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MAY 14-20, 2014
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Budget
Princeton BOE passes budget
with increase. PAGE 6
Princeton Girlchoir
celebrates 25 years
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
In 1989, when Jan Westricks
youngest son went off to college,
she placed an ad in the newspaper
and filled her living room with
the voices of 27 Princeton girls.
Now, 25 years later, the Prince-
ton Girlchoir has six choirs and
270 singers 10 times the number
of girls who answered Westricks
ad in 1989.
When I started this whole
thing, I had no idea that it would
grow and grow and become so
big, Westrick said. At the time, I
was teaching music at Princeton
Day School, and I kept thinking
that these girls sounded really
good. Id been going to the [Amer-
ican] Boychoir concerts and I just
thought, well, lets do something
for the girls.
To celebrate the 25th anniver-
sary, the Princeton Girlchoir will
be holding a special concert on
June 1 at the Patriots Theater in
Trenton.
To commemorate this special
anniversary, composer Ryan
Brechmacher was commissioned
to create a new work for the
choir, a press release said. This
delightful composition, titled A
Life of Song, which also happens
to be the theme of the celebra-
tion, embodies what Princeton
Girlchoir has meant to its many
choristers over the years.
Westrick said the Girlchoir
provides local girls with a unique
opportunity to both get to know
their neighbors and see the world.
It provides them an opportu-
nity to really work collectively
with their peers in a setting thats
not competitive like sports, but
more congenial working togeth-
er and making something beauti-
ful, Westrick said. Weve been
told by parents over and over that
their child has learned so much
and grown so much. The main
choir does international tours in
the summertime. Weve had par-
ents tell us that when the girls
come home their lives have really
been changed. Theyve met other
kids who love to sing as much as
they do, and thats always a joyful
thing.
Westrick said the focus of the
Girlchoir continues to be on the
singers, but she is constantly
amazed by the high-profile invites
the group receives.
Princeton Girlchoir's growth
is evident in their work and repu-
tation as one of the country's pre-
mier training and performance
choirs, the press release read.
Highlights of the year include
singing for both the Honorable
Hillary Rodham Clinton and the
RYAN MARSA/The Sun
A local artist participates in
Paint Out Princeton, an
event sponsored by the Arts
Council of Princeton, paint-
ing the Morven Museum dur-
ing the Morven in May cele-
bration on May 4.
LEFT: Local greenhouses
and gardeners sold flowers
and succulents on the
grounds of the Morven Mu-
seum and Garden.
Morven in May celebration
please see CHOIR, page 10
2 THE PRINCETON SUN MAY 14-20, 2014
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
Princeton High School senior
Peter Mahotiere has made histo-
ry.
Mahotiere is the first Prince-
ton High School student to re-
ceive the Gates Millennium
Scholarship, a highly selective
award that will cover all
Mahotieres unmet financial
needs at Villanova University
next year.
My college counselor at
Princeton High School told me no
one from our school had ever
won this scholarship, and I could
be the first one, Mahotiere said.
My parents believed all along
that Id get it. As I was applying, I
knew only 1,000 people would get
it, and I kept telling myself it was
fine if I wasnt
one of them.
Approxi-
mately 52,000
students ap-
plied for the
scholarship,
which re-
quired a num-
ber of essays,
several letters
of recommen-
dation and copies of high school
transcripts as part of the selec-
tion process.
Mahotiere said he believes
his extracurricular activities
set him apart from the competi-
tion.
Ive been taking Chinese for
the past three years, and I think
not many of the applicants take
that, Mahotiere said. Ive also
been playing basketball for the
last eight years, and this year I
was the varsity captain. I also
volunteer at a basketball camp in
the summer and coach middle
schoolers.
The Gates Millennium Schol-
arship was established in 1999
with a $1 billion grant from
the Bill & Melinda Gates Founda-
tion. The mission of the scholar-
ship fund, according to the web-
site, is to promote academic ex-
cellence and to provide an oppor-
tunity for outstanding minority
students with significant finan-
cial need to reach their highest
potential.
The scholarships are not
awarded in a definitive amount.
Rather, a student who is selected
as a Gates Millennium Scholar
will receive any amount they
need to fund undergraduate
through doctoral programs in
computer science, education,
engineering, library science,
mathematics, public health and
the sciences, where [minority]
groups are severely underrepre-
sented.
In a press release, the Prince-
ton Public Schools congratulated
Mahotiere and listed his qualifi-
cations as a recipient of the
award.
Peters strong academic per-
formance exceeded the minimum
GPA prequalifying require-
ments, the release said. His
leadership (teen pep leader, cap-
tain of the basketball team and
peer group leader) and service to
the community as a volunteer
basketball coach surely added to
his candidacy.
Mahotiere said he plans to
major in economics at Villanova,
and intends to play on both intra-
mural and club basketball teams
at the school.
Mahotiere said he was aston-
ished when he received the
award, and he feels an over-
whelming sense of gratitude to-
ward the people who helped him
achieve this level of recognition
and success.
Id definitely like to thank my
parents, Mahotiere said.
Theyve helped me so much
throughout the process, patting
me on the back and having so
much faith in me. I also want to
thank my varsity basketball
coach and my guidance coun-
selor. I couldnt have done this
without the people in my life sup-
porting me.
University part of sexual
violence investigation
Princeton University is one of
55 U.S. institutes of higher educa-
tion being investigated by the U.S.
Department of Education for its
treatment of sexual violence mat-
ters.
A spokesperson from the De-
partment of Educations Office
for Civil Rights said the investiga-
tion is exploring possible viola-
tions of Title IX, a federal statute
that prohibits any school that re-
ceives federal funding from com-
mitting gender-based discrimina-
tion.
While the Department of Edu-
cation said it would not release
any information about Princeton,
or the other 54 schools being in-
vestigated, they said the list of
schools would remain publicly ac-
cessible.
We are making this list avail-
able in an effort to bring more
transparency to our enforcement
work and to foster better public
awareness of civil rights,
Catherine Lhamon, the depart-
ments assistant secretary for
civil rights, said in a press re-
lease. We hope this increased
transparency will spur communi-
ty dialogue about this important
issue. I also want to make it clear
that a college or universitys ap-
pearance on this list and being
the subject of a Title IX investiga-
tion, in no way indicates at this
stage that the college or universi-
ty is violating or has violated the
law.
Princeton residents fall
victim to phone scam
A Princeton family received a
phone call from a scammer on
May 4, claiming their son would
be killed unless the family paid
$1,500 through Western Union.
This incident, first reported by
the Planet Princeton blog, is the
latest in a string of scam calls re-
ceived by area residents.
The phone call came from a
local number that has been re-
ported for other scam calls, in-
cluding one in South Brunswick
last year.
Police have recommended that
anyone who receives a phone call
claiming a family member is in
trouble and requesting money re-
main calm and use another phone
to check on the family member.
Victims of the scam should
contact police immediately with
the telephone number of the
caller and as many details as pos-
sible.
Victims should never wire
money to a caller.
