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‘SARGE’ IN CHARGE: Freedom Blast preview, veterans’ stories INSIDE

SOUTH CAROLINA’S PREMIER WEEKLY
SOUTH CAROLINA’S PREMIER WEEKLY
stories INSIDE SOUTH CAROLINA’S PREMIER WEEKLY WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 PHOTO | COURTESY OF KATIE CRUICE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

SOUTH CAROLINA’S PREMIER WEEKLY WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 PHOTO | COURTESY OF KATIE CRUICE SMITH Shannon
SOUTH CAROLINA’S PREMIER WEEKLY WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 PHOTO | COURTESY OF KATIE CRUICE SMITH Shannon

PHOTO | COURTESY OF KATIE CRUICE SMITH

Shannon High, center, along with his mother-in-law Kathy Blackwell and friends Travis and Laura Richards, cheered on softball teams at a tournament held at Praise Cathedral to raise money for the“High Hopes”campaign. High was injured during the Goodwill Mud Run.

Greer runner is home

After horrific injury

BY KATIE CRUICE SMITH FOR THE GREER CITIZEN

O n April 13, Shannon High

put on his racing shoes and

prepared to race for the fourth

time with the same teammates in the annual Goodwill Mud Run in Greenville. Shortly after leaving the starting line, High dived into a mud hole that left him paralyzed. “It was a freak accident,” High said. “I dove in, hit my head, and one of the girls on my team pulled me out. I immediately knew I had done something.”

‘I am getting more and more feeling back every day. The doctors say that within a year, I might be able to walk again.’

Shannon High

High broke the fourth or fifth vertebrae in his spine, leaving him paralyzed from the waist down and placing him on long-term disability from his job as route supervisor at

9Rounds.

“But I am getting more and more feeling back every day,” High said.

“The doctors say that within a year,

I might be able to walk again.” High has been spending time recovering at Shepherd Center in Atlanta and returned home for the first time since his accident this past week. He still has a long road ahead of him, as well as a pile of medi- cal bills, but the community and his church, Praise Cathedral, have stepped in to help. There were fundraisers held for the High family at Pizza Inn in Greer, Texas Roadhouse, Fuddruck- er’s, Tom’s, Net Café, Sims BBQ, and

Sharkey’s Pub; auctions; a bake sale and yard sale at Praise Cathedral;

a block party put on by 9Rounds;

and a golf tournament, hosted by

9Rounds.

SEE HIGH | A6

GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA VOL. 101 NO. 26 50 CENTS
GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA
VOL. 101 NO. 26 50 CENTS

District Five passes budgets

BY KATIE JONES STAFF WRITER

The new budget for the District Five Schools of Spartanburg County in- cludes 16.3 new positions to accommodate growth. The district grew by 154 students this year, a 2 per- cent increase. “The first place we’ll start is the number of stu- dents,” said David Hayes, finance director. “Of course, that’s what we’re here about. That’s what the budget is about. What drives the budget is the number of students.” The district is adding two special education self- contained teachers, two ESOL teachers, two class- room teachers at both Florence Chapel and Beech Springs, 1.5 special edu-

‘The last couple

years, we’ve been budgeting a deficit. This budget that we’ve proposed is balanced and will not require a decrease in fund balance.’

Scott Turner

District Five Superintendent

cation resource teachers, one art teacher position, one second grade teacher SEE BUDGET | A6

Police release name of suspect in fatal stabbing

Wilkins was

Riverside High student

BY BILLY CANNADA EDITOR

More details are sur- facing in a murder inves- tigation involving a 16- year-old, who police say stabbed his grandparents at a home in the River Birch Villas community off East Suber Road near Riverside High School in

Greer. According to Lt. Eric Pressley with the Greer Police Department, the

teen charged with murder, attempted murder and possession of a weapon during a violent crime is Zachary Wilkins, a rising junior at Riverside High. According to Greer po- lice, officers responded to 56 River Birch Way around 3:30 a.m. June 14 in ref- erence to a disturbance. When officers arrived, they found Gloria Wilkins, 62, who had sustained se- rious injuries and Thomas Wilkins, 60, who was pro- nounced dead inside the home. Both sustained mul- tiple stab wounds. The two were identified as Zachary’s grandpar- ents.

SEE SUSPECT | A6

Commercial, residential construction spikes

Business coming to Greer

BY AMANDA IRWIN STAFF WRITER

Based on permits, fees collected and valuations for commercial and resi- dential construction, both 2014 and the month of May indicate an increase in commercial and resi- dential growth in Greer. Year-to-date, commer- cial construction valua- tions are the highest they have been since 2011 for the period ranging from January through May, to-

taling more than $23.7 million, compared with about $16.8 million in 2013, about $16.1 million in 2012 and $6.3 million in 2011. May commercial con- struction values were the highest of any month so far this year, equaling more than $12 million, which is nearly double the next highest valuations of this year. The next high- est commercial construc- tion valuation this year was in February, totaling about $6.6 million and January reflected the low- est commercial construc- tion valuation totaling

$268,536.87.

In May, which is the most up-to-date report avail- able, there were 29 single family housing starts, re-

sulting in a year-to-date total of 95 single-family housing starts, equaling more than $17 million in single-family valuations with $5 million in May. The year-to-date single-family housing starts for 2014 are on track to exceed the 2013 year-end total of 137 starts. In May, 777 inspections and 245 code enforce- ment inspections were conducted, totaling more than 2,000 inspections and more than 600 code enforcement inspections conducted this year. According to the Plan- ning and Zoning Division’s May report, 45 residential and commercial zoning permits for construction and new business startups, SEE CONSTRUCTION | A6

and new business startups, SEE CONSTRUCTION | A6 PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN May marked
and new business startups, SEE CONSTRUCTION | A6 PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN May marked

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN

May marked a booming month of commercial and residential growth in Greer. Commercial construction valuations are the highest they have been since 2011.

INDEX | DEATHS | CLASSIFIEDS B4-5 COMMUNITY CALENDAR/NEWS A2 Mildred Grace Brown, 85 Mary Jo
INDEX
|
DEATHS
|
CLASSIFIEDS
B4-5
COMMUNITY CALENDAR/NEWS
A2
Mildred Grace Brown, 85
Mary Jo Ellison, 76
CRIME
A9
ENTERTAINMENT
B8
MILESTONES
B7
OBITUARIES
A6
OPINION
A4
OUR SCHOOLS
B9
SPORTS
B1-4
WEATHER
A6

|

LIVING HERE

A4 OUR SCHOOLS B9 SPORTS B1-4 WEATHER A6 | LIVING HERE SKILLED Bonds students head to

SKILLED

Bonds students head to national competition

B6

|

NOTABLE

Salon offers free hair cuts to veterans

The White House Salon will o er free hair cuts to veterans and active military personnel Monday, June 30. The salon, located at 200 School Street in Greer, is open from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Iden- ti cation should be available. No ap- pointments are necessary. Call 877-8877 for more information.

|

SPORTS

are necessary. Call 877-8877 for more information. | SPORTS LEGIONBASEBALL Junior team hits late-season hot streak

LEGIONBASEBALL

Junior team hits late-season hot streak

B1

TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE GREER CITIZEN, CALL US TODAY AT

877-2076

A2 THE GREER CITIZEN

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR

TODAY, JUNE 25

GRACE PLACE in Greer will have its mini-mall open 10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place is located at 407 Ridgewood Drive. I.D. required.

THURSDAY, JUNE 26

KIWANIS CLUB AT 6:30 p.m. at Laurenda’s Family Restau-

rant. Call Charmaine Helfrich at 349-1707. THE SOAR BINGO CLUB from

10 a.m. - noon at Victor Gym.

The cost is 50 cents per card

FRIDAY, JUNE 27

GRACE PLACE IN Greer will have its monthly dinner at 6:30 p.m. Grace Place is located at 407 Ridgewood Drive. I.D. required.

SATURDAY, JUNE 28

COMMUNITY FOOD BANK

10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary

Christian Fellowship, 2455 Lo- cust Hill Road, Taylors. Sup- plies rst come, rst serve.

MONDAY, JUNE 30

THE NEVER ALONE GROUP OF NARCOTICS ANONY- MOUS at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recreational Center.

TUESDAY, JULY 1

THE ROTARY CLUB of Greater Greer at 7:15 a.m. at Southern Thymes. Call

334-6177.

THE NEVER ALONE GROUP OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS

at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre- ational Center. THE LIONS CLUB at Lake View Steak House, Higway 14 at 5:30 p.m. BARBERSHOP HARMONY CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo- rial United Methodist Church,

201 N. Main St., Greer. Call

877-1352.

UPSTATE LEWY BODY and Related Dementia Support Group from 5-6 p.m. at The Haven in the Village at Chan- ticleer. Contact Gail Stokes at 350-7160 or gstokes@ seniorlivingnow.com. GAP CREEK SINGERS will rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m. at The Church of the Good Shepherd, 200 Jason St., Greer. For further informa- tion or to schedule a perfor- mance contact Wesley Welsh, President, at 877-5955.

THURSDAY, JULY 3

THE GREER CHURCH of God fellowship building host- ing a Gospel and Blue Grass Jam from 6:30-9 p.m. Call

877-3668.

THE SERTOMA CLUB at Great Bay Oyster House at 6:30 p.m. Call Bob Bowman at 316-2727. THE TAYLORS LIONS Club

at 6 p.m. at the “Clubhouse”,

500 East Main St., Taylors. Call

Allen Culver at 350-6939.

SATURDAY, JULY 5

COMMUNITY FOOD BANK

10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary

Christian Fellowship, 2455 Locust Hill Road, Taylors.

Limited supplies available on

a rst come, rst serve basis.

MONDAY, JULY 7

THE NEVER ALONE GROUP OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS

at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre- ational Center. GRACE PLACE in Greer will have its mini-mall open from

10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place

is located at 407 Ridgewood

Drive. I.D. required.

TUESDAY, JULY 8

GAP CREEK SINGERS will rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m. at The Church of the Good Shepherd, 200 Jason St., Greer. For further informa- tion or to schedule a perfor- mance contact Wesley Welsh, President, at 877-5955. BARBERSHOP HARMONY CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo-

rial United Methodist Church,

201 N. Main St., Greer. Call

877-1352.

THE ROTARY CLUB of Greater Greer at 7:15 a.m. at Southern Thymes. Call

334-6177.

THE NEVER ALONE GROUP OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre- ational Center.

Calendar deadline is noon on Tuesdays. Submit information to Amanda Irwin at 877-2076, email to airwin@greercitizen. com or mail to P.O. Box 70 Greer, SC 29652.

COMMUNITY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

Park Ridge Commons proposes expansion

Could add 10 more units

BY AMANDA IRWIN STAFF WRITER

Owners of Park Ridge Commons, an apartment complex off Memorial Drive Extension, are work- ing toward expanding the complex. During the Plan-

ning Advisory meeting last week, a proposal for the addition of 10 units was reviewed by Greer’s Building and Development Standards staff. The proposed develop- ment on this site appears to be in direct conflict with elements of earlier development on the east- ern portion of the proper- ty, according to comments provided Stormwater Engi-

proper- ty, according to comments provided Stormwater Engi- PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN Park Ridge

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN

Park Ridge Commons, located o Memorial Drive Ext. in Greer, could be expanding by 10 units, according to ownership.

neer Lillian Hanley on be- half of City Engineer Don Holloman. To be approved, the por-

tion of the property cur- rently existing would need to be improved to meet current development stan-

dards without compromis- ing the functionality of the current property. “We do have flooding

problems down on Me- morial Drive Extension,” Hanley said, added that she didn’t know what SC- DOT would require to ad- dress the issue but that it should be taken into con- sideration. The plans are concep- tual and are subject to change before the ex- pansion begins. The cur- rently proposed plans do not connect the parking structures of the com- pleted phase one and the propose phase two of the development. Glenn Pace, Planning and Zoning co- ordinator, recommended changing this to allow proper fire department ac- cess, as suggested by the fire marshal. The property is already zoned for residential multi-family so it will not need to be reviewed by the Planning Commission. Thirteen units already re- side on the property.

COMMUNITY NEWS
COMMUNITY
NEWS

FREE HOME SAFETY CHECKS FOR SENIORS

For National Safety month, the Greenville County Home Instead Se- nior Care office is offering free home safety checks for the county’s seniors through June. To request a free home safety check or a checklist, call Home Instead Senior Care office at 242-2228. Additional information and resources are avail- able at makinghomesafer-

forseniors.com.

FREEDOM BLAST

THIS FRIDAY

The City of Greer’s an- nual Freedom Blast cel- ebration will be on June 28 beginning at 6 p.m. in Greer City Park. Veterans will be recog- nized take part in a veter- an’s walk. Entertainment will include fireworks and Greer Idol participant per- formances. Food, activities and entertainment will be available.

FIRST TUESDAY ON TRADE: MILITARY APPRECIATION NIGHT

The July 1, First Tuesday on Trade will be a Military Appreciation Night held in downtown Greer from 5 – 8 p.m. Veterans are asked to meet up at Stomping Grounds Coffee House on Trade Street.

ROAD TO RECOVERY NEEDS DRIVERS AND VOLUNTEERS

The American Cancer Society needs volunteer drivers to transport pa-

tients to local treatment centers. Anyone interested in volunteering as a driver

must have a good driv- ing record, valid driver’s license, automobile insur- ance and a vehicle in good working condition. The American Cancer Society provides free training for this program.

Cancer Society provides free training for this program. Car show for a cause Pour Sports Pub
Cancer Society provides free training for this program. Car show for a cause Pour Sports Pub

Car show for a cause

Pour Sports Pub and Grille and Gregory Trailer Service organized a car show that was held last Sunday. The showfeaturedvintagerides at Greer Station. Vaughn Bragg of Pour Sports said the show saw a good turn out and there would be more to come. Proceeds bene t cancer research.

Photos Submitted

come. Proceeds bene t cancer research. Photos Submitted For more information on becoming a Road to
come. Proceeds bene t cancer research. Photos Submitted For more information on becoming a Road to

For more information on becoming a Road to Recov- ery volunteer, contact the local office at 627-8289.

GOD’S PANTRY REQUESTS DONATIONS

God’s Pantry needs the following nonperishable food donations: boxed gelatin, cans of potatoes, fruit and corn. Items can be dropped off at: 100 Enoree Road, Greer, on Thursdays from 10 a.m. – noon, 2481 Rac- ing Road, Greer, on Thurs- days 1 – 4 p.m. or 700 E. Main St., Duncan, on Wednesdays 9 – 11 a.m. For questions or to vol-

unteer call Wendy at 963-

4441.

SHARON’S CLOSET REQUESTS CLOTHING

Sharon’s Closet needs spring and summer clothing donations, es- pecially for girls in sizes newborn to 6T New or gently used clothing ac- cepted Monday through Friday 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. at 783 S. Line St Ext., Greer.

GCM FOOD PANTRY NEEDS FRUIT, CONDIMENTS, RICE

The Food Pantry needs canned fruit and condi- ments, boxed gelatin, corn muffin mix and 1-pound

bags of rice. Donate at the ministry, 738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer, between 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Visit gcminc.org or call 879-2254 for more infor- mation.

GCM SEEKS DRIVERS FOR SUMMER MONTHS

Greer Community Min- istries needs drivers for Meals on Wheels during the summer months. Several routes are avail- able and each takes about an hour, with pickup be- tween 10 and 11 a.m. To volunteer or for more information, call Wendy

Campbell at 879-2254. A Meals on Wheels driver must be a qualified driver with a valid driver’s license and have a heart for serving others. MOW has 19 delivery routes in the greater Greer area. Meals are delivered Monday through Friday.

GCM SEEKS VOLUNTEERS FOR SENIOR DINING

GCM needs volunteers to assist with the Senior Din- ing from 9 – 11:39 a.m., Monday – Friday. To volunteer or for more information, call Patsy Quarles at 877-1937.

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news

wednesday, june 25, 2014

Greer Idol, Teen Idol kick off at Freedom Blast

the greer citizen

a3

|

Teen Idol kick off at Freedom Blast the greer citizen a3 | PHil BucHHeit | tHe

PHil BucHHeit | tHe Greer citizen

Rev. Walter “Chick” McGill of Franklin, Tennessee is more than 500 miles into his walk across the United States. He is pictured passing Greer First Baptist in downtown.

