in this regulation are 10 United States Code 8013. Secretary of the Air Force: powers and duties; delegation by;
as implemented by AFM 30-130, Base Level Military Personal System. Privacy act statements are not required as
personal information is not collected from the individual. System of records notice F035 AF MP O applies.
NOTE: The reports in this regulation are exempt from RCS controls per AFR 4-38, paragraph 2-3.
Paragraph Page
Chapter 1General Information
General
1.1
4
Applicability
1.2
4
Te r m s
Explained
1.3
4
Deviations
1.4
4
Waivers
1.5
4
Supplements
1.6
4
Requisitioning
Procedures
1.7
4
Revisions
1.8
4
Distribution
1.9
5
D e fi n i t i o n s
1.10
5
Chapter 2Command and Control
Section A~Command Responsibility and Authority
Command
Responsibility
2.1
9
Utilization
of
AMC
Resources
2.2
9
Waiver Requests to AMC Operational Directives 2.3
Marginal
Weather
Conditions
2.4
9
Rerouting/Diverting an Air mobility Mission 2.5 9
Aircraft
Capability
to
Use
an
A i r fi e l d
2.6
9
Engines Running Oft/Onload (ERO) Procedures 2.7 10
Section B-Command and Control
General
2.8
10
Operational Control of AMC Air mobility Forces 2.9 10
AMC
Mission
Commander
2.10
13
A i r c r a f t C o m m a n d e r R e s p o n s i b i l i t y a n d A u t h o r i t y 2 . 11 1 3
Mission
Clearance
Decision
2.12
13
Chapter 3Crew Complement and Management
Section A~Aircrew Complements
General
3.1
Crew
Complement
No. of Printed Pages: 33
OPR: DOVG (Capt Rathbun)
Approved by: Major General Paul E. Landers Jr.
Editor: Ilene Gibson
Distribution: F;X HQ USAF/XOTTA Washington DC 20330-5050

3.2

15
15

'

AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992


Section B-Crew Scheduling
Scheduling
3.3
Not
Used
3.4
Section CCrew Management
General
3.5
Alerting
Procedures
3.6
Crew
Duty
Time
(CUT)
3.7
Waivers
to
Crew
Duty
Time/Rest
3.8
Stage
Management
3.9
Crew
Release
Policy
3.10
Home Station Predeparture Crew Rest (Includes
Rotational TDY Stations, Nonassociate ARC
Ta c t i c a l
Airlift
and
Rescue)
3 . 11
En
Route
Crew
Rest
3.12
Aircraft
Not
Capable
of
Departure
3.13
Home
Station
Postmission
Crew
Rest
3.14
Standby
Duty
3.15
AMC/DO
Waiver
Authority
3.16
Section DAMC Special Categories of Travel
Additional
Crewmembers
(ACM)
3.17
Mobility Mission Observer (MMO) Program 3.18
Mission Essential Ground Personnel (MEGP) 3.19
Incentive
Rights
3.20
Orientation, Demonstration, Test, and
Familiarization
Flights
3.21
Chapter 4-Command Operating Restrictions
General

4.1

15
15
15
15
15
16
17
17
18
18
19
19
20
20
20
24
24
25
26
27

Chapter 5~Operating Policy


General
5.1
Adherence
to
Rules
5.2
Control
5.3
Flight
Station
Entry
5.4
Ta k e o f f
and
Landing
Policy
5.5
Copilot
Landing
Policy
5.6
Transportation
of
Pets
5.7
Alcoholic
Beverages
5.8
Not
Used
5.9
Smoking
Policy
5.10
Electronic
Devices
5 . 11

28
28
28
28
28
28
28
28
28
28
29

Chapter 6Aircrew Procedures


General

30

Chapter 7-Aircraft Security


General
Aircrew

6.1
7.1
Arming

7.2

Chapter 8~Operational Reports and Forms


General
8.1
Reporting
Aircraft/Personnel
Mishaps
8.2
Reports
of
Violations
8.3
Aircraft Commander's Report on Services/Facilities 8.4

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31
32
32
32
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AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992

AMC Form 54
Aircraft Commander's Report on Crewmember 8.5 33
AMC Form 196
Figures
2-1
2-2
2-3

Runway
Runway
Operational

Obstruction
Obstruction
Control

Forms Prescribed
AMC Form 54, Aircraft Commander's Report on
Services/Facilities
AMC Form 196, Aircraft Commander's Report on
Crewmember

Criteria
Criteria
Relationships

8-4
8-5

11
11
13

32
33

AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992

Chapter 1
GENERAL INFORMATION
1.1. General:
1.1.1.. This is a command directive for supervision of AMC aircrews. Use it with the consolidated aircrew
(AMCR 55-XXX) directives, and applicable AF and AMC directives.
1.1.2.. The Aircrew Standardization Directorate (DOV) has overall responsibility for administration of this
regulation.
1.2. Applicability. This regulation is directive to all personnel assigned/attached to AMC operational
flying/aeromedical evacuation units (except as provided in AFRES/ANG 0-2).
1.3. Terms Explained:
1.3.1. "Will" and "shall" indicate a mandatory requirement.
1.3.2. "Should" indicates a recommended policy that is applied if practical.
1.3.3. "May" indicates an acceptable or suggested means of accomplishment.
1.4. Deviations. Do not deviate from the policies and guidance in this regulation, except:
1.4.1. When waived according to paragraph 1-5.
1.4.2. For safety.
1.4.3. If beyond command and control communications capability, commanders may deviate from this regulation
as necessary to protect their aircrews and/or aircraft. Report all deviations without waiver through channels to HQ
AMC/DOV within 30 days after the occurrence.
1.5. Waivers. Request waivers through normal command and control channels. Level of waiver authority will
be the TACC unless otherwise specified. For Air Reserve Component (ARC) unit-equipped (UE) units, waiver
authority will be HQ AFRES/DO or ANGRC/DO, as appropriate. In certain contingencies, HQ AMC may
delegate waiver authority to lower levels of command.
1.6. Supplements. Supplements are not authorized.
1.7. Requisitioning Procedures. Units will requisition this regulation through their servicing PDO. PDOswill
consolidate unit requirements within their area of responsibility. Requisitions for additional copies will contain a
statement of justification; i.e., fair wear and tear, unit activation, increase of personnel, etc.. Distribution to units,
organizations, and individuals outside AMC and AMC-gained ARC units may be made upon specific request, with
justification, through their MAJCOM publications distribution office (PDO)
1.8. Revisions. Personnel at all echelons are encouraged to submit proposed changes to HQ AMC/DOV. Use AF
Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication
1.9. Distribution. Order sufficient quantity to provide copies for flying unit commanders, operations supervisory
personnel, squadron section chiefs, command/control facility, stan/eval, flight crew information file, and unit
mission kits. Do not distribute to individual aircrew members

AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992

1.10. Definitions:
Additional Crewmember (ACM). An individual with valid aeronautical orders (AFR 60-13) who is required to
perform inflight duties and is assigned in addition to or authorized to accompany the normal aircrew complement
required for that mission. ACMs may not log flying time unless specifically authorized in this regulation.
Aeromedical Evacuation Coordination Center (AECC). The control facility established by the Commander of
Mobility Forces, AMC number air forces (NAF), major air command or active duty aeromedical evacuation (AE)
squadron. It operates in conjunction with the command and control centers and coordinates overall medical
requirements with airlift capabilities. It also assigns medical missions to the appropriate aeromedical evacuation
elements in the system and monitors patient movement.
Aeromedical Evacuation Crewmember (AECM). Flight nurses and aeromedical evacuation technicians.
Aircrew Threat Advisory. An intelligence message containing information about a situation which may pose a
direct threat to AMC aircrews.
Air Force Component Commander (AFCC). In a unified, subunified, or joint task force command, the
commander charged with the overall conduct of the Air Force air operations.
Deployed Tanker Airlift Control Center (DTACC). A command control center where detailed planning,
coordinating, and tasking for theater air mobility operations are accomplished. The focal point for
communications and the source of control and direction for theater air mobility forces.
Air Reserve Component (ARC). Includes Air Force Reserve and/or Air National Guard units.
Allowable Cabin Load (ACL). The maximum payload which can be carried on a mission. It may be limited by
the maximum takeoff gross weight, maximum landing gross weight, or by the maximum zero fuel weight.
Maximum through load is limited to that which can be carried on the critical leg of a route segment.
Antarctic Flight. Aircraft flight conducted below the 56 degrees south latitude.
Arctic Flight. Flight between 15 degrees and 180 degrees west longitude (exclusive of Iceland) above the 50
degrees north latitude between 1 Oct to 15 Apr excluding transoceanic flights.
Border Clearance. Those clearances and inspections required to comply with federal, state and local agricultural,
customs, immigration, and immunization requirements.
Category I Route. Any route that does not meet the requirements of a Category II route, including tactical
navigation and overwater routes.
Category II Route. Any route on which the position of the aircraft can be accurately determined by the overhead
crossing of a radio aid (NDB, VHF omnirange, tactical air navigation) at least once each hour with positive course
guidance between such radio aids.
Combat Control Team (CCT). A team of AF personnel organized, trained, and equipped to establish and operate
navigational or terminal guidance aids, communications, and aircraft control facilities in support of tactical
operations.
Command and Control Center (CCC). An agency used by a commander to plan, direct, an. If standby duty was
performed away from normal quarters, crew rest time is computed from standby time on the same basis as for
mission time.

AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992

3.15.3.2. If standby duty was performed in normal quarters, no crew rest time is authorized.
3.15.4. Waiver authority for maximum standby crew duty time rests with AMC/DO.
3.16. AMC/DO Waiver Authority. AMC/DO waiver authority specified in this section may be further delegated
to the TACC Director or COMMOBFOR for forces operationally assigned to them. The AMC air mobility
commander designated by CINC AMC who is responsible for management of air mobility forces within a theater,
a geographic area outside the CONUS, or for a designated operation. The COMMOBFOR is responsible to the
AFCC for management of theater-assigned air mobility forces and is responsible to CINCAMC for
monitoring/management of AMC-assigned air mobility forces operating within the specific area of responsibility.
Conference SKYHOOK. A communication conference available to help aircrews solve inflight problems that
require additional expertise.
Contingency Mission. A mission operated in direct support of an operation plan, operation order, disaster, or
emergency.
Critical Leg. That segment of a mission which governs the ACL which may be carried over that route.
Deadhead Time. Duty time accrued by crewmembers in a passenger or ACM status not accomplishing crew
duties.
Deployment. The relocation of forces to desired areas of operation.
Designated Courier. An officer or enlisted member, in the grade of E-7 or above, of the United States Armed
Forces, or Department of State Diplomatic Courier, selected by the Defense Courier Service (DCS) to accept,
safeguard, and deliver DCS material as directed.
Distinguished Visitor (DV). Passengers, including those of friendly nations, of colonel rank and higher, or
equivalent status to include diplomats, cabinet members, members of Congress, and other individuals designated
by the Department of Defense due to their mission or position.
Equal Time Point (ETP). The point along a route at which an aircraft may either proceed to destination/first
suitable airport or return to departure base/last suitable airport in the same amount of time based on all engines
operating.
Estimated time of arrival (ETA).
Estimated time an aircraft will be in the blocks (parked and chocked) (ETB).
Estimated time of departure (ETD).
Estimated time in commission (ETIC).
Exercises. Missions supporting Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) exercises Mission directives will be published by the
TACC, AF/DOX, or DTACC/DOO or DON. as appropriate.
Ground Time. The interval between arrival in the blocks and takeoff time.
Hazardous Cargo/Materials. Explosive, toxic, corrosive, nuclear, combustible, flammable, biologically
infectious, or poisonous materials that may directly endanger human life or property, particularly if misused,
mishandled, or involved in accidents (AFR 55-14. AFR 71-4. TO 11N-20-11).

AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992

Joint Airborne/Air Transportability Training (JA/ATT). Continuation/proficiency combat air mobility training in a
joint environment for air mobility aircrews and members of the services to ensure combat readiness of the forces
is maintained. It includes airdrop, air assault, aircraft load training, and service school support. The TACC will
publish JA/ATT tasking in appropriate OPORD/mission operating directive.
Load Message. An operational immediate message electrically transmitted from departure station listing pertinent
traffic and operational data.
Maximum on Ground (MOG). Maximum number of aircraft that can be accommodated at one time at a specific
location due to limitations of space, servicing capabilities, cargo handling, or other considerations.
Mission. The movement of a AMC aircraft from a designated point of origin to a designated destination as
defined and identified by an assigned AMC mission identifier in the schedule, mission directive, operation order,
operation plan, or frag order
Mission Advisory. A message dispatched by command and control agencies, AMC liaison officers, or aircraft
commanders advising all interested agencies of any occurrences or changes in status affecting the mission.
Operational Control (OPCON). The authority vested in an agency to determine the composition of subordinate
forces, the assignment of tasks, the designation of objectives, and the authoritative direction necessary to
accomplish the mission. The agency exercising OPCON over a specific mission has routing authority over that
mission.
Operational Support Airlift (OSA). Operational and maintenance funded C-12, C-20, C-21, C-22, T-43, and C135 aircraft assigned an operational support airlift role.
Originating Station. The base from which an aircraft starts on an assigned mission which may or may not be the
home station of the aircraft itself.
Overwater Flight. Any flight which exceeds power-off gliding distance from land.
Point of Safe Return. The most distant point along the planned route from which an aircraft may safely return to
its point of departure, or alternate airport, with required fuel reserve.
Positioning/Depositioning Missions. Positioning missions are those made to relocate aircraft at a base for the
purpose of originating a mission. Depositioning missions are those made to return aircraft from bases at which
missions have terminated.
Quick Stop. A set of procedures designed to expedite the movement of selected air mobility missions by reducing
ground times at en route and/or turnaround stations.
Scheduled Return Time (SRT). The time an aircrew is scheduled to return from a mission.
Scheduled Takeoff/Blockout Time. That takeoff time (blockout time for contract carriers) as established in the
AMC Cargo or Passenger Schedule, or Operations Orders For air aborts and diversions, this will be maximum
block-in plus authorized ground time. Early deviation does not apply to aborts/diversions unless the mission is
formally rescheduled by Current Operations
Special Assignment Airlift Missions (SAAM). Funded airlift which cannot be supported by channel missions
because of the unusual nature, sensitivity, or urgency of the cargo or operations to points other than the
established channel structure

AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992

Standby Force/Aircraft/Crews. Designated aircraft and crews capable of being launched in less than the normal
alert-to-takeoff time period.
Terrorism Advisory. A message containing information on possible terrorism, riots, civil unrest, or other terroristrelated violence that may impact AMC resources.
Unilateral Air Force Training. AMC aircrew training conducted to achieve and maintain mission-ready status in
both TF (formal schools), CF (line), and CA (combat) coded aircraft. Types of missions include aircraft
commander upgrade training, standardization/evaluation, and continuation training.
Zero Fuel Weight (Actual). The actual zero fuel weight of an aircraft is the sum of the operating weight plus the
weight of the cabin load (cargo/passengers/troops).
Zero Fuel Weight (Maximum). That weight expressed in pounds where an addition to the aircraft gross weight can
be made only by adding fuel in wing tanks. This value is referred to in the DD Form 365-4 (Form F) as "Limiting
Wing Fuel."
NOTE: Refer to AFM 11-1, for additional definitions.

AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992

Chapter 2
COMMAND AND CONTROL

Section A-Command Responsibility and Authority


2.1. Command Responsibility. AMC commanders at all levels will enforce the highest standards of safety in
airlift/tanker operations. To achieve this purpose, commanders must ensure quality condition of equipment,
thorough training and motivation of aircrew/support personnel, strict attention to duty, good judgment through
operational planning, and efficient use of resources.
2.2. Utilization of AMC Resources. CINCAMC is tasked with the efficient and economical use of the
airlift/tanker force to support DOD requirements. The TACC Director, COMMOBFORs, are responsible for
effective management of airlift/tanker resources under their operational control.
2.3. Waiver Requests to AMC Operational Directives. The available senior AMC commander may exercise
waiver authority under extraordinary conditions when life or property is in jeopardy and vital operational
necessity precludes prior approval. Submit a report through command channels to HQ AMC explaining the
reasons for such action. (See paragraph 3-8 for crew duty/rest waivers.)
2.3.1. Prior to passing waiver requests to the TACC, COMMOBFOR staff should ensure the waiver action
requested represents the COMMOBFOR position.
2.3.2. Ensure complete information within the scope of the situation is passed through command and control
center channels with a recommendation from the highest center in the chain of command.
2.3.3.. Commanders of AE squadrons have crew duty time waiver authority for aeromedical evacuation
crewmembers (AECMs) with the concurrence of the medical crew director (MCD) for missions not covered by a
specific AMCR 55-series; e.g., 55-9, 55-130, or 55-141. A written report describing the waiver will be submitted
to AMC/SGX by the squadron stan/eval office. All other waivers will be according to this regulation and reported
per paragraph 2.3.
2.3.4. For ARC UE units operating ARC missions, waiver authority is the HQ AFRES/DO or ANGRC/DO, as
appropriate.
2.4. Marginal Weather Conditions. AMC commanders at levels responsible for directing and monitoring air
mobility operations must ensure weather conditions are monitored and relayed to crews when weather conditions
are reported below weather minimums.
2.5. Rerouting/Diverting an Air Mobility Mission. Except in an emergency, or when required by en route or
terminal weather conditions or facilities, diversions or rerouting of air mobility missions must be authorized by the
CCC exercising operational control of the mission. The CCC directing the rerouting or diversion ensures the
capabilities of the affected aircraft are compatible with departure, en route, and destination requirements and
facilities. AFRES aircraft diversions must be coordinated with the AFRES Command Center (HQ
AFRES/DOOC)
2.6. Aircraft Capability to Use an Airfield The TACC Director/COMMOBFORs, will review the suitability of
airfields for use by AMC aircraft. EXCEPTION: The 89th Airlift Wing (AW) will evaluate suitability of
airfields for their planned operations. ANGRC/DO has the authority to review/evaluate suitability of airfields for
use by ANG aircrews/aircraft. HQ AMC will evaluate airfields to be transited during JCS exercises and JA/ATT
missions except those in support of aircraft under the operational control of the COMMOBFOR