AvalonBay files new suit
against municipality
Developer AvalonBay plans to
take Princeton back to court over
environmental testing the munic-
ipality has requested in the devel-
opers agreement for the Wither-
spoon Street hospital site.
AvalonBays plans to build a
280-unit housing development on
the site have been approved with
the condition that the developer
enters into an agreement with the
town.
That agreement, approved in
April by the council, includes en-
vironmental testing that Avalon-
Bays attorney publicly said was
unnecessary.
The testing requested by the
town was based on a Land Sur-
veyor Reference Page provided by
independent contractor Dr. Ira
Whitman.
Whitmans initial report said
that while EcolSciences, the envi-
ronmental consulting firm hired
by AvalonBay, conducted a site as-
sessment in 2011, it did not identi-
fy a medical waste incinerator on
the property.
I recommend sampling associ-
ated with four possible pathways
of hazardous waste migration
from the incinerator, Whitman
said.
At the April 7 Princeton Coun-
cil meeting, Whitman expanded
on his initial recommendations
with an eight-item list of things
that should be addressed at the
site, including the excavation of
six underground storage tanks,
four of which remain active. In
addition, Whitman recommended
the removal of asbestos and lead
paint. He also recommended that
concrete the developer plans to
crush and reuse be tested for
heavy metal content.
AvalonBay attorney Robert Ka-
suba said the developer is only
willing to comply with Whit-
mans original list of testing rec-
ommendations, because Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion regulations do not require
the additional testing.
Princeton attorney Trishka W.
Cecil said she received a courtesy
call from AvalonBays counsel on
May 6, and the attorney said the
developer planned to file a new
lawsuit. As of Thursday, Cecil
said she had not seen the lawsuit.
I havent seen the papers yet,
but when he called Tuesday he
said theyd be filing this week,
Cecil said. It will be heard in Su-
perior Court, most likely before
[Judge Mary C.] Jacobson.
Cecil said she has not yet
had an opportunity to discuss
the towns response to the new
lawsuit with the mayor and coun-
cil.
Katie Morgan
MAHOTIERE
Student receives Gates Millennium Scholarship
BRIEFS
Send us your Princeton news
Have a news tip? Drop us an email at news@theprincetonsun.com.
Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
The following are reports from
the Princeton Police Department.
On May 1 at 1:21 p.m., a juve-
nile male, 10 years old, was taken
into custody after a store employ-
ee called police upon observing
him attempting to steal a Zecar
(toy car) valued at $13.95 by plac-
ing it in his backpack. Patrols re-
leased the juvenile to his father at
the scene.
On May 2 at 12:47 p.m., a store
employee called police after ob-
serving an unidentified male de-
scribed as approximately 18-20
years old, long blond hair, wear-
ing a blue shirt and dark cargo
pants, bend down near a shelf of
liquor then walk briskly walk out
of the store. A check of the shelf
revealed a missing 1.75-liter of
vodka. Patrols were unable to lo-
cate the male in the area.
On May 2 at 4:49 p.m., a victim
reported that on two separate oc-
casions, April 28 and May 2, his
house painting business signs
were stolen from the front lawn of
a residence on the first block of
Elm Road. The signs were valued
at $30 each. There are no suspects
at this time.
On May 2 at 3:28 p.m., during a
pedestrian stop, active warrants
totaling more than $3300 were
found for a 23-year-old Princeton
man. The man was placed under
arrest and transported to police
headquarters. He was later
turned over to Montgomery
Township Police on their war-
rant.
On May 2 at 9:11 p.m., a store
employee called police after an
unknown male entered the store
and took a book valued at $16
from a shelf and placed it in his
pocket. The male left the store
and took a Boss bag valued at $58
from a display at the front of the
store. The male then fled on foot
toward the Spring Street Garage.
The male was further described
as high school aged, wearing
black pants, a black sweatshirt, a
black-rimmed hat with an orange
P on the front, and carrying a
backpack on his shoulders.
On May 3 at 3:05 a.m., a man
was stopped on Princeton Univer-
sity campus by Public Safety and
was found to have been operating
his vehicle after consuming alco-
holic beverages. Princeton police
officers arrived to assist and the
man was placed under arrest. He
was then transported to police
headquarters where he was
processed and later released to a
relative.
On May 3 at 11:35 p.m., a man
was arrested for criminal mis-
chief after two Ivy Club security
guards called police upon seeing
him and another unknown male
throw a large rock at a streetlight
in the Ivy Club parking lot and
break it. The other unknown
male, only described as wearing a
reddish/orange shirt, fled the
scene. A nearby window was also
broken and a parked BMW sus-
tained a dented hood from rocks
thrown by the man. The man was
processed at police headquarters
and was released with summons-
es.
On May 4 at 3:07 p.m., during a
pedestrian stop, it was deter-
mined that a 20-year-old woman
was in possession of alcohol
while under the legal age to do so.
The woman was also charged
with presenting a false public
document when she provided the
officer with fake identification.
She was released at the scene
with a pending court date.
On May 5 at 5:11 p.m., a victim
reported that actor(s) unlawfully
entered his residence on the 300
block of Ewing Street sometime
between Monday, April 28 and
Monday, May 5, by breaking a
window pane inside a vestibule
area and gaining entry through a
side door. A bedroom light was
left on by the actor(s), however,
nothing appeared to be missing.
The detective bureau is continu-
ing the investigation.
On May 5 at 9:30 a.m., a victim
reported arriving home and find-
ing the front door forcibly open
with a broken/splintered door
jam. The unknown actor(s) rum-
maged through the rooms of the
house and stole an air soft rifle,
fencing swords and jewelry. The
value of all the property stolen is
yet to be determined by the home-
owner. The detective bureau is
continuing the investigation.
On May 5 at 12:11 a.m., subse-
quent to a motor vehicle stop, a
man was arrested for an active
warrant out of the Mansfield
Township Municipal Court. The
man was transported to police
headquarters, processed and re-
leased after posting bail.
On May 6 at 3:12 a.m., patrols
arrested a man for DWI after ob-
serving him crash into a speed
limit sign on Route 206 near Cher-
ry Hill Road. No injury was sus-
tained in the crash. Further in-
vestigation revealed that the driv-
er was impaired due to prescrip-
tion drugs. He was processed at
police headquarters and later re-
leased to a sober adult.
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6 THE PRINCETON SUN MAY 14-20, 2014
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
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CHAIRMAN OF ELAUWIT MEDIA
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INTERIMPUBLISHER
L
ast year at this time, we
preached how important it was
to stay local for the summer-
time. We said that the 102 days be-
tween Memorial Day and Labor Day
weekends are crucial for the Jersey
Shore, which, no matter where you
live in our fine state, has a vital impact
on our economy.
We are now a year-and-a-half re-
moved from the devastation that was
caused by Hurricane Sandy, but some
Shore towns are still fighting to fully
recover. Beach remediation is all but
complete, and the boardwalks and
shops are up and running, for the most
part at least those that decided to re-
build.
