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TOKYO

CHRISTIAN

•Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.'^ [Mark 16:15)

Vol. 52

Wiimerciing, Pcnna., January-February, 1953

Number 1

Our Future Plans

When I left Japan in April, 1951, two strong forces were pounding at the door of my heart

demanding attention. Realizing the tremendous

need

not

could

for

ignore

Christian

the

workers

in

Japan,

on

my

I

demands

made

soul

to

remain

at

least

until

other

laborers

were

en

listed. Responsibilities in Tokyo Bible Seminary

and in

Nishiogikubo Church caused me to

pon

der over the advisability of returing to America just then. The possibility that Japan may not

be

always

now

was

as

receptive

of the

gospel as

she is

another thought

which

I

entertained.

On the other hand, visions and plans of future service for Christ in Japan had run through my mind since the time when I first arrived in Japan in 1948. Then Tokyo Bible Seminary was founded and I found myself in the position of teacher in that institution. Such responsibil ity demands preparation. Knowing that I was

illrprepared to fill such a position, I

to

rcenter

school,

which

I

did

in

determined

September,

1951.

study

indeed profitable

two

These

in

years

in

been

my preparation for service land of the rising sun.

America as

which

I

have

spent

have

Cincinnati

in

the

in

Bible

Seminary

sojourn

in

for

Christ

Now

the

time of my

a

student has

drawn

near a

close and

are

again

turned

toward

Japan.

My

our

wife

I arc

applying

for

passports

immediately

faces

and

and

are trying to make the necessary preparations for entering Japan in August. The fall term of

Tokyo Bible Seminary begins in September and

we want to

take up our work

be

there ready to

at

that lime.

We

believe

that

Japan's

greatest need

today

is an army of Japanese preachers adequately trained to lead the whole land to Jesus Christ.

Therefore, we expect to spend most of our efforts and time in trying to make Tokyo Bible Seminary just as faithful and capable a servant as possible to help meet this need. We are

aware

own

of some of the

weaknesses

and

us.

who

But

our

gives

difficulties

as

incapacities

answer

to

wisdom

well as

which

this

is

to

our

shall

trust

those

confront

in

God

liberally

that

ask

Him.

We also expect to spend what time we can

in building older churches up in their most holy

faith

study also comprises an important part of our plans for the future, for the most effective

Language

and

in

planting

new

ones.

missionary

language.

among

any

people

learns

their

The

thought

has

often

occured

to

me

that

it would be a wonderful thing if we evangelists

did

not

have

to

include in

our future plans the

item of

port.

dependence on others for financial sup

per

But after further

deliberation,

I

am

suaded that that is wrong, for it is one of God's

great blessings to his people to permit them to

those

share

who

their

labor in

material

blessings

to support

the Word.

Most of the funds necessary for living-link support for my wife have been pledged by her home congregation, Piqua, Ohio. Only $360-

a year, however, has been pledged toward my support. That means that $840 a year is needed

to complete my living-link. We will not have time before we depart for Japan to make an extensive itinerary among the churches to

visit

raise

these

funds.

But

we

will

gladly

churches interested in

helping

to

provide this

support. Will you

help

us?

If

so,

please

con

tact

us

at 2715 Price Ave.,

Cincinnati,

Ohio.

 

Pray

for

us,

brethren,

that

God

may

speed

us

in

our

return

to

Japan

and

that

we

may

faithfully

fulfill

our

ministry

there.

Pray

for

the

Japanese

Christians

for

their

temptations

and

difficulties are

many.

Pray

for

lost Japan

that

she

trained

may

be

workers

saved.

may

be

white

harvest

field,

And

Pray

sent

that

forth

a

host

of

into

that

God will answer.

—Andrew

Patten

A

New Addition

To The Mission

Mr. and

Mrs. Andrew Fatten

The decision to be a missionary in a foreign land is a momentous one. indicating that a person is qualified and willing to attempt the

fulfillment

of

the

forsaking

the

needs

of

family

of

and

another

race

old

friends

in

and

the

homeland. Its announcement is made only after much prayer and thought.

Recently

a

missionary

has

been

added

to

the

staff of

the

Cunningham

mission, and

it

is

the

purpose of this article

to

describe

the

pro

cess.

Such

an

announcement

in

this

instance

is flood-lighted with romance. While some have

dreamed

of

the

romantic

part

of

the

foreign

work,

this

writer

has

observed

the

romance

of

a

foreign

missionary

on

furlough,

Andrew

Patton.

