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[gj^j^MEISMaEMasaSMSM^MMSMMSM^MEMa

THE OF
IN ENGLISH

SONGS
SAPPHO
TRANSLATION

BY

MANY

POETS

"

DECORATED

BY

PAULMcPHARLIN

THE

PETER

PAUPER

PRESS

MOUNT

VERNON

"

NEW

YORK

9^1

^IS-

C'

fSM^MaMaEEiaMSMSISEMSJSMSEMSMSfSMSIBErajaM^J^

ti-

SOME GUIDANCE

NOTES OF

FOR
THE

THE READER

Sappho,
Greek

one

of the
was

earliest and born


most

the certainly

greatest
the

of

lyric poets,
Homer's

about

630

B.C.

on

island

of Lesbos, and
since
sweetness

lived there

of her life. Lesbos, famous


its
women

day

for the

beauty of
coast

and Minor

the

of its wine, the

lies ofl the and


is
now

of Asia

(the

Lydia of

poems)
a

called
is known ancient

Mitylene
about

after its

principal city.Not
life in

great
that and

deal the her

Sappho's
quited unre-

Lesbos, except
love

story

of her

for Phaon,

suicide

off by leaping

the
as

Leucadian modern noble

cliff, are
scholars
can

now

considered

mythical.So
she
came

far from

surmise,

however,
three

and bore

wealthy family,had
at

brothers,

was

ried, mar-

least exiled

one

child, the

daughter Cleis political reasons,


lived
in the

of

the
turned re-

poems,

was

to

Syracuse
of

for

after the

amnesty
she
was

581 B.C.,

satisfying
Aeolian

knowledge

that

the
at
a

bright star
ripeold
women's
were

of She

the

school of poetry, and


was

died

age.

apparently
circle, and

head

of

school girls' of her

or

poetry
written
to
as

probably some
songs and

poems

wedding-

choruses holiday-festival

be

sung

by

these

girls.

For
in

many

years
was

the standard
that of

readingedition
T.

of

Sappho

translation

Henry
since

Wharton,
in

published
editions

first in

London,

1877, and

then

several

there and for the


own

in New

York.
was

The

virtue

of Wharton's

edition

general reader
prose

that of each

he

suppliednot
poems metrical

only
and

his

literal but of the A


more

version

of the

ments, frag-

also the

best

then-available others.
Poems

tions transla-

principal piecesby
recent

edition Edwin

of The

of

Sappho,
a

the

translations edition excellent


versions versions in

by

Marion and
to

Cox,
York

in published in

limited
an

London

New

1924,

makes
new

supplement
of the of many
same

Wharton
as

by giving
well
as

prose metrical

material,

excellent

pieces.
modern
section

But of

for the

reader devoted

the
to

essential

source

edition cal Classi1922

Sappho

is the

her in the Loeb

LibraryLyra
and revised and

Graeca

(volume one) published in


book,
prose

enlarged in 1928. This


and with his excellent which

edited

by

J. M.
contains in

Edmonds,
new

translations,

Sappho
all of her
in
a

discoveries work

entirely outweigh
This
as new

quantity
is

known. previously

material result of the

now

moderately

complete condition
and

the
on

scholarly, ingenious
in

work indefatigable

part

of Edmonds had

scripts fragmentary manureconstructing

that

been recently
must

unearthed
remain

in

Eg^'pt.Some
in

of these the main Edmonds

reconstructions

but conjectural,

they seem

valid and the limited the

satisfying.
Loeb edition

followed
"

publication with

his

Sappho 1928
"

Revocata

publishedin London,
with
a

which

contains

same

material metrical Moore

few

tions, addi-

but this time Prose with translations

mostly in by
David

form. Robinson Mills

(together
were

metrical

versions

by

Marion

Miller)

laiajajsMaMaMSMSisMsiajsisi^MSJEMa'SM^MSM

in published

The

Songs of Sappho,
to
us are

New

York,

1925.

valuable Particularly of the and


new

Prof. Robinson's

translations

discoveries and

their Edmonds-reconstructions,

the
to

present

of are publishers appreciative with here, together


some

his

sion permisverse

them reprint his

of his

translations from

Sappho

and

Her

Influence. tiny fragments,the


ton; translations of Whartranslations tions transla-

Except
present

for the

droppingof
the and

many prose

edition

givesall of
prose

all of the of Cox;

most

of the metrical
most

all of the

prose and
new

and

of the metrical prose

of Edmonds; Robinson the of the

all of the

translations

by

discoveries.
in

In addition, it follows tions best translaand of than


course

example of
in metrical

Wharton form from

reprintingthe
other
sources
"

those

sources

are

far richer and


in

more

varied

were

available

to

Wharton

1877.
except the first great
new

All
to

of

Sappho known
a

to

us,

hymn
which lists

Aphrodite, and
be

few

of the
is

discoveries

may 191 209.

completepoems,
of these
some

Edmonds fragmentary. 170, Cox


a

separate

Wharton pieces,

130, word

Robinson

Many

fragments are
has

only, or
us

which phrase, and the fact

ancient

for preserved

by

ing; quotbe
"

as interesting

these

tiny fragments may


are

to

student

of Greek,
are
"

they

valueless generally

in

they

to irritating

the

generalEnglish reader.
it has

Therefore eliminate sufficient


interest

in the

present edition

been

our

to policy

any

fragment which
or

in translation

lacked

either
to

meaning

sufficient As

suggestion of poetry
a

that

generalreader.

result,the total of

our

pieces
Edmonds

is

only
and

but 124, the others

those 124
in

much assay

higher
of

than

the

specific
also
one

gravity
other

poetry.
with

The

present
text:

edition

takes

liberty

the

whereas

Edmonds

warns

that

certain

passages have

are

conjectural,
those

by
brackets

enclosing
for
the

them

in

brackets,
smoother

we

dropped
and

sake

of

reading

greater
The

poetic
are

enjoyment.
numbered

pieces
order but

consecutively, assigned
of

and

follow

the

not

the

numbers

by

Edmonds

in

reconstructing
the

the

nine

books

Sappho.
which

As
a

help

to

inquiring
each

reader,
is

the

number

Edmonds

assigns

to

piece
Cox

given,

the
as are

numbers

assigned Wharton)
Edmonds
is

by
and

Wharton,
Robinson.

(who
a

roughly
translation

follows

Where prose because

by
a

ing lack-

in

our

text,

it

is

he

used

metrical
one

in

Lyra
is

Graeca;

where
a

translation prose the

by
is
one

Wharton
or

Cox

lacking,

it

is

because

piece
of these

of

the

recent

coveries, dis-

or

because
one

two

translators

made
a

version

almost

identical

to

that

of

the

other.

THE

SONGS

OF

SAPPHO

i3JSEISEM2ISJSEJ5ISf3MSMaiSfSEMSM5MS

THE

WORDS

BEGIN

ARE

WORDS

OF

AIR

BUT

FOR

ALL

THAT

ARE

GOOD

TO

HEAR

laiSMSMISMMaMSMSIMSMMSMM^MaMSMMSMSMaMa^^

I.

TO

APHRODITE

A,
PHRODITE

immortal, wile-weaving splendor-throned


to

child of Zeus, 0

thee is

my

prayer.

Whelm but

not

my

heart,
hither
I

Queen,

with

and suffering
ere

sorrow,

come

pray
voice

thee, if ever afar, and


a

this thou from

hast heard

and

marked house

my nessed har-

stepping

thy
the

Father's

golden chariot, and


fair and

strong

pinions of thy
heaven dark
a

two

swans

swift, whirringfrom
thee towards the

through
earth, and
on

mid-sky, have
lo!
were

drawn

there; and

thou

blest

Lady, with

smile
me,

that

immortal
1

face, didst gentlyask what


what this wild
to

ailed

and

why

called, and

heart

would
room

have

done, and love,


if she take
soon

"Whom who

shall I make

give thee
thee

in her heart's

is it, Sappho, that does


soon

wrong?

For
not

even

flees thee, she shall she gifts,

pursue;

if she will

thy
love

yet shall

give; and
or

if she
O
come

loves not,
to
me now

she shall, whether


earnest

no";
my

"

as

thou my

then,

to

assuage

sore

trouble

and

do what

heart would

fain have

done,

thyself my

stay

in battle.
EDMONDS

Immortal of Zeus, with


ever

Aphrodite of
weaver

the broidered

throne, daughter
not

of wiles, I pray

thee break But

my

spirit

anguish and distress,O Queen.


before thou didst hear my
voice

come

hither, if listen,and
chariot

afar, and
camest

leavingthy

father's fair fleet around

golden
sparrows

house drew

with

yoked, and
their

thee,

fast flapping

wings

the dark

earth, from

heaven

through

mid

sky. Quickly

arrived

they; and

thou, blessed
didst ask, what
I in

one,
now

smilingwith
is befallen
me,

immortal and
to

countenance,
now

why
see.

call,and what

my

mad

heart draw

most

desire

"What wrongs

Beauty now

wouldst

thou
even

to

love thee.? Who


soon

For thee, Sappho.? if she


soon

if

she fliesshe shall

follow, and
loves
not

shall gifts rejects

yet

give, and

if she
I

shall
too,

love, however
release
to
me

loth." Come, cruel


cares,

pray

thee,
my

now

and

from

and

all that

heart

desires

accomplish,
WHARTON

accomplish
^

thou, and

be thyself my
/

ally.
/ /

Immortal

Aphrodite of
weaver

the

ter shimmering throne, daughthee crush


not

of Zeus, with spirit hither if


ever

of wiles, I pray and thou

my
come

anguish
before

distress, O
didst hear

Queen.
my
voice

But

afar, and

hearken,
camest

and

leaving the golden


chariot

house

of birds

thy father,
drew

with

yoked,

and

swift the

thee,

their swift heaven thou

over pinions fluttering

dark

earth, from
and

through mid-space.Quickly they arrived;


blessed
one

with
now

immortal
me

countenance

smiling
now

didst ask: what and fair thee and loves pray my what
one now

is befallen

and
most

why

I call

I in

my

heart's madness thou


even

desire. 'What
wrongs

would

draw

to

love thee.? Who


soon

Sappho.?For
if she
not

if she flies she shall


soon

follow,
and if she
I let

shall rejectsgifts shall


now soon

offer them,

love, however
release
me

reluctant." cruel
cares,

Come and

thee heart

and

from

accomplishall

that it desires,and

be thou
cox

my
i

ally.
iO

Glittering-throned

undying Aphrodite,
I

Wile-weaving daughterof high Zeus,


Tame
not

pray

thee

my
nor

soul with with

heavy woe,

dread

mistress,

Nay,
But hither Thou And

anguish.
erst

come,

if ever

of old time
to

didst incline,and from


Camest

listenedst

my

crying.

down thy father's palace with

descending

golden
fair swift

Chariot
Over Pinion

yoked:thee

flying sparrows fluttering.


ether

dark earth with


on

multitudinous

pinion through middle


from heaven like hurried.

Down

Quickly they came Smilingwith


What
was

and thou, light, eyes,

blest
me

lady.

clear
woe

undying

didst ask

the

that troubled thee


;

me,

and wherefore

I had

cried

to

What

thingI longedfor
now

to

appease
I

my

frantic

Soul: and whom Whom


must

must

thou askedst, persuade, who


now,

to thy love, and entangle

Sappho,hath wronged
Yea, for if now
he shun, he
not

thee. shall chase thee; shall

soon

Yea, if he take Yea, if he love


Love Come

he gifts,
soon

soon

give them;

not

shall he

begin to

thee, unwillino-.
me now

to

too,

and

from my

tyrannous

sorrow

Free
Have

me,

and

all things that


me

soul desires

to

done, do for
Be my
"^

Queen, and let thyself too


^

great
^

ally.
J. ADDINGTONSYMONDS

11

Beautiful-throned,

immortal

Aphrodite,

Daughter Weigh
0
me

of Zeus,
not

I implorethee. beguiler,

down

with

weariness

and

anguish,

thou

most

holy!
if ever thou
"

Come

to

me

now,

in kindness

Hearkenedst

my

words,

and often hast thou hearkened the mansions

"

Heeding, and coming


Of

from

golden

thy great Father, lovely

Yoking thy chariot,borne by thy most


Consecrated

birds, with

dusky-tinted pinions,
utmost

Waving

swift

wings

from

of heights

heaven

Through

the mid-ether;

thee, O goddess. Swiftly they vanished, leaving


with Smiling, face immortal
I
in its in

beauty,
utter

Asking why
1 had

and why grieved, call thee;

longing

dared
I

Asking
Wildered

what
in

in desiring, sought,thus hopeless


nets spreading

brain, and
and

of

passion
"

Alas, for whom?


O my
now

saidst thou, "Who

has harmed

thee?

poor

Sappho!
thee;

Though

he flies, he shall erelong pursue


too

he Fearingthy gifts, Loveless

in

turn

shall

bringthem;
thee.

to-morrow to-day,

he shall spurn

woo

Though
Thus Save Gifts seek
me me

thou

shouldst
O

him."

now,

holyAphrodite!
all I ask for,

from

anguish;give me
and

at

thy hand;
^

thine shall be the

glory.
W. HIGGINSON

Sacred

protector!
THOMAS

i2

Shimmering-throned

immortal I

Aphrodite,
thee, implore

Daughter of Zeus, Enchantress, Spareme,


Crush Whenever To And my O

Queen, this agony


not

and

anguish,

my

spirit.
hast hearkened
to
me
"

before thou
voice
to calling

thee in the distance.


come,

thou heeding, Golden

hast

leaving thy father's

dominions.
coursers, yoked to thy fleet-winged

With

chariot

swift pinionsover Fluttering And

earth's darkness.

gliding bringingthee through the infinite,


Downwards from heaven. and

Then,
With What

soon

theyarrived
countenance

thou, blessed

goddess.
me

divine
new woe

didst smiling, befallen


me now

ask

had

and

why

Thus What Who Who


in
was

I had mad
now

called thee. heart that

my
it

was

my feel
must

greatest desire.
my be

must

allurements.

was

the fair one

that

persuaded,

Who For if now And if she

wronged thee Sappho?


she flees, quicklyshe shall follow spurns
soon gifts,

shall she offer them. shall she feel it

Yea, if she knows


Even Come Drive

not

love, soon

reluctant. from

then, I pray, grant


away
me

me

surcease

sorrow,

care,

I beseech I yearn

thee, O goddess
to

Fulfill for
Be

what
my
^

accomplish.
EDWIN M. COX

thou

ally.
^

i3

Immortal

on

thy many-splendoredthrone
that with
art

Hear,
Zeus'

Aphrodite Queen,

witchingdaughter;and
break
not

pain and

moan

my

heart! thou cry hast

But

come,

if ever distant

caught of
my

old

My
And

and

heard

plea,

left thy father's To


visit me;

of gold palaces

And

yoked thy chariot,and


Driven

from

heaven fair

forth

thy sparrows
of

fleet and the

With

whirr

wings
middle

above
air.

swarthy earth

Through
How fast With "What
new

they came!