But these Shore towns still need our
support.
Beach Season 2013 was not a good
one. As if rebuilding from Sandy was-
nt bad enough, an incredibly wet June
kept visitors away from the Shore dur-
ing prime weekends. Sales for stores
in the hardest-hit areas of the storm
were off anywhere from 20-40 percent
last year, according to state economic
reports. And Gov. Christies office esti-
mated that companies lost more than
$63 million in business due to the
storm.
So whats the message here? Its sim-
ple: Visit the Shore this summer, and
visit often.
New Jersey residents often take our
coastline for granted, but we should
realize how lucky we are to have such
a gem this close to home. So lets pay it
back this summer.
There are fewer than three weeks
until the official start of the summer
beach season, but with schools letting
out a little later this year thanks to the
snowy winter, there is still plenty of
time to plan your summer vacation at
the Jersey Shore.
The beach towns need your support,
now more than ever. Lets all dedicate
at least part of our summer to giving
back.
New year, same message:
Stay local this summer
Your thoughts
What are your plans for summer vaca-
tion? Share your thoughts on this, and
other topics, in a letter to the editor.
BOE adopts budget with increase
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
School taxes in Princeton will rise with
the $86.9 million budget for 2014-2015. The
Board of Education adopted the budget on
April 28 with an 8-0 vote.
The budget has increased $1.7 million
from last year. The increase is just within
the 2 percent cap.
Superintendent Stephen Cochrane, in
his first year leading the district, said the
district cut $1.6 million in requests made
by principals and school officials.
A budget is not about numbers or dollar
signs, Cochrane said. Our vision is to put
extraordinary people in front of our kids
and to provide them with extraordinary
programs and to do so in a fiscally respon-
sible way.
The school tax rate in the newly ap-
proved budget is $1.05 per $100 of assessed
home value, an increase of about 3 cents
from last year. A homeowner at the average
assessed rate of $795,855 will pay $220.45
more than last year. The total amount to be
raised in $65.9 million, up about $1.3 mil-
lion from the $64.7 million tax levy in the
2013-2014 budget.
In addition to the tax hike, the board ap-
proved a $1.4 million withdrawal from the
capital reserve to fund several projects in
the district.
Of that, $773,050 will go to fund roofing
projects at Riverside Elementary, Commu-
nity Park Elementary and Princeton High
School. A portion of those funds will also
be used for security upgrades district-wide.
Another $714,320 in capital funds will be
used for a firewall project at John Wither-
spoon Middle School, the creation of two
classrooms and the renovation of a science
lab at Princeton High School. Space at the
high school will also be converted for ath-
letic and wrestling needs.
The budget increase is due in large part
to growing enrollment in the district. Ac-
cording to the budget presentation, the cur-
rent enrollment at Princeton High School
is 1,471 students. The projected enrollment
for the 2014-2015 school year is between
1,537 and 1,553 students. The district plans
to use savings from retirements to hire
additional staff, in addition to the in-
creased budget and capital projects.
The budget presentation and complete
budget are available on the districts web-
site at www.princetonk12.org.
Send us your Princeton news
Have a news tip? Drop us an email at
news@theprincetonsun.com.
Fax us at 856-427-0934.
Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
MAY 14-20, 2014 THE PRINCETON SUN 7
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Candidates appear at forum
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
The three Democratic candi-
dates for Princeton Council ap-
peared at a public forum at With-
erspoon Hall on April 30, where
they answered questions from
residents, delivered by moderator
Karen Siracusa.
The forum, co-sponsored by
the League of Women Voters and
Princeton Community Televi-
sion, touched on multiple areas,
including municipal property
taxes, capital spending and the
communication between mem-
bers of the governing body and
Princeton residents.
Council President Bernie
Miller and Councilwoman Jo
Butler are both running for re-
election, and Sue Nemeth, a for-
mer member of the Township
Committee, is running on a slate
with Miller.
The forum began with opening
statements from the three candi-
dates. Butler highlighted her
desire for transparency and
open lines of communication be-
tween residents and the govern-
ing body.
I care about transparency,
and I pushed for a conflict of in-
terest policy, Butler said. Im
seeking reelection because I care
deeply about the future of our
town. We need an open, transpar-
ent government that works for
our residents.
Miller, a 55-year resident of
Princeton and former mayor of
Princeton Township, announced
his intent to run on a slate with
Nemeth early this year.
Im honored to run for Prince-
ton Council with two very able
public servants, Nemeth said in
her opening statement. I know
that focusing on shared values
and finding common ground
builds community, generates
fresh ideas, saves money and
achieves results.
Several of the questions
Siracusa asked centered on a tax
increase. Municipal property
taxes went down in the first
year of consolidation, and have
remained flat under the 2014
budget. Miller said he is con-
cerned that the municipality
may be headed toward a tax in-
crease.
Having joined the Township
Committee in 2002, we found that
some of our infrastructure in the
township had been inadequately
funded. It was necessary to raise
taxes in order to fund it, and I did
vote to raise the property tax in
order to get that done, Miller
said. Unfortunately, that is a ne-
cessity from time to time. You
can only defer maintenance for
so long before your infrastruc-
ture begins to crumble. We may
face that again.
Nemeth said she also voted for
the tax increase in the former
township, and said that if elected
she would do so again if an in-
crease proved necessary.
I actually think were headed
down a path now where were de-
ferring some of the maintenance
and repairs that we need to do,
Nemeth said. You can always
have a cut, or no tax increase, but
sometimes youre kicking the can
down the road. I dont think
theres a one-size-fits-all solution.
We have to make long-term pro-
jections and sound decisions.
Butler responded to the ques-
tion about a tax increase with an
anecdote about a Princeton resi-
dent she met in 2010.
After revaluation in 2010, I or-
ganized a session at the library to
help residents who were con-
fused by their revaluation, But-
ler said. I met an elderly woman
from the Witherspoon-Jackson
neighborhood whose taxes would
be going from $1,500 to $6,000 if
the assessment of her home did
not change. I think about that
woman when I think about
spending the taxpayers money.
We have to keep this town afford-
able for everyone who wants to
live here. Thats critically impor-
tant to me, and its critically im-
portant that we deliver on our
promise of consolidation by pro-
viding improved service at lower
costs.
The three candidates agreed
that while Princeton meets the
state requirements for affordable
housing, the amount of afford-
able housing in town is still insuf-
ficient.
I support affordable housing,
and more importantly, I support
housing that is affordable,
Miller said. I have a concern
that we could turn into a commu-
nity where the middle class is
squeezed out over a period of
time, and we only have housing
that is affordable housing by
state standards, and affordable to
the 1 percent.
Nemeth and Butler agreed,
with Nemeth saying Princetons
rental backlog was not accept-
able, and Butler saying that
while she was proud of the mu-
nicipalitys insistence that 20 per-
cent of the proposed AvalonBay
development on Witherspoon
Street be affordable housing, the
number of affordable housing
units in town is still inade-
quate.
