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2014 83
NORTH JERSEY
LOCAL RABBI FINISHES HIS TORAH COMMENTARY page 6
CLOSTER CONGREGANTS SHARE THEIR SINS page 8
JEWS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS FIND JOBS page 10
FEDERATION TO HOST ISRAELI DEFENSE REPORTER page 15
A final look back
at 5774, a year
wed rather forget
Page 24
OCTOBER 3, 2014
VOL. LXXXIV NO. 2 $1.00
J e w i s h S t a n d a r d
1 0 8 6 T e a n e c k R o a d
T e a n e c k , N J 0 7 6 6 6
C H A N G E S E R V I C E R E Q U E S T E D
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NOSHES ...................................................4
OPINION ...............................................20
COVER STORY .................................... 24
KEEPING KOSHER .............................40
TORAH COMMENTARY ................... 43
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CONTENTS
AS SEEN ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE
l Last year Volkswagen donated more
than $1 million to an international youth
center at Auschwitz.
In 2011 the company donated $1
million to the Anti-Defamation League.
And in 2009 it was reported that the
Beetle that iconic VW creation
actually was designed by a Jew.
But the German automaker which,
like other industries in the Third Reich,
cooperated with the Nazis and has
been boycotted by many Jews as a
result may have finally figured out a
strategy to put the stigma of its past
behind it. It has recruited both the stars
of the original Star Trek series to plug
its new car, the e-Golf, in the United
States.
According to Auto Evolution, William
Shatner and Leonard Nimoy both
Jewish will star in the marketing
campaign for VWs first electric car.
The two apparently were tapped
because the Vulcan salute and the
Volkswagen logo have so much in
common, the auto industry publication
reported.
That salute, as any Jewish Trekkie
worth his salt will know, is similar to
a Jewish blessing sign two hands
forming the Hebrew letter Shin
that frequently appears on Jewish
gravestones.
Could the twin appearance of Spock
and Kirk convince diehard boycotters of
German cars (who, as journalist Jeffrey
Goldberg noted in a recent Atlantic
column, rarely boycott any other
German products) to drop their grudge
and buy the wagon of der Volk?
Or will their stance instead be
recharged by the memory of the
Klingon proverb the villain Khan once
quoted to Kirk: Revenge is a dish best
served cold? ULIE WIENER/JTA WIRE SERVICE
Candlelighting: Friday, October 3, 6:17 p.m.
Shabbat ends: Saturday, October 4, 7:14 p.m.
Will Jewish buyers
trek to the VulcansWagen?
l In our effort to keep you informed
and our Facebook page current,
weve been discovering some amaz-
ing videos out of Israel. The video that
goes with this picture, originally post-
ed by Roni Nili Abdu (www.facebook.
com/roni.abdu), is best seen as, well,
a video. But even the caption posted
with the video is well worth a read:
I have been working with horses
for 15 years and could not believe
the emotional intelligence a horse
has, how a horse can connect with
special-needs children. This is a new
horse here.
My son suffers from Williams
syndrome, and is one of the 150
patients with the disorder in Israel.
One of the problems among patients
with Williams is connecting with
others properly. They are very loving
and affectionate and very cordial,
enjoying attention, but often do not
know how to connect.
The video shows the boy made
initial contact with the horse and
how the horse responds to the
childs curiosity with some concern
but nevertheless contains it and get
used to the speed and the natural
movements of the child. The child
seems excited about the meeting and
the horse allows the child to cuddle.
The horse went specifically to the
child even though I was there, and he
was not interested in me at all.
When I got home and watched
the video I realized the power of that
moment of my son and the horse.
The horse followed every movement
of the child, yet allowed the child to
approach and contact him. When the
boy hugged his leg and was close to
him, the horse didnt dare to change
the angle it was standing, as if afraid
to hurt him or step on the child the
whole time the child was close to
him. You can see the horse being
attentive to the child every moment,
even when it seemed he was just
standing still and resting. The horse
did not move his foreleg Although it
was less convenient for him.
Williams children are angels of
love and one of them is my dear son,
Erez. This is dedicated to you my boy,
the boy who changed my life and
made my world forever. Love you.
To watch the video, go to facebook.
com/JewishStandard
A brick in time
l There is a tradition of serving
the head of a fish for Rosh Hasha-
nah dinner: a culinary prayer that
we should spend the year as a
head, not a tail.
There is also a tradition among
some, less recorded in siddurim
and holiday guidebooks, of
sometimes delaying your holiday
grocery shopping to the point
where the grocery stories are sold
out of key supplies such as fish
heads.
This year, Helen Maryles Shankman,
a writer in Teaneck and on our
editorial pages, found herself between
these two traditions.
Luckily, her ten-year-old son Jude
came to the rescue.
Presenting: The Rosh Hashanah
Lego fish.
May this be a year of good luck for
all of us even if we have to build it
ourselves. LARRY YUDELSON
Noted without
comment
Horse meets Israeli boy
with Williams Syndrome
4 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
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Jonathan Tucker
More new TV season news
Zack Perlman
Elliott Gould Anthony Bourdain
Kingdom starts on
Direct TV, the satel-
lite TV service, on
Wednesday, October 8, at 9
p.m. Frank Grillo plays a gym
owner and former top mixed
martial arts fighter. His two
sons also are fighters. Playing
one son is JONATHAN TUCK-
ER, 32 (whose real-life mother
is Jewish). Mulaney starts on
Sunday, October 5, at 9 p.m.
on Fox. Stand-up comic John
Mulaney plays a comedian,
also named John, who lives
in New York. ZACK PERL-
MAN, 26, plays Johns friend,
Andre, and his often-annoying
neighbor, Oscar, is played by
ELLIOTT GOULD, 76.
The fourth season of An-
thony Bourdain: Parts Un-
known began on CNN last
Sunday, September 28. I think
it may be the best show on
CNN, and in the last year it
won the prestigious Peabody
Award for its genre-bending
combination of insightful
looks into the culture, politics,
and cuisine of the countries
Bourdain visits. The episode,
first airing on Sunday, Oc-
tober 5, is the only one set
in America this season. The
subject is the Bronx. BOUR-
DAIN, 58, a former top chef
and restaurant owner, sur-
prised many, including myself,
when he disclosed in Septem-
ber, 2013 (while doing a series
episode based in Jerusalem)
that his mother, a former New
York Times staff editor, is Jew-
ish. He added that his fathers
family was historically Catho-
lic and that he was raised in
no religion and isnt religious. California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at Middleoftheroad1@aol.com
Recently, a Jewish Jour-
nal of Los Angeles col-
umnist wrote about an
interview she did with the late
JOAN RIVERS. Always can-
did, Rivers told the columnist
that when she irst announced
that she wanted to become an
actress, her father, a doctor,
actually threatened to have her
committed to a mental insti-
tution. She left home and the
next Yom Kippur found her
completely estranged from her
family, broke, and forced to
attend a little Bronx synagogue
which would let her in without
a ticket. (She that she would
always be grateful to this shuls
congregants.)
Intrigued about this story, I checked and discov-
ered that Rivers gave a much fuller account of this
Yom Kippur in a 1998 essay called Please Forgive
Me. Yom Kippur, she wrote, came only a couple
of weeks after she left home. She described the
Bronx Orthodox shul, and the service, and then
turned inward, recalling her emotions as she sat in
her seat: I had been taught since childhood that
your family is your secure foundation and to be
away from my family on Yom Kippur was the sin
of sins. I was flayed with guilt. [I] was a brat.
What if my parents died this year?... Yom Kippur
was the one precious night of the year when we all
came hurrying home, got dressed up, and looked
wonderful and all four of us walked to the temple
together. It was our one night of solidarity. To me,
personally, in my head, God that night was decid-
ing what I deserved that [next] year. I prayed and
prayed Please forgive me.
This essay surprised me
in several ways. First, I was
struck by Rivers sincere reli-
gious faith. Then I thought
about the fact that Rivers
berated herself, and not her
parents, for causing the break
that found her alone on Yom
Kippur. Whoever was at most
fault, Rivers wisely recognized
that the ight had, at least tem-
porarily, broken Jewish family
bonds that were important
to her throughout her life. I
also wondered if her father,
attending later Yom Kippur
services, asked for forgiveness
for belittling the ambition of a
daughter whose talent ulti-
mately could not be denied.
I also thought about the Bronx shul that took
in a penniless young woman on Yom Kippur and
how Rivers returned that kindness. Right after her
death, ABC News ran a special about Rivers life and
touched on her extraordinary generosity. First, they
ran a clip from a documentary about her in which
she is seen signing a raft of checks to charities, and
to pay the private school fees of staff members.
Then they showed her winning a round of Celeb-
rity Apprentice in 2009. She gave her $500,000
winnings to Gods Love We Deliver, a nonsectar-
ian organization that delivers thousands of meals to
seriously ill people in New York City and northern
New Jersey. The GLWD website notes that she was
a supporter for 25 years, an active hands-on volun-
teer, and a board member. Her Celebrity win-
nings helped GLWD stay afloat during the Great
Recession.
N.B.
Joans hardest Yom Kippur
a reminder to be kind
Noshes
Please dont feel embarrassed and please
continue with your food.
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, explaining to President Obama at a White House state
dinner that he was observing the Hindu fast of Navratri, which falls on the first nine days of
this lunar month. Unlike Yom Kippur, Navratri does not require total abstention from food and
drink, and many observe it by eating only one meal a day, or just fruit.
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Let tradition course through you
Rabbi Shmuel Goldin talks about the last of his Torah books
JOANNE PALMER
I
ts not as if it ever were easy.
The five books that make up the
Torah are at the heart of our tradi-
tion. They are ancient, and unlike
other, slightly newer texts, they are
sparsely, even starkly written.
The Five Books of Moses are our most
basic source, the magnet that pulls us in as
if we were iron filings, and attaches us not
only to it but to each other. The books also
often are hard to understand. The world
they describe is not entirely ours; people
with recognizably human emotions and
behaviors live in settings and react to reali-
ties with which we cannot identify imme-
diately or easily.
Those five books also are the source
from which we read three times during a
regular week, and that provide the core of
Shabbat services. So if you are a frequent
shul-goer you are familiar with the words,
even if you are not entirely clear about
what they mean or how they are relevant
to you.
Rabbi Shmuel Goldin, who leads Con-
gregation Ahavath Torah in Englewood
and is the immediate past president of
the Rabbinical Council of America, has
undertaken the challenge of analyzing
each parsha the weekly Torah reading.
It has been a nine-year challenge, and it
is newly completed. On Sunday, October
12, at 7 p.m., his shul will fete him in its
sukkah to mark the publication of the last
book in the series, Unlocking the Torah
Text: Devarim.
All the Unlocking the Torah Text vol-
umes provide a summary of each parsha,
and then zero in on what Rabbi Goldin
calls critical questions. He presents read-
ers with the traditional answers, and then
offers his own interpretation, which may
elaborate on the earlier ones or strike out
in new directions. He aims for a tone that
balances the line between scholarly and
accessible.
Balance, in fact, is the value that is key to
the entire enterprise. It is his mission as a
modern Orthodox rabbi always to counter-
poise tradition against modernity, so that
although he might occasionally wobble a
bit on the very taut high wire he walks, he
never falls off it.
Devarim in English, its Deuteronomy
is inherently different than the books
it follows, and Rabbi Goldin found it the
most difficult of the five to write about, he
said.
There are many reasons for that, and
one is entirely modern-day and prag-
matic. Because it is at the end of a cycle
that begins in the fall, with Simchat Torah,
most of Devarim is read during the sum-
mer. Im away for part of the summer, so
I dont give as many sermons on it, Rabbi
Goldin said. He also has taught it fewer
times, for no particular reason, he added.
Devarim also is hard because its not
written from the point of view of an omni-
scient narrator God but is a tran-
scription of Moshes final speeches to the
people. They are about to cross into the
Promised Land, the culmination of 40
years in the desert, slavery in Egypt, the
patriarchs wanderings, and all of cre-
ated history, and he is not going to go with
them. God will not allow it.
Rabbi Goldin is Orthodox, so he
approaches the text with the clear and
firm understanding that it is Gods word,
dictated by God to Moshe. That is a
straightforward approach in the first four
books, but it gets complicated in Devarim,
much of which is written in the first per-
son. The I in Devarim is Moshe. Is
Moshe just a scribe? Rabbi Goldin asked.
Are the words Gods words, written down
by Moshe, or are they Moshes words, that
God agrees to afterward?
That is an open debate among schol-
ars, even those like myself, who do not
believe in biblical criticism, Rabbi Goldin
said. (Biblical criticism is the approach
that begins with the belief that although
the Torah may or may not have been
divinely inspired, it was written by human
beings, and that it is a pieced-together
work, coming from many authors. There-
fore, scholars can analyze the text to see
when and by whom it is likely to have been
written. It is an approach first champi-
oned by the Conservative movement and
is one of the differences between it and
the Orthodox world in which Rabbi Goldin
firmly stands.)
There is no one answer, he contin-
ued. The standard approach is that no
matter how it originated, it is Gods word.
No matter how you view the development,
it is still part of the holy Torah, which we
believe is Gods word to Moshe. And that
is his approach as well, but the details
vary. What I do is go through various
opinions and look at what we learn.
It is clear that there is more of Moshe
in this book, so in my perspective, God
is giving us a message. The Torah would
have been incomplete without the clearer
view of Moshe that we get here, and that
is because Jewish tradition is the sum total
not just of the pages of books but also of
people.
Tradition changes as it courses through
individuals, and God wants us to see that.
When we talk about mesorah about
tradition often in my mind we define it
erroneously, he said. We often say that
if you ask someone what mesorah is, they
say that its tradition that you get from one
generation and hand to the next. That is
the classical definition.
But whats missing is that it courses
through you, and then you hand it down
to the next generation. It courses through
you, and through your time and your gen-
eration, and as it does, it acquires a flavor
that changes it somewhat.
As an Orthodox rabbi, I can tell you
that although the foundation remains the
same, there is no question that the flavor
changes. There is no question that our
tradition changed as it coursed through
Here, at the
wedding of
Rabbi Shmuel
Goldins parents,
his paternal
grandfather,
white-suited
Hyman Goldin,
accompanies Rabbi
Goldins father
and his mothers
father. Hyman
Goldin, a prolific
writer, inspired
his grandson as a
writer and Torah
scholar.
Rabbi Shmuel Goldin
6 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
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Poland or Spain or Africa or China or Ger-
many. And therefore I think that by put-
ting Moshe into the chumash, God is say-
ing, Dont forget that your Judaism will be
a product not only of what is taught to you
but of the people who teach it to you.
The book of Devarim is unlike the other
four also in that the element of tragedy
of Moshes being unable to reach the
goal toward which he has worked and
led and yearned for most of this life is
unmistakable.
The tragic element is powerful and
all-pervasive, Rabbi Goldin said. To rec-
ognize the power of this book, you have
to recognize the turbulence of the emo-
tions that everyone must be feeling. From
Moshe Rabbenu, who is so proud of this
people because they have reached this
point but who is profoundly sad that he
will not be able to go with them, to the
people themselves, with their conflicting
emotions, their excitement at being on
the verge of entering the land and their
sorrow at bidding farewell to the only
major leader they have known. And their
faith despite the uncertainty of what it
will mean to go on and live in the land
without him.
There is so much going on in this
book!
Another set of questions that arises from
the text have to do with the mitzvot Moshe
discusses. There are some mitzvot that
are commanded for the first time here.
Why did they not appear before? And why
are others not mentioned at all, and why
are others repeated?
There are also very difficult sections
in Devarim, including the one about the
rebellious son, whose parents are told to
stone him. Sometimes when we learn
Torah we shy away from these sections,
but I think we have to study them, to try to
understand what the Torah is telling us,
he said.
Although he began his work on the five-
volume set during a sabbatical in Israel, at
his wifes urging, most of the time Rabbi
Goldin has worked on his books he has
also been an active pulpit rabbi, respon-
sible for his big, prominent shul. During
that time, he also has taught at Yeshiva
University, and of course he had policy-
making and administrative commitment at
the RCA. He is grateful to his community
for its willingness to see his work on the
books as an asset to the shul rather than a
drag on its resources. I worked hard not
to let it interfere with my responsibilities
to the community, and the overwhelm-
ing response was that it was both good
for me and good for them, he said. I am
extremely gratified.
How did he do it? He found himself carv-
ing out little chunks of time from unex-
pected places; he would take advantage of
waiting for meetings or even weddings to
begin, he said. I would carry pieces of the
book that I was working on with me at all
times, and I learned about the vast amount
of time that we have that we dont realize
we have.
Technology helps, he added, but he
goes back and forth between high- and
low-tech methods. He writes out his first
drafts in longhand, he said, and then he
would read it into a speech recognition
machine, and then edit the product of
that process online. I dont type well,
he said. He marvels at the way his grand-
father, Rabbi Hyman Goldin, was able to
write more than 50 books without such
technology and without the Internet
and the way his grandfathers predeces-
sors were able to write at all, even without
typewriters.
He feels strongly about longhand,
though. I read an article that said that
kids who are going straight from learn-
ing to write to writing with keyboards are
missing a part of normal development,
he said. They were missing some part of
motor development; it was the physical
act of writing that gave them that. That
made me understand myself a little more
that I need the concreteness of pulling
out papers.
Now that he has finished his massive
project, and particularly now that he
knows how many little bits of time he can
carve out from his busy life, Rabbi Goldin
is feeling a bit at a loss. Letting go of it
when it was finished was hard, he said.
So something, some project, some intel-
lectual undertaking, will be next. He just
doesnt know what yet.
For now, he is looking forward to see-
ing the first new copies of his book and the
first boxed set of the complete work, as his
community celebrates their rabbi and his
work next Sunday.
Local
8 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
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Pegging your sins
Closter synagogues Slichot board offers semi-public apologies
JOANNE PALMER
M
ost of the time, asking for
forgiveness is an abstract
thing.
What if it were more tac-
tile? What if there were a visual repre-
sentation that could both jump-start and
demystify it? What if there were some
way to create community around it, by
showing the similarities of most of our
sins, as well as the peculiarities that make
each of us a singular person?
Anonymously, of course
Slichot, the act of asking for forgive-
ness from those whom we have wronged
or otherwise hurt, is something in which
we would do well to engage all year long,
but we are urged to do so on the High
Holidays. There are special penitential
prayers that Sephardim sing during all
of Elul, the month that precedes Rosh
Hashanah, and Ashkenazim begin the
Saturday night before the new year. Tra-
ditionally, we ask forgiveness from God
and from each other, and at times even
from ourselves, up until Yom Kippur,
when the gates of forgiveness close.
Asking forgiveness doesnt come par-
ticularly naturally to us, though. Thats
why Rabbi David Widzer of Temple Beth
El of Northern Valley in Closter decided
to goose the process a bit to make it
more physical and therefore more real
with a Slichot board.
The board is a big rectangular piece of
wood, lined with the sort of wooden pegs
schoolchildren use for their winter coats.
A stack of thin cardboard cards and a
locked box with a slit to receive them are
nearby. More cards, with words scrawled
on them, dangle from rubber bands slung
over the pegs.
Rabbi Widzer first saw a board at the
annual convention of the Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis, which was held
in Chicago this spring. It was the brain-
child of Carmi Y. Plaut, who runs an orga-
nization called the Whole Megillah. (Its
at www.wholemegillah.com.)
Although not many of the rabbis and
other conference- goers were
thinking about the fall holidays
very much then, the display was
getting attention. People were
filling out cards, confiding in the
cardboard, writing down the
things they wished they had not
done, the things for which they
asked forgiveness, and putting
them in a locked box.
Carmi curated the collection,
Rabbi Widzer said. He would go
through them, and attach them to
the pegboard.
Rabbi Widzer was intrigued,
and so was his shuls ritual committee.
It seemed like such a wonderful oppor-
tunity to enhance the sense of what this
season is all about, he said. So I signed
up with him, and he sent me a couple of
blueprints and posters. It was also free:
the Whole Megillah offers it as a kind of
tzedakah.
The concept of semi-public anonymous
Slichot was not new to Beth El, board
member and ritual committee chair
Martin Kasdan said. For the last six or
so years, the shul had distributed blank
cards in envelopes to people in the shul
for Kol Nidre; that practice began before
Rabbi Widzers arrival at Beth El. We
called them sin cards, Mr. Kasdan said.
People would write down the sins they
wanted to deal with in the coming year.
They would not add their names; by
design, the sin cards were anonymous.
Then people would hand the envelopes
in. If the envelopes were sealed, they
would remain closed, with the sin inside
nobodys business except the sinners.
But if they were not sealed, the rabbi
would open the cards and read them,
and then incorporate some of those sins
into the Al Chet prayer, which usually is a
list of more traditional ways to go wrong.
The Slichot board seemed like a way to
move forward from that practice, retain-
ing the confession and anonymity but
making the process more transparent
and more likely to create community.
Over the summer, ritual committee
members assembled the materials and
created the board, and at the beginning
of Elul, the week before Labor Day, the
The Slichot board at Temple Beth
El of Northern Valley contains
pegs with sin cards listing a
variety of missteps.
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board was put up in the lobby. The box and the cards
were nearby.
Over the course of the month, folks coming
through our lobby, whether they are religious school
students or nursery school parents or members com-
ing to enquire about holiday tickets or coming to board
meeting or classes everyone who came through had
a chance to reflect about the process, and to take part
in it, Rabbi Widzer said. There have been two bar or
bat mitzvah celebrations at the shul since the board
has been in place, and guests also have added cards.
Cards started to dangle from the pegs slowly at first,
but then the pace picked up. By now, I have been
curating them, taking some down and putting others
up, Rabbi Widzer said. It is an evolving display.
I think it has been cathartic for folks to write out
things that they are asking forgiveness for, he contin-
ued. They also have been looking at the board and
seeing what other people have written. Some of that
is a little bit of curiosity, but its also the recognition
that Oh, Ive done that too! or Im so glad Im not the
only one to have done that. It has been another way of
enhancing peoples feeling of connection to the com-
munity and to each other.
The sins to which people confess have been every-
thing that youd expect and then some, he said.
People have said, I wasnt patient enough with my
children, I didnt respect my parents, I was mean to
my brother.
We get a lot of I was mean to my sibling, Rabbi
Widzer continued. Some of our teachers have incor-
porated this into their classes.
People also have been asking forgiveness for not
taking care of themselves physically, for wasting
money, for getting too uptight about things, for not
speaking up, for jumping to conclusions without
knowing the facts, for not helping with chores around
the house. Its everything from the most mundane to
the most esoteric and soul-serious things, and peo-
ple feel good about having an opportunity to make
amends.
And it has changed the flavor of our preparations for
the holidays a little bit, in getting people to take them
a little more seriously a little earlier in the year, he
said. And it is a wonderful way of reminding people
that Temple Beth El is their spiritual home. Part of our
mission is to encourage people and to engage them in
all seasons of the Jewish year. This is how we do it for
the High Holidays.
As he had with the sin cards, Rabbi Widzer plans to
incorporate some of what he finds on the cards into
the service. To include things that real live members
of our congregation are confessing thats very pow-
erful, he said.
Mr. Kasdan said that one of the reasons the Slichot
board is so potent is because people know that there
is nothing so bad that they cant share it, and do it
semi-publicly.
I have found some stuff on the board by children
who obviously wrote about things that they have hid-
den from their parents, that theyre afraid to tell them
or dont want to tell them. Its about things theyve
done at school, on tests, typical kid stuff, that they
want to get into the open.
When the holidays are over, there will be a peg-
board full of dangling confessed sins. What next? How
should those sins be disposed of?
Thats still an open question, Rabbi Widzer said.
We talked a little with the ritual committee about
something like tashlich for dispensing of the cards, but
we havent come to a final conclusion yet.
This is still an experiment.
Local
10 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-10*
Jobs for people with special needs
Local groups, local business work together on training, internships, employment
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
F
or at least 25 years now, Joseph
Freedland of Fair Lawn has
been hiring people with special
needs to help in the production
and packaging of shower curtains and hos-
pital curtains at Hospi-Tel in East Orange.
The family business, founded by his
father and uncle and now owned by his
brother David, has eight to 10 such people
working in the factory at any given time.
Two of them have been with the company
20-plus years.
This has become very important to
me, said Mr. Freedland, the companys
vice president for production. We started
by hiring a few people with challenges to
do unskilled labor such as moving the cur-
tains from the cutting to sewing stations,
hanging them on racks, and packaging
them. Over the years weve had probably
100 handicapped individuals overall. But
more credit goes to our employees who
work with these individuals and help them
do the assigned tasks and really become
their friends. In order to be successful,
the special-needs individual has to be
accepted into society.
The ability to find and hold a job is a
major hurdle for adults with developmen-
tal, physical, and emotional disabilities.
Ahead of National Disability Employment
Awareness Month, marked every October,
the Jewish Standard spoke with local Jew-
ish business owners and with special-needs
professionals who provide paid or unpaid
work opportunities for this population.
For young adults in our Jewish com-
munities, the services in terms of finding
jobs when they graduate from the school
system are very limited, said Abbe Green-
berg, owner of Bright Path Consulting in
Teaneck and formerly associate director
of J-ADD ( Jewish Association for Develop-
mental Disabilities). She is a private case
manager for people with special needs and
their families.
I have hired a few individuals with spe-
cial needs myself and am deeply involved
with the discussion of employment for
adults with special needs, she said.
There is a real shortage of opportunities.
About a year ago, in response to a need
articulated by parents of young adult chil-
dren with emotional or developmental
challenges, Ms. Greenberg created Bright
Path Experience. In this setting, two fami-
lies paid her to hire their children for jobs
designed to instill workplace skills and
self-confidence.
These were two Jewish individuals
who, for whatever reason, had no practi-
cal work experience at all, not even under-
standing the concept of getting up and
going to work, Ms. Greenberg said. Both
were living at home and were kind of rud-
derless. I took them in as paid interns,
gave them responsibilities, and taught
them how to be employees.
They got a paycheck and learned how
to open a bank account, manage their
money, come to work and accomplish
tasks, and gain some competitive edge in
the world. After six months, they were
coming into the office every day in but-
ton-down shirts and slacks, doing errands
and filing, doing research, making bank
deposits. I gave them a tolerant yet rigor-
ous workspace.
As a result of this experience, one of
the young men was able to begin a college
program and the other found full-time
employment.
The Bergen County-based Sinai Schools,
one of the countrys leading Jewish school
networks for children with learning or
developmental disabilities, provides basic
employability skills training for its high
school students and also runs two adult
programs in which vocational training is a
primary aspect.
All four participants in Netivot, Sinais
day habilitation program at the Jewish
Center of Teaneck, and all three residents
of Sinais Sheli residence for men, also in
Teaneck, hold down jobs geared toward
helping them become more independent.
Among the local workplaces that accom-
modate Sinai students and adults mostly
in food services are Dougies Bar-B-Que
and Grill in Teaneck, the Frisch School and
Yavneh Academy in Paramus, and Maadan
kosher deli and catering in Teaneck, as
well as Yeshiva University. Whereas most
vocational training opportunities for its
students until now have been in Jewish-
owned businesses, Sinai recently began
placing men in Toys R Us, Modells, Party
City, and other Paramus stores.
We find that most employers in our
community are eager to help and find
a way to make it work, Chavie Hagler,
Sinais adult program director, said.
There is some responsibility on the part
of the employer, because although we pro-
vide a job coach to be with each employee,
there has to be a point person at the place
of employment to work with them and be
creative in finding tasks for them to do.
Food services generally work out well,
she added. It has a predictable routine
you can be taught and doesnt have a lot of
surprises, so its well-suited for most peo-
ple in our population. I try to change it up
so everyone will have a social component.
For example, one participant interning
at Maadan does a lot of back-of-the-store
work but also helps customers in order to
develop his social skills.
Maadans owners, Stuart Kahan and
Yossie Markovic, won the Tovei Lev (Good-
hearted) Award at Sinais 2014 benefit din-
ner in recognition of their acceptance of
Sinai students over the past 30 years.
In their minds, making a place in their
store for people with disabilities is nothing
especially noteworthy, and not worthy of
recognition. It is simply the right thing to
Binyamin works at Maadan kosher deli and catering in Teaneck. COURTESY SINAI
I have hired a
few individuals
with special
needs myself
and am deeply
involved with
the discussion
of employment
for adults with
special needs.
There is a real
shortage of
opportunities.
ABBE GREENBERG
Local
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To the many businesses that have employed SINAI
students and adult participants over the years.
By seeing them for their abilities and the value that
they bring to your businesses, you have helped to
shape a better and more inclusive world.
THANK YOU!
Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
do, Sinais chairman, Rabbi Mark Kara-
sick of Teaneck, said.
We started our store 1982, the same
year Sinai started, Mr. Kahan said. A
few years later, they needed something
for the older kids to do to integrate them
into the work world and build up their
confidence and teach them some skills.
The partners created a job for one Sinai
student: packing, labeling and inventory-
ing candies. After a few years they found
more tasks for Sinai kids to do.
Over the years weve taken students
almost every semester, Mr. Kahan said.
Now we have a boy with Down syn-
drome who comes a few days a week
for a few hours. I was blown away by his
abilities. Hes bright and funny, and a
diligent worker.
Were teaching him how to crack
eggs, how to cook them and how to
make egg salad. Hes also doing inven-
tory and telling us what we need to order
hopefully these are things he can use
in the future.
Though Maadan does not pay Sinai
interns, Mr. Kahan and Mr. Markovic
invest no small amount of time and
attention in their vocational training. I
dont know if wed hire these guys full
time because this work environment
could be too intense for them, but other
businesses are geared to this type of
worker, Mr. Kahan said. Quite a few
had the potential and eventually they
found something.
Rabbi Yisrael Rothwachs, Sinais dean,
said that the students parents are eager
for their kids to find gratifying employ-
ment. Like all parents, they want their
children to be as independent as possi-
ble and to be happy, he said.
Feige Weinstein, who son, Yosef
Weinstein, 35, is a Sheli resident, said
that both she and her son are very
happy about his employment at Dou-
gies. He works there as a waiter four
days a week. While he was still a stu-
dent at Sinai, he learned workplace
skills through internships at a kosher
pizza store, a wine store, a dry cleaner,
and a paint store, all on Teanecks West
Englewood Avenue, as is Dougies.
Yosef, like every person, needs to be
busy, Ms. Weinstein said. Hes blessed
to be a people person and likes to smile,
say hello, and give high-fives. People at
Dougies are very kind to him, and very
accepting. He loves to go to work and he
needs to work not that he makes much
money, but thats not the point. Im hop-
ing he can get another job for Sundays
and Fridays.
According to Rabbi Rothwachs, Usu-
ally we are happy with our lot in life
when we feel we are being productive
and filling a need and we are part of a
community. Often, because individu-
als with disabilities have challenges that
put them on the sidelines, families are
left feeling that their child cant be a
productive part of the workforce. Thats
why this aspect of what were doing is
so important. Maybe these young men
will never master Jewish texts, but they
can hold onto a job and contribute to the
broader community.
He emphasizes that the benefits are
not only for the worker. When parents
and children walk into a store and see
someone there with a disability who is
able to help them, that sends a strong
message.
Teaneck General Store owner Bruce
Prince has two Jewish special-needs stu-
dents from Teaneck High School work-
ing in unpaid internships for a couple of
hours a day under the supervision of job
coaches with the New Jersey branch of
Yachad, the National Jewish Council for
Disabilities.
This is not the first time Mr. Prince
has participated in this program, so he
has a system in place for working with
the coach and high school counselor to
match each interns strengths with an
appropriate task.
We sell a lot of board games and card
games here, and one of the guys sits
down with new games and figures out
how to play it and what is the best age
for playing it, and writes a synopsis that
we copy and place by the game so cus-
tomers know whats good for different
age groups, he said.
Other tasks include taking inventory,
stocking shelves, and taking out the
trash. Depending on the individual, I
would consider hiring someone with
disabilities, said Mr. Prince, who will be
honored at Yachads breakfast on Octo-
ber 26. We did hire one young man the
summer before last.
Jeffrey Manas of Teaneck, owner-oper-
ator of Bayit Interiors, took on a Yachad
client as an unpaid once-a-week intern
last year, and now pays him minimum
wage.
Last year he did menial things like
inventory, and he did a good job. Then
I started teaching him to use my tools
with my supervision; a little drilling
and putting in screws. He learned how
SEE JOBS PAGE 12
Maybe these
young men will
never master
Jewish texts,
but they can
hold onto a job
and contribute
to the broader
community.
RABBI YISRAEL ROTHWACHS
Local
12 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-12*
to use a tape measure and how to tie knots. I do a lot of
stringing and restringing, so thats important. To you and
me, maybe its nothing, but he was excited about it, Mr.
Manas said.
Im trying to teach him skills that can be used in an
office, he continued. He knows the alphabet and does
my filing. This year Im working on having him answer
telephones. I am writing out a script and helping him
practice; I think it will be a tremendous plus because he
can work in any office if knows how to answer phones.
In the short run it helps me, and in long run it helps him.
Its a credit to my customers that they are very accept-
ing of him, and satisfied that hes there doing something
productive.
Reva Judas, project coordinator for NJ Yachad and its
vocational program, said that most clients are between 22
and 39 and have a variety of physical, developmental, and
emotional disabilities.
At first, all our clients were working at Five Star Cater-
ers and in the Yachad office in New York, she said. Now
we have 10 participants, and they come to our Teaneck
office four days a week, 9 to 4, via NJ Transit or Access
Links or private transportation.
From here they each go to several different jobs
Jobs
FROM PAGE 11
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during the week, from 10 to 2, accompanied by a
state-trained job coach a paid professional or a
social-work or psychology student. Employees really
respond to us because of the job coaches, and a lot
of feedback goes on.
In addition to Teaneck General Store and Bayit
Interiors, Yachad clients work for Kosher Experi-
ences lunch programs at three local day schools,
Privet Flowers in Teaneck, Shalom Yeladim early-
childhood centers, DubeZone gym program at the
Lubavitch preschool in Tenafly, and Joseph Kushner
Hebrew Academy in Livingston. One client, who has
a masters degree in biology, helps in Kushners sci-
ence labs.
Another client washes wigs at Teanecks Lillian
Lee Salon for distribution through Lillian Lees Do
Wonders charity. Goodwill, The Jewish Link, and the
Fair Lawn gown gemach also hire Yachad clients.
Every week, some of the clients travel across the
bridge to organize books in the libraries at Yeshiva
University and its boys high school, and in the office
of SAR High School in Riverdale.
Were also starting to work with the Cheer Pro-
gram, which helps the elderly homebound with
errands such as grocery shopping and laundry, Ms.
Judas said. They got a grant, so they can pay our cli-
ents. Sometimes individuals and organizations hire
us to stuff envelopes and make hostess gifts, center-
pieces, and candy bags in exchange for a donation
to Yachad.
The skills clients learn at the Yachad office before
and after work hours are just as important as the
vocational training, she said. We give them train-
ing on traveling on public transportation, proper
hygiene, how to communicate with their boss and
co-workers, how to dress appropriately for the job,
how to do a job interview and write a rsum.
Sinais Chavie Hagler agrees that workplace skills
are essential for future success. If they master
something, they can market themselves more eas-
ily, she said. For example, they could tell a poten-
tial employer, I can work in your kitchen because
Im a pro at vegetable prep.
As these individuals get older, they need to have
meaning and structure in their lives. They feel tre-
mendous pride that they go to work every day like
their parents and siblings, she said.
This former participant at Sinai Schools Netivot
program reads to children at a Jewish preschool.
COURTESY SINAI
JS-13
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Shes a project-based fellow
Tikvah Wiener tapped
by Joshua Venture Group
LARRY YUDELSON
T
ikvah Wiener of Teaneck
describes herself as pas-
sionate about project-based
learning.
As head of the English department at
the Frisch School in Paramus, where she
taught for 13 years, Ms. Wiener brought
that innovative educational approach
into the high schools curriculum and
extracurricular activities. Its a pedagoy
where students engage in solving a com-
plex real world problem and they cre-
ate different products as a result of their
learning, she said.
The products could be a multimedia
presentation, or a blog displaying stu-
dents interpretations of Shakespeare. But
it also could be a class-wide effort to study
the problem of snow removal and offer
suggestions for improvement a project
that would include math and science as
well as civics and English.
This school year, Ms. Wiener has a new
job: She is chief academic officer at the
Magen David High School in Brooklyn.
And she has just received a prestigious
and lucrative award to help her pro-
mote project-based learning in Jewish day
schools across the country.
The Joshua Venture Group named her
as one of six people who will receive two-
year grants of more than $80,000 as well
as training to develop their ideas for the
Jewish community.
Lisa Lepson, the Joshua Venture
Groups executive director, said that the
organizations goal is to reinvigorate and
expand the Jewish community by sup-
porting Jewish social entrepreneurs.
Among previous recipients of the
Joshua Venture fellowship is Rochelle
Shoretz, founder of Sharsheret, the
Teaneck-based organization devoted
to fighting breast cancer in the Jewish
community.
Ms. Wiener has a great reputation
within the education community, Ms.
Lepson said. Were really excited about
her project. Were also really excited
about her as an educator and potential
leader.
Ms. Wiener said she first discovered
project-based learning when she was
coordinating interdisciplinary studies
at Frisch. Its an interdisciplinary way
of thinking, she said of the educational
approach, which challenges students to
learn through a process of doing rather
than just listening.
The course material is arranged
around a question that students have
to answer about a real-world problem
of scenario, and the units final product
is something that has value in the real
world, she said.
Students are asked to be active cre-
ators rather than passive consum-
ers of content, she added; if they are
studying physics, for example, they
might be asked to explain how under-
standing speed and velocity, force and
motion could help them design wear-
able technologies that improve athletes
performances.
At Frisch, she was able to take project-
based learning to the next level: inquiry
based learning, which is Where you say
to the student, what do you want to learn
and how do you want to learn it? she
said.
In afterschool clubs and electives
dubbed Real School, students created
events and projects based on what the
Tikvah Wiener believes project-based learning helps students maximize
both study and problem solving and wants to bring the discipline to
Jewish education.
SEE WIENER PAGE 17
Local
JS-15*
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 15
MOROCCO
pop. 32.3M
ALGERIA
pop: 37.4M
TUNISIA
pop. 10.7M
LIBYA
pop. 5.6M
EGYPT
pop. 83.7M
ISRAEL
pop. 7.9M
WEST BANK
(Judea & Samaria)
pop. 2.1M
GAZA STRIP
pop. 1.7M
JORDAN
pop. 6.5M
SYRIA
pop. 22.5M
IRAQ
pop. 31.1M
KUWAIT
pop. 2.6M
SAUDI ARABIA
pop. 26.5M
YEMEN
pop. 24.8M
IRAN
pop. 78.9M
OMAN
pop. 3.1M
UNITED ARAB
EMIRATES
pop. 5.3M
QATAR
pop. 1.9M
BAHRAIN
pop. 1.2M
LEBANON
pop. 4.1M
who is David?
who is
Goliath?
jns.org/subscribe-to-our-newsletter
jns.org
Theres no lack of media coverage on
Israel, the Middle Easts sole democracy
with civil rights and a free press. What is
lacking is objective coverage. This tiny
Jewish nation, the size of New Jersey,
with less than eight million people, a
quarter of them non-Jewish, generally
receives inaccurate, harsh, even hostile
coverage from the worlds press.
The Jewish News Service (JNS.org)
was created to correct that. Our weekly
reporting, including exclusive distribution
rights for Israel Hayom, Israels most
popular daily, now appears in 31 Jewish
weeklies. We invite you to join us in
getting the truth out about Israel. Go to
jns.org/subscribe-to-our-newsletter today.
Another decade, another war
Israeli journalist will report on Gaza
at federation breakfast in Englewood
LARRY YUDELSON
A
lon Ben-David entered journal-
ism in 1985. He was 18.
Thats when he was drafted
into the Israeli Defense Forces;
he spent his time in the IDF working for
Army Radio.
Its considered one of the best schools
of journalism, he said. They throw you
into the work.
Thirty years later, Mr. Ben-David is the
military correspondent for one of the three
Israeli television channels, which incon-
gruously is called Channel 10. (Channel
1 is the original, state-run station, where
Mr. Ben David started working soon after
his army term; the second channel is the
privately run Channel 2.) In that capacity,
he will come to Englewood next week to
speak about the Israeli situation, with spe-
cific attention to the ramifications of this
summers war with Gaza.
A lot of history has happened on his
watch. He covered the first intifada, the
second intifada, the second Lebanon war,
the withdrawal from Gaza, the recent con-
flicts in Gaza All of those, he said.
In the 1990s he specialized in covering
Lebanon, where Israeli troops patrolled
until they withdrew in 2000. His biggest
story at that time was when he joined a
army patrol for 80 hours while they set
up an ambush against Hezbollah. He also
broke the story of the Mossads assassi-
nation of Fathi Shaqaqi, co-founder and
leader of the Islamic Jihad, in Malta
Perhaps his biggest story, though, came
not in Israel but in Manhattan. On Septem-
ber 11, 2001, he had just begun a graduate
program at Harvard, where he eventually
earned a masters degree in public admin-
istration from the universitys Kennedy
School. He was able to get to New York by
the next day and for the next few days he
was the only Israeli reporting from Ground
Zero.
The biggest change he has seen in his
years of reporting is in Israelis view of
Israels military.
The army was considered something
sacred, a myth, he said. The coverage
was very careful.
As time went by, the whole approach of
Israeli society toward the army changed,
in part because of the IDFs long occupa-
tion of Lebanon, with its steady drumbeat
of Israeli casualties.
Now, The army is still the most loved
and trusted institution in Israeli soci-
ety, but society demands more account-
ability. It wants to know how things are
conducted.
At Channel 10, as at all Israeli media out-
lets, there is a representative from the gov-
ernment censor who works under very
Save the date
Who: Alon Ben-David, an Israeli journalist specializing in military issues
What: Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey networking breakfast
Where: Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, 350 Engle St., Englewood
When: Tuesday, October 7, 7:30-9:30 a.m.
Couvert: $25. Free parking and valet service.
RSVP to Beth, (201) 820-3911 or bethj@jfnnj.org.
Israeli journalist Alon Ben-David has
covered the ghting in Lebanon and
Gaza, and reported from Ground
Zero on 9/11.
SEE JOURNALIST PAGE 53
Local
16 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-16*
More than just a beauty contest
Mrs. N.J. from Mahwah stresses the value of community service
LOIS GOLDRICH
Y
es, the lovely woman crowned
Mrs. Mahwah, and subse-
quently Mrs. New Jersey
United States 2014, is Jewish.
And yes, the glamorous photo dis-
played here might easily explain her suc-
cess in the national beauty pageant.
But, says titleholder Paige Lippe, she
did not enter the contest to garner admir-
ers but rather to publicize the work of
her late father, Dr. Michael S. Lippe.
As the Jewish Standard reported in
December 2010, Dr. Lippe, the longtime
emergency room director at Good Samar-
itan Hospital in Suffern, N.Y., was killed
in a plane crash on the way to the Finger
Lakes region in upstate New York. He was
on his way to Geneva General Hospital in
Geneva, N.Y., when his plane went down
in a storm.
Looking for a way to showcase the
memorial project created by her mother
in memory of Dr. Lippe, his daughter
learned that this particular beauty pag-
eant circuit, Mrs. United States, requires
that contestants represent a platform,
or cause, with which they are closely
associated. (There are many other cir-
cuits including Miss America, Mrs.
America, Miss Universe, Mrs. Universe,
and so on.)
According to its website, the pageant
fosters an environment where the value
of community service and state pride is
as integral a part of the overall experi-
ence as the competition itself. Our shared
vision is to promote New Jerseys mar-
ried women, encourage philanthropic
efforts, and draw attention to companies
and organizations of interest to married
women across the state.
That hook got me involved, said Ms.
Lippe, 36, who is a board-certified behav-
ioral analyst, explaining that she had first
become interested in the idea of pageants
after hearing a segment on National Pub-
lic Radio.
I decided to see if there was anything
for married women, and I came across
this, she said. I told the [now former]
director that I had no performance tal-
ent and was told that what I needed was
a platform.
She had one and the contest pro-
vided a great opportunity to publicize it.
Indeed, Ms. Lippe said, It is this, the
opportunity to talk about my fathers leg-
acy and connect with the community to
help local volunteer first responders, that
was the sole purpose for my involvement
in a pageant for married women.
The Dr. Michael S. Lippe Memorial
Project reflects the late physicians com-
mitment to support emergency medical
services. A big supporter of first response
care, he taught in Rockland Community
Colleges paramedic education program
and helped design its curriculum.
The project holds fundraisers to ben-
efit the Hudson Valley Paramedics Asso-
ciation and provides scholarships to local
students.
We give stethoscopes and modest
scholarships to paramedic graduates and
Mahwah High School graduates who dem-
onstrate an interest in first response, Ms.
Lippe said. We gave a scholarship to a
girl who volunteered with the Mahwah
Fire Department. Were hoping the schol-
arship program will grow.
Ms. Lippe said she recently approached
the Jewish Home in Rockleigh to speak
about its experiences with first respond-
ers. Her visit, she said, led to her decision
to volunteer there.
Ill plan a once a month visit with my
daughter, she said, noting that she would
coordinate an intergenerational art activ-
ity. (Her daughter, whose name she prefers
not to provide, is 20 months old.)
Her mother, Suzanne Lippe, also from
Mahwah, is an artist. Recently the project
sponsored a fundraiser where she taught
a two-hour class on drawing the human
form. An upcoming fundraiser will be
Halloween-themed.
Ms. Lippe, who met her husband,
Jared Stephans, at a gym, said she got
a personal trainer for six months and
was in the best shape of her life when
she entered the contest. She agreed that
we dont usually think of Jewish women
entering such pageants.
As far as I know, there was only one
other Jewish woman in the contest, she
said; she was Mrs. New York.
Ms. Lippe said that despite the asso-
ciation of beauty pageants with body
image, she thinks the cultural imperative
for women to look pretty is unfor-
tunate and archaic. That having been
said, I feel better about myself when I
feel strong and fit. Its complicated for a
young woman to look attractive and feel
good about herself.
Its important for mothers to have
time and health, she added, pointing
out that she also has to be strong in her
job, where she works with developmen-
tally delayed people who need physical
assistance.
Mrs. New Jersey United States said
there is little stress associated with her
pageant title, and she creates her own
opportunities to speak.
With Rosh Hashanah coming, and los-
ing my dad, we needed a new chapter for
our family, she said. This is about my
dad and his legacy to remember him.
Such a good man!
Paige Lippe entered the Mrs. New Jersey United States 2014 contest to honor
the work of her father, Dr. Michael Lippe, with first responders.
It is this, the
opportunity to
talk about my
fathers legacy
and connect with
the community
to help local
volunteer first
responders, that
was the sole
purpose for my
involvement in a
pageant for
married women.
kids wanted to do. That included a student-run fash-
ion show, a student-organized day of Jewish study,
and a student-directed project learning how to pro-
gram iPhone apps.
Project-based learning requires a lot of scaffolding,
she said. Teachers ind it intriguing. They love to see
kids engaged. They want to know how they can do it.
To help spread the word, she is launching a network
for project-based learning in Jewish day schools. Magen
David and Valley Torah High School in Los Angeles are
the irst schools in the network. The I.D.E.A. Schools
Network stands for Innovation, Design, Entrepreneur-
ship, Arts. The Network is transdenominational and
open to both supplementary and day schools.
In year one our goal will be to transform our schools
and share it out with the ield, she said.
In July, she ran a conference about project-based
learning at Yeshivat Noam for local day school educa-
tors. Its an opportunity to effect change for the Jewish
education ield at large, she said.
Project based learning has a strong base in public
and private schools in California, she said. There are
many websites with lesson plans and advice. But day
schools have special needs that she hopes they can
solve together. There are certain conversations that
only happen within Jewish education. How do I balance
a dual curriculum, or Hebrew textual skills, or how do I
include Judaic studies with general studies?
We want to embrace these pedagogies because we
want joyful learning, but we want our students to learn
texts and love texts and love their religion, she said.
The other conversation thats important in Jewish edu-
cation is the balance between tradition and innovation. I
want to honor my tradition as a Jew. How do I honor the
past while still moving conidently into the future?
Not that the move to the future is necessarily smooth
sailing.
Education is being disrupted now, she said. Theres
a general sense in education that we need to change.
This change reflects changes throughout society. Our
schools are modeled on a factory system from the last
century, she said. The future is volatile and uncertain,
complex and ambiguous. I dont know what kind of job
Im training my student for. I need a flexible student