Then,

Blessed

One, didst thou

lips divinely smilingask:


mischance what task
is the dearest aim is
come

upon

thee now?

Unto Have

I been Of

called? what heart?

thy mad
to

who

is

to

be

Persuaded Thine
For

thy passion? Sappho,name

enemy!
fliesthee
spurns
now

whoso Who

shall

soon

pursue;

shall give anon; thy gifts


not,

And

whoso

loves thee

whate'er

she do.

Shall love thee soon."

Ah,

come

then, and
crush
me:

release all I

me

from
see

alarms

That

long to

Fulfilled,fulfill!A ver)^
Be thou
to
me.

mate-in-arms

WILLIAM

MARRIS

i'l

[2M2MSM^IS^MSM3M3MMMHSEMM5MMSJSI3I3MBM5MSf3JSMa

II.

TO

BROCHEO

It

is

to

be
to

God, methinks,
sweet accents

to

sit before

you

and

listen

close have When

by

the

and

which winning laughter you. short


a or

made

the heart in
on

my

breast beat fast, I warrant

I look

you,
am

Brocheo, my

speechcomes
moment

fails me fire has

quite,I
overrun

in a tongue-tied;

delicate my
ears

my
runs

flesh, my
down
as me

eyes grow and and


a

dim

and

sing,the

sweat

tremblingtakes
but

me

till I altogether, death poor, itself seems


I
must

am

green far
.
.

paleas
"

the grass, and


now

not

very
content

away;
.

that I
Edmonds

am

fain be

That

man

seems

to

me

peer him makes

of

gods,who

sits in

thy presence,

and

hears close

to

thy sweet
my
a

speechand lovely
heart flutter in
no

laughter;that
bosom. For when

indeed
I
see

my

thee but
is broken

I have little, and my

ance utter-

left,my
subtle fire has

tongue
run

down,

a straightway

under

my

skin, with

eyes

I have

i5

no

sight, my
all my

ears

ring,sweat
I
am

bathes

me,

and and
I

trembling
in

seizes

body;

than paler
one

grass,
But

seem

my

madness
since
one

little better than


so

dead.

must

dare all,
2

poor

wharton
. . .

That

one

seems

to

me

the
near

equal of
him makes thee
even

the

gods,who
sweet

sits in

thy

presence

and

hears

thy
my
a

voice

and

that laughter; lovely my of bosom.


utterance,
races

indeed
I
see

heart beat fast in little I


at
once am

For my under

when

bereft
a

tongue my

is useless

and
see

subtle
ears

fire

skin, my
forth and

eyes all my

nothing,my
is seized
seem

ring, sweat

pours
am

body
grass
I
must

with
in

trembling.I
madness

than paler

dried

and

my
.

littlebetter than

dead.

But

dare all
.

cox

Peer Man Close

of

gods he

seemeth
gazes

to

me,

the blissful

who

sits and

at

thee before him,


in silence hears thee

and beside thee sits,

Silverly speaking. Laughing


love's low Oh laughter. my

this,this only
to

Stirs the troubled


For

heart in
see

breast

tremble

should

I but

thee
voice

littlemoment,
;

is Straight my

hushed

Yea, my
'Neath

tongue the flesh


see

is broken, and

through and through me tingling;


of

Eire runs impalpable


mine

Nothing
Waves Sweat
runs

my
in

eyes, sounds

and
;
tremor

noise

roaring

my

ear

down

in

rivers,a

seizes

i6

Fails

me

; no

voice

comes

my

tongue

is palsied ;
run

fire through all Thrilling my


Mine

flesh hath make

eyes

cannot

see,
stun

mine

ears

dinning

Noises The
sweat

that

streameth
"

down,
wan

my

whole
me

frame

seized with

Shivering, and
Greener Almost than
as

o'er paleness
;

spread,

the dead.

grass

seem

with

faintness

WALTER

HEADLAM

LIFE

divine! while

to

sit before

Thee

flows laughter thy liquid and


to

Melodious,
To
O

listen close from Love's full score.

notes rippling

music

of

thy lovely speech!


beats fast and
can

My My
And O

heart rapid

high.

soul tongue-tied
strive

onlysigh.
cannot

for words

it

reach.

sudden
ears

fire! subtly-running with

My My

dinning ringingsing.
blinded

is lost, a sight

thing,
love

in speech, Eyes,hearing,

expire,
grass

My
Wet

face

like wilted pale-green, the dew whole


me.

by

and

evening breeze.

Yea, my
Sweat

seize. body tremblings


Death

bathes

nearby doth

pass,

Such

thrilling swoon, gods,but


not

ecstatic death

Is for the

for

me.

My

beggar words

are

naught to

thee,

Far-off

thy laugh and perfumed breath.


DAVID M. ROBINSON

i8

EIcMSJSMSISM2MM2Ma3MM3M3MaiSM3JaMMt5lE!M0^^

III.

MOONLIGHT

Around lost them fullest.

the fair when

moon

the

brightbeauty of
illumes light

the

stars

is its
3

her silver

the world
EDMONDS

at

The

stars

about when

the fair she


at

moon

in

their

turn

hide

their

brightface
with silver.

about

her full

lights up
wharton

all earth
3

The when

stars

about

the fair

moon

lose their

brightbeauty

she, almost

full,illumines all earth with silver.


cox

Bright No When Floods


more

stars,

around

the fairSelene
the

peering,

their

beautyto

nightdiscover

her silver light she, at full, ensphering,

the world

over.

T.

F.

higham

The

stars

around

the fair moon

fade

Against the night,


When And

gazing full she


the spreads
seas

fills the

glade

with

light. silvery
h.
de

vere

stackpoole

The Hide

gleamingstars
their

all about the

moon shining

faces,when bright

full-orbed and shadowed

splendid
earth with

In the

the sky she floats, flooding silver light.

Clear

edwin

m.

cox

i9

IV.

ORCHARD

SONG

And
.

by

the cool waterside the

the breeze

rustles amid shed

the

and apple-branches,

quivering leaves

lethargy
.

EDMONDS

And

round

about

the cool
streams

water

gurglesthrough applequivering leaves.


WHARTON

boughs, and

slumber

from

And

by

the

cool and

stream

the

breeze

murmurs

through
quivering
cox

applebranches
leaves.

slumber

pours

down

from

Cool

waters

tumble, singing as they go


leaves
are

the Through appledboughs. Softly Down


streams
a

dancing.

slumber

on

the

drowsy flow,
T. f. higham

My

soul

entrancing.

Through The And

with fragrance crowned orchard-plots

clear cold fountain forest leaves with


to

murmuring
sound rustling

flows

Invite

soft

repose.

JOHN

h.

merivale

All Cool

around
streams

through branches
call,while
distilleth. down

of

apple-orchards
the leaves a-tremble
addington symonds

from
j.

Slumber

By

the cool

water

the breeze

murmurs,

rustlins:

Through apple branches,


Streams down

while

from

quivering leaves
edwin m. cox

deep slumber.

20

(3MMMJii!MSMSIBJlMSMclia2MSM2MM0M0MSE^^

V.

TO

APHRODITE

Come,

Queen of Love,

to

bear round
unto

goldencups

o" of
6

nectar

cheer mingled with gentle


mine.

these comrades
Edmonds

thine and

Come,

of Cyprus,and goddess with

in

golden cups

serve

nectar

mixed delicately

delights.

Wharton

KuPRis, hither Come,


Mixed and pour from of goldthe goblets
nectar

for love's and

with dainty delight pleasure's


j.
addington symonds

Joysof
2i

the

banquet.

Come,
Hither Where

Venus,
with

come

thy goldencup,

nectar-floated flowerets swim.

fillthe goblet Fill, up; These shall kiss laughinglips the brim
"

Come,

Venus,

come!

anon.

Goddess The With Of


way,

of

Cyprus
serve

come,

where of

beautylights
all delights

and

in

cups

gold these lips

nectar,

mixed

by

love with of
amorous

goldendays,and

dusk

nights.
H.
DE

VERE

STACKPOOLE

Come And
in

hither foam-born

Cyprian goddess, come.


richest
nectar

goldengoblets pour
in
to most

All mixed Thus

ethereal

perfection.
edwin m. cox

us. delight

VI.

TO

APHRODITE

And

to

thee I will burn

the rich fat of

white

Mat
. . .

EDMONDS

But

for thee will I lead and


. . .

to

the altar the

of offspring
Wharton

white
1
,

goat

add

libation for thee.

But
CToat

for thee I will and


. . .

bringto

the altar the

young

of

white
cox

add

libation for thee.

22

For A To And A

thee, unto
goat
"

the altar will I lead

white

the altar

by

the

sea:

there, where

waves

advance for thee.

and

waves

recede,

full libation will I

pour

H.

DE

VERE

STACKPOOLE

VII.
O
as

TO

APHRODITE

GOLDEN-WREATHED

Aphrodite, would
mine
. . .

that

such

lot
9

this

were

edmonds

This

lot

may

I win,

golden-crownedAphrodite.
WHARTON

May

I win

this

O golden-crowned Aphrodite. prize,


cox

Love-goddess Would

of the wreath
were

of

gold,
j.
M. edmonds

that this lot

mine.

VIII. Who
.

TO

THE made

MUSES

have

me

honored

by

the

of gift

their work.
10

EDMONDS

Who

gave

their

and gifts

made

me

honored.
WHARTON

10

Whose
. . .

of gift

their

own

work
J.
M. EDMONDS

Hath

brought me

honcx.-.

23

IX. But

TO have and

SOME

WEALTHY

WOMEN the

received when

true

prosperity from
not

golden

Muses,

I die I shall

be

forgot.
EDMONDS

ii

Bu.T
The Muses
not

to

me

gave be

true

wealth, and when


,

I die
J.
m. edmonds

I shall

forgot.

X. These of my

TO

HER

COMPANIONS

songs

I will

sing rightwell to-dayfor

the

delight
i2

comrades.

edmonds

This

will I

now

to please sing deftly my

girl-friends.
WHARTON

ii

This

will I

now

to please sing skilfully my

friends.
cox

ii

These For my

songs
sweet

with I'llsing to-day comrades' sake and

all

my

might delight.
J.
M. EDMONDS

dear

XI.

TO

HER

FRIENDS

For

those

I have

done

good

to,

do

me

the greatest wrong.


EDMONDS

i3

For

they whom
thee
to

I benefit

injureme

most,

wharton

i 2

For

whom

I do

good,thou

harmest

me

the
cox

most.

i2

24

XV. The when


.

THE

DAWN had

golden slipperedDawn
. .

just

come

upon
EDMONDS

me

i 9

Me

just now

the

Dawn golden-sandalled

has called.
cox

i8

XVI. And
. .
.

LYDIAN

WORK fair reached


20

motley

gown,

Lydian work,
Edmonds

down

to

her feet.

BROIDERED

Strap of beautiful

Lydian work

covered
WHARTON

her
i9

feet.

Her

shiningankles

clad in fairest fashion the realm of

In broidered So
came

leather from the Goddess.

Lydia,
cox

20

XVII.

OF

JASON'S
all manner

MANTLE of colors. hues.

Mingled

with with

edmonds

2 i

Shot

innumerable

cox

20

XVIII.

TO

HECATE

Aphrodite's

handmaid golden-shining

EDMONDS

24

The

handmaiden

of

shininglike gold. Aphrodite,


cox

54

26

XIX.

MAIDENS

Rose-armed,
. . .

fair-cheeked, honey-voiced. saucy-eyed,


EDMONDS

30

With

rosy

arms

and

glancing eyes

and

fair cheeks
wharton

and
i29

honeyed voices.
With cheeks and

rosy

glancingeyes

and

voices

svi^eet

as

honey.

cox

ii8

XX.

TO

LOVE

DEARESToffspringof Earth
Love the child of

and

Heaven.

edmonds

3i

Aphroditeand

Heaven.
WHARTON

i32

XXI.

TO

HESPERUS

Fairest

of all the

stars

that shine.

edmonds

32

Thou

art, I

think,

an

evening

star,

of all stars
WHARTON

the fairest.
i33

XXII.

TO

PERSUASION

Man-beguiling

daughterof Aphrodite. daughterof Aphrodite.

edmonds

33

Persuasion,
27

wharton

i35

EjaSJMa5M0MHSMSISMSIEJSMSIM3MSM2MaM2M3M2f2M@MSI3J

XXIII. CHARAXUS

TO

HER

BROTHER

Will
. . .

If give. you and

hover about bid your your

the notable rather than friends go their ways,

the and

good

noble, and

grieveme

by saying in
become
a

pridethat svi'elling
you,
at

I,

forsooth, am
these for
a

to reproach

such

as things

you my

may mind

rejoice your
is
not
so

heart. Feed

your

fill.For the
snare

as

me,

to softly disposed

anger
never

of

child. But

make

no

mistake

in

this; the
was

catches the old bird; I know

what
sort

the

depth of
am

your

knavery before, and


to.

of what

is the foe I

opposed
the
35

Be you

better advised then, and that side.

change your heart; for

well I know Gods


on

being of

I have gentle disposition


edmonds

my

28

Thou

flittest
nor

among

men

who biddest

are

notable
to

but

neither

good
and

noble, and

thou

farewell

thy friends,
heart such
not

me grievest

of by saying in thy swelling pride


a

that I have

become thou

reproachto

thee.

Turning

to

thingsmayest
so

sate

thy heart, for


the anger
is
not

my

thought is
But

softly disposedtowards
waver

of children.

do

not

in this: the old bird


to

caught by
thou have

the

snare.

I understand go, and


to

what
sort

limit of baseness of
an

formerlydidst
been

what

enemy
to

we

opposed.
spiritI
me.

