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Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine
Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine
“My field covers everything. I must be a specialist in every specialty; I must be

“My field covers everything. I must be a specialist in every specialty; I must be able to talk with all physicians on their own terms. I probably do more studying than anyone else in the world.” —Frank H. Netter, MD

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University Table of Contents Meeting the Demand 2

Table of Contents

Meeting the Demand

2

The Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

4

Accreditations and Professional Memberships

4

Message from the Dean and Vice President of Health Affairs

5

Frank H Netter’s Life and Work

6

Administration, Faculty and Staff

7

Curriculum Overview

10

Interprofessional Education and Team Building

13

Research Opportunities

13

Institutes of Excellence

14

Clinical Partners

15

Admissions

18

Financial Aid and Scholarships

21

Student Affairs

22

Quinnipiac at a Glance

24

About the Area

25

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Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

Meeting the Demand The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University is
Meeting the Demand The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University is

Meeting the Demand

The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University is taking aim at one of the most pressing needs in the nation today—the need for more compassionate, culturally competent and patient-centered physicians who have the ability to work in teams with other health care professionals.

Quinnipiac is in a unique position to implement an innovative approach to medical education. Students in its new medical school will have the opportunity to work side by side with students in the University’s well-regarded School of Health Sciences and School of Nursing, learning to deliver patient-centered care as members of a team.

students to thrive physically, emotionally, socially and psychologically and make the successful transition from student to physician.

Quinnipiac’s vision was to design a learning community where the faculty’s primary mission is to teach, where diversity and inclusivity are paramount and where cultural competence and social engagement are inherent. And from this vision, the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine welcomed its inaugural class of students in August 2013.

Before physicians can attend to the health of others, they first must be well themselves. The educational program in the School of Medicine has been designed to foster balance and allow

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Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

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"The primary focus of our faculty on student learning, coupled with our commitment to instructional
"The primary focus of our faculty on student learning, coupled with our commitment to instructional
"The primary focus of our faculty on student learning, coupled with our commitment to instructional

"The primary focus of our faculty on student learning, coupled with our commitment to instructional excellence, are the underpinnings that create a unique, student-centered environment. This results in superbly prepared clinicians with all the skills needed to provide the highest quality care for patients."

—Stephen Wikel Professor and Chair, Department of Medical Sciences, and Senior Associate Dean for Scholarship

Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine is housed on Quinnipiac’s North Haven Campus in

the Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences.

This modern facility has simulation labs, examination and patient assessment rooms, high-tech

classrooms, an operating room and electronic resources that enable students to access the

information they need from anywhere in the world, 24/7.

The 325,000-square-foot center is designed to facilitate collaborative learning for students

pursuing degrees in medicine and other health professions. Students can study or socialize

on the outside terrace, the lounge or in one of many study rooms.

Accreditations and Professional Memberships

Quinnipiac University is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and

the Board of Higher Education of the state of Connecticut. All programs in health sciences have

been approved by appropriate state and national agencies or are in the process of accreditation.

The School of Medicine is accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, and as a

new school has preliminary accreditation status. Provisional accreditation status is anticipated in

2015 and full accreditation status in 2017.

The undergraduate and the master of science in nursing program are accredited by the National

League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). Both the undergraduate and doctoral nursing

programs are seeking accreditation with the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

The physician assistant program is accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education

for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA).

Message from the Dean and Vice President of Health Affairs

Bruce Koeppen, MD, PhD

The need for well-educated and highly trained physicians has never been greater. The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine is poised to develop physicians who will become integral members of patient-centered health care teams, working closely with other health professionals to provide comprehensive care.

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University As you work your way through the

As you work your way through the curriculum, you will have opportunities to interact with a wide range of students in Quinnipiac’s School of Health Sciences and School of Nursing. Our state-of-the- art educational space has been designed to facilitate the development of the knowledge, skills and values that will be required for our graduates to function effectively as members of a health care team.

Also, we are developing three institutes of excellence at the medical school:

The Institute for Primary Care, which will ensure an environment that encourages and promotes the selection of primary care as a discipline.

The Institute for Rehabilitation Medicine, in which interprofessional teams will devote themselves to rehabilitation medicine, with specific emphasis on providing services for wounded veterans.

The Institute for Global Public Health, which in concert with the Albert Schweitzer Institute at Quinnipiac, will address global health issues.

These institutes will support and encourage academic endeavors and high-quality research that are part of the school’s broader mission of teaching, research and service.

If you aspire to be the kind of physician this nation needs in the coming decades, you will find no better place to accomplish your dream than here at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine. We welcome all applicants who share our vision for the future.

welcome all applicants who share our vision for the future.  Above Netter Image © Elsevier.

Above

Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

Frank H. Netter’s Life and Work Perhaps no other physician has had a greater impact

Frank H. Netter’s Life and Work

Perhaps no other physician has had a greater impact on medical education than Dr. Frank H. Netter. His more than 4,000 medical illustrations provide an unparalleled visual chronicle of a revolutionary period in modern medicine and continue to inspire and educate medical students the world over.

As a medical student, Netter drew visual representations of lecture notes that enabled him to understand and recall material. After graduation and a brief practice as a general surgeon, he traded his scalpel for a paintbrush and enjoyed a prolific career as a medical illustrator for pharmaceutical companies.

The Ciba Collection of Medical Illustrations, a 13-volume set of Netter’s work, earned a place in libraries and clinics across the country. In 1989, he published his eponymous “Atlas of Human Anatomy,” which is widely used by medical students.

Netter’s legacy transcends his life’s work. A major gift from Barbara and the late Edward Netter, Frank Netter’s first cousin, pays tribute to “Medicine’s Michelangelo” in the naming of the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University.

With his exceedingly rare combination of artistic talent and perspective as a physician, Netter brought his subject matter to life with stunning precision and clarity. He illustrated cutting-edge medical advancements ranging from organ transplantation and joint replacement to the first artificial heart.

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Image courtesy of The Archives of the Frederick L. Ehrman Medical Library.

of The Archives of the Frederick L. Ehrman Medical Library. “I always tried to make [the
of The Archives of the Frederick L. Ehrman Medical Library. “I always tried to make [the

“I always tried to make [the person in the painting] look like a living patient, with the proper facial expression and so forth, to show that this is not a machine we’re dealing with.”

—Frank H. Netter, MD

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

Administration and Faculty

The faculty members and administrators of the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine are renowned educators, scholars and experts in their respective medical specialties.