who is good at problem solving, who is innovative.
Change is hard and it is scary. We need to educate
parents and take parents along on our journey. Many
parents dont know that schools should look different,
she said.
And she doesnt mean just the parents at Magen David.
Shes also preaching this message as the new chairman
of the board of education at the Yavneh Academy in
Paramus, the elementary school her children attended.
And she hopes her neighbors and former colleagues
in Bergen County heed the charge of project-based
learning.
Im obviously focused on Magen David, but I see Ber-
gen County as a real leader in Jewish education, she
said. We should all support each other.
Local
JS-17
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 17
More than 90% of our graduates were employed, in graduate school, or both within six months of
graduation 87% of applicants were accepted to at least one medical schoolnearly double the national
average 97% of applicants were accepted to at least one law school 46 full-time and intern hires at Big
Four accounting rms Employment at investment banks and consulting rms including Goldman Sachs,
JPMorgan Chase, Credit Suisse, Accenture, and Mercer Lets talk! Call our Ofce of Admissions at
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Wiener
FROM PAGE 14
Teachers nd it
intriguing. They love
to see kids engaged.
TIKVAH WIENER
Local
18 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-18*
n 1 The Breda and Kaufman families, who
belong to the Jewish Community Center
of Paramus/Congregation Beth Tikvah,
build a sukkah together. We follow the
Italian tradition of hanging glass and
glass-like ornaments, Alan Breda wrote.
n 2 Dr. Reuben Gross of Teaneck cre-
ated a sukkah that has two plastic see-
through walls, to bring the beauty of
the outside into the sukkah, and enables
parents to keep an eye on their children
as they romp in the backyard, he said.
Here, he sits with three grandchildren,
Daniel, Netanel, and Akiva Lipshitz.
n 3 The sukkah at Temple Emeth
of Teaneck was designed by
Edward Pierce. BARBARA BALKIN
n 4 Temple Emanu-El of Closters youth
group, F2F, went sukkah-hopping.
n 5 Cantor Barbra Lieberstein of
Ramsey sent in a photo of her sukkah.
n 6 Scenes from Sukkot at the
Solomon Schechter Day School of
Bergen County in New Milford.
1
2
3
5
4
6
L
ast year, we asked readers to
send in photographs of their
sukkot, and promised that wed
publish as many of them as
possible.
We know that there are many ways of
decorating sukkot both institutional and
smaller-scale and hope we all can share
ideas with each other.
We also hope that this will be the first
of an annual tradition, and that this first
small effort will unleash a torrent of pho-
tos in our general direction.
Please send this years pictures to
letters@jewishmediagroup.com. Include
your name, and if the sukkah was set up
by an organization, please let us know
that as well.
Local
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 19
JS-19*
Gallen celebrates
Adult Day
Services Week
The Gallen Adult Day Health Care Cen-
ter, part of the Jewish Home at Home,
celebrated National Adult Day Services
Week last month. The week included a
spa day, with hand massages and aroma-
therapy, casino games, a performance of
A Cruise Around the World in Song, and
New Orleans jazz. It ended with an elegant
lunch.
The National Adult Day Services Associa-
tion advances the national development,
recognition, and use of adult day services
and provides a coordinated program of
professional and compassionate services
for adults in a safe place outside the home
during the day.
Gallen participants, also members of
the choir, participated in A Cruise
Around the World in Song. Volunteer
Marilyn Bell rehearsed the program
with them for three months.
Bris Avrohom gala dinner
Bris Avrohom, headquartered in Hill-
side, recently held its 35th anniversary
dinner at the Sheraton Parsippany Hotel.
Former Chief Rabbi Yisroel Meir Lau of
Tel Aviv, who also is the chair of Yad
Vashem, was the guest of honor. The
dinner was preceded by Bris Avrohoms
29th annual gala wedding ceremony,
where eight couples from the former
Soviet Union were married according to
Jewish tradition.
The hotel parking area had eight
chuppahs, one for each couples family
and friends, and more than 350 guests
attended. Rabbi Mordechai and Shter-
ney Kanelsky, Bris Avrohoms execu-
tive and associate director, respectively,
gave the couples wedding gifts including
books, candlesticks, and a kiddush cup.
Rabbi Kanelsky and Bergen County
Executive Kathleen Donovan presented
the Community Service award to Rob-
ert M. Durando, general manager of the
George Washington Bridge, and Rabbi/
Cantor Berele Zaltzman was honored
with the Kesser Shem Tov award.
To the far left of the grooms are Bris Avrohoms program director, Rabbi Ba-
ruch Lepkivker, and administrator Rabbi Dovid Wilansky. Former Ashkenazi
Chief Rabbi Yisroel Meir Lau and Rabbi Mordechai Kanelsky are in the center.
Shterney Kanelsky, Rabbi/Cantor Berele Zaltzman, outreach director Rabbi
Yudi Kanelsky, and Torah education/youth director Rabbi Avremy Kanelsky
are also pictured in the group.
Nursing home leaders meet
with lawmakers in Trenton
Last month, Sunni Herman, executive vice
president and CEO of the Jewish Home at
Rockleigh, along with representatives of
five other nursing homes in the state, met
with New Jersey legislators to advocate
behalf of New Jerseys nursing homes. The
meeting included a discussion of the value
of not-for-profit aging agencies and the
work of Leading Age NJ.
Ms. Herman met with state leaders
including Lieutenant Governor Kim Gua-
dagno, State Senate Minority Leader
Thomas H. Kean Jr., Assistant Major-
ity Leader Paul A. Sarlo, and Assembly
Speaker Vincent Prieto.
Leading Age NJ, formerly the New Jersey
Association of Homes and Services for the
Aging, is the statewide association of not-
for-profit senior care organizations and is
dedicated to advancing aging services in
New Jersey through advocacy.
Assemblyman Joseph A. Lagana,
who represents the 38th District, with
Sunni Herman.
Knesset member coming to Teaneck
Israeli Knesset member Ruth
Calderon will discuss Tal-
mud as a Bridge Between
Secular and Religious Israe-
lis on Sunday, October 12,
at 8 p.m., for an adult edu-
cation program at Congrega-
tion Rinat Yisrael in Teaneck.
Ms. Calderons talk will
incorporate a brief Talmud
lecture to illustrate how to
link secular Israelis with Jew-
ish religious literature, creating a bridge
across the society. She will
talk about her journey to
the Knesset in 2013 and
the objectives of Elul and
Alma, two programs she
founded. Elul is the first
Israeli beit midrash for
secular Israelis, and Alma
seeks to acquaint secular
Israelis with Hebrew cul-
ture. The synagogue is at
389 W. Englewood Ave. For
information, call (201) 837-2795.
Ruth Calderon
Talk by Anne Franks stepsister
set for October 27 at Bergen YJCC
Eva Schloss, Anne Franks
stepsister and childhood
friend, will speak at the Ber-
gen County YJCC in Washing-
ton Township on Monday,
October 27, at 7 p.m. Valley
Chabad of Woodcliff Lake will
co-host the evening as part of
its Eternal Flame Holocaust
Education Program. The
Jewish Home Assisted Living
is among the sponsors.
Ms. Schloss, 85, who is a Holocaust
survivor and an author, will tell the
story of her life, including her time at
Auschwitz-Birkenau. Her father and
brother did not survive the war, but she
and her mother were freed in 1945 by
Russian troops. They returned to Holland
where her mother, Elfriede
Geiringer, married Otto
Frank, Anne Franks father,
in November 1953.
Eva married Zvi Schloss,
another Jewish refugee from
Germany, who had escaped
to Pal esti ne before the
war. The couple had three
daughters.
Valley Chabads Eternal
Flame program is sponsored
by the George and Martha Ri ch
Foundation, dedicated to Holocaust
education, genocide prevention, and the
elimination of intolerance toward any
minority group.
Buy tickets on online at Eternalflame.
org or by calling (201) 476-0157.
Eva Schloss
ZOA center director will address
anti-Semitism on college campuses
Susan Tuchman, director
of the Center for Law &
Justice for the Zionist Orga-
nization of America, the
oldest pro-Israel organiza-
tion in the United States,
will discuss Anti-Semitism
on College Campuses.
The talk and breakfast for
parents of college-bound
teens, sponsored by the
Bergen Count y Hi gh
School of Jewish Studies and open to
the entire community, is set for Sunday,
October 19, from 9:45 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m., at Maayanot
Yeshiva High School for
Girls in Teaneck.
Bess Adler, BCHSJSs
principal, will discuss how
the school prepares its
graduates to confront these
challenges.
Maayanot i s at 1650
Palisade Ave. Sponsorships
are available. For tickets,
call (201) 488-0834 or www.wizevents.
com/register/2950.
Susan Tuchman
Editorial
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Rebecca Kaplan Boroson
The NFL desperately needs a prayer
W
ho would have guessed that in the week
of Yom Kippur football of all things
would put prayer in the national news?
I have loved football since I was a boy.
Growing up with my father thousands of miles away, I
actually took myself to Miami Dolphin games on a bus
most Sundays during the season from the age of per-
haps 12.
I love the game, but I also love the celebration of
faith, which seems unique to the NFL. The beautiful
prayer circles that we see after NFL games, where
players from opposing teams, who moments ago were
crushing each others bones, now kneel together in
prayer. Tony Dungy of the Indianapolis Colts winning
the Super Bowl and immediately ascribing the glory
to God. Tim Tebow wearing his religious convictions
on his sleeve and coining a
new phrase in his humility
before God.
For those who believe
that God has no place
in the NFL, I ask them,
really? So the only thing
that should be allowed
are the truly dignified
displays of women jump-
ing up and down in Lycra
with pompoms and cleav-
age, and bare- chested,
pot-bellied men with their
team names written across their stomachs? Wearing
a cheese hat is okay, but not a yarmulke?
Who would have thought that 50 years after femi-
nism, women would feel no offense being reduced to
go-go dancers in underwear cheering a touchdown?
And thats OK, but prayer is not?
When you go to a British soccer game you run the
risk of being trampled to death by a notorious army
of drunken knuckle-draggers, assuming you can stay
awake for the predictable nil-nil score. (International
soccer is the one exception to the rule that men are
goal-oriented.) What you most certainly will not see
is any form of prayer.
And for those of us who appreciate the benedic-
tion before a game and who found Tebowing to be
inspirational, how dare we employ a double standard
and not salute the demonstration of faith by Husain
Abdullah of the Kansas City Chiefs?
By penalizing Abdullah for a gesture of Muslim
prayer after picking off Tom Brady and scoring a
touchdown, the NFL has reached a level of schizo-
phrenia that is truly troubling.
Here is a league being universally condemned for
its soft approach to domestic violence and the Ray
Rice incident. Here is a league besot by scandal over
the Adrian Peterson corporal punishment episode.
And here is a league engulfed in controversy over
commissioner Roger Goodells response to both.
Youd think that a league that is being accused of
looking the other way in order to generate bucket-
loads of cash would appreciate the morality of play-
ers who believe in God, lead religious lives, and offer
harmless gestures of faith in a game.
Youd think that a league being accused of amorality
would treat religious players like Husain Abdullah as
a godsend, and celebrate rather than penalize them.
We in the West who continually reach out to our
Muslim brothers and sisters asking them to ensure
that extremists not take over their religion should be
cheering and applauding special athletes like Abdul-
lah, who are a phenomenal credit to their faith and
inspire Americans to give gratitude to God.
What was the officiating team on Monday night
thinking when it penalized an absolutely innocent
demonstration of worship?
America is a religious country and sincerely so.
Ninety-two percent of the population believes in God.
But for all that, America loves compartmentalizing
religion. Keep it in the church, but not in the schools.
Put God in political campaigns but not in the popular
culture. Aside from those who pay for their airtime,
like Joel Osteen, notice that you rarely ever see reli-
gion on TV.
What players like Husain Abdullah are guilty of,
and what gets under peoples skin, is breaching the
Shmuley Boteach of Englewood, who has written 30
books and has just published Kosher Lust. Follow him
on Twitter @RabbiShmuley.
20 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-20*
Starting again
F
inally, a lull.
Maybe it is our imagination, but the world, or at least
our little corner of it, seems to have calmed down.
We are now well into the holiday season; Rosh
Hashanah is well past, and depending on when you read this, Yom
Kippur might be too. Those are the most emotionally dense of
the Tishrei holidays, the days when memory and longing and fear
and the desire for change and at the same time for return throb
most painfully.
After that, Sukkots wonder and Simchat Torahs joy feel almost
like coasting.
And the weather has changed too. Its fall now. The light has
changed; the air feels different; we dress in layers, long sleeves
and thin wool and sweaters and tights. Shabbat starts earlier and
we walk our dogs in darkness.
Although many kinds of terror threatens from many quarters
from around Israels borders and the rest of the Middle East, from
Europe, from Africa none has intruded in the last few weeks. We
have been free to revel in the change of seasons, in the excitement
of the new light, of the intensity of the holidays.
So maybe now we have the luxury of looking around for signs
of goodness after the terrible summer, when they were so hard
to come by. Signs of unity. Signs of the truth that in fact, despite
all the ideology and theology that divides us, we are one people.
To begin with, there are the holidays themselves, that time
when all of us well, okay, we dont actually come together, but
at least we do the same things at more or less the same time, even
if we do them differently. Its sort of like young childrens parallel
play, which is after all an important development stage.
Tashlich brought so very many of us out. In Manhattan, that is
strikingly visible, as Jews of every possible degree of difference,
dressed in wildly varying ways, stand side by side along the rails
throwing bread into the river and then allowing their thoughts
to wander as they follow the clouds and the boats and then head
home for yes, another meal.
Other ritual, too, is a great uniter. We might go about Slichot,
say, differently, but the range of stories in our pages during the last
few weeks, as well as the entries in our calendar, make it clear that
it has community-wide appeal. And we know that on Friday night,
the melody of Kol Nidrei will resound across the world. The voices
will be different but the music will not.
And then there is food. Even those Jews who do not make it to
shul at all on the holidays often find themselves at a table laden
with impossible amounts of food. Whatever else we do, on these
fall days we seem to eat as if gorging were newly fashionable.
When we consider how much hatred there is in the world
around us, wouldnt it be wonderful if we Jews could stop hating
each other? If we could take the opportunity that this new year
brings us to start again? To turn it around and turn it around and
start fresh? To love each other like sisters and brothers? That is to
say, not simply, not purely, not without resentments, not without
some eye-rolling, not without baggage but always with love.
JP
Rabbi
Shmuley
Boteach
By penalizing
Abdullah for a
gesture of Muslim
prayer after picking
off Tom Brady and
scoring a touchdown,
the NFL has
reached a level of
schizophrenia that is
truly troubling.
Rabbi, dont wimp out on Israel
S
ince the eve of Rosh Hashanah, print
journalism and the blogosphere have
abounded with conversations about
what rabbis will be talking about when
congregants sit in the pews during the holiday
season.
After this summer, there is no shortage of
material. A rise in anti-Semitism worldwide; an
increase in violence on college campuses; the
murders of four teenage boys, three of them
Israeli and one Palestinian; a 50-day war with
Hamas in Gaza, where more than 75 percent of
Israel was within reach of rockets, not to mention
the worsening situation in Ukraine and the growth of ISIS all
this should be enough material for any rabbi.
Thus, I was surprised to see an article in the New York
Times that claimed that many rabbinic col-
leagues most maintaining anonymity for fear
of their views affecting their positions would
not broach Israel, or events surrounding Israel,
as a sermon topic, for fear of offending the right
or left.
Further to the point, Peter Beinart wrote in
Haaretz that rabbis should steer away from ser-
mons about Israel these High Holidays because
they are B-grade pundits. His point expressly
implies that rabbis are ill equipped to speak
about Israel effectually. Additionally, Beinart
said, the real issue with the Jewish world today is
illiteracy with Jewish texts, not Israel, and that is where rabbis
should concentrate.
The NFL desperately needs a prayer
touchdown, the NFL has reached a level of schizo-
phrenia that is truly troubling.
Here is a league being universally condemned for
its soft approach to domestic violence and the Ray
Rice incident. Here is a league besot by scandal over
the Adrian Peterson corporal punishment episode.
And here is a league engulfed in controversy over
commissioner Roger Goodells response to both.
Youd think that a league that is being accused of
looking the other way in order to generate bucket-
loads of cash would appreciate the morality of play-
ers who believe in God, lead religious lives, and offer
harmless gestures of faith in a game.
Youd think that a league being accused of amorality
would treat religious players like Husain Abdullah as
a godsend, and celebrate rather than penalize them.
We in the West who continually reach out to our
Muslim brothers and sisters asking them to ensure
that extremists not take over their religion should be
cheering and applauding special athletes like Abdul-
lah, who are a phenomenal credit to their faith and
inspire Americans to give gratitude to God.
What was the officiating team on Monday night
thinking when it penalized an absolutely innocent
demonstration of worship?
America is a religious country and sincerely so.
Ninety-two percent of the population believes in God.
But for all that, America loves compartmentalizing
religion. Keep it in the church, but not in the schools.
Put God in political campaigns but not in the popular
culture. Aside from those who pay for their airtime,
like Joel Osteen, notice that you rarely ever see reli-
gion on TV.
What players like Husain Abdullah are guilty of,
and what gets under peoples skin, is breaching the
Opinion
line that separates the secular from the
religious, the holy from the profane, the
sacred from the everyday. God is a seri-
ous subject. People want Him in their lives
and will turn to Him at the appropriate
time.
But not in their recreation. We just want
to have a good time.
We want to see bone-crunching tackles,
running backs diving into the end zone.
Not people on their knees in prayer.
But people like me admire Abdullah
precisely because we dont believe in
these artificial lines. We believe in live
and let live.
Were not here to ever impose our faith
on anyone else. But we wont accept hav-
ing it knocked out of us either. Were not
fanatics. We dont argue that its our way
or the highway. Were not going to make
you pray. But less so are we willing to
allow you to forbid us to practice our faith.
Its a free country. Some want to spike
the ball in the end zone. Some want to get
on a knee and give thanks. Who does that
bother?
Public schools never should have man-
datory prayer. But as the Lubavitcher
rebbe of blessed memory argued, they
should have a moment of silence where
pupils can choose to reflect on something
higher if they so choose. God should not
be mandated at school. But He need not
be chased out either.
Religion obviously should not be
enforced in public schools, but parents
should get vouchers to send their children
to religious schools if they so choose. Its
their tax money after all.
So hack away at that artificial line,
Husain. Pray away on the gridiron. Keep
on being you. Youre my Muslim brother. I
greatly respect your love of your faith and
I hope more of my Jewish brothers follow
suit and proudly proclaim their own faith
in public.
I realize that there are about as many
Jews playing in the NFL as there are rab-
bis in the French Foreign Legion. But just
imagine if a single Jewish player, after
scoring a touchdown, were to pull out his
tzitzis and kiss them on national TV!
Priceless.
JS-21*
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 21
Its a free
country. Some
want to spike the
ball in the end
zone. Some want
to get on a knee
and give thanks.
Who does that
bother?
A tale of two sermons
A
few years ago, on the first day of Sukkot,
Rabbi Yosef Adler delivered this sermon
at Teanecks Congregation Rinat Yisrael,
where he serves as spiritual leader:
During the Sukkot holiday, in birkhat hamazon,
our blessing after meals, we recite the following
prayer: Harahamon hu yakim lanu et sukkat David
hanofelet, May Hashem establish for us the fallen
sukkah of David.
Why the image of a fallen sukkah for the Davidic
kingdom, he asked. Why not a castle or some other
sturdy structure?
Rabbi Adler expounded on an explanation first
offered by Rabbi Yehuda Amital, ztl, who recently had died. When
a house collapses, the new structure that replaces it is never the
same. It is something different. Not so the sukkah. Every year, after
Simchat Torah, we dismantle the sukkah and store it in our garage.
The following year, immediately after Yom Kippur, we take it out and
rebuild it. We may replace a cracked panel, our children may add
new decorations, but the sukkah remains.
So too with Judaism, Rabbi Adler concluded. We may be exiled
to the far reaches of the earth, to strange lands in strange times, but
our devotion to Jewish law remains steadfast. The sukkah that is,
the laws of sukkah does not change. Each year the sukkah returns
to its original essence. The secret of our survival lies in our fealty to
Jewish tradition.
The following morning, on the second day of Sukkot, Rabbi Joel
Pitkowsky delivered this sermon at Teanecks Congregation Beth
Sholom, where he serves as spiritual leader:
May the All-Merciful establish for us the fallen sukkah of David.
Why the metaphor of a sukkah? Why not a castle?
Rabbi Pitkowsky, again citing Rav Amital, continued: A building
may look permanent but it is not. Like empires, it ends. But a sukkah
can be rebuilt in different times and places. We may select different
materials and it may come in different styles and dimensions but the
essential laws that turn a shack into a sukkah, primarily the roof, or
schach, remain the same. So long as we hold onto our essence, the
Jewish people, like a sukkah, can adapt to historys violent storms.
One sermon in two days, delivered three blocks apart. There are
a number of possible lessons to be learned:
1. Stick to one shul. If you dont, you may find yourself listening to
the same sermon day after day.
2. Move around. Seeing how different congregations celebrate our
festivals and hearing what they have to say may provide a depth of
insight that one-eyed viewing does not. A sermon becomes sharper
when delivered in different venues, its imbedded values more
evident. At Rinat Yisrael, an Orthodox congregation
led by Rabbi Adler since its founding in 1979, the ser-
mon underlined the continuity of Jewish law. At Beth
Sholom, a Conservative congregation founded in 1952
and led by Rabbi Pitkowsky since 2011, the sermon
addressed the tension between tradition and change,
with which that denomination long has grappled.
Worshipping in a synagogue affiliated with another
denomination will not necessarily lead to a kumbaya
moment. On the contrary, the experience can be jar-
ring. One emerges from the other synagogue with
deeper appreciation of the often profound differences
that synagogues, Jewish law, and God play in peoples
lives. This can be a good thing. Unspoken assumptions are high-
lighted and preconceived notions are challenged. Sometimes, you
better understand your own by going somewhere else.
3. Yehuda Amitals life (1924-2010) and teachings are worthy of
our study. Romanian-born, Amital was the sole Holocaust survivor
in his family. As a teenager in a forced labor camp, he swore that
if he survived, he would study Torah in Jerusalem. He made his
way there after liberation and attended Hevron Yeshiva, a leading
charedi institution. The day after Israel declared independence, a
Shabbat, Amital enlisted in the IDF, and later he fought in Latrun
and the Galilee. While savoring Jewish self-defense in the shadow of
the Holocaust, he urged religious soldiers to sanctify Gods name by
upright behavior. After the Six Day War, Rav Amital founded Yeshi-
vat Har Etzion, helped build it into one of Israels most innovative
institutions, and inspired a generation of religious Zionists.
4. Two synagogues, three blocks apart, each with membership
numbering in the hundreds, generally are unaware of each other.
As things now stand, on Shabbat and holidays, these two com-
munities often pass each other with nary a nod, like dark matter
through our bodies, undetectable except with the most sensitive
of instruments. The diminishing openness to other Jews, not to
mention other observant and believing Jews, diminishes us all.
It does not bode well for our, and Israels, future. If nothing else,
think of all the time that could be saved if the rabbis worked on
their sermons together!
5. In recent years, the divisions among the various streams of
American Judaism have been highlighted. It takes an extraordinary
teacher like Rav Amital, ztl, to remind us how much we share.
Surely this is the first step to re-establishing the fallen sukkah of
David.
Barry E. Lichtenberg of Teaneck practices law in Manhattan. In
Israel, he attended Yeshivat Kerem BYavneh.
Barry E.
Lichtenberg
Rabbi David-
Seth Kirshner
SEE WIMP OUT PAGE 22
Opinion
22 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-22*
Yes, second-day chag
I would like to state my disagreement
with Rabbi Engelmayer on the second
day of Yom Tov for Passover, Sukkot,
and Shavuot (What a difference a day
makes, September 26).
There are two reasons. First, while the
original reason for the second day of Yom
Tov in the diaspora was about doubt over
when the holiday should be, over the cen-
turies a second reason developed. That
reason is the spiritual centrality of the
land of Israel for Jews. We must observe
another day outside of Israel because we
are on a lower spiritual level if we live out-
side of Israel. As many American Jews dis-
engage from the land and State of Israel,
this reason remains important. This is also
why there is strong resistance to this idea
within the Conservative Rabbinical Assem-
bly and no support at all within Orthodoxy.
Secondl y, Rabbi Engel mayers
Sometimes its simple
Good versus evil in the world
R
osh Hashanah and Yom Kip-
pur speak to us differently
each year, challenging us to
hear their unique voice. This
year, as we confront a world marked by
turbulence, pain, and uncertainty, the
singular voice of these holiest of days
becomes even more important to hear.
A striking inconsistency surrounds
the seminal event that the midrash tells
us gives birth to the symbol of the Sho-
far. Why is it that God directly launches
Akiedat Yitzchak, the aborted sacrifice of
Isaac, but it is left to an angel to stop it?
The Akeida narrative opens with a
direct instruction from God to Avraham:
And it was after these things that God
tested Avraham and said to him Take
your son, your only one, whom you love,
Yitzchak In contrast, however, three
days later, as Avraham stretches forth his
hand on the summit of Mount Moriah
to fulfill Gods will, the text clearly pro-
claims: And an Angel of the Lord called
to him from the heaven, and said Do
not stretch out your hand against the
lad
If God directly launches this difficult
test, why does He halt it only through the
aegis of a messenger?
The simplest answer to this mystery
may be the most profound. At a moment
of potential violence against man, even
when that violence is mandated by God,
God is distant, His presence is dimin-
ished. God directly launches the Akeida,
but when the patriarch moves to sacrifice
his son, God is not there; his presence
can be felt only through an
angel.
There will be times in
human experi ence, the
Torah teaches us, when vio-
lence will be justified, essen-
tial, and moral. God does
not rejoice at such times.
When man is threatened,
when his image is dimin-
ished at the hand of his fel-
low man, Gods image is
diminished as well.
This scene, this message, captures
the conflict that defines our times the
spreading global war between two clear
religious visions.
On one side stands a religious vision
that revels in the cry of jihad; that sees
God rejoicing in the violent destruc-
tion of human life; that is bent upon the
destruction of all vestiges of other faiths
and traditions; that perceives no inde-
pendent value in human thought, cre-
ativity, debate, or dialogue. On the other
stands a religious vision rooted in Jew-
ish tradition that perceives a fundamen-
tal value to all human life; that discerns
Gods presence in mans independent ini-
tiative; that views the exchange of ideas
as powering mans accomplishments;
that sees violence as an unfortunate, if
at times necessary, tool in the confronta-
tion with evil; that counters the calls for
jihad with a passionate plea for what it
perceives as Gods greatest gift to man,
shalom.
In short, we are witnessing a clash
between a religious vision
that is so God-centric that
it leaves no place for man
and a religious vision that
posits an essential partner-
ship between God and man
in the creation of sanctity in
this world.
How tel l i ng that our
homeland and our people
stand on the front lines of
a global conflict, as hap-
pens over and over again
throughout history. Make no mistake
about it, Israel is Ground Zero, not only
in its battle for survival, but in the world
war against Islamic fundamentalists.
And how important it is that we insist
that the battle against such fundamen-
talism should be a battle against all of its
forms and all of its mutations: from Isis
to Hamas, from Hezbollah to al-Qaeda,
from the Nusra Front to the mullahs of
Iran. For while these groups may well
war with each other, their fundamental
vision remains the same: a world without
freedom, without choice, and without
independent human endeavor.
Here then, the unique voice of the
High Holidays this year, an overlay upon
the ever-present messages of teshuva
and personal growth. Locked in a global
struggle not only over mans soul, but
over mans vision of God and Gods will,
we must pledge to do our part. We are
challenged by these days to better under-
stand and appreciate our own vision of
the sanctity of all mankind, to support
the struggle against Islamic fundamental-
ism in all its forms, to support our broth-
ers and sisters in Israel as they face an
ever-changing violent landscape, and to
insist that the world recognize Israels
struggle as its own.
Above all, we are challenged to pray
that God respond to the clarion call for
jihad through the bestowal of his great-
est gift upon the world and upon our
nation: Hashem oz lamo yitain, Hashem
yvareich et amo vashalom. May God
grant his nation strength; may God bless
his nation with peace.
Shmuel Goldin is the senior rabbi
at Congregation Ahavath Torah in
Englewood and the immediate past
president of the Rabbinical Council of
America.
Rabbi Shmuel
Goldin
Make no mistake
about it, Israel
is Ground Zero,
not only in its
battle for
survival, but in
the world war
against Islamic
fundamentalists.
My response to Peter Beinart and the
many anonymous rabbis quoted by the New
York Times is simple: Dont wimp out.
What congregations around the globe
want from their leaders is simple. They
want courage. They want leaders with con-
victions and principles and passion. Congre-
gants want to be infected with that passion
by their rabbis. As clergy members, we have
been deputized to share our interpretation
both of texts and current events and
to lend a Jewish voice and lens to the situ-
ation in which we find ourselves living. Few
people want to come to synagogue to hear
a tofu-flavored thought about the Torah por-
tion these days. They want to know what
you think and why you think it. That is, after
all, why they hired you.
As with all things that require courage,
speaking up and out might make you vulner-
able. That is a good thing. I contend that the
very openness that is fostered in being honest
is the secret ingredient that allows us to be
sensitive and thoughtful in crafting our mes-
sage, so that other views and opinions can
be heard and tolerated, even if disagreed
with. Walking that line and making many feel
included is sacrosanct. Clergy members can
finesse that line better than most.
Isnt that why we heard the calling to join
the cloth in the first place? Didnt we want to
change the world and make it a better place?
I chose to be a rabbi because I wanted to lend
my voice to the shaping of this planet. Reli-
gion is not a sideline sport. It necessitates me
getting on the field and being open and raw.
Our shying away from the hard conversations
will not make that change, and it most defi-
nitely will not inspire our flocks. That silence
leads rabbis to a career limited to hatch em,
match em, and dispatch em. While those
touchstones are sacred, I know that my job
calls for more from me.
In my congregation, I speak about
Israel as much as I speak about any topic.
Everyone who walks through our doors
knows that we have unconditional love
for our Israel. But they also know that we
can ask tough questions and be lovingly
critical in an effort to make our home-
land better and ourselves too. Isnt that
the essence of religion? Shouldnt that be
the ideal we strive for?
To my colleagues in the pulpit, I encour-
age you to ignore the New York Times and
brush off Beinart, who is at best a B-grade
rabbinic adviser. Instead, muster the courage
to speak your heart and your passion these
High Holidays. Infect your congregation with
your courage, and challenge them to lead.
Let them know whether you are left or right,
critical or complimentary. Your baring your
own soul will help effect change. That is the
core component of the High Holiday season.
I posit that doing so will stoke your members
to make a difference in their workplaces and
among their friends. And frankly, after all
that has happened in our world recently, I
think the courage to speak our mind is what
we need most right now.
Lets celebrate that courage and not
squelch it. That would be a sin too great to
burden this season.
David-Seth Kirshner is the senior
rabbi of Temple Emanu-El of Closter
and president of the New York Board
of Rabbis.
Wimp out
FROM PAGE 21
That silence leads
rabbis to a career
limited to hatch
em, match em,
and dispatch em.
While those
touchstones are
sacred, I know
that my job calls
for more from me.
Opinion
JS-23
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 23
T
hat future generations may
know that I made the chil-
dren of Israel live in booths
(sukkot) when I brought
them out of the land of Egypt Leviti-
cus 23:43.
Booths clouds of honor (ananei
kavod) Rashi.
When we were young, many of us
were taught that the sukkah espe-
cially its essential covering represents
something otherworldly. The structure
in which we were dining was meant to
evoke the divine clouds that sheltered
the Israelites in the desert.
The definition of booths was, in
fact, debated by the Tannaitic sages.
One opinion took them to be real huts,
erected for shelter from the sun; the
other identified them with the biblical
cloud-pillar also known in the Tal-
mud and midrash as clouds of honor
that guided and protected the Jews
throughout the exodus.
It may seem far-fetched to read
booths metaphorically as divine
clouds. Clouds and booths are
hardly synonymous. We could also
argue, however, that the more literal
interpretation is undermined by the
fact that this reference in Leviticus is
the only explicit record of booth-dwell-
ing by the Israelites. The heavenly
cloud, in contrast, appears repeatedly
in the Torah, from Exodus onward.
In fact, the link between sukkot and
ananei kavod is supported by two sepa-
rate streams of textual evidence. There
are several instances where the Bible
uses sukkah literally, a covering or
canopy in poetic references to God,
who is hidden behind a screen
of clouds. Furthermore, the
phrase when I brought them
out of the land of Egypt sug-
gests a direct connection
between the sukkot in this
verse and events that took
place during the early his-
tory of the exodus. Sukkot,
as it happens, is also a place
name. As implied in Exodus
(13:20-22) and underlined by
the Jerusalem Targum, Sukkot
the Israelites first station outside of
Egypt was the place where the divine
clouds first appeared. So, in a nonlit-
eral but strongly suggested reading
of Leviticus, the sukkot in which God
sheltered the Israelites were none other
than the divine clouds that first accom-
panied them at Sukkot.
If we dwell in booths on Sukkot to
recall the divine clouds of the des-
ert, the question becomes why this
holiday is the right time for such a
commemoration.
Throughout the Bible, clouds are a
common manifestation of Gods pres-
ence. At the revelation on Mt. Sinai,
Moses disappears into a cloud on the
mountain. In the desert, the cloud pil-
lar guides the Israelites and descends
regularly to speak with Moses or to
mark the next station. Gods glory
(kavod) appears in a cloud at the dedi-
cation of the Tabernacle and again at
the dedication of Solomons Temple,
in each case preventing entry into the
sanctuary. These clouds are not ethe-
real mists; they are tangible.
But the word kavod has a dual
Letters
Yes, second-day chag
I would like to state my disagreement
with Rabbi Engelmayer on the second
day of Yom Tov for Passover, Sukkot,
and Shavuot (What a difference a day
makes, September 26).
There are two reasons. First, while the
original reason for the second day of Yom
Tov in the diaspora was about doubt over
when the holiday should be, over the cen-
turies a second reason developed. That
reason is the spiritual centrality of the
land of Israel for Jews. We must observe
another day outside of Israel because we
are on a lower spiritual level if we live out-
side of Israel. As many American Jews dis-
engage from the land and State of Israel,
this reason remains important. This is also
why there is strong resistance to this idea
within the Conservative Rabbinical Assem-
bly and no support at all within Orthodoxy.
Secondl y, Rabbi Engel mayers
rationale smacks a religion of conve-
nience, which does not ask for commit-
ment. This continued acceptance of a
religion of convenience may be one of
the reasons for the decline of the Con-
servative movement.
Interestingly, there may be a change
in how the second day of Yom Tov is
celebrated. As the barriers between
Jews in Israel and the diaspora dissolve
(many American Jews live part time
in Israel or have family members who
made aliyah), the determination of
whether you celebrate a second day of
Yom Tov may be changed from where
you live to where you actually are. Both
positions have strong basis within Jew-
ish law. The reason for adopting the
second position is a change of the facts
on the ground, not convenience.
Alan Mark Levin
Fair Lawn
201-390-8400
CALL NOW FOR
IMMEDIATE
TREE CLEAN UP
Ask for Dovid
Clear the air
above your Sukkah
Clouds of glory, clouds of honor
meaning in the Bible; it
is alternatively translated
as glory or honor,
depending on the con-
text. Generally, glory is
a divine quality, whereas
honor denotes respect
shown to humans. The
distinction is best illus-
trated in the King James
Version rendering of a
verse where kavod is used
twice, in both senses: It
is the glory (kavod) of God to conceal a
thing, but the honor (kavod) of kings is to
search out a matter (Proverbs 25:2).
The divine clouds of Sukkot the sages
ananei kavod are of a different nature
than the clouds of glory. The sages mul-
tiplied the singular cloud-pillar by seven,
with six clouds shielding the camp in each
direction and one leading the way forward.
One midrash compares the clouds with the
bridal canopy prepared by a groom, and
another goes so far as to associate them
with imagery from Song of Songs (2:6)
his left hand was under my head, his
right arm embraced me. These clouds
are intimate and nurturing; they envelop
and protect as would a parent or a lover.
The clouds of Sukkot are clouds of honor,
rather than clouds of glory.
Sukkot is celebrated in the wake of the
Days of Awe, whose religious experience is
one of encountering divine glory. On Rosh
Hashanah, we acknowledge Gods majesty
over creation and in history. The shofar
invokes the clouds of Mount Sinai, where
Gods glory was manifest most clearly:
You revealed yourself in your cloud of
glory on your holy mountain. And on Yom
Kippur, we confront the finitude of human
life and contrast our moral shallowness
with an infinite God.
When Sukkot arrives, our relationship
with the divine has changed. While we are
thankful for the harvest, yet another sign
of divine glory, we are preoccupied with
distinctly human anxieties related to the
imminent rainy season and the dark win-
ter. On Sukkot, we ask for human honor
and dignity: To be sheltered under divine
wings, rather than overpowered by divine
glory. Under the sukkahs canopy, God
honors man.
David Zinberg lives in Teaneck with his
wife and three boys and works in financial
services. His blog is Realia Judaica.
David S.
Zinberg
Year in Review
24 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-24
September 2013
The United States and Russia reach a deal
to rid Syria of its arsenal of chemical weap-
ons, promoting Jewish groups to suspend
their efforts lobbying for U.S. strikes against
Damascus.
Rabbi Philip Berg, founder of the Kabbalah
Centre in Los Angeles and teacher of Jewish
mysticism for A-list celebrities, dies at 86.
William Rapfogel, the ousted leader of the
Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty in
New York, is arrested on charges of grand
larceny and money laundering. Investiga-
tors later say the scheme involving Rapfogel
netted $9 million in illicit funds, including
$3 million for Rapfogel himself. Rapfogel
pleads guilty the following April and is sent
to prison in July for 3 1/2 to 10 years.
In his address to the U.N. General Assem-
bly, President Obama says the U.S. focus in
the Middle East will be on keeping Iran from
obtaining a nuclear weapon while advancing
Israeli-Palestinian peace. Meanwhile, in a
meeting with U.S. Jewish leaders, Palestinian
Authority President Mahmoud Abbas says he
is more hopeful now for peace than he was in
the mid-2000s.
The Foundation for Jewish Culture, a
53-year-old organization dedicated to
promoting Jewish culture and the arts,
announces it is closing.
Larry Ellison, CEO of the technoloy com-
pany Oracle, is ranked as the richest Jew in
the United States, according to the Forbes
400 list of the wealthiest Americans, which
puts Ellison at No. 3. Other Jews making the
top 20 are Michael Bloomberg (10, $31 bil-
lion); Sheldon Adelson (11, $28.5 billion);
Sergey Brin (14, $24.4 billion); George Soros
(19, $20 billion), and Marc Zuckerberg (20,
$19 billion).
Ruth Bader Ginsburg becomes the irst
U.S. Supreme Court justice to preside over a
same-sex marriage, the wedding ceremony
of Michael Kaiser and John Roberts.
October 2013
SHUTTERSTOCK
A landmark study of U.S. Jews
by the Pew Research Center
inds the Jewish intermarriage
rate has risen to 58 percent and
that among the 22 percent of
American Jews who describe
themselves as having no reli-
gion, two-thirds are not rais-
ing their children as Jews. The
survey also estimates the U.S.
Jewish population at 6.8 mil-
lion, roughly the same estimate
arrived at by Brandeis Univer-
sity researchers analyzing 350
separate population studies.
The Parliamentary Assembly
of the Council of Europe, a pan-
European intergovernmental
organization, overwhelmingly
passes a resolution calling male
ritual circumcision a violation
of the physical integrity of chil-
dren and putting it in the same
class as female genital mutila-
tion. Israeli President Shimon
Peres joins the chorus of voices
protesting the decision. In
November, the groups leader
assures Jews that the council
does not seek to ban Jewish rit-
ual circumcision.
Addressing the Anti-Defama-
tion Leagues centennial con-
ference, the U.S. ambassador
to the United Nations, Saman-
tha Power, vows that the United
States will not cut a bad deal
with Iran.
Year in Review
JTA STAFF
Read about the highs and lows of 5774 and everything in between.
Year in Review
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 25
JS-25
December 2013
Gal Gadot, an Israeli actress who is a
former Miss Israel, is cast as Wonder
Woman in the upcoming ilm Batman
vs. Superman.
WIKICOMMONS
Swarthmores Hillel chapter becomes
the irst to join the so-called Open Hil-
lel movement, which challenges Hil-
lel Internationals guidelines prohibit-
ing partnerships with groups it deems
hostile toward Israel. Hillel boards at
Vassar and Wesleyan soon follow suit.
URJ
The Union for Reform Judaism
announces at its biennial conference
in San Diego that it has sold off half
its headquarters in New York and is
investing $1 million from the proceeds
to overhaul the movements youth pro-
gramming. Here, a group of women
hold hands around the Torah dur-
ing Shabbat morning services at the
conference.
A day after meeting with President
Obama, Israeli Prime Minister Benja-
min Netanyahu tells the U.N. General
Assembly that Israel is ready to go it
alone against Iran should it come close
to obtaining a nuclear weapon.
Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, who founded
the Sephardic Orthodox Shas political
party and exercised major influence on
Jewish law, dies at 93.
MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES
New York City Mayor Michael Bloom-
berg is named the irst recipient of
the Genesis Prize, a $1 million award
for a renowned professional capable
of inspiring young Jews. The prize is
funded by a consortium of Jewish phi-
lanthropists from the former Soviet
Union.
Arieh Warshel, a U.S. professor born
and educated in Israel, and ex-Weiz-
mann Institute professor Michael Lev-
itt are among the winners of the 2013
Nobel Prize for chemistry.
Two Orthodox rabbis from the New
York area and two accomplices are
arrested for allegedly kidnapping and
beating men to force them to grant
their wives religious Jewish divorces,
or gets.
IDF SPOKESPERSON/FLASH90
Israeli forces discover a terror tun-
nel running from Gaza to an Israeli
kibbutz. The tunnel is full of explosives
and ends near an Israeli kindergarten.
Janet Yellen is named head of the U.S.
Federal Reserve, becoming the third
American Jewish central banker in a
row and the irst woman to hold the
post.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM
Movement leaders at the centennial
conference of the United Synagogue
of Conservative Judaism in Baltimore
agree that signiicant rejuvenation
is needed if Conservative Judaism
is to reverse its negative trajectory.
Rabbi Steven Wernick heads United
Synagogue.
Israelis demonstrate against the
release of 26 Palestinian prisoners.
November 2013
Semen Domnitser, the former Claims
Conference employee who was found
guilty of leading a $57 million fraud
scheme at the Holocaust restitution
organization, is sentenced to eight
years in prison. The scheme entails fal-
sifying applications to two funds estab-
lished by the German government to
make restitution payments to Holo-
caust survivors.
In a survey of 5,847 European Jews,
nearly one-third of respondents say
they seriously considered emigrating
from Europe because of anti-Semitism.
German authorities begin taking steps
to identify the provenance of more
than 1,400 works of Holocaust-era art
found in the Munich home of Cornelius
Gurlitt.
Joseph Paul Franklin is executed
for killing a man at a St. Louis-area
synagogue in 1977. Franklin, 63, shot
Gerald Gordon outside the Brith Sho-
lom Kneseth Israel synagogue as Gor-
don left a bar mitzvah. Franklin also
is convicted of seven other murders
throughout the United States and
claims credit for 20 deaths between
1977 and 1980.
Forty families belonging to the cha-
redi Orthodox extremist group Lev
Tahor consider fleeing their Quebec
homes because they fear that Canadian
welfare authorities are poised to seize
their children.
The United States and a coalition of
world powers reach a six-month agree-
ment with Iran to curb the countrys
nuclear program in exchange for some
sanctions relief while negotiations for
a inal settlement on Irans nuclear
program are conducted. Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pans the
deal as a historic mistake. The deal
goes into effect on January 20.
The release of 26 Palestinian prisoners unleashed anger and protests in Israel.
URIEL SINAI/GETTY IMAGES
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks out against the interim
nuclear deal with Iran. HAIM ZACH/GPO
SEE DECEMBER PAGE 26
Year in Review
26 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-26
G M A R
C H A T I M A H
T O V A H
P R A Y ,
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The membership of the American Studies Associa-
tion endorses a boycott of Israeli universities. The
controversial decision comes after months of debate
and prompts several American schools to withdraw
from the association in protest and dozens more to
condemn the move.
Jacob Ostreicher, a New York businessman held in
Bolivia since 2011, returns to the United States, in part
thanks to efforts by actor Sean Penn. Ostreicher was
managing a rice-growing venture in Bolivia when he
was arrested on suspicion of money laundering and
accused of doing business with drug dealers.
The Native American and Indigenous Studies Asso-
ciation becomes the third U.S. academic body in less
than a year to recommend that its members boycott
Israeli universities.
After being pardoned by Russian President Vladi-
mir Putin, former Russian oil tycoon Mikhail Khodor-
kovsky is released from prison and leaves Russia,
where he spent 10 years behind bars.
Philanthropist Edgar Bronfman dies in New York at
84. An heir to the Seagram beverage fortune, Bron-
fman was a longtime advocate on behalf of Jewish
causes, serving as the head of the World Jewish Con-
gress and inancing many efforts to strengthen Jewish
identity.
YouTube
Amid a public debate in France over an allegedly
anti-Semitic gesture called the quenelle, the French
media publish a photo of a man performing it out-
side the Toulouse school where four Jews were mur-
dered. Several French cities later announce they have
banned performances by the comedian who popular-
ized the salute, Dieudonne Mbala Mbala.
January 2014
Brooklyn chasidic real estate developer Menachem
Stark is kidnapped, his lifeless body later found in
a dumpster. The New York Post provokes outrage
among many Jews with a cover calling him a slumlord
and a headline asking, Who didnt want him dead?
Months later, a construction worker is arrested for
the killing.
FLASH90
Ariel Sharon, the controversial warrior-turned-
statesman who served as Israels prime minister from
2001 until 2006, when he was rendered comatose by
a stroke, dies at age 85. Here, Sharon in 2004.
JTA and MyJewishLearning, which includes the
popular parenting website Kveller.com, announce
their intention to merge.
The Israeli government announces that it plans to
invest more than $1 billion over the next 20 years to
strengthen the Jewish identity of diaspora Jews, par-
ticularly young Jews, but the details remain fuzzy.
The chief rabbinate of Israel reaches an agreement
with the Rabbinical Council of America to automati-
cally accept letters from RCA members vouching for
the Jewish status of Israeli immigrants. The agree-
ment follows a temporary suspension by the chief
rabbinate in accepting such letters from at least one
well-known RCA member, Rabbi Avi Weiss of River-
dale, N.Y.
Two modern Orthodox high schools in New York
stir controversy with decisions to allow girls who wish
to don teillin.
UJAFederation of New York, the largest Jewish fed-
eration in North America, names attorney Eric Gold-
stein as its new CEO and successor to longtime CEO
John Ruskay.
MIKE COPPOLLA/GETTY IMAGES FOR SODASTREAM
Actress Scarlett Johansson comes under criticism
for serving as a spokeswoman for the Israeli company
SodaStream, which has facilities in the West Bank.
Johansson, who is Jewish, stands by SodaStream
December
FROM PAGE 25
SEE JANUARY PAGE 31
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G
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OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Jewish Community Relations Council
Mitzvah
Day
NOVEMBER 2
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7
6
5
2
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Jewish Community Relations Council
Mitzvah
Day
NOVEMBER 2
CRYSTAL SPONSOR
Northern Valley Affairs
at Temple Emanu-El of
Closter
SILVER SPONSORS
Century 21 Associates Foundation
Valerie Maier Donor Advised Fund
Holy Name Medical Center
The Jewish Standard
Maadan
L
ik
e
u
s
!
TO PARTICIPATE
Register online at
Sign up early to guarantee your preferred activity
Walk-ins welcome at sites where space permits
Questions? Contact Alice Blass,
aliceb@jfnnj.org or 201.820.3948
So grab your parents, your children and your
grandchildren and choose one of our more than 40
different sites from Rockleigh to River Edge, from Fair
Lawn to Franklin Lakes, and from Westwood to Wayne -
for a day of giving, of caring and of tikkun olam.
Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School,
Oakland Choir performs at Federation Apts.
and socializes with residents, 1-2:30 pm
Congregation Keter Torah assembles
emergency care kits for senior clients of Jewish
Family Service agencies, 10:30 am 12 pm
Congregation Gesher Shalom Hebrew
School students write Thanksgiving cards and
create bookmarks for seniors, and assemble
emergency care kits.
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Cong. Bnai Israel
Choir performs at Oradell Health Care Center,
10 am
Hillel college students along with Rosenbaum
Yeshiva of North Jersey and Yavneh Academy
middle school students will spend time with the
Friendship Circle in sports and art activities,
12 2 pm
JCCP/Beth Tikvah Hebrew School students will
bake and deliver treats to local Paramus Police,
Fire and EMS, 9:30 am
JCCP/Beth Tikvah Singers perform at Jewish
Home Assisted Living, River Vale, 2 3 pm
Jewish-Korean Youth Leadership
Coalition in coordination with Bonim Builders,
paints the Sinai Schools Sheli House, 1:30 5 pm
Jewish Youth Encounter Program
students clean up the NJ Palisades Interstate
Park, 12 2:30 pm.
Lubavitch on the Palisades Hebrew School
children assemble gifts to benet children with
cancer, Lubavitch on the Palisades, Tenay,
11:45 am -12:30 pm
National Council of Synagogue Youth
coordinates a carnival for children at Institute
for Pediatric Cancer and Blood Disorders at
the Joseph M. Sanzari Childrens Hospital at
Hackensack University Medical Center,
(formerly Tomorrows Childrens Institute),
1 5 pm
Temple Avodat Shalom Hebrew School
students create centerpieces and cards for Caf
Europas Chanukah party. During school hours.
Temple Avodat Shalom Junior and Senior
choirs sing and socialize with residents at
Bergen Regional Medical Center, Paramus,
2 3 pm
Tikkun 4 Kids of Congregation Beth
Sholom collect, sort, and stock the food pantry at
Jewish Family Service of Bergen & North Hudson,
11 am 3 pm
Yavneh Academy students sort and stock
shelves at the Center for Food Action, Saddle
Brook, 10 am 12 pm
Yeshivat Noam students play games and
socialize with residents of Prospect Heights Care
Center, Hackensack, 2 - 3:30 pm.
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
We extend our gratitude to
PARISIAN BEAUTY
ACADEMY
for their generous complimentary
services on Mitzvah Day for clients of
social service agencies.
To make an appointment to utilize
these services on Mitzvah Day, you
must call in advance.
Call Jewish Family Service of Bergen
& North Hudson, 201.837.9090, or
Jewish Family Service of North Jersey,
973-595-0111.
Mitzvah Day Co-Chairs
Sari Gross & Laurie Ann Weinstein
Mitzvah Day Staff
Joy Kurland, Director
Jewish Community Relations Council
Alice Blass, Mitzvah Day Coordinator
Natalya Taleysnik, Administrative Assistant
Mitzvah Day Four page spread.indd 1 10/1/2014 1:06:11 PM
V
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R
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G

