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M A Y B A C H
A R R I M O T I O N
3 - P E R F
E M M Y A W A R D
ARRI C OMPAC T 12, 000 W
ARRI 3- P E RF MOV E ME NT
ARRI ULT RA P RI ME S
N E W S
A R R I C A M
04 A R R I MOT I ON
06 A R R I C A M 3- P e r f Mo v e me n t
A R R I C A M L i t e Un i v e r s a l V i e wf i n d e r
To p L o a d A d a p t e r 2
07 A R R I C A M S t u d i o L D B A d a p t e r
L e n s D a t a D i s p l a y F P
F E M- 2 f o r A R R I F L E X 435 A d v a n c e d
08 I n - C a me r a S l a t e R e a d e r
T i mi n g S h i f t B o x
09 Ne w A R R I UL T R A P R I ME S L e n s e s
10 L o s A n g e l e s d e b u t s t h e A R R I C A M
11 C l a i r mo n t C a me r a o r d e r s 20 A R R I C A MS
12 A R R I C A M L a u n c h e s i n A s i a
Ho n g K o n g , B e i j i n g , S e o u l , S i n g a p o r e
14 A R R I C A M P r e s e n t a t i o n s
I t a l y Me x i c o Hu n g a r y
16 A R R I S K Y PA NE L
17 A R R I S T UD I O- C OOL
18 A R R I C OMPA C T 12, 000 W
19 S ma l l e s t 6 k W/230 V E l e c t r o n i c B a l l a s t
wi t h A c t i v e L i n e F i l t e r ( A L F )
20 C a r l Z e i s s C i n e L e n s e s
24 On t h e mo v e : 3- P e r f
26 Ma y b a c h
C o me b a c k o f a L e g e n d
28 T h e Mo v i e b e f o r e t h e Mo v i e
30 A n a t o my 2
31 A R R I F i l m & T V S e r v i c e s Mu n i c h
a n d A R R I R e n t a l G e r ma n y
32 UK A R R I G r o u p
e x p a n s i o n l e a d s t o p r e s t i g i o u s n e w o f f i c e s
33 Ma k i n g t h e R i g h t Mo v e
34 T h e A me r i c a n E mb a s s y
36 Un d e r wa t e r C a me r a S p e c i a l i s t u p g r a d e s
wi t h a n A R R I F L E X 435 f o r B o n d
B r i g h t L i g h t s a t t h e R o y a l Op e r a Ho u s e
37 To p Ta i wa n S t u d i o c h o o s e s A R R I L i g h t i n g
38 T h e b r i g h t s i d e o f t h e F o r c e :
A R R I L A S E R D i g i t a l F i l m R e c o r d e r
e n t e r s t h e Ho l l y wo o d WA R S
40 T HE 25T H HOUR
A n e w Sp i k e L e e P r o j e c t f i l me d wi t h t h e A RRI C A M
42 Tu r n i n g o n t h e L i g h t s
a t t h e S a l t L a k e C i t y Ol y mp i c s
44 A R R I C A M a n d C l a u d e L e l o u c h
45 A R R I i n t h e R a c e wi t h Vo d a f o n e a n d F e r r a r i
46 FA C I NG T HE T R UT H
D a n i s h P r o d u c t i o n i n B l a c k a n d Wh i t e
48 A S e l e c t i o n o f C u r r e n t l y S e r v i c e d P r o d u c t i o n s
2
C O N T E N T S
Dear est ARRI Fr i ends,
We couldnt have asked for better timing: right on schedule for the ibc and cinec, the Academy
of Television Arts & Sciences has chosen to honor ARRI with a Primetime EMMY Award
for outstanding achievement in engineering development of ARRI and ARRIFLEX Cameras.
We are particularly pleased to receive this award since it comes from a completely new
direction the television industry.
This completes (at least for now) a circle that was begun at Satis 2001 in Paris with a double
Satisfecit for the ARRICAM and the ARRILASER. In March 2002 the Academy of Motion
Picture Arts and Sciences, which also awards the OSCARs

, followed up with a Scientific


and Engineering Award for the ARRILASER, and shortly afterwards both products ARRI-
CAM and ARRILASER received a Red Dot Award for excellent design. The ARRICAM
even captured a place in the top class, the Best of the Best. We at ARRI are extremely proud
of these awards, as they show how well recognized and appreciated our products are in the
industry and with our customers.
Just how close we are to our customers is also shown by the interest in our latest product, the
ARRICAM family. Despite the at times extremely difficult economic situation in the film and
media industry, this years production was already sold out in July.
With the interchangeable 3-perf kits for the ARRICAM, ARRI caters to the considerably
strengthened trend towards cost-saving 3-perf productions. The highest priority for us is to sec-
ure our customers investment: the kit is considerably less expensive than the conversion of
an entire camera, as was necessary in the past. In addition, it is now possible to convert back
and forth between both formats as required. All components and features of the ARRICAM
system can also be fully utilized for 3-perf. Both the ARRILASER and the LOCPRO35 of
course support full 3-perf functionality.
In the main facility in Munich, ARRI caters to customers wishes for service from a one-stop
shop, by consolidating the divisions lab, sound, TV post-production and digital film in the
ARRI Film&TV Services GmbH, a constellation which is unique in the world. The rental park
organization was also consolidated for the first time in the company ARRI Rental Deutsch-
land GmbH.
For you as an ARRI customer this means considerably fewer contact persons, fewer time-
consuming intermediate steps and improved access to the entire service spectrum.
A lot has changed at ARRI. And new ideas are still waiting to be put into practice together
with you, our customers and partners.
What do you think of that?
I look forward to exciting discussions with you: at the ibc, the cinec, or wherever we have
the opportunity.
Best Regards from Munich,
Your
Alfred Schopf
Alfred Schopf
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4
Complex effects shots are traditionally done
by a special effects crew with heavy motion
control equipment, and simpler shots by the
first unit with small record/repeat systems,
so called memory heads. In the last years
though, more and more special effects shots
of increasing complexity are shot by the first
unit, often on location. Unfortunately, neither
existing motion control systems nor memory
heads properly address the needs of first unit
special effect shots. Traditional motion con-
trol systems are too complex and costly, and
memory heads do not have sufficient features.
This is where ARRIMOTION steps in, offe-
ring quick setup, easy operation and power-
ful features for feature films and commercials.
The basic ARRIMOTION system is small and
portable and can be operated by the cam-
era assistant, especially since the system seam-
lessly integrates with most modern ARRI cam-
eras and uses other familiar components, like
the ARRIHEAD and the ARRI Lens Control
System. Moves can be created by operating
the camera, ARRIHEAD and Lens Control
System in the normal fashion, while the ARRI-
MOTION system records all actions. Playing
moves back is as easy as pushing the PLAY
button on a video recorder. The producer will
be pleased because standard ARRI compo-
nents are used and fewer specialty items have
to be rented.
The basic setup consists of the main control-
ler, which is attached to the ARRIHEAD, two
small motors that are placed between the
ARRIHEAD and the ARRIHEAD hand wheels
and the Jogbox, which is used to record and
playback moves. For most record/repeat
moves the ARRIFLEX 16SR3, 435, 535 and
ARRICAM cameras can be used. Frame accu-
rate effects such as time lapse or go motion
can be accomplished with the 435Advanced
(435 Advanced & LDS support available at
the end of the year).
Here some example applications:
Record time lapse camera moves.
Record at different camera speeds for
foreground and background.
Assist on tricky camera moves, for
instance difficult focus in extreme
close-ups (table top).
Remote control the ARRIHEAD.
Create multiple layers.
Shoot clean plates/background plates.
Capture camera position and lens (LDS)
information for post-production.
In addition to being easy to use, the ARRI-
MOTION system excels through its great
features and expandability. The system has a
recording capacity measured in hours rather
than seconds, and with the integrated digital
storage, moves can be recorded and called
up later. If more items beyond camera, head
and lens need to be controlled, the main
controller can be expanded with additional
modules, allowing up to 48 axes. For the
ultimate in expandability, multiple main con-
trollers can be networked together for an
unlimited number of axis. Other accessories
available include a servo motor module, a
Bloop Light and the GPI Trigger Box, which
allows the ARRIMOTION system to trigger
or be triggered by other devices. The ARRI-
MOTION system can also control a Beta-
cam video deck.
The ARRIMOTION system is a complete sys-
tem that tightly integrates with existing ARRI
gear and gives the production crew unprece-
dented simplicity and control when shooting
special effects. It is ideal for productions that
need precise camera control but do not have
the need, time or budget for a full motion
control system.
ARRIMOTION Compatible Cameras
ARRICAM Studio, Lite
ARRIFLEX 435ES, 435 Advanced
ARRIFLEX 535A, 535B
ARRIFLEX 16SR 3, 16SR3 HS, 16SR3
Advanced, 16SR3 HS Advanced
ARRIMOTION Components
The ARRIMOTION system consists of three
core components the main controller, the
Controlled Head Motors and the Jogbox.
The Main Controller
The main controller consists of at least one
module, the Camera Control Box (CCB-1).
ARRI MOTI ON
The ARRIMOTION system gives productions a simple and user
friendly alternative to complex and expensive motion control
rigs. Just add a couple of small, lightweight components to an
ARRIHEAD, and suddenly camera moves, lens operations, fps
changes and shutter changes can be recorded and played
back without any loss of production time.
The complete
ARRIMOTION System
5
Its functions can be expanded by adding
other modules to control head motors, lens
motors and other equipment. A typical Main
Controller consist of:
The Camera Control Box (CCB-1) stores moves
and governs communication between all
components. It connects the ARRIMOTION
system to:
the camera,
the ARRIMOTION controllers
(Jogbox or Laptop),
the Bloop Light and GPI Trigger Box
and the Lens Control System hand units
ZMU-1, ZMU-2 or WHA-2 (with WZU-1
and/or WFU-1).
The Motor Control Box (MCB-1) controls up
to 3 Controlled Head Motors (CHM-1) and
reads the signals from the ARRIHEAD-2 with
Encoders.
The Lens Control Box (LCB-1) controls up to
3 Controlled Lens Motors (CLM-2) and can
process Lens Data System (LDS) information.
Controlled Head Motors
Two Controlled Head Motors (CHM-1), one
for pan and one for tilt, attach between the
ARRIHEAD and the ARRIHEAD hand wheels.
Operating an ARRIHEAD with the Controlled
Head Motors feels exactly like operating it
without the motors, thanks to the adjustable
fluid drag. While the ARRIHEAD is operated,
the main controller records all pan and tilt
movements. When the move is played back,
these motors will precisely repeat the pan and
tilt movements of the operator.
The Jogbox
The Jogbox is used to setup the ARRIMOTION
system, and to record and play back moves.
When equipped with the Jogbox Cable
Adapter JCA-1, it connects with a cable to the
main controller. Optionally it can also slide
into the Jogbox Hand Wheel Controller.
Other ARRIMOTION Components
The Auxiliary Control Box (ACB-1)
The ACB-1 controls up to 3 external servo
motors (model movers, dolly drives, etc.)
Bloop Light (BLT-1)
The Bloop Light exposes sync marks on film
GPI Trigger Box (GPI-1)
The GPI Trigger Box is used to trigger ex-
ternal events from the ARRIMOTION sys-
tem, or to have the ARRIMOTION system
be triggered by external events. It is possi-
ble to connect up to four GPI Trigger Box-
es to the CCB-1.
The Jogbox Hand Wheel Controller (JHC-1)
JHC-1 is a stand that mounts onto a flat
tripod base and connects to the CCB-1.
It has two adjustable arms to accept
ARRIHEAD hand wheels, a receptacle to
accept the Jogbox, and a platform for a
video monitor.
For Setup, Record
and Playback
the Jogbox is used
The ARRI-
MOTION Main
Controller
PPM FI L MPRODUKTI ON,
VI ENNA
The Controlled Head
Motors attach
between the Hand
Wheels and the
ARRIHEAD
MI CAN WERBEFI L MPRODUKTI ON, VI ENNA
6
a high quality 35mm film master that can be
transferred to any future video format if
needed. Currently, all modern telecines can
easily accommodate film shot at 3perfor-
ations per frame.
With the advent of the Digital Lab and the
fast rising popularity of the ARRILASER, two
developments that are closely related, many
producers are also looking at the option of
shooting 3-perf for theatrical release. Now
it is possible to scan the complete 3-perf ne-
gative into a digital intermediate format, per-
form all post-production steps in the digital
realm, and then use the ARRILASER to record
the images back onto 4-perf Internegative (IN)
or Interpositive (IP) to create standard 4-perf
In addition to the standard 4-perf movement a
3-perf movement that fits in either the ARRI-
CAM Studio or the ARRICAMLite is now avail-
able.
Many aperture formats do not use all the ver-
tical space provided by a 4-perf movement,
and can instead fit within 3perforations.
Shooting 3-perf results in savings of about
25% in film stock and processing costs, with
no reduction in image quality: it simply does
away with the space that was unused before
on 4-perf film.
So far, shooting 3-perf has been a popular
choice for television sitcoms. It allows them to
reduce production costs while still retaining
release prints. Not only does this save money
for productions that already opt for the digi-
tal post, it also facilitates further distribution
options like DVDs etc.
The 3-perf conversion kit K2.54165.0 consists
of the 3-perf movement as well as a 3-perf
film gate, format mask and filter holder.
ARRI CAM 3- Per f Movement
The new Lite Universal Viewfinder features
an anamorphic element in the viewfinder
arm that allows switching between spherical
and anamorphic viewing. Since it can be
attached to both the Lite and Studio camera,
this viewfinder is a must-have item for any
anamorphic ARRICAM production.
With the superior optical quality that is the
mark of ARRI viewfinders, the Lite Universal
Viewfinder is still small and lightweight
enough for handheld work on the Studio or
Lite cameras. All standard ARRI viewfinder
features have been incorporated, including
camera left or right viewing, automatic or
manual image rotation adjustment and a
swing-in ND 6 contrast filter. In response to
customer requests, the viewfinder arm teles-
copes to move the eyepiece away from the
camera. This allows a more comfortable
viewing position or left eye viewing.
A new spherical Lite viewfinder based on
the Lite Universal Finder design is also in
preparation. Both viewfinders share the same
superior optical quality and use the Studio
extension and may use the Studio eyepiece.
By exchanging their viewfinder arms, a Lite
Universal Viewfinder can be converted to
spherical-only viewing and vice versa, using
a system that is familiar from the 435/535B
viewfinders.
Lite Universal Viewfinder Ident No. K2.54099.0
The Top Load Adapter 2 allows Studio maga-
zines to be mounted on the ARRICAM Studio
in top load or in an angled back load posi-
tion. Magazines can be switched between
the two positions without having to switch
adapters.
The top-load position of the new adapter is no
different from the original Top Load Adapter.
When mounted in the back load position, the
magazine is at a 30 angle. In this position
even a 1000 magazine will clear the top of
the bridge plate as well as the geared head.
Top Load Adapter 2 Ident No. K2.54139.0
ARRI CAM Li te Uni ver sal Vi ewfi nder
Top Load Adapter 2
The Lens Data Display for the focus puller
(LDD-FP) is a new milestone in the develop-
ment of the ARRI Lens Data System. Made
possible by the LDS lenses, which communi-
cate with the camera, the LDD-FP is a small
and lightweight display that shows critical
lens information and camera status.
Because of its small size it can be mounted
in a number of ways. Most importantly, it
can be attached to the matte box where the
assistant can see precise lens and camera
information while keeping an eye on the
action. Of course, the LDD-FP also mounts
on any of the accessory shoes on the cam-
era a useful option if the assistant must
operate on the camera right side.
The screen of the LDD-FP is a high contrast
Advanced TFT color screen with adjustable
brightness that can be viewed not only
indoors but also on location in bright sun-
light. The display can be configured to
show the lens focus scale, zoom scale, iris
scale and/or camera information in any
combination. Thus the assistant can set the
LDD-FP to show just the information needed.
LDD-FP Ident No. K2.54163.0
The Functional Expansion Module FEM-2
extends the capabilities of the 435Advanced,
making it the perfect high speed MOS com-
panion for the ARRICAM cameras. Both the
ARRIFLEX 435Advanced and the ARRICAM
System can now use the modern features
designed to make work faster and more
efficient, from Lens Data System to Wireless
Lens and Camera Control. Accessories such
as the Lens Data Display for the Focus Puller
(LDD-FP), or the Wireless Lens Control System
can now be used for both 435Advanced
and ARRICAMs.
The FEM-2 provides full Lens Data System
features. The information from LDS lenses is
processed in the FEM-2 and forwarded to the
Lens Data Display (LDD or LDD-FP), which can
be connected to the FEM-2. The Lens Data
Display allows the camera assistant to quickly
determine lens status, camera status and
depth of field.
FEM-2 Ident No. K2.52226.0
The Studio LDB plate is equipped with three
3/8 threaded holes, two on the backside
and one on the front.
The Dovetail Shoe (K2.52225.0) can be
attached to one of the 3/8" threaded holes
of the Studio LDB Adapter. The Studio LDB
Adapter can then be mounted to any other
ARRI part with a dovetail, for instance:
the Dovetail Rod Clamp,
(19mm: K2.54148.0, 15mm:K4.52563.0)
which mounts directly to rods,
the Dovetail 3/8" Clamp (K2.52082.0),
which screws into any 3/8" threaded hole,
the WHA-2 Rod Bracket (K2.52150.0),
an adjustable arm that mounts to 19mm
support rods, and
the WHA-2 Rosette Bracket (K2.52153.0),
which mounts to the ARRIHEAD rosette.
Studio LDB Adapter Ident No. K2.54144.0
Under some circumstances, most notably
when using the ARRICAMStudio on a Steadi-
cam, it is preferable to mount the Lens Data
Box removed from the camera body. The
Studio LDB Adapter can be used to mount the
Lens Data Box above the camera or directly
on the Steadicam.
The Studio LDB Adapter consists of two plates
and a cable. The Studio Body Plate mounts
onto the ARRICAM Studio. The Studio Lens
Data Box is attached to the Studio LDB Plate.
The LDB Adapter cable (1meter/3feet) con-
nects the two plates.
Aside from a quick Velcro-mount, there are
various other mounting options, providing
great flexibility:
FEM- 2 for ARRI FLEX 435 Advanced
ARRI CAM Studi o LDB Adapter
Lens Data Di spl ay FP
8
I n- Camer a Sl ate Reader
The Timing Shift Box adjusts the phase rela-
tionship of the mirror shutter to the movement.
The result is that the film is exposed while be-
ing transported, which creates a streaking
effect. Though strictly speaking an image de-
fect, this is an effect that has become very
popular in the past years.