Through an innovative curriculum that includes clinical experience and research opportunities, faculty members will provide a solid foundation in the medical sciences. They are committed to preparing future physicians to enrich the field of medicine with new discoveries and to practice with empathy and compassion.

Administration

Bruce Koeppen

Dean of the School of Medicine and Vice President for Health Affairs BS, University of Illinois, Urbana; MD, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine; MSc and PhD, University of Illinois, Urbana; postdoctoral fellow, department of physiology, Yale University School of Medicine

department of physiology, Yale University School of Medicine Anthony Ardolino Executive Dean and Professor of Medical

Anthony Ardolino

Executive Dean and Professor of Medical Sciences BA, Wesleyan University; MD, University of Connecticut School of Medicine; resident, internal medicine, and chief resident, internal medicine, St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center; certificate, Stanford University Faculty Development Program in Preventive Medicine; board certified in internal medicine

in Preventive Medicine; board certified in internal medicine James Casso Director of the Human Anatomy Laboratory

James Casso

Director of the Human Anatomy Laboratory BA, Central Connecticut State University

Anatomy Laboratory BA, Central Connecticut State University Michael Cole Director of Admissions for Operations BS and

Michael Cole

Director of Admissions for Operations BS and MSJ, Northwestern University; MA, Boston College

BS and MSJ, Northwestern University; MA, Boston College Charles N. Collier Jr. Assistant Dean of Health

Charles N.

Collier Jr.

Assistant Dean of Health Career Pathways BA, Mercer University; MS, Emporia State University

BA, Mercer University; MS, Emporia State University Sylvie Hangen Director of Financial Aid BA, Central

Sylvie Hangen

Director of Financial Aid BA, Central Connecticut State University

of Financial Aid BA, Central Connecticut State University Lisa Coplit Associate Dean for Assessment and Faculty

Lisa Coplit

Associate Dean for Assessment and Faculty Development and Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BA, Brandeis University; MD, Boston University School of Medicine; intern and resident, Boston University Primary Care Training Program in Medicine, Boston Medical Center; chief resident, Boston University Residency Program in Medicine, Boston Medical Center and Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center; diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicine

Center; diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicine Michael Ellison Associate Dean for Admissions and Assistant

Michael Ellison

Associate Dean for Admissions and Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BS and MS, Chicago State University; EdD, Roosevelt University of Chicago

State University; EdD, Roosevelt University of Chicago David Gillon Senior Associate Dean for Administration and

David Gillon

Senior Associate Dean for Administration and Finance BS, University of Connecticut; CPA

and Finance BS, University of Connecticut; CPA Yanko Michea Associate Director for Medical Technology MD,

Yanko Michea

Associate Director for Medical Technology MD, Pontifical Catholic University (Chile); MS and PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston; postdoctoral fellow, the Center for Biosecurity and Public Health Informatics Research, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston; diplomate, Institute of Psychiatry and Psychology (Chile); diplomate, Multimedia Design, Pontifical Catholic University (Chile)

Multimedia Design, Pontifical Catholic University (Chile) Samuel Parrish Jr. Associate Dean for Medical Student

Samuel

Parrish Jr.

Associate Dean for Medical Student Affairs and Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BS, The College of Charleston; MD, Medical University of South Carolina; intern, resident and chief resident, child health, University of Missouri School of Medicine-Columbia; fellow, adolescent medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, State University of New York, Stony Brook; board-certified, pediatrics and adolescent medicine

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Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

Anna Spragg

Director of Student Affairs BS and MS, Quinnipiac University

of Student Affairs BS and MS, Quinnipiac University Magda Stayton Associate Vice President for Health Affairs

Magda Stayton

Associate Vice President for Health Affairs Development BA, University of California, Los Angeles; MA, Hofstra University

of California, Los Angeles; MA, Hofstra University Charlotta Taylor Director of Admissions for Student

Charlotta Taylor

Director of Admissions for Student Recruitment and Engagement BA and MS, Wright State University

and Engagement BA and MS, Wright State University Stephen Wikel Professor and Chair, Department of Medical

Stephen Wikel

Professor and Chair, Department of Medical Sciences, and Senior Associate Dean for Scholarship BA, Shippensburg State College; MSc, Vanderbilt University; PhD, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); senior fellow, immunology and medical zoology, Rocky Mountain Laboratory, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health Faculty Abayomi Akanji Professor of Medical Sciences MBBS,

Faculty

Abayomi Akanji

Professor of Medical Sciences MBBS, medicine and surgery, and MSc, chemical pathology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; DPhil, University of Oxford (U.K.); FRCPath, Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, London; FRCPI, Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland; and FAS, Fellow Nigerian Academy of Sciences

of Ireland; and FAS, Fellow Nigerian Academy of Sciences Robert Bona Professor of Medical Sciences BS,

Robert Bona

Professor of Medical Sciences BS, St. John’s University; MD, State University of New York Upstate Medical College; internship and residency, internal medicine, Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital; fellowship, hematology and oncology, University of Connecticut Health Center; diplomate: internal medicine, medical oncology and hematology

internal medicine, medical oncology and hematology Todd Cassese Associate Professor of Medical Sciences and

Todd Cassese

Associate Professor of Medical Sciences and Director, Clinical Arts and Sciences Course AB, Harvard University; MD, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine; intern and resident, internal medicine, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine; chief medical resident, University of California-San Francisco; trainee, University of California-San Francisco Medical Education Area of Distinction

Francisco Medical Education Area of Distinction Lisa Conti Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BA,

Lisa Conti

Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BA, University of Rhode Island; MA, University of Vermont; PhD, University of Vermont; postdoctoral fellow, neuroscience research, department of psychiatry, University of California at San Diego School of Medicine

University of California at San Diego School of Medicine Lynn Copes Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences

Lynn Copes

Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BA, Columbia University; MA, Arizona State University; PhD, Arizona State University; postdoctoral research scientist, George Washington University

research scientist, George Washington University J. Nathan Davis Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BS,

J. Nathan Davis

Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BS, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; PhD, University of Texas at Austin; postdoctoral research fellow, tumor cell biology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

tumor cell biology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Linda S. Ellis Associate Professor of Medical Sciences

Linda S. Ellis

Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BS, University of California, Los Angeles; MD, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine; MJ in health law, Loyola University Chicago Law School; anatomic and clinical pathology internship and residency, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine; pediatric pathology fellowship, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center; diplomate, anatomic pathology, clinical pathology and pediatric pathology, American Board of Pathology

and pediatric pathology, American Board of Pathology Richard Feinn Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BA,