It started visibly when a missionary from the Flathead Indian Mission in Montana, Betty Armstrong, visited the Cincinnati Bible Sem inary in the fall of 1951. Andy, never a man to

soon,

short

visit, she left for Montana, and Andy's life was never the same again. His "dormitory-mates"

let

opportunity's

an

knock

go

with

unanswered,

her.

.A.fter a

made

acquaintance

had ample opportunity to see his

letter-writing

and

the other effects of the "love bug"

bite.

Last

September

Betty

inary

for

blossomed

one

into

semester's

courtship.

enrolled

study.

in

the

Sem

Acquaintance

On

November

4

the

World Mission Volunteers meeting of the Sem

inary,

the

of

which

for

of

Andrew

the

their

is

provided

an

was

comity agreement!)

president,

occasion

pleasantly

surprising

(This

The

at

the

nouncement

engagement.

rapidly.

20

more

wedding

Church

of Christ in Piqua, Ohio, Betty's home church. Although most of the wedding party was

than any

missionary

then

for

came

Development

date

was

set

December

late

for

rehearsal on

the

morning

of

the

ding day, none

was so

late as

Matthew

wed

Ikeda,

a Japanese Christian who is now studying in

the Seminary, an

usher in the wedding. He

arrived

and

all

five

was

minutes

before

well.

The

Piqua

the

music

began,

church

furnished

the organist, singer, and one usher. Maid of Honor Dorothy Schmale, an instructor at the

Seminary,

of

Harold

and

Best

Man

Sims,

stood

Earl

with

Sims,

brother

the

bride

and

groom as they pledged their vows before Prof.

Annual Report

There are now 14 churches in Japan which were started by this mission. Thirteen of them reported and are included in this summary.

Here are the names or locations of the churches:

Abico, Arakawa, Minato, Mikawashima, Nishi Hachioji, Nishi Ogikubo, Sakurayama, Seta- gaya, Kamiuma, Wakaba, Yochomachi, Nakano,

Soka, Yokosuka. Several of these are new churches and quite small, and without buildings. The total attendance averaged as follows: Sun

day

168,

Women's Meetings 81, Youth Meetings 129. The total number of baptisms was 119. The total offerings for the year amounted to Yen- 1,339,336—equal to $3,720.10.

Sunday night service

morning service 383,

Sunday

School

1107,

Prayer

Meeting 95,

The

annual

report

of

the

churches

for

the

year

1952

is

in

some

respects

not

as

good as

the

last

two years.

Although

the

figures

for

a

few

of the

churches show

a

little increase, the

majority showed a slight decrease. Especially noticeable is the sudden drop of baptisms from

more than two hundred in 1950 and 1951

over

a

hundred

in

1952.

to just

Of course this is something which concerns us very much and hasten to make an effort to

explain. Without a doubt, the year 1952 to

the

nation

a

up

time

the

of

Japan

was

one

when

they

made

of

great

their

first

importance,

step

major

ladder of

reinstatement in the

world.

The effect of once more being free

felt

in

many

ways.

It

is

evident

that

has

been

persons

became

Christians

because

of

the

Occupation

and

also

the

socialistic

American

advantage

of

church

membership.

Therefore,

when

agreement was

signed the

latter part of

the

April

it automatically set free those persons who had

become Christians for these reasons.

indebted

they

began

to

fall

away.

No longer

Then

there

are, of course, those persons who just naturally

drift away (thorny, hard ground). It is a little

difficult

pointing,

to

write

about

a

report

that

is

but

easy

to

report

something

disap

where

there is improvement. Therefore, to write that

the total baptisms have dropped by almost fifty

per cent, grieves me very much.

I pray that this report will be acceptable to

God

and

in

God

our

Saviour,

Jesus

Christ,

and

trust

for

the

salvation

day

by

day,

of

the

Japanese people who shall be saved according to His grace throughout this year of 1953. Pray

with

us to this end.

Yours in

Stanley

Jesus'

Name

Buttray

G.

M.

The

Elliott of the Cincinnati Bible Seminary.

ceremony,

witnessed

by

a

large

number

of

local

friends

and

visitors,

impressed

upon

each

Andy

simple

one the

would

and

greatness

soon

of

the work Betty and

The words were

the

Eternal

undertake.

appropriate,

honoring

Author of Marriage.

At the reception in the church basement flash bulbs provided the illumination as various

photographers continued their pictorial records.