With the TSB the timing shift effect can be ad-
justed from very faint to very strong. A timing
shift can be done while the camera is running
(a timing shift ramp), or the effect can be
locked in to remain constant.
The TSB hardware is based on the MCB hard-
ware. To ensure that the TSB is not confused
with the MCB, the TSB front cover is red.
The TSB can be mounted on the ARRICAM
Studio in place of the MCB, connected to ST
or Lite camera with a cable and the MCB
Cable Adapter.
The TSB, MCB and SCB can be used simul-
taneously.
Timing Shift Box Ident No. K2.54171.0
Ti mi ng Shi ft Box
A revolutionary system has been further
improved: So far, the ARRICAMs in-camera
slate system was used just like a time-code
slate. All information on the film is clearly
readable and can be used in post production
wherever it is needed avoiding the disad-
vantages of conventional clapper boards,
such as poorly readable hand writing, not up-
dated information, slates outside the image
area or out of focus. Now the in-camera slate
reader recognizes the data automatically to
improve comfort, reliability and throughput
dramatically. The ICS reader can be used
while the images are loaded into the editing
system or immediately at the telecine. A new
software grabs the individual in-camera slate
images from the video signal, reads the data
and writes these into a file.The sound can now
also be syncronized directly in the telecine
process to create immediate video rushes. Sub
clips can be created automatically in the edit-
ing systems and sound can be synchronized
here as well.
For editing systems like AVID, the film is trans-
fered in the telecine without any additional
efforts to log the in-camera slate data: a de-
cisive advantage for telecine operators. The
footage is loaded into the editing system. At
the same time it is sent to the in-camera slate
reader. Alist of all in-camera slate information
is created during this process, such as name
of production, director, DoP, take number,
scene number and film time code. Within the
editing software, the footage can be split up
into sub clips automatically. Manual sub clipp-
ing is not needed anymore. In the next step,
image and sound can be automatically syn-
chronized using the time code information.
With the ICS reader used on the telecine, cre-
ating video rushes is considerably speeded
up and simplified, avoiding the up to now ne-
cessary process to load the material into the
editing system first. The in-camera slate rea-
der supports not only the logging of the in-
camera slate data during the scanning pro-
cess, but also the direct sound synchroni-
sation. Prior to scanning, the sound is trans-
fered into audio systems with an immediate
access, such as SADIE or In-Draw. Addition-
ally a log file of in-camera slate events is
generated. This file can be used in further
post production.
In-Camera Slate Reader Ident No. K2.47436.0
9
Carl Zeiss Distagon 1.9/12mm
Super wide angle lens with a viewing angle of
103 (diagonal)
Coverage of Super 35 format (max. image
diameter 32.4mm)
Fifteen individual lens elements in twelve lens
groups, one consisting of UD (ultra low dis-
persion) with deviating partial dispersion to
correct transverse chromatic aberration
Iris settings from T2 to T22
Shortest focus distance 0.3m/1ft
Outstanding image quality covering the full
focusing range from infinity to close-focus
Internal focus with floating elements
Iris aperture consisting of 9 blades
Uniform position of scales and gears guarantee
easy lens change
Easy change of focus scales optional as
meter or feet scale
Front diameter 156mm, length of lens
140mm (from PL-mount)
Weight 2kg
Carl Zeiss Sonnar 1.8/180mm
Extremly high speed tele lens
Coverage of Super 35 format (max. image
diameter 32.4mm)
Nine individual lens elements in seven lens
groups, three consisting of UD (ultra low
dispersion) glass with deviating partial
dispersion to correct the longitudinal
chromatic aberration (secondary spectrum)
Iris settings from T2 to T22
Shortest focus distance 2.6m/8ft
Outstanding image quality covering the full
focusing range from infinity to close-focus
Internal focus (floating of elements) ensures
that mechanical, overall length of lens
(166mm) remains constant throughout the
entire focusing range
Iris aperture consisting of eleven blades
Uniform position of scales and gears guarantee
easy lens change
Easy change of focus scale
optional as meter or feet scale
Front diameter 114mm,
length of lens 166mm (from pl mount)
Weight 2.5kg
New ARRI ULTRA PRI ME Lenses
The ULTRA PRIME lens range now consists of a total of fifteen different focal length lenses.
With the Carl Zeiss Distagon 1.9/12 mm and the Carl Zeiss Sonnar 1.8/180 mm, the range of ULTRA PRIME
lenses has been further extended and now offers the most extensive set of lenses on the market.
180mm ULTRA PRIME
K2.47381.0m
K2.47382.0 feet immediately available
180mm ULTRA PRIME LDS
K2.52202.0m
K2.52203.0feet immediately available
12mm ULTRA PRIME
K2.47378.0m
K2.47380.0 feet immediately available
12mm ULTRA PRIME LDS
K2.52198.0m
K2.52199.0feet available end of 2002
10
Over 400 people attended the presentation,
including cinematographers, directors, pro-
ducers, camera operators and press. The
evening unfolded with a walk down the red
carpet to the theatre, just across from Brown-
stone Street. A few ARRI CAMs, lit by ARRI
lights, peppered the area for people to take
a look through the lens. After a champagne
welcome reception, the crowd was ushered
into the theatre where key personnel gave
an overview of the products and history.
Alfred Schopf, ARRIs CEO, began the eve-
ning with a comparison of ARRI to Warner
Brothers, and the longevity that both compa-
nies have enjoyed. It is a pleasure to stand
before you in this beautiful theatre on a studio
lot with such a rich tradition. As you know,
the Warner Brothers started as a partner-
ship of two. This history is not dissimilar to
our own and just slightly shorter. By the looks
of things, they seem to have done pretty
well, said Schopf. He gave the crowd an
overview of ARRIs history and its products.
ARRI has been a part of the film industry
for over eighty-five years, providing tools for
artists, and at the same time supplying and
supporting industry-related service busines-
ses around the world, said Schopf. In my
capacity as CEO it is my challenge and
opportunity to guide the company during this
exciting period and the merging of analog
and digital technologies. To that end, we
present to you a range of products that are
all designed with special consideration
towards todays production demands in the
digital age of film.
Charlie Davidson, Vice President Lighting
Division, ARRI Inc., was next, detailing the
immense reach that ARRI lighting has world-
wide, including the most recent job of light-
ing the winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. We
are convinced that our growth will come
from both our worldwide reach and the
increasing diversity of ARRI lighting products,
he explained.
ARRI is of course still best known for cam-
eras, movie cameras to be specific, conti-
nued Volker Bahnemann, President, ARRI
Inc. A combined design and engineering
team from our two camera product groups,
ARRI and Moviecam, was formed to create
the new ARRICAM system. Fritz Gabriel
Bauer presented a look at the precision
and engineering of the ARRICAM system.
When Moviecam became part of the ARRI
Group of companies, we thought about how
to merge talent, abilities, style, vision and
experience from both companies: ARRIs
background of engineering and manufactur-
ing high-tech, high-end equipment for the film
industry and my thoughts about user-friendly
and modular cameras, and thats how we
decided to design the ARRICAMs, said Bauer.
Los Angel es debuts the ARRI CAM
It was a red carpet premiere for the debut of the ARRICAM in Los Angeles on February 28 at Warner Brothers
Studios. Held on the backlot, ARRI in the Digital Age of Film was the theme emblazoned on the Stephen J. Ross
Theatre marquee as guests were shuttled from gate 2 to the theatre.
Some of the notables who attended the event included:
Steven Poster, ASC, president of the American Society of Cinematogra-
phers, George Spiro Dibie, ASC, president of the International Cinemato-
graphers Guild, Georgia Packard, president of the Society of Operating
Cameramen, Steve Papazian, Executive VP, Feature Production, Warner
Bros., Ronald Silveir, COO, The Post Group, Mark Murphy, Vice President,
Fujifilm, Joel Marshall, Atomic Film Company, Al Mayer, Sr. Vice President,
R&D, Panavision, Jim McCullaugh, Executive Director, ASC, Dash Morri-
son, Deluxe, Otto Nemenz, Pete Romano, President, Hydroflex, Richard
Agostinelli, COO, NeTune Comunications, Rufus Burnham, The Camera
House, Terry and Denny Clairmont, Clairmont Camera, Michael Cooper,
ILM, Ray Feeney, President, RFX, Robert Keslow, Keslow Camera and
Walter Schonfeld, President, Technicolor.
Cinematographers who attended included:
Jerzy Zielinski, ASC, John Toll, ASC, Russell Carpenter, ASC, Daryn
Okada, Suki Medencevic, Amelia Vincent, ASC, Victor Goss, Michael
Hofstein, Victor Kemper, ASC, Russ Alsobrook, ASC, Affonso Beato,
Kristian Bernier, Adam Biddle, Jerry Callaway, James Chressanthis, Curtis
Clarke, ASC, Ericson Core, Richard Crudo, ASC, Eagle Egilsson, Paul
Elliot, Steven Fierberg, Isadore Mankofsky, ASC, Teresa Medina, Robert
Mehnert, Bruce Merwin, Doug Milsome, BSC, Kramer Morgenthau, David
Mullen, John Newby, Sam Nicholson, Vernon Nobles, Woody Omens,
ASC and Bob Primes, ASC.
Fred Goodich, cinematographer,
Bob Hoffman, Technique,
Steve Pizzello, Editor, American
Cinematographer (f. l. t. r.)
Sarah Levy, cinematographer,
Steven Poster, President, ASC,
Manny Treeson, Lighting Designer
Cinematographers Amelia Vincent,
ASC, and Kramer Morgenthau
Terry Clairmont, Otto Nemenz,
Fritz Gabriel Bauer (f. l. t. r.)
Visitors of the presentation show great interest
in the new ARRICAM
But we did not do so to make just another
fine camera, we did it because we are con-
vinced of the superior quality of film as the
leading medium for the foreseeable future.
Addressing the digital products that ARRI has
brought to the market, Bahnemann added
our digital technologies allow us to release
much of the still untapped quality potential
in film, especially when dealing with the pro-
cess that is rapidly gaining in importance,
the digital intermediate. Treated to a look
at the most recent trailer for STAR WARS:
EPISODE II ATTACK OF THE CLONES Bahne-
mann announced that LucasFilm is utilizing
the ARRI LASER to output the entire feature
to film. Johannes Steurer, head of digital
systems, and Franz Kraus, Managing Direc-
tor, both of whom received a Scientific and
Technical Academy Award from the Academy
of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on March
2, proceeded to enlighten the audience on
the ARRILASER. Kraus also showed a sample
of HD versus film comparisons from the
project CI RCLE OF LOVE.
Motion picture production is a complex
process involving many decisions regar-
ding economics, artistry and technology,
concluded Bahnemann. We realize there
are many options available. But somewhere
in the process you are likely to encounter
one of our products or technologies be it in
acquisition, production or post-production.
ARRI intends to remain involved in all aspects
of filmmaking.
Suzanne Lezot t e
Then they incorporated a lot of new things,
said Denny Clairmont, President, Clairmont
Cameras. Terry Clairmont, CEO, Clairmont
Cameras, emphasized that the initial order
of cameras is twenty we ordered 12 Stu-
dios and eight Lites, which we think is the
right balance. Again, this is an initial order,
to carry us through the end of the year.
Cinematographer Bojan Bazelli used an
ARRICAM package for over four months of
production on the Dreamworks feature THE
RI NG. We have put theses cameras through
some pretty demanding weather conditions,
working in extreme temperature changes,
from very cold to very warm, summarizes
Bazelli after returning the equipment. Cine-
matographer Jacek Laskus, ASC, who used
the Studio ARRI CAM on THE GUARDI AN,
praised the new technology. The viewing
system is superb. The ability to read out all
the information from the lenses is also a
great help. I think it is a great marriage
between the design of the Moviecam and
the ARRI technology. Im looking forward to
many millions of feet of film to run through it.
Clairmont Camera has been in business since
1980, and for over 20 years they have ren-
ted ARRI cameras. Their rental inventory has
over 300,000 items, and Clairmont has the
most motion picture cameras in the world
with the exception of Panavision. They cur-
rently reside in a 32,000 square foot custom
built building in North Hollywood, California.
They also have a facility in Vancouver, British
Columbia, and are in the process of opening
an office in Toronto, Canada.
The Clairmont brothers began working in
films when they were children as extras and
stand-ins. Their father, Leonard Clairmont,
was a director of photography and, due to
his contacts, the Clairmont kids worked on
over 100 movies between them. After high
school, both of them began working at Birns
& Sawyer in Hollywood, until Terry left to
work as a cameraman in television com-
mercials. In 1972, the Clairmonts made an
agreement to purchase two of the then-new
ARRIFLEX 35BL cameras and put them into
Birns & Sawyers rental inventory. It quickly
became the place to rent the ARRIFLEX
35BL cameras. After leaving Birns & Sawyer
in 1976, the Clairmonts partnered with
Edward Engel and his wife, creating a cam-
era rental house called Clairmont-Engel. By
1980, the Clairmonts had set up shop on
their own with seven employees. Clairmont
has several types and brands of cameras
which allow for greater choices. As Denny
Clairmont has always said, Pick the right
tool for the right job.
Suzanne Lezot t e
www.clairmont.com
Cl ai r mont Camer a or der s
20 ARRI CAMS
Clairmont Camera of Los Angeles, one of the leading rental facilities
for ARRI cameras, has ordered 20 ARRICAM units. For Clairmont, this
investment was logical because, They took the best features of the
ARRIFLEX cameras and the best features of the Moviecam cameras, and
came up with a camera combining the best of both.
Terr y (left) and Denny Clairmont In Clairmont Cameras premises
The presenters gather beneath the marquee
Volker Bahnemann, Dr. Johannes Steurer,
Franz Kraus, Alfred Schopf, Charlie Davidson,
Fritz Gabriel Bauer (f. l. t. r.)
11
12
The program in each city started with Mr.
Schopf giving an overview of the ARRI
Group. Mr. Schopf described the history of
ARRIs achievements and showed a number
of milestone products, followed by current
ARRI products and services. He introduced
the new ARRI corporate structure, which
consists of five divisions (Camera, Light,
Digital, Rental, Film & TV Services) in three
legal entities (Hardware, Rental, Postproduc-
tion). This was followed by the ARRI vision,
emphasizing that ARRI strongly believes in
film as the premier acquisition medium, and
stating ARRIs goal and passion to provide
The Best Image On Screen for the customers.
The first stop of the tour was Hong Kong
where the ARRICAM was presented in front
of an enthusiastic audience. ARRIs partner
in Hong Kong and China, Jebsen & Co Ltd,
represented by Mr. Jimmy Yeung, Division
Director of the Photo, Imaging & Optical
Division, did a fantastic job of organizing
the ARRICAM launch, gathering many local
industry professionals. As was the case with
the other launches, each participant received
a thick folder containing ARRI CAM infor-
mation such as the System Guide and the
Quick Guides, with translations into the
local languages where necessary.
After Hong Kong followed Beijing, where
the cameras were first presented at a mili-
tary studio. This was somewhat of an honor,
as few Western people have been granted
access to this facility before. On the next day
the gracious hosts, Pearl Guo, Grace Wang
and June Fung of Jebsen & Co Ltd. had ar-
ranged for a presentation at the Beijing
Film Studios. The cameras were presented
in front of a large audience of curious locals.
Especially the hands-on session following
the presentations was appreciated, as it
allowed direct contact with the equipment
that the cameramen and assistants hope to
be working with in the future.
Following Mr. Schopf, Mr. Bergmann talked
about the success of the ARRI CAM system.
He explained that ARRI has so far sold over
80 ARRICAM systems and over 50 sets of
LDS Ultra Primes, and that new orders are
coming in at a strong rate. Mr. Bergmann
also showed images of famous DPs like Russell
Carpenter, Jon Fauer, Jamie Anderson and
others who have used the ARRICAM, and
presented glowing quotes from these DPs who
were enthusiastic about the features, weight,
size and noise level of the ARRI CAMs. Mr.
Bergmann ended with a size and weight
comparison of the ARRI CAMs versus the
competitors, which was very positively re-
ceived. Especially seeing how small even the
ARRI CAM Studio is in contrast to the com-
petitions smallest camera elicited surprised
gasps from the audiences.
In Seoul, Korea, the show was presented in
front of more than 100 people in the beauti-
ful ballroom of the Hyatt hotel. The audience
was treated to a festive dinner, and from
the ice sculpture containing the ARRI CAM
Lite poster to the large projection screen
everything was top notch. A large stage gave
the ARRI CAM ample room and to great
applause, Mr. Schopf and the local represen-
tative, Mr Kiwhan Inn, President of SAMA
Electronics Corp. unveiled the ARRI CAMs.
A lively question and answer session was
followed by some hands-on, during which
many were surprised by how well balanced
ARRI CAM Launches i n Asi a
Right after the NAB trade show, ARRI sent top personnel
on a grand ARRI CAM tour through Asia. Alfred Schopf,
CEO of the ARRI Group, Horst Bergmann, Director of Sales
and Marketing, and Marc Shipman-Mueller, Technical
Camera Marketing, spent two weeks literally traveling
around the world, presenting the ARRI CAM in Hong Kong
(China), Beijing (China), Seoul (Korea) and Singapore.
Hong Kong- Bei j i ng
Horst Bergmann talking about the
success of the ARRICAM system
Grace Wang, Business Development Manager Jebsen, Alfred Schopf, CEO ARRI,
Marc Shipman-Mller, Technical Camera Marketing ARRI,
Horst Bergmann, Marketing Director ARRI, Francis Lau,Director, Jebsen (f. l. t. r.)
The ARRICAM workshop with
Marc Shipman-Mller
during the ARRI CAM
presentation in Korea
Kiwhan Inn, President, SAMA
and Alfred Schopf
The ARRICAM
poster in ice
13
and light the ARRI CAM Lite is. After the
official launch two more days of seminars
were conducted for local DPs, assistants and
the employees of SAMA Electronics Corp.
Following a 10 minute video, which gave
an overview of the ARRI CAM components,
Mr. Shipman-Mueller demonstrated the fea-
tures of the ARRI CAM system on stage. He
described the differences and commonalities
between the Studio and Lite cameras, and
explained the different ARRICAM magazines.
Then he showed how easy the viewfinders
can be exchanged between cameras and
explained the many functions of the electronic
remote controls, including the fact that they
can not only be quickly snapped onto to the
cameras, but also operated up to 200 feet
away from the cameras, connected with a
cable. Following a detailed discussion of
the features of the Lens Data System, Mr.
Shipman-Mueller explained the In-camera
Slate System and demonstrated the innova-
tive Shoulder Set.