But do thou, then, attend


on

others, and

place thy thoughts


contented

better

things.For

nourishing a gods are

know clearly

that the blessed

present with
ROBINSON

iSO

Aye,
And And I

seek the false and bid


your

shun

the

true,

friends
in

go

hang

for

you. say

grieveme

your

and pride,

bringyou
flout
no me

shame.

Go, have your way.


your

And I have

till you'vehad
never

fill;

fears,and
anger

will,
child.
a

For the Do Old The What


as

of

you

choose; but have


how my
to

care;

birds know
measure

shun

the
;

snare;

of

foe is ta'en he'll do

once

he's done
not

again;

I shall Be wise I know

be

beguiled.
heart;

in time

then, change your


take my

the

gods will
my

part
j.
m. edmonds

Because

mild. spirit's

29

XXIV.

TO

THE

NEREIDS

Golden and

Nereids,
that the and

grant
true

me

pray

my

brother's shall be
errors

safe
plished, accom-

turn, re-

desires of his heart away his and former


a

putting

he

shall

become and be and that


to

delightto
our

his friends

to grief

his enemies;

may

house

be

of disgraced
to

no

man.

And the

may
sore

he

willingto bring honor


the words
must

his sister; and


resentment

pain
taunt

wherewith,
cut to

in bitter

of he he

have

the

quick,he sought ere


"

departed
does
on

overwhelm

my may them
in

heart,
he choose clean

O,
amid

when

return

some

day,
to cast

his fellow-townsmen's and


to

mirth desire thou


snout

away, and

have

mate,
as

if he

one,

wedlock baleful and

due

worthy; and
mayst

for thee, that evil

black
to

and

she-dog,thou
go

set

the

ground

a-huntingother

prey.
EDMONDS

36

[The

"black

and

baleful

she-dog" was
in

Doricha,

san courte-

beloved

by

Charaxus

Egypt]

Aphrodite hither
come

and

ye

Nereids,
and

grant
that

me

that

my
in

brother his heart


to

return

unharmed,
to

whate'er

he

wishes

pass,

all shall be

completed.And
and

rightall
he And
to

the sins
to

which

he

formerlycommitted,
a woe

that

prove may make

be

joy to
come

his friends and


to
us no

to

his enemies. he be I will

there

illfame.

May
and

willing forgive
in

his sister

sharer

in his

honor;

the bitter

pain

and

the words

with

which

formerlyhe

30

his

resentment

sought to
song

overwhelm the

my
"

heart

when the

he

heard

my

that

cut

to

quick

for amid

merry when
it shall

feast of welcome he be
in
returns,
to cast
as

given

him may

by
at no

his fellow distant


a

citizens

hope
away;

he

day, his
so

them

and
as

to

find

wife, if he

desires,

worthy wedlock.

But

for thee, thou


to

swarthyshe-dog,
other
i83

snout thy ill-smelling setting

the

ground, pursue
robinson

prey.

Golden

Daughters of
my brother

the Foam

Bring me
And Grant And Shall

home. safely

whatsoe'er he shall

his heart desire possess entire.


was

what righting
sorrow

wrong
no

before.
more.
a

his
our

true

friends bear
never

That Then Honor And When O


soon,

name

blot.

he'll fain his sister and bright; the


taunt

to

bring
sting
poor
as

the bitter my

that made
a

heart sick
cuts to

he heard when

rebuke

such

the

quick
"

the

brimming
and

cup

goes

round

For his

returningsafe

sound.

Shall all that illbe And


Let But

forgot;
to

ifhe's fain of him take


a

wife

wed.
to

worthy maid
for you,

his bed

she-dog, as helly
your illsnout, game
is

Ground

and
to

game

pursue
j.M.
Edmonds

Where

be got.

3i

XXV.
O
. . .

TO

CHARAXUS she find thee


a

Cypris,
so

may

even

too

bitter,nor

boast

herself hath

loud, saying: "What


made this second

love-match delightful
edmonds

Doricha

time!"

31

O
. . .

Cypris, and
boasted

he

found

thee

more

bitter. And
a

the

others match

aloud, saying: "To


come

what
time

lovedelightful

is Doricha

this second

"

ROBINSON

\%\

And,
.
. .

Cypris,may
than with
once

she find e'en Thee Thou


wert,
nor

Less

sweet

boast what

bliss

Is Doricha's

new

mate

like this!
J.
M. EDMONDS

XXVI. The and

TO

ANACTORIA

IN

LYDIA host of foot,

fairest thing in all the world


some

some

say
to
me

is

again a
And who

navy

of
to

but ships, make

'tis the heart's

beloved.

'tis easy far


men

this understood mankind


in

by

any.

Helen,

all surpassed the


so

beaur)^ chose
of

for the best of and but


woman

of destroyer

all the honor


or

Troy,
dear,

thought
was

not

much

either of child
to

parent

led
is is
near ever

astray
easy

by
to

Love

bestow when
it then

her heart she thinks that you


one

afar; for
of lightly

be bent See
we

what
us

and
now

dear.

to

remember of whom the

Anactoria,
rather

that the
sweet

are

partedfrom
of her

I would

sound her

footfall and face than

sightof
32

the

of brightness

beaming

all the

noblest

[or fairest]man

the

one

who
so

quicklydestroyed
much either of child
to

all Troy'shonor, and


or

thought not
was

parents dear, but


the

led

astray

by

Eros

love afar.

For

female
is
near.

is

bent alwayseasily And


so

if one

thinks
now

lightly
that

of what thou

do

thou, Anactoria,
a

hast gone
us,

off

to

Lydia with
and

soldier

as

thy husband,
we are

remember present and the

Sappho

Atthis, though
to prefer
see

not

with

thee. I should

thy lovelystep
to

brighttwinkle

of thine

eyes

than

have

all the foot in


i84

chariots of the
arms.

Lydians and

all those who

on fight

robinson

TROOP

of horse, the serried ranks of marchers,

noble

fleet, some

think
me

these of all on

earth

Most

beautiful. For
Is

naught else regarding

my

beloved. this is for all most


on

To

understand

simple. perfection
give her,

For thus And

gazing much

mortal

what knowing already


Him

life could

chose

fair Helen, Ilium's honor.


of adored

Him

the

of betrayer she
not

Then But

recked

child

or

parent.

to love, and yielded

forced

by

her

passion.

Dared Thus
To

Fate

in exile.

quicklyis bent
whom

the will of that and dear


seem

woman

thingsnear

to

be

nothing

So

mightestthou fail, my Anactoria,


If she
were

vi^ithyou. and radiant face

She

whose

footfall gentle

34

Hold Of

the

power

to

charm

more

than

vision

chariots and Of

the mail-clad

battalions

Lydia's army.
we

So Man But

must

learn in

world his

m_ade

as

this

one

can

never

attain

o-reatest

desire,
Fate

must

pray

for what

good fortune

holdeth,
EDWIN M. COX

Never

unmindful.

A To To

HOST

of horse

or

foot

may

be
see,
me

some

the fairest sight to


a

some

fleetof
one

ships ; to
passes
my

The And She


Man

loved
'tis to

all.
case;

easy

prove

that had
ever

the fairest face


on,
set

looked

her

joy

Upon

the ravisher of heedless


or

Troy,

And Of

of the call
sweetest

parent dear

child,

Left her home, To


For Is
ever

by

Love

beguiled

give her
easy
to

heart afar. mislead she


to

woman,

when
is
near

pays

no

heed

To

what

her and

dear. gone,

Anactory,though far thou'rt


Let
us

remembered
sweet

be

by

one

Whose Whose Than

footfall I'd rather hear. smile I'd rather


see.

beaming
all the And

Lydian chariotry
men

mighty

of

war.

35

Well

wot

no

mortal

wight delight;

May
Yet
a

have

the best for his

one-time

happy

lot
j.
M. EDMONDS

Is better

than forgot, longed-for

XXVII.

TO

HERA

[Upon Sappho'sreturning from


Make stand beside
me

exile]
great Hera,
to

in

dream,
answer

the beauteous of the


an

shape
famous of the hither

that

appeared
Atreus'

in

the

prayer made put


not

kings of
overthrow from but
to

seed when At

they had

end forth
win
to

of

Troy.

first when

they

Scamander's
ere

swift

flood, they could


fain
to

home,

that could Zeus

be,
and of

were

make

prayer

thee and
now

mighty
I, O

to

child. Thyone's lovely grace


I

So

pray of old,

Lady,

that and

thy

may

do

again,
of

as

things pure

beautiful

among

the maids

Mytilene, whom
sing
grace upon

I have

so

often

taught to
as

dance

and seed

to

and thy feast-days;

even

Atreus'
out

by

of thee and
so

thy fellow-Gods
of mine.

did

put
at

then prayer

from this
40

Ilium,

I beseech

thee, Hera, aid thou

my

homeward

voyage

edmonds

Near present

me

in

dream,

revered which
in

Hera,
answer

may
to

there

be

form thy graceful

their

prayer
complished ac-

the Atreidae, the famous the destruction the


were

kings,saw
of

when

they had

when Troy. At first,

from

Scamander swift-flowing
not

they
before

set

forth

hither, they

able

to

reach and
now

home the

they had approached


and

with

prayer

thee

Zeus all-mighty
I beseech

Thyone's goddess,
ful beauti-

charming
that
as

child. So

thee, revered

I formerly, may the maidens


to

do of

again thingsholy and

among
at

Mitylenewhom
and
out

I have

taught
as

thy

feasts often with thee your

dance

often their

to

sing; and

the

Atreidae
so

help put
be
a

shipsfrom
me

Ilium,
away
i96

urge

that thou

helperto

to

sail

home,

kindlyHera.

robinson

Great And

Hera, grant my
show The before beauteous Atreus' my

prayer

to-night.

dreamingsight
face of yore,

Which When

hero-sons fall'n and


grace.

Troy was
Saw of

all was

o'er.

Thy

They
Could

that from
not

swift Scamander's home when


out

flood

win

they stood

37

Till And.

prayer

were

said

to

Thee, Great
the
sweet

One,

mighty

Zeus

and
now

Son

Thyone
To The The do

bore. So

pray and

again things pure

high

Mytilenianmaids
maids To
I

among.

taughtwith
thee
;

dance

and

song

honor
as

And

even

erst

with

Your

high aid
of mine

Atreus' So Be
on

seed the anchor way

weighed.

this homeward

Thy gentle power


Hera,
with
me.

divine,
j.
m. edmonds

XXVIII.

WHEN

TEMPESTS

RAGE

When

tempests

rage,

the mariner,
cast

for fear of the overboard


I

great
drive
no-

blasts of the wind, doth his vessel ashore; whither


in in time
as

his cargo
I

and

for

me,
nor

pray

may

be bound fear

of
cast

storm,

be fain with for worthless


in his

lyingheavy
the

my

heart

to

my

cargo

into

deep;

but

if so
sea

be it should
to

fall to Nereus the of gift


my

flowingpageant
. .

of the

receive

goods

EDMONDS

4i

In

raging

storms

sailors in fear of the and beach their


it is
at

great

winds

cast

forth their cargoes I


not

shipon
stormy,
random

the land.
nor

May

sail from

anywhere when
and

cast

all the

cargo,
sea.

worthless

valuable,

into

the

deep

But the
sea

if it shall be for Nereus


to

in his

flowingprocession
ROBINSON

on

receive

my

careo
"^ ^

20Q

38

XXIX.

LOVE

IS

IN

NO

HASTE

If
...

my

paps

could

stillgive suck would

and
I

my
come

womb
to

were

able

to

bear

children, then

another
age
now

marriage-bed with
maketh
Love
a

feet; unfaltering
wrinkles
to to

but

nay, my

thousand
no

go

upon his

flesh, and
. .

is in

haste

flyto
. . .

me

with

of pain gift of praises

of the noble
. . .

taking
breast

sing us

the

her

of the violet-sweet

EDMONDS

42

If

my

breasts could

were

still capable of

giving milk,
I
not;
2:0 to

or

my

womb

bear

children, then

would

another
as

with marriage-couch age and

feet that tremble my flesh


ten

but,

it

is,

alreadyputs
Eros flies not

about
to

thousand
me

wrinkles,
his the of gifts

me,

pursuing
.

with

pain

of the noble
... . .

taking
breast!

O
. .

sing us

praises

of her of the violet-sweet

ROBINSON

i99

And

if these And

paps

their milk make

could
new men

give,
live.

this womb
I

Then

would To
a

go

with

free footsteps

bridal bed that

again;

But His

now

Age

doth

spreadapace
o'er my
me.

thousand
in
no

wrinkles haste
to
come

face,

Love's

to

Love

with

his gift of pain.


^ ^

J.

M.

EDMONDS

39

XXX. And
evermore

PARTING

FROM

FRIENDS will

them

I answered:

"Gentle you be

dames, old,
our

how life

you

remember

till

togetherin
then you
gether to-

the

heyday
both

of

youth!
and

For

many

things did
And
very
now

we

pure

beautiful. heart with

that

depart

hence, love wrings my

anguish."
EDMONDS

43

To old many that keen

them
age

said, "Gentle
we

ladies,how
our

ye

will remember

till For

what

did

togetherin
beautiful

brilliant did bitten then. my

youth!
And heart

thingsholy
ye have

and

we

now

left the

city,love

has

with
i97

pangs."
"Sweet

robinson

dames,"

I answered

"O,

But How And And And

remember you'll
we

tillyou're gray

lived in Youth's
we

heyday.
once

all that how


now

three used

to

do,
true;

'twas

good
must

and

how

'twas
you

that I

part from

My

lovesick

heart's all woe."

j.

M.

Edmonds

XXXI. For
.
. .

TO

HER I look
as

BELOVED

when such than

upon
are,

you, and

then

meseems

Hermione liken you rather

was

never

you
a

just it
nay,

is

to

to

Helen

to

mortal

maid;
my

I tell vou,

I render

your you
40

beauty the
with all my

sacrifice of all

thoughts and worship


edmonds

feelings.

44

too

found

fault with
may

the
lose

Cyprus-born
me

"

whose rather

favor I

pray back the

these words

not,

but

bring me
I desire
45

again
most to

the
see.

maiden

whom

of all womankind
Edmonds

BID

thee

come

back

the

quickest way,
cloak;

my

rosebud

Gon-

gyla,takingthy
me

milk-white

a longing from truly

flitsabout

the beautiful, for thy thyself,


I look
at

robe

sets

me

all aflutter, as blamed lose whom


me

it,and

For rejoice. pray


me

myself once

the
not

Cyprus-born goddess.I
her
grace,

that this word back

but
women

bring to

again thee

most

of all mortal

I desire

to

see.