A
C
R
O
S
S

G
E
N
E
R
A
T
I
O
N
S
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Jewish Community Relations Council
Mitzvah
Day
NOVEMBER 2
w
w
w
.
j
f
n
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j
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o
r
g
/
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e
| P
a
ra
m
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s
| N
e
w
J
e
rs
e
y
0
7
6
5
2
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Jewish Community Relations Council
Mitzvah
Day
NOVEMBER 2
CRYSTAL SPONSOR
Northern Valley Affairs
at Temple Emanu-El of
Closter
SILVER SPONSORS
Century 21 Associates Foundation
Valerie Maier Donor Advised Fund
Holy Name Medical Center
The Jewish Standard
Maadan
L
ik
e
u
s
!
TO PARTICIPATE
Register online at
Sign up early to guarantee your preferred activity
Walk-ins welcome at sites where space permits
Questions? Contact Alice Blass,
aliceb@jfnnj.org or 201.820.3948
So grab your parents, your children and your
grandchildren and choose one of our more than 40
different sites from Rockleigh to River Edge, from Fair
Lawn to Franklin Lakes, and from Westwood to Wayne -
for a day of giving, of caring and of tikkun olam.
Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School,
Oakland Choir performs at Federation Apts.
and socializes with residents, 1-2:30 pm
Congregation Keter Torah assembles
emergency care kits for senior clients of Jewish
Family Service agencies, 10:30 am 12 pm
Congregation Gesher Shalom Hebrew
School students write Thanksgiving cards and
create bookmarks for seniors, and assemble
emergency care kits.
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Cong. Bnai Israel
Choir performs at Oradell Health Care Center,
10 am
Hillel college students along with Rosenbaum
Yeshiva of North Jersey and Yavneh Academy
middle school students will spend time with the
Friendship Circle in sports and art activities,
12 2 pm
JCCP/Beth Tikvah Hebrew School students will
bake and deliver treats to local Paramus Police,
Fire and EMS, 9:30 am
JCCP/Beth Tikvah Singers perform at Jewish
Home Assisted Living, River Vale, 2 3 pm
Jewish-Korean Youth Leadership
Coalition in coordination with Bonim Builders,
paints the Sinai Schools Sheli House, 1:30 5 pm
Jewish Youth Encounter Program
students clean up the NJ Palisades Interstate
Park, 12 2:30 pm.
Lubavitch on the Palisades Hebrew School
children assemble gifts to benet children with
cancer, Lubavitch on the Palisades, Tenay,
11:45 am -12:30 pm
National Council of Synagogue Youth
coordinates a carnival for children at Institute
for Pediatric Cancer and Blood Disorders at
the Joseph M. Sanzari Childrens Hospital at
Hackensack University Medical Center,
(formerly Tomorrows Childrens Institute),
1 5 pm
Temple Avodat Shalom Hebrew School
students create centerpieces and cards for Caf
Europas Chanukah party. During school hours.
Temple Avodat Shalom Junior and Senior
choirs sing and socialize with residents at
Bergen Regional Medical Center, Paramus,
2 3 pm
Tikkun 4 Kids of Congregation Beth
Sholom collect, sort, and stock the food pantry at
Jewish Family Service of Bergen & North Hudson,
11 am 3 pm
Yavneh Academy students sort and stock
shelves at the Center for Food Action, Saddle
Brook, 10 am 12 pm
Yeshivat Noam students play games and
socialize with residents of Prospect Heights Care
Center, Hackensack, 2 - 3:30 pm.
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
We extend our gratitude to
PARISIAN BEAUTY
ACADEMY
for their generous complimentary
services on Mitzvah Day for clients of
social service agencies.
To make an appointment to utilize
these services on Mitzvah Day, you
must call in advance.
Call Jewish Family Service of Bergen
& North Hudson, 201.837.9090, or
Jewish Family Service of North Jersey,
973-595-0111.
Mitzvah Day Co-Chairs
Sari Gross & Laurie Ann Weinstein
Mitzvah Day Staff
Joy Kurland, Director
Jewish Community Relations Council
Alice Blass, Mitzvah Day Coordinator
Natalya Taleysnik, Administrative Assistant
Mitzvah Day Four page spread.indd 1 10/1/2014 1:06:11 PM
28 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-28
Sign up early!
www.jfnnj.org/mitzvahday
AREAS AROUND FAIR LAWN
10 am 12 pm
Help clean up designated parks and picnic areas.
GREAT OAK PARK
Oakland
10 11:30 am
Join families and students from the Academies at
Gerrard Berman Day School to clean up this park
next to the school.
LOWER BRETT PARK
Teaneck
10 am 12 pm
Clean debris and clear invasive species under the
guidance of the Hackensack River Greenway.
NEW BRIDGE LANDING
River Edge
10 am 12 pm
Remove trash, plant spring owering bulbs, and
remove invasive vegetation in this historic park,
an American Revolutionary War site.
PATERSON GREAT FALLS NATIONAL
HISTORIC PARK
10 am 12 pm
Clean up trash around this beautiful national park.
TENAFLY NATURE CENTER
12:30 -2:30 pm
Beautify the trails. There may be other projects,
which well identify on Mitzvah Day.
VAN SAUN MILL BROOK
Paramus
10 am 1 pm
Work with the Hackensack Riverkeeper and help
clear out debris from Van Saun Mill Brook, located
behind Yeshivat Ben Porat Yosef on Frisch Court.
NEW
DRESS FOR MESS AT ANY OF THESE CLEANUP SITES.
BRING YOUR OWN WATER AND SNACKS.
NEW
ARTS & CRAFTS WITH THE
POMEGRANATE GUILD OF NORTH
JERSEY
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel
10 am 12:30 pm
Make no-sew blankets for children here and in
Israel.
ASSEMBLE PACKAGES FOR AMERICAN
SOLDIERS
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Cong. Bnai Israel
10 am 12 pm
Prepare packages for American soldiers serving
overseas. For a list of items to collect email
aliceb@jfnnj.org
WRITE LETTERS TO THE IDF
Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
9 11 am
Write letters to soldiers serving in the Israel
Defense Forces.
FAMILY FUN PROJECTS
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, Tenay
1 3 pm
Stop in and do a mitzvah. Decorate reusable bags
to be donated to a food shelter.
JOIN HUNGER WALK
Shepherd Lake State Park, Ringwood
1- 3 pm
Join members of Temple Beth Rishon on the
Ringwood Hunger Walk. Bring food donations to
the Hunger Walk to benet the Ringwood branch
of the Center for Food Action. For information
email jasonokin@outlook.com
KIDS WHO CARE - SHARE
Temple Sinai, Tenay
8:30 am 12:30 pm
Make cards for soldiers, blood donors and seniors.
Good for all ages.
MAKE GIFTS AND CARDS
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center
10 am 12 pm
Prepare cards to cheer up patients.
PJ CARES HANDS-ON MITZVAH FUN
FOR LITTLE ONES
Bergen County YJCC, Washington Township
10 11:30 am
Children ages 3 6 can make projects to benet
clients of social service agencies in our community
and in Israel. Interspersed with fun games and a
storywalk.
ORGANIZE SCHOOL SUPPLIES AND
BACKPACKS
Congregation Ahavat Achim, Fair Lawn
9:30 am 12:30 pm
Assemble backpacks and school supplies to
benet children in under-served areas.
PAINT WITH BONIM BUILDERS
Sinai Schools Sheli House, Teaneck
9 am 12:30 pm
Roll up your sleeves and give the Sheli House,
a group home for mentally disabled adults, an
extreme makeover. Prep the rooms and use paint
rollers and trim brushes to paint the interior of this
Teaneck home. Dress for a mess. Closed-toed
shoes a must. Minimum participant age is 12.
Participants 12 15 years must be accompanied
by a participating adult. Cold water and kosher
snacks will be provided.
PUT IT IN YOUR POCKET MITZVAH
FAIR
Temple Beth Or, Washington Township
9 11 am
Make small gifts to benet those in the National
Service. Write a message on Billys Baseballs,
decorate Hearts of Hope, and much more.
NEW SORT AND DISTRIBUTE
Hoboken Emergency Food Pantry
11 am 1 pm or 1 3 pm
Help distribute items at this emergency food
pantry and clothing ministry. Indicate the shift you
prefer. Ages 10 +.
SORT AND PACK CLOTHING FOR ISRAEL
Temple Beth Rishon, Wycko
1 4 pm
Work with Yad Leah, and sort and pack new or
gently-used childrens clothing (Infant-4T) and
Purim costumes (adult and children) to be sent to
low-income communities in Israel.
SORT AND PACK CLOTHING FOR KIDS AT
OASIS
Beth Haverim Shir Shalom, Mahwah
1- 4 pm
Join the social groups of Beth Haverim Shir
Shalom and help sort and pack new or gently-
used childrens clothing (Infant 5T) to benet
children at Oasis, a haven for women and children
in Paterson.
SORT AND BAG FOOD
CUMAC Center of United Methodist Aid to the
Community, Paterson
9:30 am 12:30 pm
Sort and bag food in this warehouse that serves
as a supply center for other area food pantries
and also for families. Additional opportunities to
help may be available with a Community Closet
project (thrift shop/disaster relief). Ages 12 +.
STITCH AND SCHMOOZE
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel
10 am 12 pm
All knitters and crocheters are invited to make
scarves, hats, lap-robes and afghans to be
donated to various local organizations that help
needy families.
VISIT A CHESED FAIR
Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
11 am 1 pm
Find out about places where you can volunteer.
Meet with representatives from various agencies.
NEW
NEW
BRING YOUR PET
Emerson Health & Rehabilitation Center
2 3 pm
All friendly pets (no birds, please) are invited to
meet the residents at this senior facility. Share a
funny story or two about your pet with them.
CRAFTS & GAMES
Buckingham at Norwood
2 4 pm
Participate in an afternoon of crafts and
games with residents in the Korean wing of the
rehabilitation center.
DANCE PARTY
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, Tenay
10:45 am 1:45 pm
Join a dance party with pizza and ice cream
sundaes for participants of the Kaplen Adult
Reach Center, a program for frail seniors, many
of whom have Alzheimers disease or a related
form of dementia. For families and children in fth
grade and up. Space is limited.
HELP AT THE FAIR
Jewish Home at Rockleigh
10 am 12:30 pm
(check-in 10 am)
1:30 4:30 pm (check-in 1:30 pm)
Escort and assist residents as they shop at the
annual craft fair and explore the many vendor
booths. Additional help may be needed with fair-
related tasks. Afternoon volunteers will help man
the booths. All proceeds go to the residents funds
which are donated to various charities. Please
indicate which shift(s) you want.
HELP MAKE A MINYAN
Daughters of Miriam/The Gallen Institute, Clifton
8:45 10 am
Participate in the morning prayers with the
residents, followed by breakfast and visitation.
PLAY MUSIC & GAMES
Jewish Home at Rockleigh
10:30-11:30 am
(check-in 10:15-10:30 am)
Assist residents at games and music programs in
activity rooms.
RUN A CARNIVAL
Daughters of Miriam/The Gallen Institute, Clifton
1 3 pm
Help run booths and escort residents to the
various games and activities.
SING-A-LONG & MUSIC REVIEW
Lillian Booth
Actors Home, Englewood
2:30 3:45 pm
Join young members of Kol Haneshama who will
put on a music review and lead a sing-a-long.
SING WITH SHIRAT CHESED CHOIR THEN
CLOWN AROUND WITH AREYVUT
CareOne at Teaneck | 1:30 3:30 pm
Enjoy these fun activities with the residents and put
smiles on their faces.
SOCIALIZE AND PLAY GAMES
Emeritus at Wayne | 1 4 pm
Join members of Congregation Shomrei Torah in
socializing activities with residents of this assisted
living facility.
TIDY UP THE YARD
J-ADD Gordon Home, Washington Township
1 2:30 pm
Spruce up and plant fall bulbs in the yard of this
Jewish Association for Developmental Disabilities
home. Socialize with the consumers.
VISIT THE ELDERLY WITH CHABAD
CENTER OF PASSAIC COUNTY
Wayne | 1 2:30 pm
Friendship Circle Action Teens will bring Smiles-to-
Seniors to this area senior home. Sharpen up your
Bingo skills and get your smiles in gear!
Adult Briefs
Arts and Crafts Kits and Supplies
Baby Basics
Baby Clothing for Israel
Baby Clothing for Oasis
Baby equipment
Blankets and Towels* - for pets
Cell Phones
Chanukah Toys
Coat Drive
Disposable items for Bonim Builders
Emergency Care Kits
Eyeglasses
Food
Musical instruments*
New Books
New scarves, hats and gloves
Paper Goods and Cleaning Supplies
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Collections & Drives
BLOOD DRIVES will take place at the
locations listed below. Ages 16 (with parental
consent) - 75. ID required. Appointment
preferred but walk-ins welcome.
Glen Rock Jewish Center*
9:00 am 2:00 pm
JCCP/Congregation Beth Tikvah* Paramus
9:00 am2:00 pm
Temple Israel & Jewish Community Center**
Ridgewood, 8:45 am2:00 pm
Temple Sinai of Bergen County & Kesher
Community Synagogue*
at Temple Sinai, 8:30 am1:30 pm
*ARC = American Red Cross
** CBS = Community Blood Services
For more information on item
descriptions and drop-off locations,
please visit
www.jfnnj.org/mitzvahday
Pet Toys and Treats
Plastic supermarket bags*
Plush Toys
Ramapo Readers
School Supplies
Socks and/or Underwear (New)
Soda Can Tops
Stationery
Supplies for Soldiers
Toiletries
Toothbrushes
*New drive this year.
Mitzvah Day
NOVEMBER 2
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JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 29
Sign up early!
www.jfnnj.org/mitzvahday
AREAS AROUND FAIR LAWN
10 am 12 pm
Help clean up designated parks and picnic areas.
GREAT OAK PARK
Oakland
10 11:30 am
Join families and students from the Academies at
Gerrard Berman Day School to clean up this park
next to the school.
LOWER BRETT PARK
Teaneck
10 am 12 pm
Clean debris and clear invasive species under the
guidance of the Hackensack River Greenway.
NEW BRIDGE LANDING
River Edge
10 am 12 pm
Remove trash, plant spring owering bulbs, and
remove invasive vegetation in this historic park,
an American Revolutionary War site.
PATERSON GREAT FALLS NATIONAL
HISTORIC PARK
10 am 12 pm
Clean up trash around this beautiful national park.
TENAFLY NATURE CENTER
12:30 -2:30 pm
Beautify the trails. There may be other projects,
which well identify on Mitzvah Day.
VAN SAUN MILL BROOK
Paramus
10 am 1 pm
Work with the Hackensack Riverkeeper and help
clear out debris from Van Saun Mill Brook, located
behind Yeshivat Ben Porat Yosef on Frisch Court.
NEW
DRESS FOR MESS AT ANY OF THESE CLEANUP SITES.
BRING YOUR OWN WATER AND SNACKS.
NEW
ARTS & CRAFTS WITH THE
POMEGRANATE GUILD OF NORTH
JERSEY
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel
10 am 12:30 pm
Make no-sew blankets for children here and in
Israel.
ASSEMBLE PACKAGES FOR AMERICAN
SOLDIERS
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Cong. Bnai Israel
10 am 12 pm
Prepare packages for American soldiers serving
overseas. For a list of items to collect email
aliceb@jfnnj.org
WRITE LETTERS TO THE IDF
Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
9 11 am
Write letters to soldiers serving in the Israel
Defense Forces.
FAMILY FUN PROJECTS
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, Tenay
1 3 pm
Stop in and do a mitzvah. Decorate reusable bags
to be donated to a food shelter.
JOIN HUNGER WALK
Shepherd Lake State Park, Ringwood
1- 3 pm
Join members of Temple Beth Rishon on the
Ringwood Hunger Walk. Bring food donations to
the Hunger Walk to benet the Ringwood branch
of the Center for Food Action. For information
email jasonokin@outlook.com
KIDS WHO CARE - SHARE
Temple Sinai, Tenay
8:30 am 12:30 pm
Make cards for soldiers, blood donors and seniors.
Good for all ages.
MAKE GIFTS AND CARDS
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center
10 am 12 pm
Prepare cards to cheer up patients.
PJ CARES HANDS-ON MITZVAH FUN
FOR LITTLE ONES
Bergen County YJCC, Washington Township
10 11:30 am
Children ages 3 6 can make projects to benet
clients of social service agencies in our community
and in Israel. Interspersed with fun games and a
storywalk.
ORGANIZE SCHOOL SUPPLIES AND
BACKPACKS
Congregation Ahavat Achim, Fair Lawn
9:30 am 12:30 pm
Assemble backpacks and school supplies to
benet children in under-served areas.
PAINT WITH BONIM BUILDERS
Sinai Schools Sheli House, Teaneck
9 am 12:30 pm
Roll up your sleeves and give the Sheli House,
a group home for mentally disabled adults, an
extreme makeover. Prep the rooms and use paint
rollers and trim brushes to paint the interior of this
Teaneck home. Dress for a mess. Closed-toed
shoes a must. Minimum participant age is 12.
Participants 12 15 years must be accompanied
by a participating adult. Cold water and kosher
snacks will be provided.
PUT IT IN YOUR POCKET MITZVAH
FAIR
Temple Beth Or, Washington Township
9 11 am
Make small gifts to benet those in the National
Service. Write a message on Billys Baseballs,
decorate Hearts of Hope, and much more.
NEW SORT AND DISTRIBUTE
Hoboken Emergency Food Pantry
11 am 1 pm or 1 3 pm
Help distribute items at this emergency food
pantry and clothing ministry. Indicate the shift you
prefer. Ages 10 +.
SORT AND PACK CLOTHING FOR ISRAEL
Temple Beth Rishon, Wycko
1 4 pm
Work with Yad Leah, and sort and pack new or
gently-used childrens clothing (Infant-4T) and
Purim costumes (adult and children) to be sent to
low-income communities in Israel.
SORT AND PACK CLOTHING FOR KIDS AT
OASIS
Beth Haverim Shir Shalom, Mahwah
1- 4 pm
Join the social groups of Beth Haverim Shir
Shalom and help sort and pack new or gently-
used childrens clothing (Infant 5T) to benet
children at Oasis, a haven for women and children
in Paterson.
SORT AND BAG FOOD
CUMAC Center of United Methodist Aid to the
Community, Paterson
9:30 am 12:30 pm
Sort and bag food in this warehouse that serves
as a supply center for other area food pantries
and also for families. Additional opportunities to
help may be available with a Community Closet
project (thrift shop/disaster relief). Ages 12 +.
STITCH AND SCHMOOZE
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel
10 am 12 pm
All knitters and crocheters are invited to make
scarves, hats, lap-robes and afghans to be
donated to various local organizations that help
needy families.
VISIT A CHESED FAIR
Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn
11 am 1 pm
Find out about places where you can volunteer.
Meet with representatives from various agencies.
NEW
NEW
BRING YOUR PET
Emerson Health & Rehabilitation Center
2 3 pm
All friendly pets (no birds, please) are invited to
meet the residents at this senior facility. Share a
funny story or two about your pet with them.
CRAFTS & GAMES
Buckingham at Norwood
2 4 pm
Participate in an afternoon of crafts and
games with residents in the Korean wing of the
rehabilitation center.
DANCE PARTY
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, Tenay
10:45 am 1:45 pm
Join a dance party with pizza and ice cream
sundaes for participants of the Kaplen Adult
Reach Center, a program for frail seniors, many
of whom have Alzheimers disease or a related
form of dementia. For families and children in fth
grade and up. Space is limited.
HELP AT THE FAIR
Jewish Home at Rockleigh
10 am 12:30 pm
(check-in 10 am)
1:30 4:30 pm (check-in 1:30 pm)
Escort and assist residents as they shop at the
annual craft fair and explore the many vendor
booths. Additional help may be needed with fair-
related tasks. Afternoon volunteers will help man
the booths. All proceeds go to the residents funds
which are donated to various charities. Please
indicate which shift(s) you want.
HELP MAKE A MINYAN
Daughters of Miriam/The Gallen Institute, Clifton
8:45 10 am
Participate in the morning prayers with the
residents, followed by breakfast and visitation.
PLAY MUSIC & GAMES
Jewish Home at Rockleigh
10:30-11:30 am
(check-in 10:15-10:30 am)
Assist residents at games and music programs in
activity rooms.
RUN A CARNIVAL
Daughters of Miriam/The Gallen Institute, Clifton
1 3 pm
Help run booths and escort residents to the
various games and activities.
SING-A-LONG & MUSIC REVIEW
Lillian Booth
Actors Home, Englewood
2:30 3:45 pm
Join young members of Kol Haneshama who will
put on a music review and lead a sing-a-long.
SING WITH SHIRAT CHESED CHOIR THEN
CLOWN AROUND WITH AREYVUT
CareOne at Teaneck | 1:30 3:30 pm
Enjoy these fun activities with the residents and put
smiles on their faces.
SOCIALIZE AND PLAY GAMES
Emeritus at Wayne | 1 4 pm
Join members of Congregation Shomrei Torah in
socializing activities with residents of this assisted
living facility.
TIDY UP THE YARD
J-ADD Gordon Home, Washington Township
1 2:30 pm
Spruce up and plant fall bulbs in the yard of this
Jewish Association for Developmental Disabilities
home. Socialize with the consumers.
VISIT THE ELDERLY WITH CHABAD
CENTER OF PASSAIC COUNTY
Wayne | 1 2:30 pm
Friendship Circle Action Teens will bring Smiles-to-
Seniors to this area senior home. Sharpen up your
Bingo skills and get your smiles in gear!
Adult Briefs
Arts and Crafts Kits and Supplies
Baby Basics
Baby Clothing for Israel
Baby Clothing for Oasis
Baby equipment
Blankets and Towels* - for pets
Cell Phones
Chanukah Toys
Coat Drive
Disposable items for Bonim Builders
Emergency Care Kits
Eyeglasses
Food
Musical instruments*
New Books
New scarves, hats and gloves
Paper Goods and Cleaning Supplies
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Collections & Drives
BLOOD DRIVES will take place at the
locations listed below. Ages 16 (with parental
consent) - 75. ID required. Appointment
preferred but walk-ins welcome.
Glen Rock Jewish Center*
9:00 am 2:00 pm
JCCP/Congregation Beth Tikvah* Paramus
9:00 am2:00 pm
Temple Israel & Jewish Community Center**
Ridgewood, 8:45 am2:00 pm
Temple Sinai of Bergen County & Kesher
Community Synagogue*
at Temple Sinai, 8:30 am1:30 pm
*ARC = American Red Cross
** CBS = Community Blood Services
For more information on item
descriptions and drop-off locations,
please visit
www.jfnnj.org/mitzvahday
Pet Toys and Treats
Plastic supermarket bags*
Plush Toys
Ramapo Readers
School Supplies
Socks and/or Underwear (New)
Soda Can Tops
Stationery
Supplies for Soldiers
Toiletries
Toothbrushes
*New drive this year.
Mitzvah Day
NOVEMBER 2
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Jewish Community Relations Council
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Jewish Federation
Jewish Community Relations Council
Mitzvah
Day
NOVEMBER 2
CRYSTAL SPONSOR
Northern Valley Affairs
at Temple Emanu-El of
Closter
SILVER SPONSORS
Century 21 Associates Foundation
Valerie Maier Donor Advised Fund
Holy Name Medical Center
The Jewish Standard
Maadan
L
ik
e
u
s
!
TO PARTICIPATE
Register online at
Sign up early to guarantee your preferred activity
Walk-ins welcome at sites where space permits
Questions? Contact Alice Blass,
aliceb@jfnnj.org or 201.820.3948
So grab your parents, your children and your
grandchildren and choose one of our more than 40
different sites from Rockleigh to River Edge, from Fair
Lawn to Franklin Lakes, and from Westwood to Wayne -
for a day of giving, of caring and of tikkun olam.
Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School,
Oakland Choir performs at Federation Apts.
and socializes with residents, 1-2:30 pm
Congregation Keter Torah assembles
emergency care kits for senior clients of Jewish
Family Service agencies, 10:30 am 12 pm
Congregation Gesher Shalom Hebrew
School students write Thanksgiving cards and
create bookmarks for seniors, and assemble
emergency care kits.
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Cong. Bnai Israel
Choir performs at Oradell Health Care Center,
10 am
Hillel college students along with Rosenbaum
Yeshiva of North Jersey and Yavneh Academy
middle school students will spend time with the
Friendship Circle in sports and art activities,
12 2 pm
JCCP/Beth Tikvah Hebrew School students will
bake and deliver treats to local Paramus Police,
Fire and EMS, 9:30 am
JCCP/Beth Tikvah Singers perform at Jewish
Home Assisted Living, River Vale, 2 3 pm
Jewish-Korean Youth Leadership
Coalition in coordination with Bonim Builders,
paints the Sinai Schools Sheli House, 1:30 5 pm
Jewish Youth Encounter Program
students clean up the NJ Palisades Interstate
Park, 12 2:30 pm.
Lubavitch on the Palisades Hebrew School
children assemble gifts to benet children with
cancer, Lubavitch on the Palisades, Tenay,
11:45 am -12:30 pm
National Council of Synagogue Youth
coordinates a carnival for children at Institute
for Pediatric Cancer and Blood Disorders at
the Joseph M. Sanzari Childrens Hospital at
Hackensack University Medical Center,
(formerly Tomorrows Childrens Institute),
1 5 pm
Temple Avodat Shalom Hebrew School
students create centerpieces and cards for Caf
Europas Chanukah party. During school hours.
Temple Avodat Shalom Junior and Senior
choirs sing and socialize with residents at
Bergen Regional Medical Center, Paramus,
2 3 pm
Tikkun 4 Kids of Congregation Beth
Sholom collect, sort, and stock the food pantry at
Jewish Family Service of Bergen & North Hudson,
11 am 3 pm
Yavneh Academy students sort and stock
shelves at the Center for Food Action, Saddle
Brook, 10 am 12 pm
Yeshivat Noam students play games and
socialize with residents of Prospect Heights Care
Center, Hackensack, 2 - 3:30 pm.
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
We extend our gratitude to
PARISIAN BEAUTY
ACADEMY
for their generous complimentary
services on Mitzvah Day for clients of
social service agencies.
To make an appointment to utilize
these services on Mitzvah Day, you
must call in advance.
Call Jewish Family Service of Bergen
& North Hudson, 201.837.9090, or
Jewish Family Service of North Jersey,
973-595-0111.
Mitzvah Day Co-Chairs
Sari Gross & Laurie Ann Weinstein
Mitzvah Day Staff
Joy Kurland, Director
Jewish Community Relations Council
Alice Blass, Mitzvah Day Coordinator
Natalya Taleysnik, Administrative Assistant
Mitzvah Day Four page spread.indd 1 10/1/2014 1:06:11 PM

JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 31
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JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 31 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 31
and resigns as a global ambassador for
the British-based charity Oxfam, say-
ing she and Oxfam have a fundamen-
tal difference of opinion in regards to
the boycott, divestment and sanctions
movement.
The Israel Air Force is accused of
attacking a warehouse of advanced
Russian-made S300 missiles in the Syr-
ian port city of Latakia. Israel declines
to comment on the attack.
A federal judge tosses out a $380 mil-
lion sexual abuse lawsuit iled against
Yeshiva University by 34 former stu-
dents of its high school for boys. The
suit alleged that the university ignored
warnings of assault by two faculty mem-
bers between 1969 and 1989. In dis-
missing the lawsuit, Judge John Koeltl
rules that the statute of limitations has
expired.
Longtime California congressman
Henry Waxman announces his retire-
ment. Waxman had represented Cali-
fornias 33rd District since 1975 and
was considered the dean of Jewish
lawmakers.
Jewish philanthropist and humanitar-
ian Anne Heyman, founder of the Aga-
hozo-ShalomYouthVillage in Rwanda,
dies during a horse-riding competition
in Palm Beach, Fla.
April 2014
Casino magnate and conservative
backer Sheldon Adelson buys another
Israeli newspaper, Makor Rishon, mak-
ing him the owner of several of Isra-
els major right-wing media outlets
and two of the countrys four major
newspapers.
LEAH WEISS CARUSO
Mobilized by the death of Samuel
Sommers the 8-year-old son of Rabbi
Phyllis and Michael Sommers, whose
struggle with leukemia was docu-
mented on a popular blog called Super-
man Sam 73 Reform rabbis shave their
heads to raise $600,000 for pediatric
cancer research. Locally, they include
rabbis David Widzer, shown here, Paul
Jacobson, and Joel Mosbacher.
American-Jewish contractor Alan
Gross goes on a hunger strike to protest
his imprisonment in a Cuban jail and
the lack of American assistance. Later
in the year, in ailing health and with no
prospect of release, Gross bids goodbye
to his family during a prison visit.
White supremacist Frazier Glenn
Miller, 73, kills a man and his grandson
outside the Jewish Community Center
of Greater Kansas City and then shoots
to death a woman at a Jewish assisted-
living facility a few blocks away. None of
the victims are Jewish, highlighting the
diverse constituency served by Ameri-
cas Jewish institutions.
February 2014
The government of Spain approves
a bill to facilitate the naturalization of
Sephardic Jews of Spanish descent.
Staff at Hadassah Medical Center in
Jerusalem go on strike as the hospital,
facing a huge deicit, teeters on the
edge of bankruptcy and fails to pay its
workers.
Abraham Foxman announces he is
stepping down as national director of
the Anti-Defamation League after 27
years in the post. Foxman, a child sur-
vivor of the Holocaust and one of the
highest-proile American Jewish lead-
ers, says he will step down in July 2015.
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
and his wife, Priscilla Chan, top the
Chronicle of Philanthropys list of the
top 50 U.S. donors to charitable causes
in 2013. In December, the couple gave
18 million shares of Facebook stock, val-
ued at more than $970 million, to the
Silicon Valley Community Foundation.
Alice Herz-Sommer, the 110-year-
old Holocaust survivor and concert
pianist whose life is the subject of a
documentary, dies a week before the
ilm wins an Oscar.
The Giymat Rosa Synagogue in Zapor-
izhia, eastern Ukraine, is irebombed,
sustaining minor damage. The attack
comes amid growing turmoil in Ukraine
following the overthrow of President
Viktor Yanukovych.
JDC
Alena Druzhynina of the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Committee,
wearing a white helmet, entered Inde-
pendence Square in Kiev to bring food
to an 82-year-old pensioner who has
been homebound since the violence
began.
March 2014
AIPAC leaders emphasize bipartisan-
ship and mutual respect at the groups
annual policy conference in Washing-
ton. The conference follows a bruising
period in which the pro-Israel lobby
had championed a new Iran sanc-
tions bill, only to back down when it
becomes clear the bill lacked the neces-
sary support from the White House and
congressional Democrats to pass.
In one of many low-level skirmishes
over the course of months, Israeli air-
craft strike several targets in the Gaza
Strip after Palestinians ire rockets
into Israel, sending Israelis into bomb
shelters.
David Hellman, a New York personal
trainer, pleads guilty to using violent
means to force recalcitrant husbands to
give their wives a Jewish writ of divorce,
or get. Hellman, who faces up to 20
years in prison and a ine of $250,000,
was one of 10 men arrested in October
2013 in an FBI sting operation.
Yeshiva University is at risk of running
out of unrestricted cash in the near-
term future, warns Moodys Investors
Service, which says deep and growing
operating deicits are likely to continue
at the university due to poor inancial
oversight and high expenses. In May,
YU will announce that the Monteiore
Health System is assuming operational
control of YUs Albert Einstein School
of Medicine.
Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud
Olmert is found guilty of accepting
bribes in the corruption case involving
the Holyland real estate development
in Jerusalem. Olmert, who is convicted
of receiving about $150,000 in bribes
through his brother, Yossi, becomes the
irst former Israeli prime minister to be
convicted of taking a bribe. The crime
carries a possible sentence of 10 years
in prison.
SEE APRIL PAGE 32
The lobby of Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem. BEN SALES
A police cruiser at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City.
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY ES
January
FROM PAGE 26
Year in Review
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Jewish Community Relations Council
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Jewish Federation
Jewish Community Relations Council
Mitzvah
Day
NOVEMBER 2
CRYSTAL SPONSOR
Northern Valley Affairs
at Temple Emanu-El of
Closter
SILVER SPONSORS
Century 21 Associates Foundation
Valerie Maier Donor Advised Fund
Holy Name Medical Center
The Jewish Standard
Maadan
L
ik
e
u
s
!
TO PARTICIPATE
Register online at
Sign up early to guarantee your preferred activity
Walk-ins welcome at sites where space permits
Questions? Contact Alice Blass,
aliceb@jfnnj.org or 201.820.3948
So grab your parents, your children and your
grandchildren and choose one of our more than 40
different sites from Rockleigh to River Edge, from Fair
Lawn to Franklin Lakes, and from Westwood to Wayne -
for a day of giving, of caring and of tikkun olam.
Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School,
Oakland Choir performs at Federation Apts.
and socializes with residents, 1-2:30 pm
Congregation Keter Torah assembles
emergency care kits for senior clients of Jewish
Family Service agencies, 10:30 am 12 pm
Congregation Gesher Shalom Hebrew
School students write Thanksgiving cards and
create bookmarks for seniors, and assemble
emergency care kits.
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Cong. Bnai Israel
Choir performs at Oradell Health Care Center,
10 am
Hillel college students along with Rosenbaum
Yeshiva of North Jersey and Yavneh Academy
middle school students will spend time with the
Friendship Circle in sports and art activities,
12 2 pm
JCCP/Beth Tikvah Hebrew School students will
bake and deliver treats to local Paramus Police,
Fire and EMS, 9:30 am
JCCP/Beth Tikvah Singers perform at Jewish
Home Assisted Living, River Vale, 2 3 pm
Jewish-Korean Youth Leadership
Coalition in coordination with Bonim Builders,
paints the Sinai Schools Sheli House, 1:30 5 pm
Jewish Youth Encounter Program
students clean up the NJ Palisades Interstate
Park, 12 2:30 pm.
Lubavitch on the Palisades Hebrew School
children assemble gifts to benet children with
cancer, Lubavitch on the Palisades, Tenay,
11:45 am -12:30 pm
National Council of Synagogue Youth
coordinates a carnival for children at Institute
for Pediatric Cancer and Blood Disorders at
the Joseph M. Sanzari Childrens Hospital at
Hackensack University Medical Center,
(formerly Tomorrows Childrens Institute),
1 5 pm
Temple Avodat Shalom Hebrew School
students create centerpieces and cards for Caf
Europas Chanukah party. During school hours.
Temple Avodat Shalom Junior and Senior
choirs sing and socialize with residents at
Bergen Regional Medical Center, Paramus,
2 3 pm
Tikkun 4 Kids of Congregation Beth
Sholom collect, sort, and stock the food pantry at
Jewish Family Service of Bergen & North Hudson,
11 am 3 pm
Yavneh Academy students sort and stock
shelves at the Center for Food Action, Saddle
Brook, 10 am 12 pm
Yeshivat Noam students play games and
socialize with residents of Prospect Heights Care
Center, Hackensack, 2 - 3:30 pm.
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
We extend our gratitude to
PARISIAN BEAUTY
ACADEMY
for their generous complimentary
services on Mitzvah Day for clients of
social service agencies.
To make an appointment to utilize
these services on Mitzvah Day, you
must call in advance.
Call Jewish Family Service of Bergen
& North Hudson, 201.837.9090, or
Jewish Family Service of North Jersey,
973-595-0111.
Mitzvah Day Co-Chairs
Sari Gross & Laurie Ann Weinstein
Mitzvah Day Staff
Joy Kurland, Director
Jewish Community Relations Council
Alice Blass, Mitzvah Day Coordinator
Natalya Taleysnik, Administrative Assistant
Mitzvah Day Four page spread.indd 1 10/1/2014 1:06:11 PM
Year in Review
32 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-32
RESCUE IN
BUDAPEST
The 70th Anniversary of
Raoul Wallenbergs Mission
to Save the Last Jews of Europe
See montclair.edu/global-education for further information.
A Series of Free Lectures,
Films and Special Events
Open to the Public
Fall 2014
October 6 - December 18
This series was made possible by a grant from the
New Jersey Council for the Humanities, a state partner
of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional
support has been provided by The Hungary Initiatives Foundation,
Holocaust Council of Greater MetroWest, Congregation Bnai Keshet
of Montclair, Temple Ner Tamid of Bloomeld, Consulate General of
Sweden in New York and Montclair Public Library.
ABED RAHIM KHATIB/FLASH 90
After weeks of near breakdowns
in Israeli-Palestinian peace talks
brokered by U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry, Israel suspends all nego-
tiations after Palestinian Authority
President Mahmoud Abbas Fatah
party signs a unity accord with
Hamas, a designated terrorist orga-
nization. President Obama responds
by saying it may be time for a pause
in Middle East peacemaking. Kerry
later expresses regret for saying that
Israel risks becoming an apartheid
state or a non-Jewish one if the two-
state solution is not implemented.
U.S. negotiators blame Israel for the
talks collapse. Here, Ismail Haniyeh
of Hamas, right, and Fatahs Azzam
Al-Ahmed are at a press conference
Gennady Kernes, the Jewish mayor
of Kharkiv, Ukraines second-largest
city, is shot in a suspected assassi-
nation attempt, leaving him in criti-
cal condition. The shooting comes
amid growing violence between Rus-
sian-backed Ukrainian separatists in
eastern Ukraine and forces loyal to
the new Ukrainian government in
Kiev. Kernes is airlifted to Israel for
treatment.
The Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organizations
rejects J Streets bid for membership.
J Street, the liberal Washington group
that lobbies for increased American
pressure to bring about a Mideast
peace deal, lost its bid for member-
ship in the main communal group
on foreign policy issues by a vote of
2217, with three abstentions. J Street
needed the support of two-thirds of
the conferences 51 members to gain
admission.
RONALD MARTINEZ/GETTY IMAGES
Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald
Sterling is banned from the NBA for
life and ined $2.5 million after being
caught on tape making racist com-
ments to his girlfriend. He is heard
saying that his views reflect the way
the world works, and as evidence he
says that black Jews in Israel are just
treated like dogs. His girlfriend is
heard countering that as a Jew, Ster-
ling should know better than to advo-
cate discrimination, citing the Holo-
caust as an example of where racism
can lead.
An arm of the private equity irm
Bain Capital buys the Manisch-
ewitz Company, the iconic producer
of kosher packaged goods, for an
undisclosed sum. According to The
New York Times, the new owners
are expected to promote the word
kosher as an indication of quality
food rather than just a religious term.
Genealogical research reveals that
the late archbishop of New York, Car-
dinal John OConnor, technically was
Jewish. OConnors mother, Dorothy
Gumple OConnor, was born Jewish
but converted to Catholicism before
she met and married OConnors
father.
April
FROM PAGE 31
May 2014
New Yorks 92nd Street Y, a Jewish
center for arts and culture, names its
irst non-Jewish executive director,
Henry Timms. Shortly afterward, Sol
Adler, the previous longtime execu-
tive director, who was ired after rev-
elations that he had a long-term affair
with his assistant, hangs himself in his
Brooklyn home.
An Anti-Defamation League anti-
Semitism survey inds deeply anti-
Semitic views are held by 26 per-
cent of 53,000 people polled in 102
countries and territories covering
approximately 86 percent of the
worlds population. Critics say the
surveys 11 questions are not accurate
gauges of anti-Semitism.
Maccabi Tel Aviv wins the Eurole-
ague basketball championship by
beating favored Real Madrid, 9886,
in overtime.
Novelist Philip Roth receives an
honorary doctorate from the Jewish
Theological Seminary. Now consid-
ered one of the greatest living Ameri-
can writers, Roth had caused outrage
early in his career with his sometimes
Only one other Jewish weekly
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Year in Review
JS-33
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 33
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stinging portrayals of Jewish life. In 2012, Roth
announced his retirement.
The Jewish community of Sharon, Mass., is
shocked as the rabbi of Temple Israel, Barry
Starr, resigns amid allegations that he used
synagogue discretionary funds to pay about
$480,000 in hush money to an extortionist to
hide a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old.
Starr apologizes to the congregation in an email.
Far right parties make gains in European Par-
liament elections, including Greeces Golden
Dawn.
The European Union says it has banned the
import of poultry and eggs produced in West
Bank settlements.
CNAAN LIPHSHIZ/JTA
A gunman kills four people at the Jewish
Museum of Belgium in Brussels. Several days
later, Mehdi Nemmouche, a 29-year-old French
national of Algerian origin, is arrested in connec-
tion with the attack.
NOUR SHAMALY/POOL/FLASH90
Pope Francis travels to Israel and the West
Bank, visiting the Western Wall, Yad Vashem and
the West Bank security fence, among other sites.
Year in Review
34 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-34
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June 2014
Former Knesset speaker Reuven Rivlin of the Likud party is
elected president of Israel, defeating Meir Sheetrit of Hatnua
in a 6353 runoff vote. Rivlin formally succeeds Shimon Peres
and becomes Israels 10th president in late July.
Rep. Eric Cantor, the majority leader in the U.S. House of
Representatives and the highest-ranking Jewish elected ofi-
cial in American history, is upset in the Republican primary
for Virginias 7th Congressional District by a Tea Party chal-
lenger. Dave Brat, an economics professor, wins handily after
attacking Cantor for drifting from conservative principles.
Days later, Cantor resigns his post as majority leader.
Weeks after leading Maccabi Tel Aviv to the Euro-
league title, David Blatt becomes the head coach of
the NBAs Cleveland Cavaliers. Blatt had played for
an Israeli kibbutz team in 1979 after his sophomore
year at Princeton and then competed for the U.S.
team that won the gold medal in the 1981 Maccabiah
Games. He returned to play nearly a decade profes-
sionally in Israel.
SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES
Three Israeli teenagers, later identiied as Naftali
Fraenkel, Gilad Shaar and Eyal Yifrach, are kidnapped
in the West Bank from a hitchhiking post. Israel
responds with three weeks of intensive searches,
including mass arrests in the West Bank of Hamas
members and the re-arrest of dozens of Palestinians
released as part of the Gilad Shalit prisoner-exchange
deal. Three weeks on, Israeli authorities ind the teens
bodies and announce that the boys were believed to
have been killed the night they were kidnapped. The
incident sparks the revenge killing by Jews of an Arab
teen, riots and a surge of rocket ire from the Gaza
Strip. The Israel Defense Forces responds by launch-
ing Operation Protective Edge Israels deadliest foray
into Gaza since its 2005 withdrawal on July 8.
FLASH90
Rachel Fraenkel, whose son, Naftali, is one of the
three murdered teenagers, speaks at the funeral. The
families strength and goodness impress the nation
and the world
Israel announces that the suspect in the April 14
killing of Israeli Police Superintendent Baruch Miz-
rachi is Ziad Awad, a West Bank Palestinian released
as part of the Gilad Shalit prisoner exchange.
The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church
(U.S.A.) votes 310303 to divest from three American
companies that do business with Israeli security ser-
vices in the West Bank. Heath Rada, the moderator
of the assembly, says its not a reflection for our lack
of love for our Jewish sisters and brothers, but Jew-
ish leaders say it will have a devastating impact on
their relations with the church.
New York Jewish teenager Josh Orlians raunchy
stand-up routine on Americas Got Talent cracks
up the judges, but his Orthodox day school isnt
tickled.
July 2014
Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, the father of
the Jewish Renewal movement, which sought to
introduce more music,
dance, and meditation into
prayer and Jewish life, dies
in Boulder, Colo., at 89.
Israel launches its third
major Gaza operation in six
years. Dubbed Operation
Protective Edge, the cam-
paign begins with 10 days of
intensive airstrikes in Gaza.
After several failed cease-
ire attempts, a ground inva-
sion of Gaza follows. Hamas
ires thousands of rockets
into Israel, striking as far
away as Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
and a Haifa suburb. In four weeks of ighting before
a 72-hour cease-ire in early August, some 1,800 Pal-
estinians are reported killed. Israel comes under
heavy criticism for attacks that kill children, strike
U.N. facilities and damage civil infrastructure. Israel
blames Hamas for using civilians as human shields
and schools, hospitals and U.N. facilities as weapons
depots. The death toll in Israel includes 64 soldiers
and three civilians. Several of Israels casualties are
due to Palestinian iniltrations of Israel through tun-
nels burrowed under the Israel-Gaza border. Israels
prime minister says destroying the tunnels is one of
the wars main objectives.
Damage from a Hamas-fired rocket is inspected at an Israei settlement.
YONATAN SINDEL/FLASH90
Year in Review
JS-35
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 35
JS-35
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 35
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A riot outside a French synagogue is
one of several incidents related to the
Gaza war that threaten Jews in Europe.
The riot by Palestinian sympathizers
outside the Synagogue de la Roquette
in central Paris traps some 200 peo-
ple inside the building. A street brawl
ensues between the rioters and dozens
of Jewish men who arrived to defend
the synagogue.
Most foreign airlines suspend flights
to Israels Ben Gurion Airport near Tel
Aviv after a Hamas-ired missile strikes
nearby. The suspensions, prompted by
a flight ban issued by the U.S. Federal
Aviation Administration, last two to
three days.
Iran and the major powers, led by
the United States, agree to extend
negotiations over Irans nuclear pro-
gram for another four months, citing
progress in a number of areas. But the
potential deal breaker remains: Iran
does not want to reduce the number
of its centrifuges, and the world pow-
ers say they wont accept Iran main-
taining its existing capacity for ura-
nium enrichment.
A Hamas
missile
explodes near
Ben Gurion
airport.
YONATAN SINDEL/
FLASH90
August 2014
HADAS PARUSH/FLASH90
As the ighting in Gaza wanes and
Israeli troops begin to pull back, Israel
experiences several terrorist attacks
inside the country perpetrated by West
Bank Palestinians, including a tractor
attack in Jerusalem.
NATI SHOHAT/FLASH90
The 72-hour cease-ire that brought
Operation Protective Edge to a halt
expires, and Gazans resume intensive
rocket ire against Israel. The Israeli
military responds with airstrikes inside
Gaza. The sides then agree to another
72-hour cease-ire.
The University of Illinois rescinds a
job offer to Steven Salaita, a professor
of American Indian studies, following
a series of anti-Israel tweets from him,
including missives comparing Israel
to the Ku Klux Klan. Following a pub-
lic outcry, university chancellor Phyl-
lis Wise relents and submits Salaitas
SEE AUGUST PAGE 36
36 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-36
Year in Review
36 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-36
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Jewish Federation of Northern New Jerseys
Commerce & Professionals and Physicians & Dentists Divisions
invite you to a
Networking Breakfast
with

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Tuesday, October 7 | 7:30 am
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East conflict for more than 25 years. Specializing
in defense and military issues, Ben-David
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for Israel Channel 10 and Middle East
Correspondent for Aviation Week. He delivers on-
air analysis of military news, as well as reporting
on-the-scene daily. Mr. Ben-David will share his
insights into the multiple situations facing Israel
and her neighbors in the Middle East.
Co-Chairs
Dr. Jonathan Mangot and Daniel Shlufman
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Leslie Billet Erik Maschler
Emily Gutter Jayne Petak
Michael Gutter Steve Rogers
Nina Kampler Jason Shafron
Lee Lasher Edward Solomon
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candidacy to the university board while mak-
ing it clear that she does not support his hire. In
September, the board votes 81 to reject Salaitas
hire. Salaita threatens to sue.
Joseph Raksin, an Orthodox rabbi from Brook-
lyn, is shot and killed on his way to Sabbath ser-
vices in North Miami Beach. Some activists say
the murder was a hate crime, but more than a
month on police still have no arrests and say the
motive for the killing remains unclear.
EMAD NASSAR/FLASH90
The Wall Street Journal reports that the White
House took the extraordinary step in July of halt-
ing the Pentagons delivery of U.S.-made Hellire
missiles to Israel in the midst of its conflict with
Hamas in Gaza. The denial came as the Obama
administration urged Israeli restraint in its Gaza
operation and days before Israel rebuffed a
cease-ire proposal from Secretary of State John
Kerry. A State Department spokeswoman denies
any change in policy, saying, Given the crisis in
Gaza, it is natural that agencies take additional
care with deliveries as part of an interagency
process.
MOMENT MAGAZINE
Writer and liberal activist Leonard Fein dies at
80. Fein had founded Mazon: A Jewish Response
to Hunger and the National Jewish Coalition for
Literacy, and co-founded Americans for Peace
Now and Moment Magazine. A few weeks later,
Feins older brother, Rashi Fein, a Harvard pro-
fessor known for his contributions to medicine
and social policy, dies at 88.
In a rare instance of violence from the Gaza
conflict reverberating in New York, a Jewish
couple is accosted by pro-Palestinian assailants
on Manhattans Upper East Side. The incident
prompts Rabbi Haskel Lookstein, the head of a
prominent modern Orthodox day school in the
neighborhood, Ramaz, to consider instructing
students not to wear their kippot in public. He
later changes his mind.
August
FROM PAGE 35

