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. r;ffi8*+**s'.,

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INCREDIBLE PROOF.OF AN ALIEN RACE ON THE MOON! tHE EVIDENCE:

. lmmense mechonicol rigs, some over o mile long . Stronge geometric ground morkings ond symbols . Consiructions severol times

higher thon onything built on Eorth . Lights, flores, vehicle trocks, towers, pipes, conduits

THE CONCLUSION:

Somebody is doing something on our Moon _ ond doing it right now, on o stunningly mossive scole!

0n extremely convincing cose thot the

Moon hos life on it

probobry ,o*ol

. on intelligent

j'roJh:;t;ll'the

roce which soror system "

"Leonord's photos

ore truly mind-boggling when

one begins to see whot he

-,,

- Publishers Weekly

WHAY

NASA KNSWS

BUT ltrON'T

DEVULGH!

WIth careful logic and reason, George

Leonard has studied all the data (includ'

official NASA photographs and the

ing

astronauts' Apollo tdpes) to prove his

theory of a highly advanced underground

civilization that is working the surface of

the Moon-rJ1ining, manufacturiftB, com'

fr

I

h

#P

Arerhere Ro,erbo ',*!:,?H"ri,' ;,?,i',"roir srores?

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SOffiEBODY

EI$E

r5 0N

THE ffiOSN

George H. Leonard

@ X,A luilGtnoo BooN

PUBLISHED

BY POCKET BOOKS NEW YORK

SoMEBODY EI"SE rS ON THE MOON

David McKay editiou publl3hed 1976

POCKET BOOK

edition published

October, t977

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AU

Copyright,

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by George If. konard.

portlons

thereof,

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Priuted in tJre fr.S.A

PERI\fiSSIONS

W, 72-73, by petmlsslon of Little, Brown and Compa:ly.

Pp. 14th48,

by pennlssion of \,[r. 'W'. Norton & Co., Inc., 1953.

Pp. 195-96, From Aeimou on AstronoffiUt

& Co., Inc.

Pp, 2lg.l4,

(Trpllngor

C. Mrxwell Cede.

Chapter 4, copyright, @,

1963, by Mercury Press Inc. Reprlnted by permission of Doubleday

from Othet Worlils Than Ours, C. Maxtrell Cq4e

Publtshtng Company, 1967); copyright, @, 1966,6y

Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to grve uP every preconceived

notion, follow humbly wherever and to

wha,tever abysses nature leads,

Or you shall learn nothing

-T. H. HUXLEY

I thhk we're proPerty.

-Qs6qLEs Fonr

The Moon program has been a military-engineering

operation from the start. Don't let the

science here and there, the flood of dqta,

fool you: ft's for show.

---f)9. S.er"rurl WrrrcoMB

I

ONE Contents L i s t o f Photographs Prelace "There's Change on the llrlssn-
ONE Contents L i s t o f Photographs Prelace "There's Change on the llrlssn-
ONE Contents L i s t o f Photographs Prelace "There's Change on the llrlssn-

ONE

Contents

List of Photographs Prelace

"There's Change on the llrlssn-

Go Find It!"

9

13

23

TWO

A Few Facts about the Moon

31

THREE

A Motor as Big'as the Bronx

40

FOUR

Pushing

the Moon Around: SuPer

FTVE

sx

SEVEN EIGHT NINE TEN
SEVEN
EIGHT
NINE
TEN

ELEVEN

TWELVE

THIRTEEN

FOURTEEN

FIFTEEN

SIXTEEN

SEVENTEEN

Rrgs

Spraying

THIRTEEN FOURTEEN FIFTEEN SIXTEEN SEVENTEEN Rrgs Spraying O u t t h e Craters C h

Out the Craters

Change on the Moon: Knocking

a n g e o n t h e M o o n : Knocking T

Things That Move Around

: Knocking T h i n g s T h a t Move Around R a

Rays Streaming from Craters:

A Startling Theory

What's Going On in Tycho?