The last stop of the tour was Singapore, where
ARRI dealer Cine Equipment Pte. Ltd. went
all out to show off the cameras. In front of
more than 100 people the cameras were un-
veiled accompanied by fanfares, smoke ma-
chines and flashing lights. To top it off, Mr.
Schopf received a commemorative plaque
from Tng Siew Moi, Managing Director of
Cine Equipment Singapore. During the Q & A
session the ARRI representatives were able
to answer many concerns, and at the same
time learned a lot about the requirements of
customers from all over Southeast Asia. Most
often the differences between the Studio and
Lite cameras were discussed in detail, since
many rental houses were pondering the ques-
tion which camera to purchase. Results dif-
fered: where Steadicam and hand held work
was prevalent, the Lite camera was favored,
but where a super silent all-round camera was
needed, the Studio was the top pick. Often
the local rental houses came to the conclusion
that they really wanted to have both cam-
eras in the long run. An in depth training
course was given to the Cine Equipment crew
and some customers the next day.
Apart from the official launches, the ARRI
team also partook in many local customs,
ranging from dining and dancing in a beer
garden in Beijing and Karaoke in Korea, to
the digestion of live sea cucumbers and
pickled duck eggs in Hong Kong. The Hong
Kong harbor view at night, the Great Wall
of China and the beautiful landscape of
Singapore were sights to remember. Most
interesting were the lively discussions with
local film professionals before and after the
official presentations. Many of the discussions
centered on hot topics like the Digital Inter-
mediate, the ARRI LASER or Film vs. HD,
and often impromptu presentations of NAB
materials were added to the official launches.
In summary, the tour was a great success,
and the ARRI team is looking forward to
visiting their partners in Asia again.
Marc Shi pman- Ml l er
Hong Kong:
jinkyngai@mail.jebsen.com.hk
Beijing:
guodongmei@bj.jebsen.com
Korea:
samari@shinbiro.com
Singapore:
cineqmt@mbox3.singnet.com.sg
Si ngapor e
Kiwhan Inn, President,
SAMA, and Alfred Schopf
unveil the ARRI CAM
Tng Siew Moi, Executive Director Cine Equipment,
and Alfred Schopf
Visitors at the ARRICAM Launch
in Singapore
Alfred Schopf with the
ARRI CAM Lite
The ARRI CAM Launch Team Jackson Lee, General Manager,
Cine Equipment and Alfred Schopf
Alfred Schopf during the
opening speech
Kor ea
14
Pr esentati ons
ARRI CAM
In June ARRI Italia officially launched the new ARRICAM system
at their premises in Rome.
Alfredo Betro, Camera Operator, Marc Shipman-
Mller, Technical Camera Marketing, Antonio
Cazzaniga, Vice President, ARRI Italia (f.l.t.r.)
Camera Operator
Vitoria Tempo
I tal y
The ARRICAMs had already had their debut
in Italy last year when Fred Schuler used them
on his film GERMANI KUS. At the time, ARRI
Italia celebrated the cameras premiere with
business partners on the set in Cinecitt.
Now, one year later, there is every reason to
be happy about the successful market pre-
sence of the ARRICAM system: all large Italian
rental houses have already worked with the
ARRICAMST and LT the innovative features
of the new system are convincing. DoPs, cam-
era operators, rental house owners and busi-
ness partners crowded into ARRI Italias prem-
ises to view the complete camera system. The
ARRI launch also offered visitors the welcome
opportunity to pose questions to ARRI repre-
sentatives from Munich and Italy and to dis-
cuss suggestions together.
The system was described in all its aspects.
Among others, Alfred Rsli, president of
ARRI Italia, and Antonio Cazzaniga, vice
president of ARRI Italia, discussed the future
prospects of the ARRI group. There followed
a detailed technical presentation of the ARRI-
CAM system. Between the various sessions
the cameras were available for hands-on
demonstrations. The fact that the ARRICAM
was the main subject of interest, despite the
excellent Italian buffet, speaks for itself
Ant oni o Cazzani ga
15
CINETEC, ARRIs exclusive agent in Mexico
successfully carried out the first ARRICAM
presentation in Latin America.
After the opening speech by Thomas Bruenger,
General Manager of CINETEC, Claus Collin,
ARRIs Area Sales Manager for Latin Ameri-
ca, introduced the system, followed by Power-
point presentations and a detailed demon-
stration of the ARRICAM system. Gnther Zoeh,
Camera Product Manager at ARRI, demon-
strated the complete range of accessories on
both ARRICAM cameras. After this he gave
an impressive showing of the short time it
takes to set up the ARRICAMs ready for shoot-
ing. However, the highlight was the ensuing
hands-on session, enabling everybody to
gain the best impression for themselves. At
the end some participants had to be separ-
ated almost by force from the cameras the
new ARRICAMs were just too interesting
for them.
Ulrich Brnger, president of CINETEC, be-
gan the general presentation in the evening
with a summary of ARRIs history: From the
beginnings of the company through to the
new ARRICAM system and the worldwide
presence of the ARRI Group. Ulrich Brnger
particularly thanked Mara de Jess Garcia,
owner of the rental house CTT Exp. & Rentals
who had kindly provided the ARRICAM LITE
camera. Thanks also went to Fernando
Hernndez, owner of the rental house Revo-
lution 435 D&C who had made available a
dolly and accessories for the Mexican ARRI-
CAM launch. Afterwards a slimmed down
version of the workshops was presented fol-
lowed by a social gathering around the cam-
eras with tequilas and cuba libres which
rounded off the evening.
By the end of the year there will be at least
three ARRICAMLITE cameras available in
Mexico: One at CTT Exp. & Rentals, and two
more which have been ordered by the rental
houses Equipment & Film Design (Georgina
Teran) and Renta Imagen (Juan Garca;
Alonso Garca; Cuco Villeras).
For CINETEC the ARRICAM launch was a
great success which was characterised by the
high standard of technical knowledge and
interest of the Mexican cameramen. For our
part, we will be interested to see what ideas
will be turned into successful films with these
new cameras.
Thomas Bruenger
cinetecmex@compuserve.com.mx
Ulrich Bruenger, President of Cinetec,
and Fernando Hernandez, Owner of
Rental House Revolution 435 D&C
Jaime Langarica, General Manager, City
Productions, Thomas Bruenger, General
Manager, Cinetec, and Susana Velazquez,
Operations Manager, City Productions
Maria de Jesus Garcia, Owner of CTT
Exp. & Rentals and Arq. Balthazar Arroyo,
General Manager, CTT Exp. & Rentals
Georgina Teran, Owner of Equipment &
Film Design/Alpha Star
Tibor Vagyczky, HSC and president of
IMAGO, invited HSC members, representa-
tives of IMAGO and the association of regio-
nal broadcasters to the annual meeting. DoP
Vilmos Zsigmond, taking a break from the pre-
parations for his new film J ERSEY GI RL with
director Kevin Smith in Philadelphia, was
among the participants.
The ARRICAM system was presented by
Claus Collin, Area Sales Manager from
ARRI Munich and Frdric Kaczek, Technical
Support, from ARRI Austria. After the presen-
tation visitors had the opportunity to see for
themselves the features of the ARRICAMST
and LT.
Cl aus Col l i n
Hungar y
Claus Collin, Area Sales Manager ARRI, Tibor
Vagyczky, HSC, DoP Vilmos Zsigmond (f. l. t. r.)
In May two ARRICAM workshops were held for DoPs and
camera operators in Mexico-City as well as a general
presentation for rental houses and production companies.
Mexi co
The Hungarian Society of Cinematographers, HSC, demonstrated the ARRICAM
system in the premises of the Magyar Filmlaboratrium in Budapest.
16
The ARRI SKY PANEL works in tight spaces
and up against set walls. Each module is
440mm 360mm (approx. 17" 14") but
is only 50mm (2") deep! The fibre glass rein-
forced plastic housing ensures durability and
light weight and the SKY PANELs intelligent
docking system allows quick set-up in multiple
configurations.
One complete system three modules in-
cludes power supply, 5 m supply cable with
integrated dimmer and stirrup. For safe and
convenient transport all parts are packed in
custom designed cases.
Despite perfect daylight characteristics no
mercury is used and therefore no hazardous
waste!
Modular Expansion
up to six single lighting modules 21"
diagonal panel can be combined either
end to end or side to side to create a po-
werful true daylight soft source in a wide
variety of configurations.
Quick release locks make set up and
operation easy.
Barndoors, eggcrates, filter frames and
intensifiers are easily mounted for additio-
nal control.
Instant Light No warm up required
The ARRI SKY PANEL starts at full intensity
and true daylight color as soon as it is
switched on.
No Color Temperature Shift
No shift in color temperature at any tilting
angle or in any given dimming position.
High Operating Temperature Range
Unlike fluorescents the light output is not
related to ambient temperature
( 4 F to 122 F/ 20 C to 50 C)
Extremely long Lamp Life
Several 10.000 hours lamp life is antici-
pated
Dimming
Linear dimming range down to 4%
Remote Control via DMX optional
R e v o l u t i o n a r y D a y l i g h t S o f t S o u r c e
ARRI SKY PANEL
ARRI has developed a new soft virtually shadow-free light, based on
OSRAMs flat Planon source. By computer simulation ARRI
engineers together with OSRAM have optimised this new lighting source
to match true daylight on film. No colour correction is required.
Three ARRI SKY PANELs in
vertical configuration
Rear view with swivel spigot Single ARRI SKY PANEL
Technical Data
Supply voltage range: 20 30V DC
Supply current: 140W each module
Operating frequency: 40 80 kHz
Ambient temperature range: 20 C to 50 C; ( 4 F to 122 F)
Colour Rendering: >Ra 92
Colour Temperature: 5600K
Weight: approx.12kg (26lb); three module system
Power Factor: 0.9 at 230V, full load
Accessory Power Supply (for 3 module and 6 module systems)
Supply voltage range: 100V 240V AC
Operating frequency: 47Hz 63Hz
Output voltage: 28V DC
Output power: 500 W for three modules
1000W for six modules
Dimensions: 410mm (L) x 250mm (W) x 140mm (H)
Weight: approx. 5.3kg (11.7lb)
17
With the STUDIO COOL Series ARRI introduces the most flexible
studio fluorescent lighting available. The design utilizes the latest lamp and
reflector technology.
Technical Data
Dimensions in mm: 596 (L) x 314 (W) x 152 (H)
Supply voltage range: 230V 50/60Hz
120V 50/60Hz
Output frequency: 40kHz (full load)
Power Factor: 0.98
Ambient temperature range: 20C 50C (68 122 F)
Color Rendering: Ra >90
Color Temperature: 3200K or 5400K
Light Output at 3 m: 540lux
Weight (4 tubes): approx. 5kg (11lb)
A single ARRI STUDIO COOL lamphead
will accomodate standard 55W tubes and
is prepared for the new 80W tubes which
increase light output by 30%. In addition, the
reflectors are interchangeable. Designers can
select either the wide, soft 140 beam angle
reflector or when more punch is required
the tighter 90 beam angle reflector can be
installed quickly and easily.
The rugged aluminum extrusion housing fea-
tures a detachable ballast/electronics module
for ease of service and maintenance.
The ARRI STUDIO COOL Series
is available in 3 Models
2 Tube TC-L 55W
4 Tube TC-L 55W
8 Tube TC-L 55W
Control Options
Dimming via DMX Control
Two Step Switching
Phase Control Dimming
Accessories include:
Barndoors
Intensifiers
Egg Crates/Louvers
Filter Frame
A R R I Go e s C o o l
ARRI STUDI O COOL
4-tube version Rear view with detachable
electronic control box
4-tube version with hinged
accessor y holder
4-tube version with egg crate
18
New design principles and consistent use of
newest materials technology make it possible
to reduce weight without compromising per-
formance and reliability. The ARRI COMPACT
12,000 W Fresnel satisfies location require-
ments for an easily managed lamphead
without sacrificing ARRIs traditional perfor-
mance and durability.
The 500mm lens gives an enormous punch
of light, delivering over 80,000 lux/6
halfbeam angle at 10meters in full spot.
Flood is a full 5,500 lux/50 halfbeam
angle.
A single stirrup lock is easy and safe to oper-
ate and the moveable stirrup points perfectly
balance any accessory combination. The
lamp holder is spring-loaded and an additio-
nal secondary bulb-shaft lock prevents bulb
breakage in operation.
The new COMPACT 12,000W replaces the
double ended ARRI AD 12 kW Daylight
lamphead. Existing Electronic Ballasts
12/18kWEB or 6/12kWEB can be used.
Technical Data
Dimensions in mm: 740(L) x 750(W) x 690(H)
Weight: approx. 45kg
Lens Diameter: 500mm
Barndoor Insert Size: 530mm
Filter Insert Size: 530mm
Lamp Holder: ARRI G38 Fast Lock
Lamp: 12kW Single Ended
ARRI COMPACT 12,000 W
High light output, a very even field and low
weight are the main advantages of the new ARRI
COMPACT 12,000 W single ended daylight
luminaire. The complete COMPACT series now
comprises eight lampheads from 125 W up
to 12,000 W.
19
With the best power semiconductors available
used in a new electronic design with Reduced
Switching Losses (RSL), the new ARRI 6kW
Compact Electronic Ballast saves space and
set up time. Crews will appreciate this new
lightweight package, no larger than a
2,5/4kWballast.
Active Line Filtering (ALF) with Power Factor
Correction fulfils the latest strict Electro-
Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) regulations
of the European Community.
With ALF, Power Factor is corrected to unity
and additionally, all harmonics and current
peaks are reduced to very low values, meet-
ing the strictest international standards.
Smal l est
6 kW/230 V
El ectr oni c Bal l ast
wi th Acti ve Li ne Fi l ter (ALF)
ARRI introduces the smallest and lightest 6 kW/230 volt Electronic Ballast:
utilising the latest technology and taking advantage of advances in electronic development,
the ballast is about 30 % smaller and 20 % lighter than existing models.
Technical Data
Dimensions in mm: 358 (L) x 243 (W) x 450 (H)
Weight: 25kg (55lb)
Max. ambient temperature: 50 C (122 F)
Line voltage range: 180 250V AC
Frequency: 50/60Hz
Input connector wiring: 1; N; PE (single phase)
Input current: 38 27A (eff.)
Apparent power: 6800VA (max.)
Power factor (cos ): approx. 0.98
Efficiency: approx. 0.90
Ident No.: L2.76193.0
20
LORD OF THE RI NGS in postcard size on the
movie screen? That wont make you a star.
Cine lenses are developed for images for
which size matters, to quote TI TANI C film
director James Cameron. Magnification
factors of up to 1,000x are attained in
normal cinema projections.
Cine lenses are a major factor in the quality
of the final film, an investment which must
earn its return, in constant use and with plenty
of wear and tear often under conditions
which you normally would like to protect pre-
cision instruments from: heat, cold, vibra-
tions, shocks, sand, rain, snow, dust, smoke,
oil dust
Cine lenses are rental goods which have to
perform over years and decades, remaining
robust and reliable, without much downtime,
in order to fulfil the economic expectations
of the rental houses. How are such precision
items created, and what are the requirements?
Special operating conditions
special handling
Unlike consumer lenses, cine lenses are focused
not only before the shot, but also while the
camera is running. Any play, every so-called
backlash movement in the focus drive would
be a considerable disturbance, as well as
causing lateral or rotational image shift. The
mechanics of cine lenses must therefore be
designed and manufactured in an extremely
precise fashion, to ensure a long lifetime.
The focus puller must be able to rely totally on
the focus scale. It is his tool, which he needs
to guarantee image sharpness. Good cine
lenses therefore have absolutely correct, indi-
vidually calibrated scales. A scale engraved
for the nominal focal length 50mm would
not be exact if the actual focal length of one
particular lens was for example 50.18mm.
Carl Zeiss therefore equips all its film lenses
with individually calibrated scales.
Color matching is also important not only
for the individual lens, but also across the
entire range. The tiniest difference can add
time in post-production. For this reason, Carl
Zeiss calculates and manufactures its cine
lenses as super-color-matched sets so that
no color shift will occur when switching focal
lengths. However, these are just a few of the
particular requirements for which Carl Zeiss
has developed optimum solutions during
their over one and a half centuries of com-
pany history and experience.
Carl Zeiss: Whats in a Name?
In 1846 Carl Zeiss founded his mechanical
factories for the manufacture of precision
instruments for the university in Jena. Carl
Zeiss was the first to develop optical instru-
ments using scientific methods and he was
extremely successful with his idea. Many of
the most important innovations in applied
optics technology come from the company
he founded: apochromatic lenses, anti-reflec-
tive coating of lens surfaces, the projection
planetarium, the most highspeed photogra-
phic lens of all time (the Planar 1:0.7/50 for
photographing the dark side of the moon),
the stereooperation microscope for surgery,
Cine Lenses
Carl Zeiss
Computerised processing of lens element surfaces in one
of the most modern glass manufacturing plants in the world
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the highest resolution photolithographic lenses
for semi-conductor manufacture (over 5.000
line pairs per millimeter), and many more.
Today Carl Zeiss employs 13.000 people
at over 20 locations and produces several
thousand optical and mechanical precision
instruments for medical and industrial appli-
cations, photography and film, vision correc-
tion as well as leisure activities. Traditionally
the police, the military and government organ-
isations have also a high demand for top
class instruments for viewing and recognition
purposes, ranging from telescopes to micro-
scopes and distance meters, night vision
devices, aerial cameras and submarine
periscopes.
The companys size allows Carl Zeiss to keep
the relatively low volume business with cine
21
lenses afloat and thereby to achieve high
delivery capability. A small, exclusive manu-
facturer of cine lenses would have a consider-
able disadvantage in terms of delivery times
and costs with regards suppliers because
of its unattractively low quantities for optical
glass (Carl Zeiss keeps over 100 tons in
stock!), precision parts, metal alloys, paint,
test tools etc.
Since 1907 Carl Zeiss has been supplying
high-speed lenses of the Tessar type for cine-
matographic purposes. The Tessar which was
invented and patented by Carl Zeiss in 1902
later became the eagle eye of your came-
ra, the most frequently built lens type of all
time. Today the Carl Zeiss range comprises
over 40 different lenses, including complex
high-speed types as well as lenses with vari-
able focal lengths.
Manufacturing Lenses
In 1998 Carl Zeiss set up the most modern
manufacturing facility for lenses in the world,
in its plant in the southern German town of
Oberkochen. It is equipped with computerised
milling, grinding and polishing machines,
MRF-aspheric technology, high precision inter-
ferometers for quality control, ultrasonic clean-
ing devices for lens surfaces, high vacuum
coating machines to multi-coat the lens ele-
ments, equipment developed in-house which
equip the lenses of the same set with super-
color-matched technology, etc
Here Carl Zeiss produces the lens elements
for the cine lenses: every surface is made
individually, with the greatest care and con-
tinuous checking of mechanical and optical
accuracy. The precision equals that of optics
for scientific instruments, thereby that of glass
elements for consumer lenses by a factor of
ten and it is one hundred times higher than
what is usually defined in the industry as pre-
cision mechanics.