JS-37
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 37
Year in Review
JS-37
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 37
MEYLEKH VISWANATH
Celebrants rededicate Nariman House, the reconstructed
Chabad house in Mumbai, India, that was closed after Paki-
stani terrorists killed six people there, including Chabad
emissaries Gabriel and Rivky Holtzberg, as part of a mas-
sive attack in November 2008 that left 166 people dead.
Hamas and Israel agree to a cease-ire that ends their
50-day war. In all, the war leaves an estimated 2,200 Pales-
tinians dead. Sixty-seven soldiers and six civilians are killed
on the Israeli side, including two soldiers who die of their
wounds after the cease-ire is completed and a 4-year-old
boy killed shortly before the truce. Brokered by Eypt, the
cease-ire stipulates that Israel and Eypt open all border
crossings to allow international humanitarian aid and con-
struction materials to enter Gaza. In Israel, the verdict is
mixed over whether the Israeli operation achieved its aims.
Israel sets off international condemnation with its
announcement that it is appropriating nearly 1,000 acres
of West Bank land near the Gush Etzion bloc. Peace Now
says it is Israels largest West Bank land grab since the
1980s.
September 2014
Jewish journalist Steven Sotloff, an Ameri-
can-Israeli who had been taken captive while
covering the Syrian civil war, is beheaded by
ISIS, the outlaw group that has declared an
Islamic state in parts of Iraq and Syria. ISIS
publishes video of Sotloff s beheading and
that of another American and a Briton, fuel-
ing the U.S. decision to expand its airstrikes
against ISIS and enlist other countries in the
cause.
Joan Rivers, a Jewish comic who broke bar-
riers for women in comedy and on television,
dies at age 81.
Rabbi Brant Rosen decides to quit his 17-year
pulpit job at the Jewish Reconstructionist Con-
gregation in Evanston, Ill., after his outspoken
criticism of Israel becomes too divisive for
his congregation. Rosen is one of the leaders
of the rabbinical council of Jewish Voice for
Peace, a group the Anti-Defamation League
lists as one of the top 10 anti-Israel organiza-
tions in the United States.
A group of 43 reservists from the Israel
Defense Forces famed 8200 intelligence
unit causes a stir by publicly vowing to stop
collecting information on Palestinians. The
intelligence gathered harms innocents and is
used for political persecution and for invading
most areas of Palestinians lives, the reserv-
ists write in their public letter to Israels prime
minister and IDF top brass. Our conscience
no longer permits us to serve this system. The
IDF says it will take disciplinary action against
the reservists.
More than two weeks after over 40 United
Nations peacekeepers from Fiji are kidnapped
from the Golan Heights by the Al Nusra Front, an
al-Qaida-afiliated rebel group in Syria, the peace-
keepers are released and cross the Golan border
into Israel.
Four Ohio University students are arrested when
a fracas erupts during their protest over the Stu-
dent Senate presidents blood bucket challenge
of Israel in which Megan Marzec ilmed herself
dousing herself with a bucket of fake blood to sup-
port the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions move-
ment against Israel. Her video echoes the ALS ice
bucket challenge campaign designed to raise
money for and awareness of ALS.
Coming in October
October 17: Finance &
Charitable Giving
October 31: Events &
Celebrations
October 31: About Our Children
To advertise
call 201-837-8818
or email natalie@jewishmediagroup.com
Opinion
38 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-38*
Allies and adversaries in the Middle East
W
ho are we at war with in the Middle East?
At irst glance, this seems like a straight-
forward question with an obvious answer.
We are at war with the Islamic State ter-
rorist organization in Iraq and Syria. Moreover, war is
the exact descriptor to use, now that the Obama adminis-
tration has gotten over its initial reluctance to portray the
clash in this part of the Middle East with such a stark and
unmistakable word.
War, however, is rarely simple. As a rule of thumb, we
should appreciate that the identiied enemy is not the only
enemy. Hence, while we are at war most immediately with
Islamic State, that should not preclude us from grasping
that there are other local forces with whom we have sep-
arate, equally complex, and potentially very dangerous
conflicts.
The Second World War provides a good historical exam-
ple of what I mean. From 1941 onwards, the Soviet Union
was an ally of Britain, which had been ighting Nazi Ger-
many solo for the previous two
years, and the United States,
which entered the war follow-
ing the Japanese attack on Pearl
Harbor. But in the decades
before that capitalist-com-
munist military alliance, the
Soviet Union was very much an
enemy, perceived by European
leaders especially as the main
threat to the stability of west-
ern democracy.
Only with the rise of Nazism
did the Soviet threat retreat into the background. But even
then, there was an awareness that once our business with
Hitlers regime was done, we would remain fundamentally
at loggerheads with the Soviet Union. That was why World
War II segued rapidly into the Cold War that dominated
international relations for the next half-century.
A similar pattern is observable with Islamic State. The
coalition that the U.S. has assembled to ight this bar-
baric scourge is, much like the Anglo-American-Soviet
coalition of the 1940s, based upon an immediate coin-
cidence of interest. But many of the powers involved
with it should not be described as friends. Some of them
particularly those with an indirect, ambiguous role
might in fact become declared enemies in the not-too-
distant future.
I include in that category states like Turkey and Qatar.
Turkey is not a central actor in the war against Islamic
State, having elected not to join the other 10 Middle East-
ern countries that assembled in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, ear-
lier this month to announce the coalition with the Ameri-
cans. Turkish leaders say their principal aim is to provide
humanitarian aid to the thousands of refugees that have
poured across their countrys borders, though there is
widespread agreement that the Turks are engaged in sup-
porting the military operation from behind the scenes.
Similarly, Qatar is playing what the Reuters news agency
described as a supporting role, which means that it will
not be visibly deploying military force against Islamic
State, in stark contrast to Arab neighbors like Jordan,
Saudi Arabia, and Bahrain, all of whom have participated
in bombing runs against Islamic State positions in Syria in
recent days.
I also include Iran in that category. Iran, again, is
not a formal participant in the U.S.-led coalition, but
Washington has been keen to emphasize that Tehran
shares western disquiet at the rise of Islamic State. And Ira-
nian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif was quick to point out, in
media interviews during his visit to New York for the U.N.
General Assembly, that his country had been praised by
Iraqi Kurdish leaders for providing them with weapons in
their darkest hour of need. Iran is the only country in the
region that is capable of helping in the maintenance of sta-
bility, Zarif told the National Interests Jacob Heilbrunn,
presumably with some relish.
The plain fact is that any calculations we make in Iraq
and Syria will need to factor in the Qatar-Turkey axis (the
main state-backers of the Sunni Muslim Brotherhood
movement in the Middle East) and the Iranian-led alliance
that comprises the Assad regime in Syria, the Hezbollah
terrorist organization in Lebanon, and the Palestinian
Hamas regime in the Gaza Strip. Therefore, not only do
we face the task of destroying Islamic State, but we have
to do so in a way that avoids creating suspicion about our
true intentions within what might conveniently be called
the not allies, not enemies camp.
This is a stratey that, in military terms, is fraught with
risk, at the same time as being enormously confusing
politically. Do we look sideways at Irans nuclear program
for the sake of a successful campaign against Islamic State?
Do we continue ignoring Qatari and Turkish backing for
Hamas for the same reason? Look at how western lead-
ers have addressed these issues French Foreign Minister
Laurent Fabius, for example, has insisted, You must not
establish confusion between this [Islamic State] question
and the question of nuclear weapons that we are discuss-
ing now with the Iranians, without explaining whether
the war on Islamic State has impacted negotiations over
Irans nuclear ambitions. The lack of consistency and clar-
ity is deeply disturbing.
And so I return to my original question: with whom are
we at war in the Middle East? Islamic State is a breathtak-
ingly brutal case of where Islamism can lead, but it is far
from being the only Islamist force in the Middle East that
is willing to kill Americans and other westerners. Assum-
ing we are able to defeat Islamic State, we will still have
to deal with a spectrum of adversaries that includes al-
Qaeda offshoots, the Muslim Brotherhood, and most of
all the Iranian regime. We need to be thinking now about
how to approach these entities and states in the wake of
an Islamic State defeat, much as British and American
planners thought about postwar relations with the Soviet
Union in the closing stages of World War II.
Doing so eficiently means not closing our eyes and ears
to unpalatable truths. Most urgently, lets not fool our-
selves into thinking that Iran wont take advantage of the
situation, or that its nuclear program is not a comparable
threat to that posed by Islamic State. There is a real pros-
pect that Iran will weaponize its nuclear program, thereby
inaugurating an era of danger for the Middle East that will
make this one look like a picnic. Should that happen, the
war against Islamic State will seem like a footnote in a
broader story of western defeat in the Middle East, rather
than the opening gambit of a stratey to confront and, yes,
defeat the enemies of freedom across the region.
JNS.ORG
Ben Cohen has written for JNS.org, the Wall Street Journal,
Commentary, Haaretz, and other publications. His book,
Some Of My Best Friends: A Journey Through Twenty-First
Century Antisemitism, is available through Amazon.
Ben Cohen
In July, Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davuto-Dlu, left, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, and Qatari Foreign
Minister Khalid bin Mohammad Al Attiyah met in Paris to discuss a cease-fire deal for Gaza. STATE DEPARTMENT
JS-39
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 39
It was a very good year.
JSTANDARD.COM
MEETINGTHE POPE page 6
HONORINGAGOODDOCTOR page 7
PARSINGASUPREME COURT RULINGpage 8
PREVIEWINGISRAEL: AHOME MOVIE page 29
JULY 5, 2013 VOL. LXXXII NO. 42 $1.00
2013 82
The Goldin way
Englewood rabbis path
to national leadership
page 16
Local
6 JEWISH STANDARD JULY 12, 2013
JS-6*
Outcry over hosting a sex offender
Baruch Lanner appearance seen as emblematic of communal failings on abuse
LARRY YUDELSON
T
he head of the Yeshiva Uni- versity High School for Boys is under fire for hosting a con- victed child molester at his Teaneck synagogue and home as recently as February, even as the high school and the parent university was sued this week for $380 million for damages growing out of alleged sexual abuse at the high school three decades ago. Rabbi Baruch Lanner is the former New Jersey director of the Orthodox NCSY youth group. In 2000, a Jewish Week report documenting his long history of emotional and sexual abuse finally ended his career at the Orthodox Union; in 2002 he was convicted of molesting two girls at the Hillel Yeshiva High School in Deal. On Purimthis year, Lanner was a guest at the home of Rabbi Michael Taubes, who is both the rosh yeshiva of the YU high school (or MTA, as it generally is called) and the spiritual leader of Congregation Zichron Mordechai in Teaneck. Lanner was paroled in 2008 and has been seen at Zichron Mordechai since then. David Cheifetz of Teaneck raised the issue publicly on June 30 in an address to the annual conference of the Rabbinical
Council of America. How is it possible? he asked the 50 rabbis who attended the session, the first of the convention. It staggers the mind, really, that the principal of MTA would be hosting the most notorious pedophile in the history of modern Orthodoxy, Cheifetz told the Jewish Standard. This was even more true, he said, in wake of the revelations, first published in the Forward last December,
of alleged abuse by the schools former principal, Rabbi George Finkelstein. Reached at his MTA office, Taubes said, Imnot going to comment at this time. The public affairs office of Yeshiva University declined to comment on the propriety of Taubes hosting Lanner. The Standard has spoken to three Teaneck residents who saw Lanner at Taubes Purim meal, which was open to the public, seated in a position of respect,
or at Zichron Mordechai. Two of those witnesses, who prefer not to be identified, are Orthodox rabbis who work at YUs Washington Heights campus. The third, Jordan Hirsch, is a member of a nearby Orthodox congregation that met in Zichron Mordechai while its own building was under renovation. Cheifetz said that after he posted a copy of his RCAtalk on Facebook, and then later on a blog, the Jewish Community Watch, Taubes called him. Although Taubes downplayed the significance of Lanners visits, Cheifetz said, He did not deny that Baruch Lanner was at his shul.
Couldnt send himaway
He said it was only two times in three years, Cheiftz said. He mentioned that those Shabbosimwhen Lanner was there, he was a guest at Rabbi Taubes home. He did not deny that Baruch Lanner was in his house on Purim. He said that Baruch Lan- ner, he claimed, came to deliver shaloch manos and he couldnt ask himto leave so he stayed for a little bit. Cheifetz said he told Taubes, You as the head of a synagogue and as a principal of MTA are not just yourself. You are a symbol. You are a role model. What about all the victims of Baruch Lanner? What do you think this is doing for them?
Giving voice to victims
Teanecks David Cheifetz works to establish newwatchdog organization
LARRY YUDELSON
David Cheifetz is not the first victim of childhood sexual abuse in the Orthodox community to come forward. But he may be the first who also is an executive at McKinsey & Company, the New York-based hi gh-profi l e management consulting company. He sees the problem of sexual abuse as reflecting the failure of the institutions that allowed it to happen. And he is working to build his own institution, with the tentative name of Mi Li Who Is For Me? This is not intended as a one-man shop, he said. There are many activists who have done fantastic work on a limited budget. This is meant to address it on some degree of scale. Activists have had a profound impact on helping victims, he said. In Lakewood, he said, Rabbi Yosef Kolko eventually pleaded guilty of abusing a
child, after years of denial, because of activists behind the scene, whose names are not known, working very hard to identify other victims who were willing to step forward. The next stage, he said is to step forward and create an organization of scale, with employees. We need to move
from what has been to a great degree a guerrilla battle against overarching, large-scale, institutionally powerful organizations whether Agudah, NCSY
and OU in the days of Lanner, whether its Yeshiva University, whether its Lakewood, whether its particular chasidic sects we need to assemble an operation that is of scale to help victims and their families. Chei fetz, who i s a member of Congregation Rinat Yisrael in Teaneck, envisions a two-prong mission for the organization. The primary objective would be to serve as an ombudsman, to help victims and families go through the entire process, both in terms of managing the legal and social welfare systems and getting pro bono support. The other prong will deal in more general advocacy. We need to fundamentally change the thinking of the community, including the modern Orthodox community, in terms of how we relate to victims and accusations, he said. We need to give the benefit of the
doubt to victims. So far, Cheifetz has begun recruiting members for two boards: a governing board that would handle the financial side, and an advisory board. He has incorporated the organization and has begun the paperwork of setting it up. And he is holding lots of meetings. Im currently focused on growing a network of rabbis who are committed to the core principles, engaging with psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers, and others with relevant insights and experience, he said. Im also engaging with members of other faith groups. In general, the proposal has been greeted with enthusiasm. Major efforts are underway to build funding and other support, and I am delighted to speak to people who want to help create an institutional solution to this terrible problem, which has been largely ignored and hushed up by our community for far too long, he said.
David Cheifetz: It is easier to punish the victimthan it is to punish the perpetrator.
Rabbi Norman Lamm: I acted in a way that I thought was correct, but which now seems ill conceived.
Rabbi Michael Taubes is head of the Yeshiva University High School for Boys and leader of Teanecks Congregation Zichron Morechai.
Major efforts
are underway to
build funding and
other support
DAVIDCHEIFETZ
Local
6 JEWISH STANDARD JULY 12, 2013
JS-6*
Outcry over hosting a sex offender
Baruch Lanner appearance seen as emblematic of communal failings on abuse
LARRY YUDELSON
T
he head of the Yeshiva Uni- versity High School for Boys is under fire for hosting a con- victed child molester at his Teaneck synagogue and home as recently as February, even as the high school and the parent university was sued this week for $380 million for damages growing out of alleged sexual abuse at the high school three decades ago. Rabbi Baruch Lanner is the former New Jersey director of the Orthodox NCSY youth group. In 2000, a Jewish Week report documenting his long history of emotional and sexual abuse finally ended his career at the Orthodox Union; in 2002 he was convicted of molesting two girls at the Hillel Yeshiva High School in Deal. On Purimthis year, Lanner was a guest at the home of Rabbi Michael Taubes, who is both the rosh yeshiva of the YU high school (or MTA, as it generally is called) and the spiritual leader of Congregation Zichron Mordechai in Teaneck. Lanner was paroled in 2008 and has been seen at Zichron Mordechai since then. David Cheifetz of Teaneck raised the issue publicly on June 30 in an address to the annual conference of the Rabbinical
Council of America. How is it possible? he asked the 50 rabbis who attended the session, the first of the convention. It staggers the mind, really, that the principal of MTA would be hosting the most notorious pedophile in the history of modern Orthodoxy, Cheifetz told the Jewish Standard. This was even more true, he said, in wake of the revelations, first published in the Forward last December,
of alleged abuse by the schools former principal, Rabbi George Finkelstein. Reached at his MTA office, Taubes said, Imnot going to comment at this time. The public affairs office of Yeshiva University declined to comment on the propriety of Taubes hosting Lanner. The Standard has spoken to three Teaneck residents who saw Lanner at Taubes Purim meal, which was open to the public, seated in a position of respect,
or at Zichron Mordechai. Two of those witnesses, who prefer not to be identified, are Orthodox rabbis who work at YUs Washington Heights campus. The third, Jordan Hirsch, is a member of a nearby Orthodox congregation that met in Zichron Mordechai while its own building was under renovation. Cheifetz said that after he posted a copy of his RCAtalk on Facebook, and then later on a blog, the Jewish Community Watch, Taubes called him. Although Taubes downplayed the significance of Lanners visits, Cheifetz said, He did not deny that Baruch Lanner was at his shul.
Couldnt send himaway
He said it was only two times in three years, Cheiftz said. He mentioned that those Shabbosimwhen Lanner was there, he was a guest at Rabbi Taubes home. He did not deny that Baruch Lanner was in his house on Purim. He said that Baruch Lan- ner, he claimed, came to deliver shaloch manos and he couldnt ask himto leave so he stayed for a little bit. Cheifetz said he told Taubes, You as the head of a synagogue and as a principal of MTA are not just yourself. You are a symbol. You are a role model. What about all the victims of Baruch Lanner? What do you think this is doing for them?
Giving voice to victims
Teanecks David Cheifetz works to establish newwatchdog organization
LARRY YUDELSON
David Cheifetz is not the first victim of childhood sexual abuse in the Orthodox community to come forward. But he may be the first who also is an executive at McKinsey & Company, the New York-based hi gh-profi l e management consulting company. He sees the problem of sexual abuse as reflecting the failure of the institutions that allowed it to happen. And he is working to build his own institution, with the tentative name of Mi Li Who Is For Me? This is not intended as a one-man shop, he said. There are many activists who have done fantastic work on a limited budget. This is meant to address it on some degree of scale. Activists have had a profound impact on helping victims, he said. In Lakewood, he said, Rabbi Yosef Kolko eventually pleaded guilty of abusing a
child, after years of denial, because of activists behind the scene, whose names are not known, working very hard to identify other victims who were willing to step forward. The next stage, he said is to step forward and create an organization of scale, with employees. We need to move
from what has been to a great degree a guerrilla battle against overarching, large-scale, institutionally powerful organizations whether Agudah, NCSY
and OU in the days of Lanner, whether its Yeshiva University, whether its Lakewood, whether its particular chasidic sects we need to assemble an operation that is of scale to help victims and their families. Chei fetz, who i s a member of Congregation Rinat Yisrael in Teaneck, envisions a two-prong mission for the organization. The primary objective would be to serve as an ombudsman, to help victims and families go through the entire process, both in terms of managing the legal and social welfare systems and getting pro bono support. The other prong will deal in more general advocacy. We need to fundamentally change the thinking of the community, including the modern Orthodox community, in terms of how we relate to victims and accusations, he said. We need to give the benefit of the
doubt to victims. So far, Cheifetz has begun recruiting members for two boards: a governing board that would handle the financial side, and an advisory board. He has incorporated the organization and has begun the paperwork of setting it up. And he is holding lots of meetings. Im currently focused on growing a network of rabbis who are committed to the core principles, engaging with psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers, and others with relevant insights and experience, he said. Im also engaging with members of other faith groups. In general, the proposal has been greeted with enthusiasm. Major efforts are underway to build funding and other support, and I am delighted to speak to people who want to help create an institutional solution to this terrible problem, which has been largely ignored and hushed up by our community for far too long, he said.
David Cheifetz: It is easier to punish the victimthan it is to punish the perpetrator.
Rabbi Norman Lamm: I acted in a way that I thought was correct, but which now seems ill conceived.
Rabbi Michael Taubes is head of the Yeshiva University High School for Boys and leader of Teanecks Congregation Zichron Morechai.
Major efforts
are underway to
build funding and
other support
DAVIDCHEIFETZ
JSTANDARD.COM
THE ROLE MODEL LAUTENBERGNEVER KNEWpage 6
ETHICS AFTER AUSCHWITZ page 10
HERES TOYOU, MRS. ROOSEVELT page 44
JULY 26, 2013 VOL. LXXXII NO. 45 $1.00
2013 82
Praying
in color
Michael Haruni
illuminates the liturgy
with new siddur
page 20
IN THIS ISSUE
About Our
Children
Readers
Choice
JSTANDARD.COM
LOCALS PAINT FOR ISRAEL page 8
TENAFLY TEENS RECORDSURVIVORS page 10
JEWISHHERITAGE INAMINOR LEAGUE page 12
CHIEF RABBI BUSTED; ISRAEL SHRUGS page 27
JUNE 28, 2013 VOL. LXXXII NO. 41 $1.00
2013 82
Genes, judges,
and Jews
Supreme Court
DNA decision
analyzed page 20
Local
14 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 11, 2013
JS-14*
REPORTERS NOTEBOOK
Playing to the Pew
In Broadways Bad Jews, two actors, local boys, find parallels to their Jewish lives
JOANNE PALMER
I
t must be the zeitgeist. Just as the Pew Research Cen- ters survey of American Jews was released, to a flurry of responses and defenses and soul-searching posts and stories and interviews for an exam- ple, take a look at the front pages of this newspaper Bad Jews, a play looking at the same set of phenomena, opened at the Roundabout Theater Companys Laura Pels Theater on West 46th Street. (The play hit the road for a year after playing to capacity crowds in its earlier run. The original cast has returned for this production, which ends on Decem- ber 15.)
The Pew survey showed that many younger Jews are loath to affiliate with a denomination, join a synagogue, refrain from intermarriage, or call themselves religious, although they are proud to be Jews. Bad Jews, written by Joshua Harmon, shows how some of that plays out in fam- ily life; its more witty, more specific, often more profane, and therefore more probing than the anodyne prose of the Pew survey, and it is very effective. Its also (whew!) good theater. Bad Jews is set in a studio apartment in a prewar building on Manhattans Upper West Side, where two brothers, their first cousin, and a girlfriend have gathered to spend a claustrophobic and
loud night. Their grandfather was bur- ied that day, and shivah will begin in the morning, in an apartment down the hall. One of the brothers Liam, a smart, articulate, often unpleasant graduate student has moved far beyond what he sees as the irrational, outmoded demands of old-fashioned Jewish life. The Birthright-intoxicated cousin a funny, frequently savage, larger-than-life Vas- sar senior with huge frizzy hair that she tosses and wraps and that seems almost to have its own life wants to make ali- yah and join the IDF as soon as she grad- uates. Her Jewishness defines her; she prefers being called Daphna, her Hebrew name, rather than her birth name, Diana. The younger, Jonah, brother just wants
to be left alone, and the perky blonde girlfriend, when asked about her fam- ilys background, says that they are from Delaware. Its the Pew study, come to life. It is also a family drama, entirely acces- sible to non-Jewish audiences, but the specifics make it resonate with Jews in a way that, say, a play like Doubt, with a compelling plot and vivid characters, appeals to everyone but has a special meaning to the Catholic audiences who went to parochial schools. Both the actors who play Bad Jews brothers are Jewish, and both come from Bergen County. Both grew up in kosher homes and their families belong to Con- servative shuls. Both retain strong ties to
Tracee Chimo, Philip Ettinger, Molly Ranson, and Michael Zegen carry the tensions of Bad Jews. JOAN MARCUS
JSTANDARD.COM
2013 83
Thanksgivukkah!
NOVEMBER 22, 2013 VOL. LXXXIII NO. 11 $1.00
page 22
LOCAL RABBI IS FRIENDOF BILL page 8
WHATS UP, DOCTOR BARKAMA? page 10
VETERANS VISIT ENGLEWOODSCHOOLpage 14
ISRAELIS MODERNIZE DYLANpages 3, 48
INTHIS ISSUE:
ABOUT OUR
CHILDREN
OurChildren
About
Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families
All the Worlds a Stage Vitamins for Kids Supplement to The Jewish Standard and Rockland Jewish Standard December 2013
Winter Fun
Holiday mashup wont
happen again until 79043 c.e.
(We should live so long!)
JSTANDARD.COM
LESSONS OF ABROKENNECK page 6
CHANT ENCOUNTERS page 12
65 YEARS OF INNOVATIONpage 30
APRIL 12, 2013 VOL. LXXXII NO. 30 $1.00
2013 82
Local rabbis
remember
Rabbi
Soloveitchik
Reflections
on the Rav
VOTE!
READERS CHOICE
SEE PAGE 34
JSTANDARD.COM
FREEDOMSONG
MUSICAL ABOUT RECOVERY STAGEDINTEANECK page 10
FEDS CRACK DOWNONISRAELI KIOSK WORKERS page 27
SPORTS: INTHE BIGINNINGpage 31
Screening
Israel
MARCH 1, 2013 VOL. LXXXII NO. 24 $1.00
Film & Cultural
Festival starts locally
Saturday night
2013 82
The David Frank
Award for Excellence in
Personality Profles
FIRST PLACE
The Goldin way
Joanne Palmer
Award for Excellence
in News Reporting
FIRST PLACE
Outcry over hosting
a sex ofender
Larry Yudelson
Review Writing
FIRST PLACE
Praying in color: Michael Haruni
illuminates the liturgy with new siddur
Joanne Palmer
Best Local News
SECOND PLACE
Outcry over hosting
a sex ofender
Larry Yudelson
Health, Science, Technology, and
Environmental Reporting
FIRST PLACE
Genes, judges, and Jews: Supreme
Court DNA decision analyzed
Miryam Z. Wahrman
Review Writing
SECOND PLACE
Playing to the Pew
Joanne Palmer
Award for Excellence in
Graphic Design: Covers
SECOND PLACE
March 1, April 12 and
November 22
Jerry Szubin
The 2014 NJ Society of Professional Journalists
Excellence in Journalism Awards
The Simon Rockower Awards for
Excellence in Jewish Journalism
The Jewish Standard has nearly 82,000 Facebook likes.
Only one other Jewish weekly has more.
Our Facebook page has the highest readership engagement of any
Jewish weekly newspaper. No other even comes close.*
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Keeping Kosher
40 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-40*
New cheeses added
to Tnuvas quality line
Expanding upon its offerings of high quality cheeses, Tnuva
recently introduced new items to retail locations across the
country. The new line features cheddar, mozzarella, and
muenster, available in cheese sticks, chunk, and sliced
varieties.
Each new cheese is produced in accordance with the pro-
duction methods passed down from generation to genera-
tion. These techniques enhance the flavor, which is culti-
vated and enriched through the slow production process.
Wrapped in redesigned packaging, Tnuvas new products
uphold the same commitment to quality, taste, and fresh-
ness as traditional Tnuva products. All varieties of the ched-
dar, mozzarella, and muenster cheeses are cholov Yisroel,
strictly supervised from the farm to the inal packaging by
the New Square Rabbinical Kashrus Council, the Orthodox
Union, and the united Mehadrin hechsherim under the
Vaad Mehadrin Council. Tnuva cheeses are available in
the dairy aisle at all local specialty kosher stores and main-
stream supermarkets in select locations.
Kosher Experience
focuses on catering
Last month, Kosher Experience closed its Cedar Lane
restaurant and changed gears to focus on its Madison
Caterers business at 306 Main Ave. in Clifton.
The new state-of-the-art catering kitchen will offer
irst-class service for all occasions, and has both meat
and dairy facilities under Star-K supervision. In addi-
tion to on-site catering for yeshiva breaks at Great Wolf
Lodge and meals at Medieval Times, they prepare
school lunches. The new facility also includes a party
room with space for up to 140 people.
For catering information, call manager Avi Leven-
brown at (201) 6927222 or (201) 7879333.
Kosher Experience
306 Main Ave.
Clifton
www.kosherexperience.net or
thekosherexperience@yahoo.com.
Kosher Market
Meats Chicken Deli Appetizing
Prepared Foods Groceries Frozen Foods Catering
MON-WED 8-6; THURS 8-7; FRI 8-4; SUN 8-3; CLOSED SATURDAY
UNDER RABBINICAL SUPERVISION
67 A. East Ridgewood Ave. Paramus, NJ 07652
201-262-0030
www.harolds.com
First Class Service for All Occasions
Avi Levenbrown
201-692-7222 201-787-9333
306 Main Avenue Clifton
KosherExperience.net thekosherexperience@yahoo.com
Catering
For Every Occasion
KOSHER
EXPERIENCE
Serving The Kosher Way Since 1976
DELI RESTAURANT CATERING
#
1 New Jersey
Annual
Readers
Choice
Poll Avi & Haim
Proprietors
Under Rabbinical Supervision
894 Prospect Street
Glen Rock, NJ
Tel: 201-445-1186
Fax: 201-670-5674 www.koshernosh.com
Whole
Wheat
Cracker
We Are Now
Nut Free
STRICTLY KOSHER shomer shabbos
UNDER RCBC cholov yisroel pas yisroel
Large selection of delicious
Challah Pastries cookies bobkas pies & More...
Commercial Caterers & Restaurants welcome
Where Quality and Freshness Count!
19-09 FAIR LAWN AVE
FAIR LAWN
201 796-6565
LSHANAH TOVAH!
READERS
CHOICE
2014
FIRST PLACE
BEST BAKERY
BEST CHALLAH
Garden Lites debuts
gluten-free Bakes
Veggie and whole grain dish
is flavorful and low in carbs
Garden Lites continues to innovate in the frozen food
aisle with the debut of Garden Lites Bakes. The irst
flavor to make its debut as part of the Star-K Kosher-
certiied Garden Lites Bakes Line was Cheddar Broc-
coli Bake.
As with other products by Garden Lites, the irst
and main ingredient is vegetables. This, like other Gar-
den Lites products, is gluten-free, vegetarian, low in
calories, high in iber, and rich in whole grains. Ched-
dar Broccoli Bake can be found in the freezer section
of most food stores.
Bakes will have a richer flavor proile than original
Garden Lites Souffls while still remaining low calorie
at 250 calories or fewer. Go to www.gardenlites.com.
Like us
on Facebook.
facebook.com/jewishstandard
Keeping Kosher
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 41
JS-41*
Kosher Experience
focuses on catering
Last month, Kosher Experience closed its Cedar Lane
restaurant and changed gears to focus on its Madison
Caterers business at 306 Main Ave. in Clifton.
The new state-of-the-art catering kitchen will offer
irst-class service for all occasions, and has both meat
and dairy facilities under Star-K supervision. In addi-
tion to on-site catering for yeshiva breaks at Great Wolf
Lodge and meals at Medieval Times, they prepare
school lunches. The new facility also includes a party
room with space for up to 140 people.
For catering information, call manager Avi Leven-
brown at (201) 6927222 or (201) 7879333.
Kosher Experience
306 Main Ave.
Clifton
www.kosherexperience.net or
thekosherexperience@yahoo.com.
Hungarian kosher
family recipe book
Food, Family and Tradition: Hungarian
Kosher Family Recipes and Remembrances
by Lynn Kirsche Shapiro recently was pub-
lished by Cherry Press. The book includes
more than 150 original recipes, with full-color
photographs and preparation methods.
The author tells the story of her par-
ents, Holocaust survivors Sandor and Mar-
git Kirsche, founders of Hungarian Kosher
Foods, the largest all-kosher supermarket in
the Midwest, and shares the family recipes.
Heres a recipe from the book that will be perfect in your sukkah or for a din-
ner thats sure to please.
Stuffed Peppers
MEAT
10 servings
Stuffed peppers are a wonderful
alternative to stuffed cabbage and
they are easier to prepare because
you dont need to roll the pep-
pers. Any combination of orange,
red, and yellow peppers presents
beautifully on a platter. We rarely
use green peppers because we
find them somewhat bitter. All na-
tures colors are spectacular.
FOR THE FILLING:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 medium onion, finely diced
1 pound ground beef, turkey,
chicken, or a mixture of these
1/2 cup of uncooked long
grain white rice
1/4 teaspoon salt
pinch black pepper
4 mushrooms, finely chopped,
optional
For the peppers:
10 medium bell peppers, yellow,
red, or orange
1 (12-ounce) bag shredded
cabbage or 1 small head
cabbage, shredded
8 ounces refrigerated sauerkraut,
well drained
FOR THE SAUCE:
1 (15-ounce) can tomato sauce
or 2 cups tomato juice
1 scant teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
dash seasoned salt
MAKE THE FILLING:
In a 12-inch saut pan, over medium
heat, heat the oil. Add the onions
and saut until soft and translucent
but not brown. Add the meat and
brown for a few minutes, stirring
and breaking into small pieces with
the fork or spatula. When the meat
is browned, add the uncooked rice,
the salt and pepper, and the mush-
rooms, if using. Stir to mix. Remove
from heat. Reserve.
STUFF THE PEPPERS:
Cut the top with stem horizontally
off the pepper and reserve. Remove
core and seeds and discard. Divide
the filling equally and stuff the
peppers loosely. Top peppers with
reserved caps.
COOK THE PEPPERS:
Layer the bottom of a large Dutch
oven or 8-quart pot with half of the
cabbage and half of the sauerkraut.
Arrange peppers on the cabbage-
kraut layer in a single layer. Cover
peppers with remaining cabbage
and sauerkraut.
Mix tomato sauce or juice with sea-
sonings. Pour over peppers. Cover
with a tight-fitting lid. Over high
heat, bring to a boil. Decrease heat
to low and simmer until cabbage
and peppers are cooked through,
about 2 hours.
Alternatively you can bake, covered,
at 350F for 3 hours. Serve peppers
on a large platter, alternating colors.
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Using sacred imagination at Yom Kippur and Sukkot
T
his time of year
we are inundated
with metaphors
to help us under-
stand God and the theme of
the holidays. At Kol Nidrei
we enter a court with God
presiding as judge and ask
to have our vows annulled.
Later on Yom Kippur, we
pray to be sealed in the Book
of Life; this metaphor chal-
lenges us to live a life of good
deeds, a life we can be proud
of. At the end of the day, we
stand at the open ark and feel the urgency
of the moment as we read how the gates
are closing.
Depending on when you receive this
newspaper, and when you have time to
read it, you may be preparing for Yom
Kippur and its many metaphors that are
intended to make our repentance before
God more thoughtful and enduring.
If youre like me, though, Yom Kippur
will be over by the time you
get to this column and the
J ewi sh communi t y wi l l
already be preparing for Suk-
kot. Sukkot is filled with sym-
bolism too, much of which
emanates from the sukkah
itself. The sukkah is by defi-
nition a temporary structure.
In Leviticus 23:42, the Torah
commands us to sit or dwell
in the sukkah for seven days.
The symbolism of the Suk-
kah is multilayered. Leviticus
23:43 says it is to remind us
of the booths our ancestors dwelt in after
the Exodus. Other traditions say that it rep-
licates the shelters our ancestors built in the
fields during the harvest time after settling
in the land. The prophet Amos invokes the
sukkah as a symbol of a future redemption:
In that day, I will set up again the fallen
sukkah of David: I will mend its breaches
and set up its ruins anew. I will build it firm
as in the days of old.
Another value the sukkah symbolizes
is hospitality. A midrash traces this con-
nection back to our patriarch Abraham,
who offered hospitality to three strangers
under the shade of his tree. For this act of
kindness, God protected the Israelites in
their booths during the years of wander-
ing in the desert. Today, the hospitality of
the sukkah is both real and metaphorical.
Many families take delight in hosting loved
ones or being hosted during the week of
the festival. But there is also a beautiful
tradition of inviting ushpizin, heroes from
Jewish history, into the sukkah. Thus even
if you are by yourself in the sukkah, you
are not alone.
The sukkah also represents gratitude.
That we are commanded to be partially
homeless one week a year is a mandate to
be grateful for the homes we have and the
comfort they provide. Also, many fill their
sukkot with fruit, gourds, or other symbols
of the harvest. We are reminded that food
is a gift from God.
To make the symbolism of Yom Kippur
or Sukkot meaningful, it helps to have
what I call sacred imagination. These
rituals build on everyday experiences.
We see courtrooms on television. Some
of us keep journals or blogs, writing the
significant events of our lives down for
later reference. Im sure each of us has
chased after a bus or a train whose doors
are about to close; the success of your day
may have hinged on whether you arrived
before the doors closed. Using sacred
imagination to transform these experi-
ences into moments of holiness can help
us truly appreciate Yom Kippur.
Similarly, each one of us has been in a
place where we felt unstable, unsafe, or
unsure. We made the best of it until we
could get back to our comfort zone. The
sukkah places us there temporarily, but
with our sacred imagination we offer
gratitude to God and feel the presence
of loved ones. Then the festival becomes
transformative.
May you be sealed for life and blessing,
and may your festival be joyous.
Rabbi Steven
Sirbu
Temple Emeth,
Teaneck, Reform
What did King David drink?
Israeli wine researchers aim to revive ancient libations
BEN SALES
ARIEL, WEST BANK The small cardboard box in
Elyashiv Droris palm looks like its full of black pebbles.
Closing the box quickly, he explains that it cannot
be open for long. The pebble-like pieces, which were
uncovered in an archaeological dig near Jerusalems Old
City, are in fact remains of a kilo of grapes stored nearly
3,000 years ago. They were preserved under layers of
earth from the era when David and Solomon ruled over
the Land of Israel.
Next to his laboratory at Ariel University, Drori an
oenophile who has judged international wine competi-
tions already has barrels of wine made from grapes
that have grown in Israel for two millennia. Finding a liv-
ing sample of the 3,000-year-old grapes will be the next
step in his years-long quest to produce wine identical to
that consumed in ancient Israel.
Its not interesting to make chardonnay in Israel
because theres chardonnay that comes from Califor-
nia, said Drori, the agriculture and oenology research
coordinator at the Samaria and Jordan Rift Center of
Ariel University. But if you can make wine in Israel that
isnt elsewhere and that connects to the history here,
thats much more interesting.
Today there are hundreds of Israeli wineries, but they
largely use varieties of grapes that are indigenous to
Europe. By finding and growing grapes native to Israel,
Drori hopes to bring Israeli winemaking back to its roots.
One major hurdle: The areas past Muslim rulers pro-
hibited alcohol consumption for centuries, and many
indigenous grape varieties all but fell out of use. But
some of the grape varieties survived.
Cremisan Cellars, a winery outside Bethlehem run
by Italian monks, has produced a dry white wine called
Hamdani Jandali that is made from two species indig-
enous to the area. Drori has found mentions of Jandali
and Hamdani grapes in Second Temple-era texts from
2,000 years ago, and is preparing to showcase kosher
wines made from the grapes at a festival next summer.
With funding from the Jewish National Fund as well
the city and national governments, three years ago he
sent a team of Ariel masters students on treks across
Israel to find grapes growing in the wild. After three
years of searching across the country with tips from
hikers who had seen wild grapes the students found
100 varieties of grapes unique to Israel. Of those, at least
10 are suitable for winemaking.
I understood how much local species are connected
to their countries, said Yakov Henig, one of Droris stu-
dent researchers. Every nation has its species, and we
Elyashiv Drori and his students planted grapes in
this small vineyard at Ariel University. BEN SALES
JS-43
Dear Rabbi
JS-43
Dvar Torah
Dear Rabbi: Your Talmudic advice column
Dear Rabbi,
Ive been arguing with my
friend, who wants me to
join her at Shabbat ser-
vices at an alternative
minyan. She says I will
find it more intellectual
and more egalitarian and
I should come with her.
I explained to her that I
went to that minyan once
and found out that ser-
vices were held in the base-
ment of a private home.
Ive learned that ideally public com-
munal prayer should be conducted in the
most aesthetic surroundings, preferably
an attractive dedicated synagogue build-
ing, not a rec room.
I agree with that and Im not going to go
with my friend. But what should I tell her?
Aesthetic in Englewood
Dear Aesthetic,
Its always best to tell your friend the truth
about how you feel. But try not to dispar-
age her choices when you do that.
In an ideal world, a community will pro-
vide its people with centralized places of
worship that are artistically beautiful, intel-
lectually stimulating, and open and wel-
coming to all who wish to come. By joining
together in such venues, a local popula-
tion can be more efficient in the use of its
resources and strengthen social solidarity.
For most people, those simple, prac-
tical goals are enough to motivate them
to accept some compromises to their
independence and join in with the larger
collective.
Your friend and her group want to vary
from this path, and there is nothing inher-
ently wrong with that. It may be that they
want a subtly variant style of
prayer or that they want greater
control over lectures and learn-
ing that they cannot have within
a mainstream group.
We know that even the nicest
finished basement cannot be
ranked as the ideal architectural
context for creating a sense of
the numinous for awe-inspiring
worship. But your friend and
her ilk opt to forego that for their
offbeat independence. And they
seem to have the resources to sustain their
preferences.
Although in theory you are right to con-
clude that for the context of public prayer,
above ground is preferable to under-
ground, permanent is better than ad hoc,
and aesthetics do matter, you should rec-
ognize whats going on and not criticize
her groups decisions.
In our complex communities we need to
allow that one persons rec room can be
another persons special spiritual place.
Dear Rabbi,
Im bombarded at this time of year with
requests for donations from many worthy
local, national and international causes.
Im not wealthy. So how do I prioritize
which ones to support?
Parsimonious in Paramus
Dear Parsimonious,
Yes, thats a tough question. To find the
most philanthropic gratification I advise
that you give thoughtfully to accredited
organizations as an expression of your
values. If you believe foremost in support-
ing the indigent and those in personal
straits, then give to a credible social wel-
fare agency. Depending on exactly where
they live, many local people support the
Jewish Family Service of Bergen and North
Hudson or the Jewish Family Service of
Northern Jersey, or Project Ezra.
If you choose to support religious or
education initiatives, we are blessed with
a multitude of shul and school options in
our communities.
If you have resources to direct to the
performing arts, then the distinguished
local Teaneck Garage Theatre Group will
welcome your help.
If you wish to make a basket donation to
cover many bases, the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey encompasses var-
ied charities. It is a good alternative if you
want one-stop giving.
In the season when we seek compassion
for ourselves, it is good to bestow compas-
sion on others by making your generous
gifts and pledges now for the coming year.
Dear Rabbi,
Im an ultra-Orthodox man who will not
sit next to a woman on an airplane. After
boarding a flight recently I politely asked
that a woman next to me move her seat to
accommodate my religious obligations. The
woman refused and the flight was delayed.
Airline security was called, and I was