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2.6.1. The mission directive confirms that the TACC/COMMOBFOR with area responsibility has reviewed the
airfield of intended operation for obstructions and other hazards in accordance with Air Force and AMC directives
(figure 2-1). The TACC/COMMOBFOR will advise crews of obstruction and other factors that could be
hazardous to airland operations (figure 2-2). A pilot who has observed operations into a specific certification
airfield will be in the left or right seat during operations at that airfield. Waiver authority for certification airfields
rests with the OG/CC.
2.6.2. AMC/COMMOBFORs will evaluate this data to update and validate airfields for the airfield certification
program. They will determine aircrew certification and briefing requirements. Submit requests for additional
tape/slide briefing modules to HQ AMC/DOT.
2.7. Engines Running Off/Onload (ERO) Procedures. The TACC Director, COMMOBFORs, (HQ AFRES/DO
for AFRES aircraft on AFRES missions and ANGRC/DO for ANG aircraft on ANG missions) may authorize
EROs to expedite the flow of aircraft through airfields and to reduce ground exposure of aircraft. Conditions must
warrant departure from normal operating procedures. See applicable AMCR 55-XXX for aircraft commander
options and aircraft procedures.
Section BCommand and Control
2.8. General. CINCAMC retains command of AMC forces at all times, except non-mobilized AFRES (UE) and
ANG forces. Operational control may be delegated to subordinate or theater commanders. Command and control
of AMC-assigned tanker/airlift forces is exercised through command and control centers. They are the executive
agents for the commanders exercising operational control over air mobility forces. The operational control
relationship between the CCC and the type of mission is described below and depicted in figure 2-3.
2.9. Operational Control of AMC Tanker/Airlift Forces:
2.9.1. The TACC/DTACCs are responsible for all missions except non-mobilized AFRES UE and ANG missions
and those in the local flying area. Changes to approved schedules or urgent mission requirements will be
accomplished by/concurred with The TACC/DTACCs.
2.9.1.1 AMC Gained Forces (ARC). The ARC maintains command and operational control of AMC gained
airlift/tanker any place in the world when engaged in global air mobility operations. Operational control is
exercised by CINCAMC through AMC command and control centers only when an ARC UE aircraft is operating
on an AMC mission number.
2.9.2. Theater Tanker/Airlift Operations:
2.9.2.1. Theater-Assigned/Attached Forces. Theater-assigned air mobility forces are assigned or attached by JCS
for employment within a unified commander's theater of operations. OPCON of theater-assigned air mobility
forces is exercised by the unified commander through the AFCC who exercises operational control through the
COMMOBFOR
2.9.2.2. AMC-Assigned Forces. AMC maintains command and operational control of AMC-assigned
airlift/tanker forces any place in the world when engaged in global air mobility operations. Operational control is
exercised by CINCAMC through AMC command and control centers. The DTACC functions as an extension of
the TACC for management of AMC-assigned air mobility resources operating in overseas theaters and directs
overall air mobility operations to include instructions to extend, reroute, or terminate air mobility missions as
approved by the TACC.
2.9.2.3. Tactical Operations. Upon advice of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and with approval of the Secretary of
Defense, operational control of AMC-assigned tanker/airlift forces may transfer to the commander of a unified
command or joint task force for the conduct of operations within a specific area of responsibility.

11

AMCR 55-1 20 August 1992

RUNWAY.

C-5, KC-10, C-17 t


C-130
t
C-141. KC-135 '

C-5, KC-10 150"


C-130
105"
C-141, KC-135. C-17 116'

Airfield considered safe if no obstructions penetrate shaded areas.


Clearance assured if aircraft is within 36 ft of runway centerline and
a bank angle of 3 degrees (C-6, C-141) or 6 degrees (C-130) is not
exceeded.
Figure 2-1. Runway Obstruction Criteria.

C-5, KC-10, C-17 6C-130


6'
C-141. KC-135 4'

RUNWAY
EDGE

C-5, KC-10 93'


C-130
59C-141,KC-135, C-1769-

Aircraft commanders must be advised of obstructions that penetrate


shaded area.
Figure 2-2. Runway Obstruction Criteria.

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2.9.2.4. Emergency Authority. Under provisions of JCS Pub 2, the commander of a unified command is
authorized to assume temporary operational control of all available forces within the commander's area of
responsibility during a major emergency.
EXCEPTION: Forces scheduled for or actually engaged in the execution of specific operational missions under
war plans approved by the JCS.
2.9.3. For unit scheduled pilot proficiencies, navigation trainers, etc., operational control is vested in the wing,
group, or unit commander.
2.9.4. Operational control during exercises, contingencies, or war may transfer to other commanders as specified
in the CINCAMC OPLAN/OPORD.
2.9.5. Operational Support Airlift (OSA):
2.9.5.1. The TACC is responsible for central management of all active duty CONUS-based OSA airlift missions.
ANGRC/DO is responsible for central management of all ANG OSA airlift missions The TACC accepts
requirements from all users, integrates the travel requests into missions, tasks the operating units, and manages
each mission until it is completed.
2.9.6. Aeromedical Airlift:
2.9.6.1. 375 AW Command and Control Center, in conjunction with the AECC, is responsible for central
management of all CONUS-based C-9 As.
2.9.6.2. Europe. The AECC at Rhein-Main AB, in conjunction with the USAFE surgeon general, establishes
mission requirements for aeromedical missions.
2.9.6.3. Pacific. The AECC at Yokota AB, JA, in conjunction with the PACAF surgeon, establishes mission
requirements for aeromedical missions.
2.9.7. 89 AW Airlift Forces:
2.9.7.1. CINCAMC has operational control of 89 AW airlift forces. Special Air Missions Officer (HQ
USAF/CVAM) directs special air missions (SAM). Aircraft and crews of the 89 AW are outside the normal
control authority of the AMC command and control system. Operational control authority is delegated by
CINCAMC to 89 AW Commander, who exercises operational control of 89 AW forces.
2.9.7.2. The Office of the Vice Chief of Staff, HQ USAF, through the Special Air Mission Officer
(HQ USAF/CVAM). tasks 89 AW SAMs
2.9.7.3. The 89 AW Current Operations Branch (DOO) acts as the single point of contact for mission assignments
from HQ USAF/CVAM.
2.9.7.4. The 89 AW/DOO, in coordination with Andrews Command and Control Center, acts as the executive
agent for the 89 AW Commander on command and control matters. It also acts as liaison between SAM aircraft
commanders and HQ USAF/CVAM.
2.9.8. ARC Air Mobility Forces:
2.9.8.1. Command of ARC air mobility forces remains with AFRES/ANG. OPCON is deternimed by whether an
aircraft is operating an AMC or non-AMC ARC mission segment.

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13

2.9.8.2. An ARC mission number indicates that the controlling ARC agency retains operational control (OPCON)
even though the aircraft is being monitored in the AMC command and control system.
2.9.8.3. An AMC mission number indicates that OPCON has been transferred to AMC. AMC control commences
when the aircraft arrives at the station where the AMC mission originates and ceases upon arrival and offload at
the station where the AMC mission terminates. AFRES aircraft diversions must be coordinated with the AFRES
Command Center (HQ AFRES/DOOC).
2.9.8.4. Prior to mobilization, ANGRC/DO may resume at his discretion OPCON of an ANG aircraft.
2.10. AMC Mission Commander. An AMC mission commander is designated when tanker/airlift aircraft are
participating in deployment, redeployment, or employment operations during exercises, contingencies, and other
operations specified in the implementing directive. The AMC mission commander takes action to assure safe and
successful accomplishment of the mission. For unilateral wing/group training missions, the AMC mission
commander is appointed by and responsible to the wing/group commander. For all other missions, the AMC
mission commander is appointed and his/her responsibilities are designated in the implementing directive.
TYPE OF MISSION CCC EXERCISING OPCON
A M C - A s s i g n e d A i r l i f t / Ta n k e r s T A C C
Theater-Assigned/Attached Airlift/Tankers Theater DTACC
Air Evac:
Domestic
Scott
CP
Intertheater
TA C C
O p e r a t i o n a l S u p p o r t A i r l i f t : TA C C
Special Air Mission (SAM) Andrews CP
E x e r c i s e / C o n t i n g e n c y A s s p e c i fi e d i n O P O R D / F R A G O R D
AMC-Gained Airlift/Tankers
ARC Mission Number AFRES Command Center/ANG Operations Center
A M C M i s s i o n N u m b e r TA C C
Figure 2-3. Operational Control Relationships.
2.11. Aircraft Commander Responsibility and Authority. An aircraft commander (AC) is designated on all
flights on the AMC Form 41, Flight Authorization, in accordance with AFR 60-1/AMCSUP 1. Aircraft
commanders are:
2.11.1. In command of all persons aboard the aircraft.
2.11.2. Responsible for the welfare of the crew and the safe accomplishment of the mission. This begins upon
notification of the mission and terminates upon mission completion.
2.11.3. Vested with the authority necessary to manage their cr"-> and accomplish the mission.
2.11.4. The final mission authority and will make decisions not specifically assigned to higher authority.
2.11.5. The final authority for accepting any waiver affecting their crew or mission.
2.11.6. Charged to keep the applicable commander informed concerning mission progress and/or difficulties.
2.12. Mission Clearance Decision. The decision to delay a mission may be made either by the controlling
agency or the aircraft commander when, in the opinion of either, conditions are not safe to start/continue a
mission. Final responsibility for the safe conduct of the mission rests with the aircraft commander. If the aircraft

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commander refuses a mission, it will not depart until the conditions have been corrected or improved so that the
mission can operate safely. Another aircraft commander and aircrew will not be alerted to take the same mission
under the same conditions.

