Sei sulla pagina 1di 3

Anti-Inflammatory and Healthy Diet: How to Choose the Right Cooking Oil and the Right Salad Oil.

What we should know. Let me tell you that this article is not about the best eating fats which fish and krill ones may be the best?? Another article will be written for that.
Table of alimentary and cooking oils giving also the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 contents, these polyunsaturated and unstable fats, needed also in really small quantities; those for which this ratio is the less are in red and are the best ones (having less anti-inflammatory action or properties); the second best are in blue. The worst in saturated fatty acids (SFA) are in green. The best oils for cooking, specially deep cooking, are the ones with the highest smoke points and are in magenta, (Every oil, no matter how good it may be, will burn when you heat it up long enough. And when oil burns, it rapidly denatures and produces potentially carcinogenic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.). Those with higher content of monounsaturated (MUFA) and lesser one in polyunsaturated (PUFA), what is good, taking olive oil as reference are in cyan. Those with the worst ratio ratio of omega-6 to omega-3, taking Safflower as a reference, are in maroon or dark red. Remember also the trans-fatty acids1 that are in some margarines and make margarines the worst of the fats for cooking and spreading on foods. (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/trans-fat/CL00032) - (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarine) (http://www.google.com/search?q=margarines&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=tEMqUdS7GujD0AHEnoHQCA&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQs AQ&biw=1280&bih=644). Finally, what leads me at writing this article is my investigation on CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) that , I now understand, although being an isomer of linoleic acid, is mostly taken in the meat, the dairy products - cheese, yogurt (plain), sour cream - derived from ruminants, ground fresh turkey and egg yolk, but can be produced industrially from Safflower oil or free fatty acids from safflower oil serving as a starting material for its production under the name of ClarinolTM G-80 (http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/fcn/gras_notices/grn0148.pdf). To speak of dietary fat and fat intake, in general, in order to avoid deficit and illnesses, I will need to write another article where I will introduce the animal fats.

Table of comparison of cooking and dressing oils


COOKING OIL SFA (%) MUFA (%) PUFA (%) O-6 (%) Linoleic O-3 O-9 O-6:3 RATIO (%) (%) -Linoleic Mead acid SMOKE POINT

Almond oil Avocado oil (extra virgin) Beef tallow Butter Butter oil, (anhydrous) Canola oil Coconut oil (extra virgin) Corn oil (refined) Cottonseed oil Flaxseed oil Grapeseed oil

8.2 11.6 49.8 63.3 62.3 7.4 86.5 13.0 25.9 9.4 9.6

69.9 70.6 41.8 25.9 28.9 63.3 5.8 27.6 17.8 20.2 16.1

17.4 13.5 4.0 3.8 3.7 28.1 1.8 54.7 51.9 66.0 69.9

17.4 12.5 3.1 3.4 2.3 19.0 1.8 53.5 51.5 12.7 69.6

0 1.0 0.6 0.4 1.5 9.1 0 1.162 0.2 53.3 0.1

69.4 67.9 36.0 24.6 25.2 61.7 5.8 27.3 17.0 20.2 15.8

Not a source of O-3 13.1 : 1 5.2 : 1 8.6 : 1 1.6 : 1 2.1 : 1 Not a source of O-3 46.1 : 1 259.4 : 1 0.2 : 1 676.1 : 1

420F (216C) 400F (204C) 400F (204C) 250300F (121149C) 485F (252C) 400F (204C) 350F (177C) 450F (232C) 420F (216C) 225F (107C) 420F (216C)

Hazelnut oil Lard Macadamia oil Mustard oil Olive oil (extra virgin) Palm oil Palm kernel oil Peanut oil (refined) Rice bran oil Saffloweroil (refined) Sesame oil (semi-refined) Soybean oil, (refined) Sunflower oil (refined) Tea seed oil Walnut oil (semi-refined) Wheat germ oil 1.

7.4 39.2 12.5 11.6 13.8 49.3 81.5 16.9 19.7 7.5 14.2 15.3 13.0 21.1 9.1 18.8

78 45.1 83.5 59.2 73.0 37.0 11.4 46.2 39.3 75.2 39.7 22.7 46.2 51.5 22.8 15.1

10.2 11.2 4.0 21.2 10.5 9.3 1.6 32.0 35.0 12.8 41.7 57.3 36.4 23.0 63.3 61.7

10.1 10.2 2.0 15.3 9.8 9.1 1.6 32.0 33.4 12.7 41.3 50.3 35.3 22.2 52.9 54.8

0 1.0 2.0 5.9 0.8 0.2 0 0 1.6 0.1 0.3 7.0 0.9 0.7 10.4 6.9

77.8 41.2 83.0 11.6 71.3 36.6 11.4 44.8 39.1 74.8 39.3 22.6 46.0 49.9 22.2 14.6

Not a source of O-3 10.2 : 1 1.0 : 1 2.6 : 1 12.8 : 1 45.9 : 1 Not a source of O-3 Not a source of O-3 20.8 : 1 133.1 : 1 137.0 : 1 7.1 : 1 39.4 : 1 31.8 : 1 5.1 : 1 7.9 : 1

430F (221C) 370F (188C) 413F (210C) 489F (254C) 375F (191C) 455F (235C) 450F (232C) 450F (232C) 490F (254C) 510F (266C) 450F (232C) 460F (238C) 440F (227C) 485F (252C) 400F (204C) 225F (107C)

The best oil in this ascending ratio is first Flaxseed oil with a ratio 0.2 : 1, but rather low in MUFA; the second best is Macadamia oil expressed from the nut meat of the macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia) tree, a native Australian nut, with a ratio 1.0 : 1; the third best is Butter oil (http://www.examiner.com/article/what-is-butter-oil), with a ratio 1.6 : 1; the fourth best is Canola oil, with a ratio 2.1 : 1; the fifth best, Mustard oil, ratio 2.6 : 1; the sixth best, Walnut oil, ratio 5.1 : 1; the seventh, best Beef tallow, ratio 5.2 : 1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallow) (http://www.wholelifeeating.com/2011/08/beef-tallowan-excellent-cooking-fat/); the eight best, Soybean oil, ratio 7.1 : 1; the ninth best is natural Butter, ratio 8.6 : 1 (You have been
lied to about butter: Butter has been maligned as unhealthy for decades - http://www.naturalnews.com/031002_butter_misinformation.html; Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/031002_butter_misinformation.html#ixzz2Lj48T1Zo); Macamadia oil and Mustard oil are really good

1.