Pastor ‘talks the talk’ and ‘walks the walk’ across United States

worshipping in a church. He will be the first to tell you, due to the summer heat, he is taking his time and is not in a race. He hopes to reach the Santa Monica Pier by Christmas. If it takes longer, he’s OK with it. “Lincoln talked about the new birth of freedom in The Gettysburg Address,

Gill of Franklin, Tennessee is more than 500 miles into his walk across the United States to promote a new birth of freedom and integrity in America. The 68-year-old pastor hopes that his walk will inspire

a spiritual awakening for

our country by making Americans more aware of God’s Law, constitutional principles, family values, civil liberties and human rights. He began his walk in Kill

Devil Hills, North Carolina April 23 and arrived in Greer June 17. His walk will cover 3,200 miles and end on the Santa Monica Pier in California. McGill, a former busi-

nessman,familycounselor, eryone to know what the

private Christian academy principal, electronics tech- nician and project director of humanitarian health services in Uganda, East Africa, currently serves as pastor of a church in Guys, Tennessee. He said God came to him through 2 Chronicles 7:14 and asked him to walk across America. He planned on beginning his journey in early spring, but due to an extremely cold winter, did not leave

by Phil buchheit Staff Writer

‘I’m promoting a new birth of freedom and integrity in America by raising awareness to the Ten Commandments and the golden rule.’

walter ‘Chick’ McGill

the second oldest person to ever do it. “If you’re going to talk the talk you got to walk the walk,” McGill said. And that is just what he is doing. For more information on McGill’s walk across Amer- ica, and for daily updates, visit walkthewalknow. com.

American flag that he is carrying across America represents. “The flag represents we the people. It doesn’t rep- resent the Federal govern- ment. We are supposed to be self-governed. The gov- ernment is not supposed to interfere with our fam- ily, our religion, how we raise our children …”, said McGill. According to McGill, if he completes his walk across America, he will be

Rev. Walter “Chick” Mc-

but I don’t think he under- stood it quite the same way that I do. I believe the new birth of freedom is what Christ talked about when He said you must be born again. I don’t think you can have freedom with- out having the new birth experience…I hope that (through this walk) I can draw more people closer to God. I hope America will draw closer to God. McGill also wants ev-

hope America will draw closer to God. McGill also wants ev- Kill Devil Hills until April.

Kill Devil Hills until April. “I’m promoting a new birth of freedom and in- tegrity in America by rais- ing awareness to the Ten Commandments and the golden rule. Those things that if we observed we wouldn’t need law enforce- ment,” McGill said. McGill, who served two and a half years in Viet- nam, is saluting as many drivers as he can during his walk across the country as

a way to show Americans

they should exemplify re- spect to one another. McGill’s wife Barbara is driving the support vehi- cle and keeps him hydrat-

ed during his journey. The two have a RV they sleep

in

every night. They park it

at

a different church most

nights. McGill about 14 miles daily. He does not walk on Saturdays or Sundays, but instead spends these days

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by AmAndA irwin Staff Writer

The Greer Idol and Greer Idol Teen competitions will begin at Freedom Blast on Friday, June 28. The fourth season of Greer Idol Teen will begin at 6 p.m. and the eighth season of Greer Idol will begin at 8 p.m. The singing competi- tions will continue through the summer at the amphi- theater in Greer City Park as part of the Tunes in the Park series beginning on July 11 with Jim Quick and the Coastline Band. Other performances will include The Carolina Coast Band on July 18, Encore on July 25 and Rock and Roll Re- union on August 1. This year’s 10 Greer Idol contestants have a range of experiences from singing in competitions, perform- ing in musical groups and giving live performances at local establishments. Finalists include Amy Alford, who grew up sing- ing solos in her church choir and sang in the High Praises band, and John Garrison, a returning 2012 Greer Idol competitor who performed in the 2011 All- State Choir. First time Greer Idol par- ticipant Brian Scott Garner is not a first time perform- er, as he is a member of T3 Talent and he studied musical theatre at North Greenville University. Contestants Kiley Savan- nah Godsey, who partici- pated in the All-State Or- chestra and competed in the Greenville Sings com- petition this past winter, and Elizabeth Haney, who is a wife, mother of three, will also show their chops at this year’s Greer Idol. No strangers to compe- titions, before choosing to share their talents at Greer Idol, Josh Jordan au- ditioned for The Voice in Nashville and Youth Pas- tor James Landreth was a finalist in Liberty Idol and spent two years learning and performing at the Fine Arts Center of Greenville. Before attending the S.C. Governors School for the Arts and Humanities voice program in the fall, Lau- ren Painter will perform at Greer Idol along with Melissa Velez, who sings karaoke and hopes to one day sing in an animated movie. And this year’s fi- nal Greer Idol competitor is Stephen Young, who sang in a gospel quartet in college and is a father of six. Young’s son Kody won Greer Idol Teen last year. Greer Idol Teen 12 final- ists include an array of first-time performers to well-seasoned singers. Not unfamiliar with per- forming are competitors Ashley Goss, who per- formed with Carolina Pal- ace and Converse College for nearly five years, Isabel Greene, who performed in the her school’s produc- tion of “Annie,” and Zele- na Hull, who performed in Best Singer in the State. Newcomer Sha Jackson will take on her first com- petition though she has participated in school tal- ent shows. Familiar faces in Greer Idol Teen, Taylor Lee sang in Nashville Con- nection, and Maloree Mc- Cormick participated in season three of the X Fac- tor. Performers Keddy Men- doza entered Best Singer several years, winning the elementary division, and Sophia Noyes began per- forming at 7 years old, including church produc- tions, musicals and talent shows. Teen singer Jacob Roach performed at Smiles Acoustic Café, writes his own music, and plays gui- tar and piano. Camden Taylor is another first time performer, though she has performed karaoke and sings in church. Roni Leigh Teems will perform at Greer Idol Teen for the second year, recently taking up singing in addition to her 10 years of dance, and the final performer is Devon White, who has sang at nurs- ing homes since he was 8 years old and joined the

|

idol contestants

since he was 8 years old and joined the | idol contestants Alford Garner Garrison Haney

Alford

he was 8 years old and joined the | idol contestants Alford Garner Garrison Haney Godsey

Garner

8 years old and joined the | idol contestants Alford Garner Garrison Haney Godsey Jordan Landreth

Garrison

old and joined the | idol contestants Alford Garner Garrison Haney Godsey Jordan Landreth Velez Painter

Haney

joined the | idol contestants Alford Garner Garrison Haney Godsey Jordan Landreth Velez Painter Young teen

Godsey

the | idol contestants Alford Garner Garrison Haney Godsey Jordan Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants

Jordan

idol contestants Alford Garner Garrison Haney Godsey Jordan Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull

Landreth

Alford Garner Garrison Haney Godsey Jordan Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza

Velez

Alford Garner Garrison Haney Godsey Jordan Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza

Painter

Garner Garrison Haney Godsey Jordan Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach

Young

teen contestants

Godsey Jordan Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson

Goss

Jordan Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick

Hull

Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes

Lee

Landreth Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes

Mendoza

Velez Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes Taylor

Roach

Painter Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes Taylor White

Teems

Young teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes Taylor White school

Greene

teen contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes Taylor White school chorus.

Jackson

contestants Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes Taylor White school chorus. For

McCormick

Goss Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes Taylor White school chorus. For more

Noyes

Hull Lee Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes Taylor White school chorus. For more information

Taylor

Mendoza Roach Teems Greene Jackson McCormick Noyes Taylor White school chorus. For more information on Greer

White

school chorus. For more information on Greer Idol and Greer Idol Teen contestants, visit facebook.com/greeridol.

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A4 THE GREER CITIZEN

OPINION

The Greer Citizen

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

‘But seriously, folks ’

I n all my years as a stand-up comic,

I’ve never been unable to provide

a snappy, ‘come-back’ to a boister-

ous heckler. Indeed, if you hand them enough rope, they usually end up hang- ing themselves and making a comic’s life much easier. “My name is Sapphire!” hollered one young woman, out of the blue, and very much into her cups (as well as nearly falling out of them), during a midnight show in Las Vegas. “Of course it is.” “And I’m a stripper!” “Imagine my surprise.” “And I make more money than you!” “I’m sure you do, but tonight, I have your twenty five bucks, so sit down, be quiet, and let everybody else hear the show, OK?” By that time, the audience, most ap- preciatively, turned en masse and told her to shut up. So, it’s no big deal: I’m used to heck- lers and, to be honest, I really never encountered that many on a regular basis. I tell you all this because in the last few months, I’ve been been utterly incapable of replying to a woman I see,

I’M JUST SAYING PAM STONE
I’M JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE

once a month, during a scheduled day of volunteering for those in need. Let me be perfectly clear that I enjoy everyone on my route and I don’t think for a second she means to be the least bit cruel, because she’s always smiling when she says it. But on the first Mon- day of each month, I knock on her door, she opens it, and says, “Boy, you sure are tall.” “Yep,” I nod, “Yep, I am.” “I mean, you’re really tall.” Holding my arms out on either side of my body, palms up, I reply, “I dunno what to tell ya. I’ve complained about it but nothing changes.” “Whew,” she generally ends with, “some kind of tall.” OK, so there you have it- I’m tall. And she has pointed it out to me every month for over a year now. But here is

the strangest thing of all She is exactly my height. Possibly, a fraction taller. She opens the door of her neat-as-a-pin house, towering over the stoop, blocking all light emanating from

the interior, and says, “Boy, you’re tall.” I just don’t know what to say to that. It’s like being a redhead and having the comedian, Carrot Top, go out of his way to approach you, brow furrowed with puzzlement, and announcing, “Boy, your hair is really red.” A couple of months ago, knowing what was coming, I tried a different approach. As I pulled up to her house, more out of bemusement than anger, when the monthly declaration regarding my height was offered upon opening the door,

I countered, “Well, you know, you’re

pretty ‘up there’ too, Stretch!” to which

she replied, “Yeah, but you’re really tall.”

Annnnd

I

got nothin’. Who wants to

get into a ‘my dog’s bigger than your dog’ contest when there’s another ten meals, cooling off by the minute, to be delivered? Again, I don’t ever think it’s meant to be unkind. I think it’s just a sort of observance, with the honesty of a child, that glances up at a stranger in the

check-out line and then proclaims loudly to its mother, “That man sure has a big stomach!” No harm was meant. It’s just something of interest that was noted be- tween implorings for a Kit-Kat or bubble- gum. I just wish, I thought, bracing myself and admitting to a little tension creeping into my shoulders as I turned onto the familiar street, that there might be some other gambit of conversation that could be proffered, for a change. “Is that truck bad to drive?” Looking around at my ancient Dodge, I replied, “Well, it’s a long bed, so park- ing’s a pain. I need a tugboat to pull me into a space at the grocery store,” then laughed at my own joke. “No,” she said, “I mean, is it bad on gas?” Relieved that she was showing sympa- thy in what might be a plight to my well being, I smiled and replied, “It’s a killer. “Oh,” she said, nodding understand- ingly and taking her meal. She paused before she closed her door and re- marked, “You sure do look tall driving that truck.” I got nothin’.

THE UPPER ROOM

|

Being

accountable

Read Hebrews 10:23-25

W e urge you, beloved, to

admonish the idlers, en-

courage the fainthearted,

help the weak, be patient wit all of them. -- 1 Thessalonians 5:14 (NRSV)

I went mountain climbing the other day and met up with some energetic students. When I thought I could not possible go on, they shouted words of encouragement: “You can do it!” “You are one strong lady!” At times, they burst into song to boost morale. Together, we made it all the way.

Being accountable to

one another to keeps us on track.

This experience reminds me if our Christian walk. Some- times the battle is too fierce, and we feel we can’t go on. We don’t have the strength to even pray. In such times, we need other people to support, encourage, and admonish us in love. Through Christian fellow- ship, we have the strength to hold on to God’s promises and to continue. Being accountable to one another to keeps us on track. Some people say that they need not to go to church any- more because they listen to ser- mons on TV or on the Internet. This practice is no substitute for Christian fellowship. The TV won’t comfort us through hard times, rejoice in our bless- ings, or keep us accountable. Our brothers and sisters in Christ will. Thought for the day: We are members of the body of Christ and accountable to one another. Prayer: Thank you, dear God, for the fellowship of believers. Teach us to cherish it and play our roles in the community of faith. Amen.

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to 317 Trade St., Greer 29651. can be The Greer Citizen | EDITORIAL Taking time to

|

EDITORIAL

Taking time to honor our troops, war heroes

As we get ready to celebrate our independence as a nation, we must shift our attention to those who sacrificed for it. This week in Greer, the city will put on Free- dom Blast, an annual event that offers great entertainment, food and a salute to those that serve. Our town has no shortage of amazing ser- vicemen and women, who have sacrificed and continue to sacrifice for the freedoms we some- times take for granted. Flipping through The Greer Citizen this week, you can learn about Preston Johnson, a U.S. Army veteran from Greer who served two ter- rifying tours in Vietnam. You can learn more about Cliff Harpst, an 88-year-old World War II veteran who can still recall his war experience as vividly as the day he was sent to the front lines. You might flip the page to read about Lewis Vaughn, a name many in Greer might recognize from his 18 years spent in South Carolina House of Representatives. Vaughn is a veteran of the Korean War and is currently working to estab- lish a unique monument on I-385 in Greenville County called the “Corridor of Honor.” This 12- mile stretch of road will recognize war heroes from the six 20th and 21st century wars. These people are our own. They are proud to say they served their country. South Carolina is a breeding ground for brave men and women who want to do the right thing and serve in whatever capacity they can. This was proven to ring true in an example we saw last week. As many of you know by now, President Barack Obama awarded the Medal of Honor to South Carolina resident and retired U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. William “Kyle” Carpenter. His story is an amazing one, and it’s worth repeating.

South Carolina is a breeding ground for brave men and women who want to do the right thing and serve in whatever capacity they can.

Carpenter was serving as a Marine rifleman in Afghanistan when Taliban fighters attacked his group. Not long after, Carpenter found a live grenade nearby and he had a decision to make. In what had to be the most split-second decision he ever made, Carpenter opted to save his buddies, tossing himself on the grenade. He did what he knew to do. He was putting others’ lives ahead of his own. Thankfully, he did not pay the ultimate price. He was horrifically injured and still continues

to recover, but he lives to tell his amazing story, and last week, he became only the eighth living Medal of Honor recipient. “As the president put the Medal of Honor around my neck, I felt the history and the weight of a nation,” he was quoted as saying in

a recent statement. “I will wear it for those who have been wounded on distant lands who still

continue to fight in battle, and through long and difficult days of recovery here at home. And for those who have given it all, I can never express in words what you mean for this nation.” We have to honor our veterans any chance we get. Whether it be Memorial Day, Veterans Day or our nation’s Independence Day, take some time to recognize the veteran in your life. They may not have a story quite like Kyle’s, but they have all paid a price and we owe them

a debt of gratitude.

The Greer Citizen

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CURIOUSLY

AMANDA

AMANDA IRWIN Sta reporter

Drowning in debt

H igh school graduates being herded into higher education institutions and

handed high-interest loans to secure nonexistent jobs isn’t uncommon — but it’s very problematic, and this month, Senate struck down a bill intended to lessening student debts. The Student Emergency Loan Refinancing Act would’ve al- lowed students to refinance loans at lower interest rates (3.86 - 6.41 percent), saving millions of students thousands of dollars. The lost revenue would be

subsidized through closing tax loopholes for wealthy and the “Buffett Rule,” which places

a tax increase upwards of 30

percent on individuals earning more than $1 million annually, effecting 0.3 percent of taxpay-

ers. The bill wasn’t perfect, as

it didn’t address rising college

costs that have tripled over the past 30 years in 4-year public colleges, ensuring reliance on loans for higher education. Why care? Because more than 40 million Americans have student loans, collectively total $1.3 trillion in debt (6 percent of the federal debt) making student loans the second larg- est cause of debt, according to the Federal Reserve. It’s been suggested if enough students

default, a crash reminiscent of the housing market will occur, resulting in college closings and borrowers with bad credit unable to invest in the economy. In 2003 5 percent of repaying borrowers defaulted, increasing to 10 percent in 2012. When generations of people entering the workforce can’t in- vest their money, the economy is obviously negatively im- pacted. Excessive student debts prevent many working adults from buying homes, starting businesses and financially supporting their communities. Instead they’re renting and si- phoning whatever’s left to pay debts unavoidable. The American economy hasn’t changed to meet its societies needs. The system is rigged to benefit corporations at the expense of its people. While no bill is perfect, on behalf of the millions of in-debt students, I’m highly disap- pointed in the failure of our representatives to turn a prom- ising bill into a political-party issue. When American citizens fail, our economy fails, and a failing economy has no political biased and effects all of us.