While

the

newly-weds

were

cutting

the

cake,

Betty's parents were making acquaintance with

the visitors. (Andy's family was unable to at

tend.) Suddenly a woman's shriek and a crash

be

notified

the

party

that

the

punch

would

delayed in arriving. A large crock of it had been dropped on the kitchen floor. After a quick trip to the grocery store, however, a substitute

punch

supplemented

the

ice cream

and

cake.

On

that day

there began a fresh

example of

"missionary cooperation." For a few

days they

"honey-mooned"

in

Columbus,

Ohio.

After

a

visit in Piqua they moved to 2715 Price Avenue, Cincinnati 4, Ohio, which will be their home until the trip back to Japan next summer. May the Lord bless their preparations and their com

bined

work.

—Earl

Sims.

TOKYO CHRISTIAN

THE

Published

TOKYO

bi-monthly

to

the

by

call

CHRISTIAN

the

Church

of

Christ,

of

who

Christ

Cunningham Mission, Tokyo, Japan, for the infor

mation and inspiration of every Christian whose

is

carrying out

and

heart

is

willing to help in the supreme task of

open

the Great Commission of Christ: "Go ye therefore

and

teach all nations, baptizing them

in the name

of

Ghost; teaching them to observe aU things what

soever I

the

Father,

and

of

the

Son,

and

of

lo,

1

the

a™

Holy

with

have commanded you; and,

you

28:19,

alway, even

20.

unto

the end of the

world."

Matt.

fintered as second class matter in the Wilmerding.

Pa., Postofflce under the Act of March 3, 1879.

TWO-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION

SO CENTS

"FLAMING

MRS.

ALFRED E. SIMS

D.

TORCH"

CUNNINGHAM

W.

EVA

D. GREEN

50

CENTS

Director

Editor

Forwarding Agent

Office

of

PubUcation:

Wilmerding,

Pa.

Please

send

all

correspondence

and

the

mission

to:

Miss

Eva

D.

Green,

offerings

127

E.

for

Mercer

Avenue, College Park, Georgia. Make all checks pay

able to our forwarding agent.

Mrs.

W. D.

MISSION

Cunningham

STAFF

Director

16 Wakaba Cho, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Patton, 2715 Price Ave.,

Cincinnati 4. Ohio.

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Taylor, 1003-3 Chome Kamaiu-

ma. Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo.

Mr.

and

Mrs.

Stanley

Buttray,

450

575

2-Cbome,

Machi,

Kamiochiai, Shinjiiku Ku, Tokyo.

Mr.

and

Mrs.

Harold

R.

Sims,

Aral

Nakano-Ku,

Tokyo,

Japan.

TRUSTEES

Mrs.

Mr.

Mr.

W. D. Cunningham

T.

O.

Hathcock

Lawrence

Bain

Orvel

C.

Crowder

Mrs.

Miss

E.

G.

Nabell

Eva

Green

J. E. Lipscombe

Alfred

E.

Sims

Packages lor Japan should be sent direct by

parcel

post

to

one

of

the

missionaries

whose

ad

dresses are shown above. Packages of clothing can

be sent up to 22 pounds, not over 42 inches long

or 82 inches in girth.

matter

inches long

Consult your local post office about preparation

Packages of printed

not over 24

up to

6

pounds 9

ounces,

and 36 inches girth can be sent.

of

packages

for

maiUng.

If you change your address please notify A.

E.

Sims,

310

Brown

Avenue,

Turtle

Creek,

Pa., giving both your old and your new address.

there is the wealth that is stored up in heaven.

Jesus said "Lay up for yourselves treasures in

heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth con

not break through

you suppose has more

sume and where thieves nor steal." And who do

treasures laid up in heaven than does Mrs.

Cunningham? Yes that treasure is worth more

than all the money in this world, all the silver

and gold and precious gems, all the houses and

do

lands,

yes

all

the

wealth

of

this

world.

Yes

indeed we heartily agree that Mrs. Cunningham

is

indeed

a

tremendously

wealthy woman 11

—A.

E.

S.

Hauula, Oahu, T. H.,

December 15, 1952

Dear Brother Sims:

I want to thank you for your statement in defense of Mrs. Cunningham. Persons who

know her need no such statement; but others

who have not had the privilege of knowing her

might believe that which is not true when

supposedly Christian leaders make such ac

cusations as those reported in your article. You know that soon after Brother Cunning

ham's

Mrs.

vate

Cunningham. She entrusted me with pri

among which was

work with

death,

papers

we went

of

the

to Tokyo

to

Mission

Brother

Cunningham's

will.