The three candidates will be
listed on the Democratic primary
ballot in June. A full video of the
April 30 forum is available at
www.princetontv.org.
WEDNESDAY May 14
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister, 28
Witherspoon St., Princeton. (609)
924-5555. 10 p.m. Hosted by Eric
Puliti. Registration begins at 9
p.m. 21-plus. www.theaandb.com.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country
Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Cen-
ter, 1 Monument Drive, Princeton.
(609) 924-6763. 7:30 p.m. to
10:30 p.m. Instruction followed by
dance. $8. www.princetoncoun-
trydancers.org.
Cornerstone Community Kitchen,
Princeton United Methodist
Church, Nassau at Vandeventer
Street, Princeton. (609) 924-
2613. 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Hot
meals served, prepared by TASK.
Free. www.princetonumc.org.
Attention Deficit Disorder Lecture
and Discussion: Children and
Adults with Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder, Riverside
School, 58 Riverside Drive,
Princeton. (609) 683-8787. 7:30
p.m. to 9 p.m. 'Mindfulness Medi-
tation Goes to School' presented
by Trish Miele, former West Wind-
sor-Plainsboro third-grade
teacher turned mindfulness med-
itation educator. 'Indigo Kids:
What Parents Can Do to Promote
Their Children's Unique Gifts and
Help Them Deal with Rigid Sys-
tems' presented by Robert Schi-
raldi. E-mail
adhdcoachjane@gmail.com for
information.
Children of Aging Parents, Prince-
ton Senior Resource Center,
Suzanne Patterson Building, 45
Stockton St. (609) 924-7108.
4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monthly
group for family and friends car-
ing for an older adult. Group facil-
itated by Susan Hoskins, LCSW.
Information includes helpful
strategies for providing good
care, local resources, caregiver
self-care, and long-distance care-
giving. Free. www.princetonse-
nior.org.
Tour and Tea, Morven Museum, 55
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
924-8144. 1 p.m. Tour the
restored mansion, galleries and
gardens before or after tea. Reg-
ister. $20. www.morven.org.
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket Founda-
tion, 354 Stockton St., Princeton.
(609) 683-0057. 1 p.m. New Jer-
sey governor's official residence.
Group tours are available. Regis-
tration required. $5 donation.
www.drumthwacket.org.
Talk, Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon St. (609) 924-8822.
7 p.m. 'From Surviving to Thriving
College' presented by Nic Voge
and Matt Frawley. www.princeton-
library.org.
Meeting, Princeton Photography
Club, Johnson Education Center,
D&R Greenway Land Trust, 1
Preservation Place, Princeton.
(732) 422-3676. 7:30 p.m. 'Pho-
tography and Memory: Con-
fronting the Internment of
Japanese-Americans During
World War II' presented by
Stephen Perloff, editor of 'The
Photo Review.' Bring items for
sale. Wine, cheese and desserts.
Free. www.princetonphoto
club.org.
Open House, The Lewis School, 53
Bayard Lane, Princeton. (609)
924-8120. 1 p.m. Information
about alternative education pro-
gram for different students with
language-based learning difficul-
ties related to dyslexia, attention
deficit and auditory processing.
Pre-K to college preparatory lev-
els. www.lewisschool.org.
Princeton Public Library, 65 With-
erspoon St. (609) 924-8822. 7
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Personal Brand-
ing and Technology workshop
with design consultant John
LeMasney. www.princetonli-
brary.org.
THURSDAY May 15
Bach on Thursdays, Fuma Sacra,
Trinity Episcopal Church, 33 Mer-
cer St., Princeton. (609) 448-1113.
11 a.m. Lunch followed by a con-
cert by a vocal ensemble special-
izing in music of the Baroque era.
The vocal ensemble will be joined
by the Fuma Sacra Baroque
Orchestra playing on period
instruments. Andrew Megill con-
ducts. $5 donation.
Faculty Series, Westminster Con-
servatory, Niles Chapel, Nassau
Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau
St., Princeton. (609) 921-2663.
12:15 p.m. Trio Brillante Ensemble
featuring Katherine McClure on
flute, Melissa Bohl on oboe and
Esma Pasic-Filipovic on piano.
Free. www.rider.edu.
The Moscow Virtuosi, McCarter
Theater, 91 University Place.
(609) 258-2787. 7:30 p.m. Con-
ducted by Vladimir Spivakov with
works by Vivaldi, Rossini,
Tchaikovsky and Boccherini. $20
to $60. www.mccarter.org.
Arnie Baird, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon St., Princeton.
(609) 924-5555. 10 p.m. 21-plus.
www.theaandb.com.
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
948-4448. 8 p.m. All levels class
at 8 p.m. Intermediate level class
at 8:30 p.m. Open dance, socializ-
ing and refreshments from 9:30
to 11:45 p.m. No partner neces-
sary. $15. vivatango.org.
Author Event, Labyrinth Books, 122
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 497-
1600. 6 p.m. Warren Bobrow,
author of 'Apothecary Cocktails.'
Cocktail hour of mixing and sam-
pling drinks.
Author Event, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon St. (609)
924-8822. 7 p.m. '2 Authors, 2
Road Trips, 2 Americas' with
Ethan Casey, author of 'Home
Free;' and Bill Steigerwald, author
of 'Dogging Steinbeck.' Both will
offer tales of the coast to coast
journeys made in conjunction
with their books. www.princeton-
library.org.
Princeton Farmers' Market, Hinds
Plaza, Witherspoon St., Prince-
ton. (609) 655-8095. 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Produce, cheese, breads,
baked goods, flowers, beef, poul-
try, eggs, coffee, chocolates,
jams, grains, pickles and more.
Music from noon to 2:30 p.m.
Rain or shine. www.princeton-
farmersmarket.com.
Meeting, 55-Plus, Jewish Center of
Princeton, 435 Nassau St. (609)
896-2923. 10 a.m. 'Approaches to
the Study of Brain Disease: My
Research Story' presented by
Cheryl Dreyfus, professor and
chair in the department of neuro-
science and cell biology at Rut-
gers RWJ Medical School. $3.
www.princetonol.com.
Girls Night Out, Palmer Square,
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 921-
2333. 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Food sam-
plings, live music, prizes and
more. This year's event has two
ways to enjoy the evening. Free
general admission to in-store
sales, discounts and promotions,
one-time access to Taste of the
Square tent and free parking. $10
admission benefits Dress for Suc-
cess Mercer County and includes
food, drinks, Salon Pure styling
demonstrations, prizes and more.
Register online. Rain date is May
16. www.palmersquare.com.
Social Coffee, Newcomers Club,
Princeton YWCA, 59 Paul Robe-
son Place, Princeton. (609) 497-
2100. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. For
women to explore interests, the
community and new people.
www.ywcaprinceton.org./new-
comersclub.cfm
35th Anniversary Celebration Din-
ner, Princeton Toastmasters Club,
Italian American Sportsmen's
Club, Princeton. 6:30 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. Register. $55. www.prince-
tontoastmasters.org.