Richard Feinn

Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BA, Southern Connecticut State University; MS, Southern Connecticut State University; MA, Central Connecticut State University; PhD, University of Connecticut

Connecticut State University; PhD, University of Connecticut Victor Francone Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BS,

Victor Francone

Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BS, MS, PhD, University of Barcelona; postdoctoral research fellow in neuroscience, University of Connecticut Health Center

in neuroscience, University of Connecticut Health Center Richard Gonzalez Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences

Richard Gonzalez

Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BA, MA, Wichita State University; MSc, PhD, State University of New York at Buffalo; training course, International Forensic Program

at Buffalo; training course, International Forensic Program Neil Haycocks Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BS,

Neil Haycocks

Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BS, Mary Washington College; PhD, University of Texas Medical Branch; MD, Virginia Commonwealth University; pathology residency, anatomical and clinical pathology, Baylor College of Medicine; hematopathology fellowship, University of Maryland Medical Center; board certification:

American Board of Pathology, anatomic and clinical pathology, and hematology

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Norbert Herzog

Professor of Medical Sciences BA, University of California, Los Angeles; MSc, California State University-Northridge; PhD, University of Texas at Austin; postdoctoral fellow, Scripps Research Institute and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

Scripps Research Institute and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center David Hill Director of Global Public Health and

David Hill

Director of Global Public Health and Professor of Medical Sciences BA, Williams College; MD, University of Rochester School of Medicine; DTM&H, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; intern and resident, internal medicine, Strong Memorial Hospital; fellow, medicine/ infectious diseases, University of Virginia Hospital

infectious diseases, University of Virginia Hospital Carolyn Macica Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BA,

Carolyn Macica

Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BA, State University of New York at Potsdam; MS, PhD, New York Medical College; postdoctoral research fellow in neuroscience/ molecular and electrophysiology, department of pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine

of pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine Douglas McHugh Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BSc

Douglas McHugh

Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BSc (honors) and PhD, University of Aberdeen (U.K.); postdoctoral fellow and assistant scientist, department of psychological and brain sciences, Indiana University

of psychological and brain sciences, Indiana University Thomas Murray Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BS,

Thomas Murray

Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BS, Tulane University; MD and PhD, University of Connecticut School of Medicine; resident, pediatrics, and fellow, pediatric infectious diseases, Yale University School of Medicine; fellow, medical microbiology, Yale-New Haven Hospital

fellow, medical microbiology, Yale-New Haven Hospital Christine Niekrash Associate Professor of Medical Sciences

Christine

Niekrash

Associate Professor of Medical Sciences Sc.B., Brown University; DMD, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine; MDSc, clinical specialty certificate, periodontology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine; certificate in gerontology, Medical College of Virginia

certificate in gerontology, Medical College of Virginia Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

Victoria Richards

Associate Professor of Medical Sciences and Director of Assessment BS, University of California, Irvine; MAS, University of Nevada-Las Vegas; PhD, University of Arizona; postdoctoral fellow, pharmacology, University of Wisconsin-Madison; postdoctoral researcher, pharmacology, Midwestern University

postdoctoral researcher, pharmacology, Midwestern University Anna-leila Williams Associate Professor of Medical Sciences

Anna-leila

Williams

Associate Professor of Medical Sciences BA, Clark University; Physician Associate, Yale University Physician Associate Program; MPH, PhD, Yale University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; postdoctoral fellow, cancer control research, Dartmouth Medical School Norris Cotton Cancer Center

Dartmouth Medical School Norris Cotton Cancer Center Anthony Payne Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BS,

Anthony Payne

Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences BS, Winthrop University; MS, University of Florida; PhD, Wake Forest University; postdoctoral, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center; postdoctoral fellow, University of Florida

Sciences Center; postdoctoral fellow, University of Florida Nancy Wills Professor of Medical Sciences BS, The Ohio

Nancy Wills

Professor of Medical Sciences BS, The Ohio State University; MA, PhD, University of Virginia; postdoctoral research fellow in physiology and biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch and Yale University School of Medicine

Texas Medical Branch and Yale University School of Medicine Barbara Pober Professor of Medical Sciences BA,

Barbara Pober

Professor of Medical Sciences BA, Yale College; MD, Yale School of Medicine; MPH, Harvard School of Public Health; internship and residency, pediatrics, Tufts New England Medical Center, Boston; fellowship, genetics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; diplomate, American Board of Pediatrics; American Board of Medical Genetics (clinical genetics, clinical cytogenetics)

Medical Genetics (clinical genetics, clinical cytogenetics) Mark Yeckel Professor of Medical Sciences BA, University of

Mark Yeckel

Professor of Medical Sciences BA, University of California, San Diego; Msc and PhD, University of Pittsburgh; postdoctoral associate, neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine

associate, neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine Administrative Staff Barbara Bergen Concentration Capstone

Administrative Staff

Barbara Bergen

Concentration Capstone Coordinator

Della Degnan

Secretary, School of Medicine

Dena Farber

Faculty Development Program Coordinator

Nona Guarino

Education Program & Assessment Coordinator

Harold Kaplan, MD

Medical Student Home (MeSH) Director

Katherine LaMonaca

Global Public Health Program Coordinator

Donna Lougal

Secretary, Development and Alumni Affairs

Rita Pacheco

Business Services Manager, Department of Medical Sciences

Julia O’Connor

Secretary, School of Medicine

Mara Saccente

Executive Assistant to the Dean

Angela Scarduzio

Admissions Assistant

Gabbriel Simone

Program Coordinator of Health Career Pathways

Toni Sorrentino

Admissions Assistant

Curriculum Overview The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine curriculum provides a solid foundation
Curriculum Overview The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine curriculum provides a solid foundation

Curriculum

Overview

The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine curriculum provides a solid foundation in the fundamentals of the basic sciences and clinical medicine with an emphasis on evidence-based patient care. Discussions of the social and behavioral factors that influence patient care are an integral part of the curriculum.

During the first two years, the curriculum is

organized around integrated organ system

blocks, providing students with a 360-degree

view of each organ system through the lenses

of three courses—Foundations of Medicine,

Clinical Arts and Sciences, and Scholarly

Reflection and Concentration Capstone.

The third year of the curriculum provides

in-depth clinical education experiences through

required clerkships in family medicine, internal

medicine, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology,

pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery. Students

receive training in both ambulatory and

inpatient settings.

Required clinical experiences during the fourth

year consist of an intensive care clerkship, an

emergency medicine clerkship and an inpatient

subinternship.