Optical Lens Elements
Today, nearly 250 different glasses and crys-
tal substances with various optical characte-
ristics are available to the lens manufacturer.
Some of them are almost as heavy as iron,
others more expensive than gold. Some can
withstand thousands of years, others are
Comprehensive optical precision
measuring device in operation
The Carl Zeiss Plant in Oberkochen
22
relatively fragile in chemical or thermal
terms and may not last a year without special
protection. Many provide color neutrality,
others may have slight or even marked color
deviations. For their cine lenses, Carl Zeiss
uses a well considered selection of approx.
110 types of glass, mainly supplied by the
leading manufacturer of optical glasses, the
Carl Zeiss subsidiary SCHOTT Glas, located
in Mainz.
Only through the skillful combination of
different types of glass in lenses of different
forms is the optical designer able to minimise
the lens aberrations to the extent that the image
performance of the lenses attains a very high
level and the conditions for a lens without
color shifts are achieved.
High Precision Mechanics,
Careful Assembly and Testing
The mechanics of cine lenses also demand
precision within the micrometer range. This is
at the limit of what can reliably by produced
in series manufacturing with metals some-
times actually surpassing the limit. The manu-
facture of such high quality lenses cannot be
compared with industrial mass production.
Highly qualified precision opticians and pre-
cision mechanics with special dedication to
their job, and using the most exact measuring
equipment and special tools, align the indi-
vidual lens elements with each other until the
entire product reaches a quality level which
could never be achieved on an assembly line.
Each individual lens is adjusted directly on the
Carl Zeiss K-8 MTF-testing machine during
manufacture to achieve maximum optical per-
formance. Lenses are not simply produced,
with the good ones being identified in the
final quality control process.
Every completed and adjusted lens is meas-
ured for its exact focal length and receives an
individually calibrated distance scale which
shows the exact distance values for this par-
ticular lens. Of course this procedure is also
adhered to when for example exchanging the
lens ring on the ULTRA PRIMES. Through
this complex manufacturing process Carl
Zeiss achieves an extraordinary consistency
in series production.
Carl Zeiss Measuring Equipment
You cant manufacture more precisely than
you can measure is a truism from the manu-
facturing industry. That means that the avail-
able measuring technology must be 5 to 10
times more exact than the required manufac-
turing precision. For this reason, Carl Zeiss
has always developed its own highest preci-
sion measuring apparatus, thereby ensuring
a market advantage. These optical measuring
devices are used worldwide by quality-con-
scious optics manufacturers, as well as by
standards and testing institutions, measuring
labs and test magazines, and by camera ren-
tal houses with high quality demands.
Strict Testing of Prototypes
Carl Zeiss has, as a manufacturer of scientific
optics for aeronautical use and optical sys-
tems for border control and national defence,
its own unique idea of adverse conditions
of use: in comprehensive test labs, barbaric
heat, oppressive humidity, arctic cold, dripping
Lens elements are prepared for anti-reflex coating.
Optical glass in various
sales forms: blocks (rear),
bars and plates (centre),
pressings (front)
Trained eyes examine
precision lens elements
for surface quality
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moisture, shaking, vibrations, dropping onto
concrete, bumps, shocks, cyclical temperature
and humidity changes, supersonic low-level
flights, rocket launches, cross-country driving in
a tank, saltwater mist, lorry transport on gravel
roads and other such things are simulated
even the extreme pressure and temperature
conditions of outer space. Every lens proto-
type is subjected to a well thought out mixture
of these adversities and then analysed in order
to find further possibilities for improvement
and to integrate these before the start of series
production. The current ULTRAPRIME lenses
owe their low servicing requirements partially
to this strict prototype testing process.
ARRI and Carl Zeiss
Carl Zeiss has been supplying Arnold&Richter
with high-speed cine lenses since1937. Today
a large range of film lenses is developed and
manufactured exclusively for and together
with ARRI. Carl Zeiss and ARRI are in constant
contact to discuss new optical product ideas
and to examine them in terms of technical and
economic feasibility. The modern ULTRAPRIME
set with, as it now stands,15 different focal
lengths, and the set of ULTRAPRIME LDS lens-
es which was adapted from it for the new
ARRICAM, are the most impressive results of
this collaboration to date. But as always:
further ideas are already in discussion
we hope that they will be just as successful
as the already established, award-winning
lens ranges.
Recognition from the Industry
The ULTRA PRIME lenses are presently the
most widely used new high performance
lenses in the film industry: nearly 500 sets
are available worldwide. Important films
have been made with these lenses, including
such spectacular productions as the trilogy
LORD OF THE RI NGS.
Their predecessors were also very successful:
among others, the wide range of Superspeed
T 1.3 lenses or the VARIABLE PRIME lenses
which, while being variable focal length
lenses, offer the speed and image quality of
fixed focal length lenses. For both lens ranges,
the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
Sciences has awarded ARRI and Carl Zeiss
a Scientific and Engineering Award

.
Kornel i us Ml l er/Markus Wi ederspahn
The front optical sub-assembly is inserted into an
ULTRA PRIME lens mount
ULTRA PRIME lenses for ARRI in production
at Carl Zeiss
Fine processing of surfaces during assembly
Fine-tuning of mechanical lens components
ULTRA PRIME lens in the
climatic test at 40 F
24
For our production NACKT, we decided to
shoot in Super 35 for a conversion to Cinema-
scope, explains Norbert Preuss. We wanted
to do something optically dramatic. Also,
Scope is especially good for a film empha-
sizing an actors ensemble. Id often heard
of Super 35 shot in 3-perf and that this method
offers a 25% saving in material with no loss
of quality whatsoever. But it was totally new
to use traditional post methods, cutting the
3-perf negative totally conservative, as
though High Definition didnt exist. In pre-
vious 3-perf productions, such as TATTOO, the
High Definition method was always used and
the post-production was completely digital;
once the material was online the negative
was never touched. That was exactly what we
didnt want, since there are so few effects in
this film. We simply went through the entire
process with the people in the film lab, the
sound department, the video scanning and
the visual effects. It became obvious that
this process was working out just fine.
Another reason to shoot in 3-perf was the
ability to do extremely long takes. DoP Frank
Griebe: We wanted to shoot a 12-minute
dialogue scene with Steadicam, complete
in one take. Thats not possible with 4-perf,
because even with the large magazine, you
can barely shoot 10 minutes of film. With
3-perf you can use a large magazine and
shoot 13 minutes. You simply have 25%
more material at your disposal. The actors
have much more freedom and no limitations.
As a producer youre not so nervous when
youre shooting 3-perf and foot after foot of
film runs through the camera. At the begin-
On the move: - Per f
3
ARRI is currently the only European facility worldwide
that offers the complete 3-perf chain, from 3-perf cameras,
the LOCPRO 3-perf location projector through the entire
digital and analog post-production to 3-perf projection in
the ARRI cinema. Fanes Film shot their new feature film
NACKT (Doris Drrie, Director) in 3-perf, and for the first
time used the conventional analog method to complete
the post-production for a 3-perf film. This process is only
available at ARRI in Munich. Producer Norbert Preuss
from Fanes Film, DoP Frank Griebe, Sepp Reidinger, head
of ARRI Feature and TV-Drama, and Andreas Kern, from
Motion Picture Tools, describe their experiences with this
project and 3-perf technology.
ning we were shooting around 6000 feet a
day. Doing 4-perf this would have translated
into around 8000 feet. This saved us 850
euros per day in material costs alone. Ulti-
mately, we only shot approximately 120,000
feet of film, which would have been 160,000
feet with 4-perf. In addition to reduced raw
stock costs, you save 25% in developing
and further handling costs: you save on the
first and second answer prints, and also on
the interpositive, because we didnt switch
to 4-perf until we went from spherical to
anamorphic on the internegative. Altogether
we saved over 50,000 Euro by shooting
3-perf without any loss in image quality,
concludes producer Norbert Preuss.
DoP Frank Griebe adds: Some producers
dont want to risk shooting in 3-perf. They
believe the money they save on material
will only be spent later in expensive digital
post-production, but thats not true. 20 years
ago there were already efforts to shoot in
3-perf, before that even in 2-perf. Sergio
Leone shot on 2-perf and copied to 4-perf.
ARRI revived this idea and began about 3
years ago to manufacture more cameras
with a 3-perf movement. This again set the
process in motion.
ARRIs managing director Franz Kraus ex-
plains: We want to offer alternatives, digital
as well as traditional. It should be possible
to apply the optimal process to each indivi-
dual project. The client should see the money
theyve spent on technical services directly
reflected on the monitor or projection screen,
or hear it over the speakers.
whether or not the negative cutting would
work as well with 3- as with 4-perf. Thanks
to the new software, it worked out just fine.
With the software I wrote, it is possible to
register 3-perf 35mm materical precisely
down to the individual perforation. This
allows exact coordination with the Avid cut
list, says Andreas Kern. ARRI is the only
post-production facility with this software.
Until now Keycode registration of 4-perf
films was done on an Excalibur. This does
not allow for Keycode registration of 3-perf
material. But in order to cut the negative
later there must be a comprehensive cut list
covering the translation from the digital off-
line cut and the analogue negative cut. This
is where Andreas Kern, longtime consultant
at ARRI and expert troubleshooter, steps in.
For ARRI, he developed a unique software
which closes this gap. Andreas Kern explains
the principle: The Keycode appears in 4-
perf every 16 frames, i. e., 4 16 = 64,
meaning that from one Keycode to the next
are 64 perforations. For 3-perf this means
that there is no even number of frames within
the 64 perforations. (4-perf: 16-16-16-16
= 64; 3-perf: 21-21-22 = 64) NACKT was
the first film to utilize this software, and it
functioned beautifully.
The next big worry was, how will the optical
handling function? Opticals normally done
with an Oxberry werent possible. There was
no Oxberry that could print 3-perf. Then
you either go the digital route, which is what
we did, or do an A/B process, remembers
Norbert Preuss. At that time optical printing
was the gap in the 3-perf chain in Germany.
Sepp Reidinger: At the time we did the post-
production for NACKT there was no Oxberry
in Germany which could print 3-perf material.
Thats why ARRI has now modified their
Oxberry printer to accomodate 3-perf, closing
the gap in the chain.
Briefly: everything worked fantastically. Im
totally satisfied. 3-perf proved successful. I
would shoot every Super 35 film for conver-
sion into Scope in 3-perf again, summarizes
Norbert Preuss.
J ochen Hhnel
Unlike some other companies, which regard
the digital age as a threat to the entire film
industry, ARRI recognized the writing on the
wall and acted accordingly.
We recently merged our two divisions film
lab and ARRI TV, the analogue and digital
post-production processes, in order to be
able to offer our clients the best of both
worlds. Together with the close exchange
and feedback from the camera-manufacturing,
new synergies come into being. In this tran-
sition phase, we want to offer our customers
the advantages of analogue film technology
as long as possible."
With ARRIs 3-perf filming technology, ana-
logue as well as digital post-production are
offered a tool to make 35mm filming easier
and more inexpensive.
Another, almost more important prerequisite
for the 3-perf method was that modern
Telecines were available which at the touch
of a button could scan in either 3- or 4-perf
and that editing is done on the Avid, as with
NACKT. The great thing is that its now poss-
ible to utilize all the processing forms with
3-perf traditional film lab processing and
editing, but also innovative digital processing,
meaning the digital intermediate process, in
which the negative is scanned and the images
remain in digital form until they are recorded
out on the ARRILASER.
With NACKT, one sees the first 3-perf feature
film completed with the classic, analogue
post-production methods. Sepp Reidinger
recalls the post-production: The DoP or
director came by to view the rushes. The ARRI
Cinema is equipped to project in 3-perf,
which enabled us to evaluate the color gra-
ding on a large cinema screen. The high-
light: the projection of the 3-perf first trial
composite print in the cinema was for the
first time coupled electronically with the
audio from the Avid DAT. Sepp Reidinger
further: The film was cut electronically on
Avid and converted to KDL (Keycode Decision
List) using software developed by Andreas
Kern especially for this process. The negative
cutting followed. All effects, lap dissolves,
and titles were done digitally and recorded
on the ARRILASER in 3-perf, because these
internegatives had to be cut into the original
3-perf negative.
That all sounds very good, nevertheless,
I was sometimes a little nervous, admits
Norbert Preuss. The big question was
The picture shows the 25 % savings in negative
material gained with 3-perf in all stages of
production (from shooting to intermed positive),
and the final step to 4-perf
DoP Frank Griebe
Producer Norbert Preuss,
background: chief recordist Chris Price Director Doris Drrie gives instructions
The picture shows, in a comparison of 3-perf
with 4-perf, the 25 % gain in the number of
frames using the same amount of film material
26
MAY B A C H
In the Coloneum in Cologne, the largest studio
in Europe, a 1: 2 scale model of Rome's
Pantheon was built the perfect stage for a
perfect car. The Pantheon becomes the womb
for the Maybach. We first see the automo-
bile as an indirectly lit silhouette within the
organic interior of the Pantheon. A brilliant
beam of light falls upon the vehicle from above,
awakening it to life. The film continues with
four transparent monitor screens that float
in the Pantheon and display the different
Maybach-Worlds: freedom, tradition, crafts-
manship, and individuality: the Maybach is,
as it were, charged with the impressions
of these worlds. In the monitors we see, for
example, flights of birds through clouds,
zeppelin-airships, whose motors were built
With the introduction of two high-end luxury models one of the most exclusive brands
of automobiles in the world comes back to life after an absence of over sixty years:
Maybach. This name looks back at a long tradition. As early as the 1930s the name
Maybach stood for exclusivity as well as technically innovative luxury automobiles.
This myth is revived with the introduction of the new models supported by an
impressive film by Radical Images Film Production in Cologne which lives up to the
truly classical standards set by its subject: THE SPI RI T OF LEADERSHI P
by Maybach, craftsmen working with loving
detail on wooden instrument panels, leather
seats and trim, and, finally, a series of faces
which in their diversity represent the indivi-
duality of every Maybach automobile.
It was a challenge to install the complete
technology light and camera equipment
in this 360-degree domed structure in a way
which allowed the cameras to be moved
freely on the set, explains co-director and
producer Alexander Paul of Radical Images,
Cologne. The construction from which the
Pantheon dome had to be hung from the
ceiling in order to relieve the underpinnings
weighed almost fifty tons. Car photography
is one of the most difficult tasks, agrees
Comeback of a Legend
co-director and director of photography
Jacques Steyn in the accompanying Making
Of which was produced alongside the
film. Precise and, above all, flexible techno-
logy was required: a number of ARRIFLEX
435s, a variety of lenses, including revolving
optics came from ARRI Rental, in addition
to the T-Rex system. Unlike other automobile
projects, we of course couldnt just cut
out part of the body or remove the roof for
a better lighting, explains Jacques Steyn
a horrifying thought, considering all the
intricate and loving details he impressively
brings to the screen.
Many of the images were first put together
in the post-production. That way we could
optimally present the car with all its reflections.
The background was lit and filmed separ-
ately, explains Alexander Paul. The lay-out
of the film, together with all the technical
solutions needed to ensure a perfect execu-
tion were thought out and planned in detail
before production began. We saw this as
the greatest challenge. In that respect you
could say that all that was left was the
shooting which we did in five days.
A concept that would have also surely im-
pressed Karl Maybach, founder of the luxury
brand: In 1919 he had the idea to construct
a technically perfect automobile for the
upper 10,000. By 1946, 1800 different
versions of the Maybach had been built
including the forerunner of todays model,
the Maybach DS 8 Zeppelin. Karl Maybach
concentrated on the design of motors and
chassis. The exclusive clientel contracted
coachbuilders to finish the body each accor-
ding to their individual tastes. Thus no historic
Maybach is identical to another every car
is unique. DaimlerChrysler preserves this
tradition of individuality with the new May-
bach at least in the interior design. Who-
ever orders a Maybach is spoilt for choice,
having to select from an almost infinite
number of paints, leather types, textiles and
wooden trim. The goal is to fulfill every
customers wish.
Jochen Thieser
www.radicalimages.com
MAYBACH THE SPI RI T OF LEADERSHI P
Concept /Production Radical Images

Filmproductions GmbH, Cologne


Director/ Executive Producer Alexander Paul
Director/ DoP Jacques Steyn
1st AD Arndt Wiegering
Producer Claudia Bauer
Unit Manager Markus Hoock
Steadycam Klaus Liebertz
Second Unit Operator Ergun Cankaya
1st Camera Assistant Ansgar Krajewski
Gaffers Alex Tolocyki and Werner Wiese
Key Grip Helge Felgendreher
Grip Jens Kaschub
Cameras ARRI Rental, Cologne
Format 35 mm
Length 04:45 Minutes
Jacques Steyn,
Alexander Paul
(f. l. t. r.)
complete support and flexibility, and who
are willing to take on and complete unusual
and difficult projects.
The Munich production company Claussen
& Wbke is also convinced of the impor-
tance of title design. Jakob Claussen: The
opening credits are like a wink of the films
eye; they offer the chance to create moods
and expectations, to show the audience
what is coming in a very emotional fashion.
Theyre a type of teaser or trailer and create
the moods awaiting the viewer during the
film. Thomas Wbke: It always makes
sense to involve a creative outsider, a title
design artist who has a new and fresh per-
spective of the film and can advise and support
you accordingly. Claussen & Wbke, ARRI
clients since NACH FNF I M URWALD (1995):
We strongly recommend planning the titles
as a substantial part of every films budget and
to work with specialists.
Director Tom Tykwer is well known for his
titles. He explains: In the titles its possible
to prepare the climate and mood, and some-
times also the films rhythm. Through the
precision of the title design, the audience also
sees how much care the film will dedicate to
its characters and plot. Titles which appear
to be simple can also have a cunning effect
on the audience, subconsciously setting a
rhythm and developing graphic beauty.
Titles have enjoyed a kind of boom in
recent years, which is nice to see, because
after all, titles are a part of the film and not
just an appendix. However, I sometimes see
the danger that the titles, instead of being
designed within the context of the film, are
designed to create a spectacular effect for
their own sake. In this respect Ive had good
results at ARRI, because the people there
are not only technically competent, but are
also aware of content, and you can work
with them to reach aesthetic decisions as
well as planning the technical steps. Some-
times youre still looking for the best solution
during post-production, and the team from
ARRI has proven to be curious and creative
in their efforts to help me find such solutions.