BNI Fusion, Palmer Clarion Inn,
3499 Route 1, Princeton. (609)
638-3740. 7 a.m. Free network-
ing. www.bninjpa.org.
Professional Service Group,
Princeton Public Library. 10 a.m.
Free support and networking for
unemployed professionals.
www.psgofmercercounty.blogspo
t.com.
FRIDAY May 16
Benefit Concert, Animal Alliance,
Richardson Auditorium. (609)
258-9220. 8 p.m. Meral Guney-
man presents a solo piano per-
formance, meet and greet and CD
signing. Her performance
includes music by Chopin, Scar-
latti, Ellington, Gershwin and
Radiohead. Register. $35.
www.animalalliancenj.org.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 MAY 14-20, 2014
please see CALENDAR, page 13
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date of the event.
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Suite 211, Skillman, NJ 08558. Or by email: news@theprinceton-
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(www.theprincetonsun.com).
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CINN&INS0N
DELR&N
00REST0WN
By ELIAN RUBIN
Special to The Sun
Once a year, the John Wither-
spoon Middle School Do Some-
thing Club, a service club that or-
ganizes projects for the school
and different community organi-
zations, hosts Service Saturday.
Service Saturday is a day where
kids from the school volunteer to
help out the community. This
year was the third annual Service
Saturday, and more than 130 stu-
dents and staff members volun-
teered. Service Saturday this year
was a humongous success with a
big variety of activities. Together
students and staff purchased and
made 120 bagged lunches for Cri-
sis Ministry and 40 Mother's Day
packages filled with makeup, toi-
letries and handmade bracelets of
hope for the women of Home-
Front. They made children's ac-
tivity kits, birdhouses for Prince-
ton Nursery School, two peace
poles that symbolize a united
world and more than 40 art
frames with student-designed art
for area organizations. They also
spent time with Princeton Care
residents, beautified the grounds
around JW, and even created a
movie to capture the day.
JW parents and Naked Pizza
provided a pizza lunch with re-
freshments and dessert. Materi-
als and items that were needed
were purchased using funds
raised through the Do Something
Clubs monthly pretzel sales.
John Witherspoon Middle
School students are very busy.
They had three concerts during
the past week and preparation for
state testing the next week, and
that didnt affect the quality of
Service Saturday at all. Many
students showed up at 9 in the
morning after two hours of play-
ing in a local lacrosse tourna-
ment. Some students went to
music rehearsals and doctors ap-
pointments in between time serv-
ing the community. This shows
how much middle school kids
care about the community.
It was a great day at JW, said
Principal Jason Burr. Our stu-
dents worked so hard all week,
several performed in one or more
of our spring concerts; we have
testing coming up this week, and
none of these factors inhibited
over 100 students from taking
time out of their Saturday morn-
ing to come and help out. Ms.
Riely and the members of the Do
Something Club really rallied the
building together. I am so proud
of our students.
Do Something Club Advisor
Kelly Riely said, It was an amaz-
ing morning watching students
and staff interact joyously with
the common desire to support a
community that has supported
them. Thank you to the amazing
students, staff and parents of the
John Witherspoon Middle School
for making Service Saturday an-
other memorable and proud mo-
ment!
The John Witherspoon Middle
School Do Something Club makes
a difference to the community
and the school. All of their serv-
ice efforts enrich the lives of oth-
ers locally and beyond. They
dont just work with Princeton,
they work with national and in-
ternational organizations such as
Make A Wish. But Service Satur-
day is our day to give back to the
Princeton community, and we are
glad to do it!
10 THE PRINCETON SUN MAY 14-20, 2014
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in full in 36 mos.
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24-hour emergency service
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609-695-6773 www.tdcmiIman.com
Be social.
Like us on
Facebook!
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and tidbits of
information
about your town.
Honorable Sandra Day O'Connor,
performing the national anthem
at the Jets game, and the choir's
premiere performance at
Carnegie Hall.
The choir, whose members are
high school-aged and younger,
has more than 500 alumnae. Some
of those former members will be
returning to the Girlchoir for a
special performance at the June 1
concert.
The show will begin at 4 p.m. at
1 Memorial Drive, Trenton. Tick-
ets are available at www.prince-
tongirlchoir.org, or by phone at
(866) 967-8167. A multimedia ver-
sion of this story, with videos
from the Princeton Girlchoir, is
available at www.theprinceton-
sun.com.
CHOIR
Continued from page 1
Choir has more
than 500 alumnae
School hosts Service Saturday
Send us your Princeton news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at
news@theprincetonsun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the edi-
tor at 609-751-0245.
MAY 14-20, 2014 THE PRINCETON SUN 11
* Getting married?
* Engaged?
* Expecting?
* Need to thank someone?
Send news and photos to
The Princeton Sun via email
to news@theprincetonsun.com.
Tell us your news.
Well tell everyone else.
Please recycle this newspaper.
The Princeton Regional Cham-
ber of Commerces Women in
Business Alliance recently an-
nounced its Annual Women of
Achievement Awards honorees
from the Princeton Region and
Central New Jersey for their pro-
fessional accomplishments and
contributions to the community.
The Women of Achievement
award acknowledges outstanding
women each year who have real-
ized extraordinary levels of ac-
complishment in their respective
fields. This class of honorees in-
cludes such diverse fields as edu-
cation, not for profit organiza-
tions, health care and social advo-
cacy.
Recognition will take place
during a breakfast at TPC Jasna
Polana on June 17.
The Princeton Regional
Chamber and WIBA have created
the Women of Achievement
award to honor women in the
community who have made out-
standing strides in their chosen
professions and causes. It is a
wonderful way to celebrate this
outstanding group of women,
said Michelle Everman, a mem-
ber of the WIBA Committee who
helped create the recognition.
Members of the WIBA commit-
tee nominated women and those
candidates were reviewed by a se-
lection committee along with the
chamber staff.
We are thrilled to honor these
remarkable women leaders for
their extraordinary achieve-
ments, said John Thurber, chair
of the Princeton Regional Cham-
ber of Commerce. As accom-
plished leaders in their respective
fields, each of these women
serves as a role model and a
source of inspiration for all of us.
The Women of Achievement
award is designed to recognize
these women and the people who
have supported them on their
journey to achieving success in
their chosen profession.
The 2014 Women of Achieve-
ment honorees are:
Courtney Banghart, womens
basketball coach at Princeton
University for encouraging young
women to strive for excellence.
Lynne Cannon, Board of Di-
rectors chair, Robert Wood John-
son Hamilton and CEO Princeton
Management Development Insti-
tute, for leadership in health care.
Mara Connolly Taft, Taft &
partner, for marketing and social
advocacy.
Yvette Donado, Educational
Testing Service, for nonprofit ed-
ucation development and leader-
ship in the Hispanic community.
The Princeton Regional Cham-
ber of Commerce is a member-
ship organization committed to
promoting business growth with-
in the Princeton Region and sur-
rounding areas. With more than
1,800 individual contacts and
more than 880 Member compa-
nies, the Princeton Regional
Chamber of Commerce member-
ship is primarily focused in five
central New Jersey counties and
stretches as far as New York,
Philadelphia and Canada.