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15

Chapter 3
CREW COMPLEMENT AND MANAGEMENT
Section A-Aircrew Complements
3.1. General. Personnel assigned as a primary aircrew member on a flight, or who occupy a primary crew
position during flight, must be properly qualified, certified, and current in that crew position and aircraft in which
performing duties. Qualification and currency will be as specified in AFR 60-1 and applicable 51-series
regulations. Exceptions to this policy are outlined in AFR 60-1/AMCSUP 1. ANG aircrews will comply with
NGR(AF) 60-01.
3.2. Crew Complement. The crew complement for basic and augmented crews will be as outlined in the
appropriate volume of AMCR 55-XXX.
Section B-Crew Scheduling
3.3. Scheduling. Commanders will comply with AFR 60-1, AMCR 60-1, and the appropriate AMCR 55-XXX.
In addition, ANG comply with NGR (AF) 60-01.
3.4. Not Used
Section C-Crew Management
3.5. General. The aircraft commander is ultimately responsible for the management of his crew from mission
notification until termination at home station.
3.6. Alerting Procedures:
3.6.1. Crew alerts are normally 3+15 (4+15, C-5, KC-10 and KC-135) prior to scheduled takeoff time to allow
one hour for reporting and 2+15 (3+15, C-5) for mission preparation. (Exception: C-9 alerts may be 3+00 for
2+00 mission preparation.) Additional mission preparation time for airdrop missions is authorized if required.
Early alerting to provide additional reporting and/or mission preparation time is authorized only when absolutely
essential for mission accomplishment. Waiver authority is AMC/DO (HQ AFRES/DO for AFRES aircraft on
AFRES missions and ANGRC/DO for ANG aircraft on ANG missions). ANGRC/DO grants ANG aircraft
commanders the authority to self alert on ANG missions.
3.6.2. Crews are not alerted until aircraft is in commission or there is reasonable assurance that the estimated time
in commission will meet the proposed takeoff time.
3.6.3.. If no CCC or other control agency is available, crews will self-alert. Self-alert procedures may also be
used for tactical formation and/or local training missions. For all other missions, crews are alerted by the
responsible command and control center unless home station local procedures require self-alert.
3.6.4.. Crew Alerting on Inbound Aircraft. On missions where a crew change is planned and the authorized
ground time is four hours and 15 minutes or less, aircrews may be alerted on an inbound maintenance status A-l,
A-2, or A-3. Outbound crews are not alerted on A-2 or A-3 status until required parts are known to be available
and maintenance feels reasonably certain the aircraft can be in-commission within the planned ground time.
3.7. Crew Duty Time (CDT). Maximum crew duty times are specified in the appropriate AMCR 55-XXX.
(ARC air mobility crews will comply with AFR 60-1, in addition ANG crews comply with NGR (AF) 60-01.)
Crew duty time will not be changed after show time. The mission directive, not crew compliment, will determine
crew duty time.

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3.7.1. Crew duty time begins one hour after alert. Exceptions:
3.7.1.1. Self-alerts based on scheduled show time or for crew convenience, CDT begins at scheduled/established
show time.
3.7.1.2. Crewmembers performing other duties prior to flight-related duties, CDT begins when reporting for other
duties.
3.7.1.3. ALFA standby, CDT begins when the unit is told to launch.
3.7.1.4. BRAVO standby, CDT begins when the crew shows for duty (OSA aircraft when told to launch).
3.7.1.5. CHARLIE ALERT, CDT, if alerted, begins when die crew shows for launch.
3.7.2.. Crew duty time ends when the aircraft blocks in at the end of the mission. Exceptions:
3.7.2.1. Crew duty time does not end if any crewmember must remain at the aircraft to refuel, on/offload,
perform maintenance, etc. Normally, these duties should not be performed after maximum crew duty time has
expired.
3.7.2.2. Communication system operators may exceed crew duty time if the final portion of a mission or series of
mission segments can be conducted without their services, and if they do not exceed authorized crew duty time up
to this point. They will be credited with flying time, but not assigned crew duties.
3.7.2.3. Flight examiners, when administering evaluations and not occupying a primary crew position, may not
exceed the crew duty time established for an augmented crew in that design aircraft.
3.7.2.4. Time spent traveling as a passenger immediately before acting as an aircrew member counts as crew duty
time.
3.7.2.5. Deadhead crewmembers will not exceed the crew duty times established for an augmented crew in their
design aircraft. Crewmembers may deadhead following duties as a primary crewmember provided their combined
crew duty day does not exceed the time established for an augmented crew in their design aircraft. (Exception:
C-130 crewmembers will not exceed a 24-hour crew day.)
3.7.3 Multiple qualified AECMs may perform duties on more than one aircraft during any single crew duty
period. The crew duty times established in AMCR 55-XXX for an augmented crew must not be exceeded.
3.7.3.1. Multiple qualified AECMs must be augmented per AMCR 164-1 from initial reporting. The
circumstances associated with the multiple aircraft mission itinerary must allow for the establishment of an
adequate inflight work/rest plan whereby no single AECM will exceed 16 hours of continuous duty without rest.
3.8. Waivers to Crew Duty Time/Rest. Policy below applies for active and reserve associate aircrews. The HQ
AFRES/DO is the approving authority for AFRES missions. ANGRC/DO is the approving authority for ANG
missions ANG units will comply with NGR (AF) 60-01.
3.8.1.. For crews that have begun crew duty time, waiver authority for flight duty period is the TACC,
COMMOBFOR and 89 AW/CC. Exception: The aircraft commander is approval authority for crew duty day
extensions up to 2 hours.
3.8.1.1. Aircraft commander concurrence is required prior to initiating waiver requests. Send requests through
appropriate CCC channels The commander or designated OPR (normally aircrew stan/eval) evaluates each

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request on an individual basis with special emphasis on increased risk, available alternatives, mission priorities,
weather, etc. Aircrew stan/eval should coordinate on each request if not designated as OPR
3.8.1.2. Waivers are granted only for the next mission leg.
3.8.2. For missions in progress, send waiver requests for other provisions in this section and maximum flying time
(125/330) through DOV channels for approval. Waiver authority is the AMC/DO (HQ AFRES/DO for AFRES
missions and ANGRC/DO for ANG missions).
3.8.3. When waivers to this section are anticipated prior to mission operation, send requests through DOV
channels for approval. Waiver authority is AMC/DO (HQ AFRES/DO for AFRES missions and ANGRC/DO for
ANG missions).
3.9. Stage Management.
3.9.1. Stage Posture. Stages operate on a directional basis. Alert sequence is as follows:
3.9.1.1. Crews requiring an emergency return to home station.
3.9.1.2. Crews with scheduled return time (SRT).
3.9.1.3. Crews in stage over 48 hours.
3.9.1.4. Crews in sequence of arrival time.
NOTE: If a stage crew is forced to return to crew rest because of a mission delay or abort, that crew becomes first
out when legal for alert.
3.9.2. Mechanical Stage. Mechanical stages may be established by the CCC where no crews are staged. The
stage is created when a mission is delayed or aborted, and the crew goes into crew rest. Mechanically staged
crews become first out in the same direction when legal for alert. An inbound crew may be bumped from the
mission even though they have sufficient duty time remaining to complete that mission. ARC UE strategic air
mobility units will not stage.
3.10. Crew Release Policy. Crews should be granted as much free time as operationally feasible. Upon the
aircrew's initial arrival or reentry into crew rest, the CCC will establish an expected alert time based on a thorough
analysis of current schedules, itineraries, aircraft maintenance, movement and advisory messages, and crew rest
requirements. The crew may not be alerted or otherwise disturbed before this time except for emergencies. After
the expected alert time has been set, the CCC, with the concurrence of the aircraft commander, will establish the
latest allowable alert time not later than 6 hours after the expected alert time for all type missions except actual
contingencies. If circumstances warrant, aircraft commanders, at their discretion, may extend the window 8 hours
as a primary crew or 12 hours as a deadhead crew. CCC will not request the aircrew accept more than a 6-hour
window. This alert window applies to exercises, staging, and home station predeparture crew rest, including
rotational TDY stations.
3.10.1. If the CCC determines that a crew will not be alerted in the allowable alert time span, then at the time of
determination, but no earlier than the crew's expected alert time, the CCC will:
3.10.1.1. Reenter the crew into crew rest of not less than 12 hours and establish a new expected alert time.
3.10.1.2. Notify the aircraft commander and establish a new latest allowable alert time.