Christine Rothe, Production Supervisor at
Constantin Film: The type of title design
naturally depends upon the individual film.
When simple, traditional titles fit best, then
I advise using traditional methods, simply
for budget reasons. But as soon as you need
special colors or effects, you should do them
digitally today thats simply the most
up-to-date way to go.
28
Since the introduction of high-resolution digi-
tal film production at ARRI in 1994, German
film production companies such as Claussen
& Wbke, Constantin Film, Fanes Film,
Hager Moss Film, and X-Filme, to mention a
few, have come here for the design and
production of their titles and credits. The close
communication between director and
designer plays an important role in creating
film titles.
Director Peter Sehr, one of the first to utilize
the new possibilities in digital title technology
offered by ARRI, talks about what titles mean
in film: For me, the titles are the entrance
to the film, because the first 1 2 minutes give
the audience an idea of what they can expect.
They attempt to decode all the symbols given
to them. The audience is extremely attentive
at the beginning, thats why you must be
very careful not to create the wrong impression
at the start. For this reason the titles must
be very precise. The titles draw the audience
into the film. Since KASPAR HAUSER and
OBSESSI ON, my titles have become more
elaborate with every film. The technology
also offers progressively more, and you of
course want to take advantage of that. As
with every other aspect of ARRI, in title
design you meet the best people who offer
The Movi e befor e the Movi e
Titles as a Teaser for the Film
It all began with Bond: for the J AMES BOND films titles were and remain
a trademark. With the advent of digital film production, titles have enjoyed
a significant increase in importance, and today approach the status of an
art form. Director David Fincher set the tone and ushered in a new era with
the title designs for SEVEN and PANI C ROOM.
29
A Selection of Titles designed at ARRI Film & TV Services
ANATOMY 2 Claussen & Wbke Stefan Ruzowitzky
BOOKIES Cologne Film Mark Illsley
NACKT Fanes Film Doris Drrie
HERZ IM KOPF Claussen & Wbke Michael Gutmann
GAUGUIN - PARADISE FOUND Zen Productions Mario Andreacchio
TATTOO Lounge Entertainment Robert Schwentke
ANANSI Avista Film Fritz Baumann
101 REYKJAVIK The Icelandic Film Corp. Baltasar Kormkur
WAS TUN WENNS BRENNT Claussen & Wbke Gregor Schnitzler
HEAVEN X-Filme Tom Tykwer
ALL THE QUEEN'S MEN Atlantic Streamline Stefan Ruzowitzky
LOVE THE HARD WAY TiMe Film Peter Sehr
DER KRIEGER UND DIE KAISERIN X-Filme Tom Tykwer
MONDSCHEINTARIF Hager Moss Film Ralf Httner
WIE FEUER UND FLAMME X-Filme Connie Walther
HARTE JUNGS Constantin Film Marc Rothemund
23 Claussen & Wbke Hans-Christian Schmid
SWIMMINGPOOL Calypso Film Boris von Sychowski
UND DAS IST ERST DER ANFANG Schlemmer Film Pierre Franckh
DER GROSSE BAGAROZY Constantin Film Bernd Eichinger
OBSESSION Multimedia Peter Sehr
Kirsten Hager from the Munich production
company Hager Moss: Sometimes ideas
for the titles come during shooting, but often
they come later, when the film is finished
and you have developed a feeling for the film.
Depending on the type of film, the titles are
either classic and simple a clear font or
they could be opulent and costly, with a lot
of animation. Eric Moss: With digital tech-
nology we now have previously unknown
possibilities to produce expressive titles. You
can give your imagination free reign. Every-
thing is possible.
Austrian director and screen writer Stefan
Ruzowitzky ( AL L T HE QUEEN S MEN,
ANATOMY, ANATOMY 2) also swears by
well thought through, stylized title designs:
I see the titles as part of the story I tell. The
design must be conceptualized to fit accor-
dingly. Most of the time I have a relatively
exact idea and rely on title artists to make it
even better. In the cinema it is a real pity if
the titles dont work, because they are a sort
of calling card for the film.
Juergen Schopper, creative director at ARRI
Film & TV Services, gets straight to the point:
Title design manages the difficult aesthetic
task of putting static elements like graphics and
print into rhythm and timeflow, merging them
with moving images and thus telling a story.
Lutz Lemke plays one of the title roles at
ARRI in Munich. He can look back on over
14 years of experience in optical title pro-
duction. He came to ARRI in 1996, where
he has since worked as a film compositor and
title designer. He has designed and produced
the titles for well over 100 films: You can
already begin thinking and developing ideas
and suggestions for the title design during
the script phase. I think people should go to
the cinema, see the opening credits and be
drawn into the right mood to watch the film.
The titles create the mood! If the titles are
really great, half the battle has already been
won, explains Lutz Lemke.
Apart from the fact that many things just
arent possible with conventional optical tech-
niques, digital title design offers almost infi-
nite possibilities. Lutz Lemke: It becomes very
costly as soon as you start working with
dissolves, shadows, colors, and movement.
Theres no longer any reason to work using
the analog i.e optical process. What you can
achieve only with lots of effort optically and
what can be evaluated only when the product
is finished, is much simpler and easier to do
digitally. Framing, corrections, spacing, blow-
ups and reductions can be easily changed or
animated at the touch of a button on the com-
puter. The results are visible immediately. All
these things are complicated, time-consuming,
and therefore more expensive when produced
with optical-analog techniques.
more creative, and with significantly more
possibilities to choose from.
Jochen Hhnel
Angela Reedwisch, head of ARRI Film & TV
Services since its inception in 1994 and now
key account manager for inter-departmental
projects at ARRI, no longer sees cost as a
drawback in doing titles digitally. The inter-
activity in digital title production saves both
time and money. The dialogue between
director and designer is not only very
important but also more readily possible in
the digital process. Quick and efficient interim
test viewings are possible even over great
distances through the exchange of Quick-
time-movies via e-mail or video playout. We
all know that films need titles, and for the
same money you used to pay for analog titles
you can now produce titles digitally- faster,
30
For the digital post-production, the producers
and director embarked on a search for a
partner who could assume creative respon-
sibility and found one in ARRI. The decision
was based not least upon the successful
cooperation all parties had enjoyed working
on previous projects. It had already been pre-
viously decided to shoot with ARRI equip-
ment and complete the post-production at
ARRI in Munich.
In this film, ARRIs VFX people joined the
project shortly before shooting began. The
story revolves around among other things
artificial muscles externally controlled by
computer. This was the concept of Stefan
Ruzowitzky, who described all the effects in
minute detail in the script. The only problem
was that such software didnt yet exist. The
creative team at ARRI went to work and
developed the required software in an exten-
sive pre-production effort. According to the
directors ideas and sketches, the program
creates a 3-D representation on the monitor
of which muscles are active or inactive in a
given moment. In addition, there are rows
of numbers and columns of graphics running
through the image. By pressing a key, cer-
tain values can be influenced, explains Lutz
Lemke, film compositor and title designer at
ARRI Film & TV Services, who was respon-
sible for the design of the program.
Markus Drayss, 3-D graphics artist, did the
programming and finally created a click-
able software program. Various layouts were
presented until the directors requirements
were met. Stefan Ruzowitzky: Before we
began shooting I told them what I wanted.
You press a button and certain things should
happen. The team at ARRI far exceeded my
expectations. With all the data and anima-
tion seen on the notebook, everything really
looks very stylish and absolutely authentic.
Apart from that: over and above what we
requested, the program actually works!
As in the first ANATOMY, a medical advisor
was on hand: Axel Weusten. He worked
with the team to make the numerical data
and sequences look as medically authentic
as possible. Altogether the notebook soft-
ware appears in around 10 sequences in
the film.
With this program, all the functions actually
worked. That means the actors werent limited
to moving within a predetermined timing,
but were able to move as they wanted. The
result doesnt look staged but real. This
opinion is shared by Stefan Ruzowitzky and
Lutz Lemke. Incidentally, Sony supplied the
notebooks as product placement for the film.
Naturally the ARRI team was also present to
support the production on location, not least
because of various other effects and 3-D
scenes that were later to be created at ARRI
in post-production.
ANATOMY 2 is distributed by Columbia and
will appear in the cinemas in Spring, 2003.
Jochen Hhnel
Muscles can be controlled at a click
with ARRIs software program
With over 2 million viewers, ANATOMY was the most
successful German film of 2000. It was only reasonable
to produce a sequel to this medical-horror-thriller:
ANATOMY 2. As with the original, the new film was
produced by Columbia Tristar and Claussen & Woebke.
The screenplay was again written by Stefan Ruzowitzky,
who also directed.
ANATOMY 2
Contacts:
Key Account: Angela Reedwisch
phone ++49-89-3809 1574, fax
1773, email areedwisch@arri.de
Overall contact for national and
international ARRI Film & TV Services
projects
Feature and TV Drama:
Josef Reidinger
phone ++49-89-3809 1339,
fax-1446, email jreidinger@arri.de
Responsible for lab services,
TV features & series, scanning &
recording, HD-scanning
Commercials and Visual Effects:
Michel Schtz
phone ++49-89-3809 1527,
fax 1549, email mschuetz@arri.de
Responsible for post-production for
commercials, music videos, image
films and 2D/3D effects processing
Sound: Max Rammler
phone ++49-89-3809 1628,
fax 1520, email mrammler@arri.de
Responsible for the entire sound
processing for cinema, TV and
commercials
ARRI Rental Deutschland GmbH:
Thomas Loher, Managing Director
phone ++49-89-3809 1440,
fax 1773, email tloher@arri.de
Responsible for camera and lighting
rental in Munich, Cologne, Berlin
and Leipzig as well as the film and
TV studio in Munich
Film & TV Services Sales Germany
and German speaking countries:
We are happy to be able to welcome
back Walter Brus to our Sales Team
as of 1 September 2002.
phone ++49-89-3809 1772,
fax 1773, email wbrus@arri.de
Branch office Los Angeles:
Thomas Nickel, former lab sales
manager, has taken over management
of the newly created contact and sales
office in Los Angeles as of 1 July 2002.
He will in close collaboration with
Angela Reedwisch act as contact for American customers
planning to do their projects in Europe.
Contact: 7900 Woodrow Wilson Drive, Los Angeles,
CA, 90046, phone: ++1-323-650 39 67
fax: ++1-323-650 39 83, email: thomasnickel@online.de
ARRI Fi l m & TV Ser vi ces Muni ch and ARRI Rental Ger many
One Stop Shop for the Film Industrys Highest Expectations
You come to us with a script and leave with
a finished film or tape, Franz Kraus, mana-
ging director of ARRI AG, briefly describes
the service departments Full Service Philo-
sophy: perfection of the whole, but also com-
petence and consultation in all aspects of
service, always focusing on results thats
ARRIs strength.
On 1 July 2002, the activities of ARRI TV
Produktionsservice GmbH and the Laboratories
combined to form one company operating
under the name ARRI Film & TV Services. The
ARRI Rental area has become a separate
business unit. These changes aim to make
ARRI service available to customers more
efficiently and directly. At the same time, the
structures and responsibilities within the com-
pany have been re-organised.
Equipment:
ARRI Rental Germany
10 ARRICAM systems
50 ARRIFLEX 435 and 535 cameras
11 Moviecam Compact and SL units with Ultra
Prime, Cooke S4 Prime lenses and the brand new
Angenieux 24-290 T2.8 zoom lenses
the complete Chapman and Fisher dolly range
3D remote heads with cranes up to 15 meter height
4 LOCPRO 35 for viewing dailies on location
10 mega watts of lighting equipment and generators
with in total 2,3 mega watts including all necessary
logistics solutions
ARRI Studio
Fully airconditioned film and TV studio with over
2000 square feet of space, original sound capa-
bility, complete, computer-controlled lighting. Video
and sound control room. Extra dressing and make-
up rooms as well as production offices.
ARRI Cinema
Suitable for events such as press screenings,
award ceremonies, lectures, etc. Equipped with
10x 4, 16m screen, 11x 6x 1,10m stage, 361
seats. All standard sound formats are possible.
State-of-the-art 35mm cinema and video large
screen projectors. Foyer with bar.
ARRI Feature and TV Drama
Full lab service for TV and cinema features and com-
mercials shot on 35mm, S35mm, 16mm, S16mm
Quality Control for Film and Video Material
Telecine 35mm, S35mm, 16mm, S16mm with wet-
gate option on Rank Cintel Ursa Diamond and Ursa
Gold with Pogle PiXi color corrector and Platinum
controller, tape to tape color correction on Pogle
Platinum and DaVinci Renaissance
Offline and online editing (Avid, Symphony, Accom
Axial, Sony DVS 8000 etc.)
DVD Full Service
HD- and video transfer of any standard format
(HD-D5, HD-Cam, D1, DB etc.)
Digital Lab on Spirit High Definition Data Cine
for film transfers to PAL, NTSC or HDTV (24, 25 or
30 fr/sec, 1920x1080)
Scanning services on Kodak Genesis 35 digital film
scanner for up to 4K film scanning
Recording services on 2 ARRILASER film recorders
for film recording on 35mm intermediate negative/
positive
ARRI Commercials and Visual Effects
Full service for high
end post production
for commercials, music
videos, image films
Visual effects for
cinema and TV
Telecine 35mm,
S35mm, 16mm, S16mm on Spirit High Definition
Data Cine for PAL, NTSC and HD Telecine and
Rank Cintel Ursa Diamond with Pogle PiXi color
corrector and Platinum controller, tape to tape color
correction on Pogle PiXi and Platinum controller
Offline and online editing on Avid
HD- and Video transfer of any standard format
(HD-D5, HD-Cam, D1, DB etc.)
2D online and compositing (Discreet Logic Inferno
and Flame, Quantel Infinity, Kodak Cineon, Shake,
After Effects)
3D Animation (Maya, XSI, Softimage, 3D-S-Max)
DVD Full Service
ARRI Sound
Full service for audio
post production in all
formats. Dolby SR*D,
DTS and Sony SDDS
on Harrison Series
10/Series 12 digital
Dubbing for TV and
DVD in mono, stereo, Dolby surround and 5.1 on
Harrison Series 12
High end effect tools, big sound effects archive
32
The long awaited move has been necessitated
by steady and consistent growth over the last
19 years and can be seen as an endorsement
of the groups confidence in the UK film and
television industry. The Group is made up of
ARRI (GB), sales and service of cameras and
lighting products, together with ARRI Media
& ARRI Lighting Rental, both equipment ren-
tal houses.
The decision to buy our own property under-
lines our determination to continue to grow
and emphasizes the confidence we have in
our ability to keep on providing the service
our customers deserve. The ARRI name stands
for quality, reliability and innovation and this
will be reflected in the facilities we will be
providing for our clients, states Renos Louka,
managing director of ARRI GB.
The philosophy behind the new buildings de-
sign is to offer filmmakers and technicians the
ultimate facilities for preparing, testing and
planning their projects, whilst continuing to
optimise the efficiencies that ensure ARRI
remains competitive within the market place.
The new 4 acre Highbridge HQ site will con-
sist of three buildings totalling 75,000sqft,
containing warehousing and offices, as well
as carefully planned show rooms, test rooms,
meeting rooms, a consumable shop and even
an equipment museum. The increased space
will be of particular importance to the Rental
companies who have aspirations to take on
even more ambitious and prestigious projects
in the future.
Careful consideration was given to the choice
of location with Uxbridge which was finally
selected due to its excellent transport links and
close proximity to Central London, Heathrow
Airport, the M40, M25 and M4 motorways
as well as the major studios at Pinewood,
Shepperton, Twickenham, Ealing and Bray.
ARRI (GB) Group are already heavily involv-
ed within their new community. For example
they were approached by the Hillingdon
Arts Association to sponsor a sculpture that
was unveiled by Her Majesty Queen
Elizabeth II as part of her Golden Jubilee
celebrations on 25th June 2002.
The relocation to Uxbridge is due to take
place in Autumn of 2002 in three phases.
ARRI (GB) Group and all its staff welcome you
all to our new premises and look forward to
seeing you at our forthcoming launch party,
date to be confirmed.
Renos Louka
ARRI GB LTD
2 Highbridge, Oxford Road
Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 1LX
phone +44 1 895 457 000
fax +44 1 895 457 001
www.arri.com
UK ARRI Gr oup expansi on l eads to
pr esti gi ous new offi ces
ARRI (GB) group are proud to announce the finalisation
of plans to move to a new state of the art Headquarters in Uxbridge.
ARRI GBs new headquarter in Uxbridge
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S
THE CHESS PL AYER was shot on location
at the 18th century Hooe Barton Farm in
Plymouth on 35mm format, using an ARRI-
FLEX 535B.
The students were fortunate to find the location
of a17.5ft darkly lit barn, which was supple-
mented by a 17ft-boxing ring previously
organised by the team. With the two weather-
ed, Eastern European chess players as the
central characters, the crew tried to introduce
an element of colour to Guinness traditional
monochromatic film, and used a lot of cam-
era motion; but they shot deliberately without
camera filtration and made a conscious de-
cision not to use the camera FX, preferring to
achieve this later in post-production through
the use of digital technology. Producer
Carrie Williams knew that the team had to be
cavalier in their requests to stretch the 1.000
budget allocated by the College to the maxi-
mum. Kodak provided all the film stock.
Denham Productions provided their on and
off line Avid suites during the evenings and
weekends. Tape-to-tape grading was done at
FrameStore.
The production team first came together when
working on a shoot the previous year that
won the local Royal Television Society Award.
They regrouped this year, calling a meeting
in which their roles were defined: Carrie
Williams as Producer, Mark Carson as Direc-
tor, Chris Walmsley as Cinematographer, and
Ben Luria as Editor. Last year ARRI supported
the college with ARRIFLEX SR2 16mm cam-
era kits. But this year the team requested the
superior 35mm format to achieve a higher
production value and capture the intensity
of mood with clever use of shadowy lighting
in the dark, smoke-filled barn. The production
team also sensed that in addition to superior
quality, it would facilitate an easier postpro-
duction transfer to the Avid suite.
I have known Plymouth College for a number
of years and know the quality of work that
comes out is pretty good, explains Allan Fyfe,
ARRI GBs Senior Client Contact. During the
course of the year, he visits many schools and
colleges discussing filming techniques and
equipment. It was great to see this group
experience the 35mm format, he adds.
AlthoughAllan plays down his role on location
stating that the students were so resourceful
that he was able to take himself off teaching
in the college Chris Walmsley disagrees.
Allan was a tremendous asset, he admits.