2.

oils because they found them two times among the best - higher smoke point and good ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 with Macamadia even coming three times with a high content of MUFA and a less one in PUFA. a) For people suffering of arthritis a balanced ratio, like the ones stressed in red, is necessary in the daily alimentation. b) For people, suffering of EFA deficiency, with no arthritis, a high intake of PUFA is necessary, like stressed in dark yellow; however, because the deficiency of omega-3 is more frequent, a balanced ratio is also necessary. 1 Trans fatty acids are manufactured fats created during a process called hydrogenation, which is aimed at stabilizing polyunsaturated oils to prevent them from becoming rancid and to keep them solid at room temperature. They may be particularly dangerous for the heart and may pose a risk for certain cancers. Hydrogenated fats are used in stick margarine, fast foods, commercial baked goods (donuts, cookies, crackers), processed foods, and fried foods bought outside. (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/19514.htm) Arachidonic acids are healthy in moderate doses, and are considered essential fatty acids. For this reason, our bodies convert linoleic acid from plant oils to arachadonic acid as needed. However, we can also obtain arachidonic acid directly from meat and fish. A diet rich in meats and oily fish can cause an oversupply of arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid stimulates the production of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins and leucotrienes through in the COX (cyclooxgenase) and LOX (lipoxygenase) enzyme conversion process.

Table of major polyunsaturated fatty acids


Omega-3 fatty acids polyunsaturated (PUFAs) Omega-6 fatty acids polyunsaturated (PUFAs) Omega-9 fatty acids monounsaturated (MUFAs)

Alpha linolenic acid (ALA, or more commonly LNA) essential to human diet, not synthesized Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) essential, but synthesized metabolite of omega-3 with anti-inflammatory property Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) essential, but synthesized metabolite with antiinflammatory property

Linoleic acid (LA) essential not synthesized Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) an essential anti-inflammatory metabolite of Omega-6 Arachidonic acid (AA) essential metabolite but pro-inflammatory

Oleic acid not essential Mead acid not esssential

eErucic acid not essential

In a healthy individual, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids act in balance and the person has no tendency to develop inflammatory diseases, like colitis (ulcerative colitis ,necrotizing enterocolitis [NEC], pelvic inflammatory disease [PID], Crohn's disease and diverticulitis), nephritis, hepatitis, pleurisy, pyelitis, pharyngitis, arthritis (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis [RA], psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis), autoinflammatory diseases, like Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF), Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID), Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) ReceptorAssociated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS), Deficiency of the Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (DIRA), Behets Disease or the inflammatory pathways that can lead to a host of diseases, like Alzheimer's, asthma, atherosclerosis, fibromyalgia, systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) and Parkinson's disease. He has neither a tendency to develop a bleeding disease. (http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/Autoinflammatory/understanding_inflamatory.pdf) (http://krilloilsinfo.com/krill-oil-side-effects/)

Legend: SFA: Saturated fatty acids MUFA: Monounsaturated fatty acids PUFA: Polyunsaturated fatty acids O-3: Omega-3 fatty acids O-6: Omega-6 fatty acids O-9: Omega-9 fatty acids O-6:3 Ratio: Omega-6 to omega-3 ratio Smoke Point: The temperature at which a cooking oil starts to burn and produce chemicals that are potentially harmful. ----------------------------------------------------REF.: 1. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/19514.htm 2. http://www.wholelifeeating.com/2011/08/beef-tallow-an-excellent-cooking-fat/ 3. http://www.naturalnews.com/031002_butter_misinformation.html 4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_processing 5. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_food 6. http://theconsciouslife.com/top-10-inflammatory-foods-to-avoid.htm 7. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macadamia_oil 8. http://theconsciouslife.com/omega-3-6-9-ratio-cooking-oils.htm 9. http://www.rejuvenation-science.com/omega-3-6-oils.html 10. http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/saffoil.htm 11. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid 12. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A-linolenic_acid 13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17168669 14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19022981 15. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eicosapentaenoic_acid 16. http://krilloilsinfo.com/krill-oil-side-effects/ 17. http://krill-oil.wellwise.org/krill-oil-side-effects/krill-oil-dangers 18. Conjugated Linoleic Acid, or CLA- c9t11 (cis-9, trans-11) and the other t10c12 (trans-10, cis-12); Page last updated: Tuesday December 11, 2012; 2011-2013; aPP-aPProved.com. All Rights Reserved. Independent Division of JJSmith Group, Inc; http://examine.com/supplements/Conjugated+Linoleic+Acid/#summary10-0 19. http://www.getprograde.com/essential-fatty-acid.html 20. http://www.odec.ca/projects/2004/thog4n0/public_html/typefat.html 21. http://www.biochemj.org/bj/imps_x/pdf/BJ20011798.pdf 22. http://www.shikai.com/publications/GLA-A%20Natural%20AntiInflammatoryAgent.pdf 23. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NF-B 24. Suggestions of Nicole about Krill oil and krills