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HORIZONTAL PROJECTILE MOTION

OBJECTIVES
At the end of this activity, the students must be able to:
1. Compute for the initial velocity of the ball.
2. Compute for the time it will take the ball to reach the ground
3. Predict the distance where your ball will land.

MATERIALS
Empty wrapping paper tube
Tape
Books to stack
Stopwatch
Box cutter
Ping pong ball or rubber ball
Table
Meter stick
Paper
Markers

PROCEDURE
1. Cut the cardboard tube in half to create the ramp.












2. While they are cutting, use the piece of paper to draw a target. You will be trying to get to ball to
land on the target on the floor, as accurately as possible.
3. Stack some books on a table and tape the top of the cardboard tube to the book top to make the
ramp. Leave a bit of space at the end of the table.
4. Measure the length of the ramp.
5. Use the stopwatch to time how long it takes for the ball to slide down the ramp. Use this time to
calculate the velocity the ball will have when it goes over the edge of the table:


where v is velocity in meters per second, d is the length of the ramp in meters, and t is the time it
takes for the ball to reach the end of the ramp, in seconds.
6. It may be helpful to take your time measurement several times and then calculate a velocity.
7. Measure the height of the table to the ground. Using the acceleration of gravity and a starting
velocity of zero m/s, calculate how long it will take the ball to fall to the ground. You can do so using
the following equation:



where t is time, h is height, and g is gravitational acceleration, or 9.8 meters per second per
second.
8. Now, calculate the distance the ball will travel before hitting the ground (R). Simply multiply the
balls velocity by the time you calculated in step 7. Place your target at this distance away from the
edge of the table!


DATA AND OBSERVATIONS
Table I. Initial Velocity
TRIALS Distance (d) Time (t) Velocity (v)
1
2
3
4
5
Average

Table II. Time
Height
(h)
Acceleration
(g)
Time
(t)


Table III. Distance




RESULTS
1. What is your computed initial velocity?

2. What is your computed time?

3. What is your computed distance?


QUESTIONS
1. Did you hit the target? If not, what do you think are the factors that affect it?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Initial
Velocity
Time Distance

2. Why is it important to leave a bit of space at the end of the table?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
3. What changes can be done to the setup to increase the initial velocity and the distance (R)?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________




Reference:
http://www.education.com/science-fair/article/target-practice-horizontal-projectilerolling-table/

Prepared by:
Emmanuel C. Revilla
BSEd-3U, Physical Sciences
08/16/2014






























Start Middle End
HEAT TRANSFER
OBJECTIVE
At the end of this activity, the students must be able to:
1. Differentiate the transfer of heat through conduction, convection and radiation.

MATERIALS
6 Thermometers
1 Large Beaker
1 Flat strip of Aluminum approx. 1 x 1/4 x 8 (other suitable heat conducting material)
1 Small Low Flow Fan or Suitable Hand Fan
1 Heat Lamp

PROCEDURE

Station A: Radiation.










1. Place one thermometer inside the beaker, upright, facing the heat source, close but not
touching the glass sides.
2. Place the beaker about 50 cm away, from the heat lamp. Heat lamp should be positions to
shine straight at, parallel to the table.
3. Turn on heat lamp, record temperature at 1 minute interval for 10 to 15 minutes.

Station B. Conduction











1. Place a conducting material on the table so that an inch over hangs the table edge.
2. The heat should be placed to shine up onto or to heat the metal over the edge of the table,
from about 4 inches away.
3. Place a thermometer so that the bulb is touching the metal, one close to the beginning by the
table edge, one in the middle and one towards the far end.
4. Record starting temps, they should all be room temperature.
5. Apply the heat source to the end and take temperature reading of all three at one minute
intervals.





Station C. Convection








1. Set 2 thermometers upright each one meter from identical heat sources
2. Set up small low flow fan directing air flow across one heat source towards one thermometer
3. Turn on heat lamps, fans and begin recording temperature at 1 minute intervals.

DATA, OBSERVATION AND RESULTS
Table. Temperature Readings
Station A Station B Station C
Time Start Middle End With Fan No Fan
Initial


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


11


12


13


14


15





QUESTIONS
Radiation
1. What happened to the temperature inside the large beaker?


2. Was there any direct physical contact, molecules to molecules?


3. Was there any substantial air flow to carry heated molecules?


4. How did the heat travel through the air and glass?


5. Give 2 examples of radiation heat transfer:

Conduction
6. Explain what happened to the temperature along the metal bar?


7. How did the heat, or energy, move along the length of the bar?

8. For conduction to occur which medium does it require? Air/Water Flow or Solids


9. Is this method of transfer able to move through vacuum of space?


10. Give 2 examples of conduction heat transfer:




Convection
11. What happened to the temperature where the fan was blowing?


12. What carried the heat to the thermometer?


13. Heated air or water becomes less dense, which causes it to? Rise or Sink


14. Is this method of transfer able to move through vacuum of space?


15. Give 2 examples of convection heat transfer.




Reference:
www.apsva.us/cms/lib2/VA01000586/.../75/Heat%20Transfer.docx

Prepared by:
Emmanuel C. Revilla
BSEd-3U, Physical Sciences
08/16/2014