I

had

heard some

of the

untrue

things

that had

been

said about

him.

I

remember

that

I

cried when

I

came

to

the part of the will in which the family was

remembered. The children were willed one dol

lar each. (I understand that they had to be left something to make the will valid.) As I remem ber, Mrs. Cunningham was willed the home which they had built nearly fifty years ago and

with money received from his teaching English

and the making of English phonograph records

to be used in the Japanese schools. This home

was completely lost during World War II. All other property according to this will was en

trusted to a

committee

of

whom Judge

Hath

cock

was

the

chairman.

Since

we

have

known

Mrs. Cunningham she has drawn from this committee the same salary as that received by

all

the

spite

of

other

adult

missionaries,

and

this

the

fact

that

she

was

director of

in

the

mission.

I wish that the person who made these false

charges could be given the facts and that he

We want to keep our mailing lists up to date.

or she would try to correct them.

If

you

make

an

offering you are entitled to

You are doing a good work as editor of the

receive this paper if you so

request.

Send all

offerings to Eva D. Green, 127 E. Mercer

Avenue, College Park, Ga.

More About Wealth

Of Mrs. Cunningham

(See Oct.-Nov. Issue)

Since

we

published

Cunningham's

about

it.

We

wealth,

include

in

the

letter

about

Mrs.

several

have

written

this

issue a

statement

by Owen Still, who.was formerly a missionary

serving

right statement by Mrs. Cunningham herself.

Cunningham

No

with

one

Mrs.

Cunningham,

why

Mrs.

and

a

forth

doubt

reason

was reluctant to

reply to the charges, was her

desire to rely on Christ's admonition: "pray

for them that persecute you." Certainly there

is

no

better way than

that.

But

upon

mature

thought,

your

editor

has

arrived

at

the

personal

belief

that

Mrs.

Cun

ningham really IS

haps

very

few

in

tremendously wealthy. Per

have

this

world

such

great

wealth

as

she

has.

Her

wealth

is

accumulated

and stored in three different places. First there

is

the

wealth

that

is

stored

in

her

memory:

memories of rich experiences, memories of vic

tory over difficulties, memories of souls won to

Christ, and oh so many, many precious mem

ories! No amount of money, even numbered in

BILLIONS, could purchase these memories

away from her. Second there is the wealth that

is

stored

in

the

friends

abound

hearts

of

friends.

in

many

parts

of

And

the

these

world.

Perhaps the greatest accumulation is among

the Japanese

with whom

she

has

served more

than fifty years. Do you suppose Mrs. Cunning

ham

would

friends?

No,

take

no,

a

a

trillion

thousand

dollars

times

for

nol!

these

Third

Tokyo

Christian.

you and yours.

The

Lord

continue

Your

brother

in

Owen

Still

to

bless

Christ,

Mrs. Cunningham Writes

I was not a little surprised when I heard

recently that some one had reported that Mrs. Cunningham was a rich, woman and needed

no funds.

I cannot imagine who would say such a thing]

nor how

such a

has

many

ways

report got started. The

Devil

of

trying to

injure

Christian

work and those who are

doing it.

 

When

Mr.

Cunningham passed away he

left

in

Steubenville,

Ohio

bank $5000

matured

life

insurance

in

his

own

name.

I

felt

that

I

had a

perfect right to keep that amount for my own

private use. Two thousand dollars of it I di

left

vided among the children.

All

other

money

that

Mr.

Cunningham

was

in

the

name

of

the

Mission

and

I

con

sidered

it

a

sacred

fund

that

should

be

used

for the purpose given.

I didn't want it in my name and at the advice

of Judge T.

O.

others formed a

Hathcock of Atlanta, Ga.,

and

corporation

to hold the funds.

Judge Hathcock has spent much of his valu

able time looking after these funds and seeing they were invested where there could be no loss. I have never used any of them for my

personal use.

Japan 6 months after war

broke out and two more months on my journey

home without salary so you can readily see

I was out here in

what

happened

to

my

$3000.

At

present

I

have

saved a

little

over $1000

and I

began

think you would agree that it's time I

saving something for

my old age.