A Startling Theory What's Going On in Tycho? G a s Jets on the Moon Stitching

Gas Jets on the Moon

Stitching Up the Moon

If They Aren't Dust Clouds and

Mists-What Are They?

Li1hti and Flashes and Flares:

Are They? L i 1 h t i and Flashes and Flares: Let There Be Light-For

Let There Be Light-For Life

Ground Markings, Insignia,

and High-rise Signals

Let There Be Light-For Life G r o u n d Markings, Insignia, a n d

7

49

63

Down the Ridges

74

Service Station in a Crater?

85

94

105

tt4

t26

131

140

149

Assorted Oddities When Is a Moon Not a Moon?

160

t74

191

EIGHTEEN

CONTENTS

Pulling It All Together: Some

Hypotheses

Appendix:

To Order NASA Moon Photos

Bibliography

Index

\

{

198

221

223

229

List of Fhotographs

Page

NASA photo

on which

rutmber

discussed Phenomena

1 72-H€35

2 66-H-1612

3

72-H-1387

4 66-H-1293

5 72-H-1109

6 71-H-781

7 69-H25

8 72-H837

I

67-H-1206

m

10 72-H-834

14, 170

bridges

23, 100

manufactured

obiects, vehicle

42, M,

136, 167

machinerY,

stitches

50,

super rig in

49,
51

octagonal crater

53,58

T-scooP cutting

away central

mountain in

crater

54

super rig on crater terrace

56

X-drones making

sPiral cut

57 ,70

X.drones raising

dust on crater

rim

61, 123

domes, construa

tion, screw

63,

75,

sPraYing

crater,

79,80

cannon shaPed

object

9

Location

Mare Crisium, Mare

Tranquillitatus and

Crater Proculus

southeastern Mare

Tranquillitatus

Bullialdus-

Lubinicky area

Lunar farside taken

from Lunar

0rbiter I

east of Mare Smythii

taken by APollo 14 crew

unnamed farside

crater

King Crater

Tycho Crater

northwestern half of King Crater

10 LIST OF

PHOTOGRAPHS

Page

NASA photo

on which

number

discussbd

PhenomenA

Loeation

tl

72.H-936 63, 75

12

72-H-839 63, 57,

75, 76,

77,79,

_

80, 193

13

67-H-201 65, 66

T4

67-H-1135 96

I5

67-H-759 96, 97

spraying crater farside Crater King in highlands sprayed craters, farside Crater King crosses and X-drones,
spraying crater
farside Crater King
in highlands
sprayed craters,
farside Crater King
crosses and
X-drones, spare
parts, pipe in
ridge, nozzle in

crater

latin oross near crater 0ceanus
latin oross
near crater
0ceanus

Crater Kepler in

Procellarum

rnoving obiect Crater Vitello with tread group of ob. iects with cratered upland basin taken
rnoving obiect
Crater Vitello
with tread
group of ob.
iects with
cratered upland
basin taken by
appendages,
Lunar 0rbiter ll
connected by

16

67-H.5r 0

100

T7

67-H-327 fiz

18

69-H-29 108, 109

t9

67.H-t 179 120, 1?7

20 67-H-1651 t23, 127,

filament or track

object going

uphill

vehicle inside

anomalous crater

variety of

rays surrounding

craters

coverings, glyph

in Tycho

gas spraY, G0r1.

129 structions, power

21 67-H-187 168

22 69.H-8 174

23 72-H.1113 175, t76

source with con. necting cable

obelisk with

horizontal bar

rope ladder or vehicle tread

pure energy

flowing over

crater rim

Crater Sabine D

Oceanus

Procellarum

Crater Humboldt

and Southern Sea

Tycho Crater

Crater Tycho and

northern highlands

taken by Lunaf

Orbiter ll I

lunar farside taken from Apollo 8

northwest of

King Grater

'

LIST OF

Page

NASA photo ' on which

number

discussed

24

70-H-1630 l+$

t77,

25 67-H-304 t77

26 70-H-1629 178, l7g

27 67-H4I 179

28 67-H-266 180

29 67-H-935 181, 187

30 71-H-1765 182

31 69-H-737 I82, 183

PHOTOGRAPHS

Phenomena Location

control wheels

Fra Mauro area

machine-tooled

south of

object

Maskelyne F

crater being

Fra Mauro area

covered, tooled

obiect

control wheels

mare southeast of Crater Kepler

diamond opening

Surveyor I

in anomalous

landing site

crater

construction

area of Mare

0rientale.