All advertisements are accepted and published by the Publisher upon the representation that the advertiser/agency is authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. It is understood that the advertiser/agency will indemnify and save the Publisher harmless from or against any loss or expense arising out of publication of such advertisements, including, without limitation, those resulting from claims of libel, violation of rights of privacy, plagiarism and copyrights infringement. © All material in this publication may not be used in full or in part without the expressed written consent of management.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 DAVE SAYS DAVE RAMSEY Housing includes taxes, insurance Q: You recommend that
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 DAVE SAYS DAVE RAMSEY Housing includes taxes, insurance Q: You recommend that
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 DAVE SAYS DAVE RAMSEY Housing includes taxes, insurance Q: You recommend that

DAVE

SAYS

DAVE

RAMSEY

Housing

includes

taxes,

insurance

Q: You recommend that no more than 25 percent of your monthly income go toward a house pay- ment. Does this figure include taxes and insur- ance too?

DR: Yes, it does. Your housing payment should not exceed 25 percent of your monthly take-home pay on a 15-year, fixed- rate mortgage. When it comes to buy- ing a house, the goal is not to live in the Taj Mahal or have something so expensive you end up being “house poor.” When buying a home, especially for first-time homebuy- ers, you should look for something nice — in a decent area — that you can get paid off as quickly as possible. It’s really not a big deal if you cheat a couple of percentage points one way or the other. But 25 percent is a good rule of thumb to ensure you’ll still have money left over to live on, save and invest!

Be very kind and very grateful

Q: My mom and dad took out a whole life insurance policy for me when I was born. The cash value is $2,500, and my husband and I want to cash it out and put the money toward paying off debt. We already have larger term life insurance policies in place, but I’m worried that doing this will offend my parents. What should I do?

DR: I think the real question is how many toxic things will you do because you’re afraid you might offend them. Whole life policies are financially toxic. They’re a bad product, and keep- ing it for no better reason than it might hurt their feelings a little bit isn’t much of a reason — espe- cially when the alternative is paying down debt and getting your financial life in order. I know this is mom and dad we’re talking about, so you’ll have to be nice about everything. But at the same time, your parents have to realize it’s your life and you make the decisions. Try sitting down with them and gently explaining that while you appreciate and love them for their generosity, you’re going to cash it out and use it to get out of debt. Let them know you’re not wasting their gift, and that you’re using it to make a positive impact on your lives. You’re not doing any- thing disrespectful, Laura. Just be very clear about the reason and loving with your explanation. Then, if they chose to be- come a little emotional or resentful, that’s on them. If they get really upset and want the money back, you can do that too. But getting your financial house in order is much more important than hanging on to a bad fi- nancial product you don’t need in the first place.

C ks

Cashed

Che

Pay BillS Here

C ks Cashed Che Pay BillS Here 1921 Hwy. 101 South, Greer, SC 29651 (Exit 60

1921 Hwy. 101 South, Greer, SC 29651

(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)

864-968-1133
864-968-1133

The Greer Citizen

BUSINESS

THE GREER CITIZEN

A5

Faulkner is new Rotary District 7750 governor

Tom Faulkner was in-

stalled as district governor of Rotary District 7750 on Thursday, June 19 at an awards and installation banquet held at the Can- non Centre in Greer.

RotaryDis-

trict 7750 includes 54 clubs lo- cated in the western half of South Carolina.

Faulkner is the first District Governor selected from Greater Greer Rotary Club for the position. He served as the Charter Pres- ident of the Greer club in 2003-2004 when it was re- designated as the Rotary Club of Greater Greer. The keynote speaker for the event was James P. Fields, Jr., executive director of Palmetto Institute. To initiate his year as governor, Faulkner partici- pated in the Miracle Hill Metric Century Cycling Challenge, a 63.3 bicycle ride that included scaling Caesar’s Head. He partici- pated in the event to raise funds for Miracle Hill Min- istries. He is also raising

Faulkner

for Miracle Hill Min- istries. He is also raising Faulkner funds to build a sanita- tion

funds to build a sanita- tion system in Mirebalais, Haiti. Since 2006, through similar rides, swims and triathlons, he has raised over $150,000 for interna- tional projects in Haiti and El Salvador. In anticipation of his new role, Tom has recently stepped down as President of Nehemiah Community Revitalization Corpora- tion, a faith-based com- munity development cor- poration based in Greer, operating throughout the state of South Carolina. He is continuing to sup- port the corporation as Vice President and Direc- tor of Development. He is the owner of Koinonia Communities, LLC, a so- cial business focused on neighborhood empower- ment both locally and in- ternationally. He is the Associate Min- ister of Outreach at First Christian Church in Green- ville, becoming an or- dained minister in 2013. Faulkner is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where he majored in Eng- lish and minored in Psy- chology.

where he majored in Eng- lish and minored in Psy- chology. PHOTO | SUBMITTED BMW’s Manfred

PHOTO | SUBMITTED

BMW’s Manfred Erlacher, left, receives the J.D. Power Bronze Plant Quality Award from Joshua Halliburton.

BMW plant given award for quality and satisfaction

BMW Manufacturing recently announced J.D. Power, a source for evalu- ating customer satisfac- tion regarding new ve- hicle quality, awarded the Greer factory the Bronze Plant Quality Award in the North/South America re- gion. Other BMW Group plants have received this award, but this is the first ever for the local plant. “This is truly an extraor- dinary accomplishment for this plant,” said Manfred Erlacher, President and CEO of BMW Manufactur- ing Co. “Building quality vehicles for our customers is our top priority and this award is a demonstration of the commitment of our entire workforce.”

In addition, the J.D.

Power Initial Quality Study (IQS) ranked the BMW X3 second in its segment (compact premium SUV). The 2014 U.S. Initial Quality Study is based on responses from more than 86,000 purchasers and lessees of new 2014 mod- el-year cars, trucks,and multi-activity vehicles surveyed after 90 days of ownership. The study was fielded between February and May

2014.

BMW Manufacturing Co., LLC is a subsidiary of BMW AG in Munich, Germany and is the global produc- er of the BMW X3 and X5 Sports Activity Vehicles and X4 and X6 Sports Ac- tivity Coupe.

Activity Vehicles and X4 and X6 Sports Ac- tivity Coupe. WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Activity Vehicles and X4 and X6 Sports Ac- tivity Coupe. WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Activity Vehicles and X4 and X6 Sports Ac- tivity Coupe. WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Activity Vehicles and X4 and X6 Sports Ac- tivity Coupe. WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN

WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN

Matt Bowes stands at the helm of his new pub, Southern Growl, which o ers 60 craft beers on tap.

Southern Growl brings craft beer to Greer

BY WILLIAM BUCHHEIT STAFF WRITER

For a 25-year-old, Matt Bowes sure knows a lot about beer. The Columbus, Ohio, native recently opened up The Southern Growl, a pub that offers 60 beers on tap each day from around the world. Located in the shopping center at South Buncombe Road and Wade Hampton Bou- levard (across from Sonic), it is the only pub in the Upstate that exclusively offers craft beer, defined as coming from breweries that make 6 million barrels of beer or less annually. What that means is you will not find Budweiser, Coors, Miller or any other mass-produced beer in- side. Instead, you will find tastier, higher-quality beers on tap. “The problem is people think beer tastes like beer, and beer tastes like Bud Light,” Bowes said. “Beer doesn’t taste like beer and it doesn’t taste like Bud Light. There are so many different flavors and so there’s so much more to it.” The pub owner wants to help people expand their beer knowledge and taste, which is why Southern Growl offers “flights,” five 5-ounce glasses, each con- taining a different beer. When you find one you like, you can purchase it in a pint glass or growler, a 32 or 64-ounce glass bot- tle that can be filled and taken home. Bowes says the term “growler” comes from the old days, when people

‘The problem is people think beer tastes like beer, and beer tastes like Bud Light.’

would take metal pales to pubs and have them filled with beer to go. Growlers are especially convenient because cus- tomers can stop by, have them refilled in a matter of seconds and quickly be on their way home, Bowes said. Bowes was a chiroprac- tic assistant in Columbus when he and his wife de- cided to move to Greer last year. “We were looking around and we ended up going to Greer’s Oktoberfest,” he said. “We just kind of fell in love with the downtown and really liked the city. This spot [location of the pub] just really popped out because it’s right be- tween Greenville and Spar- tanburg and there’s just nothing like this around.” While his wife taught school at Hendricks El- ementary last winter, Bowes spent between 10- 16 hours every day on his pub. With posh wooden furnishings and welcom- ing atmosphere, he want- ed to create a pub that felt like home. “I wanted to create a place where people felt like they could come in and relax,” he said. “A lot of times, you go into a bar and it’s also a restaurant. There’s a lot going on and you feel like you have to eat or get out.”

Matt Bowes

Owner, Southern Growl

To encourage people to stay awhile, Bowes carved checkerboards into his ta- bles so people could play chess or checkers. He also has many other traditional board games available to choose from. Since opening a few weeks ago, Bowes said business has been strong, attracting all ages and a 50/50 male-female cus- tomer base. He and his staff are there to accommodate every possible customer, from the experienced craft beer aficionado to those who’ve never tasted anything but Budweiser. “When some people walk in, 60 taps is very overwhelming, especially to those that don’t know what types of beer they like or anything,” he said. “That’s where we come in. If we know what they nor- mally drink or what they like, then we can direct them and help them find what craft beer they like.” Southern Growl also of- fers cider on tap, but no wine or liquor. It’s open 3-9 p.m. Mon- day-Wednesday, 3-10 p.m. Thursday and noon-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. For more information, visit thesoutherngrowl. com

day-Wednesday, 3-10 p.m. Thursday and noon-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. For more information, visit thesoutherngrowl. com

A6 THE GREER CITIZEN

The Greer Citizen

OBITUARIES

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

Mildred Grace Brown

Mildred Grace Brown, 85, of 405 N. Main St., Greer, passed away Tues- day, June 17, 2014 at her home after an extended illness. Born in Spartanburg on November 25, 1928, she was a daughter of the late Lillie Maggie Mae Pruitt Holden and Albert E. Hold- en. She was the wife of Robert Jesse Brown. She was a homemaker and was a lifelong mem- ber of Walnut Hill Baptist Church. In addition to her hus- band, is survived by two daughters; Judy Greer and husband Donald of Greer, Joyce Jones and husband Robby of Lyman, one son; Hank Brown and his wife Renata of Wyoming, three grandchildren; Tra- vis Greer, Kimberly Greer, Graham Jones, and one great grandchild; Mikayla Cooper. She was predeceased by two grandsons; infant Kev- in Greer and Bobby Jones. The family is at 405 N. Main St., Greer and re- ceived friends Saturday 3-5 p.m. at Seawright Fu-

neral Home. Funeral ser- vices were held at Walnut Hill Baptist Church at 3 p.m. on Sunday, June 22, with Rev. Gary Hensley of- ficiating. Burial followed in Roselawn Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, me- morial contributions may be made to Hospice of the Carolina Foothills, 130 For- est Glen Drive Columbus, North Carolina 28722.

130 For- est Glen Drive Columbus, North Carolina 28722. Mary Jo Ellison Mary Jo Ellison, 76,

Mary Jo Ellison

Mary Jo Ellison, 76, of Greer, passed away Sun- day, June 22, 2014 at home. She was born April 21, 1938 at Spartanburg Re- gional Hospital to the late

Louis and Beatrice Murray. She was predeceased by her husband James Ellison Sr., her daughter Terry El- lison, her son Ken Ellison and her sister Rita Mur- ray. She is survived by her sister, Laura Sue of At- lanta, Georgia., her sons James Ellison Jr. of the home, her grandchildren James Ellison III, Jona- than Ellison both of Greer, and Todd Roer of Toccoa, Georgia. She is also survived by four great grandchildren

Taylor Ellison, Kaileigh El- lison, Jayden Ellison and Faith Ellison, all of Greer. Condolences can be made in person or at Mack-

ey Mortuary Funerals and

Cremations, Greenville. Mary Jo Ellison’s final wish was that her ashes be reunited with her husband and sons’ in Charleston, South Carolina.

OBITUARIES

Can be emailed to billy@ greercitizen.com or dropped o at 317 Trade St. Deadline:

noon Tuesday. Cost: $30; with photo $45.

BUDGET: Salaries make up 80 percent

FROM PAGE ONE

at Abner Creek, one ad- ministrative assistant po- sition, three-tenths of a music position at D. R. Hill and half an orchestra po- sition. Four special educa- tion teacher assistant po- sitions will also be added. The district is also changing an Abner Creek 4-year-old kindergarten teaching position from full-time from half-time. It is also adding an assis- tant principal position at Byrnes High. There are position re- ductions at Abner Creek, River Ridge and Bynes, netting the 16.3 new posi- tions. The number one prior- ity at Byrnes was adding an assistant principal, said Superintendent Scott Turner. “For a school of 1,700 students, having five as- sistant principals is about normal,” Turner said. “It may be on the low side in terms of support.”

One of the five assistant principals will deal cur- riculum instruction and professional development, he said. Salaries and benefits are nearly 80 percent of the district’s $69.5 million budget. The budget has an increase of 5.8 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year. The board voted unani- mously to authorize the general obligation bond, as well as well as the gen- eral fund. They didn’t in- clude millage increases. The district had not in- creased the millage since 2009-2010. The budget has a $3.8 million increase. It is a balanced budget, Hayes said. “The last couple years, we’ve been budgeting a deficit,” he said. “This budget that we’ve pro- posed is balanced and will not require a decrease in fund balance.” The board also voted unanimously to approve budgets for the Spartan-

burg County Alternative School, McCarthy-Teszler School and the R. D. An- derson Applied Technol- ogy Center. The alternative school, physically in District 7, serves all of Spartanburg County’s seven school dis-

tricts. Its budget includes

a 0.5 mil increase. The

school been running at a deficit for years, Hayes said.

“Actually, what it is is re- storing the millage to what

it was back in fiscal year

2010,” he said. “In 2011, we actually reduced the millage a half a mill dur-

ing that time and it’s been that way ever since.” The McCarthy-Teszler School also serves all Spartanburg districts and

is in District 7. Its budget

includes a 1-mil increase. The budget R. D. Ander- son Applied Technology, which serves districts 4, 5 and 6, includes a 0.1 mil increase.

serves districts 4, 5 and 6, includes a 0.1 mil increase. SUSPECT: Found injured FROM PAGE

SUSPECT: Found injured

FROM PAGE ONE

Officers located Zach- ary Wilkins, who they say had sustained gunshot wounds. The teen and his grandmother were trans- ported to Greenville Me- morial Hospital for their injuries. As of Tuesday morning, no further up- date on the condition of

Gloria or Zachary Wilkins was available. According to a report from our news partner, Fox Carolina, Zachary Wilkins is being held on no bond at the Greenville County Detention Center and will be tried as an adult.

billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

CONSTRUCTION: Starting

FROM PAGE ONE

along with sign permits, were issued, generating $1,611 in fees. Year-to- date, 77 residential per- mits were issued, 30 of which were issued in May for a year-to-date total of fees collected equaling $2,140. Of the 56 commer- cial permits issued this year, only seven issued in May. Since the start of the year, $3,150 in commer- cial permit fees were col- lected, and the Planning and Zoning Division thus

far this year has collected a total of $12,225.

airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

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Weekend Outlook

Hot weekend weather

We will see more sunshine and hot tempera- tures this weekend. Rain chances will be low on Saturday and Sunday, but we will see isolated afternoon thunderstorms. Highs will stay in the low to middle 90s for the weekend. After a week that has included temperatures in the middle 90s and afternoon thunderstorms we will see that pattern continue on Saturday and Sunday. Have a great weekend!

Freedom Blast

Where: Greer City Park

Date: Saturday, June 28 6-10 p.m.

Temps: Mostly sunny and hot. Low 90s at start.