Although we managed quite well with the
equipment, Allan gave us good advice with
some of the macro work and made subtle,
but constructive comments. Also, we hadnt
worked with the grip equipment before, the
tracking shots were difficult to achieve but
Allans advice proved invaluable.
ARRI MEDIA, the rental company of ARRI
(GB) supports students by lending equipment
and sponsoring various competitions and
award ceremonies.
Cameras, facilities and grip equipment are
offered to student organisations and indepen-
dent filmmakers who meet the criteria laid
down by ARRI MEDIAs Client Contact, Sally
Inman. Sally explained I review the appli-
cations which will contain a script, synopsis
and treatment, a full list of crew and personnel
CVs as well as a camera wish list, preferred
shooting dates and an outline of the budget
as well as any pre-production paperwork.
We dont have a student package as such,
because each student shoot will be different.
We would routinely supply a 16mm kit but
I was happy to sanction the upgrade because
Allan Fyfe would be supervising. We will
continue to invest in the future in this specialis-
ed industry and its imperative that we assist
and nurture tomorrows emerging filmmakers.
And Allan adds The entire film industry, from
the top level down, is about overcoming prob-
lems, and ARRIs role is really about initiating
these students into the club.
J udi t h Pet t y
Director Mark Carson, Producer Carrie
Williams and DoP Chris Walmsley (f. l . t. r.)
Plymouth College of Art & Design students
and THE CHESS PL AYER
Maki ng the
Ri ght Move
ARRIs commitment to educational support was
exemplified when a production team from Plymouth
College Art & Design operating as Jalapeno
Pictures set out to shoot a 40-second Guinness-
style commercial and a short film in their quest
for a BA (Hons) degree in Photo Media & Design
Communication.
The Chess Player
34
By day, Emmy Brody, a Midwest girl is thrust
into the non-stop pulse of London where
she serves as a life raft for American travelers
in need of help. By night, her personal
adventures include a complicated love triangle
between a CIA Courier and a Royal.
One of the first productions to be filmed using
the new ARRICAM, it was Director of Pho-
tography, Andy Collins who chose both the
ST studio camera and LT lightweight camera
for this 3 months production shot in Ealing
Studios and various locations in and around
London. The show will be broadcast on British
television in Autumn 2002. Cameras and
grip were supplied through ARRI MEDIA.
I approached ARRI MEDIA quite simply
because of the quality of the gear they sup-
ply, but I particularly wanted to try out the
new ARRICAM, explains DoP Andy Collins.
According to Focus Puller Alex Howe, It
took us a day to get our heads around the
camera and how it worked. Theyve taken
the best features from the Moviecam and
ARRI FLEX cameras, and built them into
one camera. It looks a bit frightening at first
because there are so many more buttons
and flashing lights, but once you start play-
ing with it, they are just the same acces-
sories that you are used to, except they are
clipped onto the side of the camera. Any-
one who has worked with these other cam-
eras, has worked with these devices before,
whether it be remote control focus, speed
ramp, iris pulls, or the sync phase video sys-
tem to shoot TV monitors. Previously you had
to hire those items separately, now theyre all
built in the camera, but theyre detachable.
If you want to go lightweight, you just pull
them off.
He added, we did shutter angle changes
with speed ramps, and often there were lots
of monitors and TV screens in frame, so we
could phase out the bars easily and quickly.
If you had to go handheld, you just stripped
all that stuff off, and within a couple of minutes,
your camera would be ready: plonk it on the
operators shoulder and off hed go.
The hand-held system has a shoe on the bot-
tom so that you can click it straight onto a
tripod. Rather than put the camera on the floor,
or have a grip hold it all the time, you take
it straight off the operators shoulder and click
it on a tripod to rest. You can run the cam-
era in that configuration and use the hand
held bars as an extra handle on your head
to operate a conventional shot, and then pop
it off the camera for the next shot, and off
you go handheld.
Alex explained in more detail, The view-
finder system on the ST is incredibly bright,
which pleased all the operators. Electroni-
cally, everything worked fine and the cam-
era performed perfectly throughout the entire
shoot, so that kept us (assistants) happy.
There is one unique feature that these new
cameras have called the Lens Data System.
The lenses have electronic contacts inside.
On the display attached to the camera you
can check all technical information, not only
what the voltage is, what the shutter angle
is, what speed the camera is running at, how
much footage you shot on the last take or
how much footage is left in the magazine but
now also what lens you are using, what
stop you are on, and what the focus setting is.
From this last information the system calcu-
lates your depth of field for you. While its
true that it gives you a bit more confidence
in terms of focus splits between two charac-
ters when they are walking, and the cam-
era is tracking with them, on long lenses, it
reaffirms that you have no depth of field at
all. You realize you are moving around wide
open with absolutely zero depth of field
and that can be frightening.
The crew worked a 5-day week, but Ameri-
can hours, i.e. very long hours. Andy Collins
commented, AMERI CAN EMBASSY was
AMERI CAN EMBASSY wi th the
New television series from 20th Century Fox
cameras and grip supplied by ARRI MEDIA
The ARRICAMS and the crew
The producers of ERIN BROCKOVICH bring a modern coming-of-age story to television: starring
Arija Bareikis, Jonathan Adams and Dave Cubitt the series revolves around the personal and
professional travails of a young Vice-Consul in London's AMERICAN EMBASSY.
DoP Andy Collins
35
tough. Our leading lady was in every day
having only had 5 hours sleep and we had
to make her look beautiful. We had to shoot
an episode, one American TV hour, which is
54 minutes, in 8 days, with about 60% loca-
tion work to 40% studio work. Days were
long; our call sheets averaged 7- 8 pages
per day. When it is aired, nobody is aware
of how long it has taken or how quickly we
worked; all they judge is what it looks like
on their TV screen. Each episode was lit as
fast as I could do it, and often I wished I had
the chance to just do that one little thing,
but on television there isnt the time.
I thought these new ARRICAM cameras were
very good. The ST has everything built into
it; I dont know what more you could need.
We used the data lenses with the package
as well as Cooke zooms. We did a few shots
with subtle rampings in them, and it was quick
and simple to use. You press 3 buttons and
off you go. They have really worked it out now
so that the camera is pretty user friendly,
Andy concluded.
AMERI CAN EMBASSY was shot on Super
35mm using a full frame and 16:9 gate. It
will be broadcast in the UK later this year.
Focus Puller, Alex Howe on location
Emmy Brody actress Arija Bareikis and the crew
with DoP Andy Collins
ARRI CAM
36
For over 20 years Mike has been revealing
to audiences the hidden beauty of the under-
water world as a director and DoP. Having
worked on over 50 features, he insists that
demands made on camera equipment when
used on an ordinary set more than double
when taken into the alien environment of the
underwater world.
Recently, Mike wanted to update all his cam-
era equipment. He bought not only an ARRI-
FLEX 435, but also a set of ARRI Zeiss Ultra
Primes from the new 12mm through to the
85mm. Their sharpness and continuity of
color I found to be incredible, he qualified.
Recently, I have been shooting scenes of
Pierce Brosnan and Halle Berry underwater
on the new James Bond film DIE ANOTHER DAY
as well as Jackie Chan in his new film
SHANGHAI KNIGHTS. Using the new camera
system, I have achieved shots underwater
using the RCU ramping system combined with
the LCS remote focus system that I could not
have achieved any other way.
Mike Valentine is only too aware of the
importance of service and backup for any
camera system. And having worked with
all the current camera equipment I find that
ARRI GBs service and backup is second to
none. I have had a state of the art under-
water housing built for the system and I am
convinced that the substantial investment
that I have made has been well worthwhile.
Si obhan Dal y
Under water Camer a Speci al i st upgr ades
wi th an ARRI FLEX 435 for Bond
For me the choice was obvious, says Mike Valentine. There is, in my
opinion, only one 35 mm camera system which can satisfy all
the demands of modern film making and that is the ARRIFLEX 435ES.
The new lights comprise two fully automated
4kW Compact ARRI HMI fresnels and a
further three automated 5kW tungsten ARRI
fresnels to add to the nine units already sup-
plied last year.
The three ARRI 5kW Theatre luminaires, in
this case incorporating dichroic reflectors, are
built into a moving yoke with scroller, while
the ARRI Compact 4kW HMIs have a dim-
mer shutter and scroller incorporated into the
moving yoke.
The issue with the Junior 5kWs was one of
size as David Harvey, the theatres co-lighting
manager explained. We chose the Junior
5kWs because we only have 750mm of
depth in our lighting battens. Furthermore, the
colors we wanted to put in our scrollers needed
to be looked after, and the dichroic filter will
give extended life to the scrolls. Having the
units motorised also cuts down on very tight
rehearsal and changeover schedules, as well
as giving designers more flexibility of multiple
positioning during productions.
The Royal Opera House specified the 4kW
HMIs to meet the lighting design for a show,
LA SONNAMBULA, which was lit by Davids
co-lighting manager, John Charlton, and
required heavy usage of the HMIs. A lot of
our decision making had to do with timing,
said David Harvey, explaining that the motor-
isation was designed not only to expedite
changeovers, but also the necessary light-
ing changes during the show.
The Royal Opera House are now progres-
sively specifying ARRI as their first choice in
large format fresnels. We opted for ARRI
this time because of its superior light output,
and the fact that you can put accessories
scrollers and shutters on the front. Further-
more, said David Harvey the Theatre 4kW
is virtually leak-proof theres absolutely no
light spill from front or back.
J err y Gi l ber t
Br i ght Li ghts at the Royal Oper a House
Confronted with the need to increase their large-format fresnels, the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden
have recently added ARRI high-grade theatre luminaires to their rig in two separate installations.
Mike Valentine
37
The new Leader Asia Pacific Creativity
Center (Lapcc) is now the largest facility in
Taiwan and has been equipped largely
with ARRI lighting.
The studio is situated on nine storeys of
office block, of which three floors have been
removed to allow construction of three large
stages the first phase of a project which will
see two further studios constructed over the
next few years.
Leader placed an order worth in the region
of 750,000 to ARRI through Cheng Seng
Trading Co., Ltd, ARRIs Taiwanese distributor.
Cheng Seng won a competitive tender to
supply their major customer, and was respon-
sible for the later stages of visual production
at the studio. They also put together the light-
ing specification, in conjunction with a con-
sultant, and Leaders decision to equip largely
from the ARRI product catalogue was based
on reputation and the ability to satisfy the pro-
duction requirement in Leaders new studios,
which also incorporates the professional Milo
Motion Control System.
Each of the three new production stages is
equipped with ARRIs proprietary series,
including Daylight, Compact, Arrisun, Pocket
Par, Minisun, X-Light, Studio and Arrilite.
These were supplied with a full range of
accessories, including ballasts, barndoors,
filters, transformers and cables.
The order consisted of multiples of ARRISUN
HMI PARs, including ARRISUN120 (12K)
lampheads, ARRISUN2 kits, ARRISUN60,
40/25, 12 plus lampheads all supplied
with lens kits, ballast and cables. The
ARRI X Light series superwide discharge
floodlights, included the ARRI X 2 (200W),
X5 (575W) and X 12 (1.2kW) with barn-
doors, ARRI X 40/25, ARRI X 60 (6kW),
with reflectors and frosted UV glass, while
the ARRI Compact 4kW, 2.5kW and 1.2kW
set and Compact 200W kit have also been
installed.
The specification also included ARRILUX
21/50 Minisun and ARRILUX 125W Pocket-
Par Pro kit (with gobo projection and liquid
light tube and optic), representing the small-
est combination daylight luminaire that
ARRI has developed to date.
Other luminaires supplied to Leader include
Daylight 12/18kW Plus, T-24 and T-12
manual spots, with barndoor and colour
frames, Studio 5kw, 2kW and 1kW, with
barndoor and colour frames as well as Junior
650W and 300 all with barndoor and
colour frames.
The new development means that Leader can
now deliver complete project planning for
film production (and postpro), 3D animation
and special effects production, professional
set design and external temporary power
generation, music composition, sound editing
and broadcast recording.
At the same time the studio will be able to
offer ARRI professional lighting for rental
purposes.
Al an Mordue
www.lapcc.com.tw
Top Tai wan Studi o chooses ARRI Li ghti ng
When the Leader Group, Taiwans top media post-production company, completed their five-year
planning and construction project to develop a Hollywood-style studio facility,
they insisted on state-of-the-art technology to achieve optimum filming quality including the lighting.
The Lapcc Studios
38
Its been a noteworthy year for the ARRI-
LASER in Hollywood, garnering a Scientific
and Technical Engineering Award from the
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
in March and setting a historical milestone
with Industrial Light & Magics (ILM) use of
the ARRILASER to transfer the entire STAR
WARS: EPI SODE I I ATTACK OF THE CLONES
feature to film, producing seven complete
digital intermediate print masters. ILMs Joseph
Goldstone, Associate Digital Scanning Pho-
tography Supervisor, Michael Cooper, Direc-
tor of Film and Editorial Services, and John
Ellis, Imaging Services Manager, discuss their
involvement with the ARRILASER.
ARRI began development on the ARRILASER
in conjunction with the Fraunhofer Society in
December 1996 and two years later intro-
duced the finished product. The following
year, ILM was just beginning to evaluate tech-
nology for their scanning and recording de-
partment, gearing up for the work that would
come to them when the pipeline for STAR
WARS: EPI SODE I I ATTACK OF THE CLONES
was in heavy production. Joseph Goldstone,
Associate Digital Scanning Photography
Supervisor, was involved in guiding the de-
cision to buy the new laser recorder tech-
nology. Before I came here, I was at
another facility that was the first
U.S. beta site for the ARRILASER,
so we started talking with ARRI
then. There was a period of maybe
a year and a half where we did
tests on the equipment that ARRI
provided for us. It was a pretty
comprehensive type of test, and
the decision was made to get an
ARRILASER recorder. Having had
a very positive experience with
the first one, we decided to get
a second one. Thats where we
were when we were looking for
this particular project. Gold-
stone recommended the ARRI-
LASER for all of ILMs work
even before the system was
considered for STAR WARS:
EPI SODE I I ATTACK OF THE
CL ONES . This is what we
were in the business of doing
before EPI SODE I I , but the fact
of the matter is that EPI SODE I I
was on a huge scale and it pushed the tech-
nology into recording out whole rolls of film,
he said.
Michael Cooper, Director of Film and Editorial
Services, agreed. ILM had already acquired
one ARRILASER before I started in my current
position, and I was pretty adamant that we
The BRI GHT si de
of the For ce:
ARRILASER Digital Film Recorder
enters the Hollywood WARS
39
switch over, that all of our film recording be
on the ARRI LASER. In house, we had half
a dozen CRT-based machines, and even
though the engineering staff here is superi-
or and is able to get very high quality out of
them, Im a big fan of the laser, not just the
speed but the image sharpness you can get
out of it.
Approaching the STAR WARS: EPI SODE I I
ATTACK OF THE CLONES release different-
ly, George Lucas was open to the idea of
utilizing the equipment in a groundbreak-
ing way by filming out seven digital inter-
mediate negatives with the absolute best
quality. George allows us to do things that
nobody else would. Its a dream to be able
to give to the public the quality of images
that we see in our screening rooms, said
Cooper. We literally were filming from the
head leader, through the content and then
the tail leader, so its a complete reel, ex-
plained John Ellis, Imaging Services Mana-
ger. Goldstone noted, its not so much that
the technology is new, its that we are trying
something new with it.
ILMs scanning and recording department
started mid- February on the STAR WARS:
EPI SODE I I ATTACK OF THE CLONES pro-
ject. By projects end, they had recorded
more than 1.5 million frames. Its just so
much more impressive to talk about frames
than footage. And each one of those frames
has to be perfect. You cant drop a frame,
you cant overexpose one frame, you cant
underexpose one frame. Then we filmed
out each reel three or four times for evaluation
before we started our seven negatives, so
literally we are talking about millions of
frames that had to be recorded out perfect,
said Ellis.
Before the final decision to film out seven
masters, ILM tested other options. We did
a big chunk of testing to try and see the
differences between directly recording the
interneg, or recording interpositive, and then
making an interneg from that and making a
print, said Goldstone. But the quality on the
really fine detail convinced us that we really
wanted to do this [digital internegative]. It
does make a difference. For any place that
does have quality projection, people are
going to sit up in their seats and take notice
because it looks very good. The digital
imaging services group at ILM originally
began with two ARRILASERS, eventually
using four machines running constantly. We
needed to do seven masters, and that is
where ARRI really came through for us. That
is a lot of volume of film to shoot out, and
ARRI freed up a couple of machines for us
in house so we could hit the production
schedule, said Cooper.
As for the quality, speed and throughput,
of all the recorders weve tested, its always
proven on balance to be the superior pro-
duct, noted Goldstone. The imagery is very
crisp, the speed at which we can expose
intermediate stock makes production really
happy, and the overall throughput running
these systems 24/7 has really made it possible
to take this step forward with EPISODE II Ellis
agreed. The name ARRI does mean some-
thing to a lot of people, because they have
been in the motion picture industry for years.
So you feel like you can rely on ARRI. They
are able to put out consistent products, and
thats whats really important. It has allowed
us and other companies to compete in digital
duplication.
Cooper cited an example of another film-
maker who took advantage of the technology
to enhance his vision. We had the ARRI-
LASER for PEARL HARBOR. I had previously
worked with Michael Bay on ARMAGEDDON,
and I was adamant at that time that the
movie we were utilizing 17 different visual
effects houses only goes on lasers. Michael
can definitely see the quality. To produce
these pristine images, using the ARRILASER
allowed them to push the quality level.
When creating visual effects, we want to
make sure on the scanning and recording
side that we are representing the digital
artists work as precisely as we can. The
ARRILASERS replicate those colors the best,
and with the volume of frames we are put-
ting out now, as a company, we just really
have to have that speed in our pipeline.
Cooper believes that the ARRILASER is a
great tool for allowing the filmmaker to
maintain creative control. Now that DoPs
are starting to realize they have a lot of
creative control with the digital color timing
and the ARRILASERS, the lasers can replicate
that work accurately onto intermediate stock.
So they are not taking a quality hit by doing
a film recording of it, and the system is fast
enough that production is not taking the hit
on delivery. Because filmmakers still want time
to make their movie.
Suzanne Lezotte
www.ilm.com
Bruce Vecchitto, Todd Mitchell, George Gambetta,
John Ellis (back), Joseph Goldstone, Darren
Jones, Michael Cooper (back), Mike Ellis,
Richard Gentner (f. l. t. r.)
Joseph Goldstone, Michael Cooper, John Ellis
(f. l. t. r.)