ROBINSON

i92

Come

with to-night rosebud

your

Lydian lyre.

Come,
Sweet For
a

mine;

this heart's desire,


go
out to

Gongyla, must

you,

glimpseof
And

your

gown

hath

thrilled

me

through

put

new

joy in
once on

my
a

heart.

too

found the

fault

day
grace I

With These But

Lady

of Love

"

whose
not

pray

words

of mine
a

may

lose for
see

me.

bringme
Than

maid

I'd rather

all her kind

apart.

J.

M.

EDMONDS

XXXIII.

TALK

WITH

ME

For
. . .

you

came

to

my
I
am

house
come.

the other O

day

and me!

sang
come

to

me,

and

that is

why

talk with

42

down

and
near,

make

me

free of you know

your
it. O

beauty.For
send your

we

are

ing walk-

and well may

handmaidens

away,

and

the Gods there


a

grant

me

whatsoever
man

they have
to

for

me.

Were

road which
. . .

could

tread
Edmonds

great
46

Olympus, I would
Indeed
it
were

ever

nothing unseemly
hast hast
we come

if

some

blamed with whom let


us

thee and
it
was

because because
not

thou thou

to

me

or

talked

me,

favored walk

so

those finely

for fitting; and


me,

everywhere.But
mortal

say this,
to

you
away

"Is it

for possible whom

maidens and
ROBINSON

be

far

from

the

women

they possess

cherish.?"
i90

XXXIV. And
.

TO

BRIDEGROOM
all the

we

maidens love
a

spend
that

night at

this door,

singing of
bridegroom,
But

the

is between

thee, thrice
sweet
as

happy
violets. and

and

bride whose
go when

breast is the dawn feet where


see

get thee up

and

shall thou

come,

may

great

Hermes

lead
as we

thy

shalt find

just so much

ill-luck

shall

to-night. sleep
EDMONDS

47

And

we

maidens

at

the doors

spend
the But

all the

night,very
and

happy bridegroom,singing of
bride
comes,

love of thee
arise

thy

with and thou

purple girdle
.

when

the

dawn feet
see

go,

and

may
as

Hermes

himself hard luck


as

lead
we

thy
shall

where

shalt have

much

sleep.
43

ROBINSON

207

XXXV.

TO

ATTHIS when

I
was

LOVED

you,

Atthis, long ago,


you
"

my

own

girlhood
me a

still all flowers, and

you

seemed

to

small
48

ungainly child.
I
LOVED

edmonds

thee

once,

Atthis, long ago


seem

a
...

and slight
33,
^ ^

ill-

favored

child didst thou

to

me.

V^HARTON

34

LOVED

thee Atthis,
a

once

long ago

to
...

me

thou
cox

didst
32

seem

small

and

child. ungraceful

3i,

LOVED

you, Atthis, seemed


to
me a

once,

long long ago

You

small, ungainlychild.
C. M, BOWRA

LOVED

you,

Atthis,

longago.
blossoming
show,
J.
M. EDMONDS

While And
A

yet my
you
were

youth was

still, to outward

slight ungainlylittle thing.

XXXVI.

FOOLISH

WOMAN

But

come,

be

not

so

proud of

ring.
a

edmonds

5 i

Foolish

woman,

not pride

on thyself

ring.
WHARTON

35

Foolish

woman!

Have

no

about pride

ring.
cox

33

FOOLISH

woman,

dost thou

set

thy pride upon


MICHAEL

ring?
FIELD

44

XXXVII.

UNDECIDED

KNOW

not

what

to

do; I am

in

two

minds
.

EDMONDS

52

KNOW

not

what

to

do; my

mind

is divided.
WHARTON

36

KNOW

not

what

to

do: I have

two

minds.

cox

34

In doubt I know

I
not

am,

I have
to

two

minds,
edwin m. cox

what

do.

XXXVIII.

THE

SKY

could

not

expect

to

touch

the

sky with

my

two

arms.

EDMONDS

53

DO

not

think

to

touch

the

sky with

my

two

arms.

WHARTON

37

With

my

two

arms,

I do

not

to aspire

touch

the

sky.
cox

35

THINK

not

with
to

these

two

White

arms

touch

the blue.
H.
DE

VERE

STACKPOOLE

XXXIX. As for

LOVE love has shaken upon

me,

my

wits

as

down-rushing
edmonds

whirlwind

that falls

the oaks.

54

45

Now
on

Eros

shakes

my

soul, a wind

on

the mountain
WHARTON

ing fall42

the oaks,

Now

Eros

shakes

my

soul, a wind

on

the mountain
cox

whelming over-

the oaks.

40

Lo, Love
Like wind

once

more

my

soul within

me

rends

that

on

the mountain

oak descends,
J.
ADDINGTON SYMONDS

As

wind

upon shakes

the mountain my

oaks in

storm.

So Eros

soul, my

life, my
H.

form.
DE

VERE

STACKPOOLE

Now Eros

like shakes

mountain

wind

the oaks

o'erwhelming,
edwin

my

soul.

m.

cox

Love

hath

shaken upon

my

heart

as

down-rushingwhirlwind
j.
M. Edmonds

that falleth

the oaktrees.

XL.

ON

SOFT

CUSHIONS

And
. . .

I will

set

you

on reclining

soft cushions
, , .

EDMONDS

56

But

upon

soft cushion

dispose my

limbs.
WHARTON

50

But

upon

soft cushion

dispose my

limbs.

cox

46

46

XLI.

GOODNESS

IS

BEAUTY

He

who
soon

is fair

to

look

upon

is

good, and

he who
wharton

is

good,
iOi

will

be fair also.

He He

that is fair is fair to outward that is

show;
edmonds

good

will

soon

be fair also.

58

He He

who who

is fair is good

to

look

upon;

is good is

fair, though

youth be
H.
DE

gone,
VERE STACKPOOLE

He

should

be

good who

is fair of

face.
grace.
EDWIN M. cox

And

he will be fair whose

soul has

Beauty,
But Worth

fair flower, with

upon

the surface lies;


in

Beauty soon

aspect vies.

anon.

XLH.

FAR

SWEETER

Far

sweeter-tuned

than

the

lyre

more
. . .

golden
59,

than
60

gold.
Far
sweeter

EDMONDS

of

tone

than

harp,more

golden than gold.


WHARTON

i22,

i23

Than

the

lyre,far

sweeter

in

tone,

than

gold, more
cox

golden.
Far A
sweeter

ii5

than

the

in sound, throbbinglyre

voice

more

goldenthan gold,new

found.
EDWIN M. cox

47

I2I3EMMSMM3MSM2MBM3J2MSM3MSI3MSME3MaiSM2^^

XLIII.

FROM

WEDDING

SONG

But
. . .

come,

dear maidens, let us

end

our

song,
edmonds

for

day
65

is

at

hand.

But

come,
near.

dear

let us girls,

cease

from

our

song;
robinson

for the
206

day is
48

ways and

was

festal mirth; and


cassia and
women

for bowls

and

cups

were

mixed,

myrrh

frankincense
a

curled aloft. Meanwhile cry, and all the


men

the elder shouted


amain

raised

loud of

delightful song
of the and

unto thanksgiving

the

Far-DartingGod
the 2od-like
*^

and hymned lyre, Andromache.

the

praiseof
66

Hector

EDMONDS

Cyprus
, . . ...

herald

came

sustained

by

the

might

of

his swift limbs,


as a

to

the folk of Ida these fair and


. . .

tidings ing bringrest

swift

messenger
a

throughout the
never

of

Asia

these tiding-s were and his


mates

fame

that

since

has died. and

"Hector

are

bringingfrom holy Thebe

Placia ever-flowing
in

the the

ache Andromshyly-glancing lovely

ships upon
robes of

briny sea;
and

and

many

bracelets of rich embroideries,


ber, beyond num-

gold and

purple, yes
he
rumor

smooth

varied bridal dower, and and father ivories," So

silver beakers

spoke; and
went

quickly uprose
the Ilium

the

beloved, and
Ilus.

throughout

wideunder

wayed cityof
the

of Straightwaythe people

well-wheeled all the

carts

brought
wives

the

mules, and

thereon slender

mounted

throng of

and

virginsof

ankles; but
And them

apart from
men

them

Priam's

daughters went.
with
the

steeds the
went

brought under youths. And


charioteers

the chariots,and

all the

mightily moved brought


. . .

and mighty people, adorned their


cars

out

their colts then


on

with

embossed

cheek-pieces.
mounted,
with like them
to

When

they were

gods, Hector
all the

and
men

Andromache,
and

there drove
women

Trojan
. . .

Trojan

into

Ilium delightful

they

50

mingled
flamed up

and
.

as

the maidens
. . .

and

cassia

and
were

incense

in smoke.

And
men

the wives, those who shouted the


name

older,

cried aloud, and


a

all the

in

strong

clear voice of

on lovelypaean, calling

of the Far-Darter
Hector

the

and they hymned goodly lyre, like


to

and

ache, Androm-

the gods.
^

ROBINSON

208

^^"

"Hector From

and

his the

men

her bringthe girl, Placia fount

eyes

gleaming.

Thebe

Holy, from

unfailing, sailing
arraying

Andromache With whorls

the beautiful, over and roundlets

the salt sea

with golden,
on

robes for her

Purpleembroidered
And silver This And Went Then Back The Then Were The And With cups

daintily, away
and

the wind

streaming;

uncountable

carven

ivory."

was

the herald's father heard of

story. it,and gay he


rose,

Hector's

and the

saying

the round the


men

Troy

Town

for all friends'


into

knowing.

of

Troy

put their mules

harnessing
pressing

the chariots,and against


rout

then mounted

of

young

women,

and of and

lightfoot girls going.


then
the soldiers

Priam's

daughters apart;
in their

their harnessing young the


men

horses under

the chariot rim,


.

prime.

sweet

was piping with lyreplay

blending.
high singing

castanets

and clashing;
to

the maidens

Sang
With There There

the

holysong
din

heaven

ascending
. .

strange
were

ringing.
.

myrrh
women

and cassia with their chant

frankincense
were

smoking;

the elder

choirino-;

5i

There The

all the God

men

sang

their

high song invoking


of the

Paean far-darting, Hector

lyring,
divine.
GEORGE ALLEN

Singing for

and

for Andromache

With
. . .

fair to tidings

Ida's

sped people,
a

of By strength And
Asia

fleet limb, swift


new^s

herald

came.

through,this
and all his meinie and

v^on

fame: living

"

"Hector
From

hither the
the

bring,

sacred Thebe

fair-flowing brinysea

Placia, on
The

o'er shipboard

Andromache; daintysparkling-eyed
of

Armlets And Much


He

gold come

plentydown

the wind

of purplefind, bridegifts

every kind,

ivorytoo,

and

many Hector's
went

silver cup." father dear

and spake,
news

leapt up,
about.

And

quick the
her
sons

Troy'swide
wains

ways

Eftsoons And And

the wheeled

brought out
all stept

yoked the
damsels

mules, and

in the dames
one

slender-ankled,

wain
man

kept

Apart

for Priam's
to

daughters; every
and

Joined horse
The A

and chariot-pole,
"

with
one

them

ran

each striplings folk


went

all, tillin

throng

mighty
The

mightilyalong.
steeds

drivers drave the boss-bedizened

Out

of the When

city
in their

equipage the godlike pair,


were,

Andromache

and

Hector, mounted

52

Thousands Towards

convoyed them
the walls o" flute
was

as

the

town

spedhome
the

Ilium; lovely

Sweet-tuned To

mingled with
a

lyre

the din of rattles, and

maiden the

quire
riven

Shrilled With

holy song,

tillwide

sky was

wondrous
in Heaven.

sound, and the Gods

laughed

In every
Were

street

was

merrymaking;
and

mixt

wine-bowl
sent

wine-cup ;
to

and

the firm-fixt

Altars

curling upward

the skies
cries

Frankincense, myrrh, and cassia, 'mid the


Of The Lord The the elder
Paean
women,

while sang loud

the
to

men

each

one

sweet

Leto's

Son,
in

of the

Lyre and

Bow,

and

hymned

glee

godlikeHector

and Andromache,
J.
M. EDMONDS

XLV.

GARLANDS

And

the maids

ripefor

wedlock

wove

garlands.
EDMONDS

61

But

in their time

garlands. theyplaited
their time.

wharton

13

They

in garlands plaited

michael

field

XLVI.

TO

THE

GRACES

Hither,

pure

rose-armed

Graces,

of daughters

Zeus.
"5S

EDMONDS

52

Come,

rosy-armed pure

of Zeus. Graces, daughters


WHARTON

65

Come,

of Graces, virgin daughters rosy-armed

Zeus.
cox

62

Ye

rosy-armed, pure Graces,


be near!

come,
michael field

Daughters of Zeus,

XLVII. Come
.
. .

THE from

GOD heaven and

OF

LOVE mantle. purple


EDMONDS

throv^^ off his

69

Coming

from

heaven

wearing

mantle. purple
WHARTON

64

Coming

from

heaven, clad
he

in

purplemantle.

cox

6i

From And round

heaven him

came.

the red

chlamys burned
J.

like flame.
SYMONDS

ADDINGTON

From
His

heaven

red returning;

of hue, blue.
H.
DE VERE

chlamys burning againstthe

STACKPOOLE

XLVHI. WOMAN

TO

AN

UNEDUCATED

When

you

are

dead have

you
no

will lie unremembered

for
come

more; ever-

for

you

part

in

the

roses

that

from

54

Pieria; nay, obscure


house
as

here, you
flitto and

will fro

move

obscure such

from

the

of Death, and
no

among

of the dead
7 i

have

fame.

edmonds

But

thou

shalt lie dead, of thee then


or

nor

shall there

ever

be

any
not

membrance re-

thereafter,for thou hast


shalt wander the obscure

of

the

roses

of Pieria; but of Hades,

thou

even

in the house

flitting among

shadowy
WHARTON

dead.
68

But

thou

shalt

ever

lie dead
or

nor

shall there be hast


none

any

brance remem-

of thee then of Pieria; but houses of Hades thou

ever,

for thou

of the
even

roses

shalt wander

unnoticed,
the

in

the

flitting among

shadowy

dead.
cox

65

Forever

shalt thou of thee


now

lie dead,
or

nor

shall there be
never

any

brance remem-

hereafter, for

hast thou

had

any

of the

roses

of Pieria; but thou the houses

shalt wander,

eternally
the
65

unregarded in
insubstantial

of Hades,

flitting among
cox

shades.