28 6-10 p.m. Temps: Mostly sunny and hot. Low 90s at start. 88/63 Iso. showers 86/63

88/63 Iso. showers 86/63 Iso. showers

90/64 Iso. showers 90/64 Iso. showers

93/70 Iso. showers 93/70 Iso. showers

94/72 Iso. showers 94/72 Iso. showers

88/63 ISO

86/63 ISO

82/62 ISO

84/60 ISO

89/73 ISO

87/73 ISO

88/76 PS

88/78 ISO

92/72 ISO

93/72 PS

93/70 ISO

90/70 ISO

96/73 ISO

96/75 ISO

91/69 ISO

91/69 ISO

July 19

June 26

July 5

July 12

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

89

68

84 91 93

84

84 91 93

91

84 91 93

93

68

67

68

 

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Sunday

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21.04”

-1.27”

94 69

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94 69 93 93 89

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6:17 AM

8:46 PM

93 93 89 70 70 72 6:17 AM 8:46 PM HIGH: Softball tournament aids family FROM

HIGH: Softball tournament aids family

FROM PAGE ONE

This past weekend, Praise Cathedral hosted a softball game to raise even more money for the High family. Nine teams, made up of 10 to 12 people, en-

tered the tournament, in- cluding the By His Stripes ministry team, which was started as a softball min- istry by Praise Cathedral member, Randy Anderson, who lost his battle with cancer back in 2012. High’s son also plays

baseball with Northwood Little League, and some of the fathers from his team formed their own team to participate in the tourna- ment as well. Praise Ca- thedral had its own team

represented, too. “We probably have about 250 people here today,” said Corey Lan- caster, who organized the softball tournament. “It’s just about people helping people.” Hamburgers, hot dogs, barbecue, and baked goods were sold to help raise more money, and T- shirts supporting the High family were sold as well. Thanks to the generous donations of Walmart in Greer, Geocker Enterprises (which owns some of the McDonald’s franchises), Goodwill, Coca-Cola, and Bi-Lo, 100 percent of the proceeds from the event will go directly to the High family.

The fundraising is not over for the High family. As Praise Cathedral hosts its annual Vacation Bible School this week, the kids will have the opportunity to show their support for them by donating money to the High Hopes cam- paign as well. “I have no idea how much has been raised [for us],” High said. “I just know that everything has been provided for.” For more information on helping the High family, visit the Facebook page, “High Hopes – Friends of Shannon High,” or donate at Greer State Bank, locat- ed at 1111 W. Poinsett St.

page, “High Hopes – Friends of Shannon High,” or donate at Greer State Bank, locat- ed

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

NEWS

THE GREER CITIZEN

A7

Rotary Club recognizes local students

For

scholastic

Mckinzie Anne Campbell Zachary Lee Kent Heather Claire Fitch Ross Klaudia Mathis Karlee Layne Gibson Kaitlyn Autumn Maynard Kelsey Amanda Gosnell Kelsey Kaye Maynard Joshua Warren Harvey Ashling Marie O’Boyle Sarah Elizabeth Livingston Triston Mark Sauvola Brady Michael O’Boyle Kaili Renee Sever Davis John Ross Jessica Reigh Smith Charlotte Anne Wilkerson Jakob Lee Su’a-Filo Jacob Lee Wilson Lindsey Kay Anderson Jacob Hunter Arms Adam Kerry Barnette Amy Catherine Barnette Cheyenne Nicole Brady Addisin Brook Callahan Amanda Kehler Bryant Campbell Turner Davenport Alleson Jean Lynn Isabel Marie Greene William Patrick Metcalf Samantha Faye Hartley Zane Odeh Sage Ameris Hill Brett Arthur Seppala Jacob Christopher Holland Devin Blair Stokes Anna Elizabeth Kemp Andrew Karl Wiren Daiya Christina Yann

GREER HIGH SCHOOL

Krishnua Briana Burnette Rebecca Nicole Burgess Olivia Marwan Fattah

Anna Elizabeth Davis Trevor Nathanyl Harris Casey Jo DeHaven Amanda Charity Kisby Bailey Elise Estes Caroline Jean Neely Christian Vincent Fernandes Kellen Pearl Rollins Graham Ellis Nall Kelsey Marie Roloson Zoe Elizabeth Nicholson Xiomara Torres Alexandria Taylor Rosenfeld Megan Raye Williams Julia Elizabeth Sudduth Victoria Halley Young Kellyn Leigh Taylor Kaillyn Amber Coleman Kaleb David Hood Hayley Wynn Cromer Candace Nicole Jensen Jesse Michael Franz Rebekah Marie Lee Jessica Lauren Greene Madeline Ruth Lewis James Kendrick Gibson Ryan Timothy McCullough Damarion Kristian Kellett Taylor Alexis McIntyre Natalie Lynn Minor Michaela Gabrielle Parker Elizabeth Hope Schneider Charlie Jean Prakit Grayson Wilson Sullivan Megan Michelle Stoxen Heather Brooke Wade Brantley Taylor Young

GREER MIDDLE COLLEGE

Annie May Brown Audrey Robyn Axmann Jeremiah Luke Buerer Tori Joy Bennett Amanda Nicole Hicklin

Enoch Daniel Carnahan Kendall Alexander Nicholson Meredith Anne Gentry Standish Lee Parker Holly Marie Houston Alexander Blue Poteat Rachel Ann Lawrence Olivia Mattea Ross Lauryn Christina Moore James Dylon Smith Erika Jean G. Peterson Katherine Jane Van Splinter Hannah Elizabeth Smith Jordan Lewis Walters Micah Seth Williams Nathan Styles Brannon Jacob Lawton Carter William Dennis Corbin Courtney Denise Caruthers Alyxandria Danielle Farkas Francisco Daniel Celis- Villagrana Daniel Thomas Hicklin Talia Grace Eshenbaugh Gabrielle Alexis Laserna Ruthellen Brooke Figueroa Kilian Reagan Meilinger Aleina Cathleen Griffin Lucas Anthony Peck Hannah Nicole Houston AnnaLeigh Springs Runion Ingrid Alison Maria Peterson Brittney Lee Sparrow Brianna Lane Poteat Caleb Austin Whitley Yusef Rasheed Robinson Byrnes High School Alyssa Torey Ballenger Shelby Megan Haas Alanna Maria Battistini Carley Amber Hall

Brandon Ronald Chamberland Deiontre Mickel Hill Hannah Elizabeth Cox Connor James Kinzie Victoria Jade Davies Patricia Elizabeth Lawson Jeremy Parker Davis Lea Louise Richter Lauren Elizabeth Duggar Ian Parker Williams Carson Leah-Marie Duthu Jesus Martin Barreto Rachel Elisabeth Owings William Christopher Blackwood Patrick Lane Ryals Zane Micaiah Burnett Bridwell Madison Kaila Schweikert Anna Grace Brockman Torry Austin Sheppard Jacob Elias Cashour Jacob Dean Turner Brittney Marie Haney Alayna Renee Wells Matthew Gene Hilley Michael James Whitehead Navpreet Kaur Michael Blake Chandler Allison Caleigh Kennedy Matthew Cam Compton Christopher YongWoon Shin Hunter Paul Corkren Emily Marie Simpson Harsahib Singh Dev Jessica Renee Spurling Rebecca Elizabeth Glenn Harry LeRoy Stathakis John Wesley Guthrie Austin Jacob Thomas Danika Shae Halvorsen Mikeala Claire Williams Haley Marie Jones

GREER FIRST BAPTIST VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

Highway 414, Landrum, is open on Thursdays from

SINGLES BIBLE STUDY

Greer First Baptist Church is holding “Agency D3” Vacation Bible School June 22-26, 6-8:30 p.m. The church is located at 202 W. Poinsett St. For more information, call 877-4253 or visit

ABNER CREEK HOSTING

2-4 p.m. The pantry is open to families in need of assistance. Photo ID is re- quired. For more informa- tion, call 895-1461.

PELHAM ROAD BAPTIST

greerfbc.org/vbs.

SIMULCAST

Pelham Road Baptist Church, 1108 Pelham Road, Greer, hosts a Sin- gles Bible Study each Sun-

Abner Creek Baptist Church will be hosting:

day from 6-8:30 p.m.

“THE WORD: CLOSER TO

GRIEFSHARE

HOME” with Beth Moore.

FAIRVIEW BAPTIST

The “Living Proof Live Si- mulcast” will take place Saturday, Sept. 13 from 9:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Tickets are $25 per per- son (including lunch) and are available online at ab- nercreekbaptist.com. The simulcast will be broadcast at 2461 Abner Creek Road, Greer.

Fairview Baptist Church, 1300 Locust Hill Road, Greer, will host Grief- Share, a support group led by Carol Allen, on the sec- ond Sunday of each month from 4:45 - 6:30 p.m. For more information,

RIVERSIDE HIGH SCHOOL

Nida Ansari Rahaf Yousef Al Sayed Taylor Lauren Brown Taylor Edward Bryson Mary Carol Butterfield Sarah Christine Byrd Megan Meiqi Fu John Delain Freeman Darby Sarah Howard Stephanie Dawn Hong Kristyn Aimee Robinson Jared Thane Laymon Bryce Coleman Safrit Dara Plamenova Lazarova Catherine Li Wei Samantha Anne Mullis Clarissa Celeste Westover Juliana-Marie Nelson Troyan Kerry Song Yan Margaret Emily Whiston Jessica Ramsey Boulos Jared Evan Boggs Rowan White Crowley Alyssa Ann Campanelli Makenna Laine Farr Juan Antonio Elizondo- Villasis Victoria Camren Glenn Neil Gramopadhye Ashleigh Elizabeth Godby Briana Leigh Parcell Yasmin Elaine Meyer Nicole Danielle Patterson Tiger Hanlin Mou Matthew Edward Robison Luke Nathaniel Stageberg Maegan Lee Rudolph Amy Elise Wortkoetter Anju Saxena Karen Raychi Zhao Lei Xu

achievement

The Rotary Club of Great- er Greer recently held its annual spring Scholastic Achievement Program in recognition of Byrnes High School’s top 15 academic students from each class at District Five’s Fine Arts Center. ROTC cadets distribut- ed the programs and the Brynes Orchestra, under the direction of Arlyn Baer, provided entertainment. Brian Forrester, President- elect of the Rotary Club, gave opening remarks and, Tom Faulkner, district gov- ernor and a member of the Greer Rotary Club, deliv- ered the State of Rotary. The evening’s speaker was Bryan Ramey, attor- ney with Bryan Ramey & Associates. Scholastic Achievement Honorees were announced by Erin Greenway, assistant prin- cipal, and presented with certificates by Dr. Jeffrey Rogers, principal. Victoria Jade Davies gave the stu- dent response. Recognized students are:

BLUE RIDGE HIGH SCHOOL

Emily Taylor Gullette

Drapier completes military training

Army National Guard Pfc. Matthew P. Drapier has graduated from basic infantry training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Geor- gia. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, mili- tary courtesy, military jus- tice, physical fitness, first aid,and Army history, core values and traditions.

Cancer society names director

Additional training in- cluded development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and experiencing use of various weapons and weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman. Drapier is the son of Nic- ola Hebert and nephew of Janine Riding, of Greer. He is a 2009 graduate of Blue Ridge High School.

The Cancer Society of Greenville County recently named Lisa Green its new executive director. After 33 years of service, Joyce Boyette, the current executive director, will re- tire in July. Under Boyette’s lead- ership, the Cancer Soci- ety of Greenville County grew from a small part- time agency with assets of $40,000, to a debt-free organization with cur- rent assets in excess of $3 million, and has provided life-sustaining services for more than a million cancer patients. “It was humbling and challenging to fill the shoes of an iconic leader like Joyce Boyette, who has done a phenomenal job of directing the Cancer Soci- ety of Greenville County for decades,” said Sam Konduros, chairman of the board of directors. “That said, we are confident that Lisa has the passion, talent, and in-depth experience to take the Cancer Society of Greenville County to the next level. Based on her ex- traordinary work ethic and demonstrated track record with the March of Dimes, our board is confident that we have found the right individual to successfully lead our organization into its next chapter of strate- gic growth.” Green comes to the Can- cer Society of Greenville County after serving with the March of Dimes for 15 years at the local, regional and state levels as an ex- ecutive director, and most recently, as statewide di- rector for the March for Babies. “Lisa has a passion for helping others and her servant’s heart will serve

her well as she meets the needs of thousands of local cancer patients and their families,” said Boyette, who actively participated on the search committee for her replacement. “It is an honor to be able to provide hope, support, and to improve the quality of life for those battling this disease right here in Greenville,” said Green. Green will fully transi- tion into the leadership role of the organization over the next 30 days, and Boyette will remain affili- ated with the agency on an emeritus basis.

CHURCH NEWS
CHURCH
NEWS

contact Carol Allen at 292-

6008.

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION TO CONSTRUCT CENTER

Three Rivers Baptist As- sociation will host a crew of 150 volunteers from Carpenters for Christ to begin construction on their new Mission Center. The association is asking churches to set aside time on Sunday, July 6, dur- ing their Sunday morning worship services to pray for the volunteers. They are also asking that congregations collect cases of water to donate to the volunteers. The goal is to collect 400 cases of wa- ter from all of the member churches. Water is due to the asso- ciation by Monday, July 7.

LEE ROAD BAPTIST TO HOST CONCERT

Lee Road Baptist Church will host TRADEMARK in concert Sunday, July 13 at 6 p.m. “These three men are allowing God to use them to challenge and encourage people in their walk with the Lord,” church officials say. Their musical style is similar to Phillips, Craig and Dean and includes hu- mor and a word from the Lord. Lee Road Baptist Church is located at 1503 East Lee Road, Taylors. For more in- formation call 244-4678.

BETHEL UNITED

APALACHE BAPTIST

METHODIST YARD SALE

SENIOR CALENDAR

Bethel United Methodist Church will hold a yard sale and car wash, and will also be selling hot dogs plates on Saturday, June 28 beginning at 7 a.m. Bethel United Methodist Church is located at 105 East Arlington Ave., Greer. Luggage will be for sale. For more information, call 879-2006.

GREER FIRST BAPTIST PATRIOTIC CELEBRATION

Greer First Baptist Church will host a patri- otic celebration service on Sunday, June 29. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. and a joint service will take place at 11 a.m. A barbecue lunch will follow.

On June 26 at 6 p.m. the “Golden Hearts” are going to Lake Bowen Fish Camp for the evening meal.