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3.10.2. If the latest-allowable alert time expires, at that time:


3.10.2.1. The crew reenters crew rest of no less than 12 hours.
3.10.2.2. The aircraft commander will contact CCC to determine the next expected alert time and to establish a
new latest-allowable alert time.
3.11. Home Station Predeparture Crew Rest (Includes Rotational TDY Stations and Rescue). Give
crewmembers, including those in administrative positions, predeparture crew rest (not applicable to ANG).
3.11.1. Provide crewmembers (deadhead or primary) on missions with scheduled time exceeding a basic crew
duty day a crew rest period beginning 24 hours before reporting for a mission. During the first 12 hours of this
period, a crewmember may accomplish limited nonflying duties, including mission planning. Waiver authority is
OG/CC for the first 12 hours. The second 12-hour period is inviolate; no duties may be performed. Infringement
of the inviolate crew rest period will necessitate the start of another 12-hour inviolate crew rest period. AFRES
units will comply with AFR 60-1 and ANG units will comply with ANGR 60-1.
EXCEPTION: 89 AW, aeromedical and operational support airlift crewmembers, will be provided a crew rest
period beginning 12 hours before reporting for a mission. This 12-hour period is inviolate; no duties may be
performed. Infringement of the inviolate crew rest period will effect the start of another 12-hour inviolate crew
rest period. When mission requirements permit, give crewmembers departing on missions exceeding a basic crew
duty day 24 hours crew rest prior to reporting for a mission.
3.11.2. Provide crewmembers on missions with scheduled duration less than a basic crew duty day, including
training missions, a crew rest period beginning 12 hours before reporting for a mission. If crewmembers perform
other duties during this period, crew duty time begins at the time they report for other duties and have had 12
hours inviolate crew rest prior to reporting for those duties.
3.11.3. When a mission departure time is established, notify crewmembers of a specific time to start predeparture
crew rest. Notification must be prior to actual start of crew rest and provided in sufficient time to allow the
crewmembers to restructure their schedule of work and rest so as to report for the mission in an optimum physical
state.
3.11.4. After a crewmember has started the 12-hour period of predeparture crew rest immediately preceding the
reporting time, establish an allowable alert time. This time starts at the anticipated mission reporting time and
lasts for six hours, after which, if the crew is not alerted, give them an additional 12 hours inviolate crew rest.
3.12. En Route Crew Rest. (ARC air mobility units adhere to AFR 60-1 or NGR (AF) 60-01 requirements, as
applicable.) Waiver authority for this paragraph rests with TACC. Minimum ground time.between arrival and
departure is 15+15, 16+15 for C-5, KC-10 and KC-135, 17+15 for nuclear airlift missions, and starts when the
aircraft blocks in. Whenever it is necessary for a primary aircrew member (except as provided in paragraph
3.12.3.3. below), to remain with an aircraft after arrival to perform maintenance, refueling, etc., the allotted
ground time for the entire aircrew begins at the termination of that crewmember's duty.
3.12.1. The TACC Director or DTACC should establish ground time in excess of normal at designated en route
stations to provide aircrews, flying several consecutive days away from home station, Uie opportunity to overcome
the cumulative effects of fatigue.
3.12.2. The aircraft commander is authorized to modify normal ground time when:
3.12.2.1. It is in the interest of safety
3.12.2.2. The mission is behind schedule. The AC may then request less than normal ground time prior to

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beginning crew rest. The crew will not report for a flight until at least 12 hours have elapsed since termination of
the previous crew duty period. The CCC will not request the AC to accept less than normal ground time.
3.12.2.3. The aircrew has completed three consecutive maximum crew duty days. The aircraft commander may
declare a total of up to 36 hours ground time. At stage locations, this aircrew's position in the stage is determined
by projected alert time and not on a first-in, first-out basis.
3.12.3. Loadmaster/Boom Operator Crew Rest Provisions:
3.12.3.1. When troops, passengers, or patients are carried (except C-5 and on nuclear airlift missions), the normal
crew rest provisions of this paragraph apply.
3.12.3.2. For C-5 aircraft, the crew rest provisions for the loadmaster designated as troop compartment/passenger
loadmaster are the same as the rest of the crew. The allotted ground time for the entire crew begins at the
termination of passenger loadmaster's duty when required to remain at the aircraft after arrival. This crew rest
provision is applicable any time passengers are carried into an en route station or are to be carried outbound.
3.12.3.3. On C-5 cargo missions, all other loadmasters are excluded from the normal crew rest provisions
provided they receive sufficient rest en route to ensure continued efficiency. Aircraft commanders will ensure
that the loadmaster have the opportunity to sleep eight hours out of each 24 hours. For C-130/C-141/C-17
loadmasters and KC-10/KC-135 boom operators, the crew rest provisions are the same as for the rest of the crew.
3.12.4. Crew Chief Crew Rest Provisions. The crew chief is responsible to the aircraft commander. The AC, in
conjunction with the en route station chief of maintenance, will determine how long the crew chief can safely
perform aircraft recovery actions. The crew chief must have the opportunity to sleep eight hours of each 24-hour
period.
3.12.5. Deadhead Crewmembers. Normally, deadhead crewmembers are given en route crew rest upon arriving
at their destination and prior to being used as a primary crewmember. However, they may be used as a primary
crewmember prior to entering crew rest provided they do not exceed a basic crew day which began when they
reported for the original departure. En route crew rest is the same as primary crewmembers. Aircrews in
deadhead status may, at their option, request a 12-hour alert window.
3.13. Aircraft Not Capable of Departure. (Not applicable to ARC air mobility units.)
3.13.1. Operational Missions. If an aircraft is not in commission or otherwise capable of departure within six
hours after the aircrew reports to a designated place of duty (for example, CCC, TALCE, base operations, etc.),
return the aircrew to crew rest. Exceptions may be granted only with the concurrence of the aircraft commander.
3.13.2. Training Missions. If an aircraft is not in commission or otherwise capable of departure within four hours
after scheduled departure time, training missions will be canceled (not applicable to ANG). Exceptions may be
granted only with the concurrence of the aircraft commander.
3.14. Home Station Postmission Crew Rest (Not applicable to ARC.) Postmission crew rest begins
immediately upon return to home station and is inviolate during normal day-to-day operations. Waiver authority
for postmission crew rest will not be delegated below the OG/CC. Crewmembers will not be required to obtain
immunizations, engage in ground training, perform squadron duties, stand by the telephone, or any other similar
activity. Postmission crew rest must be totally completed before starting predeparture crew rest for a subsequent
mission.
3.14.1. TDY in Excess of One Basic Crew Duty Day. Give one hour of crew rest time for each three hours of
time absent in TDY status. Postmission crew rest time will not exceed 72 hours, except when authorized by the
unit commander.

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3.14.2. TDY of Less Than One Basic Crew Duty Day. Provide sufficient crew rest time to resolve personal
affairs.
3.15. Standby Duty: (Not applicable to ARC.)
3.15.1. Prestandby Crew Rest. Provide ALFA, BRAVO, and CHARLIE aircrew members a 12-hour inviolate
crew rest period preceding the start of standby duty. If an anticipated mission will be away from home station in
excess of 24 hours, 24 hours prestandby crew rest prior to ALFA or BRAVO alert will be given.
3.15.2. Poststandby Mission. Upon completion of standby duty, aircrew members may be dispatched on a
mission.
3.15.2.1. Standby duty and predeparture crew rest may be concurrent if notification is provided at least 12 hours
before departure.
3.15.2.2. If started, poststandby crew rest must be completed before start of predeparture crew rest.
3.15.2.3. If an aircrew member is dispatched on a mission in lieu of poststandby crew rest, compute the
postmission crew rest time on standby time, plus mission time.
3.15.3.Poststandby Crew Rest. Aircrew members not dispatched on a mission following standby duty will receive
poststandby crew rest as follows:
3.15.3.1. If standby duty was performed away from normal quarters, crew rest time is computed from standby
time on the same basis as for mission time.
3.15.3.2. If standby duty was performed in normal quarters, no crew rest time is authorized.
3.15.4. Waiver authority for maximum standby crew duty time rests with AMC/DO.
3.16. AMC/DO Waiver Authority AMC/DO waiver authority specified in this section may be further
delegated to the TACC Director or COMMOBFOR for forces operationally assigned to them.
Section DAMC Special Categories of Travel. Special category travel authorizations will be strictly controlled.
Such authorizations will be documented by written orders or message/letter request/reply and subject to audit at
any time.
3.17. Additional Crewmembers:
3.17.1. Policy Governing ACM Authorization. An ACM is one assigned to, or authorized to accompany, the
normal aircrew complement. The commander who authorizes ACM status must ensure the individual is eligible
and familiar with the policies and procedures governing ACM travel.
3.17.1.1. Personnel Eligible for ACM. The individual must:
3.17.1.1.1. Possess valid aeronautical orders in accordance with AFR 60-13.
3.17.1.1.2. Have a current flight physical.
3.17.1.1.3. Have current physiological training.
3.17.1.1.4. Be currently on flying status.