The public is welcome to attend
the breakfast at TPC Jasna
Polana on June 17 and registra-
tion can be done at www.prince-
tonchamber.org.
Annual Women of Achievement
Award nominees are announced
ALL TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION!
Additions Kitchens Basements Decks Hardwood
Siding Doors Windows
Over 40 Years of Experience!
NJ Lic # 13VH00235600
CALL 609-820-6673 TODAY!
Tom Chapin, Princeton Folk Music
Society, Christ Congregation
Church, 50 Walnut Lane, Prince-
ton. (609) 799-0944. 8:15 p.m. A
program of eclectic songs for all
ages presented by the singer
songwriter includes songs about
emotional connection, grassroots
protest and personal commit-
ment. A performer since the ear-
ly 1960s, he began with the
Chapin Brothers Band and is an
advocate for WhyHunger, an
organization founded by his older
brother, Harry Chapin. $20.
www.princetonfolk.org.
Sound Bites, Arts Council of Prince-
ton, 102 Witherspoon St., Prince-
ton. (609) 924-8777. 8 p.m. The
Juke Joint Johnny Trio performs.
Free pre-concert workshop for
musicians and students of jazz
begins at 6:30 p.m. Bring your
own instrument. Register. $10.
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.
Benefit Evening, Sangam Festival,
John Witherspoon Middle School,
217 Walnut Lane, Princeton.
(609) 688-0248. 6 p.m. Indian
classical music, dance from all
parts of India and South Asia, and
more. Bharatanatyam perform-
ance by students of SPNAPA
Academy of Performing Arts.
Advisors include KP Ramachan-
dran, Bhargav Chandrashekar,
Deepa Subhash Limaye, Chandru
Balaraman and Bala Devi Chan-
drashekar. $25 to $100.
Gallery Talk, Princeton University
Art Museum, Princeton campus.
(609) 258-3788. 12:30 p.m.
'Greek Guile and Roman Recti-
tude' presented by Nancy Man-
ning. Free. artmuseum.prince-
ton.edu.
Art Exhibit, Princeton High School,
Numina Gallery, 151 Moore St.
(609) 806-4300. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
'The Life of Sergio Bonotto: World
War II Veteran and Princeton
Artist.' A graduate of Princeton
High School in 1944, he later
received a degree from Princeton
University. A member of the 86th
infantry division machine gun
squad, he was wounded in the
Battle of Ruhr Pocket in Ger-
many. Bonotto will share sketch-
es he created on the front, draw-
ings of battleships, photographs
from his travels, cartoons he cre-
ated for 'The Tower' and draw-
ings of scenes from around
Princeton. He will also display
some of his life's work as a
chemist. Open through May 21.
Dancing Under the Stars, Prince-
ton Public Library, 65 Wither-
spoon St. (609) 924-8822. 7 p.m.
Central Jersey Dance Society
members lead a family dance
party featuring the music of Pi
Fight Band. Lessons and lemon-
ade available. www.princetonli-
brary.org.
Outdoor Dancing, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Hinds Plaza, With-
erspoon St., Princeton. (609)
945-1883. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. All
styles. Wear dance sneakers.
Bring your own water bottle. No
partner needed. Rain location is
inside the library. Free. www.cen-
traljerseydance.org.
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
912-1272. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Begin-
ners welcome. Lesson followed
by dance. No partner needed. $5.
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
Job Seekers, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton. (609) 924-9529. 10
a.m. For professionals seeking
new employment. www.prince-
tonlibrary.org.
Spring Native Plant Sale, D&R
Greenway Land Trust, Johnson
Education Center, 1 Preservation
Place, Princeton. (609) 924-
4646. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Plants are
available in quart and gallon-
sized pots from $5 to $12.
www.drgreenway.org.
Princeton Public Library, 65 With-
erspoon St., Princeton. (609)
924-9529. 10 a.m. Job seekers.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
SATURDAY May 17
Spring Concert, Youth Orchestra of
Central Jersey, Richardson Audi-
torium, Princeton University. 3
p.m. Weekly rehearsals take place
at West Windsor-Plainsboro High
School North. Auditions for new
students will be held on Tuesday,
June 3. www.yocj.org.
Paul Lansky Retirement Concert,
Princeton University Department
of Music, Taplin Auditorium.
(609) 258-2800. 8 p.m. Perform-
ers include David Starobin, Janus
Trio and So Percussion. Free.
princeton.edu/music
A Vision of Albion, The Princeton
Singers, Trinity Church, 33 Mer-
cer St., Princeton, 866-846-7464.
8 p.m. and 8 p.m. Gabriel Crouch
conducts. $25. www.princeton-
singers.org.
John & Carm, Halo Pub, 5 Hulfish
St., Princeton. (609) 921-1710. 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. Rock and blues.
Family Day, Princeton University
Art Museum, Princeton campus.
(609) 258-3788. 10:30 a.m.
Explore lines, shapes and color
with hands on activities, perform-
ances and scavenger hunts. art-
museum.princeton.edu.
Live With That, Arts Council of
Princeton, 102 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton. (609) 924-8777. 7:30
p.m. Presentation of original
monologues and short scenes
presented by OnStage Theater
MAY 14-20, 2014 THE PRINCETON SUN 13
Coupon must be presented at time of purchase.
*Additional parts & labor in excess of one hour will
be billed at our scheduled rates. One coupon per
customer / per household. Expires 5/31/14.
Coupon must be presented at time of purchase.
Not accepted at time of installation. Not valid with
any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases.
One coupon per customer / per household.
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Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Not accepted at time of
installation. Not valid with any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases.
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Coupon has no cash value. Expires 5/31/14.
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Visit us at www.jlcrafts.com
Approximately 60 New
Sheds Just Arrived!
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PIG
ROAST
May 15th, 16th, & 17th
(in front of the
Amish Food Court)
calendar
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
please see CALENDAR, page 14
Group. $15. www.artscouncilof-
princeton.org.
California Mix, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Suzanne Patter-
son Center, 45 Stockton St.,
Princeton. (609) 945-1883. 7:30
p.m. Lessons followed by social
dance. No partner needed.
Refreshments. $12. www.central-
jerseydance.org.
Annual Gala, McCarter Theater
(Matthews), 91 University Place,
Princeton. (609) 258-2787. 8 p.m.
Straight No Chaser a cappella
group in concert. Live and silent
auction, dancing under the stars.
Register. $200. Black tie admired.
Concert only, $50.
www.mccarter.org.
SolarJam 2014, Oasis: Organizing
Action on Sustainability in
Schools, Princeton High School.
Noon. to 2 p.m. Solar celebration
with teams of students from nine
area schools who have built
either solar mini cars or created
passive solar projects. Food for
sale. Bring your own water bottle.
Free. E-mail lcutler@pds.org for
information.
Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute,
20 Nassau St., Princeton. (732)
604-4135. 2 p.m. Discussion,
meditation and Indian vegetarian
luncheon. Register by E-mail to
princeton@bviscs.org. bviscs.org.
Family Fair, Healthy Children,
Healthy Planet, Riverside School,
58 Riverside Drive, Princeton. 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Garden tours, plant
sale, family yoga, crafts, food,
music and rescue vehicles. $5
benefits garden education pro-
grams.
All SET, Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon St., Princeton. (609)
924-9529. 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
'Chemistry.' Grades 1 to 5.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Birding Trip, Washington Crossing
Audubon Society, Institute
Woods, West Drive, Princeton.
(609) 921-8964. 8 a.m. Guided
walk. Register. Free.
Spring Native Plant Sale, D&R
Greenway Land Trust, Johnson
Education Center, 1 Preservation
Place, Princeton. (609) 924-
4646. 9 a.m. to noon. Plants are
available in quart and gallon-
sized pots from $5 to $12.
www.drgreenway.org.
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning
Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton. (609) 638-6552. 10
a.m. Three-mile walk on the tow-
path. Bad weather cancels. Free.
Walking Tour, Princeton Tour Com-
pany, 98 Nassau St, near Star-
bucks. (609) 902-3637. 2 p.m. to
4 p.m. Visit Princeton University
campus and homes and hangouts
of Albert Einstein, Woodrow Wil-
son, and others. Register. $25.
www.princetontourcompany.com.
Open House, The Lewis School, 53
Bayard Lane, Princeton. (609)
924-8120. 10 a.m. Information
about alternative education pro-
gram for learning different stu-
dents with language-based learn-
ing difficulties related to dyslexia,
attention deficit and auditory
processing. Pre-K to college
preparatory levels. www.lewiss-
chool.org.
House Six, Community without
Walls, Princeton Senior Resource
Center, 45 Stockton St., Prince-
ton. (864) 901-6109. 3 p.m. Meet-
ing for the newest chapter of
CWW. E-mail barbnsc6@aol.com
for information.
princetoncww.org.
Annual Walk, NAMI Mercer, Educa-
tional Testing Service, Princeton.
(609) 799-8994. 9 a.m. Annual
walk to combat stigma and raise
money to benefit education and
support programs for families
affected by mental illness. Regis-
ter. Wellness fair, food, music and
health information.
www.namimercer.org.
SUNDAY May 18
Lance Green Trio, Alchemist & Bar-
rister, 28 Witherspoon St., Prince-
ton. (609) 924-5555. 10 p.m. 21-
plus. www.theaandb.com.
Concert, New Jersey Gay Men's
Chorus, Unitarian Universalist
Congregation, 50 Cherry Hill
Road, Princeton. (732) 579-8449.
4 p.m. 'Game On!' features music
that defies stereotypes about gay
men, sports and games. Steven
A. Russell is artistic director and
conductor. $25. www.njgmc.org.
Day Tours, Princeton University Art
Museum, Princeton campus.
(609) 258-3788. 3 p.m. Tour 'Ed-
vard Munch' exhibit with Judy
Langille or 'Photography at
Princeton' with Mike Mayo. art-
museum.princeton.edu.
Beauty 360, Princeton Center for
Plastic Surgery, 932 State Road,
Princeton. (609) 921-7161. 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Information about prod-
ucts and services. Register.
www.princetonsurgery.com.
Walking Tour, Historical Society of
Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 921-
6748. 2 p.m. Two-hour walking
tour around downtown Princeton
and Princeton University campus.
$7. www.princetonhistory.org.
Lego Club, Princeton Public Library,
65 Witherspoon St. (609) 924-
8822. 1 p.m. Grades K to 2 from 1
to 2 p.m. Grades 3 to 5 from 2 to
3 p.m, www.princetonlibrary.org.
Birding Trip, Washington Crossing
Audubon Society, Institute
Woods, West Drive, Princeton.
(609) 921-8964. 8 a.m. Guided
walk. Register. Free.
MONDAY May 19
Community Think Gathering,
McCarter Theater, Terra Teatro,
91 University Place, Princeton.
(609) 258-2787. 6 p.m. Collabora-
tion between theater and audi-
ence to create new opportunities
for the performing arts. Atten-
dees will receive a voucher for
two tickets to a performance of
their choice. Register by E-mail to
palekson@mccarter.org. Free.
www.mccarter.org.
Latin Fundamentals Workshops,
Central Jersey Dance Society,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
945-1883. 7 p.m. Bachata lesson
for beginners with Michael Andi-
no followed by social dance. No
partner needed. Register. $15.
www.centraljerseydance.org.
Happiness Project Group, Prince-
ton Senior Resource Center,
Suzanne Patterson Building, 45
Stockton St. (609) 924-7108. 1
p.m. Meet weekly to read and dis-
cuss Gretchen Rubin's book, 'The
Happiness Project: Or, Why I
spent a Year Trying to Sing in the
Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight
Right, Read Aristotle, and Gener-
ally Have More Fun.' Led by Helen
Burton. Free. www.princetonse-
nior.org.
Next Step Speaker Series, Prince-
ton Public Library, 65 Wither-
spoon St. (609) 924-8822. 7 p.m.
'Making Your Money Go Further
in Retirement,' presented by Mar-
ion Sommer. www.princetonli-
brary
.org.
Thomas C. Streckewald Memorial
Golf Classic, Thomas Edison
State College Foundation, Jasna
Polana, Princeton. (609) 984-
1588. 9:30 a.m. Golf classic bene-
fits the college foundation. Tee
off at 10:30 a.m. Cocktails, silent
auction, dinner and awards cere-
mony. Register. $300.
www.tesc.edu.
14 THE PRINCETON SUN MAY 14-20, 2014
MASSAGE THERAPY FOOT SOAK FOOT MASSAGE
$10 OFF
90-MINUTE OR
120-MINUTE MASSAGE PACKAGE
Cannot be combined with any other offer.
Expires 6/30/14.
$45
1 HOUR MASSAGE
Cannot be combined with any other offer.
Expires 6/30/14.
Gift
certificates
available!
$90
1 HOUR COUPLES MASSAGE
Cannot be combined with any other offer.
Expires 6/30/14.
609-882-8889
www.massagelawrenceville.com
LAWRENCE SHOPPING CENTER
2495 Route 1 Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
RESTORE RELAX REFRESH
WALK INS ARE WELCOME! Hours - Monday-Friday 10 AM - 9 PM, Saturday and Sunday 10 AM - 8 PM
calendar
CALENDAR
Continued from page 13
please see CALENDAR, page 16
16 THE PRINCETON SUN MAY 14-20, 2014
JoIn us for...
The NealI ChIldren`s PrInceton BenefIt
EXPERT PANEL DISCUSSIONS & INSPIRING TALKS
Saturday, May 24, 2014 9:00an - 5:30 pn
You can Make a Difference!
A Child in Nepal can be educated
$60/year!
Become the change you want
to see in the world!