George Gambetta operating the ARRILASER
40
THE
25
TH
HOUR
A new Spike Lee Project
filmed with the ARRICAM
THE 25
TH
HOUR, starring Edward Norton,
Rosario Dawson, and Brian Cox, depicts the
last day of freedom for a young man before
he begins serving a seven-year jail term for
drug dealing. Walking through the city until
dawn with his two best buddies and his girl-
friend, he is forced to re-examine his life
and the situation he is in. With its twisted,
disturbing finale, this is sure to be another
one of Spike Lee's brilliant movies. Lee has
of each day and sometimes before each
shot. This meant we were to be ready for any-
thing and to keep an open and flexible mind.
Most of the time we would start shooting
without rehearsal as soon as the actors were
ready. Camera operators Criss Norr and Jody
Williams had to constantly improvise, and
our focus pullers, Jim Belletier and Heather
Norton, had to rely on their judgment of
distance as things happened.
set, in frame, allowing Spike to shoot with
two or three cameras facing anywhere he
desired without any major relighting. Many
times, shooting like this meant that the light-
ing for one of the cameras was not ideal, but
it gave the actors tremendous freedom to
overlap dialogue and improvise. Being such a
character-driven story, this became a major
asset to the movie, and, although it made my
life difficult, it was well worth it.
directed a vast number of movies such as
CLOCKERS, SUMMER OF SAM, HE GOT GAME,
and BAMBOOZLED, working with directors of
photography such as Malik Hassan Sayeed
and Ellen Kuras, ASC. For his new project,
Lee approached cinematographer Rodrigo
Prieto for the visual realization of THE 25
TH
HOUR, which was shot with the ARRICAM
system.
Prieto shares his thoughts about his work with
Lee on THE 25
TH
HOUR: Before we started
the movie, Spike and I worked on several
commercials together. It was a great oppor-
tunity to get to know each others working
methods. This experience was particularly
important since Spike works very fast, which
was necessary to finish on time given the short
production schedule of only seven weeks.
For the most part we stuck to our conceptual
plan for each segment of the story.
In terms of shooting, Spike usually informed
me about his specific plan at the beginning
Spike also likes to have freedom on the set
to shoot in every direction with at least two
cameras rolling covering opposing angles.
The prep time was short, and it included a
few days of shooting montage scenes, so
determining how to pre-light the different
locations without really knowing
specific angles was a challenge.
Robbie Baumgartner, my gaffer,
did a great job in helping me
figure out ways to have a basic
lighting setup pre-rigged in each
set, which would save us an
enormous amount of time.
I also worked very closely
with production designer James
Chinlund incorporating practical
lighting sources into the locations.
This was especially helpful in the
Bridge Nightclub (which was an
adapted theatre), where the light-
ing for the scenes was built into the
Since the story revolves around a drug dea-
ler's (Norton) last 25 hours before going to
jail, capturing the right mood for each scene
was crucial. The linear structure is broken
with a series of flashbacks, and at one point,
a look into the possible future. Spike wanted
Rodrigo Prieto (right)
and Criss Norr
41
to avoid using narrative techniques to indi-
cate a change of time, so we had to come
up with ways to visually communicate it. We
divided the story in five looks: the prologue
(four years before), the body of the story (pre-
sent), the flashbacks, the f**k you montage,
and Utopia (the possible future).
For the prologue and Utopia, we bleach-by-
passed the original camera negative, enhan-
cing contrast and creating a gritty, dirty look.
The prologue was shot with Kodak Vision
800 (5289), while Utopia was shot with 5274
and 5245. The present was shot entirely
with a 90 shutter to enhance the sense of
time running out. Some scenes were shot in
a 45 angle. All of the present was shot with
5279 pushed one stop at the lab to add
contrast and grain. The flashbacks were shot
at 180 shutter with no pushing to subtly
convey that things seemed a little more in
control. The f**k you montage was shot
with 5285 reversal stock, developed with
cross process. Since this scene involves our
hero bitterly complaining about everything in
New York, we shot around the city with a hand-
held camera, including various things to love
and hate about the Big Apple, exaggerating
the colors, contrast and grain with the
cross process. Technicolor in New York City
developed the negative and delivered our
dailies. Joey Violante, who timed the dailies,
was of great support and a pleasure to work
with.
Whenever possible I like the camera to be
close and intimate with the actors and action.
As far as cameras go, the ARRICAM system
seems to be the ultimate camera design. It
incorporates the best of the ARRIFLEX and
Moviecam, plus some added goodies. I think
the ARRICAM is superior to the 535B due
to its size and weight. The ST can run up to
60fps, which comes in very handy. I also
love the swiveling viewfinder. I often find the
best angles are not easy to operate, so being
able to set the finder wherever you want is a
big asset. The cameras are ergonomic and
the viewfinders are very bright. We used both
the ST and LT cameras all the time. Since I
like lightweight cameras, if the LT could be
top mounted, I'd probably use it much more
than the ST. The LT on hand-held mode is my
ideal setup, but that is just because I love to
operate hand-held shots. THE 25
TH
HOUR had
very few hand-held shots, so we used the LT
as a regular B camera. Personally, I like to
strip down cameras to the basic needs for each
shot. The ARRICAM system allows you to be as
simple or accessorized as you want, depending
on the needs of each scene or project.
I used the ARRI/Zeiss Ultra Prime
lenses for this movie. I find that
with the Ultra Primes you somehow
feel a very real sense of sharp-
ness, contrast and depth. For some
reason that I can't describe, the
images shot with Ultra Primes seem
almost three-dimensional. It seems
as if you could reach out and touch
the characters. I used no diffusion
on the lenses, which, combined
with the 90 shutter, created a
sense of hyper-sharpness. Still, this
did not result in unflattering close-
ups, but it enhanced the mood,
particularly in the scenes where the
hero sees things for the last time
for seven years.
For our lighting set up, I used a lot
of Kinoflos as well as a large num-
ber of ARRI lights, particularly the
ARRI 2.5/4K and 12/18K HMIs.
One of my favorite ARRI lights is
the T 12 fresnel tungsten light. It is
very powerful, compact and light-
weight. You dont need ten electricians to
set it up, but you get a lot of bang for your
buck. However, we ended up using primarily
small fixtures, since we were very limited in
the physical placement of the lights as every
scene was being shot with two cameras
running simultaneously from opposite angles.
We often hung the lights from the ceiling or
had to hide them behind columns and set
pieces.
Camera Service Center (CSC) provided all
the cameras, lights and generators. Every-
body at CSC was very accommodating to
our needs and ready to assist whenever we
had problems or questions.
THE 25
TH
HOUR is scheduled for release in
December 2002.
Franz Wi eser
Rodrigo Prieto (front)
and Criss Norr
Rodrigo Prieto was born in Mexico City, Mexico, son of an American mother and Mexican father.
His interest in film began at an early age experimenting with Super 8 home movies, until he went on to study
at Centro de Capacitacin Cinematogrfica (CCC), the premier Mexican film school. His first assignment at
the age of 22, as an assistant and still photographer for a television commercial, launched his career. He
went on to photograph more than 500 commercials for major corporate clients. Prieto moved into features
with UN I NSTANTE PARA MORI R, building himself a strong reputation for paying scrupulous attention to
visual and dramatic detail. He worked on other films such as SOBRENATURAL ( AL L OF THEM WI TCHES) ,
EDI PO ALCADE, FI BRA OPTI CA and UN EMBRUJ O ( UNDER A SPELL) , winning a number of awards inclu-
ding the Golden Frog for best cinematography for AMORES PERROS.
He now lives in the U.S. and has since shot ORI GI NAL SI N for MGM, directed by Michael Christopher and
starring Antonio Banderas and Angelina Jolie. He subsequently teamed up with director Julie Taymor to film
FRI DA in Mexico, with Salma Hayek and Alfred Molina. Curtis Hanson hired Prieto to photograph 8 MI LE in
Detroit, Michigan, starring Eminem and Kim Basinger. Prieto also shot two documentary projects on digital
video with Oliver Stone. The first was shot in Cuba about Fidel Castro, and the second was done in the
Middle East involving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
Tur ni ng on the Li ghts
at the Sal t Lake Ci ty
At the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, lighting designers again chose ARRI Lighting Equipment both on
location and in studios. ARRIs long history of lighting Olympic events dates back 30 years to the 1972 Munich
Summer Olympics. This year more than 900 ARRI Lighting fixtures illuminated everything from outdoor events
such as bobsled/luge, alpine skiing and ski jumping to the indoor venues for ice hockey and curling in addition to
the NBC news and conference centers. ARRI lighting fixtures were supplied by CSC, High Output, Fourth Phase,
Illumination Dynamics and Lighting Design Group.
achieving the optimum athletic experience.
One thing at a Winter Olympics that is a
major factor in choosing the right equipment
is, obviously, the weather, he said. Extreme
temperatures, moisture and various altitudes
put a lot of stress on the equipment, he
explained. This was a major influence in his
decision to demand ARRI Lighting which
Brennan described as the most robust and
rugged lighting equipment in the industry,
ARRI lighting.
For the past four years, Brennan had been
designing, building, and then directing the
lighting for the Olympic Organizing Com-
mittee, and for NBCs remote studios and
locations. All of this, plus the daily routine of
maintaining the venue lighting which included
hundreds and hundreds of HMIs and tungsten
fixtures in studios, booths, hallways, media
mix zones, and indoor and outdoor locations,
he said. Those four years of planning culmi-
nated in sixteen days of competition, begin-
ning at 5:00 a.m. Dont forget, you have
to keep all the venues operating at optimum
performance through all the snow storms
and security problems, he said, and when
the competition is over, you still have all the
interview mix zones for the press and tele-
vision, press rooms, broadcast studios, all
the way up to midnight for the LATE NI GHT
WI TH PAT O BRI EN at the Medals Plaza.
NB C Ne ws a n d A n c h o r S t u d i o s
Steve Brill, President of Lighting Design
Group, Inc. was contracted once again to
design and supply lighting for the NBC
anchor studios. This follows his past work on
the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, the 1996
Olympics in Atlanta and the 2000 Olympics
in Sydney. As Brill explained, NBC kept the
award-winning team together for Sydney and
Salt Lake City. Comparing the challenge of
Salt Lake City with past Olympics, Salt Lake
was somewhat easier in that it was domestic,
he said. The equipment and crews were
more familiar. There were, however, some
significant scenic changes as this was the
1972
M U N I C H
S p o r t s Ve n u e s a n d R e mo t e B r o a d c a s t
F a c i l i t i e s
A team of lighting designers, gaffers, riggers
and support crew worked together to ensure
success. Bill Brennan, lighting director with
JustLighting, was awarded the contract for
lighting Olympic venues for broadcasting,
as well as being retained by NBC to head
the lighting design and direction for remote
studios and locations. He explained that
working the Olympics means lighting 15
world-class events for live television for 16
days straight, 12 hours a day, all at the same
time, and with this years added security
and logistical problems, it was even more of
a challenge. As senior lighting designer, he
was involved in all of the ice and snow event
venues. His goal was to provide film-like
lighting quality for the broadcasters while still
43
to maintenance of the lights, Wehner didnt
have any breakage failures. The company
support was wonderful. We had a lot of
other equipment out there, and I dont think I
ever ran into anybody from those companies.
But ARRI was out there and they made their
presence known. Thats wonderful in a situ-
ation like the Olympics. I remember Charlie
Davidson (ARRI VP Lighting) even stopped
by the office before we left. That was great.
The service, and the equipment, was just
outstanding.
Wehner also loves the versatility of the ARRI
equipment, as well as its availability. Its a
company with a very strong presence in the
first Winter Olympics NBChas covered in
a while. As you can imagine, a snow-
covered background presents some lighting
challenges. Since his main focus was to
light the studios for NBC, Brill utilized between
7501.000 fixtures in Studio 1, Studio 2
and the Research Room. The studios were
designed to be shot in 360 degrees so there
were a lot of challenges in that. There were
a lot of positions, and a lot of attention to
very fine detail. And we were always in a
studio, so all of the lighting was tungsten,
he explained.
Brills goal was to bring the feeling of Salt
Lake City to the studios. Of course, the major
priority was to make the talent look great,
he said, and we also tried to achieve a warm,
lodge sort of feeling in the studios. Since
his main task was the studios and none of the
venues, he focused on a clean look in the
studios. Most of the fixtures were in hidden
positions. Those that werent were on motor-
ized pipes that flew in and out as needed. A
lot of the backgrounds were white snow. It
was a challenge to keep that bright, winter
outdoors look without overpowering the
on-air talent,
he explained. As for weather
conditions, we didnt attempt to mimic
exterior weather conditions, but we did mimic
time of day. His decision to choose ARRI
lights was based on past experience: I chose
ARRI because the quality of the light output
is excellent and consistent, and the equip-
ment is very reliable.
Oliver Wolf Wehner also came onboard with
the team from The Lighting Design Group
(LDG), reporting to Brill. As lighting project
manager, he was largely responsible for the
packaging the budget and the crew. For
10 11 months I worked to put the lighting
package and crew in place, and once there
I provided production and logistical support
for the LDG lighting designers and crew to
ensure a smooth operation. When it came
B A R C E L O N A
1992
2002
Oliver Wolf Wehner, Lighting
Project Manager NBC Olympics
At the curling in
Salt Lake City
The start of the alpine racers
industry, and everybody is familiar with it,
he noted. Its also extremely well-constructed,
not prone too much to breakdown. Its exactly
what it needs to be, without being that much
heavier or that much bigger. I can get a lot
more into a truck. I can go anywhere and get
ARRI. With ARRI, theres a familiarity out
there with everybody that you cant beat.
You know what youre going to get, no
matter where you are.
Suzanne Lezotte
Ol ympi cs
44
On these two days of shooting a short film
was created surrounding the tragic events
of September 11 in New York: the French
contribution to an international feature film
project made up of 11 films by 11 directors.
The premiere is scheduled for the annivers-
ary of the tragedy September 11th 2002.
Yves Clanet of Techni Cin Phot met with
Claude Lelouch after filming finished.
TCP: It is impossible to mention Claude
Lelouch without at the same time thinking of
a moving camera: a handheld camera, a
camera in the midst of the action, absolute
freedom of movement while shooting the
ARRICAMLT seems to have been developed
especially for you.
CL: I expect from a camera the possibility to
involve the spectator in the story. My favou-
rite moment is when I stop being just a spec-
tator and become part of the story. The best
means to achieve this is the moving camera.
With it I can directly involve the spectator in
the whole thing. For me the more mobile a
camera is, the more subjective it can be. So
the ARRICAMLT exactly suits my type of film.
TCP: During shooting you said: It outplays
everything else. What did you mean by that?
CL: Oh, I meant that the ARRICAM shows
very clearly how superior 35mm film still is
to all current video formats. I dont know how
long that will be the case, because the count-
down is on but 35mm film and especially
Super 35 remains with all its possibilities
the most high-performance production format
by far.
I have never seen a film camera with so many
possibilities, and then so lightweight too.
The ARRICAM, and in particular the LT, is for
me the ideal camera. Nobody can say how
long that will be true, because technology is
developing at a very fast rate.
TCP: Do you have any suggestions for im-
provement?
CL: Well, as alwaysit could be a bit quieter,
then it really would be perfect.
TCP: You know that the ST is a lot quieter
CL: Yes, but unfortunately also heavier. And
also it has quite a different concept. In the
ideal case of course you would have both
cameras on a shoot. But will the budget
always allow for that?
TCP: What can you tell us about your short
film? Whose idea was it? How did you
choose the actors and who is in it?
ARRI CAM and Cl aude Lel ouch
Claude Lelouch with the ARRICAM
TCP (Techni Cin Phot), ARRIs French agent, showed the prototypes
of the ARRICAM ST and the LT for the first time in France at the
SATIS 2000. Since then, Claude Lelouch wanted to try out the new
cameras, especially the ARRICAM LT. In mid May he had the
opportunity: TCP and Technovision, a rental house specialising in
ARRI cameras, made an LT available for two days.
P
H
O
T
O
S
:

E
L
I
S
A
B
E
T
H

S
C
H
N
E
I
D
E
R
45
By linking the brands Ferrari and Vodafone,
J. Shands and N. McNeilage of the Weiden
& Kennedy agency in Amsterdam have found
a very suggestive way into peoples imagi-
nation: director Laurence Dunmore blended
the strong performance of the legendary
car-maker with the continuity and security of
Vodafones worldwide network in breath-
taking, vivid images full of strong emotions.
DoP John Mathieson used the ARRIFLEX 435
as a painter uses his brush with sensitivity
and perfect technique, supported by his cam-
era operator Daniele Massaccesi: colors and
shades of light convey to the audience the
feeling of driving at high speed, the feel of
curving into the pit lane and back onto the
track. Not only is the shivering sensation
reproduced, but also the feeling of safety and
reliability of the technology.
Strength, continuity and reliability are also
the technical features of the 435 which DoP
Mathieson particularly required for this shoot.
He went to the limits: rain, humidity and motor
vibrations at high speed had no effect at all
on the performance of the 435. Our com-
pliments go to John Mathieson for having
chosen ARRI technology.
Dr. Pi et ro La Rosa
CL: It was Alain Brigands idea. He works
with the producer of the project, Jacques
Perrin. They asked 11 directors from around
the world to portray the events of September
11th 2001 in their own way. I immediately
said yes because I liked the idea. This
catastrophe has definitely changed our lives
in many ways.
I thought up my contribution while I was out
jogging thats when I often have my best
ideas. On this day I was running through the
Bois de Boulogne, and a deaf and dumb
couple crossed my path, in full discussion.
I have always been fascinated by them: an
image 100% free of all sound-related prob-
lems. These people are not disturbed by any
noises. I asked myself how deaf and dumb
people would have experienced September
11th. And then I thought that it would also
be right to offer all the victims 11 minutes of
silence.
My two actors are Emmanuelle Laborit and
Jrme Horry, her fianc in real life too. I tell
the story of a deaf and dumb couple who
are intending to split up on this day and for
whom September 11th has the effect of a
small miracle. I wanted to find something
positive in this unbelievable occurrence,
because not everything was only negative:
just think of the willingness to help shown
by so many people. I tried to see what might
have been positive in these terrible events!
TCP: You worked with DoP Pierre-William
Glenn on this film. A large man with great
talent. You have in the past often shot films
with him and you highly respect him (cf. the
interview in En Lumire: Les directeurs de la
photographie, published by edition Dujarric).
Does he share your opinion on the new
ARRICAM?
CL: I think he appreciates the LT even more
than me. Pierre-William is an enthusiastic
advocate of the 35mm format, and he is con-
vinced that this format still has good years
ahead of it. For him the ARRICAMLT is a
homage to 35mm film and one of the most
beautiful cameras that has been designed
since the start of cinematography. In this
sense he was even more enthusiastic than
I was. I know that one day we will have to
say goodbye to 35mm film and I am prepa-
ring myself for this time.