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3.17.1.2. ACM status will not be authorized for:


3.17.1.2.1. Transportation in lieu of travel as a passenger or to provide transportation at a higher priority than
would be enjoyed as passenger.
3.17.1.2.2. For the avoidance of personal travel expenses.
3.17.1.2.3. Maintenance of currency. (EXCEPTION: Flight examiners and individuals whose orders have
currency provisions may accomplish currency items while traveling ACM.)
3.17.1.2.4. Aircrew members not yet qualified or who are training for upgrade to the next higher crew position.
3.17.1.2.5. Transportation while on leave.
3.17.2. Approval Authority:
3.17.2.1 AMC flying unit commanders may approve ACM status for eligible individuals on specific flights
operated by their unit or under their operational control. ARC flying unit commanders will approve ACM status
for eligible individuals on specific flights operated by ARC UE units.
3.17.2.2. AMC wiiig/CCs, as a AMC/ATC buddy wing host, may approve ACM status for Air Training
Command pilots on AMC training missions conducted for the purposes stated in Air Training Command
Regulation 51-7.
3.17.2.3. Medical Personnel:
3.17.2.3.1. USAF Medical Service Corps officers, including ARC personnel, assigned to aeromedical evacuation
units or HQ AMC/SG office, who are on aeronautical orders and required to participate in frequent and regular
aerial flights in an operational support status (as aeromedical evacuation operations officers (AEOOs)), may be
granted ACM status on air mobility missions by local flying unit commanders or AMC/SGXO, as appropriate, for
the purpose of positioning/depositioning for aeromedical evacuation missions. Logging flying time on
positioning/depositioning aircraft or aircraft for which AEOO has not completed appropriate training is not
authorized. AEOOs on aeromedical evacuation missions will log flying time per AFR 60-1/AMCSUP 1.
3.17.2.3.2. When a physician and/or specialized medical personnel are required on AMC aeromedical evacuation
missions, they are assigned as medical attendants and ACM status is not required.
3.17.2.3.3. Medical personnel:
3.17.2.3.3.1. Flight surgeons and residents of aerospace medicine students may be granted ACM status on any
AMC aircraft which is collocated at their duty station by local flying unit commanders. Flying time and sorties
will be logged as appropriate. At en route stations that AMC aircraft transit, flight surgeons may request ACM
status to familiarize themselves with the AMC mission. The senior AMC representative at the en route station
will review these requests and forward them to HQ AMC/SGPA and HQ AMC/DOV for approval on a case-bycase basis. (ACM status is not appropriate for travel to and from conferences.)
3.17.2.3.3.2. Medical personnel possessing current aeronautical orders, but not included above, will apply through
channels to HQ AMC/SGPA for ACM approval. HQ AMC/SGPA is approving authority for aeromedical
missions. Request to travel on missions other than aeromedical evacuation are reviewed by HQ AMC/SGPA and
forwarded to HQ AMC/DOV for approval. (ACM status is not appropriate for travel to and from conferences.)
3.17.2.3.3.3. Medical personnel granted ACM status on aeromedical evacuation missions are considered part of
the medical crew and are seated in the cabin of the aircraft. ACM status does not necessarily authorize logging of

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flying time. This will be accomplished per paragraph (3.17.2.3.4.), below.


3.17.2.3.4. Logging of Flight Time. Medical personnel, to include flight surgeons, may log time on AMC aircraft
only when the following provisions are met:
3.17.2.3.4.1. AMCR 51-1 Volume XX series (specific) aircraft training has been accomplished. (Flight surgeons
flying in other than their primary aircraft must receive egress training. This training may be provided by any
qualified crewmember and will include, as a minimum, hands-on familiarization with all emergency exits and the
location/operation of handheld fire extinguishers and crash axes.)
3.17.2.3.4.2. Possess valid aeronautical orders per AFR 60-1.
3.17.2.3.4.3. Have a current flight physical.
3.17.2.3.4.4. Have current physiological training.
3.17.3. Blanket ACM. The following individuals are authorized blanket ACM authority and do not require
approval for specific missions:
3.17.3.1. HQ AMC flight examiners on all AMC aircraft.
3.17.3.2. Any AMC aircrew flight examiner for the limited purpose of administering flight evaluations. This
includes positioning prior to or expeditious return to home station. It also includes ARC flight examiners on
aircraft for which AMC is the gaining command. This authorization excludes travel on 89 AW and nuclear airlift
missions.
3.17.3.3. AMC crewmembers when positioning for or depositioning from AMC missions, aeromedical evacuation
crewmembers when positioning for or depositioning from aeromedical evacuation missions, and AMC
crewmembers when traveling to and from locations to accomplish training requirements. ACM status is
authorized on all AMC aircraft except aircraft of the 89 AW and nuclear airlift unless otherwise approved.
3.17.3.4. Supervisors of aircrews on missions operated by their aircrews:
3.17.3.4.1. Commanders, vice commanders, DOs, and assistant DOs.
3.17.3.4.2. COMMOBFOR and area DTACC directors on theater aircraft under their OPCON.
3.17.3.4.3. Squadron section chiefs.
3.17.3.5. HQ AMC personnel as approved by HQ AMC/DOV.
3.17.3.6. Designated HQ AMC/QS team personnel on inspected unit aircraft only.
3.17.3.7. Designated Safety Investigation Board members when traveling to and from aircraft mishap
investigations. (Mission Essential Ground Personnel (MEGP) may be appropriate if the individual does not meet
the provisions of paragraph 3.17.1.1.)
3.17.3.8. AIRCCS aerial photographer crewmembers. When applicable, time and planning permitting, include
these people in OPLANs, etc..
3.17.3.9. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) evaluators when accompanying AMC aircrew members to
administer FAA flight evaluations. The FAA evaluator will not occupy either pilot seat nor manipulate any flight
controls. These evaluations must be scheduled in conjunction with required AF flight evaluations or 51-series
proficiency sorties and incur no expense to the US Government. The FAA evaluator must be listed on the AMC

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Form 41, Flight Authorization.


3.17.4. Procedures:
3.17.4.1. Forward requests for ACM status to the approving agency 10 days prior to the expected date of
departure. Include name, rank, aircrew qualification, organization, reason for travel, proposed itinerary, and
dates, and a statement of compliance with the Foreign Clearance Guide procedures (see United States Air Force
Foreign Clearance Guide) applicable to area of travel. Individuals require a security clearance appropriate to the
mission being performed. AFRES units will provide information copies to appropriate NAF/DO and HQ
AFRES/DOT
3.17.4.2. Coordination of ACM Travel. Individuals will coordinate their travel with the appropriate command
and control agency prior to travel. Medical ACMs anticipating travel on aeromedical evacuation C-9 aircraft
require prior approval from the AECC for domestic flights and the appropriate aeromedical evacuation squadron
for flights in the overseas areas. When flying ACM on aircraft other than the OSA, C-9, C-5, C-17 and C-141,
each individual will have an oxygen mask available that is compatible with the oxygen system of the aircraft.
3.17.4.3. ACM En Route Procedures. ACMs, including qualified AMC crewmembers who depart a crew to
remain TDY in a foreign country with different clearance requirements for general entry and aircrew entry, must
comply with both requirements.
3.17.4.3.1. Personnel on ACM status who intend to remain on station will furnish the CCC with:
3.17.4.3.1.1. Travel authorization indicating ACM status.
3.17.4.3.1.2. Location while on station.
3.17.4.3.1.3. Departure plans.
3.17.4.3.2. Personnel on ACM status continuing travel will:
3.17.4.3.2.1. Advise CCC of intentions to continue travel.
3.17.4.3.2.2. Furnish the CCC with travel authorization indicating ACM status.
3.17.4.4. Briefings. The aircraft commander or representative briefs all ACMs. The extent of the briefing is
commensurate with the qualification of the ACM in that design aircraft. Personnel authorized ACM status on
nuclear cargo missions are briefed on procedures, either by the operating unit or the aircraft commander.
3.17.4.5. Orders. Authority to travel as ACM should be cited in the travel orders. If ACM authority is not cited
in the travel orders, a letter or message citing ACM authority may be attached to travel orders. See AFR 107/AMCSUP 1 for statement to use in orders.
3.17.4.6. Logging of Flying Time. ACMs are not entitled to log flying time unless performing a crew duty.
Positioning/depositioning aircrew members are not authorized to log flying time unless required and authorized to
augment a crew position and perform inflight duties. Flight nurse or medical technician examiners must be
performing basic, instructor, or evaluation duties to log time.
3.17.4.7. Procedures. The CCCs will coordinate with the air terminal operations centers as early as possible to
ensure that required space is available for ACMs. Cargo or mail will be displaced when necessary on cargo or
mixed missions to accommodate ACMs. ACMs will report to the appropriate command and control facility for
accountability.
3.17.5. Priority of ACM Travel. Aircrew flight examiners have priority over all other ACMs and will not be