Thou Of The Is
now

liest dead, and


or

there will be

no

memory
never

left behind bind

thee
roses

thine in all the earth, for of Pierian flitwith


streams

didst thou

upon

thy brow; thy doom


cold and
EDWIN

to

unknown

ghostsin

nameless
ARNOLD

gloom.
55

Yea,
And

thou
lie

shalt die,

Dumb Nor of

in the silent

tomb;

thy name
any
to

Shall there be
In

fame
or

ages yet

be

years

to

come:

For of the Which Thou


But
on

Rose flowering
Pieria
no

blows,
share:

hast

in sad Hades'

house,

Unknown,
'Mid the dim

inglorious
shades that wander haunt the there

Shalt thou

flitforth and

filmyair.
J.
ADDINGTON SYMONDS

Dead

shalt thou
or

lie;and nought

Be told of thee For thou And hast


even

thought,
of the Muses' halls
tree:

pluckednot
in Hades'

Amidst No

thy fellow-thralls
shall

shade thy shade friendly

company!
THOMAS HARDY

Thee As
As

too

the

years of
as

shall
one

cover;

thou blood

shalt be

the
a

rose

born
sung,

same

with

thee.

song

word
not

said, and fall


any
more

Flower-wise, and be
Nor any
never

at

all,

memor)^

of thee has bound

an^^where;
above thine hair

For

Muse

56

L.

HERO

OF

GYARA

Well maid
.
.

did

I teach

Hero

of

Gyara,

the

fleetly-running
Edmonds

73

TAUGHT

Hero

of

Gyara, the

swift

runner,

wharton

7 i

Hero

of

Gyara,

that swift

runner,

taught.

cox

68

LI.

NO

REVENGE

Yet
, . .

am

not

resentful

in

but spirit,

have

the heart
Edmonds

of
74

little child.

AM

not

one

of

revengeful temper,

but

have
wharton

simple
72

mind.

AM

not

of

malign

nature

but

have

calm

temper.
cox

69

LH.

MY

SERVITOR

LOVE

My

servitor

Love

and

thou, O

Sappho

EDMONDS
. . .

75

Thou

and

my

servant

Love.

wharton

74

LIU.

FAME

Somebody,
others have

I tell

you,

will

remember

us

hereafter
. .

been

by disappointed
of

oblivion, but
Edmonds

never

one

by

the

judgment

good

men.

76,

77

Men

I think

will remember

us

even

hereafter.
WHARTON

32

Methinks Echo

hereafter in
to
men

some

later songs
we

spring sing.
H.
DE VERE

will bear

the

STACKPOOLE

LIV.

TO

HER

LUTE

Up, my

lute divine, and

make

of speech a thing thyself


.

EDMONDS

80

Come

now,

divine shell,become

vocal for

me.

WHARTON

45

Come,

divine

shell,yieldthy resonances

to

me.

cox

42

Come with

now,

divine tortoise, mayest


me.

thou

become

endowed
58

speechfor
make Lute

robinson

Come,

a thingof speech. thyself

My
Come,
And
in

divine.

j.

M.

edmonds

O my

come,
ear

divinest shell, all thy secrets tell.


edwin m. cox

Singing, O shell,divine!
Let
now

thy voice

be mine.

H.

de

vere

stackpoole

59

LV.

TO

ATTHIS

Lo!

Love

the looser of limbs

stirs me,

that

creature

sistible, irreto

bitter-sweet; but you,


the

Atthis, have

come

hate stead.
8i

thought of

me,

and

run

after Andromeda

in

my

EDMONDS

Now

Love

masters

my
. .

limbs but
to

and

shakes

me,

fatal

ture, crea-

bitter-sweet
.

thee, Atthis, the thought of

me

is hateful

thou

flittestto Andromeda.
WHARTON

40,

4i

Now
a

Love

the limb-loosener

sweeps

me

away
. .
.

in his

eddy,
it
to

sweet

though
to

bitter irresistible beast.


to

Yet, Atthis,
thou
robinson

is hateful

thee

think

of

me,

and

flittest
7,

Andromeda.

Love

has unbound

my

limbs and

and my

set

me

shaking,

monster

bitter-sweet

unmaking.
C. M.
BOWK A

Now

Love, the ineluctable, with


me,

bitter

sweetness

Fills

overwhelms

me,

and

shakes

my

being.
EDWIN M. cox

Lo, Love
The

once

more,

the

limb-dissolving King,
with fierce
J.

bitter-sweet

impracticable thing,
rends
me

Wild-beast-like

quivering.
ADDINGTON SYMONDS

60

The

Looser

of

our

Limbs

shakes

me

amain,

Love, the resistless ravener, But, Atthis, love


Andromeda's
is turned

joy-in-pain ;
to

hate in thee;
me.

thy quest

instead of

J.

M.

EDMONDS

Now
O

Love Love
so

has bound Love fatal,


so

me,

hands trembling,

and

feet,

bitter-sweet.

Hateful Hateful

my
to

face is to thee. thee

beyond speaking,
me

Atthis, who
Like
a

fliestfrom

white

bird Andromeda

seeking.
H.
DE

VERB

STACKPOOLE

6i

LVI.

TO

ATTHIS

"... you
no

Sappho,
more.

I O

swear

if

you

come

not

forth I will love and


set

rise and

shine

upon

us

free
a

your

beloved beside you

strengthfrom
the

the bed, and aloof your

then Chian

like robe

pure and

lily

spring hold
water.

wash your

in the

And smock and

Cleis shall and

bring down
and

from let
a

presses be

saffron
over

purple robe;
with
a

mantle

put

you

crowned
so

wreath with do

of flowers tied all the you,

about with
roast

your

head; and
you
so

come,
me

sweet

beauty

which
us

make that I

mad. make

And

Praxinoe
a

nuts,

may

the maidens

sweeter

breakfast; for
a

one

of the

Gods,

child, has vouchsafed


the fairest of all women
us,

us

boon.

This

very

day has Sappho


return surely

vowed

that she will

with
can

the mother then

with

her children."
. . .

Dearest
in the

Atthis,
^

you
...

all forget
^1

this that happened


^^

old days.?
EDMONDS

"Sappho,
not

unless truly

thou

wilt rise and show

come

out,
us,

I shall

love thee. Oh, release

rise and

to thyself

and
water

from like

thy bed
a

thy beloved
the

and strength,

with

pure

beside lily robe. And smock and

spring wash
cast

thee, tucking up
thee from
a

thy

Chian saffron and

Cleis shall

upon Put

thy press
over

purple robe.
bound with
us

mantle

thee,
crown

let wreaths
so

of flowers
come,
sweet

about the
nuts,

thy

head with

thee; and
thou
I may

beauty
O

which
so

makest make

me

mad.

Roast
a

Praxinoe,

that For This

the maidens
to
us

sweeter

breakfast of the

drink.

these

thingscome

from

one

gods,child.

62

very would with thou

day Sappho, the


return to

fairest of

women,

vowed

that she

Mitylene, most
with

beloved

of cities. Return

us,

the mother

her brood." the

Dearest
or

Atthis, dost
dost thou still
i88

all those thingsof forget

past,

remember.?

robinson

"Sappho,
. . .

if

you

say from

me

nay

My
O

love is lost

you

this
star

day.

quit your bed,


your
a

sweet

of mine.

Rise in And

dear

and shine. strength


as snow

like

lily pure
smock wash

Standingby
Tuck And Then Take up your stand

the water's

flow,
seam

of Chian you the your


in the

and

stream.

shall Cleis from and

press dress

give you

for

Shift of saffron,robe of red. Cloak And That Go That for shoulders, wreath
you

for head.
grace

shall
me

come

in all the
to
see

makes
roast
me

wild

your

face.

nuts,

Praxinoe,
breakfast
us

each maid's has


sent

merrier
morn;

be;

For God 'Tis the That At

luck this

day our

Sappho'ssworn
woman

she, the loveliest

known.

Mytilen,the
give her
Dearest

dearest

town,

Shall

children

back

their own.'

Atthis, dearest yet.


you

Can

it be that

forget.?

J.

M.

EDMONDS

63

LVII.
So

TO

ATTHIS
Atthis

LEAVING and full


in sooth
sore

I shall

never

see

more,

might
me

as

well

be dead. and

And

yet she wept


how sad
our

to

leave

hind be'tis

said "Alas!

lot; Sappho, I
I answered
me,

swear

all against my your doted remind


was

will I leave thee"; and remember


you

her, "Go
know
I

way upon you

rejoicingand
you. And
if

for you
not,

remember

then

I will

of what led

you

how forget, with


you

dear many have


a

and
a

beautiful

the life we and


sweet

For together.
roses

garlandof
your necklet and the my of

violets

mingled

decked
woven

flowinglocks by
made with of
a

my

side, and with


blossoms

many

hundred
in

your

dainty throat;
precious and
skin the
in

unguent
you

plenty, both
anointed
a

of the fair had

royal,have
bosom,
and

your

young from

upon

soft couch
a

hands

all that gentleserving-maids

Ionian delicate-living
nor

could
water-

desire; and

no

hill
we

was

there,
not

holy place nor


ever

brook, whither
noise

did

go,

nor

did with

the crowded the

of the of
"

earlySpring fillany
you

wood

medleywith
83

song
me
.

but nightingales,

wandered

thither
EDMONDS

SHALL

never

see

Atthis much how

again, and
when

surelywish
me,

were

dead.
to

Yet

she

wept
is me,

she left have And

and

said this

me,

"Woe

we terribly

suffered!

Sappho
her

trulyagainstmy
with
me;

will I leave

thee."

I answered

these words, for thou fain


to

"Rejoicing go thy
how I loved thee of what

way,

and

remember
not

knowest

thee. But thou hast

if it be

so,

am

remind

those forgot,

64

Or

handmaids had your

trim

supply
sacred haunted of

You've

fill; mount,
none we

spot,
not;

Brookside, there's
No grove
was

loud

at

break

Spring
"

With

sweet nightingales'

jargoning
and
I
.

But

we

went

there, you

J.

M.

EDMONDS

Truly Such
was

want

to

die.
when
to

her

weeping

she said
me:

good-bye.

These "What

words sad

she said

calamity!
you
most

Sappho, I leave
To "Go Not
to

unwillingly."

her I made with

: reply

good heart, but


love in

try

our forget

days gone
unkind,
you

by.

Else let me If The your

call to mind, proves

heart

soft

delightful ways
a

leave behind.

Many
Of
Crocus
rose

coronet

and

violet.
your
too

and

dill upon
a

brow

you

set:

Many
Round Woven And Of And with

necklace

your
me

soft throat from buds you my


on

you

threw,

of

hue, ravishing

often balm

spread
head
,

myrrh

upon

ointment royal

my

hair

you

shed."
CM, BOWRA

66

LVIII. And
.
.

TO

VIRGIN
"I

I answered

you, you,
not

swear

to

you

by
one

the Goddess

that

although I, Hke
I feared
me

had the
it

o" Zeus

but

virginit)^
which

nevertheless
Hera

threshold

beyond

had and

bidden

cast

away." Aye, night was

thus I heartened

you,
me,

cried aloud, "That have you,


I

sweet

enough
fear."
.

for

neither
I tell
as

you,

dear

maid, anything to
ours

Nay,
twice

prayedthat nightof

might
edmonds

be made
84

long.
I answered

And
. . .

thee thus:

"I have

sworn

this

to

thee

by
had

the

Goddess Zeus
not not

Aphrodite that, although I myself,too,


many but virginities,
one,

from

nevertheless had
manded com-

I feared

the threshold
to cast

beyond

which

Hera

me

it

away." With
me,

these words

I cheered

thee, and
not

shouted
to

aloud, "To

virgin,the night did


too

appear

be

heavy,so

that thou

need

not

traught be disi86

with

fear."

ROBINSON

LIX.

DREAM
to

OF

HERMES

[Who

led the dead said


a

Hades]
cannot

"Surely,"
.
.

Gongyla, "you

tell.?or

have

your
came

eyes
to
me

seen

"They have," sign.?"


dream,
and
I said
"

said I; "Hermes
I
am

in

Master,
I
swear

gether altoto

undone;
I
care

for bv the Blessed any


more

Goddess
am

thee perity, prosthe


85

not

so

much
a

that I
me

exalted
to

unto

but

desire

possesses

to

die, and
..."

behold

banks dewy lotus-bearing

of Acheron.

edmonds

67

"Long,"
knowest
to willing

said I, "it thou show

cannot

be." And Or

Gongyla said, "How


what

that?

Surelynot!

sign

art

thou

thy children?"
came

I'lltell you," "Certainly,

I answered.

"Hermes
we are

in, and

looking upon
For
I
swear

him

said, O
blessed

Master,
mistress

lost. utterly
I
care

by
any

the

Aphrodite that
lifted
me.

naught
a

more

that I have die hath

been

up

to

but prosperity,
to set
me

longing to
the

seized

I desire thee

in

dewy
son

field whither

in former

days thou

didst lead Atreus'

Agamemnon
But
I
must

and

all the

select flower

of the Achaeans.
I
. . .

leave this

of day,seeing that light

"

ROBINSON

204

"Long" "How "Has "Great And

said I "it cannot know you that?"


sent

be." asked

Gongyle;
I said;

sign been
Hermes

you?"

"Yes" my

stood before Most done

bed,
to

Lord

High
;

I cried

him,

My
All
So

joysare
great

my

prosperity,
is
to

helpme
one

Love!

nought

to

me;

My

desire's

die, and

see

The Of

lotus-brim dew-besprinkled Acheron ..."


J.
M. EDMONDS

LX.