Mare Veris and Rook Mountains

platform with

0ceanus

dome

Procellarum and

ribbing for

Herodutus

mountain range

Triesnecker Crater

 

cover

32 66-H.1611 185

T-bar

western Mare

 

Tranquillitatus

33 67-H-318 185, 186

plumbing obiect

0ceanus

 

Procellarum

34 67-H-307 185

right-angled

west of Rima

pipe

Maskelyne in

 

southern Mare

Tranquillitatus

35 67-H-897 187, 188

dome on

northeast of Mare

platform,

Imbrium

constructions

near Alpine

Valley

Preface Since the early tronomers have s e e n o n the Moon. 1
Preface Since the early tronomers have s e e n o n the Moon. 1

Preface

Since the early

tronomers have

seen on the Moon.

1950s, a few scientists and amateur &S'

been startled by strange events and objects

Not just intrigusd-as

countless people have been since

Galileo first tiained a

startled. Startled by lights, strange

telescope on the Moon in 1609-but

obscurations, craters

moving bands of color, odd

which have come and gone,

markings, and even suggestions of engineering.

This equivocal emotion changed

viction that the evidence added

in the 1960s to a cor-

up to signs of intelligence.

Few of the observers (especially the professionals) talked

publicly about it. They were restrained by professional

pride, fear of ridicule, strictures imposed by the scientific

method, and lack of the kind of proof one can subject to

laboratory tests. The coterie of observers holding this coo-

viction sras small.

I started with a home-ground six-inch lens reflecting

in 1952, and when the space program was born

telescope

followed it closely, both as an interested citizen and

I

amateur astronomer. The

awareness slowly grew that the

add up. We do not spend

ostensible reasons for it did not

billions to reach something merely because it is "there."

Not while our cities decay and the National Institutes of

Health get cut back.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration

l3

I4

PREFACE

(NASA) has taken more

*

moon.

than

100,000 photos of the a huge expenaifure (r

sightings

As the end product of

produ"t;

should say one end

others include visual

by astronauts, the rbcks and

things.

soil they brought back, and

instruments),

these glossy

scientific tests with countless

photos are excellent, and some of them reveal fantastic

one can

search for a long time in the

photograph tubs

all. I have

noting

at NASA's public

examined several

the anomalies

of the photos

affairs offiJes and not see them

thousand of the better pictures,

and more

obvious examples of artifice. Some

have caused others to raise

my conviction that the

or races, have

My conclu_

intriguing me

questions; a few, which fortified

Moon is

not caused a ripple

slon is that there is

ta

tures,

But

_-

occupiecl by a very advanced race

of concern or excitement.

just

too much data, too many pic_

cover the same lround.

ask questions. Dr. Farouk

now says there

geology,

than any

who was

cor-

for uljr two peopre to

people are- beginning to

El Baz, who

are spires on

taught t[e astronauts

the Moon severar li*.r" hilrr.r

Earth. The late Ivan sanderson,

constructions on

science editor of

structions were all

anomalies. A

Argosy, stated flatry that architected

cats?)

around the Moon. Some Russian scien-

scientists speak out, while most

tists (why

of ours act like cheshire

do the foreign

huo. drawn attention to

astronomers, incruding ;

handfur of amateur

priest in New

which are on the

England, have publicly raised questions

right track. An occasionar

bright student

crosure (i.e., abre to see the whore

fragmenfs*xn ability not all

Moon as something more

with a good sense of

picture when conf-ronted with

scientists have) begins to see the

than a dead sister pranet. Joseph Goodavager- an abre ob-

* Momr, probes

No. of photbs taken bgr NASA

(Furnished by the Space Science Data Center)

Rangers

Surveyors

Orbitors

Apollos

17,259

88,188

3,103

31,593

Total

f+O-f#(overstated

by

a small

all

Apollo

because not

were of the Moon).

amouut

photos

PREFACE

15

server and writer, has painstakingly listened to the tapes of

:mtronauts' conversations made while they were

in

orbit

around the Moon and uncovered excited references to arti-

facts.