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displaced by any other ACM. Priority of travel for flight examiners is: (a) HQ AMC; (b) AMC NAF; (c)
wing/group; (d) squadron/detachment. AMC NAF, wing/group, and squadron/detachment flight examiners have
priority on aircraft of their respective unit over examiners (equal or higher echelon) of another AMC NAF,
wing/group, or squadron/detachment. When the number of ACMs exceed the seating capacity of the crew
compartment, the CCC advises the Air Terminal Operations Center at the earliest possible time which, in turn,
will coordinate with the passenger reservation activity so seats not previously assigned to duty passengers or
emergency leaves can be used. ARC ACMs have priority on their unit aircraft. ACMs have priority over space
available passengers. The CCC verifies that ACM authorization has been issued by the proper approval authority,
attaches a copy of the ACM authorization to the flight clearance, and assigns ACM personnel to missions
according to the instructions contained in their travel orders.
3.18. Mobility Mission Observer (MMO) Program. MMO is a CINCAMC program designed to acquaint nonAMC general/flag officers and civilian equivalents, commanders/senior enlisted advisors of selected AMC
nonliving units, and other individuals invited by CINCAMC with the AMC mission. General/flag officers of
three- and four-star rank and civilian equivalents may be accompanied by one assigned aide, executive officer, or
military escort. MMOs accompany aircrews on AMC organic aircraft and may occupy a seat on the flight deck
during all phases of flight with the concurrence of the aircraft commander.
3.18.1. MMOs must be in official TDY status and meet air transportation eligibility requirements of DOD
4515.13R.
3.18.2. MMO approval does not fulfill requirements of the USAF Foreign Clearance Guide nor constitute theater
clearance.
3.18.3. Forward requests for MMO authority, including name, social security account number, duty title,
proposed itinerary, and point of contact to HQ AMC/DO for approval 10 days prior to expected date of departure.
MMOs may travel on all AMC aircraft except contract air mobility missions, 89 AW missions, and SAAM
conducted per AMCR 55-18. Cite MMO travel status in travel orders per AFR 10-7/AMCSUP 1, or use a copy of
the MMO approval for authentication. The requester is responsible for coordinating MMO travel with the TACC
at least two days prior to proposed travel date to ensure availability of mission to meet the traveler's needs.
3.18.4. Passenger service processes and manifests MMO travelers as space-required passengers. An AMC
Transportation Authorization is not required.
3.19. Mission Essential Ground Personnel. MEGP status is granted to individuals on a case-by-case basis who
perform unique support duties directly related and essential to a particular aircraft, aircrew, or numbered mission.
These duties require direct access to the aircraft and/or aircrew during ground or flight operations. MEGP travel
in passenger status, but report through the command and control center to the aircraft commander. If the number
of MEGPs exceeds four per aircraft, the appropriate AMC command and control agency (other than aircrew) will
ensure manifesting and antihijacking is accomplished for these persons prior to their reporting to the aircraft.
They are authorized flight deck seating with aircraft commander approval. Commanders will ensure that MEGP
status is not used for travel at a higher priority than or in lieu of regular passenger travel, for avoidance of travel
expenses, or for travel while on leave MEGPs will not be bumped en route without TACC, or COMMOBFOR
approval.
3.19.1. Approval Authority. MEGP travel status will be strictly controlled and approved by DOV only for those
with a bona fide mission essential purpose. The local command and control agency may also review and approve,
after normal duty hours and on weekends, "short notice" MEGP requests within the guidelines of this paragraph.
Approval will be annotated in the margin of official orders.
3.19.1.1. AMC/ARC, NAF, and flying wing/group/unit commanders may approve MEGP status for personnel on
unit aircraft or aircraft under their control. Examples of eligible personnel are, but not limited to, chaplains,
senior enlisted advisors, maintenance personnel, maintenance recovery teams, TALCE, security police, AIRCCS

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photographers, safety, public affairs, and unit intelligence personnel. TALCE cadre officers may use the
secondary aircraft radio with aircraft commander approval, but only during noncritical phases of flight.
3.19.1.2. Documentation maintenance and recording technicians of the 2 CTCS are authorized MEGP status only
when actively participating in an actual Airport Qualification Program mission. This authorization will not be
used for travel to or from points where an Airport Qualification Program mission originates/terminates.
3.19.1.3. HQ AMC/DOV approves MEGP status for all other personnel. (HQ AFRES/DO has approval authority
for AFRES unit-equipped unit personnel and the ANGRC/DO for ANG personnel.)
3.19.1.4. Nonmedical personnel assigned to medical/aeromedical evacuation units requiring MEGP on
aeromedical missions will forward requests to HQ AMC/SGXO for approval. Requests for travel on missions
other than aeromedical evacuation are reviewed by HQ AMC/SGXO and forwarded to HQ AMC/DOV for
approval.
3.19.2. Procedures. Forward requests for MEGP status to the approving agency ten days prior to the expected
date of departure. (EXCEPTION: AIRCCS, intelligence, or public affairs immediate MEGP requests in support
of DOD contingencies may be coordinated by telephone with HQ AMC/DOV.) Include name, rank, organization,
reason for travel, proposed itinerary, and dates. Provide information copy of request to appropriate HQ AMC staff
agency; i.e., HQ AMC/PA, HQ AMC/CMS, etc..
3.19.2.1. Orders. MEGP approval should be cited in travel orders. Following is an example statement: MEGP is
authorized by (appropriate wing/NAF/AMC/DOV) on (aircraft number and/or mission number/exercise or
contingency name) for (duration, i.e., 22-27 Jun 88). Approval (name of approving DOV individual and phone
number.) MEGP authority may also be cited in a letter or message using the statement above.
3.19.2.2. Coordination of MEGP Travel. Individuals will coordinate their travel with the appropriate current
operations function prior to travel. It is imperative that mission operators and air terminal operations centers are
aware of MEGP requirements when scheduling missions and crews. Individuals joining missions en route will
present their travel orders to the appropriate AMC command and control agency at least three hours prior to
intended travel.
3.19.2.3. Aircrew Procedures. With the concurrence of the aircraft commander and seats permitting, MEGP may
be seated on the flight deck/crew compartment during takeoff and landing. Simulated emergencies, to include noflap landings, are prohibited. Touch-and-go landings are allowed.
3.20. Incentive Flights. Unit commanders (wing, group, squadron, or detachment) may authorize limited
numbers of unit-assigned military members to accompany their unit aircraft on unit missions. The purpose of
these incentive flights will be to acquaint the individual with aircrew duties and the unique support activities
required for the unit's mission. The flights are not used for transportation in lieu of regular passenger travel, for
avoidance of travel expense, or for leave.
3.20.1. Individuals will report directly to the crew (escorted by a crewmember) for the mission duration. They
are passengers, but will be manifested by the sponsoring unit and antihijack inspected by the aircrew.
3.20.2. These individuals are authorized seating on the flight deck. They will not take precedence over ACM.
MMO, MEGP, mission route support, couriers, cargo escorts, other revenue generating passengers/cargo, or
emergency leave personnel.
3.20.3. No simulated emergencies or touch-and-go landings will be performed.
3.20.4. Travel is authorized only on the individual's unit aircraft. TDY orders will be processed by the
wing/group and include the following remarks: "Member will be escorted and manifested/inspected by a

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crewmember. Travel and flight deck access authorized on unit aircraft only."
3.20.5. If travel is to overseas areas, units will ensure that these individuals are properly border cleared and
possess all proper documentation for entry into any other country for which a stop is scheduled and for potential
diversion locations.
3.21. Orientation, Demonstration, Test, and Familiarization Flights: (Not apphcable to ANG)
3.21.1. Unit commanders (wing, group, squadron, or detachment) may approve all orientation flights on their
aircraft on a case-by-case basis to include news media, civic leaders, and Reserve Officer Training Corps students
on tactical flights. HQ AMC/DOTT is the approval authority for all unpressurized tactical flights above 10,000
feet mean sea level (MSL).
3.21.2. Rules and regulations concerning orientation flights are covered in DOD 4515.13R, AFR 60-18, AFR
190-1, and AMC Sup 1. The sponsoring organization will ensure passengers are properly manifested and
processed prior to the flight. ANG units will comply with NGR (AF) 60-01.
3.21.3. FAA designated check airmen on official business are authorized to fly on, and observe aircrew
procedures on, DOD-owned aircraft according to DOD 4515.13R Approving authority is HQ AMC/DOV. ACM
status is appropriate. ANG units will comply with NGR (AF) 60-01. These personnel are authorized access to the
crew compartment under direct supervision of the aircraft commander. They are not authorized access to the
flight controls. Simulated emergency procedures and touch-and-go landings are permitted.
3.21.4. FAA and military air traffic controllers/air traffic control analysis team members are authorized
orientation flights on local AMC training or operational missions. The local AMC wing/group commander is the
approving authority. MEGP status is appropriate. ANG units will comply with NGR (AF) 60-01. These
individuals are authorized access to the crew compartment under the direct supervision of the aircraft commander.
Simulated emergency procedures, to include no-flap approaches and landings, are prohibited. Touch-and-go
landings are permitted. This authorization will not be used for no cost (free) transportation for the benefit of the
individual or unit.
3.21.5. The commander, or designated representative, of United States Air Force Airlift Center, Special Missions
Operational Evaluation Center, 1275 TEF, and the RED FLAG AMCLO may approve ACM/MEGP status, as
appropriate, for test and exercise personnel needing to fly in conjunction with operational test and evaluation/test
exercise flights only. Such individuals may be on board for all maneuvers or flight profiles required for the
completion of the test or exercise mission.
3.21.6. The commander, or designated representative, of the Advanced Airlift Tactics Training Center (AATTC)
may approve ACM/MEGP status, as appropriate, for personnel participating in AATTC courses on training flights
conducted in conjunction with AATTC courses.