LISTEN, SHARE, BE INSPIRED, DONATE, GET INVOLVED!
Lunch & Refreshments. Admission by Donation Information
& registration on-line: www.fonnj.com
Unitarian Universalist Church of Princeton
50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJ (908)369-4318
4-PART PROGRAM INCLUDES:
Expert Panelists
Panel Discussions of Needs
Motivational Talk
Audience Conversation
Yoga Session
FONNJ-Rotary International-Humanitarian
Awards
Sponsored By
District 7510
for just
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Durga Prasad Bhattarai, UN Ambassador from Nepal Dr. Adiel Tel-Oren, Founder of the Everest Learning Academy Joe Yannuzzi,
Mt. Everest Summiteer
TUESDAY May 20
International Folk Dance, Princeton
Folk Dance, Riverside School, 58
Riverside Drive, Princeton. (609)
921-9340. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Ethnic
dances of many countries using
original music. Beginners wel-
come. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $3.
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
Writers Room, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton. (609) 924-9529. 7
p.m. For fiction and non-fiction
writers to read their work and get
feedback.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Seminar, Princeton Public Library,
65 Witherspoon St., Princeton.
(609) 924-9529. 6:30 p.m. 'Holis-
tic Marketing for the Digital Age'
presented by Michael Barry, pres-
ident of Princeton Creative Mar-
keting.
Living and Learning Without
School, Princeton Learning
Cooperative, 16 All Saints Road,
Princeton. (609) 851-2522. 7 p.m.
Teens and young adults share
stories about being home-
schooled during high school. Reg-
ister. Free. www.princetonlearn-
ingcooperative.org.
Capital Networking Group, Prince-
ton United Methodist Church, 7
Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.
(609) 635-1411. 7 a.m. to 8:30
a.m. Free.
Princeton SCORE, Princeton Public
Library. (609) 393-0505. 6:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Holistic Market-
ing for the Digital Age. Free semi-
nar. princeton.score.org/local-
workshops
JobSeekers, Trinity Church, 33 Mer-
cer St. (609) 924-2277. 7:30 p.m.
Networking and job support, free.
www.trinityprinceton.org.
calendar
CALENDAR
Continued from page 14
MAY 14-20, 2014 THE PRINCETON SUN 17
Shrek the Musical
coming to MCCC
Everyones favorite ogre comes
to Mercer County Community
Colleges Kelsey Theatre when
the award-winning Maurer Pro-
ductions OnStage presents
Shrek the Musical, a song-and-
dance-filled adaptation of the
Oscar-winning DreamWorks ani-
mated film. Dates and times for
this special family event are: Fri-
days, May 30 and June 6 at 8 p.m.;
Saturdays, May 31 and June 7 at 2
p.m. and 8 p.m.; and Sundays,
June 1 and 8 at 2 p.m. A reception
with the cast and crew will follow
the opening night performance
on May 30.
In the Kingdom of Duloc, the
classic princely rescue of the
damsel in distress is not proceed-
ing according to protocol. In-
stead, an unseemly ogre not a
handsome prince! has shown up
to rescue a feisty princess. Add to
the mix a donkey that won't shut
up, a bad guy with a short temper,
a cookie with an attitude and
more than a dozen other fairytale
misfits, and you've got the kind of
mess that calls for a real hero.
Luckily, there's one on hand and
his name is Shrek. Shrek the
Musical is part romance, part
fractured fairy tale and 100 per-
cent delightful fun for the whole
family.
Based on the Oscar-winning
DreamWorks film, this stage ver-
sion of Shrek was nominated
for eight Tony Awards, including
best score and best book for a mu-
sical, when it opened on Broad-
way in 2008. It ran for more than
12 months and since then has
toured nationally and interna-
tionally.
The shows director, Laurie
Gougher, notes that Shrek is an
exciting show to both stage and
watch. There are a lot of great
songs and signature moments
from the movie, but I especially
love how the world of Duloc is
fully realized with so many mem-
orable characters. Theres some-
thing in this show for everyone,
she says, adding that adults will
enjoy themselves as much as chil-
dren.
MPO, led by Artistic Director
John Maurer, earned rave re-
views for its production of
Monty Pythons Spamalot in
the fall and Avenue Q last sea-
son. Maurer considers Shrek
the Musical to be the largest and
most complex production in the
companys nine-year history. The
show features 35 actors, more
than 60 fairytale costumes, scores
of props and 16 hand-crafted pup-
pets, including a 24-foot dragon.
The lead characters include:
Jarad Benn of West Chester, Pa.
as Shrek; Kim Cupo of Fairless
Hills, Pa., as Princess Fiona;
Kyrus Keenan Westcott of Hamil-
ton as Donkey; and Nicholas
Pecht of Hamilton as Lord Far-
quaad.
Featured as citizens of the
Kingdom are: Margot Bergeron of
Hamilton, Evan Bilinski of
Franklin Park, Addison Blum-
berg of Yardley, Pa., Wesley Cap-
piello of Hamilton, Justin Derry
of Langhorne, Pa., Susan Fowler
of New Hope, Pa., Charlotte and
Rob Gougher of Newtown, Pa.,
Simon Hamilton of Princeton,
Bridget Hughes of Jackson, Kris-
ten Kane of Plainsboro, Rosie and
Scott Karlin of Plainsboro, Jon
Knapp of Jamison, Pa., Anna
Kralik of Hamilton, Jonathan
Logan of West Windsor, Amanda
Mancino of Bordentown, Jaimie
McMillin of Bordentown,
Michael Mitgang of West Wind-
sor, Abby Oliver of Hamilton,
Sally Page of Princeton, Danielle
Paglino of Marlboro, Caroline
Purdy of Cranbury, Donna Reed
of Bordentown, Aimee Robidoux
of Levittown, Pa. Lexi Schlaifer
of Hightstown, Dominique Shaw
of Hamilton, Liam Smith of Yard-
ley, Pa. Matt South of Levittown,
Pa., Nicky Torchia of Langhorne,
Pa., and Julianna Zannikos of
Doylestown, Pa.
Shrek is produced by Maur-
er, Diana Gilman Maurer, and
Dan Maurer. In addition to
Gougher, the production team in-
cludes musical director Peter de
Mets, choreographer Stephanie
Venanzi, costume designer Kathy
Slothower, makeup designer
Vicky Czarnik, lighting designer
M. Kitty Getlik, prop mistress
Dottie Farina, master set builder
Jeff Cantor, stage manager Bever-
ly Kuo Hamilton, set designer and
master puppeteer John M. Maur-
er, scenic artist Amy Bessellieu,
and sound engineer Nick
Mastalesz.
Tickets are $20 for all and may
be purchased by calling the
Kelsey Box Office at (609) 570-3333
or online at
www.kelseytheatre.net. Kelsey
Theatre is wheelchair accessible.
Free parking is available next to
the theater.
1-800-281-2573 1-800-281-2573
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T HE P R I N C E T O N S U N
MAY 14-20, 2014 PAGE 18
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