EBENEZER WELCOME OFFERING FREE FOOD

The Bread of Life Food Pantry at Ebenezer Wel- come Baptist Church, 4005

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A8 THE GREER CITIZEN

PAGE LABEL

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

And they were calling to one another: “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory.” - Isaiah 6:3

the whole earth is full of his glory.” - Isaiah 6:3 Worship With Us Grace United

Worship With Us

earth is full of his glory.” - Isaiah 6:3 Worship With Us Grace United Methodist 627

Grace United Methodist 627 Taylor Road • Greer

BAPTIST

Abner Creek Baptist Church

2461Abner Creek Rd., Greer • 877-6604

Airport Baptist Church

776 S. Batesville Rd., Greer • 848-7850

Apalache Baptist

1915 Gap Creek Rd., Greer • 877-6012

Bible Baptist Church

6645 Mountain View Rd., Taylors • 895-7003

Blue Ridge Baptist Church

3950 Pennington Rd., Greer • 895-5787

BridgePointe

600 Bridge Rd., Taylors • 244-2774

Burnsview Baptist Church

9690 Reidville Rd., Greer • 879-4006

Calvary Baptist

101 Calvary St., Greer • 877-9759

Calvary Baptist

108 Forest St., Greer • 968-0092

Calvary Hill Baptist

100 Edward Rd., Lyman

Calvary Road Baptist Church

108 Bright Rd., Greer • 593-2643

Camp Creek Baptist Church

1100 Camp Creek Rd., Taylors

Cedar Grove Baptist Church

109 Elmer St., Greer • 877-6216

Community Baptist Church

642 S. Suber Rd., Greer • 848-3500

Double Springs Baptist Church

3800 Locust Hill Rd., Taylors • 895-1314

Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church

4005 Highway 414, Landrum • 895-1461

El Bethel Baptist Church

313 Jones Ave., Greer • 877-4021

Emmanuel Baptist Church

423 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer • 877-2121

Enoree Fork Baptist Church

100 Enoree Dr., Greer • 268-4385

Fairview Baptist Church

1300 Locust Hill Rd., Greer • 877-1881

First Baptist Church

202 W. Poinsett St., Greer • 877-4253

FreedomFellowship Greer High • 877-3604

Friendship Baptist Church

1600 Holly Springs Rd., Lyman • 877-4746

Good News Baptist Church

1592 S. Highway 14, Greer • 879-2289

Grace Baptist Church

760 W. Gap Creek Rd., Greer • 879-3519

Grace Place

407 Ridgewood Dr., Greer • 877-7724

Greer Freewill Baptist Church

110 Pine Ridge Dr., Greer • 968-0310

Heritage Chapel Baptist Church

218Alexander Rd., Greer • 989-0170

Highland Baptist Church

3270 Hwy. 414, Taylors • 895-5270

Hillcrest Baptist Church

111 Biblebrook Dr., Greer • 877-4206

Hispanic Baptist Iglesia Bautista Hispana

199 Hubert St., Greer • 877-3899

Holly Springs Baptist Church

250 Hannon Rd., Inman • 877-6765

Locust Hill Baptist Church

5534 Locust Hill Rd., Travelers Rest • 895-1771

Maple Creek Baptist Church

609 S. Main St., Greer • 877-1791

Milford Baptist Church

1282 Milford Church Rd., Greer • 895-5533

Mount Lebanon Baptist Church

572 Mt. Lebanon Church Rd., Greer • 895-2334

New Hope Baptist Church

561 Gilliam Rd., Greer • 879-7080

New JerusalemBaptist Church

413 E. Poinsett St., Greer • 968-9203

New Life Baptist Church

90 Becco Rd., Greer • 895-3224

Northwood Baptist Church

888Ansel School Rd., Greer • 877-5417

O’Neal Baptist Church

3420 N. Highway 101, Greer • 895-0930

PelhamFirst Baptist Church

2720 S. Old Highway 14, Greer • 879-4032

People’s Baptist Church

310 Victor Avenue Ext., Greer • 848-0449

Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church

201 Jordan Rd., Lyman • 879-2646

Pleasant Grove Baptist Church

1002 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer • 877-6436

Pleasant Hill Baptist Church

4899 Jordan Rd., Greer • 895-3546

Providence Baptist Church

2020 Gibbs Shoals Rd., Greer • 877-3483

Rebirth Missionary Baptist Church

2375 Racing Road, Greer • 877-0449

Riverside Baptist Church

1249 S. Suber Rd., Greer • 879-4400

Second Baptist Church

570 Memorial Drive Ext., Greer • 877-7061

Southside Baptist Church

410 S. Main St., Greer • 877-2672

St. John’s Baptist Church

2 Groveland Rd., Taylors • 879-2904

Suber Road Baptist Church

445 S. Suber Rd., Greer • 801-0181

Taylors First Baptist Church

200 W. Main St., Taylors • 244-3535

United Family Ministries

13465 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer • 877-3235

Victor Baptist

121 New Woodruff Rd., Greer • 877-9686

Washington Baptist Church

3500 N. Highway 14, Greer • 895-1510

Welcome Home Baptist Church

1779 Pleasant Hill Rd., Greer • 901-7674

CATHOLIC

Blessed Trinity Catholic Church

901 River Rd., Greer • 879-4225

CHURCH OF CHRIST

Riverside Church of Christ

2103 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer • 322-6847

CHURCH OF GOD

Church of God - Greer

500 Trade St., Greer • 877-0374

Church of God of Prophecy

2416 N. Highway 14, Greer • 877-8329

Eastside Worship Center

601 Taylors Rd., Taylors • 268-0523

O’Neal Church of God

3794 Berry Mill Rd., Greer • 895-4273

Pelham Church of God of Prophecy

139Abner Creek Rd., Greer • 801-0528

Praise Cathedral Church of God

3390 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer • 879-4878

EPISCOPAL

Good Shepherd Episcopal

200 Cannon St., Greer • 877-2330

LUTHERAN

Abiding Peace Ev. Lutheran Church

401 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville •288-4867

Apostolic Lutheran Church

453 N. Rutherford Rd., Greer • 848-4568

Immanuel Lutheran Church &School LCMS

2820 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville • 297-5815

Redeemer Lutheran Church, ELCA

300 Oneal Rd., Greer • 877-5876

METHODIST

Bethel United Methodist Church

105 E. Arlington Ave., Greer • 879-2066

Covenant United Methodist Church

1310 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer • 244-3162

Ebenezer United Methodist Church

174 Ebenezer Road, Greer • 987-9644

Faith United Methodist Church

1301 S. Main St. (S. Hwy. 14), Greer • 877-0308

Fews Chapel United Methodist Church

4000 N. Highway 101, Greer • 895-2522

Grace United Methodist Church

627 Taylor Rd., Greer • 877-7015

Lee Road United Methodist Church

1377 East Lee Rd., Taylors • 244-6427

Liberty Hill United Methodist Church

301 Liberty Hill Rd., Greer • 968-8150

Liberty United Methodist Church

4276 Highway 414, Landrum • 292-0142

Memorial United Methodist Church

201 N. Main St., Greer • 877-0956

Mountain View UMC

6525 Mountain View Rd., Taylors • 895-8532

Sharon United Methodist Church

1421 Reidville Sharon Rd., Greer • 879-7926

St. Mark United Methodist Church

911 St. Mark Rd., Taylors • 848-7141

St. Paul United Methodist Church

3856 N. Highway 101, Greer • 895-5570

Victor United Methodist Church

1 WilsonAve., Greer • 877-5520

Woods Chapel United Methodist Church

2388 Brown Wood Rd., Greer • 879-4475

Zoar United Methodist Church

1005 Highway 357, Greer • 877-0758

PRESBYTERIAN

Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church

2094 Highway 101 North, Greer • 483-2140

Devenger Road Presbyterian Church

1200 Devenger Rd., Greer • 268-7652

Fellowship Presbyterian Church

1105 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer • 877-3267

First Presbyterian Church

100 School St., Greer • 877-3612

Fulton Presbyterian Church

821Abner Creek Rd., Greer • 879-3190

OTHER DENOMINATIONS

Agape House

900 Gap Creek Rd., Greer • 329-7491

Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr

427 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville • 281-0015

Barton’s Memorial Pentacostal Holiness

Highway 101 North, Greer

Bethesda Temple

125 Broadus St., Greer • 877-8523

Beulah Christian Fellowship Church

1017 Mauldin Rd., Greenville • 283-0639

Calvary Bible Fellowship

Holiday Inn, Duncan • 266-4269

Calvary Chapel of Greer

104 New Woodruff Rd. • Greer • 877-8090

Christ Fellowship

343 Hampton Rd., Greer • 879-8446

Christian Heritage Church

900 N. Main St., Greer • 877-2288

Christian Life Center 2CountryPlaza• 322-1325 Christian Outreach 106 West Rd. • 848-0308

El-Bethel Holiness 103 E. Church St. • 968-9474

Faith Family Church

3339 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors • 244-0207

Faith Temple

5080 Sandy Flat Rd., Taylors • 895-2524

Glad Tidings Assembly of God

Highway 290, Greer • 879-3291 Greer Mill Church 52 Bobo St., Greer • 877-2442

Harmony Fellowship Church

468 S. Suber Rd., Greer • 877-8287

Harvest Christian Church

2150 Highway 417, Woodruff • 486-8877

International Cathedral of Prayer

100 Davis Avenue • Greer • 655-0009

Lifesong Church

12481 Greenville Highway, Lyman • 439-2602

Living Way Community Church

3239 N. Highway 101, Greer • 895-0544

Mountain Bridge Community Church

1400B Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer • 350-1051

New Beginnings Outreach

104 New Woodruff Rd., Greer • 968-2424

New Birth Greenville

3315 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer • 848-2728

New Covenant Fellowship

2425 Racing Rd., Greer • 848-4521

New Hope Freedom

109 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. • Greer • 205-8816

New Life in Christ 210 Arlington Rd. • 346-9053

Point of Life Church

Wade Hampton Blvd. • Duncan • 426-4933

Springwell Church

4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors • 268-2299

Trinity Fellowship Church

3610

Brushy Creek Rd., Greer • 877-0419

1700

N. Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville • 244-6011

United Anglican Fellowship

1001 W. Poinsett St., Greer • 629-3350

United Christian Church

105 Daniel Ave., Greer • 895-3966

United House of Prayer

213 Oak St., Greer • 848-0727

Upstate Friends’ Meeting (Quaker)

39 Hillcrest St., Lyman • 877-9392

Upstate Tree of Life

203 East Bearden St., Greer • 848-1295

Victorian Hills Community Church

209 Victor Ave. Ext., Greer • 877-3981

Vine Worship Center

4373 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors • 244-8175

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

The Greer Citizen

POLICE AND FIRE

THE GREER CITIZEN

A9

Lyman man charged with attempted murder

After

stabbing

wife and

fleeing

BY PHIL BUCHHEIT STAFF WRITER

A Lyman man is in the Spartanburg County Jail after turning himself in on Sunday for a Friday morn- ing stabbing that led Spar- tanburg County Deputies on a manhunt. Christopher Allen Mid- dleton, 43, of 308 Lilly Lane, Lyman, has been charged with attempted murder and possession of a weapon during a violent crime. According to The Spar- tanburg County Sheriff’s

crime. According to The Spar- tanburg County Sheriff’s PHIL BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN Investigators with

PHIL BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN

Investigators with the Spartanburg County Sheri ’s O ce process the scene of a stabbing that occurred Friday morning on Lilly Lane in Lyman that led to a manhunt.

Office, a deputy respond- ed to 308 Lilly Lane Friday morning in reference to a welfare check on a wom- an, who had missed her doctor’s appointment. As

the deputy was arriving on scene he learned the

call had been upgraded to

a stabbing. Upon deputies

arrival they found a female victim inside the residence

who had suffered stab wounds in the shoulder, chest, stomach and hand.

The victim was air lifted to Spartanburg Regional for treatment of her injuries.

to Spartanburg Regional for treatment of her injuries. Christopher A. Middleton Deputies spoke to fam- ily

Christopher A. Middleton

Deputies spoke to fam- ily members of the victim, who had gotten to the residence before police did, and learned the fam- ily members came to the residence that morning to check on the victim be- cause she had been in an argument with Middleton the previous night and had missed a doctor’s appoint-

ment that morning. The

victim’s sister told police that when she knocked on the door nobody an- swered, but she could here her sister moaning in pain inside the residence. At this point, the vic- tim’s sister began beating harder on the door before

it was finally answered by

Middleton (the victim’s husband), who was cov- ered in blood and had a knife in his hand. When Middleton realized the vic-

tim’s father was also there, he fled into the woods on foot. The Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office used track- ing dogs and a helicopter for several hours to search

a large wooded area near

Lilly Lane and Montgom- ery Road, but were unable to locate Middleton, who turned himself in to au- thorities Sunday morning. No bond has been set for Middleton.

Greer PD requests help identifying thieves

The Greer Police Depart- ment is asking the public

for its help in identifying two white male subjects wanted for burglary and copper theft. The subjects were cap- tured on a surveillance camera last Thursday and were spotted by an offi- cer on the loading dock of an abandoned building in Greer. There is a $500 reward

to anyone providing infor-

mation that leads to the

identification and arrest

of these two subjects. Peo-

ple with information are asked to contact Lt. Press- ley at 848-2188 or epress- ley@cityofgreer.org.

Lt. Press- ley at 848-2188 or epress- ley@cityofgreer.org. 16-years-old and are also being charged with arson
Lt. Press- ley at 848-2188 or epress- ley@cityofgreer.org. 16-years-old and are also being charged with arson

16-years-old and are also being charged with arson from a May 3 fire of a va- cant home, located at 141 Beechwood Drive, Greer.

|

CRIME REPORT

(Note: All information contained in the following blotter was taken directly from the official incident

reports filed by the Greer Police Department or The Spartanburg County Sher- iff’s Office or The Green- ville County Sheriff’s Of- fice. All suspects are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in the court of law.)

POSSESSION

Caleb Daryl Bright, 17, of 2546 Holiday Road, Greer, has been charged with simple possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and speeding. According to incident reports, an officer was

conducting radar on High- way 29 when he observed

was conducting radar on High- way 29 when he observed PHOTO | SUBMITTED Greer police are

PHOTO | SUBMITTED

Greer police are asking for help in indentifying two white males that are wanted for burglary and copper theft.

reports an officer was on routine patrol when he observed a white Dodge Neon on N. Main Street

had Thang step out of

the vehicle and detected

a strong odor of alcohol

coming from his person.

of drug paraphernalia and has a warrant pending for possession of meth with the intent to distribute. Martha Michelle Gasper, 33, of 152 Shivers Lane, Liberty, has been charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. According to incident reports, an officer was in the parking lot of the dol- lar store on Highway 101 when he observed several people exit the store and get into a car. He observed another male subject be- gin walking away from the car before finally returning and getting into the back-

seat of the vehicle. The car then left the store and the officer followed it. When the vehicle crossed over the center lane, the officer initiated a traffic stop. When the car pulled over, the officer observed

a person in the back seat

(Smith) moving around the back cabin of the vehicle as if he was trying to hide something. Upon approaching the

vehicle, the officer learned the car belonged to a fam-

 

a

burgundy Honda Accord

with a cracked windshield

A

series of field sobriety

ily member of Smith. Sus-

MULTIPLE CHARGES

Zachary Ray Brewton,

Walter Davis

traveling 61 mph in a 45 mph zone. The officer

and a faulty brake light. The officer initiated a traf-

tests were given to Thang that he failed.

picious of possible drug activity, the officer asked

GREER MAN CHARGED WITH CRIMINAL SEXUAL CONDUCT WITH A MINOR

An investigation that be- gan last month has led to the arrest of a Greer man for his role in sexually

initiated a traffic stop on the vehicle and its driver (Bright). Upon approaching the vehicle, the officer imme- diately detected a smell of marijuana coming from the vehicle and observed

fic stop on the vehicle and its driver (Rainey). The of- ficer then learned the tag on the vehicle belonged to an older model Dodge Neon (2001). The officer checked both Rainey and the passenger

He was arrested and transported to the Greer City Jail where he was unable to provide a data sample on a breathalyzer due to a malfunctioning machine.

Smith for consent to search the vehicle. Smith gave the officer consent to search the vehicle and the search yielded an opera- tional scale, a pipe used for smoking meth, and meth.

abusing two victims, ages

a

glass pipe on the floor-

for warrants and learned

DUS

SHOPLIFTING

Smith told the officer

11 and 13. Walter Dwayne Davis, 37, of 1271 Brock- man-McClimon Road, Greer, has been charged with two counts of second degree criminal sexual conduct with a minor. According to The Spar- tanburg County Sheriff’s

board. Bright was placed into investigative detention and a search of the vehicle yielded a metal grinder and some green leafy sub- stance believed to be mari- juana. Bright was arrested and transported to the Greer City jail.

that Rainey had an active warrant with the Duncan Police Department for aid- ing and abetting. He was placed under arrest and picked up by the Duncan Police Depart- ment.

Katherine Elizabeth Ed- wards, 21, of 604 W Ferrell Drive, Woodruff, has been charged with shoplifting. According to incident reports, an officer was dispatched to Walmart on E. Wade Hampton in refer- ence to a shoplifter in cus- tody.

all the meth found be- longed to him. A needle was also located inside a purse in the front seat of the vehicle. Gasper said it belonged to her. Smith in- formed the officer he had half a gram of meth inside his shoe. The total weight of meth obtained from the

Office, an investigation be- gan on May 14 when two victims alleged Davis had

SHOPLIFTING

Marisol Jeanette San- chez, 25, of 318 New

Upon arrival, the officer met with the complainant

vehicle and Smith’s person was 1.9 grams.

sexually abused them. Both victims were re- ferred to the Children’s Advocacy Center for fo- rensic interviews and provided detailed disclo- sures against Davis. The investigator of the case presented her findings to

Tiffany Elizabeth Reyes, 37, of 121 Chapel Road, Greer, has been charged with shoplifting. Sandy Faye Cox, 37, of 118 Broad St., Wellford, has been charged with shoplifting and misrepresenting iden- tification to law enforce-

Woodruff Road 17C, Greer, has been charged with driving under suspension (third), faulty equipment and not in possession of registration. According to incident reports, an officer was on routine patrol when he ob-

who stated the subject (Ed- wards) came into the store and selected several items and then placed them into her pocketbook before exiting the store without paying. Edwards was arrested and transported to the

Gasper and Smith were transported to the Greer City Jail.