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Chapter 4
COMMAND OPERATING GUIDELINES
4.1. General. See appropriate AMCR 55-XXX series regulation for unit aircraft policy and guidelines.

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Chapter 5
OPERATING POLICY
5.1. This chapter outlines general AMC operating policy. Specific policies are outlined in appropriate AMCR 55XXX.
5.2. Adherence to Rules. AMC aircrews are directed to comply with AFR 60-16, appropriateflight information
publications (FLIP) documents, United States Air Force Foreign Clearance Guide (FCG), and AMCR 55- XX.
5.3. Control. A qualified pilot will be in control of AMC aircraft at all times during flight.
5.4. Flight Station Entry. Additional crewmembers are permitted in the flight station during takeoff, climb,
descent, and landing only if seats not required by primary crewmembers or flight examiners are available.
Passengers will not be seated on the flight deck of any aircraft for takeoffs, landings, or critical phases of flight,
except for MMOs, MEGPs, and individuals approved by the aircraft commander. Aircraft commanders (and
MCD on aeromedical evacuation missions) may authorize passengers to visit the crew compartment during
noncritical phases of flight. Passengers will not be permitted to occupy a primary crew position regardless of its
availability.
5.5. Takeoff and Landing Policy:
5.5.1. The pilot in command will:
5.5.1.1. After thoroughly evaluating all conditions, determine who accomplishes the takeoff and landing.
5.5.1.2. Occupy either the left or right seat during all takeoffs and landings.
5.5.2. A qualified aircraft commander will:
5.5.2.1. Accomplish all engine out approaches and landings.
5.5.2.2. Accomplish Category II ELS approaches.
5.5.3. Newly upgraded aircraft commanders will perform all takeoffs and landings as prescribed in appropriate
AMCR 55-XX
5.6. Copilot Landing Policy: Instructor/flight examiner pilots may allow copilots to takeoff and land from either
seat. First pilots on line training missions may make takeoffs and landings at airfields under AMC obstacle
waiver at the discretion of the instructor pilot.
5.7. Transportation of Pets. Transporting pets (dogs and cats) on aircraft operated by or under control of AMC
in conjunction with the sponsor's PCS is authorized. These pets are moved over selected channels. Other
pets/animals are normally prohibited but may be moved as approved by the service chief of staff in accordance
with DODR 4515.13.
5.8. Alcoholic Beverages AMC/DO (HQ AFRES/DO for AFRES aircraft on AFRES missions and ANGRC/DO
for ANG aircraft on ANG missions) may authorize the dispensing of alcoholic beverages. Individuals will meet or
review the requirements of AFR 215-7 and AFR 190-1 prior to serving alcoholic beverages on AMC aircraft.
5.9. Not Used.
5.10. Smoking Policy. Smoking is prohibited on all AMC aircraft at all times. (EXCEPTION: Troop

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commanders, after coordination with the aircraft commander, may authorize smoking on combat missions
consistent with flight safety and operational considerations. NOTE: A combat mission is any flying activity in
direct support of friendly forces engaged in armed conflict which occurs in a designated combat area.)
5.11. Electronic Devices:
5.11.1. The inflight use of non-transmitting electronic devices is approved with the following restrictions:
5.11.1.1. Limited to battery operated, pocket size tape recorders, non-printing electronic calculators, watches,
radio receivers and laptop computers only.
5.11.1.2. May only be operated during cruise.
5.11.2. Other electronic equipment that has been tested, certified interference free, and is accompanied by a letter
to this effect from ASD/ENACE or an appropriately annotated passenger boarding pass, may be used at cruise
altitude only.
5.11.3. Unit commanders (wing, group, squadron, or detachment) may waive the above provisions for news
media video and recording equipment on their unit aircraft during visual flight rules (VFR) conditions. Not
applicable to ANG. ANG units will comply with NGR (AF) 60-01.
5.11.4. In all cases, if aircraft instrumentation interference is noted, the equipment will be turned off and remain
off for the remainder of the flight
5.11.5. The use of portable cellular telephones aboard the aircraft is prohibited at all times.
5.11.6. The use of non-battery operated electric razors is permitted.

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Chapter 6
AIRCREW PROCEDURES
6.1. General. See appropriate AMCR 55-XY series regulation for unit aircraft procedures.

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Chapter 7
AIRCRAFT SECURITY
7.1. General. Guidance on aircraft security and unlawful seizure (hijacking) of AMC aircraft is contained in
applicable AMCR 55-XV and AMCR 55-37.
7.2. Aircrew Arming. For Air Operations Security purposes, HQ AMC, and air mobility wing/group
commanders may direct arming of crewmembers as appears necessary by mission threat analysis. In a
nonmobilized status, the HQ AFRES/DO will make the decision to arm AFRES crewmembers. ANGRC/DO
delegates the authority for arming ANG crewmembers to ANG wing/group commanders based on the threat
assessment and in accordance with the FCG.

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Chapter 8
OPERATIONAL REPORTS AND FORMS
8.1. General. Specific reports and forms applicable to aircrews and air mobility operations are contained in
AMCR 55-AX Reports requiring supervisory action are listed in this chapter. (Not applicable to the ANG)
8.2. Reporting Aircraft/Personnel Mishaps. Appropriate commanders will be notified of any mishap involving
AMC aircraft or crew. When notified, AMC units (safety officer, CCCs, TALCEs, AMC liaison officer, etc.)
initiate investigative and reporting action as specified in AFR 127-4, JCS Pub 6, volume II/V, and/or AMCR 5516, volume I.
8.3. Reports of Violations. Violations identified in AFR 60-16, paragraph 1-5 or 1-6, and alleged navigation
errors exceeding 24 NM and border and air traffic control violations will be reported in the following format:
8.3.1. Include the following items:
8.3.1.1. Factual circumstances.
8.3.1.2. Investigation and analysis.
8.3.1.3. Findings and conclusions.
8.3.1.4. Recommendations.
8.3.1.5. Actions taken.
8.3.1.6. Attachments:
8.3.1.6.1. Notification of incident.
8.3.1.6.2. Crew orders.
8.3.1.6.3. Statements of crewmembers (if applicable).
8.3.1.6.4. Documenting evidence (logs, charts, etc.).
8.3.2. Send the original investigation report to arrive within 45 days to HQ AMC/DOV. ARC missions receiving
alleged violations while under AMC operational control forward the original investigation through applicable
channels to arrive at NGB/SE or AFRES/IGI within 35 days. NGB/SE or AFRES/IGI will forward the original
investigation to arrive HQ AMC/DOV within 45 days.
8.4. Aircraft Commander's Report on Services/Facilities, AMC Form 54. This is an instrument for aircrews
to report that services rendered or conditions encountered were unsatisfactory or detrimental to efficient air
mobility operation; services rendered or procedures used are worthy of adoption for all AMC organizations; or a
performance rendered by a person (or persons) was commendable and deserves recognition.
8.4.1. Aircraft Commander's Responsibilities. Aircraft commanders will attempt to solve problems by contacting
the senior AMC commander, if conditions and situations warrant. If further action is deemed necessary or the
problem requires increased visibility, aircraft commanders complete a AMC Form 54.
8.4.1.1. Complete all blocks of the AMC Form 54, including time, date, place, and names/duty titles of the people
involved.

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8.4.1.2. Provide sufficient details on discrepancies to identify the problem. Recommend corrective action, if
appropriate. Be objective.
8.4.1.3. Leave an information copy with the AMC command and control center, senior AMC representative, or
for locations with no AMC representative, with the next en route AMC command and control center.
8.4.2. Processing Policy.
8.4.2.1 Command and control centers and senior AMC representatives will ensure the AMC Form 54 reaches the
senior AMC commander who exercises control over the air mobility related service within 24 hours. If required,
the information should be transmitted electronically or data-faxed. Command and control centers or senior AMC
representatives will send information copies to the aircraft commander's wing/group commander and NAF/DO.
8.4.2.2. The AMC commander responsible for corrective action will respond to the AMC Form 54 with a
message to the aircraft commander within 72 hours of receipt and will send copies of the reply to the aircraft
commander's wing/group commander and NAF DO. If the problem cannot be resolved within 72 hours, make an
interim reply followed by a final reply when the situation is resolved. The AMC commander who exercises
control over the air mobility related service will attempt to correct the problem within 30 days of the report.
AMC commanders will develop local procedures to make sure reports are answered within 72 hours and to keep
documentation on the Forms 54 they receive.
8.5. Aircraft Commander's Report on Crewmember, AMC Form 196 . The aircraft commander may prepare
a AMC Form 196 on each crewmember whose performance was outstanding, below average, or unsatisfactory
during a mission. Send the report to the commander of the unit to which the crewmember is assigned or attached
for flying. Form should fully explain outstanding, below average, and unsatisfactory performance.
OFFICIAL

HANSFORD

THOMAS A. DARBY, Colonel, USAF


Director of Information Management

T.

JOHNSON,
General,
Commander in Chief

USAF