The fourth year of the curriculum also provides

time for clinical electives, completion of the

concentration capstone project and participation

in interviews for residency programs.

Capstone

Project

Students participate in a self-directed

curriculum, in a subject area of their

choosing, and perform independent

scientific inquiry guided by a mentor

Students learn the techniques of scholarly

inquiry through formal course work and

gain expertise in a selected concentration

by taking three elective courses in other

schools, including the Schools of Business,

Communications and Law, starting in the

spring of Year 1 Students initiate the

capstone project in Year 2 and conclude

by presenting their work at a Student

Research Day in the spring of Year 4

Students may select from the following concentrations:

Global public and community health

Health policy and advocacy

Health management and leadership

Health communication

Medical education

Medical humanities

Rehabilitation medicine

Self-designed research topic

Translational, clinical and basic science research

Year

One

Foundations of

Medicine Course

(18 hrs./week)

Clinical Arts & Sciences Course

(6 hrs./week)

Scholarly Reflection & Concentration Capstone Course

(4 hrs./week)

Semester One

Semester Two

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

Block 1

Block 2

Block 3

Block 4

Block 5

Foundations of

Musculoskeletal

Neuroscience

Cardiovascular, Renal & Pulmonary

Gastrointestinal,

Science

& Integument

Genitourinary

 

& Reproductive

Biochemistry,

Anatomy, cell and molecular biology, histology, physiology

Anatomy, cell and molecular biology, histology, physiology

Anatomy, cell and molecular biology, histology, physiology

Anatomy, cell and molecular biology, histology, physiology

genetics, cell

and molecular

biology, hematology

       

and immunology

Interviewing and communication skills, Introduction to the medical history & physical examination

Musculoskeletal system and skin history and exam, counseling – sun exposure & exercise

Head, neck & neurological history and exam, mental status exam; counsel- ing - stress reduction

Cardiovascular and pulmonary history and exam, counseling - cardiac health & smoking cessation

Gastrointestinal, genitourinary & reproductive history and exam, counsel- ing – diet/nutrition, reproductive health

Introductory medical

Introductory medical

Concentration Elective # 1 Capstone project development, mentoring, narrative medicine

informatics, biostatis-

informatics, biostatis-

tics. Evidence-based

tics. Evidence-based

medicine, narrative

medicine, narrative

medicine, mentoring

medicine, mentoring

 

Recurring and integrated themes: nutrition, behavioral and social science, pharmacology and ethics.

Year

Two

Foundations of

Medicine Course

(18 hrs./week)

Clinical Arts & Sciences Course

(6 hrs./week)

Scholarly Reflection & Concentration Capstone Course

(4 hrs./week)

Semester One

Semester Two

Block 1

Block 2

Block 3

Block 4

Block 5

Block 6

Block 7

Block 8

Fundamentals

Hematology,

Neurology,

Ear, Nose

Gastroen-

Urology, OB/

Dermatology,

Integrated

of Pathology

Allergy &

Psychiatry

& Throat,

terology,

GYN, Breast

Orthopedics,

Systems

Immunology,

Pulmonology,

Nephrology

Endocrinology

Transfusion

Cardiology

Introduction

Hematology,

Brain &

Head & neck, lungs & pleura, cardiovascular

Gastrointes-

Genito-urinal,

Skin, bone,

Great

to Pathology,

immunology,

behavior

tinal, hepatic,

reproduction,

joint, soft

syndromes

microbiology,

blood bank

renal

breast

tissue, breast,

neoplasia,

 

endocrine

pharmacology/

systems

toxicology

Advanced history & exam. Introduction to clinical deci- sion-making.

Advanced history & exam. Patients with hematologic, allergic & immunologic diseases.

Advanced history & exam. Patients with neurologic & psychiatric diseases.

Advanced history & exam. Patients with cardiovascular, lung & ENT diseases.

Advanced

Advanced history & exam. Patients with obstetrical, reproductive, breast & uro- logic diseases.

Advanced history & exam. Patients with skin, soft tis- sue, bone, joint & endocrine diseases.

Advanced

history & exam. Patients with

history &

exam. Patients

gastrointes-

with complex

tinal, & renal diseases.

illnesses.

Concentration Elective # 2 Capstone project development, mentoring, narrative medicine

Concentration Elective # 3 Capstone project development, mentoring, narrative medicine

Recurring and integrated themes: nutrition, behavioral and social science, pharmacology, endocrinology and ethics.

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

Educational

Competencies

The Frank H Netter MD School of Medicine

curriculum provides its students with the

knowledge and experiences to meet all of

the following competencies

Care of Individual Patients

Professionalism

Knowledge and Scholarship

Interpersonal and Communication Skills

Practice-based Learning and Improvement

Systems-based Practice

Interprofessional Collaboration

Citizenship and Service

Medical Practice Management

Concentrated and Independent Learning

Integration—Entrustable Professional Activities

• Integration—Entrustable Professional Activities The Netter Prematriculation Program This six-week program is

The Netter Prematriculation Program

This six-week program is designed to acclimate selected students to the rigorous School of

Medicine environment and prepare them for a successful first year of study. Through lectures,

laboratory work and special topic seminars, students gain critical skills necessary for future health

care professionals. The program’s small group exercises, individualized assessment and focus

on self-directed learning, as well as its interprofessional approach, enrich student learning.

The program begins in June and is free to participants.

Health Career Pathways Program

The Pathway program aims to increase the number of underrepresented students entering

health professions and provide a more diverse workforce to meet the health care needs of the

communities they serve.

The program identifies and recruits students at every educational level, from middle and high

school to undergraduate and post-graduate programs, who have an expressed interest and

academic potential for a health professions career.

The program offers academic support, mentoring and career exploration activities during

the academic year and through summer science enrichment programs. Participating students

gain exposure to health careers and prepare to be competitive applicants to health

professions programs.

to be competitive applicants to health professions programs. "As a by-product of immersion in a teaching

"As a by-product of immersion in a teaching culture, rather than a research culture, learners within the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine will develop an appreciation for the practice of medicine as an art, not as a job, or even a career, but an art that necessitates dedication, sacrifice, passion and collaboration."

—Victoria Richards, PhD, associate professor of medical science

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

Interprofessional Education and Team Building

Quinnipiac is striving to become a national leader in team-based learning. The School of Medicine, the School of Health Sciences and the School of Nursing are collaborating to provide new and engaging interprofessional opportunities for students. Through these collaborations, students will learn to identify effective and efficient health care delivery options, better understand the expertise of fellow health care practitioners and enhance each other’s clinical skills.