—Emily B. Cunningham

A. Delightful Visit

Since the Mark Maxey family from Kyushu

visited us last spring we have had repeated invitations and urgings to go down to south Japan and return their visit. We chose the Christmas vacation this year because mid-win

ter is the most suitable time to go south and

because this would be the last chance we would

have to

make such a

trip

before our furlough

which begins this summer.

up

was the cost of the trip, but we finally decided

not to let that interfere. Then a couple of cash Christmas gifts clinched our decision. Next came the coal strike—longest in Japan's his

tory. The supply of this essential fuel became

so short that almost all passenger trains were

stopped for a while. But the strike was settled just in time to make train reservations. The inevitable rise in rates came just after we got

back home. Lastly, Sylvia became very sick

with a cold and ear ache the night before we

were

those

hip shots of penicillin and went on anyway.

The

first

thing

that

tempted

us

to

give

to

leave.

But we

gave

her

one of

She got better.

From the time that we actually got under

the morning of December 26

we enjoyed the trip and congratulated ourselves

way at 9:30 on

a thousand times on our decision to go. The

train

was

warm.

This

was

a

welcome

change

from the biting cold north wind outside and

the

interior

of

the

house

which

had

been

cold

through a month of coal shortage. The accom

modations were very reasonable and nice—^2nd

class

cording

pullman.

to

And

everything

went

just ac

schedule. It was really a relaxing

change for all of us.

Thirty-two riding hours after we boarded at

Tokyo Central we stepped off of the train in

Kagoshima city. This is about 1000 miles south

of here—the extreme southern part of Japan. The weather was balmy, and Mark Maxey had

the car backed up on the platform so the lug

gage could be unloaded into-the car immedi

ately.

lionaires

Such

service!

We

felt

exactly

like

mil

vaca

arriving for

a

3

month

winter

tion

at

Palm

Beach. We

tore out of the station

and to a ferry which had waited for a few min

utes on

other side of the bay which was the boot of a

to get there. Soon we reached the

us

beautiful

towering

live

volcano. After driving

for

of

a

the

little over

an

hour we

Mark

Maxeys.

The

reached

the

jumping off

home

place.

The next morning was Sunday and we visited 4 places. I preached at 3 of them. One place

was

a

leper

colony.

Then

on

Wednesday

I

preached at 2 other villages and on Friday at

2

more churches. There are

small

but promis

ing churches scattered all over that penisula,

and

I

was

very

interested

in

the

work—its

growth, methods, and possibilities. Thursday

afternoon—New Year's Day—we visited a vil

lage and talked with a doctor and his wife about

starting new services in one more place. The

rest of the time we spent in sight-seeing, eating,

and visiting; and enjoyed every moment of the

fellowship with them.

On Saturday, January 3, we returned to

Kagoshima city where Isabel Dittemore and her

mother and daughter live. I preached in Sendai

(45 miles north) Saturday night and 2 places

Sunday

Sunday

and

baptized

one

young man

afternoon in warm Kagoshima bay. It was a thrilling visit all the way around.

Monday

we

started

home,

but

this

time

we

stopped

in

Osaka

and

Kyoto

where

we

had

short visits with all the missionaries there. Also

we stopped in Nagoya to visit the Davis family.

We

arrived

back

home

Thursday

evening,

January 8, after 2 weeks of absence. We will never forget the kind hospitality of all of the

missionaries, and we are much encouraged by

seeing their work. There is a strong and active

group of missionaries representing churches of

Christ

in

the

Collossians

southern

half

of

1:18

"And

He

Japan.

—Harold

Sims

is

the

Head

of

the body, the church: who is the beginning, the

Firstborn from the dead; that in all things He

might have the pre-eminence."

TOKYO

CHRISTIAIV

A New Junior Church In Cunningham Home

The above is a picture, taken November 30th, 1952 of Mrs.

Cunningham's 9-10 A.M. Bible Class for teen-age students.

meets

morning. They are

This

class

her home

100 per cent

in

Sunday

Bible Carriers

every

and

the

Bible

Readers.

chapters

read

Each

during

Sunday

they

the

previous

Recently

they

were

organized into a

Church"

since

about

half

of

them

are

report

week.

"Youth

Chris-

We know that this is an important work for

the Church and ask that you join

the future of

your prayers with ours that this Youth

Group

may shine for

Mrs.

E.

A.

Christ.

Thomas,

the

wife

of

a

business

man in Japan, for a year, will teach this group

Every Sunday morning a Communion Service

is held for them conducted by

one of our Busi

ness men who is also a preacher. Four of the young people have been appointed Deacons and

do

their

work

revently

and

efficiently.