ON

ANACTORIA beloved sends


to

Atthis,
but
once

our

Anactoria her

dwells

in

far-off Sardis,

she
we

often used

thoughts hither, thinking how

live in the

days when

you

were

like

68

Goddess glorious And


sunset
now

to

her and among

she loved the dames beside

your of the

song

the best. after


are

she shines the

Lydia as
stars

Moon rosy-fingered

that

about eke

her, when
o'er

she

her light o'er briny sea spreads the and dew the And
lies
so

and the

flowery field, while


and the with
roses

far

on

ground
the

revive

daintyanthryscand
oftentime
to

melilot

all its blooms.

while

our

beloved of

wanders

abroad, when
her tender

she calls

mind
is

the love

gentleAtthis, deep
with

breast, for
she
we

sure,

weighed
for
us

down
come

longing; and
what she
says

cries

aloud

to

thither; and

know

full well, you the many


ears

and

I, for flower-tressed
to
us

Night

that hath

calls it

along all that

lies between.

edmonds

86

Atthis,
in distant

Anactoria

dear

to

you

and

dear

to

me,

is

dwelling

ing Sardis, often turning her thought hither, thinkonce we

how thee like

lived

tagethera

life in which took

she held

to

and glorious goddess,


now

in delight especial

thy song.
dames beside
as,

And when
stars

she is
sun

conspicuous among
set,

the

Lydian

the

has

is the

moon rosy-fingered

the
sea

about
o'er

her, when
the

she

her light o'er spreads the

briny
noble

and

many-flowered fields, while


roses

dew

is shed

forth, and the

revive

and the And

dainty
oft-

anthryscand
times
as

the

with honey-lotus

its bloom.

she wanders

about, thinkingof her love for gentle


heart is weighted down
us

Atthis, doubtless

her tender

with

longing;and
what she

she cries
not

to shrilly

to

come

thither; and
the manyi87

says,
to
us

unknown the

to

us.

Night,

eared, calls
69

across

severingsea.

robinson

Atthis,
Dear
to

our

Anactory,
and dear
to

you

me,

Is in far Sardis But her To

dwelling;
often hither

thoughts turn
led

the life we you her

together,
were,

When

Goddess earthly

Passingnoble, passing fair,


Your Now the song all song

excelling.
beside eventide

Lydian

dames
at

She's like the Moon With her rosy

red fingers the Sun's

Shining,when
Beside And And While And her

abed.

neighbor fires.

o'er briny sea launchinglight

eke o'er blossom-broidered the dew


its boon
roses

lea.

outsheds

pinksand
And

lifttheir heads

their spires. gilliflowers


as

And And With


Her

often
on

her

way

she wanders

gentleAtthis ponders, longing love oppressed


breast

sad

heart sinks in her tender Till she cries in

pain
for you and I

"O

come

to

me!"

"

Know Since Sends

the burden flower-robed


us

of her

cry, of the

Night

myriad ears

word

of what

she hears
main. J.
M. EDMONDS

Across

the severing

70

Atthis,

in Sardis

far

away thee alike


to me

Anactoria And Now

dear

to

dear indeed

dwells, but hither often stray

Her

thoughts sent
That When lives thou her
anew

usward

by

the

power

the life she loved

her

goddess proved, glorious


"

Thy

songs

joy at

every

hour.

You

were

her

sun
,

now

set

too

soon

Among
As, after
Of

the

Lydian dames
glow

she shines

sunset,

the lines

the rosy-fingered moon light

Throws

on

her retinue

of

stars

lane Spreadinga far-flung That Across the

of beams
streams

gleams the rocky shore


that light

salt

sea

o'er and

that bars

In vain And

the

floods its

gloom.
the fields

landward leaping many


a

bathes

Where With

flower its beautyyields

bloom. fragrant variegated

Full fair the dew The The The

springsforth
roses

and

holds

the light,

lifttheir heads,

daintyanthryscs quit their

beds,

unfolds. clover, honey-rich,

7i

Through
And
Her

all this

beauty,hard

unrest

longingcrushinglike
tender

stone

heart, ofttimes
a

alone

She She

wanders

with calm

weighted breast.
quivering lip
dark

cannot

her

And She And

through the balmy, scented


cries

aloud
come on

we

must

embark swift

thither

some

ship.
me,
ears

Full clear her words For

to

thee and many

nightwith
ardent
us

all her

Their And sends

sound

full

hears gladly

o'er the

severingsea.
DAVID M. ROBINSON

GLORIOUS

goddessin
her comrade, songs

her

eyes your songs

Were Above With

you,

and

all other

she'd
now

prize.
she dwells

Lydian women
as

them, Surpassing
The The The With

when

day dies
excels

moon rosy-fingered

host of stars, and salt


sea

illumes light

and

the cornland
its thousand
over spills

glows
blooms.

light upon
with
grasses

In loveliness the dew And Slim But


new

revives strength

the

rose,

and and

the flowering:clover. down she


once

sadlyup
in her

goes. her lover.

Remembering Atthis,
And heart sick

longing grows.
C. M. BOWRA

72

LXII.

TO

APHRODITE

And
. . .

hanging
which

on

either side
sent

thy face
thee

the from

kerchief purplehand-

Timas
a

for

Phocaea,
edmonds

from preciousgift

preciousgiver

87

And

purplenapkins for thy lap


from

(even these

wilt thou

I sent despise)

for thy lap. Phocaea, preciousgifts


WHARTON

44

And

tying the
To

snood beside

of cramoisie

hang

Thy face,
came

The From

that preciousgift
a

to

Thee
sea

preciousgivero'er
cheeks
to

the

Thy

grace.

j.

m.

edmonds

LXIII.

TO

ATTHIS

You you Bless you

are

come;

it is well; I

was

longing for
up and and for

you,

and with

now

have you,

made
I

my

heart

to

flame you,

burn

love.
as

say,

thrice bless

just so long
edmonds

and

I have

been

parted.

89

Thou and

hast thou

come:

thou inflamed
us,

hast done my
times

well. I

longed for

thee: with
we

hast
to

heart

burning already
for
as

desire. Hail
were

many
one

hail, and

long as

partedfrom

another.

robinson

i 5

74

You

are

come;

'tiswell; I

longed for you;


flame heart my
anew

And

you The

have

brought to

fire of love in my the burden


you I
were

Welcome's And

of for

song

on blessings

justso long
j.
m. edmonds

As

you

and

apart.

LXIV.

BRILLIANCE

A
...

GLAMOR

the blinding

eyes

edmonds
. . .

90

SHEEN

blindingthe

eyes

like

to

the

hyacinth-flower.
ROBINSON

i22

LXV.

DEATH

Death Or

is an

ill the ;

gods at
had

least think

so,
edmonds

else themselves

perished long ago. judged:had

9 i

Death

is evil; the

gods have

so

it been

good,
i37

they would
Death is an

die.

wharton

evil,for the gods choose


been

breath;
chosen
DE

Had

Death

good

the

gods had
H.

Death.
STACKPOOLE

VERE

To For

die
were

must

needs

be sad, the

gods do

know

it;
it.

death

sweet,

show die, and straightway they'd


EDWIN ARNOLD

75

LXVI.

PUBLIC

BEAUTY

With
.
. .

whom

you

are

mingled
which

in

vagrant
man

friendship
have for
92

which the

deems

that beautiful

any

may
edmonds

asking.
her brother's

to [Perhapsreferring

love for Doricha]

Which

deems

that

beautiful

which

is devoted
ROBINSON

to

the
i62

good. public

LXVII.

STUBBORNNESS

Foolish

do girl,

not

try

to

bend

stubborn

heart.
EDMONDS

93

Fool,

faint

not

thou

in

thy strong

heart,

wharton

i iO

LXVIII.

OF

THE

CRICKET

And
.

pours when

down the

sweet

shrill

song

from the

beneath with

his his
94

wings,

Sun-god outspread
.

illumines

earth
edmonds

down-shed

flame

From

beneath

her

wings
down

she

pours

forth

clear shrill

song,

when of the

she shouts

the

blaze outspreadperpendicular
robinson

noonday

sun.

96

76

jSiaSJSM3MSMM2MSM3JaMSMa2MSM2MSiaiSMSISEMai^^

And
.

sings
song

shrill sweet the Sun from

from rays

'neath her

wings,

When Plumb

his

doth
...

spread
j.
M. edmonds

the zenith

LXIX. Dainty

HAVE

COME thee from back whom

BACK
I had

one,

to

been

gether partedaltoedmonds

I have

come

again

96

Lo ! to the soft have


come

arms

of her whom

I had shunned
robinson

so

long I
i2i

back.

Fair So

one,

from

whom

I'd parted been you


...

longand

far,lo, I behold

j.

m.

edmonds

LXX. They egg Leda of

LEDA that
time

say

once

upon
. . .

Leda

found

hidden

an

hue hyacinthine

edmonds

97

they say

once

found

an

egg

hidden

under
WHARTON

hyacinth56

blossoms.

They

say

that

Leda

once

found

an

egg

under
cox

the
52

hyacinths.
They Leda An say, found
egg,
an

'neath leaf and blossom


in the
as

gloom
her bosom,
h.
de vere

white

Under

iris bloom.

stackpoole

77

LXXI.

THE

COUNTRY

GIRL

And
.
.

what

countrified

wench

in
not

countrified how
to

clothes draw her


98

fires gown

your
over

breast, though she knows


her ankles?

Edmonds

What

bewitches peasant-girl
to

thy heart, who


her ankles?

knows

not

how

draw

her dress about

wharton

70

What However

country

maiden

charms
sweet.

thy heart,

however fair, has


not

Who To

learned

Art by gracious her feet?


H. DE
VERE

draw

her dress around

STACKPOOLE

What Who Her Her

rustic
cannot

bewitches girl
even

thee.

draw
as

garments
ankles

neat

they should be.


edwin m. cox

roundabout?

LXXH.

THE

YOUNG

HUSBAND

But
. . .

if

you

love

me,
to

choose

a yourself younger

wife;
than I.
99

for I

cannot

submit

live with

one

that is

younger
EDMONDS

But

if thou
not

lovest
to

us,

choose

younger

bed-fellow; for I
as

will

brook

live with

thee, thine elder

am.

WHARTON

75

78

For

if thou lovest
not

us,

choose
to

another

and

younger
woman

spouse with
cox

for I will young


man.

endure

live with

thee, old

72

If love thou

hast for
a

me,

not

hate,
;

Arise For I Where

and
no

find

younger abide

mate

longerwill youth and

age

lie side

by

side.
H.
DE

VERE

STACKPOOLE

LXXIII.

WEALTH

AND

WORTH

Wealth the

without the

worth
two

is

no

harmless

housemate;

but

blendingof

is the

top of fortune.
EDMONDS

iOO

Wealth

without
is the

worth

is

no

safe

neighbor but
WHARTON

the mixture
Si

of both

heightof happiness.

Wealth

without

thee, Worthiness,
of both
is the

is

no

safe

neighbor,

but the mixture

heightof happiness.
cox

78

Wealth

without that have

Worth
are

is

dangerousguest;
most

They

both

of all men

blest.
J.
M, EDMONDS

Wealth Who

without holds them

virtue

is

dangerous guest;

mingled is supremely blest.


JOHN
H. MERIVALE

79

LXXIV.

COME,

GRACES

HITHER,

soft Graces

and

Muses. lovely-tressed
EDMONDS

iOi

Come

now,

delicate Graces

and

fair-haired Muses.
WHARTON

60

Come,

Graces

soft and

Muses

lovely-tressed.
J.
M. EDMONDS

Come

to

me,

ye graces,

Delicate, tender, fair;


Come Muses from with your

heavenly places.
H. de vere stackpoole

golden hair.

LXXV.

ADONIS

IS

DYING

The

delicate Adonis
Beat your

is dying,Cytherea;what

can

we

do.f*

breasts, maidens,

and

rend

your
EDMONDS

garments.
i03

Delicate

Adonis

is

dying, Cytherea; what

shall

we

do?

Beat

your

breasts,maidens, and rend your

tunics.
WHARTON

62

Gentle Beat your

Adonis

is

dying, O Cythera; what


maidens, and
rend
your

shall

we

do?

breasts, O

garments.
cox

59

80

LXXVIIL

FLOWERS

MAIDEN

full tender

pluckingflowers,
gatheringflowers

wharton

i 2 i

MOST

tender

maiden

cox

i i 4

I SAW The

one

flowers day a-gathering


edmonds

daintiest little maid.

^07

LXXIX. DAUGHTER

DYING,

TO

HER

For befit

lamentation
not
us.

may

not

be in

house: poet's

such

things
i36

wharton

For

it is

not

right that

in

the
not

house
us.

of

sono-

there

be
i55

mourning.
Nay,
Within

Such

thingsbefit
must not

robinson

lamentation
a

dwell
michael field

house poet's

No For

house

that
so

serves

the Muse

hath this.

room,

I wis.
edmonds

and grief;

it illbeseemeth

i08

LXXX.

GOLD

Gold

is it

child

of Zeus; the

no

moth

nor

worm

devours

it,

and

overcomes

strongest

of mortal

hearts.
edmonds

i i0

82

Yea, gold is son


Its timeless

of Zeus:

no

rust

can light

stain;
flesh
to

The

worm

that
its

bringsman's

dust
MICHAEL FIELD

Assaults

in strength

vain.

LXXXI. The
time

THE

MOON

HAS

SET

moon

has set, and

the Pleiades; it is
I

midnight, the
wharton

is

going by, and


hath left the

alone. sleep

52

The

moon

sky;

Lost is the Pleiads' It is midnight And


But time
on

light;

by; slips
couch alone I lie.
j.
addington symonds

my

The Throw The The


Yet

moon

has

set,

and

o'er the

seas

their last glancethe Pleiades weary

nightis waning fast.


is come

promised hour
and sleepless
"

and

past;

"

alone I lie.
one,

Alone

ah, false

tell

me

why.

BLACKWOOD

The The Half

silver

moon

is set;
are

Pleiades the

gone; and

longnightis spent,

yet
JOHN
H. MERIVALE

I lie alone.

The And Half Time

moon

has

set

beyond

the

seas.

vanished the

are

the Pleiades;

longweary
"

nighthas

gone.
h. de vere stackpoole

passes

yet

I lie alone.

83

LXXXII.

AS

ROUND

AN

ALTAR

The about

moon

rose

full,and. the maidens,


. .

taking their
Edmonds

stand
i i 2

the altar
.

The around

moon

rose

full, and

the

women

stood

as

though
53

an

altar.

WHARTON

The As

moon

rose

full: the
a

women

stood

though
an

within
altar
. .

sacred wood
Michael
.

Around

field

Now

rose

the

moon,

full and

argentine,
as

While

round

stood the maidens,

at

shrine.
EDWIN M. COX

Then The

the full
women

globed moon
as

arose,

and

there

stood

round

an

altar fair.
H. DE VERE STACKPOOLE

LXXXIII.

THE

CRETAN

WOMEN

Thus

of old did the


to

daintyfeet
some

of Cretan

maidens

dance soft
i i 4

pat

the music bloom

beside of the

altar,pressingthe lovely
edmonds

smooth

grass.