Interprofessional programs are incorporated throughout the School of Medicine curriculum. For example, in interdisciplinary courses on special topics offered during the first year of study, medical students learn the role of different health care professionals as part of a patient-centered health care team. In other interdisciplinary events, students examine some of the challenging legal, economic and ethical issues associated with patient care in discussions with faculty and experts in those fields.

As a component of the capstone curriculum electives, medical students may enroll in interprofessional courses developed by the Schools of Business, Health Sciences, Law and Nursing, and the College of Arts and Sciences. Working with faculty and students from other fields, medical students gain an understanding and respect for the expertise these professionals bring to health care.

The Center for Interprofessional Healthcare Education at Quinnipiac provides guidance, resources and support for interprofessional activities throughout the University and with our clinical partners.

Research Opportunities

The School of Medicine provides opportunities for students to advance their knowledge of fundamental research principles, engage in scientific inquiry and analysis, and become lifelong learners. The University has created an environment that fosters interactions among students and faculty mentors and encourages hands-on research.

and faculty mentors and encourages hands-on research. “The caliber of faculty and staff Quinnipiac was able
and faculty mentors and encourages hands-on research. “The caliber of faculty and staff Quinnipiac was able

“The caliber of faculty and staff Quinnipiac was able to recruit gives me confidence that there is going to be a lot of success happening here. The faculty and the student body seem very cooperative and cohesive. It seems like everyone here is on the same page and they all want us to do well.”

—Casey Joseph Rosenthal, Class of 2017

The newly established Institute for Primary Care, Institute for Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute for Global Public Health will support and encourage critical research, specifically in these fields.

Quinnipiac plans to build its first University research building on the North Haven Campus. The facility will include open-concept research laboratories that are ideal for collaborative research projects, core facilities, instructional laboratories, a vivarium, seminar rooms and areas for informal, interprofessional interactions.

Summer Research Fellowship

During the first two years of the curriculum, medical students interested in research beyond their capstone projects are encouraged to participate in the Summer Research Fellowship Program. In this program, medical students and faculty members collaborate in ongoing basic, translational and clinical research with investigators at well-regarded institutions, such as the Cardiology Program and the Institute of Living Psychiatry Research Program, which are both part of the Hartford Healthcare Research Institute of Hartford Hospital. Thirty student spots are available for this 12-week program, which includes a speaker series and culminates with student research poster presentations. Students are encouraged to publish and present findings at regional or national scientific meetings.

 Above Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved. Institutes of Excellence Primary Care To

Above

Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

 Above Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved. Institutes of Excellence Primary Care To address

Institutes of Excellence

Primary Care

To address the escalating shortage of primary care physicians, Quinnipiac has established the Institute for Primary Care. The institute will encourage physicians to enter the field of primary care, which encompasses the full breadth of patient services including disease prevention, health maintenance, and acute and chronic care for physical and mental illness. Through the institute, faculty and students can explore issues in primary care, the changing role of primary care in today’s health care environment and participate in interprofessional service projects.

Rehabilitation Medicine

Quinnipiac has established the Institute for Rehabilitation Medicine, in which interprofessional teams will devote themselves to the study and practice of this area of medicine, with specific emphasis on providing services for wounded veterans.

Plans are in place to collaborate with local health care facilities and organizations that work with veterans. In addition to the School of Medicine, this institute will involve occupational therapy and physical therapy faculty and students, as well as other health professions, to address issues in rehabilitation. The institute will make use of the University’s impressive advanced technology and equipment, including the Motion Analysis Lab. The collaborative work conducted at this institute will endeavor to not only improve the health and mobility of individuals in need of rehabilitation, but also improve their quality of life.

Global Public Health

This interdisciplinary field of study enables students to understand and promote individual and population health in communities here and throughout the world. Global public and community health themes are integrated throughout the School of Medicine curriculum. Students may study the field in-depth by selecting it as a concentration for the Scholarly Reflection and Capstone Concentration course.

The newly established Institute for Global Public Health will offer research opportunities, taking advantage of Quinnipiac’s international resources and growing prominence abroad. The Albert Schweitzer Institute at Quinnipiac has offered service trips to Guatemala and Nicaragua for a decade and has built relationships with international organizations and influential leaders, including the Nobel Peace Laureate and former Costa Rican President Oscar Arias.

The University is developing relationships with more universities and non-governmental organizations in Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Laos, the Philippines, Hungary, Lithuania and Ghana. Medical students may complete clinical, service and research rotations in mentored settings abroad, where they will gain exposure to a rich diversity of cultures, communities and health care from around the world.

Clinical Partners The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine strongly believes that immersion in

Clinical Partners

The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine strongly believes that immersion in clinical experiences is essential. These experiences give students the opportunity to develop relationships with patients and health care providers, with ever-increasing responsibility for patient care throughout the medical curriculum and beyond.

patient care throughout the medical curriculum and beyond.  Above: Physicians give prospective School of Medicine

 Above:

Physicians give prospective School of Medicine students a tour of St. Vincent’s Medical Center during Second Look Weekend.

Students will have weekly clinical experiences in an ambulatory primary care continuity clinic

beginning in Year 1; an integrated clinical experience that exposes students to the core disciplines

in a patient-centered curriculum in Year 3; and advanced inpatient experiences and electives in Year

4 to prepare students to thrive in residency training. Students will work closely with physicians in

more than a dozen medical specialties through clinical affiliations with four Connecticut hospitals.

St. Vincent’s Medical Center

Bridgeport, Conn.

St. Vincent’s Medical Center is the School of Medicine’s principal clinical partner and has

approximately 150 physicians on the school’s clinical faculty—some who chair the clinical

departments they represent. St. Vincent’s, with a medical staff of more than 500 affiliated

physicians, is a 473-bed community teaching and referral hospital with a Level II trauma center

and a 76-bed inpatient psychiatric facility in Westport, Conn. It provides a full range of inpatient

and outpatient services with regional centers of excellence in cardiology, surgery, cancer care,

orthopedics, diagnostics, behavioral health, senior health, women’s and family service, and

other areas of heath care. The medical center has been named Best Hospital in Fairfield County

and Western Connecticut for 2013-14 and is ranked high performing in six specialties by U.S.

News & World Report: gastroenterology and GI surgery; geriatrics; gynecology; neurology and

neurosurgery; pulmonology; and urology. Recently, St. Vincent’s was the recipient for the second

year in a row of the “A” Hospital Safety Score from the Leapfrog Group, and is also one of only

two hospitals in the state to receive both the Leapfrog “A” and Nursing Magnet® Recognition,

the highest national award for nursing excellence.