A

Seed That Grew

Thursday

afternoon

I

was

sitting

here won

dering what to do to make the beautiful Jap anese holiday beneficial, when a Korean student

minister (Mr. Pak) came into talk. He is a young man who is studying in the Conservative Presbyterian Seminary here in town, but who formerly attended the Church of the Brethren.

For

a

while

he

came

to

our

Mikawashima

Church, but is now preaching for a small group

at

another

place

 

in

town,

so

I

had

not

seen

him

for

some

time.

 

The

last

time

I

had

seen

him

he

was

very

confused on the subject of baptism. At his school some professors said one thing and some

said

another.

We

had

discussed

the

subject at

him

Briney's

read.

visit

had written

least

the

time you meet a person for the first time in the

new year, he

last

to

some

length

book

But

it

that

sprinkled

and

on

had

usual

finally

"The

been

I

had

given

Form

so

long

of

Baptism"

since

his

I

had given up

him off

in

the book as lost and

as

the

a

dyed in

the wool

wool)

Presbyterian.

(at

greeting

that

is

given

every

have decided to

After

suddenly said, "I

be immersed."

I

was

very

glad

to

hear this of

course, but he went to say that five or six of

was

of

to

be

the people

where

and

he

that

preaching

would

wanted

immerse all

baptized

he

them.

He then

said

that

he

wanted

to

be

bap

tized that

to

very

be

scriptural

day, and

that if

he

wanted

to

he

go

were going

way

all

the

and be baptized in a river.

all

I

was

agreeable

to

of

this

and

we

were

soon on our way out to the quiet flowing Tama

river—about

soon

located

beginning to

40

a

minutes

drive

from

nice

place.

The

sun

cast

purple

shadows

as

hind

the

mountains

in

the

distance

here.

was

it

set

when

We

just

be

we

entered the water, and it was really a beautiful

baptismal

after

we

clothes.

service.

had

Two

We

had

prayers

to

of

our

thanks

regular

changed

fishermen

back

in

the

distance

and

God in the high vaulted heavens were the wit

nesses.

—Harold

R.

Sims

during

perience

Church

her

stay

in

Japan.

She

with

in

Los

Youth

.'\ngeies

Groups

where

has

had

ex

in

her

Brother

home

Tom-

lison

ministers.

—Emily B. Cunningham

Notes

Mr.

and

Mrs.

Harold

Sims

are

expecting

to

be home on furlough this summer. At first they had planned to come last summer, but later

decided to wait another year. They may be able to attend a few conferences or camps during

the

to

invitations

month

visit

of

August and to

accept

fall.

churches during the

It will

be

six

years

March 31 since

We also

understand

they

that

left home.

Mr.

and

Mrs.

Har

old Taylor plan to come home on furlough this

spring

or

summer.

They

have

been

working

in cooperation with the Cunningham Mission since they were compelled to leave China be

cause

of

the

Communists

getting

control.

He

has been in charge of the Correspondence School the past year. They have been in China

and

We are glad to welcome Mrs. Andrew Patton

Japan

more

than

six years.

as

a

new member of the

Mission

Staff.

Mr. and

Mrs,

to

go

Patton

out

to

have applied for

Japan

in

passport and visa

to

August.

They

hope

get settled in

time

for

the

opening of

the fall

term

of

the

Bible

College

in

September.

There

couple

to

is

still

go

out

need

to

for

another

consecrated

Tokyo to

work

with

this

mission. With

both the

Simses and the Taylors

on furlough and only the Pattons going out,

there

will

still

be

a

shortage

of

missionaries.

Who is ready to answer, "Here am I, send me."

There

is

an

urgent

need

for

more

praying.

Brother

Stanley

Buttray's

article

emphasizes

this, because of the greater difficulty of bringing

the Japanese to Christ since they regained their

freedom

from

American

occupation.

And

espe

cially we need to pray for more missionariess to

hear

and

ans.swer

the

HAVE

YOU

MISSION

IN

call.

INCLUDED

THIS

YOUR

WILL?

New Nakano Church

Evangelislic Meetings

The

meetings

began

Monday

niglit,

Decem

ber

1st.