21, of 107 W. Celestial Drive, Greer, has been charged with shoplifting

a

issued two warrants for

magistrate judge, who

tion, located in Enoree. He

ment. According to incident

served a Ford Focus travel- ing on S. Line Street with

Greer City Jail.

and public intoxication. David T. Center, 25, of

Davis’ arrest.

reports, an officer was

a

faulty brake light. The

ASSAULT AND BATTERY

4105 Brushy Creek Road,

Davis was arrested Monday evening without incident at his place of employment, The Tyger River Correctional Institu-

dispatched to Walmart on E. Wade Hampton in refer- ence to a shoplifting call. Upon arrival, the officer met with the complainant who stated two females

officer initiated a traffic stop on the vehicle and its driver (Sanchez). Sanchez informed the officer she did not have her driver’s license or

Walter Scott Williams, 57, of 100 Old Woodruff Road B, Greer, has been charged with assault and battery (third). According to incident re-

reference to a report of an

a

one-inch laceration to

Greer, has been charged with public intoxication, shoplifting and inhaling hydrocarbons. According to incident re- ports, officers responded

is

currently being held in

came into the store and

registration. The officer

ports, an officer respond-

to Walmart in reference to

The Spartanburg County Detention Center.

FIVE CHARGED

selected various items and then placed them into a large purse before exiting the store without paying.

then learned Sanchez was driving under suspension (third). She was arrested and

ed to the above address in

assault. Upon arrival, the officer

two subjects passed out in the restroom. Upon arrival, the officer met with the complain-

WITH ARSON

The officer then met

transported to the Greer

spoke with both the victim

ant, who stated he found

 

The Greenville County

with the two subjects

City Jail.

and Williams. The victim

Sheriff’s Office has arrest- ed five people in connec- tion with a May 4 fire that burned down a mansion, located at 3705 Locust Hill Road, Taylors, that many

(Reyes and Cox), who were in the loss prevention of- fice. Cox provided the offi- cer with a false name. Both subjects were arrested and transported to the Greer

DUI

Sui Ling Thang, 33, of 3800 E. North St. 31, Green- ville, has been charged with DUI.

told the officer he and Williams got into an argu- ment and Williams struck him in the head with a cof- fee mug. Williams admitted to

the two subjects (Brewton and Center) passed out in

handicap stall of a re- stroom. When an officer

a

in

the area have over the

City Jail where they were

According to incident

striking the victim in the

years referred to as “The Castle.”

placed on trespass notice for all Walmart stores.

reports, an officer was on routine patrol when she

head. The victim suffered

Dakota James Lampin- en, Cole Andrew Holombo

AIDING AND ABETTING

observed a Toyota Corolla traveling on the wrong

the head. Williams was ar- rested and transported to

POSSESSION

and Darrien Milo-Troy Kinnunen have all been charged with third degree

Jonathan Christopher Rainey, 22, of 111 Snow St., Greer, has been charged

side of the road, which nearly struck another ve- hicle head on.

the Greer City Jail.

arson and first degree bur- glary. The other two charged

with aiding and abetting, improper tag and faulty equipment.

The officer initiated a traffic stop on the vehicle and its driver (Thang).

Gregory Richard Smith, 28, of 19 Lester Ave., Greenville, has been

in

the incident are 15 and

According to incident

The officer immediately

charged with possession

went into the restroom he observed Brewton and Center attempting to flush an air duster spray can down the toilet. Officers learned the two subjects obtained the duster spray can off the shelf at the Walmart and then entered the restroom, where at least one of the men in- haled the hydrocarbons. Both subjects were ar- rested and transported to the Greer City Jail.

RECKLESS DRIVING

Aljaquan Tyquez Wil- liams, 17, of 212 Oakland Ave. 138, Greer, has been charged with failure to

stop for a blue light, inter- fering with police, reckless driving and no state driv- er’s license. According to incident re- ports, a general emergency broadcast was sent out in

reference to two vehicles involved in a road rage in- cident with a gun. Dispatch advised that both vehicles involved (a black range Rover and a blue Ford se- dan) were heading toward the City of Greer near the intersection of Highway 14 and McCall Street. An officer observed the black Range Rover turn onto McCall Street and ac- tivated his blue lights. As the officer was attempting to pull the Range Rover over, the blue Ford turned onto McCall Street at a high rate of speed. The driver of the Ford (Williams) then accelerated to a high rate of speed and passed the Range Rover on the wrong side of the road. The driver of the Range Rover immediately pulled over and the officer began pursuing the blue Ford, which ran through a stop sign before jumping a curb

in a nearby church parking

lot. The driver (Williams) then jumped out of the vehicle while it was still moving and fled on foot toward Lake Avenue. Sev- eral officers began looking for Williams and he was eventually spotted and apprehended in a fenced area of the power plant. The driver of the Range Rover told officers some- one in the blue Ford point- ed a BB gun at her vehicle and pretended to shoot at the vehicle. Through speaking with other of- ficers and the parties in- volved, police concluded the incident stemmed from friends that were just messing around and the portion of the incident which included the point- ing of a BB gun occurred on I-385. Williams was arrested

and transported to the Greer City Jail.

a10 the greer citizen

news

wednesday, june 25, 2014

a10 the greer citizen news wednesday, june 25, 2014 PreSton Burch | the Greer citizen Burn

PreSton Burch | the Greer citizen

Burn prevention

Lola San sprays sunscreen on her daughter Eleni during a day at Thornblade pool. Eleni San competes in the SAIL swimming league each Thursday.

HUD provides $400,000 for homeless in S.C.

In second round of grants

U.S. Housing and Ur- ban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan recently announced a sec- ond round of grants total- ing $442,897 for six local homeless assistance pro- grams in South Carolina. Provided through HUD’s Continuum of Care Program, the funding will ensure additional per- manent and transitional housing renewal projects are able to continue oper- ating in the coming year,

providing housing and support services to those experiencing homeless- ness. “Communities all across the country are changing their approach to reduc- ing homelessness and now is not the time to re- treat from doing what we know works,” said Dono- van. “Investing in proven strategies such as ‘Rapid Re-housing’ and ‘Housing First’ help to break the cycle of homelessness as we’ve known it in these communities.” This year, local planning agencies called ‘Contin- uums of Care’ were asked to make strategic and hard decisions in order to implement a required five percent cut as a result of

sequestration. While HUD was able to fund all eligi- ble new permanent hous- ing projects requested, the Department was only able to fund permanent housing and transitional housing renewal projects requested in this second round of grants (Tier 2). Despite these cuts, most local planners chose to re- allocate funds from lower priorities in order to cre- ate projects following best-practice models that serve those homeless per- sons most in need. Earlier this year, HUD awarded $1.6 billion in the first round of funding to more than 7,100 existing local homeless programs operating across the U.S.

Sewer fees set to increase in Taylors

By Katie Jones Staff Writer

Taylors sewer users will see a slight user fee increase on their tax no- tices. The Taylors Fire and Sewer District voted unanimously to approve the 2015 budget, which includes minor increases

in both the sewer user fee

and millage rate. For residents, it means $30 on their tax notices,

an increase of $10. Busi- ness and commercial us- ers will pay $100 instead

of $50.

It will mean an addi- tional $117,000 for the district. Churches with activities, like daycares, will see an increase of $50, but it will yield less than $1,000 for the district. The increases will cover the current debt payments and the “Mill Hill” project, in which the sewer lines will eventually be moved into the public right of way instead of under or

‘This has been a good year. We’ve had some past years where we’ve really wondered if we were going to get through the year with the budget.’

behind houses, where they currently reside. The district plans for a “normal” year. “We don’t know what the future holds. We’re work- ing with what we’ve expe- rienced in the past years,” Commissioner Doug Wavle said. “This has been a good year. We’ve had some past years where we’ve really wondered if we were go- ing to get through the year with the budget. Personnel is the district’s largest expense at a little more than $4.2 million. That expense is increas- ing about 13 percent, due to additional employees,

Ben stoner

cPa, a.t. Locke

raises and rising cost of insurance, said Ben Stoner, a CPA with A. T. Locke. “This is a service dis- trict,” Stoner said. “We provide services, so obvi- ously the cost of people is our biggest cost.” The fire and sewer de- partments have separate millage rates. Overall, the district will have a net millage increase of 0.9 A taxpayer with a $100,000 owner-occupied home will pay an additional $3.60. No one spoke in favor or opposition of the budget.

Greer’s Waite earns CFP

Greer’s Aimee Waite, Investment Management Consultant at The Faust- Boyer Group of Raymond James, has earned the CFP (Certified Financial Plan-

ner) certification from the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards. One

of

the highest profession-

al

certifications in the fi-

nancial planning field, the CFP certification is only achieved by meeting strict education, examination, experience, and ethics re- quirements. Waite joined The Faust-Boyer Group in 2009 and has worked as

a financial advisor since

2007.

“Earning this certifica- tion is both a significant professional milestone and a testament to the val-

ue Aimee places on serv- ing her clients,” said Lynn Faust, senior vice presi- dent of investments with the Faust-Boyer Group. “We are extremely proud of her dedication and commitment in achieving this goal.”

The Faust-Boyer Group

of Raymond James spe- cializes in high net-worth financial planning, execu- tive financial planning, generational planning, retirement planning and investing for women. With more than 100 years of combined experience, The

Faust-Boyer Group utilizes a team approach to help their clients create a per- sonalized masterpiece of financial independence. The CFP marks iden-

tify those individuals who have met the rigorous experience and ethical requirements of the CFP Board, have successfully completed financial plan- ning coursework and have passed the CFP Certifica- tion Examination covering the following areas: the fi- nancial planning process, risk management, invest- ments, tax planning and management, retirement and employee benefits, and estate planning. CFP professionals also agree to meet ongoing con- tinuing education require- ments and to uphold CFP Board’s Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibil- ity, Rules of Conduct and Financial Planning Practice Standards.

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

SPORTS

The Greer Citizen

77

on

BYRNES

Rebels win NC State tourney

BY BILLY CANNADA SPORTS EDITOR

The Byrnes football team continued its summer suc- cess last weekend, win- ning a 7-on-7 tournament at North Carolina State University.

‘O ensively and

defensively, I thought we played well. It was a good experience.’

Brian Lane

Byrnes head coach

The Rebels picked up their first tournament vic- tory of the season earlier this month at Auburn Uni- versity. Byrnes was undefeated in the recent tournament finishing 7-0 overall. “It went well,” head coach Brian Lane said. “I thought we saw good competition. It’s a time to get out there and get reps and see what your guys have got. Of- fensively and defensively, I thought we played well. It was a good experience. There were some good teams there. Anytime you see good teams, you see good competition.” Teams were represented from North and South Car- olina, as well as Virginia. SEE BYRNES | B4

South Car- olina, as well as Virginia. SEE BYRNES | B4 MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Riverside picked up ve 7-on-7 victories last Friday at a tournament at the J.B. “Red” Owens Complex in Easley. Head coach Phil Smith said he has seen some positive things from his squad this o season.

RIVERSIDE

Warriors showing improvement

BY BILLY CANNADA SPORTS EDITOR

Riverside football coach Phil Smith said he was pleased with his team’s showing at a 7-on-7 tournament at Easley High School last Friday. The Warriors walked away with five wins and Smith said his team will use that as momentum as they continue summer workouts. “We lost the first two,” Smith said. “We made some mistakes, which is what you expect at your first one. We took on Greenville and had some success, which lit a fire under our guys a little bit. We scored a touch- down in the last minute of the game and ended up winning it. The kids played hard and it was fun to see their excitement.”

The Warriors avoided injuries, which Smith said was the most im- portant thing. “Overall, we went 4-3 in pool play and we ended 5-4,” he said. “To come out of there with a winning record was good. We didn’t get anybody hurt and we were able to get seven straight games in. It was a testament to our strength and conditioning coach, preparing them for that heat and getting them to go that long.” Smith said he saw some areas where his team could improve be- fore hosting Southside in a 7-on-7 this week. “We made a ton of mistakes de- fensively and it could have made the difference in a game or two,” Smith said. “It’s good to make those mistakes now and learn from them

‘The kids played hard and it was fun to see their excitement.’

Phil Smith

Riverside head coach

and correct them before the season starts. Hopefully we’ll continue to improve.” With some changes implemented over the offseason, the Warriors are still finding ways to work together. “It’s still a learning curve with the offense we’re putting in,” Smith said. “Really, this is an opportunity to see SEE RIVERSIDE | B4

this is an opportunity to see SEE RIVERSIDE | B4 MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
this is an opportunity to see SEE RIVERSIDE | B4 MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

The 2014 Yellow Jackets got valuable practice time in at a Fellowship of Christian Athletes 7-on-7 tournament at Greer High, said head coach Will Young.

GREER

Jackets show skills in annual FCA tournament

BY BILLY CANNADA SPORTS EDITOR

Area football teams showcased their talent last Friday at Greer’s an- nual FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes) 7-on-7 tournament. Yellow Jacket coach Will Young said his guys used the day to get better and work on several key areas. “I thought our guys per- formed well,” Young said. “There were a lot of teams, so we got a lot of good reps in. We didn’t get too hot. I thought everyone competed really well. For our first one, I thought we did alright.” For Young and his team, time and score did not matter. “It’s one of those tour- naments without the score being kept,” he said. “The big thing is to work on our throwing and catch- ing and all that stuff. We’ll know more this Thursday at Spartanburg because they will keep score and

‘We made some

plays, got some interceptions. It was just a really good practice for us.’

Will Young

Greer head coach

have officials and all that. We made some plays, got some interceptions. It was just a really good practice for us.” The head coach said he saw some nice things from his backup quarterback. “Our backup quarter- back, Brice Green, played really well,” Young said. “Xavier Wright played re- ally well at receiver for us. Those are the ones, com- ing away, who felt pretty good. We were pretty im- pressed with them.” SEE GREER | B4

B

BLAME CANNADA BILLY CANNADA
BLAME
CANNADA
BILLY
CANNADA

Pucker up, sis

I think I speak for the en-

tire country when I say,

“What was that?’

I imagine very few things in life are as dis- satisfying as the way Sun- day’s World Cup match between the United States and Portugal ended. High-fives had already been exchanged, the bus was warming up and a very deserving U.S. men’s national team was on its way out of the “group of death.” That pesky Ronaldo. One of the world’s best had blown chance after chance during the prior 94 minutes of play. All it took was one last oppor- tunity, however. With time dwindling, the superstar striker delivered a cross only he could have placed so perfectly, setting up a goal with 20 seconds left and ending the match in a 2-2 draw. A tie. This is something I’m sure Americans struggle with. We don’t do ties. There’s always a winner and a loser. You don’t invest 90 minutes of your time into a gut-wrenching game without a payoff. There’s always overtime. There’s always a last second go-ahead point that makes all right with the world again. For bet- ter or for worse, there’s always something there to keep you from—as the old expression goes—kissing your sister. I’ve got a major prob- lem with the format of group play in the world cup. I get that draws are a part of soccer, but I don’t think they should exist when stakes are that high. We had been giving Portugal all it could handle all night, creat- ing one opportunity after another. Given an extra 15 minutes, I think we could have come out on top. Instead, a draw and a ton of uncertainty is what Americans are stuck with. What happens now? If we beat or tie Germany, obviously there’s nothing to worry about. But, after that, it gets confusing. Portugal’s last-second goal did more than just frustrate the U.S., it kept

every team in the group alive. In what seems to be an endless list of scenar- ios, one thing is certain. Thursday’s match against the Germans is going to be one of the most impor- tant games we’ve been a part of. With both teams sitting on four points in the group, there’s the obvious option of just kicking the ball around for 90 min- utes (which would result in both teams advancing). As intriguing as that idea is for American soccer fans, I doubt Germany will see the same way. They’re going to want to beat us, even if a tie gets them through to the next round. We should want to beat them as well. I don’t think anybody saw this World Cup run coming from the United States. We weren’t given much of a shot when the groups were announced. We weren’t given much of a shot when Landon Donovan was left off the roster. We didn’t really have a chance against Portugal after losing Jozy Altidore in the opening match against Ghana. But, it’s time to face it. The U.S. is good. Germany might be favored to win the whole cup, but I believe that we will win on Thursday. We’ve all got to believe.

b2 the greer citizen

b2 the greer citizen FilE photo | thE GrEEr CitizEn Looking to dish out some hard

FilE photo | thE GrEEr CitizEn

Looking to dish out some hard hits in his senior season, Blue Ridge linebacker Eric Diaz said he is ready to lead the defense.