St. Vincent’s Medical Center is a subsidiary of St. Vincent’s Health Services, which includes

St. Vincent’s College, St. Vincent’s Special Needs Services and St. Vincent’s Medical Center

Foundation. The hospital’s affiliation with Ascension Health gives medical students access to a

nationwide network of hospitals. St. Vincent’s MultiSpecialty Group, an affiliate of St. Vincent’s

Medical Center, is a clinically integrated network of primary care and specialty care providers

in the community and in the hospital. Serving southwestern Connecticut, St. Vincent’s Health

Partners, a physician hospital organization, provides a strategy to improve patient care most

efficiently through active coordination of care and data sharing.

through active coordination of care and data sharing. Students make us better. As physicians teaching students,
through active coordination of care and data sharing. Students make us better. As physicians teaching students,

Students make us better. As physicians teaching students, we have to be on our toes. You remind us of why we went into medicine: to help people.”

—Stuart Marcus, MD, president of St. Vincent’s Medical Center, in a presentation to prospective School of Medicine students.

 Above: Clockwise, from left: St. Vincent’s Medical Center; Dr. Kenneth Fine, chief medical officer
 Above: Clockwise, from left: St. Vincent’s Medical Center; Dr. Kenneth Fine, chief medical officer

 Above:

Clockwise, from left: St. Vincent’s Medical Center; Dr. Kenneth Fine, chief medical officer at Jewish Senior Services, speaking with a social worker; and an aerial view of the Jewish Senior Services campus.

Jewish Senior Services The Jewish Home

Fairfield, Conn.

Jewish Senior Services, The Jewish Home, is one of the premiere providers of senior care in Connecticut serving clients at two Fairfield locations and in clients’ homes throughout Fairfield and New Haven counties. The five-star skilled nursing and short-term rehabilitation facility has been serving the community for 40 years with an unparalleled level of quality and personalized care. Other services provided include home care, hospice, day services, advocacy and education, and long-term care protection. The Jewish Home is proud to partner with Quinnipiac University for training, residency and internship programs for geriatric practitioners.

Middlesex Hospital

Middletown, Conn.

Middlesex Hospital is a 275-bed, acute-care hospital that was founded in 1904. It is part of the Middlesex Health System, an independent, not-for-profit, community-based health network of inpatient, outpatient, diagnostic, emergency and rehabilitation facilities. In addition to Middlesex Hospital, and a fully integrated, state-of-the-art Cancer Center in Middletown, Middlesex Health System also has medical centers in Essex and Marlborough and serves more than 265,000 residents in Middlesex County and beyond. Middlesex Hospital has been designated as a Top 100® Hospital four times. It also was the first hospital in Connecticut to earn the national Magnet Award for Nursing Excellence and has retained this designation since 2001.

ƒ Left

Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

this designation since 2001. ƒ Left Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved. 16 | nettersom.quinnipiac.edu
MidState Medical Center Meriden, Conn. In quarterly patient satisfaction surveys, MidState Medical Center consistently

MidState Medical Center

Meriden, Conn.

In quarterly patient satisfaction surveys, MidState Medical Center consistently rates among the top hospitals in Connecticut and the nation. MidState offers free and safe parking, as well as private inpatient rooms. Services include general surgery, emergency medicine, the Weight Management Program, MidState Medical Group Walk-in Center, MediQuick for urgent care needs, and state-of-the-art care dedicated to cancer care, wound and hyperbaric care, family birthing, maternal fetal medicine, sleep care, digestive health, pain management, neurosciences and cardiac care. The medical center is a member of Hartford HealthCare, a large, diversified health care system in Connecticut. Hospitals and Health Networks named MidState the “Most Wired” hospital in the nation for three years in a row. The medical center’s Critical Care Unit earned the silver-level Beacon Award from The American Association of Critical Care Nurses.

Waterbury Hospital

Waterbury, Conn.

Waterbury Hospital is the largest private employer in the Greater Waterbury region and serves a vital role in the economic vitality of Western Connecticut. It is a private, non-profit acute care teaching hospital licensed for 367 beds and affiliated with the Yale School of Medicine, the University of Connecticut School of Medicine and Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, and now is a clinical partner with Quinnipiac’s Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine. Founded in 1890 as Waterbury’s first and Connecticut’s fourth hospital, Waterbury Hospital is a full-service community health care institution with centers of excellence in primary care, cardiac services, behavioral health and orthopedics. The hospital received the annual Most Wired Award from the American Hospital Association, for the best use of technology on behalf of patients.

Right„

Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

 Above:

Clockwise, from left: Middlesex Hospital, Waterbury Hospital and MidState Medical Center.

from left: Middlesex Hospital, Waterbury Hospital and MidState Medical Center. nettersom.quinnipiac.edu | 17
from left: Middlesex Hospital, Waterbury Hospital and MidState Medical Center. nettersom.quinnipiac.edu | 17
Admissions The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine seeks applicants with excellent academic credentials

Admissions

The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine seeks applicants with excellent academic credentials who are active learners and demonstrate interest in both the humanistic and scientific aspects of the profession. The School of Medicine admissions committee evaluates each applicant holistically. Students from nonscience backgrounds are welcome and strongly encouraged to apply.

Academic Requirements*

Candidates must have a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university or

an international equivalent degree. Two semesters of the prerequisite courses (see chart) must be

completed prior to matriculation. Upper-level courses and AP credit may be used to satisfy basic

requirements when applicable.

Applicants with a degree from outside the United States must complete a minimum of 32 semester

hours of the prerequisites in biology, chemistry and physics from an accredited college/university in the

United States or Canada. Online courses are not considered to fulfill prerequisites in math and science.

Course work recommended, but not required, includes biochemistry, natural sciences, human

physiology, genetics and cell biology, psychology, sociology, ethics, health policy, foreign language,

humanities, communications or computer literacy.

General Biology

2 semesters (with labs)

General Chemistry

2 semesters (with labs)

Organic Chemistry

2 semesters (with labs)

General Physics

2 semesters (with labs)

College English

2 semesters

College Mathematics or Statistics

2 semesters (college algebra or above)

or Statistics 2 semesters (college algebra or above) “The individuals we seek to admit are committed

“The individuals we seek to admit are committed to excellence and passionate about caring for the total well-being of others. These are people who thrive and enjoy working in a team environment and value service as well as social justice.”