threatened with being removed from the
flight and being blocked from flying in the
future by being assigned to the no-fly list.
I need to fly to see my family and to
conduct my business. I feel that people
are misunderstanding my religious needs
and discriminating against me. What
should I do?
Misunderstood in Monsey
Dear Misunderstood,
Unfortunately it appears that nobody mis-
understands your intention to discrimi-
nate against others based on gender. In
America and most of the world, segrega-
tion or the denial of civil rights based on
race or gender or sexual orientation no
longer is condoned. That being said, you
have three options to choose from.
You can live apart from the world in
a self-imposed ghetto with other like-
minded people, and continue to practice
your gender segregation together. Or you
can go out to the public sphere with your
current attitudes and continue to clash
with the people around you. Or you can
modify your beliefs and behaviors and no
longer practice segregation, discrimina-
tion, and the denial of civil rights based on
gender. Its up to you to decide how to live
your life.
Rabbi Dr. Tzvee Zahavy was ordained at
Yeshiva University and earned his Ph.D.
in religious studies at Brown University.
He has published several new Kindle
Editions at Amazon.com, including The
Book of Jewish Prayers in English, Rashi:
The Greatest Exegete, Gods Favorite
Prayers and Dear Rabbi: The Greatest
Talmudic Advice which includes his past
columns from the Jewish Standard and
other essays.
Rabbi Tzvee
Zahavy
The Dear Rabbi column offers timely advice based on timeless Talmudic
wisdom. It aspires to be equally respectful and meaningful to all varieties
and denominations of Judaism. You can find it here on the first Friday of the
month. Send your questions to DearRabbi@jewishmediagroup.com.
have a culture and tradition of making wine. This is con-
nected to our identity.
Droris next goal is to match the wild grapes to grape
seeds and remains found in ancient archaeological sites.
If a seed has survived the centuries with its shape intact,
Udi Weiss, an archeo-botanist at Bar-Ilan University, will
create a 3-D scan of the ancient grape seed and deter-
mine, based on its shape, whether it matches grapes that
grow now.
We want to get to a place where there will be a kind
of fingerprint for the species we found all over Israel,
said Weiss, who works with Drori. My hope is that I can
say that a sample is exactly the shape of a seed I found in
Davids City in Jerusalem.
To tackle the challenge of grape remains whose shapes
have been distorted, Drori has enlisted Mali Salmon-
Divol, a biologist specializing in DNA analysis who has
begun sequencing the genomes of the indigenous Israeli
grapes. Once Salmon-Divol has a record of each species
DNA, she will sample the DNA of the ancient grapes and
see how they line up.
Based on the fruits genes, Salmon-Divol can tell a lot
about the wine they produced.
You want to know what this wine looked like, which
wine King David drank, white or red, she said. We can
see if its red or white, strong or weak.
Droris research has shown that native Israeli grapes
are different from those grown in Italy and France. He
says Israeli grapes are most like those in Greece, likely
owing to ancient Mediterranean trade routes.
Drori is vinting his wines purely for research, but
hopes Israeli wineries will use the indigenous species
as long as theyre not sacrificing their wines taste.
We want wine thats good because of its quality and
its story, he said. Our goal is to interest the vineyards
to bring the antique species back. JTA WIRE SERVICE
Elyashiv Drori, standing, who has been working
for years to identify and grow grapes indigenous
to Israel, consulting with a researcher in his lab at
Ariel University. BEN SALES
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 43
44 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-44*
Crossword BY DAVID BENKOF
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Serious readers welcome!
BOOKS & GREETINGS
Please come prepared to discuss
What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty
FIRST MEETING: October 14 at 7pm
Founders: Author Kieran Scott & Librarian Sabina Albirt
Please email any questioons to kieran@kieranscott.net
www.jstandard.com
Across
1. Kvetch
5. Kiss alternative
9. The Big ___ (nickname for North
Americas biggest Jewish city)
14. Shevat, ___, Nisan...
15. Celebration in Bette Midlers home
state
16. ___ Hill (part of Toronto with many
Jews)
17. Philip Roth and Henry Roth
19. Color scheme in part of Schindlers
List
20. IDF foul-up
21. Haroset holidays
23. Maoz Tzur (Rock of ___)
25. Flatow or Levin
26. Place for a shtreimel
29. Womens ___ Network (organization
for female Reform clergy)
34. ___ Annie of Oklahoma!
35. ___ Reeds
37. Actress Dunham (Girls)
38. Marx Brothers specialty
39. Reason Titanic passengers Isador
and Ida Straus died
42. Yom Ha___ (another name for Rosh
Hashanah)
43. Haifa is north of Tel Aviv on ___
45. ___ Rangers (Haim Saban fran-
chise)
46. Freudian idea
47. Turn in a new draft to the Forward
50. Kind of tallit material
52. Gloria Steinem goal
53. Association for Jewish Studies direc-
tor Sheramy
54. Zionist Szold
59. Arthur Millers All My Sons, e.g.
63. Treat someone as if they were in
herem (excommunication)
64. Great Jewish court
66. First Zionist Congress site
67. Pop
68. LA Republican Jewish congressional
candidate Carr
69. Remains of the destruction of the
Temple
70. Rabbinical pioneer Frank and others
71. Luxemburg was a red one
Down
1. Container for Manischwitz chicken
consomme
2. ___ Olam (prayer that ends Shabbat
services)
3. Babylonian Talmud voice
4. Levittown house
5. ___ G (Sacha Baron Cohen persona)
6. What 12-year old boys are on, in
terms of Jewish adulthood
7. Brent Spiners Star Trek role
8. Say dreck and putz
9. Take in, as the Torahs teachings
10. Behave as Israel in 1967
11. Common item chasidic masters used
to smoke tobacco
12. Gaza underground tunnel, sometimes
13. Second Temple Period and others
18. Landau won an Oscar for playing him
22. One of Dinas dozen
24. Mark Zuckerberg, e.g.
26. Genesis woman
27. South Pacific song: There is
Nothing Like ___
28. Costumes for Herods men
29. Isaac Asimovs I, ___
30. Sorkins ___ Good Men
31. Bli ___ (Dont hold me to that)
32. Mandy Patinkin line: My name is ___
Montoya...
33. Esther, but not Tobit, is in the Biblical
one
36. Rush it
40. Repeat a Torah verse that was read
improperly
41. Order at Howard Schultzs Starbucks
44. Like Pee Wee Hermans humor
48. Veil-wearers
49. She Done Him Wrong actress West
51. Bouncer at Studio 54
53. Presented a movie idea to Spielberg
54. Olam ___ (the world to come)
55. Gabor and Hesse
56. Munch (on)
57. Moscow monster
58. Eilat neighbor
60. Sailing Down My Golden River
singer Guthrie
61. Ron Arad and Zach Baumel
62. Ticho or Sokolow
65. Rumor ___ it (Rob Reiner film)
The solution for last weeks
puzzle is on page 51.
JS-45*
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 45
Jewish World
Challenge from the left
New NIF campaign adopts rights tools
RON KAMPEAS
WASHINGTON In a strategic shift, the New
Israel Fund is arming itself with a set of sharp
political tools and picking a fight.
Its target: Israels political right.
Its weapons: Opposition research, media
monitoring, and staking its claims to patrio-
tism and Zionism.
If NIFs dramatic language, outlined in a
September 18 press release, and its tough
new posture seem familiar, its because the
funder is adopting tactics used by the right to
marginalize NIF and its clients.
Over the past decade, Israel has endured
an assault on liberal democratic values and
a growing defiance of democratic norms,
endangering freedom of speech and con-
science as well as minority rights, the release
said. Overt racism, ultra-nationalism and
xenophobia are on the rise.
The shift for NIF, said Daniel Sokatch, the
groups executive director, is its readiness to
directly confront the right.
Its time to try and put wind in the sails
of people who are pushing back against an
increasingly narrow, increasingly xenopho-
bic, increasingly undemocratic vision of
Israel and what Israel can be, he said.
Theres not much substantively new in the
NIF initiative. The group has funded some of
the groups named under the rubric New Ini-
tiatives for Democracy for years, and other
proposals, like monitoring right-wing media,
remain amorphous.
Its also not clear whether the $2 million
earmarked for the initiative in 2014 is an
increase in existing funding for the named
projects, although Naomi Paiss, NIFs spokes-
woman, said that in time the proportion of
funding for the initiative will increase. NIF
now runs a budget of $30 million and doles
out grants totaling $10 million annually.
The campaign, Sokatch said, is aimed at
donors who are alarmed at what they per-
ceive as the inexorable rise of undemocratic
trends among Israelis, particularly relating to
the peace process, political dissent, and rac-
ism toward minorities, including Arabs and
migrants.
The traditional vehicles of progressive
Israel, which were once mighty, are gone, he
said, referring to the Labor Party and other
leftist institutions that have been weakened
over the past two decades. Whats left as the
last standard-bearer of liberal Zionism is the
civil society sector, and the one big name that
everybodys heard of is the New Israel Fund.
But Gerald Steinberg, a founder of NGO
Monitor, a sharp critic of NIF, said the organi-
zations new course amounted to rebrand-
ing, in part to court big donors. Its a way to
move the organization toward the consensus
and away from the fringe, he said.
Under assault from the right since the
early 2000s for backing a handful of groups
identified with Israels non-Zionist left, NIF
officials until now generally have ignored the
criticism. Spokesmen deflected attention by
emphasizing that the bulk of NIF funding is
for less objectionable social action, including
protection for victims of domestic violence
and poverty and to fight for pluralism and
interreligious understanding.
Those tactics did not help, and now NIF a
group that for decades preferred the shadows
and relinquishing the spotlight to its benefi-
ciaries earns regular derisive mentions by
right-wing columnists. Its also been the sub-
ject of Knesset hearings on proposed limits
on how groups like NIF spend their money.
But now NIF and its grantees are embrac-
ing the symbols and rhetoric used by the
right to great effect. The Council for Peace
and Security, which is slated to receive at
least $200,000 from NIF under the new
initiative, enlists hardened former security
heavyweights such as ex-Mossad boss Meir
Dagan and ex-military chief of staff Gabi Ash-
kenazi to articulate blistering critiques of
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus
policies.
And this month Molad, a think tank poised
to take in at least $300,000 under the new
initiative, published an expose showing that
the bulk of government funding for hous-
ing development on Israels periphery (the
Negev, the Galilee and the West Bank) goes
to settlements and institutions affiliated with
the national religious camp and not to the
Negev and Galilee, nor to the charedi Ortho-
dox sector.
Mikhael Manekin, the managing director
of Molad, called the report oppo research
and noted the coverage it earned in the cha-
redi press. The goal, he said, is not just to
critique what is happening in the country, but
to replace the current government by part-
nering with sectors not usually cultivated by
the left, including the charedim.
Peter Beinart, a vocal critic of Israeli poli-
cies who is also a Zionist, said embracing poli-
tics and taking the struggle to the streets is
what the right wing has done for years.
If you look at the way they built conser-
vative institutions in the U.S. and Israel, the
wisdom is to go for the long haul, Beinart
said. Taking a more aggressive and political
response is important.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Simmering in the skies
El Al faces uproar over charedims refusal to sit near women
BEN SALES
TEL AVIV For approximately a half hour at
the beginning of her El Al Israel Airlines flight
from New York to Tel Aviv last week, Elana
Sztokman watched as the charedi Orthodox
man seated next to her rushed up and down
the aisle searching for someone willing to
switch seats so he wouldnt have to sit there.
On the same route several hours later,
another El Al flight was delayed as charedi
men stood in the aisles refusing to sit next to
women.
After takeoff, the men resumed their pro-
test until other seats were found for them. A
passenger on the flight told the Israeli website
Ynet that the trip was an 11-hour nightmare.
Israels national airline has had to con-
tend with charedi Orthodox Jews insisting
on gender separation in the skies for a long
time. But the two recent incidents Sztok-
mans story went viral after she wrote
about it in the online magazine Tablet
have prompted calls for El Al to resolve the
ongoing issue.
Some have suggested that the airline insist
that strictly observant passengers sit in their
assigned seats. Others say the airline should
create gender-segregated sections, so seat
maps would not have to be reconfigured on
the spot.
What offends me is the premise that sit-
ting next to me is a problem, said Sztok-
man, author of the recent book The War on
Women in Israel: A Story of Religious Radical-
ism and the Women Fighting for Freedom.
Im a person first and foremost.
Sztokman, who has faced similar situations
on past El Al flights, said she has written the
airline to complain several times but has not
heard back.
In a statement responding to an inquiry
from JTA, El Al made no mention of the Sep-
tember 22 and 23 incidents, but said that
the airlines staffers are trying their best
to respond to every request of any of the
passengers.
An online petition launched Sunday is call-
ing on the airline to provide a small section
of gender-segregated seats for an extra fee.
In two days, the petition garnered more than
1,500 signatures.
I do think El Al has a responsibility to
make its passengers feel safe and prevent this
type of thing from happening, the petitions
author, Sharon Shapiro of Chicago, said. I
dont think women should be harassed or
feel bad or guilty if they cant change seats. I
dont think men who feel its a halachic [Jew-
ish legal] mandate that they cant sit next to
women should be put in a position that they
have to nudge and ask.
Special sections or flights for charedi pas-
sengers have been suggested before but
never implemented. In a controversial move,
some Israeli bus companies separated seating
for women and men on several lines in 2010.
In 2011, the Israeli Supreme Court ruled that
forcing such segregation is illegal.
If they rent the whole plane, El Al can run
empty planes, said Anat Hoffman, executive
director of the Israel Religious Action Center,
a Reform Jewish group. But you cant make
people move because of their gender.
Hoffmans organization challenged El Al
two years ago on gender segregation when
an American woman, Debra Ryder, was
forced to switch seats after a man refused to
sit next to her. A lawyer for Hoffmans group,
Orly Erez-Litkhovsky, demanded that Ryder
be compensated approximately $14,000 as a
result.
El Al rejected the payment demand but
said it would revisit its guidelines for flight
attendants, reconsidering having them ask
passengers to move or telling people to stay
in their seats.
The man who was assigned a seat next to
Sztokmans eventually switched with another
passenger. Sztokman said she hopes public
outcry in the wake of the incident includ-
ing outcry from charedi Orthodox will push
El Al to take action.
I hope this helps people within the cha-
redi world think twice about whether this is
the culture they want, and I hope this encour-
ages women in Israel to speak more, Sztok-
man said. We have to speak more. We cant
just sit down and keep taking it.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Daniel Sokatch, New Israel Funds
executive director, says his group is
ready to confront the right directly.
COURTESY OF NEW ISRAEL FUND
Calendar
46 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-46*
Friday
OCTOBER 3
Yom Kippur in Teaneck:
The Jewish Learning
Experience offers free
services at Maayanot
Yeshiva High School for
Girls, 6 p.m. Also October
4 at 10 a.m. 1650 Palisade
Ave. (201) 966-4498 or
www.jle.org.
Yom Kippur in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth offers a
community Erev Yom
Kippur tot service for
children up to 5 with
their families, 6:45 p.m.
1666 Windsor Road. For
information, Lee Stein,
(201) 833-1322.
Saturday
OCTOBER 4
Yom Kippur in Teaneck:
The Jewish Learning
Experience offers free
services at Maayanot
Yeshiva High School
for Girls, 10 a.m. 1650
Palisade Ave. (201) 966-
4498 or www.jle.org.
Yom Kippur in
Montebello:
Congregation Shaarey
Israel offers community
Yizkor, 11:45 a.m. 18
Montebello Road,
Montebello, N.Y. (845)
369-0300.
Yom Kippur in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel holds Yizkor at
12:30 p.m., a healing
service at 4:15, and
Mincha and Neilah at
5:20. Guest tickets
available. 53 Palisade
Ave. (201) 265-2272.
Yom Kippur in Glen
Rock: The Glen Rock
Jewish Center offers
community Yizkor,
12:45 p.m., and Neilah at
6. 682 Harrison Road.
(201) 652-6624.
Yom Kippur in Leonia:
Congregation Adas
Emuno has family/
childrens services, 2 p.m.
No tickets required. 254
Broad Ave. (201) 592-
1712.
Yom Kippur in Closter:
Temple Beth El has
services for families with
young children, 2:30 p.m.,
and Yizkor/Neilah at
3:30. 221 Schraalenburgh
Road. (201) 768-5112.
Yom Kippur in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth offers
a Yom Kippur family
service, 2:30 p.m.;
afternoon and Yizkor
services at 3:45, and
Neilah and concluding
services at 5:45. 1666
Windsor Road. For
information, Lee Stein,
(201) 833-1322.
Yom Kippur in Tenafly:
Temple Sinai of Bergen
County offers a young
family service, 2:45 p.m.
2- to 6-year-olds must
be accompanied by a
parent. 1 Engle St. (201)
568-3035.
Yom Kippur in
Orangeburg: The
Orangetown Jewish
Center holds both family
services and separate
Yizkor services, both at
3 p.m. 8 Independence
Ave., Orangeburg, N.Y.
(845) 359-5920 or
office@theojc.org.
Yom Kippur in
Paramus: The Jewish
Community Center of
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah offers a
community Yizkor
service, 4 p.m. East 304
Midland Ave. (201) 262-
7691 or www.jccparamus.
org.
Yom Kippur in
Mahwah: Beth Haverim
Shir Shalom offers
community Yizkor,
5:30 p.m. 280 Ramapo
Valley Road. (201) 512-
1983.
Sunday
OCTOBER 5
War veterans meet
in Hackensack: The
Teaneck/New Milford
Post #498 Jewish War
Veterans meets for
breakfast at the Coach
House Diner, 9 a.m.
Prospective members
welcome. Route 4 East.
Past Post Commander
Stan Hoffman, (201) 836-
0814.
American Jewish
Experience in Tenafly:
Miriam Gray leads the
Kulanu BYachad class at
Temple Sinai of Bergen
County, which focuses
on the American Jewish
experience, 9:30 a.m. 1
Engle St. (201) 568-3035.
Games in New City:
The West Clarkstown
Jewish Center hosts
Military Mah Jongg,
where players move from
table to table, at noon.
Event includes lunch,
refreshments, and prizes.
195 West Clarkstown
Road. (845) 352-0017.
Monday
OCTOBER 6
Book discussion: At the
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai
Israel, Edith Sobel talks
about Alice Hoffmans
book, The Museum of
Extraordinary Things,
at the Book and Lunch
program, noon. Lunch
with reservations. 10-10
Norma Ave. (201) 796-
5040.
Tuesday
OCTOBER 7
Liran Kapoano
Israel advocacy talk
in River Edge: Liran
Kapoano, the former
director of the Center
for Israel Engagement
of the Jewish Federation
of Northern New
Jersey, who is now
the founder/CEO of
CTC Media, discusses
After the Summer of
2014: Reframing Israel
Advocacy for River Dell
Hadassah at Temple
Avodat Shalom, 1 p.m.
Dairy refreshments. 385
Howland Ave. (551) 265-
1573.
Discussing atrial
fibrillation: Dr. Suneet
Mittal, director of the
electrophysiology
laboratory at the Valley
Hospital in Ridgewood,
offers a talk, Atrial
FibrillationTurn the Beat
Around, a look at the
heart rhythm abnormality
that affects an estimated
2.7 million Americans, at
the Bergen County YJCC
in Washington Township,
7 p.m. 605 Pascack
Road. (201) 666-6610,
(800) Valley1, or www.
valleyhealth.com/events.
Yoga in River Edge:
Bettina Jones leads
De-Stress With Yoga
at Temple Avodat
Shalom, 7 p.m. Course
runs through Nov. 18. No
experience necessary;
wear comfortable
clothes. 385 Howland
Ave. (201) 489-2463 or
sallyisaacs@gmail.com.
Book club in
Washington Township:
The book group at the
Bergen County YJCC
looks at Jojo Moyess
One Plus One, 7:30 p.m.
605 Pascack Road. (201)
666-6610.
Wednesday
OCTOBER 8
Caregiver support in
Rockleigh: A support
group for those caring
for the physically
frail or suffering from
Alzheimers disease
meets at the Gallen Adult
Day Health Care Center
at the Jewish Home at
Rockleigh, 10-11:30 a.m.
Topics include long-term
care options, financial
planning, legal concerns
and the personal toll
of caregiving. Shelley
Steiner, (201) 784-1414,
ext. 5340.
Sukkot in River Edge:
Temple Avodat Shalom
begins Sukkot with a
family service at 5:15 p.m.,
pizza dinner in sukkah
at 6, festive service at 7,
and refreshments. 385
Howland Ave. (201) 489-
2463.
Sukkot in Tenafly:
Temple Sinai of Bergen
County offers a young
family service, 5:30 p.m.,
after sukkah decorating
at 4:30. A parent must
accompany 2- to 6-year-
olds. 1 Engle St. (201)
568-3035.
Sukkot in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
a family service led
by Rabbi David S.
Widzer and Cantor Rica
Timman, 6 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
Closter. (201) 768-5112.
Thursday
OCTOBER 9
Sukkot in Jersey City:
Congregation Bnai
Jacob has services,
9 a.m., followed by lunch
in the sukkah. 176 West
Side Ave. (201) 435-5725.
Sukkot in River Edge:
Temple Avodat Shalom
offers services, 10 a.m.,
and Torah study and
lunch, sponsored by
Rabbi Jacobsons
discretionary fund, in
the sukkah at noon. 385
Howland Ave. (201) 489-
2463.
Saturday
OCTOBER 11
Shabbat for pets in
River Edge: Temple
Avodat Shalom offers a
petting zoo, 3:45 p.m.,
pizza in the sukkah at 5,
and pet blessings in the
sukkah at 5:45. Pets must
be on a leash or in an
appropriate pet carrier.
385 Howland Ave. (201)
489-2463.
Sunday
OCTOBER 12
Childrens program:
The Jewish Community
Center of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah continues its
Sunday Specials series
for 4- to 7-year-olds,
with Fun with Nature.
9:30-11 a.m. Songs, crafts,
bouncy castle, science,
and cooking. Nut-free
snacks. East 304 Midland
Ave. (201) 262-7733 or
edudirector@jccparamus.
org.
Dead Sea scrolls: The
Glen Rock Jewish Center
and Temple Beth Sholom
of Fair Lawn sponsor
a program on The
The Kaplen JCC
on the Palisades in
Tenafly screens The
Nazi Officers Wife
on Monday, October 6, 7:30 p.m.,
as part of a series, Top Films
You May Have Missed (or want
to see again). It was written by
former Bergen County resident
Susan Dworkin with filmmaker
Liz Garbus and narrated by
Susan Sarandon. Harold Chapler
introduces the film and leads
the discussion that follows. 411 E.
Clinton Ave. (201) 408-1493.
OCT.
6
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 47
JS-47*
Meaning of the Dead
Sea Scrolls for Judaism:
Myth and Reality, by
Dr. Adolfo Roitman, at
the GRJC, 11 a.m. 682
Harristown Road. (201)
797-9321, ext. 415, or
(201) 652-6624.
Family program in
New Milford: Solomon
Schechter Day School
of Bergen County offers
Sundays at Schechter, a
community-wide Jewish
themed interactive family
series, with a Sukkah
Bash with Musical IQ,
1-3 p.m. Storytelling,
musical instruments,
songs, drumming
workshops, arts and
crafts, and nut-free
snacks. Special lunch
for alumni families with
young children at 12:30.
295 McKinley Ave. (201)
262-9898, ext. 213 or
events@ssdsbergen.org.
Celebrating Rabbi
Goldin in Englewood:
To honor Rabbi Shmuel
Goldins completion of
his Torah commentary,
Unlocking the Torah
Text, Congregation
Ahavath Torah honors
its head rabbi at a
Simchat Beit Hashoeva
in the shuls new sukkah,
7 p.m. Music, dance, and
refreshments. Book sets
available for sale and
signing. 240 Broad Ave.
(201) 568-1315 or www.
ahavathtorah.org.
In New York
Friday
OCTOBER 3
Yom Kippur: The East
Side Synagogue offers
free community Kol Nidre
services at All Souls
Sanctuary in Manhattan,
8:55 p.m., and on Yom
Kippur day, 10 a.m.,
with afternoon services
at 2:45 p.m., Yizkor at
4:45, and ending with
Havdalah, singing, and
dancing. 1157 Lexington
Ave., between 79th and
80th streets. Participants
must call the information
line, (212) 560-2222.
Sunday
OCTOBER 5
COURTESY OF MELANIE EINZIG
Family program: Babies
and toddlers and their
parents are welcome to a
program at the Museum
of Jewish Heritage A
Living Memorial to the
Holocaust, 10:30 a.m. The
musical group Yellow
Sneaker (Brooklyn-
based performers/
teaching artists Ora and
Yoshie Fruchter) and
their puppet pals will
entertain; their repertoire
includes connections to
Jewish life and traditions.
Programs continue
November 16, December
14, January 25, February
22, March 22, and April
26. Light snacks. 36
Battery Place. (646) 437-
4202 or www.mjhnyc.org.
Singles
Sunday
OCTOBER 12
Senior singles meet in
West Nyack: Singles
65+ meets for a social
bagel and lox brunch at
the JCC Rockland, 11 a.m.
450 West Nyack Road.
$8. Gene Arkin, (845)
356-5525.
Sunday
OCTOBER 19
Singles meet in
Caldwell: New Jersey
Jewish Singles 45+
meets for lunch,
Pictionary, prizes, and
mingling at Congregation
Agudath Israel, 12:45 p.m.
$10. 20 Academy Road.
(973) 226-3600, ext. 145,
singles@agudath.org, or
slg@bellatlantic.net.
Armenian women
in the spotlight
The Gross Center for Holocaust and
Genocide Studies at Ramapo College
in Mahwah offers a panel discussion,
Islamicized Armenian Women and
Orphans and the [Re]emergence of
Armenian Identities in Turkey a Cen-
tury After the Armenian Genocide,
on Wednesday, October 8, at 7:30 p.m.
The program will be in the colleges
Trustees Pavilion. For information call
(201) 6847409 or go to ww.ramapo.
edu/holocaust.
Tribute to Joan Rivers on PBS
PBSs American Masters is
streaming an In Memoriam
tribute broadcast of Joan Rivers:
A Piece of Work. It was screened
in September but is available for
free viewing on the American
Masters website, pbs.org/ameri-
canmasters for a limited time.
Yiddish book center hosts community open house
The Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Mass., holds its
fourth annual community open house on Sunday, Octo-
ber 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The day features events
for people of all ages, including a performance by the
klezmer fusion band Yale Strom & Hot Pstromi, a visit
by author/performer Mark Binder, and the opening of
an exhibit of work by the Soviet artist Felix Lembersky.
Aaron Lansky, the Yiddish Book Centers founder
and president, will attend. Guided tours and Mediter-
ranean food are featured.
Temple Sinai
readies 5K run
Temple Sinai of Bergen County will
hold its inaugural 5K Run/Walk on
Sunday, October 19. The run will begin
at 9 a.m., and the walk at 9:15. Regis-
tration begins at 7:45.
About 200 to 300 runners and walk-
ers are expected to participate in the
5K, which will follow a route through
Tenafly. There will be awards for the
top three male and female runners,
T-shirts, music, and food.
Proceeds from the 5K will support
programming and events at Temple
Sinai. Kings supermarkets is among the
sponsors. Natalie Barbanel, Alissa Sch-
urr, and Franci Steinberg are the event
chairs. Temple Sinai is at 1 Engle St.
For information call (201) 5683035 or
www.templesinaibc.org.
From left, Mark Binder, Yale Strom & Hot Pstromi, and detail from Felix Lemberskys
A Woman in Recline: The Siege of Leningrad.
Friendship Circle Walk to aid
the special needs community
Hundreds of people are expected
to join Friends Walk 4 Friends,
the second annual Friendship
Circle Walk sponsored by the
Friendship Circle of Passaic
County, on Sunday, October 26.
The wheelchair-accessible event
goes around Wayne Valley High
Schools track. The school is at
551 Valley Road, Wayne.
Registration/ check-in begins
at 1 p.m., and the walk is at 2.
A barbecue and festival will fol-
low the walk. If you pre-register
by October 20 you will receive a
T-shirt. Proceeds will beneit the
Friendship Circle, a nonproit
organization that provides social
opportunities for people with
special needs and their families
with volunteer friends. For infor-
mation, call (973) 6946274 or go
to www.friendswalk4friends.
com.
Joan Rivers in Joan Rivers A Piece of Work (2010) directed
by Ricki Stern and Annie Sundberg. CHARLES MILLER
Announce your events
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are free. Accompanying photos must be high resolution, jpg les.
Send announcements 2 to 3 weeks in advance. Not every release will
be published. Include a daytime telephone number and send to:
NJ Jewish Media Group
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Jewish World Obituaries
48 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-48*
Solomon Borodkin
Solomon Elias Borodkin, 85, of Cliffside
Park died on September 27.
Born in Brooklyn, he was director of
quality control for over 20 years at Dia-
gravure Film Manufacturing Co. before
retiring in 1994. Before that he worked
at Premo, Domino Sugar, and in Israel.
Along with his wife, he was among
the original founders of Kibbutz Urim
in the Negev and Congregation Or
Zaruah in Manhattan. He attended
courses at JTS, the 92nd Street Y,
and Congregation Ahavath Torah in
Englewood.
He is survived by his wife of 65 years,
Thelma, daughters, Arlene Swern
(David Grayson) of Parsippany and
Wendy Borodkin (Ira Brandwein) of
Teaneck; five grandchildren, and two
great-grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to Jewish
National Fund, ORT, Hillel, Gesher Sha-
lom of Fort Lee, or Friends of the IDF.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial
Chapels, Fort Lee.
Sara Felder
Sara Felder, 92, of Englewood Cliffs
died on September 24.
Born in Akron, Ohio, she was a
musician, a violin teacher, and a
member of Temple Sinai of Bergen
County in Tenafly.
Predeceased by her husband,
Marvin, in 2013, she is survived by her
children, Joan of New York City and
Dr. Mitchell of El Paso,Texas, and two
grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Eden Memo-
rial Chapels in Fort Lee.
Charlotte Gluck
Charlotte Gluck, ne Goff, 92, of Fort
Lee died on September 29.
Born in Bayonne, she was an art lec-
turer at Bergen Community College.
Predeceased by her husband,
George, she is survived by her
children, Dr. Eric, Margery, and
Laurie; five grandchildren, and
great-grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Eden Memo-
rial Chapels in Fort Lee.
Nat Herskowitz
Nat Herskowitz, 81, of Boca Raton, Fla.,
formerly of Fort Lee and Oakland, died
on September 23.
Before retiring, he was an electri-
cal engineer for Singer-Kearfott in
Little Falls.
Predeceased by his wife, Eileen,
he is survived by his children, Glen
(Ronni), Stuart (Randi), and Julie Bu
(Gerard); sisters Lillian Fink, and
Mildred Zang (Robert), and eight
grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to Jewish Fed-
eration of Northern New Jersey, Para-
mus. Arrangements were by Robert
Schoems Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
LeBron takes on Tel Aviv
Jamess circus, David Blatts NBA debut
spice the Maccabi-Cavaliers meeting
HILLEL KUTTLER
TEL AVIV The carnivals coming to
Cleveland, and the Maccabi Tel Aviv bas-
ketball team has a front-row seat.
In fact, the 2014 Euroleague and Israel
Super Basketball League champions will
be participating.
On Sunday, Tel Aviv will present the
inaugural challenge for NBA super-
star LeBron James as he returns to his
hometown Cavaliers as a free agent after
spending four seasons with the Miami
Heat. And the Israeli club will be facing
the coach who led them to both titles
David Blatt was hired in June to guide the
rebuilt Cavs.
Guy Goodes, the Tel Aviv assistant
who ascended to head coach when Blatt
moved to the National Basketball Asso-
ciation, knows what to expect when he
brings his guys to face the King before a
packed house and hordes of media.
Its a show, a circus, Goodes said ear-
lier this month at Nokia Arena here on
the teams annual media day prior to a
four-game, 17-day trip to Brazil and the
United States.
Such an atmosphere is not what a
coach wants in preparing his team for
a season, Goodes acknowledged, adding
that its not the optimal preparation.
But Goodes wasnt grousing. Maccabis
two exhibition games against NBA clubs
Tel Aviv also plays the Nets in Brooklyn
two nights after meeting the Cavs and
Blatts hiring bring honor to Israel, he
said.
Blatt, who led Tel Aviv for four seasons,
said, The fact that my first game as an
NBA head coach, ironically, is against
the team that I was so much a part of is
almost overwhelming.
The new Cleveland coach should
have plenty to feel good about with the
revamped Cavs, who have failed to make
the playoffs since James made the exodus
to Miami in 2010.
Not only did they bring back the four-
time Most Valuable Player, but also reeled
in all-star forward Kevin Love from Min-
nesota in a trade. And they re-signed
their young point guard Kyrie Irving, the
NBA All-Star Games MVP last season.
Blatt recognizes that James return to
the Cavaliers is much more important
than his own NBA debut.
I would be happy to be his warm-
up act in this game because I think he
deserves that, Blatt joked.
Former NBA guard Jeremy Pargo, a
one-time Cavalier now playing for Tel
Aviv, is looking forward to his much less
heralded return to Cleveland.
Any time you can play an NBA game
or against an NBA team, its always
exciting, he said. It should be fun. The
fans there have always been great.
The games in Cleveland and Brook-
lyn also bring a serious dimension as
fundraisers for organizations benefiting
Israeli soldiers and children from Israels
South affected by the rocket attacks from
Gaza that prompted Operation Protective
Edge this summer.
Twelve Israeli soldiers wounded in
the Gaza battles will be flown in for both
games. In Brooklyn, the Nets will wear
uniforms with their names spelled in
Hebrew.
That game will mark a New York home-
coming for Maccabi forward Sylven
Landesberg, a native of nearby Queens.
On a recent visit there, Landesberg said
he was mobbed by Israelis at a shopping
mall who noticed him wearing a team
shirt.
Going to Cleveland, playing against
our old coach, LeBron, Kyrie some of
the best players in the world Im a huge
competitor, so to be able to take part in a
game like that, its going to be a lot of fun.
Im psyched, said the heavily tattooed
Landesberg, who sat out Maccabis title
runs with an injury.
Its going to be a packed house, Im
guessing, and I dont think Ive played in
front of a crowd that big before. Its going
to be amazing.
Landesbergs relatives will see him play
in Brooklyn. The parents of Jake Cohen, a
Tel Aviv forward from suburban Philadel-
phia, will be at both games.
Cohen got a taste of the NBA while play-
ing in Las Vegas for the Phoenix Suns
Summer League team before returning to
Israel to join the national team. One prac-
tice in nearby Rishon LeZion was halted
by three air-raid sirens, he said.
His mother prevailed upon him to call
her each day of the war Cohen said he
complied with the request. I dont like
making my mom nervous, he said. Both
of his parents saw Cohen play in Tel Aviv
last season. Neither had ever been to
Israel.
Cohen said that Blatts jumping from
Israel straight to the NBA is not a fluke.
Still, Cohen said, we want to beat him.
Landesberg said of his ex-coach, I
know hes not going to take it easy on us
not one bit. I want to test myself against
the best.
While not NBA caliber, Tel Aviv and
several other Israeli clubs are indicative
of the improved quality of hoops in the
Jewish state. Since 2009, Omri Casspi
and Gal Mekel became the first two Israe-
lis to reach the NBA. Now Blatt, a Boston
native who immigrated to Israel in 1981,
and who lives near here with his wife and
children, also is a pioneer.
I think it says a great deal, Blatt said
when asked what the trios ascension
indicates about Israeli basketball.
Worldwide, the game has become
more open and less border-oriented. You
see it from a lot of different countries: the
migration of players and other talents to
and from one country to another and
one continent to another, he said. And
I just think that this has been a natural
progression that we have sort of become
included in. JTA WIRE SERVICE
LeBron James, shown at the Cleveland Cavaliers media day in suburban Cleve-
land on September 26, returns to his hometown team with a preseason game
against Maccabi Tel Aviv. JASON MILLER/GETTY IMAGES
Obituaries
49 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-49*
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 49
Sadly we lost both of our dear
parents; Dr. Jack (Chaim) Alster,
lost his hard-fought batle to
cancer on May 5th of this year.
He along with his wonderful
doctors fought so hard to beat
this dreadful disease; however,
its recurrence afer 12 years at
age 86 was insurmountable.
His ever loving support of our
dear mother who struggled with
severely deterioratng health over
the past four years was never ending and its lesson
of unending love and commitment will forever be
ingrained in our memories.
Six weeks afer my dads passing, on June 17th,
we lost our dear mother, Anita. Mom was always
there for us and for those less fortunate. She was
especially there for Dad each step of the way and
tried hard to navigate the bumps, raising four young
children as Dad worked his job at Picatnny Arsenal
and earned his doctorate later in life. He worked his
entre career for the US Army in research as a Ph.D.
chemist for the Dept. of Defense. He felt this was his
way of paying back this great naton for providing
refuge and home for his family
that included his parents and fve
brothers back in the late 1930s.
He was a survivor, born in
Cologne, Germany in 1927. He and
his brothers arrived here afer frst
escaping to Holland. There, he was
cared for by a Jewish Dutch couple,
Bram Polash (my namesake) and
his wife (they later perished in
Auchwitz), untl my grandparents
of blessed memory were able to
atain the needed visas to come to America in 1937.
He never needed much; content to enjoy his
wife and his life, his community, his family, and his
Shabbat.
Always content with what they had and always
with a warm smile, may their life-lessons of love be
an ever-lastng lesson to all of us. Although they are
no longer with us here in this world they will forever
be alive in our hearts and in the good things that we
do.
We love and remember you both every day and
know that such a large part of your spirits and souls
live on in all of us.
Dr. Bram and Shari Alster, Marc Alster, Gigi Alster, Drs. Riva and Ayal Kaynan
and our entre Alster /Nichtberger/Schwartz/Samuel families.
h"b
In Loving Memory of our dear parents - Dr. Jack (Chaim) and Anita Alster
Planning in advance is a part of our lives.
We spend a lifetime planning for milestones such as
weddings, homeownership, our childrens education,
retirement, vacations, and insurance to protect our
loved ones.
End-of-Life issues are another milestone. You
make arrangements at your convenience, without
obligation and all funds are secured in a separate
account in your name only.
Call our Advance Planning Director for an appointment
to see for yourself what peace of mind you will receive
in return.
GUTTERMAN AND MUSICANT
JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTORS
800-522-0588
WIEN & WIEN, INC.
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
800-322-0533
402 PARK STREET, HACKENSACK, NJ 07601
ALAN L. MUSICANT, Mgr., N.J. Lic. No. 2890
MARTIN D. KASDAN, N.J. Lic. No. 4482
IRVING KLEINBERG, N.J. Lic. No. 2517
Advance Planning Conferences Conveniently Arranged
at Our Funeral Home or in Your Own Home
GuttermanMusicantWien.com
Our Facilities Will Accommodate
Your Familys Needs
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Conveniently Located
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201.843.9090 1.800.426.5869
Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Inc
Jewish Funeral Directors
FAMILY OWNED & MANAGED
Generations of Lasting Service to the Jewish Community
Serving NJ, NY, FL &
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Prepaid & Preneed Planning
Graveside Services
Gary Schoem Manager - NJ Lic. 3811
Roger Manners
Roger Steven Manners, 66, of Glen
Rock died on September 23.
A graduate of Texas A&M, he
earned a masters degree at New
Jersey Institute of Technology. He
was a civil engineer and a member of
Temple Beth Sholom in Fair Lawn.
Predeceased by a brother, Mitchell,
he is survived by his wife of 39 years,
Marian, ne Richmond, children, Gail
Suchanski (Richard) and Ilene ( Jeffrey
Ettinger); a brother, Lee (Audrey);
and one grandchild.
Donations can sent to Temple
Beth Sholom, Fair Lawn, or the
National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
Arrangements were by Louis Sub-
urban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Helen Markowitz
Helen Markowitz, 90, of Fair Lawn
died on September 29.
She was a member of the Friend-
ship Club in Fair Lawn and the Focus
on Eyes Support for the Visually
Impaired.
Predeceased by her husband of
38 years, Alex, she is survived by
nephews, Sanders Marco and Richard
Taub, and a niece, Robyn Taub.
Donations can be sent to the New
Jersey Foundation for the Blind, Den-
ville. Arrangements were by Robert
Schoems Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Gloria Nahum
Gloria Nahum, ne Elfenbein, of Para-
mus died on September 24.
Born in New York, she earned a
degree from William Paterson College
after raising four children. She taught
third and fourth grade for 25 years
in the Paramus public schools. She
was a longtime member of the Jewish
Community Center of Paramus/Con-
gregation Beth Tikvah, where in June
she was honored along with her hus-
band at its annual dinner dance for 58
years of service to the shul. They also
taught Looking At Life With Humor
at the Bergen County YJCC and Yes-
terday, Today, and Tomorrow at the
JCCP/CBT.
She is survived by her husband
of 65 years, Albert, children, Robert
(Roberta), Kenneth (Ann), Laurie
(Richard Krieger), and Debra (Chris
Landsberg), and 12 grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to the Jew-
ish Community Center of Paramus/
CBT or the American Heart Associa-
tion. Arrangements were by Robert
Schoems Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Leonore Saltzman
Lenore Saltzman, ne Friedman, of
Monroe Township, formerly of Fair
Lawn and Paterson, died on Septem-
ber 23.
She was a nationally recognized
calligrapher for 30 years with her
worked displayed in art galleries in
New York City.
Predeceased by her husband of 44
years, Samuel, and a brother, How-
ard, she is survived by her children,
Dave (Heidi R. Joseph) of Princeton
and Bobbie (Anne V. Sullivan) of Chi-
cago, and extended family.
Arrangements were by Louis Sub-
urban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Shirley Savell
Shirley Savell, 95, of Boca Raton, Fla.,
formerly of River Edge and New Mil-
ford, died on September 22.
Before retiring, she was a book-
keeper for David Weber Oil Com-
pany in Carlstadt and was a former
member of Temple Avodat Shalom
in River Edge.
Predeceased by her husband,
Lawrence, she is survived by her
children, Cynthia of Chandler,
Ariz., and Edward (Pearl) of River
Edge; three grandchildren, and five
great-grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to Autism
Speaks in New York City. Arrange-
ments were by Louis Suburban
Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Vladimir Tsivkin
Vladimir Tsivkin, 72, of Mahwah
died on September 24. Arrange-
ments were by Louis Suburban
Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Obituaries are prepared with
information provided by
funeral homes. Correcting
errors is the responsibility of
the funeral home.
Classified
50 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-50
Get results!
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this page.
201-837-8818
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70 Herbert Avenue, Closter, N.J. 07642
ANTIQUES
CEMETERY PLOTS FOR SALE
. Cemetery Plots
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Gravesites Available $1050 ea
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excellent location
Call Mrs. G 914-472-2130
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CRYPTS FOR SALE
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40% off Sanctuary price for same
units. Call 410-886-1123
SANCTUARY Abraham & Sarah,
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drawers, #4185 and 4186, Bldg 1,
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HELP WANTED
YESHIVA in River Edge, N.J.
seeks part-time learning
specialist for 4th grade girls.
PM hours only, 12:45 - 4:45.
Must have a degree in
special education, psychology
or education.
Join a collaborative and
professional staff.
Send resume to
resumes@rynj.org
or fax 201-986-1155
TUTORING
WANT TO LEARN SPANISH?
Retired NewJersey Teacher
organizing small classes
of conversational Spanish.
All age levels.
Private tutoring available also
Call 201-965-1185
SITUATIONS WANTED
HHA with 6 yrs experience to care
for elderly. Live-in, anytime. Relia-
ble. Speaks English. Call 201-682-
1529
COMPANION: Experienced, kind,
trustworthy person seeking part
time work. Weekends OK. Meal
preparation, laundry, housekeep-
ing. Will drive for doctors appoint-
ments; occasional sleepovers. 973-
519-4911
CHHA - 8 yrs experience with spe-
cial care hospice/hospital/home.
Also care of elderly/loved ones.
Available night/day. Good referen-
ces. Own transportation. Joy 201-
449-8517
COMPANION/CARETAKER for
elderly. 12 years experience, in-
cluding early alzheimers. I speak
English! Have car!. References
upon request. Call Renata 973-
689-5576
A Certifed Male and Female are
looking to care for elderly. Referen-
ces! Years of experience! English
speaking. Call 201-313-6956; 201-
575-7324
SITUATIONS WANTED SITUATIONS WANTED
CARING, honest, experienced
young lady seeks job as nanny
/housekeeper/companion. Referen-
ces available. Call Grace 917-756-
3456
ELDER Care- Monday to Friday.
Many years experience. Depend-
able, pleasant, speaks English. Will
do light cooking and cleaning. Call
Cheryl 917-564-4800
EXPERIENCED, reliable woman
with excellent references seeks
Full-Time, Part-Time, day/night,
live-out position to care for elderly.
Call 973-341-2747
MALE CHHA looking for position to
care for elderly. Full or Part-time,
Live-Out/In. 5 years experience.
Reliable! Drives! Speaks English.
Call 973-389-3842
MATURE experienced Home
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paperwork,
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insurance claims
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201-214-1777
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Established 2001
MATURE lady who is pleasant and
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disabled. Experience as HHA. 201-
257-7003
RELIABLE woman seeks position
to care for sick, elderly, or child-
care. Live-in/out. Excellent referen-
ces. 201-838-2368
CLEANING SERVICE
ALSAIGH CLEANING
OFFICE & HOME
Polish Woman w/25 yrs exp.
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201-679-5081 (Text)