And NASA drowns in data. Scientists representing all tlisciplines have subjected the Moon to spectrographic and

seismographic

tests, whose

results fill room after room after room. Add

and laser-beam and radar-rnapping and other

to this the countless symposia and treatises

,and minutes of

no one per-

mcctings, and we have a store of informatibn

son can wade through, to say

('l'hen double the total to allow

nothing of comprehend.

for Soviet data!)

The problem is complicated by

Each thinks it has "the

long time learning some can never

the number of disciplines'

'word." Most scientists spend a

how to communicate with their peers; overcome the shock of interdisciplinary

transactions. A scientist is often tempted to attribute the

criticism of a pet thesis by someone from a different dis- cipline to the difference between them, rather than to &c-

cept it constructively. In an ideal world of full scientific communications. the data about the Moon would require

years to review and understand; in the real world, the iob

may never be done. It is pertinent to point out, too, that

friction between the scientists and engineers over the space eflort has become apparent after a superficially harmonious

start. Goals and methods to reach those goals ate often

seen from entirely different standpoints by these two

groups.

The geologist sees the Moon in terms of rocks and soil.

The astrophysicist is interested in the origin and evolution

bacteria which blocks of life.

of the Moon. The exobiologist thinks of

might be in the soil, or signs of the building

The chemist can

*

and the uplands.

list alt the elements

found in the maria

Ad infinitum. Few people can put it all

together with any creativity or broad insight. It's a sin not

to

a strong

background in a discipline-but if you

have

* Much of the Moon

(singular,

consists of dark, relatively

mare).

The

uplands

The floors of

flat, low areas

ealled maria

color, i.@.,

tend to be lighter in

dark craters and

large

of higher albedo.

circular "'seas"

the dark

consist of mare mtaterial. Early'obserrrers believed

word for

sea, "maxe."

areas to be seas, hence the Latin

Maria are extensive on

side.

the near side of tle Moon, rare on the far

16

PREFACE

have it, you may be lost, unable

up with a tide of abstracts and

gredients

to see the forest. we end

articles, like in-

journal

for a soup laid out'on a counter*with the chef

on vacation.

Intelligent laymen

want to hear what is on the knife

garbage. A newrpup., .orr*Jrt

he heard one rnore astronomer

be a bilrion pranets in our

could be a hundred thou-

edge of current truth, not

recently said to me that if

on TV

say that there must

galaxy, &od out of those there

sand with life, and so on, he'd be sick.

our satellite has always suffered

inattention by the pro-

survey

of the

fessionals.

Patrick Moore wro,te in his A

Moon (Norton,

1963): "Most of the reports come from

there were not many profes_

, . until recently

sional astronomers who

Moon" and 'No professionir astronomer has

paid serious attention to the

enough spare

number of hours spent

glass and watching the

Many know the

li}t

to spend

night after night studying the features of the

by

Moon with an adequate telescope.,'

A lightly made case. The

amateurs

rubbing red dust into

k

Moon in dlr$ b3

yards is incalJulable.

near side of the Moon

better than some geograih.r, tnow

head oi itr. astronomy

university brurrr.J-.rii;

Earth. At the same time, the

department at a large Midwestern

my questions

about the Moon (after

being very helpful in

sky charts available) with the

such matters as making

in their theses

weights

.

.