TCP: Do you think you will use the ARRICAM
for your next films?
CL: One thing is certain, that I will use it for
my next film. But I dont know yet if I will buy
it or rent it Im sure you wanted to know
that.
TCP: You have always bought your own cam-
eras. Will you do that with the ARRICAM
too, despite the investment of approximately
300,000 Euro?
CL: I like to have my own cameras. On a
shoot I like to be able to decide at short
notice without having to carry out steadiness
tests or look around for accessories every
time. Sometimes I like to move fast and so
I like to have my cameras available and ready
to go around the clock. Right now I dont
know if I will buy an ARRICAM. I cant plan
yet. But if the cinema gods are with us
then yes!
TCP: Thank you for your time and hopefully
well see you soon in the cinema.
CL: Thank you, and as you say: see you in
the cinema.
Yves Cl anet
Techni.phot@wanadoo.fr
ARRI i n the Race
wi th
Fer r ar i and Vodafone
59 crew members, 17 suppliers,
6 actors and 4 days shooting
between Mugello and Rome: those
are the figures for the commercial
FERRARI VODAFONE, produced by
Movie Magic Interna-
tional in Italy. Producer
David Turchi used the
ARRIFLEX 435 in this
film for Ridley Scott &
Associates (London).
Claude Lelouch and
Emmanuelle Laborit
DoP Pierre-William Glenn
46
FA C I NG T HE T R UT H
Danish director Nils Malmros first attracted the attention of a broad audience with his 1982 film THE TREE OF
KNOWLEDGE. In 1997 he received first prize at the Scandinavian Film Festival in Trondheim for BARBARA which
was also nominated for an Oscar

. His latest work, FACI NG THE TRUTH, is a very personal film, shot in only
48 days in black and white with ARRIFLEX 535 and 435 cameras.
D a n i s h P r o d u c t i o n i n B l a c k a n d W h i t e
DoP Jan Weincke
Although fiction, FACI NG THE TRUTH draws
heavily on the experiences and personality
of Richard Malmos, the directors father, a
pioneer in neurosurgery in Denmark. In the
film, the 80-year-old protagonist is confronted
with a series of fatalities caused by a substance
used at the end of World War II to provide
contrast in X-ray images. Together with his
son, the neurosurgeon undertakes a trip into
the past. It is the story of a man who tries to
do everything right but falls victim to his own
morals and principles. A film about truth and
lies, ambition and principles, but also about
human warmth.
The film was shot with the ARRIFLEX 535
along with a 435 for the Steadycam shots
in 1:2.35 format with anamorphic lenses
from Hawk on Fuji FG 71112 and Ilford
HP5 Plus film material. Black and white was
chosen not only because of the historical
theme: Malmos wanted to remove the modern
colors from the streets and houses instead
of repainting, and also the blood in the sur-
gery scenes would have simply been too
overwhelming in color. In addition, director
Nils Malmos and DoP Jan Weincke had
always wanted to shoot a black and white
film together.
The Fuji material used in the exterior scenes
was underexposed one stop at 160 ISO
and developed at a gamma of 0.65 by
FilmTeknik A/S in Copenhagen. The Ilford
film for the interiors, on the other hand, was
exposed at 400 ISO and developed with
47
a gamma of 0.75. This not only resulted in
a perfect combination of the different film
stocks, but also created very subtle gray
shadings, following the tradition of fine
black and white films. For this reason too,
only styrofoam panels, reflectors, and white
plastic sheets were used to brighten the ex-
terior shots. Additional lighting would have
been much too unnatural.
The interiors were shot almost exclusively in
the studio. Two permanent sets allowed the
production to have the grips work on which-
ever set was not being used, thus saving
time and money.
The primary light sources in the studio were
ARRI T12 and T24 luminaires, as well as
Kinoflo elements. The aim was to achieve
the most natural-looking lighting possible.
The T12 and T24 were primarily placed
behind the windows to provide direct and
indirect lighting. The Kinoflos were hidden
under the ceiling to give the entire image
a soft look. The set itself was thus almost
completely free of lighting and grip equip-
ment.
One main problem was, however, the exa-
mination lamp on the surgeons forehead.
The original from 1940 was naturally too
weak to be of use during the surgical se-
quences. A lamp of sufficient strength was
needed which could produce a spot with a
maximum diameter of 34 cm. The distance
from the patient was also critical. Short of
actually performing the operation, the high-
est degree of authenticity was sought. The
problem was solved with the use of an ARRI
Pocket Par with a Liquid Light. The beam
was narrow enough, and the lamp could be
placed almost 1 meter above the patient.
Stops 5.6, and 8 were ideal for the close-
ups of the operations.
We are looking forward to seeing the
results FACI NG THE TRUTH opens in mid-
October in Danish cinemas.
Jan Weincke
DoP Jan Weincke (left) and focus puller Sren Berthelin
Director Nils Malmros (left) With the 535 in the operating room
DoP Jan Weincke (right) and focus puller Sren Berthelin
P
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ARRI Medi a
Title Production Company DoP Equipment
ARCHER Hat Trick Sean Bobbit 16SR3 Advanced
BENEDI CT ARNOL D Dark Eagle Seamus Deasy ARRI CAM LT/ST + 435
CAL ENDER GI RL S Harbour Prods Ashley Rowe BSC ARRICAM LT + 535B
DEAD GORGEOUS Carlton Simon Kossoff BSC 16SR3 Advanced
HAPPI NESS I I BBC Entertainment Simon Richards 16SR3 Advanced
I NSPECTOR L I NL EY BBC TV Chris Seager BSC 16SR3 Advanced
J OHNNY ENGL I SH Working Title Remi Adefarasin BSC ARRI CAM LT/ST, 535B + 435
MANCHI L D I I BBC TV Matt Gray 16SR3 Advanced
NEVERL AND Miramax Roberto Schaefer ARRICAM ST + Compact
THE I I NSI DE CF1 Cyf Martin Langer 535B
SECOND COMI NG Red Prosds David Odd 16SR3 Advanced
SECOND NATURE Granada Film Vernon Layton BSC MC Compact & SL
SONS & L OVERS Company Pictures Richard Greatrex BSC 16SR3 Advanced
RED CAP Stormy Pictures Gordon Hickie 16SR3 Advanced
THE MOTHER Mother Prods Alwin Kurchler 16SR3 Advanced
48
A Sel ecti on of Cur r entl y Ser vi ced
ARRI Rental G E R M A N Y
Title Production Company Director DoP Equipment
BI RKENAU P'Artisan Marceline Loridan-Ivens Emmanuel Machuet 16SR3, lighting, grip
DI E TRENKS Bavaria Film Gernot Roll Gernot Roll 535B, 435, lighting
HAI RYTAL E New Vision Gene Quintano Maher Maleh 535B, 435, MC SL, grip
HEI MAT 3 Edgar Reitz Filmprod. Edgar Reitz Thomas Mauch 35IIIC, 535, 435, lighting, grip
LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDI NARY League Productions Stephen Norrington Dan Laustsen lighting, grip
GENTL EMEN
L ORD OF THE RI NGS 3foot6 Peter Jackson Andrew Lesnie 535, 435, MC SL
L UTHER NFP Neue Filmprod. TV Eric Till Robert Fraisse 535, MC SL, lighting, grip
OCTANE Delux Production Marcus Adams Robin Vidgeon ARRI CAM LT/ST, 435, grip
OGOPOGO MBP John Handerson John Ignatius 535, 535B, 435
POL I CEWOMAN Olga Film Thomas Berger Thorsten Breuer 16SR3 Advanced
SNI PER 2 Eurofilm Craig Baxley David Connell ARRI CAM LT/ST,
Optimo Zoom, lighting, grip
UNDERWORL D Subterranean Prod. Len Wiseman Tony Pierce-Roberts ARRI CAM LT/ST, 435,
lighting, grip
49
ARRI Li ghti ng Rental L O N D O N
Title Director DoP Gaffer
CAL ENDAR GI RL S Nigel Cole Ashley Rowe Tony Devlin
COL D MOUNTAI N Anthony Minghella John Seal Mo Flam
GOODBYE MR CHI PS Stewart Orme Martin Fuhrer Larry Prinz
FOOTBAL L ERS WI VES David Holroyd Nick Dance Darren Harvey
HI DAL GO Jo Johnson Shelley Johnson Dave Maddux
I NSPECTOR LYNL EY MYSTERI ES Richard Spence Chris Seager Stewart King
J EFFREY ARCHER PROJ ECT Guy Jenkin Sean Bobbit Brian Beaumont
REAL MEN Sallie Aprahamiam Tim Palmer Andrew Hamilton
RED CAP Martin Hutchings Gordon Hickey Keith Woodward
THE SECOND COMI NG Adrian Shergold David Odd Andrew Taylor
CSC N E W Y O R K
Title Production Company DoP LD / Gaffer Equipment
THE 25TH HOUR 25th Hour Productions Rodrigo Prieto Robbie Baumgartner ARRICAM LT/ST, 535B, lights, grip
BL ACK ONYX CT Films Shawn Kim ARRICAM LT, 535B
J ESUS, MARY & J OEY Federal Hill Pictures Bernd Heinl ARRICAM LT, 535B
THE CHI CKEN CL UB Kori Production Inc. Patrick Cady Lance Phox 16SR3 Adv., 16SR3 HS, lights, grip
NADEZDA Pilgrim Six Corp Harlan Bosmajen 535B
NOL A Hutch Films LLC Horacio Marquinez 535B
MARI A FUL L OF GRACE Journeyman Productions Jim Denault MC, 16SR3
MOL LY GUNN MGM Pictures Michael Ballhaus Andrew Day lighting, grip, Locpro 35
SECRET LIVES OF DENTISTS Secret Lives, LLC Florian Ballhaus Andrew Day lighting, grip
I N THE CUT Red Turtle Inc. Dion Beebe John Velez ARRICAM LT/ST, lighting, grip
ED Viacom Mike Slovis ARRICAM LT/ST, 3-Perforation
SEX & THE CI TY Sex & the City, Inc. Terry Stacey & John Thomas Mike Marzovilla 16SR3 Advanced, lights, grip
THE SOPRANOS Soprano Production / HBO Kevin Janicelli lighting
THI RD WATCH Third Watch Production Glen Kershaw Joe Sciretta MC SL, 16SR3, lighting, grip
Pr oducti ons
50
GAP Films Karlsberg E & P Mller
Project Client
SI XT NACHBARN, HECKE, LEASI NG embassy of dreams Filmproduktion
BAHLSEN PI CK UP TRAMPOLI N, HUND embassy of dreams Filmproduktion
MLLER FROOP E & P Commercial
HENKEL A KI SS OF SOFTNESS E & P Commercial
MC DONALDS SPEI SE UM DI E WELT E & P Commercial
MEGA RADI O SUPPE, SPERMA, WAND, Final Touch Filmproduktion
BREAK DANCE
MI GRO GMB SKAI FLY GAP Films
ONE TO ONE ENERGY TENNI S, GAP Films
DRI NKI NG MACHI NE, CHI LDSPLAY
KARLSBERG BLONDES GAP Films
MC DONALDS WM 2002, SPEI SE Rapid Eye Movement Filmproduktion
UM DI E WELT FOOD
PROVI NZI AL- VERSI CHERUNG HEBEBHNE Wonderboys Film
Title Director Production Ser vice
ANATOMI E 2 Stefan Ruzowitzky Claussen & Wbke Digital Visual Effects, Title
BOOKI ES Marc Illsley Cologne Geminie Digital Visual Effects, Title
CUBA Maurus vom Scheidt Drife Production Digital Visual Effects, Title
MUSTERKNABEN 3 Ralf Httner d.i.e. film GmbH Digital Visual Effects
HEI MAT 3 Edgar Reitz Edgar Reitz Filprod. Digital Visual Effects
L I VESCHALTUNG Michael Dreher Kaliber 35 Digital Visual Effects, Title
NACKT Doris Drrie Fanes Film Digital Visual Effects, Title
PARI S J E T' AI ME Tom Tykwer X-Filme Digital Visual Effects
TABATAH Klaus Knoesel Olga Film Digital Visual Effects
101 REYKJ AVI K Baltasar Kormkur ICF The Icelandic Film Corporation Title
ARRI Commer c i al s and Vi s ual Ef f ec t s
ARRI Featur e and TV Dr ama
Title Director Production
ANATOMI E 2 Stefan Ruzowitzky Claussen & Wbke
BOOKI ES Mark Illsley Cologne FIlm GmbH
DAS WUNDER VON BERN Snke Wortmann Little Shark Entertainment
GANZ UND GAR Marco Kreuzpaintner Olga Film
GEORGE AND THE DRAGON Tom Reeve The Carousel Picture Company
L UTHER Eric Till NFP Neue Filmproduktion TV
SOL OAL BUM Gregor Schnitzler Goldkind Film
VERSCHWENDE DEI NE J UGEND Benjamin Quabeck Claussen & Wbke
WI E DI E KARNI CKEL Sven Unterwald jr. Achterbahn AG
AUGUST DER GL CKL I CHE Joseph Vilsmeier Post One
DEM GL CK SO NAH Matthias Steurer d.i.e. Film
DI E FL L E DES PROF. CAPEL L ARI Nikolai Mllerschn Allmedia
EI NE L I EBE I N AFRI KA Xaver Schwarzenberger Teamworx
HEI MAT 3 Edgar Reitz Edgar Reitz Filmprod.
KL I NI K UNTER PAL MEN Otto Retzer Post One
MEHR AL S AL L ES Richard Engel NDF
MUSTERKNABEN Ralf Httner d.i.e.
POL I CEWOMAN Thomas Berger Olga Film
TATORT Thomas Jauch Der Prgelknabe/MTM
UNTER VERDACHT I I Friedemann Fromm Pro GmbH
VERL OREN Christoph Hochhusler Fieber FIlm
51
F
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GAP Films Migro Gmb Skai GAP Films One to One Energy embassy of dreams Bahlsen
ARRI Sound Featur efi l ms for theatr e r el ease
Title Production
ANATOMI E 2 Dt.Columbia
BI RKENAU PArtisan Filmproduktion
DER ALTE AFFE ANGST Neue Bioskop Film
DER BRI EF DES KOSMONAUTEN Clasart Filmproduktion
EI NE L I EBE I N AFRI KA TeamWorx
GERMANI KUS Vision Film
MEN I N BL ACK I I PPA Film/Columbia Tristar
STUART L I TTL E I I PPA Film/Columbia Tristar
THE MAN WI THOUT THE PAST Mina Kindl Filmproduktion
WI E DI E KARNI CKEL Achterbahn AG
Featur efi l ms for TV r el ease
Title Production
DAS DUO DI E SAAT DES GEL DES TV 60 Filmproduktion
DER BESTSEL L ER Post One
EI N HI MMEL REI CH AUF ERDEN TeamWorx
GEHT NI CHT GI BTS NI CHT Hager Moss
I CE PL ANET H5B5
J ESUS VI DEO Rat Pack Filmproduktion
MANN OH MANN Post One
SCHWABENKI NDER Filmline
SEKTI ON Relevant Film
UNTER VERDACHT TV 60 Filmproduktion
embassy of dreams Sixt
Rapid Eye Movement Mc Donalds
Wonderboys Film Provinzial Versicherung
Key Contacts
Support Camera
Gnther Zoeh
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1209
gzoeh@arri.de
ARRI Rental Deutschland
Thomas Loher
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1440
tloher@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
Key Account: Angela Reedwisch
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1574
areedwisch@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
International Sales:
Thomas Nickel
+1- (0) 323- 650-3967
thomasnickel@online.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
National Sales: Walter Brus
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1772
wbrus@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
Feature & TV Drama:
Josef Reidinger
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1339
jreidinger@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
Commercials & Visual Effects:
Michel Schtz
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1527
mschuetz@arri.de
ARRI Film & TV Services
Sound:
Max Rammler-Rogall
+49- (0) 89- 3809- 1965
mrammler-rogall@arri.de
ARRI GB Ltd.
Renos Louka
+44- (0) 1 89 54 57 000
rlouka@arri-gb.com
ARRI Media
Philip Cooper
+44- (0) 1 89 54 57 100
pcooper@arrimedia.com
ARRI Lighting Rental
Tommy Moran
+44- (0) 1 89 54 57 200
tmoran@arrirental.com
ARRI Inc.
Franz Wieser
+1- (0) 845- 3531400
fwieser@arri.com
CSC Camera Service Center
Hardwrick Johnson
+1- (0) 212- 7570906
hjohnson@cameraservice.com
ARRI Canada
David Rosengarten
+1- (0) 416- 2553335
david@arrican.com
ARRI Italia
Antonio Cazzaniga
+39- 02- 26227175
acazzaniga@arri.it
http://www.arri.com
Arnold & Richter Cine Technik
Trkenstrae 89
D-80799 Mnchen
phone +49- (0) 89- 3809- 0
fax +49- (0) 89- 3809- 1791
Published by: Arnold & Richter Cine Technik, Trkenstr. 89, D-80799 Mnchen
Editor, editorial office, text: Jochen Thieser (Executive Editor), Marita Mller
With additional text by: Thomas Brnger, Antonio Cazzaniga, Yves Clanet, Claus Collin, Siobhan Daly,
Jerry Gilbert, Jochen Hhnel, Renos Louka, Alan Mordue, Kornelius Mller, Marc Shipman-Mller,
Suzanne Lezotte, Judith Petty, Jan Weincke, Markus Wiederspahn, Franz Wieser
Artwork: Uwe Heilig Werbeagentur, Mnchen
Printed by: rapp-druck GmbH, Flintsbach
Litho: EDTZ, Ottobrunn
Technical data are subject to change without notice
Expo Calendar 2002 / 2003
These are the most important exhibitions where you can find out about
ARRI products and services:
2002
September 13 17 IBC Amsterdam
September 21 23 cinec Munich
October 03 05 World Lighting Fair Tokyo
October 18 20 LDI Las Vegas
October 22 24 Satis Paris
November 20 22 Interbee Tokyo
2003
March 05 09
ProLight & Sound Frankfurt
March 24 28 MIP-TV Cannes
April 05 10
NAB Las Vegas
May 07 09 SHOWTECH Berlin
May 27 30 KOBA Seoul
June 03 05 Testing Expo Stuttgart
June 16 20 Broadcast Asia Singapore
June 24 27 Expo Cine Video Mexico City
July 01 04 SMPTE Sidney
September 07 10 Plasa London
September 12 16 IBC Amsterdam