Thus
in
measure

at

times

with

tender the

feet the Cretan

women

dance fine soft


54

round of the grass.

fair altar, tramplingthe


wharton

bloom

84

Thus
in

sometimes,
round grass.

the Cretan

women,

tender

footed, dance

measure

the fair altar,crushingthe fine bloom


cox

of the

50

The

Cretan

women

thus of old

with carefully

tender

feet

danced

about

fair altar,treading the delicate soft bloom


ROBINSON

of the sward.

25

And

thus

at

times,

in

Crete, the

women

there

Circle in dance In measured With tender

around

the altar fair;

movement,

treading as theypass
of the grass.
H.
DE

feet the soft bloom

VERE

STACKPOOLE

[With

the

: previous]

Then,
The And The
With

as

the broad

moon

rose

on

high,

maidens
some

stood the altar


measure graceful

nigh;

in

well-loved

spot danced

round,

lightsomefootsteps treading
soft and grassy

The

ground.

m.

j.

walhouse

LXXXIV.

MNASIDICA

Mnasidica,

of fairer form

than

the

daintyGyrinno.
EDMONDS

ii5

Mnasidica

is

more

than shapely

the tender

Gyrinno.
WHARTON

76

85

More

is shapely

Mnasidica,

than

Gyrinno. gentle
cox

73

Mnasidica

of fairer

shape than

tenderest

Gyrinno.
J.
M. EDMONDS

LXXXV.

GO

GARLANDED

But
.
. .

do of

you,

Dica,

let

your

twine dainty fingers

wreath may look

and anise-sprays

bind

your

lovelylocks;
too,
are more

for it apt
to

well be that the blessed with favor


on

Graces,

that which away from

is adorned

with

flowers,
. . .

whereas

they turn

all that

goes

ungarlanded
EDMONDS

i i 7

Do

thou, Dica, surround

with garlands of dill


on a

fair

with foliage,
even

soft hands blessed


turn

twining
look away

shoots

for together:

the

Graces

kindlier from

and flowerysacrifice, lack

their face

those who

garlands.
WHARTON

78

Do

thou, O Dica,

set

garlands upon thy

hair,weaving thy lovely


for those who
even

sprigsof
wear

dill with

delicate hands;

fair blossoms of Goddesses

may who

surelystand
look without

first

in

the

presence who
come

favor

upon
cox

those
75

ungarlanded.

But

hair, on placethose garlands thy lovely


the tender
;

Twining
With Are Who

sprouts
for

of anise

green

skilful hand
to pleasing

and offerings

flowers

the

Gods, who
with

hate all those uncrowned heads.


C. D. YONGE

come

before them

86

[aaMM2M3MSM5MSrSMMSISMMSMMSiaiSiaJSiaiaiSMMSIS^^

Of

and foliage wreaths thine


own

flowers love-laden for

Twine With Weave

hair, thyflowing maiden. fingers,

soft

of parsley fair; garlands


are

For flowers On Look But

sweet,

and the Graces with may

wreathed suppliants down


turn

from from

their

places. heavenly
away.
j.
a. symonds

the crownless

recline, Here, fairest Rhodope,


And With The The And 'mid locks thy bright

intertwine,

soft as fingers
ever

softest down,

verdant
are

crown. parsley

Gods

with pleased

flowers that bloom

leaves that shed divine

perfume.

But, if ungarlanded, despise


The richest offered sacrifice.
John
h. merivale

Let With

Dica fingers, dainty

mine,

wreathen

dill thy love-locks twine;


is with

For that which Favor


But
never

flowers

gay.

saith it
turn

nay. her head


j.
m. edmonds

she will

away

From

all that goes

ungarlanded.

Weave

Of

maiden, from the garlands, hands and with soft gentle dill,
round leafage your

strands

Set the delicious

head.

87

The
Love But

Goddess
to

and
on

the

happy Graces
faces,

look

flower-crowned the

turn

aside from

ungarlanded.
CM. BOWRA

Bring

summer

flowers, bringpansy,
and sweet-briar and blue

violet.

Moss-rose

columbine.

Bring loveliest leaves, rathe privet, eglantine.


Brown

with myrtles thou


a

the dews upon the

of

morning
to

wet:

Twine With Then Those Sweet When Look


On

wreath hands

thy brows

set;
;

thy soft

wayward
on

tendrils twine

placethem, maiden,
curls
too

those curls of thine.


or

fair for

gems

coronet.

is the breath

of blossoms, and

the Graces, their way.

through Love's templewend suppliants


down maidens from heed with smiles from with

their celestial places of chaplets the may;

wreathed

But Nor

the crownless them when

choir

they hide

their faces.

they sing nor

when
J.

they pray.
SYMONDS

ADDINGTON

Take With And

of sprigs soft hands round

anise

fair

twined,
hair

thy bonny

Achaplet bind;
The
Muse

with

smiles will bless gay.

Thy
While She

blossoms from

the g-arlandless
T. c. tucker

turns

away.

88

All

unto delicacy

me

is

and lovely,

for

me,

OLove!

Thy wings

are

as

the the

midday fire.
sun

as Thy splendor

above.
H.
DE VERE

STACKPOOLE

LXXXVII.

TO

HER

PUPILS

You

dishonor when you

the

of good gifts
"We

the buxom
you,

Muses,
dear you

dren, chil-

say

will
sweet

crown

Sappho,
not

best my

of player
skin
to

the clear

Know lyre."

that

is all wrinkled

with
are

age, my but few

hair is turned

from the
in

black

white, my
scarce

teeth the

remaining, and
used
once

legs can

carry foot it
as

body

you

to

join

the dance, of

to

nimbly as
I
cannot

the littlefawns, nimblest


even

Yet living things.?


can

help it. Not

God

self him-

do

what

cannot

be; and
and

surelyas

starry darkness

Night
unto

follows the ends catches beloved


every

rosy-armed Dawn
of the earth, Death
it in

brings us

tracks
even as

and everything living he would thinks


to not

the end, and


to

give his

wife

Orpheus, so

he

ever

keep prisoner
the

woman

that dies, for all he should of string for


me

let her follow


it

song

and

her

spouse.

But

I, be

known,

love soft
to

and living, desire of the


to

and beauty belong brightness therefore I shall


not

the

and sunlight;

crawl loved

away and your


USa

my

lair tillthat needs


you.

must

be, but
it is

continue

lovingwith
love, nor
90

And I pray

now

enough
.
.

that I have
edmonds

would

for

more
.

LXXXVIII. You had when and


in
a

TO

HER silent behind

PUPILS the my for


me

crouched
I

great
way

bay tree,
to

dren, chiltown;

passedyesterdayon
all was that
sweeter

the
I
saw

moment

when

you. the

Ah,
women

but I drank that


went

draught with thirsty eyeslAye,


me

with

thought me
heedless of for

suddenly become
my
a

silent

and fellow-wayfarer
I

company,

and
whelmed over-

sometimes

heard scarcely
ears

them;
poor
seems,

humming
away

my my
wits.

and

my

dear

flew spirit
are

with
me-

Such

things,it

of and

fate, and
visit

thought,gentlemaidens,
alas! when Yet
I
saw a

I would
too

come

you,
me

but
out.

I did

you

were

quick, and
was

shut

fair

sightere

the door

shut, and
me

the

very

clothes

on

your

backs, being yours, thrilled

through.
i i SB

EDMONDS

LXXXIX.
O

TO thou

A child the

DREAM of black
sweet

DREAM,

Night,
of

who

comest

ere

break
to

of dawn
our

when

God

Sleephath
pangs desire
meet

not

long

stay upon
me

how eyelids, should I dare

dire the
to

of

thou grief

foretellest

keep
not

and the

ability
lot thou

apart!Yet

I have

hopes I

shall

bodest, but refuse nothing I wish


it
me;

for if the Gods


never

but offer been


so

for when
as

was

child I should mother's


me

have
a

dull And what honor

to

disdain the

my Gods

dear

offer of

pretty toy.
to

pray

give

the

opportunity
done them

take

long for
my

now,

seeingthat
and dances.

I have

all such
iiSc

in

songs

edmonds

9i

XC.

TO

ALCAEUS but

[Who
shame

said

to

Sappho:
me]
of
a

I fain would

speak

to

you,

restrains

If
were

your
not

desire

were

thingsgood

or

and fair, your tongue then make


EDMONDS

mixing

draught of
eye, but

ill words, would

would your

not

shame

possess

your

you

plea
i i 9

outright.
Hadst
not

thou

felt desire for framed but


some

thingsgood
evil hadst

or

noble, and
had

had
not

thy

tongue

speech,shame

filled thine
it.

eyes,

thou

spoken honestlyabout
WHARTON

28

Hadst

thou

wished formed thine

for

thingsgood

or

noble

and

had
not

not

thy
shown about

tongue
from
it.

evil eyes,

speech, shame
but thou hadst

would

have

spoken frankly
cox

26

A.

FAIN

would and

speak,I fain
fear my

would

tell,

But
S.

shame

utterance

quell.
fair

If

aught of good, if aught of


tongue
shame
were

Thy
Nor

to laboring

declare.
fear
anon.

should
to

dash reach

nor thy glance,

Forbid

thy suit

my

ear.

A.

Sweet

violet-weaving Sappho,whose
should

soft smile

My

tongue

free,
shame holds
me

Lo, I would
I
s.

but speak,

the while

gaze

on

thee. thou but felt desire of noble

Hadst

things,

92

Hadst

not

thy tongue
had
not

to speak no good, proposed

Thy
Nor

words shame

been

destitute of

wings,

thine

eyes

subdued.
H.
DE

VERB

STACKPOOLE

A.

Sappho

of the violet
as

tresses,

Gentlysmiling, pure
There's But
s.

day,
my heart confesses,

something that
takes my

shame

speechaway,
and fair ill prepare,

Were did

your your
no

desiring good
tongue
shame
no

And Then But

had you

possessed your sight.

had

outright. pledyour plea


J.
M. EDMONDS

XCI.

TO

HANDSOME

MAN

Stand unveil

up,

look

me

in the

face your

as

friend

to

friend, and
i 20

the charm

that is in

eyes.

edmonds

Stand eyes.

face

to

face, friend
. . .

and

unveil

the

grace
wharton

in thine
29

Face eyes.

me,

my

dear

one
.

and
.
.

unveil

the

grace

in thine
cox

27

Stand That's

and

unfold

as

friend and

to

friend the
me

grace

in those

eyes,

look

in the face.
J.
M. EDMONDS

93

Friend,
Unto
Unto Unto

face

me

so

and

raise

my
mine

face

thy face, thy gaze.


grace.
h.
de vere

eyes

my

soul its

stackpoole

XCII.

TO

RIVAL,

IN

IRONY

VERY

good day to

daughterof

very many

kings.
EDMONDS

i2i

All

joy to thee, daughterof Polyanax.

wharton

86

From

me

all joy to

thee, O

daughterof Polyanax.
cox

83

XCIII.

SPRING

RETURNS

Why
vex me

does

the ?

heavenly swallow, daughter of Pandion,


edmonds

i22

...

Why,
me?

swallow, lovely

Pandion's

child, dost thou

weary
cox

85

Ah,

Procne, wherefore

dost thou

weary

me
.

MICHAEL

FIELD

Why The

am

I vexed

to

see

Pandion's

child

Swallow heavenly

of Spring? bringher gift


J. M.
EDMONDS

94

XCIV.

DREAM the

DREAMT

that I talked with

Cyprus-born
.

EDMONDS

i23

In

dream

spakewith

the

daughterof Cyprus.
WHARTON

87

In

my

dream,

spoketo

the

Cyprian goddess.

cox

84

XCV.

SLEEP

May

you

in sleep

the bosom

of

tender

comrade
.

EDMONDS

i28

Sleep

thou

in the bosom

of

thy tender girl-friend.


WHARTON

83

Upon

friend's thy girl and


on

white

and

tender

breast,

Sleepthou,

her bosom

find

thy rest.
H.
de

vere

stackpoole

XCVI.

COME

YE

MUSES

COME

hither, ye Muses,

from

your

golden house
EDMONDS

i29

Hither

now,

ye Muses,

leavinggolden surroundings.
cox

8i

Hither

now.

Muses!

leaving golden seats

MICHAEL

FIELD

95

ISEMSEEM5]MSMEMM2JSMMMSMESMa'HMSMc!MS2MSMSJ3MSJ

XCVII.

CLEIS

HAVE

pretty little daughterwho

looks
I would

like
not

golden
take all
i30

flower, my

Cleis, for darling


nor

whom

Lydia, nay
I
HAVE a

Lesbos. lovely

edmonds

fair

daughterwith

form
I

like

golden flower,
all Lydia nor
wharton

Cleis, the beloved, above


Lesbos lovely
. . .

whom

prizenor

85

HAVE

fair

daughterwith
whom

form

like
more

goldenflowers,
than all Lydia
cox

Cleis the belovedest


or

I cherish

Lesbos. lovely

82

HAVE

child,a lovely one.

In

like the goldensun beauty


sweet

Or like And
I

flowers of earliest bloom


name,
were

Cleis is her

for whom

treasures, Lydia's

theymine.
JOHN
H. MERIVALE

Would

gladresign.
a

HAVE

child; so fair
is she,
care.

As

goldenflowers
giveher

My Cleis,all my
I'd
For
not

away

wide Lydia's lands


men

sway

Nor

long to

see.

CM.

BOWRA

HAVE

little daughterrare

That's

like the

goldenflowers fair,

My
96

Cleis;

Oh,
I
cannot

my

sweet

mother, 'tisin vain,


as once

weave

wove,

So

'wiidered

is

my

heart and that

brain
I love.
THOMAS MOORE

With

thinkingof

youth

Sweet

mother, let the weaving be,


hand
is faint
to
move.

My
Frail
I

Aphrodite masters
my young

me;

long for

love.

T.

F.

higham

My Has

sweet

mother!
me sense

Fair and

Aphrodite's spell
reason

from

all bereft,

And,
No

yearning for

that dear beloved the warp


or

youth,
edwin

longercan

see

weft.

m.

cox

Sweet

mother,
with
a

at

the idle loom the

lean.

Weary
Remains

longingfor

boy
"

that still
to

dream

of loveliness

fill

My

soul, my

will. life, at Aphrodite's


h.
de vere stackpoole

C.