—Michael Ellison, associate dean for admissions

—Michael Ellison, associate dean for admissions  Above Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.
—Michael Ellison, associate dean for admissions  Above Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

Above

Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

*Academic requirements are subject to change for Fall 2015.

Application Process Applicants are required to apply through the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS)
Application Process Applicants are required to apply through the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS)

Application Process

Applicants are required to apply through the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS) at www.aamc.org. The AMCAS application cycle runs from June through December. The Association of American Medical Colleges must process and verify the completion and submission of the AMCAS application, application fee and supporting documents before the School of Medicine will review an applicant file. Candidates who meet Quinnipiac’s threshold criteria will receive a secondary application electronically. From those secondary applications, candidates will be selected for on-site interviews. Please check the School of Medicine web pages (nettersom.quinnipiac.edu) for the most current admissions information.

Application Deadlines

AMCAS application deadline: December 1

Secondary application deadline: January 15

Secondary Application Fee: $85 or AMCAS Fee Assistance Program (FAP) waiver documents.

MCAT Requirement

All applicants are required to submit valid MCAT (Medical College Admission Test) scores. Tests must be taken within three calendar years of the year a student intends to enroll in medical school. For example, for entrance in Fall 2014, tests must be taken between January 2011 and September 2013.

International Applicants

Permanent resident aliens or applicants with a Green Card in their possession may apply.

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

Class of 2017 profile

AMCAS applications received:

1,914

Applicants invited for an interview:

418

Class Size:

60

Female:

30 (50%)

Male:

30 (50%)

Underrepresented in Medicine:

9 (15%)

Age (mean):

25

MCAT (mean):

29.5

Total GPA (mean):

3.55

GPA in biology, chemistry, physics and math (mean):

3.67

Highest degree earned:

Bachelor’s

33 (55%)

Graduate

16 (27%)

Post-baccalaureate

11 (18%)

Majors represented (a sampling):

biology, biomedical engineering, chemistry, economics, music history/theory, neuroscience, political science, psychology and Spanish

States represented:

California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas and Virginia

Letters of Recommendation

The Office of Medical School Admissions will accept only letters of recommendation that have been received and processed through AMCAS. The AMCAS web page has detailed instructions on how to submit letters.

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University

While all applications submitted prior

to published deadlines receive full

consideration, the Office of Medical

School Admissions uses a rolling

admissions process and recommends

that applicants submit applications

well before final deadlines.

Letters of Recommendation Requirement

Letters are used to assess an applicant’s motivation and suitability for medical school and a career

as a physician from both an academic and character perspective. Applicants have two options to

complete the letters of recommendation requirement:

A packet from the applicant’s undergraduate or post-baccalaureate prehealth or

premedical office, or a career services office

Four individual letters, two of which must be from science faculty members

Completed File

Applicants are solely responsible for meeting established deadlines and for monitoring the status

of their AMCAS and secondary application.

the status of their AMCAS and secondary application. “We want to maximize and optimize every avenue
the status of their AMCAS and secondary application. “We want to maximize and optimize every avenue

“We want to maximize and optimize every avenue of education that we have to support Quinnipiac students’ learning and give them a strong and deep foundation of knowledge. I look forward to integrating their academic curriculum with their clinical experiences. I want them to appreciate early on the tremendous influence they are going to have on the lives of the people they care for.”

— Frank Scifo, MD, medical director of physician operations at St. Vincent’s Medical Center and member of the School of Medicine’s admissions committee.

Interview Process

The admissions office makes interview invitations to applicants via email. After a date is set,

applicants will receive information regarding lodging, local travel and other pertinent information.

The interview day consists of interviews with faculty, clinical partners and community volunteers;

meeting the director of financial aid; an overview of the curriculum and student affairs; a campus

tour; and lunch.

Acceptance Status

Once the School of Medicine admissions committee makes a final decision, each applicant will be

informed via email.

Learn more

Your success is very important to us, and we are committed to helping you achieve your goal of

becoming a physician. We are here to help you manage the application and admissions process.

You also are invited to learn more about the School of Medicine on our North Haven Campus by

attending one of our information sessions or by visiting our website at nettersom.quinnipiac.edu.

ContACt uS

Mailing address:

Office of Medical School Admissions 275 Mount Carmel Ave., Hamden, CT 06518-1908

Telephone:

203-582-7766/203-582-QSOM

Toll free:

855-582-7766/855-582-QSOM

Online:

nettersom.quinnipiac.edu

Financial Aid and Scholarships Financial assistance is available to students through federal and private loans,
Financial Aid and Scholarships Financial assistance is available to students through federal and private loans,
Financial Aid and Scholarships Financial assistance is available to students through federal and private loans,
Financial Aid and Scholarships Financial assistance is available to students through federal and private loans,

Financial Aid and Scholarships

Financial assistance is available to students through federal and private loans, scholarships and work-study programs. The Office of Financial Aid will work with applicants to help obtain funding and guide them through the procedures to apply for scholarships, grants, federal and private student loans, and federal work-study. Personal budgeting, debt management and student loan repayment counseling also is available.

Scholarships

The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine is committed to selecting the best students possible to meet its mission. The school will award several need-based and merit scholarships that will target individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds; students interested in primary care, rehabilitative medicine or global public health; and exemplary students regardless of their intended medical specialty. In addition, foundation scholarships will be awarded annually through a competitive application process.

More Information

For more detailed information, including tuition and a list of scholarships, visit www quinnipiac edu/medical/financial-aid

visit www quinnipiac edu/medical/financial-aid For financial aid questions, contact the Frank H. Netter MD

For financial aid questions, contact the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine Office of Financial Aid at 203-582-5100, toll-free at 855-582-5100 or email us at finaidmedicine@quinnipiac edu

Commitment to Diversity

Quinnipiac University as a whole, and the School of Medicine specifically, are committed to attaining and maintaining a diverse and inclusive student body, faculty and staff. Quinnipiac admits students of any race, color, creed, gender, age, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, and disability status to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. Quinnipiac University does not discriminate in these areas in the administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

Above

Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

 Above: The TD Bank Sports Center, left, and its High Point Solutions Arena. Student
 Above: The TD Bank Sports Center, left, and its High Point Solutions Arena. Student

 Above:

The TD Bank Sports Center, left, and its High Point Solutions Arena.

Student Affairs

The Office of Student Affairs at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine coordinates a comprehensive program of services and activities designed to complement the educational experiences of medical students, foster personal and professional growth and engage students in the community.

Student Affairs provides medical students with academic advising, career development opportunities and assistance as they progress through the academic curriculum toward residency choice and practice opportunities.