Diaz to anchor young defense

By Billy Cannada SportS Editor

As one of the few return- ing starters on the Blue Ridge football defense, Eric Diaz knows he is go- ing to have to step up and lead. The senior linebacker said his team has managed

to fill in holes so far this offseason, and expects nothing less heading into the fall. “I think it’s going well so far. We’ve got some new guys and new faces, but

I feel like we’re working

hard as a team on Mondays and on our conditioning days,” Diaz said. “When we practice for 7-on-7s, I feel like everybody is pick- ing up the routes and the plays. Our new coaches are getting the hang of things around here.” The team will be depend- ing on underclassmen to create opportunities. “We have a lot of juniors coming in for replace- ments on the d-line and the linebacker core,” he said. “We lost six out of our front seven that were here last year. I feel like they’ll fit in pretty good. I’m confident in them.” Diaz hopes to keep the linebackers engaged and focused on and off the field. “I feel like a big part of our defense is going to be getting the lineback- ers focused and getting the plays in,” he said. “We have to know what every- body else is doing on the field, including us. We

‘We have to know

what everybody else is doing on the field, including us. We have to be quarterbacks of the defense.’

Eric Diaz

senior linebacker

have to be quarterbacks of the defense.” Diaz said his role on the field will increase tremen- dously this fall. “I feel like my role is pretty big, especially be- cause we lost a lot of coaches,” he said. “I’m the only returning starter in our front seven, so I feel like I have a big role com- ing up. I know I will have to make key decisions and just be a leader out here and just give it all every- day.” Blue Ridge will begin competing in 7-on-7 tour- naments in July. “We have a lot of compe- tition this year,” Diaz said. “I think we’ll see some new competition that we haven’t played before in 7-on-7. I feel like we’ll do really well.”

sports

wednesday, June 25, 2014

Tiger receiver shows leadership

By Billy Cannada SportS Editor

Rising Blue Ridge senior Tay Jenkins knows this season is going to require some tough adjustments. Aside from several coaching changes, the se- nior receiver is learning to adjust to his new role as an offensive leader. “I think I can help bring experience,” Jenkins said. “We have a whole lot of new guys, especially with a sophomore quarterback. This is his first year on varsity basically. Instead of being down on guys, you just have to uplift them.” Despite changes in the program, Jenkins said he and his teammates are putting in solid work this summer. “We lost a lot of coaches, but I have a good connec- tion with coach (Shane) Clark,” he said. “We’re on the same page with a lot of stuff. If he sees something that I don’t see, we’re able to communicate on the field. I think that helps our offense feel a lot better.” The team is working out multiple times each week. “We’re working three days a week right now,” Jenkins said. “Mondays are more of our condi- tioning days, but we’re in the weight room all three days. We’re just getting stronger. I think it’s help- ing us and I think we will see it when we get into competition.” Jenkins will be catching passes from a different quarterback this season with the departure of Ty

a different quarterback this season with the departure of Ty FilE photo | thE GrEEr CitizEn

FilE photo | thE GrEEr CitizEn

Blue Ridge speedster Tay Jenkins is adjusting to a new offense this season with the loss of several key seniors.

Montgomery. The wide out said the receiving core has been getting in some extra repetitions with sopho- more Jay Urich after prac- tices. “There’s a lot we do off the field that people don’t see on Friday nights,” Jenkins said. “With Jay (Urich), he’s been working everyday after workouts. Our timing is the key, so we stay out there working. It’s not just me and him, it’s all the receivers. The work ethic is tremendous. We stay out there.” Blue Ridge will begin 7-

on-7 tournaments in July. “To me, 7-on-7s are more of offensive game,” he said. “There’s not really that much contact. You get jammed a little bit, but it just helps us know where to be and learning the right routes to run. There’s a lot of competi- tion. There’s a lot trash talking going on. It’s just fun. You might beat them now, but you’ve also got to beat them on Friday nights with the pads on.” For Jenkins, a successful senior season will mean a little more of the same.

“We’ve always been a winning class,” he said. “We’ve only lost three games since I’ve been at Blue Ridge High School. Our main goal is to go to state and we plan on going to state. We just have to come out on Friday nights and prove it, especially since we lost a lot of se- niors. We’re the underdog right now, but we’re Blue Ridge so we just have to show everybody who Blue Ridge is.”

Jenkins contributing on both sides

By Billy Cannada SportS Editor

The Blue Ridge football team is going to demand more of Vonta Jenkins this fall. The multi-sport athlete will be all over the field for the Tigers this season, holding down the defense at linebacker and anchor- ing the offense at running back. Jenkins said the team has been focusing on put- ting in the necessary work in the weight room during the offseason. “The main things we’re working on are speed and strength so, when we get on the field, we’ll be conditioned and be able to beat more teams and pound through the whole game,” he said. “In the weight room, we’re doing multiple things to help us get stronger and more physical, because most of the time, we are smaller than the teams that we’re playing.” Tiger fans are no strang- ers to hearing Jenkins’

Tiger fans are no strang- ers to hearing Jenkins’ FilE photo | thE GrEEr CitizEn Vonta

FilE photo | thE GrEEr CitizEn

Vonta Jenkins will play a key role on both sides of the ball this year for the Blue Ridge Tigers.

name called over the loud speaker, as the junior also plays a key role on the basketball team. “Basketball and football

shape are very different,” he said. “It does help you keep motivated to keep running. In basketball, you can’t just stop and you

don’t have breaks. Foot- ball is more of a strain on your body because you’re taking hits. I think balanc- ing the two keeps me in better shape.” Jenkins said his team will need him to step up and fill the role of a leader after losing so many se- niors on last year’s roster. “I need to have lead- ership on both sides of the ball,” he said. “I can’t make as many mistakes as I did last year. I just have to be there and be able to be depended on during the season and during the games.” Blue Ridge hopes to make it a little further in the postseason than last year. Jenkins said it will just take a little dedica- tion. “I think our goals are very high and they can be met,” Jenkins said. “We want one thing this year. We want a ring. I feel like we get it.”

Eastside senior linebacker seeking success

By Billy Cannada SportS Editor

These past four years have required a lot of growth from Eastside se- nior linebacker and slot receiver Ty Thomason. Thomason has started on varsity each year, and he said his maturity has come from watching and learning. “Everyone wants to make the most of their senior season and it’s definitely important. That’s when you’ve got to make up your mind on colleges in things like that, but most impor- tantly, you’ve got to lead the team,” he said. “This is my fourth year starting on varsity so I’ve really been able to see so many seniors and have some many examples of how to

lead. I’m just going to try to follow in the shadows of guys like Mikey Fernan- dez, who played last year.

I just want to be able to

lead like those guys.” In just a short amount of time, Thomason said the football culture has changed at Eastside.

Thomason said the football culture has changed at Eastside. prESton BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn Rising

prESton BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn

Rising Eastside senior Ty Thomason has a winning season on his mind, hitting the weight room during offseason workouts.

“Coming in, you could

see the culture. They weren’t very focused dur- ing the offseason and we didn’t have that many peo- ple at summer workouts,” he said. “The culture has

changed. Everyone wants to get better here. The coaches are doing every- thing they can for you and it’s up to us to work. Ev- eryone has realized that and we push each other.

Everyone is starting to work more. We want it more.” Having success this sea- son is going to require a team effort. “Everyone says the QB is

‘In the past, Eastside has been known as the school that doesn’t compete with anyone, but we want to change that. That’s how you change the culture.’

ty thomason

senior linebacker

the leader on the field, but he can’t depend on just himself,” Thomason said. “He’s got to have everyone around him. He’s got to have linemen to block for him and he’s got to have receivers. Our receiving core has improved tremen- dously. Everyone needs to be able to make the plays when we need them. We have to depend on every- one equally.”

Thomason, whose dad, Jeff, is the head coach for the Eagles, said it has not always been easy playing for his father. “Everyone asks me that,” Thomason said with a smile after being asked what it was like to be coached by his dad. “It’s tough because I don’t re- ally get a break. Over the summer, everyone is go- ing to the beach, but I’m at the school every day. I haven’t missed a workout and hopefully I won’t miss one this season. He does a good job of, once we get home, leaving (the coach- ing) on the field.” Right now, the Eagles only have one goal in mind for the 2014 season. “We want to have a win- ning season,” Thomason said. “We want to compete. In the past, Eastside has been known as the school that doesn’t compete with anyone, but we want to change that. That’s how you change the culture.”

wednesday, june 25, 2014

sports

the greer citizen

b3

Junior legion hits stride, wins four straight

By Billy Cannada SportS Editor

The Greer American Legion Post 115 junior squad caught fire last week, earning four wins and keeping in contention for home field advantage in the postseason. Post 115 earned wins over Spartanburg, Gaff- ney and Union (twice) last week, going 4-1 dur- ing a grueling five-game stretch. The junior team picked up its only loss of the week to Inman in a 6-3 battle. “It was a big week,” head coach Nate Ramsey said. “I thought we were flat against Inman. We had a week off and I thought we came out flat. Tues- day night, we gave some guys an opportunity that wouldn’t normally get an opportunity and they per- formed.” Southside Christian pitcher Scott Hutto took control against Gaffney,

Christian pitcher Scott Hutto took control against Gaffney, prESton BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn The junior

prESton BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn

The junior legion teamfound its stride last week, notching four wins in the last five games to keep in the playoff hunt.

Ramsey said. “Wednesday night, we gave the ball to Scott Hut-

to. He’s been one of our guys all season and we knew we needed to beat

Gaffney again if we want- ed to get in these top two spots,” he said. “Scott did

a good job.” The team finished the week with back-to-back wins over Union in a dou- ble header. “We just took care of business when we needed to,” Ramsey said. “It was a good week.” Heading into the home stretch of the season, Ramsey said his team is trying to stay focused on its goals. “Obviously, we have to finish,” he said. “We have four games left. Gaffney has four losses and we have four losses. We just have to finish. If we can position ourselves in the top two and get that home field advantage, I think that will be a big factor in how far we can go. We’re in a good spot.” The junior legion team has four regular season games left on the sched- ule, and they are the most important ones, according to Ramsey. “We’ve got every team in

our league one more time,” Ramsey said. “We’ve got as much information as we have on everybody, now we just have to go out and play the game. We’ve tried to put ourselves in the best position to succeed and hopefully they get it done. “There’s a certain num- ber of wins that I think will put us in second place, but we just want to go out and play four games the right way,” he said. “To win all four and to stay hot at the right time would be great.” Ramsey said this is a team that could do some damage in the playoffs. “We can make a run,” he said. “I’ve said all year that we’ve got enough pitching to make a run. I think, if we can stay away from defen- sive miscues, yeah we’re going to make a run. We’ll go as far as our pitching and defense takes us.”

defense takes us.” b illy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076 prESton BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn Spartanburg took it

prESton BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn

Spartanburg took it to the senior legion team on Monday night, handing Post 115 a 13-7 loss.

Senior legion gets two wins

By Billy Cannada SportS Editor

The Greer American Le- gion Post 115 senior team earned wins over Travel- ers Rest and Gaffney last week, but fell to Spar- tanburg in back-to-back games to end the week. Post 115 faces games against Inman, Union and Gaffney this week as they wind down the regular season. After a rough start to last week with a 15-3 loss to Inman, the senior legion team bounced back to beat Travelers Rest 14-6. Post 115 would continue the solid play into Friday, taking down Gaffney by a score of 5-4. Spartanburg would be a different story, however. The legion team fell in back to back games, se- curing losses of 13-8 and

13-7.

By Mark Vasto For thE GrEEr CitizEn

I magine this scenario

happening to you:

You’ve worked all

your life for a major company. In the early stages of your career you suffered not one but two debilitating work-related injuries. Rather than su- ing the company or sitting on your couch collecting workman’s comp, you not only go back to work immediately, you become the catalyst for sweep- ing safety changes at the company.

the catalyst for sweep- ing safety changes at the company. prESton BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn

prESton BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn

The senior team will take on Union on Friday.

The senior legion team

will be on the road this Wednesday at Gaffney for

a 7 p.m. showdown. They

will return home on Friday for a makeup game with Union.

|

a sporting view

Though you liked work- ing on the docks, time conspired against you physically and you were “forced” into manage- ment. You are respected by your peers, but one

day -- a Monday to be ex- act and only three months on the job in a new division of the company

-- your boss informs you

that you are fired effec- tive two days from now. When you ask why, he tells you it was something “personal.” Then he tells

Edwards notches first road-course victory at Sonoma

A well-timed

caution

helped get Carl Ed-

wards to the front of

the field, and the driver of the No. 99 Roush Fenway Ford did the rest. Edwards passed Marcos Ambrose for the lead mo- ments after a restart on Lap 86 and subsequently held off a charging Jeff Gordon to win Sunday’s Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma Raceway. The victory was Ed- wards second of the season—guaranteeing him

a spot in the Chase for

the NASCAR Sprint Cup, provided he finishes in the top 30 in points after race No. 26 and attempts

to qualify for every race.

It was the 23rd win of his

career, and first Sprint Cup win on a road course. Gordon finished second, .591 seconds behind Edwards. The runner-up result was Gordon’s fifth at Sonoma, matching his number of victories at the 1.99-mile road course. The triumph had special meaning for Edwards precisely because it was Gordon who was chasing him to the finish line. “That’s a moment I’ll never forget, to be standing in Victory Lane and to have held off Jeff Gordon, with all the suc- cess he’s had here and in our sport,” Edwards said after climbing from his car. “It’s just really, really special. “I’m living proof right here that, whatever it is you’re doing, just keep doing it, and don’t ever give up, because somehow things can work out. I’m just very fortunate.” Long before he made his Sprint Cup debut in 2004, Edwards had watched Gordon dominate road races at the tricky, techni- cal track in wine country. “Literally, I’m a fan of this sport, and I grew up watching Jeff Gordon go through those esses and watching how he drove

his car, so to be able to hold him off like that means a lot,” Edwards said.

able to hold him off like that means a lot,” Edwards said. photo | CourtESy oF

photo | CourtESy oF naSCar.Com

Carl Edwards celebrates in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma Raceway.

“I’m glad there wasn’t one or two more laps in the race, because I don’t know if it would have worked that way, but it definitely meant a lot to have Jeff Gordon in my mirror.” Dale Earnhardt Jr. ran third, his best-ever road course result, fol- lowed by pole winner Jamie McMurray and Paul Menard. Kasey Kahne, Jimmie Johnson, Marcos Ambrose, Greg Biffle and Clint Bowyer completed the top 10. Bowyer and Ambrose led the field to green on Lap 80, after Matt Kenseth’s brutal contact with the tire barriers in the esses brought out the fourth caution of the afternoon. Kenseth’s No. 20 Toyota spun out of control from contact with Dale Earn- hardt Jr.’s No. 88 Chevro- let, which bounced off the curbing and into the side of Kenseth’s car. “My bad--I hit the curb and ran into him,” Earn- hardt said on his radio. What happened before the previous caution, how- ever, was the crux of the race. Edwards, Ambrose and Bowyer all came to pit road right before NAS- CAR called a caution for

‘that’s a moment I’ll never forget, to be standing in Victory Lane and to have held off Jeff Gordon, with all the success he’s had here and in our sport.’

debris in Turn 10 on Lap 71. That enabled them to stay out under the yellow and propelled them to the front of the field. Edwards was able to stay there, despite heavy pressure fron Gordon in the closing laps. In fact, Gordon said

a mistake in Turn 4 six

laps before the finish may have cost him the race. “Gosh, I wish I could have had those last five or six laps to do over again,” Gordon said. “I started overdriving it a little bit trying to catch him and making a few mistakes, and I made one in particu- lar that really cost me. “I think if I had just stayed smooth and stuck with it—looked like his car really started falling off those last couple laps, and I might have had a shot at least putting more pressure on Carl to force him to make a mistake or

Carl Edwards

maybe get a run inside of him.” There were significant fireworks, however, be- fore that final run. Bowyer started losing positions

after the restart on Lap 80 as Edwards surged into second place. Johnson passed the No. 15 Toyota

entering Turn 11 on Lap 81, and Bowyer, who had

a tire going down, spun

after contact from the front bumper of McMur- ray’s Chevy. With nowhere to go on the inside of the corner, Kevin Harvick slammed into Bowyer. Harvick had one of the fastest cars on Sunday but had gotten mired in traffic because of a slow stop on pit road before a restart on Lap 75. The wreck dropped Har- vick to 20th at the finish, but Bowyer rallied for his 10th-place result.

