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Jade Procella ENC 1101 McGriff March 27, 2014

Argument Essay Grief and sorrow effect our lives every day but is it really necessary? Are these aspects of day to day life really worth all the trouble they cause? Life could be better or it could be worse without it depending on the view point you take. Although anguish and lost are terrible to feel a person truly cannot become a fully formed human being unless they have experienced some form of it in their life; to feel happiness is also very important. To not know grief you dont really have the best understanding of happiness either. These two pieces of life balance each other out to help you get the best capability of living as you can. If you did not know how bad pain is to feel you would not be able to appreciate the good times like the simplicity of life, birthdays, and holidays. Also vice versa some pain is good to feel because it makes you realize that you might be at your lowest point but there is always the next day and things cannot possibly get any worse. In The Miracle of Melancholia it talks about how John Keats has experienced much sorrow in his lifetime but that sorrow and pain has greatly contributed to his writings. Keats had used his gloom for inspiration for his great ideas and creations like some of his poetry. He believed

that what made us melancholy was our awareness of things inevitably passing, but that when we sense impending death, at that precise moment, we can grasp the beauty of the world. The downside to accomplishing becoming a full formed human-being is that we must experience all the grief, sorrow, and pain of life. In the article Bombs Bursting in the Air the narrator has experienced a lot of this grief and tragic events like losing a friend at a young age, having a friend whos kid has a tumor, and knowing someone she thought was happy killing himself. The narrator of the article stated she realized that we are all doomed even though life goes on after tragic events happen. From the articles sorrow is dreadful to feel but it is necessary to become who you are meant to be. You cannot truly become who you are meant to be in life without it just like you cannot become who you are meant to be without happiness either.

Works Cited Nadell, Judith, John Langan, and Eliza A. Comodromos. The Longman Writer: Rhetoric, Reader, Research Guide, and Handbook. Boston: Longman, 2011. Print. "Bombs Bursting in the Air" Beth Johnson

Nadell, Judith, John Langan, and Eliza A. Comodromos. The Longman Writer: Rhetoric, Reader, Research Guide, and Handbook. Boston: Longman, 2011. Print. The Miracle of Melancholia Eric G. Wilson