For

the

first

niglu

we

had

expected

about 25, but they just kept on coming in until

the

sermon

was

almost

over

and

finally

were 62 present. The

sermon was good

there

(all of

them so far have been more than an hour long)

and

the

the

crowd

was

building,

pleased

but

with

it was

both

it

and

nice new

nothing like

the rejoicing of the members. We were all so happy and encouraged we could hardly leave

the church that night. The next night there were 67 present—more than at the movie across

the

fell

street.

down,

From the next night the attendance

maybe

because

the sermon

was not

as interesting, but probably because of the cold. Wednesday night we had 47, and Thursday

night only 37 (Maybe because I had preached

the previous night). Thursday night's sermon

on

"The

True

God"

was

the

best

yet.

Friday

night we had 41, and Saturday 44, Sunday morning 50, and Sunday night 34, Changing preachers each night the subjects the first week were largely introductory. (Subjects: The Place

of Religion

Seeing God through His Word. The True God,

in our Life, The True Religion,

Man

Is

a

Sinner, The

Fate of

Humanity.)

There are many things about the meetings of

which we are rejoicing, The house just in front

of

not

the church is

strict

Buddhist, and

even

let

their

children

come

to

they will

Sunday

School. But the first night the old Grandmother

came

can't

came walking over,

looked in and

back

every

night.

finally

She

in.

She

has

been

read

by

the

electric

light,

so

remembers

the

scripture

and

hymn

numbers

and

reads

them

the next day. We

loaned her a song book and

New Testament. She is one of the most zealous

inquirers. But there are about .six or eight other

people

the

who

heard

about

Christianity

for

first

night

friend,

since we moved here, came one night to church. We have been having a prayer meeting at

came back every

time

that

that

Monday

night and

week. Also Lois" Englisli

she has

been

asking to

speaking

come ever

6:30

every

morning.

It

is

really

cold,

but

I

haven't missed one yet.

Also

I

am

sure

many

of the people at home are praying for the meet

ing, and

it

is

a

real

success

so

far.

Because

of

the

coal

strike

we

only

have gas

six

hours

a day

cold, but

sitting in the

the

and

cannot get

coal. The

hours

church is ice

coming faithfully and

every night—

people are cold for IH

believers

hear the

and

unbelievers

Word

of

God.

suffering together

to

The

Sunday

School,

Sunday

morning,

De

cember 7, the first time in the new building, was

just overflowing. They were jammed into every

room—about

and

tbe

the

260

of

them.

season

The

just

new

about

building

doubled

Christmas

attendance.

—Harold R. Sims (From a personal letter)

Saturday evening was

the

night of the

City-

wide

Youth

Meeting again.

I

think there were

about 70 present at

the Yotsuya Church, 11 of

whom

went

the

translater

from

of

Nakano.

tbe

new

The

New

speaker

was

Testament

in

colloquial Japanese, which is taking the country

by storm.

lightening talk, and I think he has some good

ideas. He was a former propaganda writer for the Japanese militarists, and is really a lan

He

gave

a very interesting and en

—H.

R.

S.

guage scholar.

We

arc

glad

to

see

that

the

offerings

in

creased during the last two months. While the increase was not enough to make up for the deficit of the preceding four months, yet it is

encouraging

to

see

the

to

express

our

thanks

more

of

His

servants

increase, and

we

to

be

God

for

that.

encouraged

to

want

May

give

in a way that is pleasing to Him. This Mission

should

have

approximately

$30,000.00

per

year

in

order to

carry forward

the

work.

They fell

far

short of that last year, but even $30,000.00

seems

pitifully

amounts

being

small as

compared

to

spent

for

less

worthy

the

vast

causes.

Rope Holder List

December and January

ARKANSAS

Bentonville

Christian

$19.25; Siloam Springs — Women's

First Christian Church, $50.00.

Church,

Council,

CALIFORNIA — Mrs. J. H. Yates, $50.00; Mrs, Maree Clickenger, $5.00; Covina Church of Christ, $40.00; Culver City Church of

Christ, $10.00.

COLORADO —• Elbert Christian Church, $40.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA — Mr. and Mrs.

W.

W.

BonDurant,

$10.00;

BonDurant, $5.00.

Miss

Julia

E.

FLORIDA — Eustis Church of Christ, $325.00;

Major

and

Mrs.

Walter

W.

Evans,

$25.00;

Del.and — Christian Women's Fellovrship, First Cliristian Church, $50.00.

GEORGIA — A Friend, $5.00; Mrs. Carrabelle

Kamn, $5.00; Mr. J. M. Blackwell, $5.00; East Point — Loyal Gleaners Class, Jefferson

Park Christian Church, $7.55.

IDAHO

Buhl

Christian

Mission

Fund,

$25.00; Boise — First Christian

Church, $25.