The Zen of Zim

you that he scheduled a

press conference in the next room and he wants

you to attend. Oh

it’s in five minutes. Some of you would have been stunned and attended the press confer- ence. You acted polite and held yourself together. (You’re also the type of person who thanks the cop who just wrote you a ticket, aren’t ya?)

The rest of you would have cursed the boss out, grabbed the nearest box of copy paper, dumped said paper over the boss’s head or desk, collected a

and

few staplers, paper clips and outdated pictures of your wife when she was still known as your hot girlfriend and gone to happy hour(s). But if you were Don Zimmer, you’d go to the press conference, shrug

and say, “no

when reporters asked if you understood why you were being fired. Then you’d laugh, pack up your stuff, go to happy hour, manage the team until Wednesday and move on to manage the Boston Red Sox for a few memorable seasons.

hell no”

Zimmer got his start playing with “The Boys of Summer,” the cham- pionship Dodgers team

of the ‘50s. He also was

a member of the 120-

game losing 1962 New York Mets. He married his high-school sweetheart at home plate between games of a doubleheader. He was once beaned so hard in the head that he ended up in a coma for 13 days. As a result, Zim- mer carried around four titanium screws in his skull for the rest of his life. Another result of the accident was the introduc-

tion of the batting helmet in Major League Baseball. He never made a dime outside of the constructs of MLB.

Zimmer passed away

a few weeks ago at the

age of 83. His 66 years of baseball knowledge and lore may be gone, but as the luminaries who as- sembled in Tampa Bay to

pay their final respects to this humble, loveable man surely can attest -- guys like Joe Torre, Tommy Lasorda and Lou Piniella, to name a few -- he left

a lifetime of baseball

memories in his wake.

B4 THE GREER CITIZEN

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

B4 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN Greer
B4 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN Greer

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Greer coach Will Young, pictured center, provides instruction during last Friday’s FCA 7- on-7 tournament at the high school.

GREER: Looking for coachable moments

FROM B1

There was no shortage of competition. Young said his players got to match up with some of the best in the area. “We thought Hillcrest was very athletic. Travel- ers Rest played really well, I thought,” he said. “Most of the teams were pretty tough. Overall, it was just a good day of competi- tion.” Tournaments like this one help develop offensive timing that becomes so important during regular season play, Young said.

“We just want to keep getting reps in,” he said. “We have to fine tune our passing game and get it better. We’ve had some kids that have been on vacation. We haven’t quite had everybody there early in the summer, so now that we’ve got everybody here, we can work on tim- ing and being more com- petitive.” Greer played a total of nine games, beginning at 9 a.m. and lasting until the mid-afternoon. “It’s just nice,” Young said. “The FCA part of it is a good message for those

kids and the coaches as well. We were excited to be able to show off our facili- ties and what we have and how grateful we are for everything at Greer High School.” The Yellow Jackets will travel to Spartanburg for another 7-on-7 this Thurs- day. “There will be teams from all over the state and all over the southeast,” Young said. “I think part of it will actually be tele- vised, so it will be a neat thing for the kids.”

billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

SPORTS ROUNDUP
SPORTS
ROUNDUP

talented athletes.” The camp ran through Thursday, June 19.

CRUSADERS ADD ROLLE TO BASEBALL ROSTER

New North Greenville baseball coach Landon Powell has wasted little time hitting the recruiting trail. Powell pulled in his first commitment recent- ly, as Indian River Junior College transfer Shaquille Rolle signed a letter of in- tent to play baseball for the Crusaders. Rolle, a native of Nassau, Bahamas played his high school baseball at Heritage High School in Boca Del- ray, Florida, where he was a three-year letterman. Rolle compiled impres- sive numbers during his 2014 campaign at Indian River State College, both at the plate and on the base path. Rolle boasted a .325 batting average for the In- dians, with one home run, six doubles and a triple. He also accounted for 20 sto- len bases, 31 runs scored, and plated 21 RBI. He was equally impres- sive in the field for the Pioneers with a .986 field- ing percentage, accounting for a 103 putouts from his center field position. “We are very excited to welcome Shaquille to the North Greenville family,” said Powell. “We plan on Shaq being a key piece in resurrecting the success of our traditionally rich baseball program.”

STATON IS NAMED TO NGU ALL-STAR TEAM

North Greenville base- ball standout Allen Sta- ton continued adding to his baseball resume this week, as the rising senior was named to the Coastal Plain League All-Star team, putting together a solid season thus far for the Co- lumbia Blowfish. Staton has recovered nicely from an injury sus- tained during the 2014 regular season, batting .324 for Columbia, with five RBI and nine runs scored. Staton also has ac- counted for one home run and four doubles. The Coastal Plain League is a wooden bat, summer baseball league desig- nated for collegiate base- ball players. The league is based out of Holly Springs, North Carolina. The league was started in 1937 and ran through 1941 before being suspended during World War II. The Colum- bia Blowfish joined the league in 2006, playing their games at Capital City Stadium in Columbia, South Carolina.

CAROLINA RAVENS YOUTH FOOTBALL REGISTRATION

Registration is now un- derway for the fall season of Carolina Ravens youth tackle football (ages 6-12) and cheerleading (ages 5-

13).

To register online, visit ravensfootballsc.com. For more information, call

423-4550.

REGISTRATION OPEN FOR GOODWILL MUD RUN

Registration has opened for the fall edition of the Goodwill Mud Run, which will take place on Satur- day, Sept. 13 at SC-TAC (formerly the old Donald- son Center). Teams of four will run 3.5 miles while navigat- ing 35 unique obstacles in this Marine Corps inspired course. Event officials say the funds raised from the mud run will help further Goodwill’s mission of pro- viding job training and job placement services that assist South Carolina resi- dents searching for em- ployment. For more information on the fall Goodwill Mud Run, visit the official event web- site at goodwillmudrun. org.

NORTH GREENVILLE HOSTS PROSPECT ELITE CAMP

North Greenville head coach Jeff Farrington and the football staff recently hosted a two-day North Greenville Prospect Elite Camp beginning last Tues- day morning in Younts Stadium. The camp played host to 86 high school athletes, grades 9-12, from South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia high schools. The athletes were given a chance to meet with each coach on staff as well as get an inside look at the facilities at Hendricks Fieldhouse. Athletes were also put through a variety of drills including the 40-yard dash, broad jump and pro shuttle agilities. Other ac- tivities during the session included offensive and de- fensive positions drills as well as one-on-one compe- tition. “Today was a great first day of camp and I am pleased with the turn- out for our first prospect camp,” said Farrington, a Greer High grad, after day one of the camp. “We had a chance to work with many

BYRNES: Comes out on top in second 7-on-7

FROM B1

Lane said his guys are using these tournaments as a way to test their skills and to continue to im- prove. “This gives quarterbacks a chance to work on tim- ing with receivers. Your defensive backs get to work on their coverages and doing different things of that nature,” he said. “In 7-on-7, you can get a lot of work in.” The trip was even better for Rebel receiver Chavis Dawkins. “Chavis Dawkins actu- ally got an offer from North Carolina State while

we were there,” Lane said. “They saw something they liked and offered him, so that was a good thing for him.” Aside from the tourna- ment, Lane said experienc- es like this can help build valuable team chemistry. “It’s always good to be able to build team chemis- try, and that’s what we’re trying to do,” Lane said. “With a coaching change, it’s always difficult for a team to see what the new coach wants but, as you get in there, getting team chemistry going is always good.”

billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

RIVERSIDE: Using tournaments to gauge progress

FROM B1

a lot of kids and how they

are going to perform. It gives them a chance to show their talent and I think we’re on the right track. Like any coach is going to tell you at this point, we’ve got a long way to go. But, progress is be- ing made. I think these tourna- ments really help with of-

fensive timing, but overall, it just helps with being competitive. This gets the competitive juices flowing and it shows you how your guys respond when the going gets tough. We had some of that.” Smith said he saw some positive things from his offensive skill players in Easley. “Antonio McGowen was

a big part of the win over Greenville,” he said. “Will Urich, Emanuel Jackson and Ryan Cerino playing quarterback, I thought they played well. They saw

a bunch of different looks defensively, but I think they were the ones that stood out.”

billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

ones that stood out.” billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076 MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN Riverside is just
ones that stood out.” billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076 MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN Riverside is just

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Riverside is just beginning its 7-on-7 tournaments for the summer. The Warriors hosted Southside on Tuesday.

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PURSUANT TO S.C. SELF STORAGE LAW 39-20-45, the following units will be auctioned on Saturday, July 12th, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. at Upstate Storage, 13072 E. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer, SC 29651. (864) 879-0562. Contents are to be sold by the unit for monies owed as follows. #78 B. RISER: electronics, furniture, filing cabinet, tools, tubs, boxes, books, kitchen- ware #87 P. BRAGG: chairs, ta- bles, tubs, furniture, electron- ics, vacuum, printer, clothing, movies, florals, dishes.

#93 M. COGDILL: stereo, small appliances furniture, housewares, display case, hand trucks, chest, entertain- ment center, stove, dresser, beds #151 J. MICHAEL: clothing, decor, stroller, table, kitchen- ware, kids items, boxes #166 R. JOHNSON: chairs, beds, tables, recliners, clothes, microwave, clock, tv’s, weights #191 L. HOOPAUGH: dryer, bed, rocking chair, dart board, air conditioner, bakers rack, golf equipment, electronics, speakers, decor, kids stuff #196 M. EVERETT: exer- ciser, couch, tv’s, dressers, small appliances, toys, orna- ments, decor, beds #198 N. TERRY: couches, tables, beds, boxes, dresser, clothing, furniture #207 A. GOSNELL: stove, kitchenware, buffet table, washer, fishing equipment, tools, chairs, housewares, tire, suitcase, rug, air condi- tioner #223 A. GOSNELL: wagon

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NOTICE OF APPLICATION. Notice is hereby given that SALERNO, LLC, D.B.A. ALL AMERICAN LIQUOR, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will al- low the sale and off premises consumption of LIQUOR at 14158 EAST WADE HAMP- TON BLVD., GREER, SC 29651. To object to the issu- ance of this permit/license,

written protest must be post- marked by the S.C. Depart- ment of Revenue no later than July 4, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following informa- tion:

(1) the name, address and telephone number of the per- son filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be de- nied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the ap- plicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the prem- ises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to:

S.C. Department of Rev- enue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.

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CASE NUMBER 13-CP-23-

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SHARONVIEW FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. Victor Allan Paris, Defendant. Amended summons (Non-Jury)

TO DEFENDANT VICTOR ALLAN PARIS:

YOU ARE HEREBY SUM- MONED and required to an-

swer the Complaint herein,

a copy of which is herewith

served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscribers at their office, Kirschbaum, Nanney, Keen- an & Griffin, P.A., P.O. Box 19806, Raleigh, NC 27619, with thirty (30) days after service hereof exclusive of the day of such service; and

if you fail to answer the Com- plaint within the time afore- said, Judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in said Complaint. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Summons and Complaint

in the above-captioned action

were filed with the Greenville County Clerk of Court on July 29, 2013. This firm engages in the col- lection of debts. The Com- plaint herein involves an at- tempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. This 29th day of April, 2014

Charles

Bar#13905

N.

Griffin,

III,

Attorney for the Plaintiff Post Office Box 19806 Raleigh, NC 27619 Telephone: (919) 848-9640 Facsimile: (919) 848-8755

6-18,25, 7-2

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

AUCTION EVERY THURS- DAY, 11am in old ABC Build- ing 317 S. Buncombe. Visit auctionzip.com

6-4,11,18,25-TFN

ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in 107 S.C. newspapers for only $375. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 2.6 million readers. Call Donna Yount at the S.C. Newspaper Network, 1-888-

727-7377.

Jordan

J ordan

327 Suber Road 1 & 2 Bedroom

879-2015

Now LeasiNg!

Storage

Special

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(10 x 10 2nd month Free)

14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd.

864-879-2117

Storage Special greer Storage llc 2 For 1 (10 x 10 2nd month Free) 14372 E.
Storage Special greer Storage llc 2 For 1 (10 x 10 2nd month Free) 14372 E.

HOMES AND

LANDFORSALE

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

Longs, SC- FSBO 2400sf. Commercial Building, 1.35 acres, 100 ft. rd. frontage on Hwy 9, includes 1550sf 3BD, 2BA home. High traffic volume 15 min. to the beach. $300,000- 843-756-

7236

APARTMENTS

FOR RENT

SUMMERTREE APTS.:

SUMMERTREE WELCOMES YOU HOME!!! MOVE IN SUMMERTREE TODAY & RECEIVE OUR MOVE-IN SPECIAL!

Summertree offers spacious

1 & 2 bedroom apartment

homes with a great location, just minutes from Spartan- burg. Call Sandra at (864)

439-3474 to find out more. Section 8 vouchers & trans- fers welcomed. Equal Hous- ing Opportunity. Profession- ally managed by Partnership Property Management.

6-11,18,25

1 BEDROOM APARTMENT

for rent. Recently renovated. Utilities included. No Pets. $550 month. Great location, near Applebees in Greer. Call Karen 864-320-3114.

6-25

MOBILE HOMES

FOR RENT

3 BEDROOM 2 BATH, mo-

bile home, north of Greer. Large lot, $500 per month. Deposit and references re- quired. Call 380-1451.

6-4,11,18,25-TFN

HELP WANTED

THE CITY OF WELLFORD IS taking applications for Maintenance Supervisor. Must have experience in sewer and general mainte- nance. Applications will be taken at 127 Syphrit Road, Wellford, SC Monday thru Friday, 8am – 5pm until July 1, 2014. Questions call 864-

439-4875.

6-18,25

HELP WANTED: NEED someone to cut grass, paint, etc. Call 879-2015.

6-4,11,18,25-TFN

Nat’l Company hiring locally. Manangement/Sales. Great Pay, RapidPromotions, Paid Vacation, Retirement Plan.

Interviews this week. No Ex- perience required. We Train. Call 864-243-6503 to sched- ule your personal interview.

HIGH-TECH CAREER with U.S. Navy. Elite tech training w/great pay, benefits, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-662-7419

DRIVERS/

HELP WANTED

Dedicated Operation. Swing Transport seeks Switcher at Spartanburg, SC facility. No-Touch, Great weekly pay, Benefits! CDL-A, 2yrs Exp.

1-855-349-2759

6-18,25

Drivers: Local/Regional/OTR New Enhanced Pay, Package

Based on Exp. Excellent Benefits. Consistent Miles Daily/Weekly/ Bi-Weekly Hometime CDL-A 1yr

OTR exp 855-842-8498

6-25, 7-2

Drivers, CDL-A: LOCAL!! FT in Greenville Area. 1+ Yrs Exp - Current Medical Good Work

History. For Fastest Results Apply at: www.drive4innovative.com or leave msg: 1-888-206-3752

6-25,7-2

Drivers: CDL-A Company Drivers.

Quickway Transportation is Hiring. Daily Home Time, Excellent Benefits, High Earnings.

Call: 877-600-2121 www.quick-

waycarriers.com

6-25

Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers

earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded.

$1000 sign on to Qualified driv- ers. Home most weekends. Call:

843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghi-

way.com EOE

GUARANTEED PAY! CLASS-A -

CDL FLATBED DRIVERS NEEDED!

Local, regional, OTR. Great pay package/benefits/401k match. 1yr exp. required. Call JGR 864- 488-9030 Ext. 319, Greenville and Gaffney SC locations. www.jgr- inc.com

LAID OFF? PLANT CLOSING? Need that new job? Call Xtra Mile & enroll in CDL Class-A training today! 1-866-484-6313 / www. xtramiledrivertraining.com

ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 107 S.C. newspapers for only $375. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 2.6 million readers. Call Donna Yount at the S.C. Newspaper Network, 1-888-