CLAUDIAS HOUSECLEANING
Residential
Excellent References
English Speaking
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
201-598-2206
POLISH CLEANING WOMAN
- Homes, Apartments, Offices-
14 years experience, excellent
references.
Affordable rates!
Izabela 973-572-7031
Estates Bought & Sold
Fine Furniture
Antiques
Accessories
Cash Paid
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THE JUNK MAN
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PLANNER
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Classified
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 51
JS-51
Solution to last weeks puzzle. This weeks puzzle is
on page 44.
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MOHELS
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Free
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VENDORS
VENDORS
Dont miss out being part of our
HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE
to be held at
Congregation Beth Sholom
Teaneck, N. J.
November 2, 2014
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Reserve a spot now!
Call: Cindy
201-907-0305
cblitz@Primepak.com
sponsored by Sisterhood
Tel 310.442.0020 | 800.813.0557 | mazon.org
10495 Santa Monica Blvd., Ste. 100, Los Angeles, CA 90025
MAZON IS ending hunger making a difference tikkun olam
keeping kids healthy nutrition for seniors sustenance
tzedakah fostering responsibility raising awareness soup
kitchens food banks food pantries social justice self-
empowerment partnering for change advocating for people in
need building a robust emergency food network encouraging
public policy reform a legacy of giving promoting health and
well-being tribute cards fulfilling a jewish tradition making
an impact optimism nourishment pursuing justice working
to end food insecurity meeting basic human needs nutrition
and health education initiatives a strong safety net providing
assistance and support concern for others a voice for people
who are hungry enhancing quality of life jewish values in action
THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY
WORKING TOGETHER TO END HUNGER