.,,

much since. Many

comment "r have no time for

researeh, there

the Moon. There is my own

are the graduate students who o*.d help

If the Moon suffered lack of attention

prior to the' NASA probes, it

by rear heavy-

has ,oi gained ,*ry

astronomers have not crosely examinei

Along with the amateurs,

NASA photographs; few outside NASA have.

the

There

are notabre exceptions.

Moore and

wilkins did consicrerabre luoa, work and

pub-

references on the Moon which are classics.

headed by sagan and Moore are crose-

lished standard

several astronomers

ly tied in to NAsA's Moon

advisory committee work. tentiveness there has been

pro{ru* through action and

so?ne peopre. A struc-

Empire state

But, .r.r, with thJ-general inat-

controversy. The size of the

engineering seen on the Moon throws

ture cen't be many times larger than th;

PREFACE

17

lltrilding or Grand Coulee Dam. Nothing manufactured can hc longer and bigger in diameter than the Alaska pipeline.

Sctrlpture carved

out of mountains can't possibly throW

shadows several miles long.

John J. O'Neil, science editor and amateur astronomer'

rcported in 1953 that he saw a twelve-mile-long bridge be-

tween two promontories on the edge of Mare Crisium. ft was, hc said, straight as a die, and cast a shadow beneath. We all

pointed our telescopes there, straining to see, while O'Neil

took his lumps frsm the professionals. As this is written,

I have before me the hauntingly

beautiful shot of the

Mlrc Crisium area taken by the Apollo 16 spacecraft in

April , 1972. Several "bridges," some arching high, some straight, cast $adows on the ground as the sun streams

hcncath. (See plate 1

172-H-8351.)

One professional astronomer

hopelessly inaccuratq, k irrs inclicated that

wrote: "O'Neil's sketch was

by Wil-

but later observations made

some sort of arch did in fact exist

rrcarhy

This may be so: but at best it is a tiny natural

fcature of no interest or importance whatsoever." So you can See that controversy rages. When a person dcserving any respect at all in a field makes an assertion rtot in harmony with the current beliefs, he or she has the

brrrclen of proof. It is less painful

rcason !) than it

lions,

hcalthy. Without it, all sorts of

to be criticized (within

is to be ignored. Others will ask ques-

be skeptical, try to replieate the finding. This is

rascals might invade a

licld of knowledge and lower the standards. Then where

would we be? How could we be sure that breakthroughs

wcre real? Professionals are conservative, and tend to keep tlrcir assertions in check until they have been subjected to

thc "research method." The reader will have already perceived that this book is not presented as, nor intended to be, a scientific work; nor

Irrrs anything approximating the scientific method preceded it. [rr the scientific method one collects data, analyzes, for-

rrr u la tes hypotheses, and tests those hypotheses in a sys-

no way now to test the tenets of this

tcrnatic way.

lrook systematically, which is one reason why all the sci-

may be

concerning the question of intelligence oc-

cupying the Moon. Scientists are compelled to pick things

otl' the mark

t:nlific test setups filling

I

see

dozens of rooms at NASA

r

18

PREFACE

up and subject them to

not, they are going to do it.

laboratory tests, ffid, relevant o,r

So one can ask: Do we need

right now another scientific

of the critically important

why? The rcir-ographs

paper on the Moon, in the face

issue of who is on the Moon and

have sent enough signals

analyzed surface elements.

and take an

and the spectrographs- have

Now it is time to stind, back

overall look, to try to see the Moon for what

the eye and brain pick up, with the mass of data available

for reference and not paramount in and of itself.

This book is the result

of studying

thousands of NASA

photographs, talking with many peopte associated with the

I-unar

program, reviewing the data where it held promise

the book's thesis, reading

reports from other

Russia), and tracking down every

lead

Moon's anomaries: odd seismographic

be readers stimulated to

the Moon, and maybe-just pack up and leave, because

spoke to a crowd, I was faced

that r finally

for clarifying

countries (e.g.,

open to me on the

reports; constructions, sprays, and the Moon's

Hopefully there will

own photos

ground swell of

mechanical rigs, sculpted craiers, history, weirdest of all.

get their

and open the doors I've missed. perhaps a

opinion will persuade Congress to put

whole teams of people on

maybe-the occupants will

They don't seem to like crowds.

who does? The last time I

with three questions which recurred so much

put in big letters on a blackboard for all to see:

No, I do not know who They are. No, I do not know where They come from. No, I do not know precisely what Their purpose is.