ILLINOIS

Edwardsville

Missionary

Study

$250.00;

$10.00;

Group,

Alton

$20.00;

Mr.

First

Eldon

Christian

La\vless,

Church,

Miss

Fern

McClelland, $1.00.

INDIANA

Mr.

and

Mrs.

Kenneth

Eade,

$10.00;

Burncttsville

Christian

Church,

$5.00; Markle

Church

of Christ,

Missionary

Society, $106.88; Columbus — Christian Church, $50.00; Wabash — Kum-Join-Us-

Class, Treaty Church, $37.27.

IOWA

Miss

Bertha

K.

Sargent,

$30.00;

Lovilia Church of Christ, $10.00; Council

Bluffs

First

Christian

Church, $50.00.

KANSAS — Mrs. Roy Pigeon, $3.00; Clear-

water Churcli, $128.00; Norton Christian

Church,

$67.82;

Hugoton

Christian

Sunday

School, $65.00; Mrs. Virginia G. Templeton

and

Nadine, $6.00.

KENTUCKY — Harrodsburg — Cornishville

Christian

Sadieville

Church

Sunday

School,

$100.00;

Women's

Christian

Missionary

Society, $12.00; Mr. John

Eggleton, $1.00.

MAINE —• Mr. William F. Brawn, $l00.

MARYLAND — Mt. Rainier Christian Church,

$6.00; Mrs. Leona O. Rider, $10.00.

MASSACHUSETTS

$12.00.

MICHIGAN

Miss

Mrs.

Mabel

E.

B.

S.

Donnell,

Gould,

$1.00;

Forest Hill — Church of Christ, $10.00; Mrs.

Margaret J.

MISSISSIPPI

Morrison, $35.00.

Mrs.

Joe

Martin,

$6.00;

Hickorv — .-Xntioch Christian Church, $25.00;

Columbus — Women's Christian

First

First

Christian

Christian

Church, $25.00;

Church, $25.00.

Fellowship,

Aberdeen

MISSOURI — King City — The Loyal Wo

men's

$6.00.

Class, Island

City

Christian

Church,

NEBRASKA — Mr.

Virgil

Marshall, $250.00.

NEW

NORTH

YORK — Mrs.

Lillian

Clark, $1.00.

CAROLINA — Nashville — Beulah

Church of Christ, $65.00; Mrs. H. F. Latham,

$15.00; Lcaksville — Young People's Society,

Christian Church, $3.00;

Ransoniville — _St.

Clair

Missionary

—Christian

Hope

Society.

Church

$17.35;

Janiesville

of

Christ,

$18.50;

Mrs. T. H. Davis, $35.00.

OHIO

$10.00;

Mr.

and

Cincinnati

Mrs.

Addie

H.

Missionary

Pelfrey,

Group,

Chase Avenue Church, $25.00; Seaman—May

Hill

Church

of

Christ, $25.00; Geneva —

In

dependent

Christian

Missionary

Society,

Park

Street

Church,

$3.00;

Hamersville

Church of Christ (A Friend), $10.00; Jamcs-

to^vn — Grape Grove Church, $51.00: Mal- vern — Missionary Society. Chri.«;tian Church,

$25.00; Hamersville—Church of Christ. $37.50;

Rushylvania Church of Christ, $50.00; Glous-

ter — The Loyal Daughters, $25.00; Salem—

Phillips Christian Church and C. E. Society,

$75.30;

Nashville Church of Christ, $20.00;

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Deem, $10.00; Columbus

—Southwood

Georgetown

County),

Church

of

Christ,

Church

$20.00;

(Adams

Bethlehem

$20.00;

Moscow —

Ladies'

Aid,

Church of Christ, $10.00; Hicksville — West Milford Church of Christ Bible School,

$35.00; Steubenville — LaBelle View Church

of Christ, $10.00; Phalanx Station — Brace-

TOKYO

CHRISTIAN

ville

Christian

Church,

$17.00;

Miss

Mildred,

Covington, $5.00;

Class,

Hopedale—Loyal

Workers

Hopedale —

Christian Church, $25.00;

Married

Workers

Class,

Christian

Church,

$5.00; Hopedale — Christian Church Sunday

School, $23.17; New Somerset Christian Bible

School, $21.00; Willing Workers Missionary Society, New Somerseet Christian Church,

$20.00.

OREGON — Mr. N. J.

Reasoner, $1.00.

PENNSYLVANIA —

Dickerson