Tel 310.442.0020 | 800.813.0557 | mazon.org
10495 Santa Monica Blvd., Ste. 100, Los Angeles, CA 90025
MAZON IS ending hunger making a difference tikkun olam
keeping kids healthy nutrition for seniors sustenance
tzedakah fostering responsibility raising awareness soup
kitchens food banks food pantries social justice self-
empowerment partnering for change advocating for people in
need building a robust emergency food network encouraging
public policy reform a legacy of giving promoting health and
well-being tribute cards fulfilling a jewish tradition making
an impact optimism nourishment pursuing justice working
to end food insecurity meeting basic human needs nutrition
and health education initiatives a strong safety net providing
assistance and support concern for others a voice for people
who are hungry enhancing quality of life jewish values in action
THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY
WORKING TOGETHER TO END HUNGER

Tel 310.442.0020 | 800.813.0557 | mazon.org
10495 Santa Monica Blvd., Ste. 100, Los Angeles, CA 90025
MAZON IS ending hunger making a difference tikkun olam
keeping kids healthy nutrition for seniors sustenance
tzedakah fostering responsibility raising awareness soup
kitchens food banks food pantries social justice self-
empowerment partnering for change advocating for people in
need building a robust emergency food network encouraging
public policy reform a legacy of giving promoting health and
well-being tribute cards fulfilling a jewish tradition making
an impact optimism nourishment pursuing justice working
to end food insecurity meeting basic human needs nutrition
and health education initiatives a strong safety net providing
assistance and support concern for others a voice for people
who are hungry enhancing quality of life jewish values in action
THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY
WORKING TOGETHER TO END HUNGER

Gallery
52 JEWISH STANDARD DATE, 2014
JS-52*
n 1 Children at the Chabad Jewish Center in
Franklin Lakes make goats horn shofarim to
be blown in the synagogue on Rosh Hashanah.
n 2 Seventh-graders in the religious school at
the Jewish Community Center of Paramus/
Congregation Beth Tikvah are absorbed in
their first online class taught by educators in
Israel. There are 16 sessions planned to teach
Holocaust and Israel studies; classes are with
Israeli teachers and seventh-graders at the
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai
Israel. The Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey is helping to fund the program.
n 3 Religious school students of Shomrei Torah
Wayne Conservative Congregation continue
a chesed project linking a mitzvah to the
weekly text by making cards to be distributed
to blood donors at the American Red Cross.
n 4 Students in the younger grades at Ben
Porat Yosef learn about bees and their impor-
tance to the health of the of planet. Workshops
explore bee anatomy, pollination, foraging,
technology influenced by bees, honey pro-
duction, the geometry and function of hives,
colony collapse disorder, and bees in Judaism.
Beekeepers brought the bees to the school.
n 5 In preparation for the new year, students
from the Academies at Gerrard Berman Day
School in Oakland went apple picking and
took a hay ride at Demarest Farms in Hillsdale.
n 6 Students at Yeshivat HeAtid welcomed
Cliff Sunflower and his Dancing With the
Honeybees program. He talked about
the life cycle of bees, pollination, and how
honey is produced. Students also made
beeswax candles and tasted honey.
n 7 More than 25 people attended the CPR
class given at the Jewish Center of Teaneck
by Rabbi Daniel Senter and Ben Rosler. Con-
gregant Debbie Laves learns how to use the
AED (Automated External Defibulator), under
the guidance of Mr. Rosler. MICHAEL LAVES
1
2
3
4
5
7
6
Keep us informed
We welcome photos of community events. Photos
must be high resolution jpg les. Please include
a detailed caption and a daytime telephone.
Mailed photos will only be returned with a self-
addressed stamped envelope. Not every photo
will be published.
PR@jewishmediagroup.com
NJ Jewish Media Group
1086 Teaneck Rd., Teaneck, NJ 07666
(201) 837-8818
Real Estate & Business
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 53
JS-53*
Elite Associates
Ann Murad, ABR, GRI, SRES
Sales Associate
NJAR Circle of Excellence Gold Level, 2001, 2003-2006
Silver Level, 1997-2000, 2002, 2009, 2011, 2012
Direct: (201) 664-6181, Cell: (201) 981-7994
E-mai l : anni eget si t sol d@msn. com
313 Broadway, Westwood, NJ
Each Ofce Independenty Owned and Operated
ANNIE GETS IT SOLD
EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
HOUSING EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389
TENAFLY
894-1234
TM
CLOSTER FABULOUS $850,000
Move right in to exquisite 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath split level colonial on beautiful
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master suite w/bath, office & lots closets, park-like yard.
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
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871-0800
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768-6868
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666-0777
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com
(201) 837-8800
READERS
CHOICE
2013
FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
ALL CLOSE TO NY BUS / HOUSES OF WORSHIP /
HIGHWAYS / SHOPPING / SCHOOLS & NY BUS
TEANECK OPEN HOUSES
220 Vandelinda Ave. $759,000 3-5 PM
Perfect Brick Ranch. 103'X150' Landscaped Prop. Party
Deck off Lg Granite Kit. Banq DR. 1st Flr Mstr Suite/Bath +
2 More BRs, Bath + 2nd Flr: 2 BRs + Sit Rm, Laund, Bath.
Grnd Flr: Sep Ent to 4 Rms, .5 Bath. Great For Prof Off or
Extend Fam. C/A/C. Gar.
142 E Maple St., Teaneck $275,000 1-3 PM
Lg Duplex Condo. 2 Floors w/ Entry on Each Lev. 3 Brms, 2.5
Baths. H/W Floors. Pool Onsite.
920 Commonwealth Dr. $339,900 1-3 PM
Country Club Area. 3 Brm Colonial. H/W Floors. Entry Foyer,
Liv Rm/Fplc, Form Din Rm, Eat In Kit, Screened Porch. Walk
Up Attic. Fin Bsmt. 1 Car Gar.
99 E Cedar Ln. $428,900 1-3 PM
Updated Country Club Col. LR/Fplc, Updated Kit, Din Area/
Sliders to Fenced Yard + Paver Patio, Den/4th BR, Full, 1st
Flr Bath. Three(3) 2nd Flr BRs + Bath. Fin High Ceil Bsmt +
.5 Bath.
619 Palisade Ave. $299,900 1-4 PM
Move In Ready 3 Brm Colonial. H/W Flrs. Ent Foyer, LR/
Corner Fplc, DR, Den, Mod Eat In Kit. Finished 3rd Flr. Nat
Woodwork. 2 Car Gar.
271 Queens Ct. $425,000 2-4 PM
Colonial on 75' X 195' Prop. Cov Frnt Porch, Ent Hall, LR/
Fplc, Form DR, Den/Fplc, Eat In Kit, .5 Bath, Screened-in
Porch/Fplc, 3 Brms/2nd Flr, Walk-up to 4th Brm/3rd Flr. H/W
Flrs, C/A, 2 Car Gar.
736 Mildred Street $859,000 3-5 PM
Park-Like 89 X 286 Property. LR/Fplc, Den, Form DR, Sun
Room, Kit/Bkfst Rm. Sep Office/In-Law Suite. 5 Brms, 3Full,
2 Half Baths. Fam Rm/Fplc. C/A/C, 2 Car Gar.
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$799,000
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the second foor. Granite chefs kitchen, family room, fnished
basement, powder room and much more. Two-zone C/AC
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newly paved driveway.
Call Nicole Idler for any
information at 201-906-9338 and
to list or buy in Bergen County.
201-894-1234
www.jstandard.com
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center offers
free yoga for patients with cancer
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center will offer free
onsite yoga courses to patients with cancer, beginning
October 13. This yearlong program runs in 8-week ses-
sions meeting every Monday from 11 a.m. to noon, and
will repeat five times throughout the next year. Classes
are open only to Englewood Hospital patients.
The course will be led by a Kula for Karma Certified
Yoga Alliance teacher with advanced training in
instructing students with cancer. Medical clearance
from a physician and registration are required. Yoga
mats, blankets, blocks, straps, and bolsters will be
provided.
The program is made possible through a grant
from the Fred J. Brotherton Charitable Foundation
in conjunction with Kula for Karma, The Cancer
Treatment and Wellness Center at EHMC, and The
Center for Integrative Medicine at EHMC.
For more information or to register, call (866) 980-
3462 or visit www.englewoodhospital.com and click
on the Class & Event Registration tab. Englewood
Hospital and Medical Center is located at 350 Engle St.
The 8-week courses begin October 13, January 5,
March 30, June 15, August 24, and November 9.
clear directives made by a Supreme Court ruling more
than 23 years ago that restricts censorship to prevent-
ing clear and present danger that could harm national
security.
I will never report operations before theyre con-
ducted, Mr. Ben-David said. I will never expose new
weapons that are considered classified. We do not report
exact locations of rockets, so as not to help the other side
aim better.
That doesnt mean he never argues with the stations
censor, who is a civilian.
We disagree a lot. Its a dialogue, he said.
Channel 10 has a strong commitment to news coverage,
he continued. We have 300 to 350 people. We broadcast
about seven hours of news and current affairs shows every
day. Of course, in times of conflicts and emergency we
switch to 24-hour coverage.
What was in the Gaza war is that despite the emer-
gence of all kinds of new media and the web, at the end of
the day people want to hear something or read something
they can trust, that was verified by journalistic standards.
There were tons of conspiracies and all kinds of legends
running through the war. At the end of the day they want
to sit down and know what really happened.
As to what really happened in Gaza or more specifi-
cally, what the results will be Mr. Ben-David is balancing
his initial feelings with what he has seen as the results of
the 2006 war with Lebanon.
I keep reminding myself of the mistakes I made in
2006, when I was completely focused on the failures on
our side and didnt see the impact on the other side, he
said.
Military failures claimed the lives of many Israeli sol-
diers mostly a result of bad decision making, connect-
ing means to ends.
Yet at the end of the day, the war achieved a deterrence
that no one would have dreamed of. We were certain we
were just starting the countdown to the next round against
Hezbollah. Weve had complete calm for eight years.
I remind myself of that when I try to analyze the Gaza
war from the short perspective we have today. According
to Hamas behavior since the war ended, maybe we did
generate some more deterrence.
My sense is the destruction of the high-rises in Gaza in
the last three days of the war had a huge impact on Pales-
tinian society and Hamas. They were shocked. They didnt
believe Israel would do that. It was a signal that we would
go all the way. It seems to me that striking and destroy-
ing the high-rises in the wealthier neighborhoods of Gaza
perhaps had the same impact as destroying the Hezbollah
neighborhood in Beirut in 2006, he said.
Journalist
FROM PAGE 15
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
TENAFLY
34 CLOVER STREET
TENAFLY
18 WIGHT PLACE $888,000
TENAFLY
82 OAK AVENUE
TENAFLY
15 FARVIEW ROAD $2,100,000
O
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2
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C
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!
TENAFLY
150 COLUMBUS DRIVE
TENAFLY
140 DOWNEY DRIVE
TENAFLY
123-B HICKORY AVENUE
TENAFLY
15 BIRCHWOOD ROAD
S
O
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S
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L
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A
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TENAFLY
297 ENGLE STREET
TENAFLY
7 ESMOND PLACE
TENAFLY
139 HUDSON AVENUE
TENAFLY
511 KNICKERBOCKER ROAD
S
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S
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TENAFLY
63 OAK STREET
TENAFLY
27 SUFFOLK LANE
TENAFLY
18 MIDWOOD ROAD
TENAFLY
120 DEVRIESE COURT
S
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TENAFLY
11 WHITEWOOD ROAD
TENAFLY
46 SUSSEX ROAD
TENAFLY
14 LAWRENCE COURT
TENAFLY
29 FARVIEW ROAD
S
O
L
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!
S
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!
S
O
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D
!
S
O
L
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!
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
FIND OUT WHAT YOUR HOME IS WORTH!
Just call our 24/7 hotline for your complimentary consultation.
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
TENAFLY SHOWCASE
Real Estate & Business
54 JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014
JS-54
SELLING YOUR HOME?
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Cell: 201-615-5353 BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com
Like us on Facebook
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Wine for a hot or cold Sukkot
JAY BUCHSBAUM
T
he weather around Sukkot can
be very unpredictable, but I
have you covered no matter
what the weather brings. This
year Sukkot comes late, mid-October, and
depending on which way the winds blow,
you could be bundled in layers of sweat-
ers or schvitzing in 80 plus degrees and
80 plus humidity. Deciding what wine to
have is usually a function of what food
youre having, but weather, especially
when food is eaten outdoors, can play just
as important a role.
If the sun is shining and the temps are
on the rise, no matter the dish, you want
something that will keep you cool and
certainly not something that will add a
degree of uncomfortable heat. On the
other hand, if autumn chills are in the air,
a rich inviting wine is perfect for warming
up with.
Now lets talk about the temperature at
which we typically serve our wines. There
are warm-weather reds that are appropri-
ate for a deep rich roast but also can be
drunk slightly cool, and whites that are
so rich and flavorful they can be served
at just below room temperature and need
not be iced. We often drink our reds too
warm. Generally, room temperature for a
wine usually is European room tempera-
ture low to mid 60s at most. Whites are
often drunk far too cool. They should be
served at low 40s to 50 degrees.
Here are five wines for hot weather
and the temperature at which they
should be served and five for cooler
temperatures. Most importantly, sur-
round yourself with good friends, family
and company and your temperature will
always be just right!
Cool weather wines
Herzog Napa Cabernet: rich big fruit
in the mouth; flavorful dishes; serve at
67-70 degrees
Flam Reserve Syrah: rich with spice
and cedar, perfect for roasts; serve at
67-70 degrees
Porto Cordovera: sweet, luscious, great
way to warm body and soul; serve with
dessert 70+ degrees
Shiloh Chardonnay: full bodied and
complex with great aroma; can be
served at high 50s
Capcanes Petita: less expensive than
its big brother HaAbib but rich; serve at
67-69 degrees.
Warm weather wines
Tzuba Pinot Noir: from an Estate Win-
ery; elegant, lighter but complex; serve
in the low 60s
Pacifica Pinot Noir: typical Pacific
Northwestern Pinot Noir, fruity and
robust; serve in the low 60s
Flam Blanc: delicious white blend
that dances on your tongue; serve cold
between 47-49 degrees
Baron Herzog Chenin Blanc: crisp and
loaded with flavor and aromas of sweet
lemons; serve about 47 degrees
Herzog Reserve Late Harvest Chenin
Blanc: aromatic, sweet and perfect with
dessert, fruit, ice cream or on its own;
serve ice cold mid to low 40s
Diabetes foundation schedules
annual tennis evening
The Diabetes Foundation, Inc., whose
mission is to improve the care and qual-
ity of life for children and adults with
diabetes in New Jersey, will host its
sixth annual tennis event on Saturday,
October 25, from 6:30 to 11 p.m. at the
Washington Township Tennis & Fitness
Club, 620 Pascack Road, Washington
Township.
The event welcomes both players
at $65 and nonplayers at $35 and will
include door prizes, raffles, food, and
beverages. Players will be matched by
ability whenever possible.
It promises to be a great time for
those who enjoy playing tennis and
at the same time want to support an
important cause that is close to so
many of us, said Roberta Schmidt,
executive director of the Diabetes
Foundation. There are still openings
for players and nonplayers, and for
sponsors at levels ranging from under
$200 to $500.
According to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, there are
nearly 30 million people with diabetes,
or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population,
a number that continues to grow. In
New Jersey alone, there are more than
750,000 diabetics.
Diabetes is the third largest cause
of death among Ameri cans, and
the leading cause of blindness and
nontraumatic amputations.
For more information on the event,
call (201) 444-0337 or go to www.
diabetesfoundationinc.org.
JS-55
JEWISH STANDARD OCTOBER 3, 2014 55
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
TENAFLY
34 CLOVER STREET
TENAFLY
18 WIGHT PLACE $888,000
TENAFLY
82 OAK AVENUE
TENAFLY
15 FARVIEW ROAD $2,100,000
O
P
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N
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S
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N
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A
Y

2
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4
J
U
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S
T
U
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N
I
N
G
C
O
N
T
E
M
P
O
R
A
R
Y
!
TENAFLY
150 COLUMBUS DRIVE
TENAFLY
140 DOWNEY DRIVE
TENAFLY
123-B HICKORY AVENUE
TENAFLY
15 BIRCHWOOD ROAD
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
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L
E
A
S
E
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
TENAFLY
297 ENGLE STREET
TENAFLY
7 ESMOND PLACE
TENAFLY
139 HUDSON AVENUE
TENAFLY
511 KNICKERBOCKER ROAD
S
O
L
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S
O
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!
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
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TENAFLY
63 OAK STREET
TENAFLY
27 SUFFOLK LANE
TENAFLY
18 MIDWOOD ROAD
TENAFLY
120 DEVRIESE COURT
S
O
L
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L
E
A
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E
D
!
S
O
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D
!
S
O
L
D
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TENAFLY
11 WHITEWOOD ROAD
TENAFLY
46 SUSSEX ROAD
TENAFLY
14 LAWRENCE COURT
TENAFLY
29 FARVIEW ROAD
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
FIND OUT WHAT YOUR HOME IS WORTH!
Just call our 24/7 hotline for your complimentary consultation.
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
TENAFLY SHOWCASE
JS-56
We reserve the right to limit sales to 1 per family. Prices effective this store only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Some pictures are for design purposes only and do not necessarily represent items on sale.While Supply Lasts. No rain checks.
Morningstar
`
646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666
Tel: 201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225

Visit Our Website at:
www.thecedarmarket.com
STORE HOURS
SUN - TUE: 7AM - 9PM
WED: 7AM - 10PM
THURS: 7AM - 11PM
FRI: 7AM - 2 HOURS
BEFORE SUNDOWN
Sign Up For Your
Loyalty
Card
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201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
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M A R K E T
M A R K E T
TERMS &CONDITIONS: This card is the property of Cedar Market, Inc. and is intended for exclusive use of the recipient and their household members. Card is not transferable. We reserve the right to change or rescind the terms and conditions of the Cedar Market loyalty programat any time, and without notice. By using this card, the cardholder signifes his/her agreement to the terms & conditions for use. Not to be combined with any other Discount/Store Coupon/Ofer. *Loyalty Card must be presented at time of purchase along with IDfor verifcation. Purchase cannot be reversed once sale is completed.
CEDAR MARKET
Loyalty
Program
CEDAR MARKET
Loyalty
Program
Fine Foods
Great Savings Sale Effective
10/5/14 -10/15/14
FISH
ea.
ea.
ea.

Tropical
Roll

Crabmeat
Roll
$
4
75
$
4
50
$
10
95
DAIRY FROZEN
MEAT DEPARTMENT
Cedar Markets Meat Dept. Prides Itself On Quality, Freshness And Affordability. We Carry The Finest Cuts
Of Meat And The Freshest Poultry... Our Dedicated Butchers Will Custom Cut Anything For You... Just Ask!
SUSHI SUSHI
Lb
$
4
99
$
8
99 $
7
99
$
2
49
$
4
49
$
8
99
Lb Lb Lb Lb
Lb
Lb Lb
Baby
Flounder
Salmon
Florentine
Seafood Stuffed
Mushrooms
**New Item**
Wasabi
Herring
LB
lb.
lb.
EA
PROVISIONS
$
4
99
10 OZ
2/$
4
Empire
Chicken or Turkey
Franks
16 OZ
FISH
Fresh
Chicken
Cutlets
Fresh
Chicken Combo
Drums & Thighs
American Black Angus Beef
Silver
Tip Roast
American Black Angus Beef
Shoulder
London Broil
Fresh
Ground
Chuck
American Black Angus Beef
Boneless
Flanken
Beef
Cheek Meat
Frozen
Duck
$
12
99
$
11
99
$
11
99
$
3
99
2 Pack
Bellacicco
Garlic
Bread
8 OZ
Gluten Free
Felafalim
Falafel
Balls
Save On!
Dagim
Tilapia
Fillet
Save On!
Mazor
Puff Pastry
Sheets
10 OZ
Pods, Shelled & L/S
Seapoint
Edamame
12 Pack
Macabee
Pizza
Bites
Barneys Beef
Kreplach
& Franks n
Blankets
Birds Eye
Chopped Spinach
& Broccoli
Assorted
Hod Lavan
Turkey Slices
12-14 OZ 6-9.6 oz
$
2
29
$
2
99 $
3
99 $
2
29
All Varieties
Ossies
Egg
Salad
$
3
99
EA
HOMEMADE DAIRY
14 OZ
16 OZ 15 OZ
2/$
5
$
3
99
4/$
5
PRODUCE
Organic
Bananas
69

$
1
99
Organic
Red or Green
Grapes
GROCERY
BAKERY
24 oz
$
8
49
Chocolate
Melt Away
Babka
Unsalted
Fleischmanns
Margarine Sticks
16 oz
$
1
79
$
2
99
2/$
1
Philadelphia
Cream
Cheese Bars
Assorted
Natural & Kosher
Shredded Cheese
Assorted
La Yogurt
Yogurt
8 oz
8 oz
6 oz
2/$
5
Assorted
Say Cheese Diet
Cheese Cakes
2.5 oz
2/$
7
$
1
79
Assorted
Polly-O
String Cheese
10 oz
2/$
3
Red &White
Golds
Horseradish
8 oz
$
1
99
Zieglers
Apple
Cider
Family Pack
Large White
Eggs
64 oz
18 pack
2/$
5
Tuv Taam
Cole
Slaw
14oz
2/$
3
Assorted
Breakstones
Sour Cream
16 oz
2/$
5
Save On!
Heckers
All Purpose
Flour
5 LB
$
8
99
Orig., French Roast &Decaf
Tasters Choice
Instant
Coffee
7 OZ
99

Save On!
Ronzoni
Elbows &
Penne Rigate
16 OZ
2/$
3
Crushed & Chunks
Dole
Pineapple
in Juice
20 OZ
$
4
99

Extra Light
Bertolli
Olive
Oil
Lemon Zinger,
Chamomile, Fruit
Sampler, Cinnamon
Apple, Peppermint
Celestial
Tea Bags
17 OZ
99

Assorted
Hunts
Snack Pack
Gels
4 PACK 99

Hunts
Canned
Tomatoes
Sauce &
Crushed
28-29 OZ
$
5
99
Save On!
Mazola
Canola
Oil
96 OZ
$
2
99
Original Only
Nabisco
Ritz
Crackers
12.5- 13.7 oz
2/$
5
Original & Olive Oil
Pam
Cooking
Spray
5-6 OZ
2/$
5
Original Only
Motts
Apple
Juice
64 OZ
2/$
5 20 CT
99

Save On!
Diamond
Kosher
Salt
13 oz
2/$
4
Save On!
Gefen
Mini
Mandel
14 OZ
4/$
5
Save On!
Gefen
Mushrooms
Stem & Pieces
8 OZ 16 OZ
3/$
2
**New Item**
Riverhead
Pearled
Barley
2/$
5
Save On!
B&G
Kosher Dill
Gherkins
14 OZ
$
1
79
Save On!
Almondina
Original
Biscuit
4 OZ
3/$
2
Save On!
Skittles
Fruit
Chews
1.35 oz
2/$
3
Save On!
Fleischmanns
Active Dry
Yeast
3 pack
$
2
99
Save On!
Windex
Blue
Trigger
69

69

69

2/$
5
Farm Fresh
String
Beans
Sugar Sweet
#1 Yams
Crunchy
Bosc Pears
Snow White
Cauliower
Sugar Sweet
Cantaloupes
Red Ripe!
Slicing
Tomatoes
Fresh
Pascal
Celery
Lb
Lb
Lb
Lb
Lb
Lb Lb
69

MIX & MATCH


26 OZ
6 OZ
2/$
4

Spicy Girl
Roll
Lb
Lb Lb
99

$
10
99
Fresh
Chicken
Wings
Inner Skirt
Steak
Pickled
Beef Tongue
89

3/$
5
$
1
99
4/$
3
Family
Pack
Super
Family
Pack
$
10
99
Super
Family
Pack
$
7
99 $
6
99
Bergen County Apple Picking At Cedar!
Jona Gold, Red Delicious,
Golden Delicious,
Macintosh, Ginger Gold