To admit ignorance to the

big question in no way weak-

ens the empirical obsenrations. An idiot can ask more

questions than a wise man can answer.

Behind this book is a generation of Moon

rrague.

buffery and

the influence of ville Astronomers'

the late Bill Vaughan from the old itock-

r am indebted to all the people

ungrudgingty of theii ti*e,

and Jim

in and out of NASA who gave

particularly Les Gaver and his staff

(audio-visual)

Kukowski (newsroom), &nd to those few who gave it

grudgrngly.

PREFACE

79

Finally, ffiy thanks

I catl Dr. Samuel

to the one-time NASA scientist whom

Wittcomb. The book would

not only did he

still have

make it a

lrccn written without him, but

rrcrrer book-he ielped me

feel cocksure while r wrote iL

SOMEBODY ELSE rs oN T H E MOON
SOMEBODY ELSE rs oN T H E MOON
SOMEBODY ELSE rs oN T H E MOON
SOMEBODY ELSE rs oN T H E MOON
SOMEBODY ELSE rs oN T H E MOON

SOMEBODY

ELSE

rs oN

THE MOON

GHAPTER ONE "There's Change on the Moon- ancl Space Administration G o Find lt!' I
GHAPTER ONE "There's Change on the Moon- ancl Space Administration G o Find lt!' I

GHAPTER ONE

"There's Change

on the Moon-

ancl Space Administration
ancl
Space Administration

Go Find lt!'

I .stood in the marble lobby

('rrpitol,

of the National Aeronautics

building in the shadow of the

aware of the

erowds bumping me as they streamed to lunch. It was just

staring at a glossy photograph, barely

()no of the thousands of

l)r'ogram.

hlirrg.

It

photos taken by NASA in its lunar

But it was hard to keep my hands from trem-

What I saw was fantastic, unbelievdble.

proved to me that the Moon was not as they pre-

to us-a dead satellite having only strategic and

scnted it

h :rsic-research interest.

T'he photograph, wtih others in my collection, fairly

sc'rcamed out the evidence that the Moon' has life on it.

'l'lrcre was no denying the truth which shone through: the

race or races which

pr'ohably moved in from outside the solar system. The

is firmly in the possession of these occupants.

M oon

M oon is occupied by an intelligent

lrviclence of Their presence is everywhere: on the surface,

on the near side and the hidden side, in the craters, on the

rrrirria, and in the highlands. They are changing

,\tt.rpicion or recognition

,\tn,iet Moon programs-which may not really be so much

of that triggered the (/.,S. and

its face.

ru nrce

'l'he

as a desperate'cooperation.

picture I

held showed a manufactured vehicle,

other manufactured objects. Three match-

t:lcrrming among

irrs struts came out of the rear. A beautiful molded point

rutlorned the front. The object was perfectly oval. Along

onc cdge, underneath, could be seen cilialike appendages,

r'('ricrnbling those of a centipede. (See plate

I t was one more piece of evidence,

2 [66-H-16121.)

which I added to the

23

24 SOMEBODY ELSE IS ON THE MOON

grolvlng list of

enormous machinery and devices that

around and knockeh down the rims of

which ;"il;

had talked

pap;;r: i'neded to talk

ptshed the Moon

the craters; another shocker

about in the scientific articles or the

to somebody. Was there a NASA scieniist

who would Ievel

things I saw,

braking influence, too. There had to

straight sense. so far, all I,d

with me? r wanted to communicate about the

3od perhaps needed a

be

a scientist who would talk

gotten was quick statements that

of natural

before I,d

grammed.

origin. Sometimes they

asked the questioor,

iu the phenomena were

shot o,rf the answer even though they were pro-