The Office of Student Affairs also oversees student organizations and community outreach activities. Students are encouraged to join interest groups representing major medical specialties, as well as the University’s chapter of the American Medical Student Association, the Organization of Student Representatives, the student branch of the Association of American Medical Colleges, and the Student National Medical Association. Quinnipiac University has numerous volunteer opportunities through the

Office of Community Service and the Albert Schweitzer Institute at Quinnipiac University, as well as activities organized by academic departments. In 2010 Quinnipiac was selected to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll.

Medical students are invited to attend University-wide events and programs, such as lectures by prominent speakers, theater productions, concerts and cultural and religious celebrations. Sports fans can watch the Division I Bobcats play in the TD Bank Sports Center on the University’s nearby York Hill Campus. The 185,000-square-foot facility has both basketball and hockey arenas.

Right „

Clockwise from top: students hike Sleeping Giant Mountain, author and guest lecturer Wes Moore, the basketball court in the TD Bank Sports Center, the Lender School of Business Center, and Charles Gibson, former ABC News Anchor who spoke on campus.

nettersom.quinnipiac.edu | 23
nettersom.quinnipiac.edu | 23
nettersom.quinnipiac.edu | 23
Quinnipiac at a Glance Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., offers more than 70 undergraduate and
Quinnipiac at a Glance Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., offers more than 70 undergraduate and
Quinnipiac at a Glance Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., offers more than 70 undergraduate and

Quinnipiac at a Glance

Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., offers more than 70 undergraduate and graduate programs to 6,200 undergraduate and more than 2,300 graduate and law students through its Schools of Business and Engineering, Communications, Education, Health Sciences, Law, Medicine, Nursing and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Quinnipiac’s 250-acre Mount Carmel Campus contains academic buildings and residence halls. The nearby 250-acre York Hill Campus houses the TD Bank Sports Center, residence halls and the Rocky Top Student Center. From Rocky Top’s outdoor seating, you can see the breathtaking views of the state’s rolling hills and coastal cities.

closest airport, Bradley International Airport (Hartford/Springfield), is about 40 minutes from campus. Amtrak, as well as Metro-North and Shore Line East commuter lines, run through the New Haven train station.

Both Hamden and North Haven reflect the charm and beauty of New England, with bucolic neighborhoods on tree-lined roads. Quinnipiac places the highest priority on the safety of all members of the campus community and has dedicated extensive planning and resources to a secure University environment.

The University consistently ranks among the top regional universities in the North in U.S. News & World Report’s America’s Best Colleges. The 2014 issue named Quinnipiac the top up-and-coming university in the North region for the second consecutive year.

The 104-acre North Haven Campus is home to the School of Education, School of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine and other graduate programs. The campus has its own dining hall, a University bookstore and a library, broad lawns and ample parking in a suburban setting. Medical students may avail themselves of the services provided at the Health and Wellness Center on Bobcat Way on the Mount Carmel Campus. Students are entitled to use the fitness centers and attend fitness classes on all three campuses. The

 Above:

Clockwise from left: Arnold Bernhard Library on the Mount Carmel Campus; North Haven Campus; and the Rocky Top Student Center on the York Hill Campus

and the Rocky Top Student Center on the York Hill Campus  Above Netter Image ©

Above

Netter Image © Elsevier. All Rights Reserved.

About the Area

New Haven, a hub of culture and entertainment,

is a short ride from the University. The city offers

an assortment of restaurants, museums and art galleries, vibrant nightlife, an annual professional

tennis tournament and the popular International Festival of Arts and Ideas. Visitors can enjoy

a slice of renowned New Haven pizza in the

Wooster Square district or see a performance at the Shubert or Long Wharf theaters.

Wine aficionados will enjoy the Connecticut Wine Trail; two vineyards are in neighboring Wallingford. Families can explore Mystic Seaport and the nearby aquarium, the historic Amistad Freedom Schooner and the Essex Steam Train and Riverboat, as well as two major amusement parks and two ski areas. The state offers a number of outdoor activities: sailing on Long Island Sound, biking trails, picnicking at Hammonasset Beach State Park or hiking Sleeping Giant Mountain—the majestic backdrop to Quinnipiac’s Mount Carmel Campus.

majestic backdrop to Quinnipiac’s Mount Carmel Campus.  Above: Clockwise from top: Students bike on the
majestic backdrop to Quinnipiac’s Mount Carmel Campus.  Above: Clockwise from top: Students bike on the
majestic backdrop to Quinnipiac’s Mount Carmel Campus.  Above: Clockwise from top: Students bike on the

 Above:

Clockwise from top: Students bike on the Farmington Canal Trail; medical students on a boat tour of the Connecticut River during orientation; Long Island Sound beach; and the New Haven Green.

Photo credits for photography throughout the book:

John Hassett, Edward Kobayashi (p. IBC), Robert Mesolella (p. 24), and Mark Stanczak

Regional Map Albany Boston Providence Hartford Meriden Middletown Waterbury New Haven Bridgeport Newark New
Regional Map
Albany
Boston
Providence
Hartford
Meriden
Middletown
Waterbury
New Haven
Bridgeport
Newark
New York City
Quinnipiac University
Philadelphia
Bradley Intl. Airport

Distances

City

Mileage

Driving Time

Albany, NY

140 miles

2 hrs. 30 min.

Boston, MA

130 miles

2 hrs. 15 min.

Bridgeport, CT

25 miles

25 min.

Hartford, CT

30 miles

35 min.

Meriden, CT

16 miles

20 min.

Middletown, CT

20 miles

20 min.

Newark, NJ

102 miles

2 hrs. 15 min.

New Haven, CT

8 miles

12 min.

New York City, NY

90 miles

1 hr. 45 min.

Philadelphia, PA

180 miles

3 hrs. 40 min.

Providence, RI

112 miles

1 hr. 45 min.

Waterbury, CT

30 miles

35 min

Postal Address Office of Medical School Admissions 275 Mount Carmel Avenue Hamden, CT 06518-1908 Campus
Postal Address Office of Medical School Admissions 275 Mount Carmel Avenue Hamden, CT 06518-1908 Campus

Postal Address Office of Medical School Admissions 275 Mount Carmel Avenue Hamden, CT 06518-1908

Campus Location 370 Bassett Road, North Haven, Conn.

Telephone: 203-582-7766/203-582-QSOM Toll free: 855-582-7766/855-582-QSOM medicine@quinnipiac.edu nettersom.quinnipiac.edu