GUARD

THY

TONGUE

When
tono-ue.

anger

swells in the heart, restrain

the

idly-barking
i37

EDMONDS

When from

anger

through the spreads

breast,guardth)^ tongue
wharton

barking idly.

2 7

98

When Let
not

anger

surges

through thy heart


tongue take part.
edwin m. cox

thy fooHsh
stirs

When

anger
once

thy breast,speak not

at

all,

For words,

rest beyond recall. spoken, H.


DE VERE

STACKPOOLE

CI.

THE

NIGHTINGALE

The

harbingerof Spring,the nightingale. lovely-voiced


EDMONDS

i38

Spring's

messenger,

the sweet-voiced

nightingale.
WHARTON

39

The

messenger

of

Spring,the

sweet-voiced

nightingale.
COX

37

The The

dear

good angelof

the

spring
ben

nightingale.

jonson

Spring's The

messenger

we

hail.
MICHAEL FIELD

sweet-voiced

nightingale.

CII.

GOLDEN

PULSE

And

goldenpulses grew

upon

the shore.

edmonds

i39

99

And

golden pulsegrew
Grew

along the

shores.

cox

28

golden pulsealong the

sand,

michael

field

cm.

SLEEP

And

black night's

slumber

was

shed

upon

their
EDMONDS

eyes.
i4i

When

all nightlongsleep holds their

eyes.
WHARTON

43

When

all

holds nightlong sleep

them.

cox

4 i

And

black night's

slumber

fell

upon

their

eyes.
J.
M. EDMONDS

CIV.

LIKE

CHILD

And

I have

flown

to

you

like

child

to

its mother.
EDMONDS

i42

And

I flutter like

child after her mother,

wharton

5S

So, like

child after its mother,

I flutter.

cox

36

Like I
am

child whose

mother's

lost,
M.

terror-tossed. fluttering,

j.

walhouse

iOO

EEi^jSMaMMMaasaSSMSMMSMSMEMM^'clI^^

CV.

ON

CHILD'S

TOMB

I
a

AM

littlemaid
say

who

cannot

talk,but yet, if I
with the voice
to

am

asked
never

I question,

enough plain
my

that

wearies

of

speechat
of Leto
a

feet: I was Aristo

dedicated

the Aetho-

pian Child
son

by

daughterof Lady
be thou

Hermocleitus of
women,

of Saunaidas,
in

ministrant, thou
bound gratitude

of

thine; to whom

and gracious,
Edmonds

giveour
Maidens,
before

familygood fame.
dumb feet
a as

i43

am

speakthus, if any
To Leto's

ask, and

set

your

tirelessvoice:

Aethodaughter Hermocleides whom

pia was
son

I dedicated

by

Arista

daughterof
O queen of house.

of

Saynaiades, thy servant,

women;

bless thou, and

our deignto glorify

WHARTON

ii8

iOi

Maidens,

though

am

dumb,
feet
one

yet thus
with
an

speak,if

any To

ask, and placeat your

untiringvoice:
I consecrated

Aethopia

tlie

daughter

of

Leto

was

by

Arista, daughterof Hermocieides


O

Saonaiades, thy servant,


thou bless and

queen

of

women

whom

mayest

deign to
cox

our glorify

house.

ii2

Voiceless
Unto

and speak,

from

the tomb
I

reply.

Aethopia,Leto's child, was by


was

Vowed Who
O

the

daughterof Hermocieides,
son

the

of Saonaiades.
unto

virginqueen,
and

my

prayer

incline.
our

Bless him

cast

on thy blessing

line.
DE VERE STACKPOOLE

H.

CVI. This

ON
is the

TIMAS dust of Timas, who received and and


into

was

phone's Perse-

black all her fair

chamber

all unwed, took knife

for whose shore


EDMONDS

death

companions

the

lovely
i44

hair of their heads. This


is the dust of

Timas, whom

dark Persephone's she

ber cham-

received, dead before her wedding; when


all her
tresses

perished, lovely
ii9

fellows

dressed

with

sharpened steel
WHARTON

the

of their heads.
is the

This

dust

of Timas

whom before

the her

dark

chamber when

of she

Persephone received, dead


died all her

wedding;

with companions clipped

sharpened metal
cox

all their

tresses. lovely

ii3

i02

This She Her Cut

dust lies in

was

Timas'

; ere

her bridal hour

gloomy bower; Proserpina's


each head lovely
strewments

from virginplaymates with dead.

sharpsteel

their locks, the

for the
a. elton

CHARLES

This

is the dust

of Timas,

whom

unwed bed:

Persephonelocked
For her the maids Their curls and
to

in her darksome

who

were

her fellows shore this tribute bore.


J.
A. SYMONDS

her tomb

Here Passed With


Her

rests

the dust of Timas

who, unwed.

the dark

of Persephone. portals when her

metal, sharpened

fled, spirit

mourning

friends each

shore her fair-tressed head.


EDWIN M. cox

This Passed In

is the dust of

Timas, who, unwed.


of

hence

to

house Proserpina's sorrowing the tribute

gloom ;

mourning

all her
cast

playmatesshed
on

Their

curls and

her tomb.
H.
DE

VERE

STACKPOOLE

CVH.

THE

FISHERMAN'S

TOMB

To
a

the fisherman

Pelagon his
an oar as

father Meniscus
a

has

put up
life.
i45

and fishing-basket

mxcmorial

of his hard
EDMONDS

i03

Over

the and

fisherman memorial

Pelagon
of
a

his father

Meniscus
wharton

sets

weel

oar,

luckless life,

i 20

This

oar

and

net

and

fisher's wickered his buried


son
"

snare

Meniscus Memorials The hard

placedabove

of the lot in lifehe bore, and

needy life of Pelagon.


Pelagon,his
to

charles

a.

elton

Here,
A

to

the fisher and

sire Meniscus

laid trade.
neaves

wicker-net

oar,

show

his

weary

life and
lord

Over

the fisher
oar worn

Pelagon Meniscus
the for
wave, ever,

his father the


to

set

The

by
and

the trap, and memorials there

fishing net;
be
sea.

For all men, Of

the luckless life of the fisher,the laborer of the


H.
DE VERE

STACKPOOLE

CVIII.

THE

GOD'S

TOAST

There
Hermes

stood took

mixing-bowl of
wine-jug to
up

ambrosia
out

readymixed,
for the Gods.

and And

the

pour

then wished

they all took


all manner

the beakers, and


to

pouring

libation

of 2;ood luck

the bridegroom.
EDMONDS

i46

And took held

there the bowl the ladle


to

of ambrosia
out

was

mixed, and
then

Hermes

pour made

for the

gods; and

they all
groom bride5i

and goblets, all

libation, and

wished

the

good

luck.

wharton

i04

sporting,sweet
thee of

to

the

bridegroom.May

Hesperus

lead

honoring Hera rejoicing,

o" the silver throne,


wharton

goddess
133

marriage.

Bride,
the

teeming

with

bride the fairest rosy loves, thee


to

image
to

of

Paphian goddess,hie

the bed, hie thee

the

couch,

softly sporting,sweet
star,

to

thy bridegroom. May


thee
where willingly

Hesperus, the evening


thou shalt marvel
at

lead

Hera

of the silver throne,

goddessof
145

wedlock.

ROBINSON

Bride,

in whose

breast haunt

rosy

loves !

Bride, fairest of the Paphian groves!


Hence,
Hence
to

thy marriage rise,and go!


the bed, where thou shalt show

to

With

honeyed playthy wedded


sweetness

charms.
!

Thy
Let

in the

arms bridegroom's

Hesper lead

thee forth, a wife.

Willing and worshippingfor life.


The

silver-throned,the wedlock
Hera,
wanton

dame.
shame!
J.
ADDINGTON SYMONDS

Queen

without

Bride, around
Sweet The Give

whom of the

the

rosy

loves

are

flying,
lying.

image
bed
to

Cyprian undying,

awaits

thee; go, and with him

the groom

thy sweetness,

sighing. softly
before thee, o'er thee.
H. de vere stackpoole

May Hesperus in gladness pass


And
Hera

of the silver throne

bend

i06

ex.

WEDDING

SONG

Raise
Ares
a

high
comes

the roof-beam, the

carpenters.

Hymenaeus!

Like

bridegroom,Hymenaeus!

taller far than


wharton

tall man.

Hymenaeus!

9i

Up

with

the rafters

high,Ho

for the

wedding! wedding! wedding!

Raise them The

Ho high,ye joiners,

for the

as bridegroom's

tall as
Ho

Ares, Ho
for the
Ho

for the

Far taller than

tall man.

wedding! wedding! wedding!


EDMONDS

Towering
Over the

as

the Lesbian

poet,

for the for the

poets

of other lands, Ho

i48

Raise

high the
comes

roof beams, the

workmen!

Hymenaeus!

Like Ares Taller

bridegroom! Hymenaeus! Hymenaeus!


cox

far than

all tall men!

88

Artists,

raise the rafters

hig-h !
"

Ample

scope
comes

and

stately plan
the

Mars-like

bridegroom night.
anon.

Loftier than

man. lofty

Workmen

lifthigh the beams !

of the roof,

Hymenaeus
Like Ares

from ! who
!

sky comes

the groom

to

the bride,

Hymenaeus
Than
men

must

die stands

he taller in
h. de vere

pride,
stackpoole

Hymenaeus
i07

CXI.

THE

EVENING

STAR

Evening

Star that

back bringest

all that

lightsomeDawn

hath

scattered

afar, thou

the sheep,thou bringest bringest child home


to

the goat, thou

her bringest

the mother
. . .

EDMONDS

i49

Evening,
thou

thou

all that brightmorning scattered, bringest goat, and the child back
cox
to

the sheep,the bringest

its mother.

92

Hesperus!

Thou

all thingshome; bringest hath


to

All that the The Thou

garish day

scattered wide; the welcome


to

sheep,the

goat, back

fold;
side.
APPLETON

the child, too, bring'st

his mother's

Thou,
That The The

homeward Hesper,bringest radiant dawn

all

sped far and wide.


goat
to

sheep to fold, the


children
to

stall.
side.
rennell rodd

their mother's

Star All Goat And

that

home bringest

again

brightDawn
to

far and wide, spreads

fold and
to

sheep to

pen, side.
j.
M. edmonds

children

their mother's

Hail,
All Thou And

back gentleEvening, that bringest hath

thingsthat brightmorning
the lamb, bringest
to

beguiled.

thou

the kid. bringest


edwin m. cox

its mother

her

drowsy child.

i08

Children

astray goats
the
to

to

their mothers
, ,

and

the herd,

Sheep to

through shepherd,
o" the bird, has scattered

twihght the wings


All

thingsthat morning
with

of gold, fingers

All

O Evening! thingsthou bringest,


at

last to the fold.


H.
DE VERE

STACKPOOLE

HESPERUS,
to

thou the weary,

all good things bringest


"

Home

to

the

hungry cheer,

To The

the

young

bird the

broodingwings, parent's
steer;

welcome of
our

stall to the o'erlabored peace about


our

Whate'er Whate'er
Are

hearthstone

clings,

household
us

gods protect by thy look


too to

of dear.
rest;

gatheredround
the bring'st

of

Thou

child

its mother's

breast.
LORD
BYRON

[See also number

xxi]

CXII.

LIKE

THE

APPLE

As very

the

blushes sweet-apple of the

on

the

end

of the

bough, the

end

bough,
not

which

the
not

overlooked, gatherers
reach,
wharton

nay

overlooked

but could

93

As

the

sweet

appleblushes bough
could

on

the

end

of the

bough,

the nay
90

very

end

of the but

which

the

missed, gatherers
cox

missed

not,

not

reach.

i09

At

the end

of the bou2;h

"

its

uttermost

end,

Missed

by
not

the the harvesters,ripens


out

apple.

Nay,

overlooked, but far


with all best

of their reach,
edwin m. cox

So

things.

Like

the

sweet

applethat bough
"

reddens of the

At

end

of the the

far end

bough

"

Left

by
not

so gatherers swaying, forgotten,

thou.

Nay,

tillnow. forgotten, ungotten, ungathered


H.
DE VERE

STACKPOOLE

CXIII.

LIKE

THE

HYACINTH

Like
on

the

hyacinthwhich
and

the

underfoot shepherdtramples
on purple

the mountain,

it stillblooms

the

ground.
i5i

EDMONDS

As

on

the hills the the

the hyacinthunder trample shepherds


is
to pressed

foot and

flower purple

earth.
WHARTON

94

As

on

the the hills, and the

under shepherdstramplethe larkspur lies

foot

flower

empurpling

in

decay

on

the
9i

ground.

cox

O'er

the hills the heedless

shepherd,
larkspur.
edwin m.
cox

his Heavy footed, plods Crushed Soon behind him

way;

lies the

empurpling in decay.

no

As

on

the hills the the

shepherds
darkness,

Trample

hyacinthdown,
earth with
a

Stainingthe
There where

flower has blown.


H. DE VERE STACKPOOLE

[With the previous] :


Like

the

sweet

which apple

reddens

upon

the

topmost

bou2;h,

A-top on

the

topmost
"

twig,
"

which

the

forgot pluckers
could
it till

somehow,

Forgotit not,
now.

nay,

but

got

it not,

for

none

get

Like

the wild the

hyacinthflower, which
of the

on

the hill is found.


tear

Which

passingfeet

for ever shepherds

and

wound,
Until the blossom purple
is trodden into the

ground.
D. G. rossetti

CXIV.

THE

DOORKEEPER'S

FEET

The

feet doorkeeper's five hides and


to

are

seven

fathoms
it took
ten

long, and
shoemakers ways
an

his
to

sandals make

the

pair
"

them;

his father lived in other


to

honest

but claimed life,

be better born

than

Cecrops himself.
EDMONDS

i54

To

the

feet doorkeeper

seven

fathoms
ten

long,and
wharton

sandals of
98

five bulls' hides, the work

of

cobblers,

Hi

Master Twelve

Doorkeeper's

pretty feet be;


his shoes, three.
J.
m. edmonds

good ells long must


to

It takes five hides And cobblers

make
times

three

CXV.

HAPPY

BRIDEGROOM

Happy

bridegroom,the marriage is accomplishedas


it should

you for is

prayed
yours face
. . . . .

be, and

the

maiden
over

you
her

prayed

and
.

soft and

gentleis shed

delightsome
i55

EDMONDS

Happy

bridegroom, now
thou

is

thy wedding
of

come

to

thy
a

desire, and
hue of

hast the maiden

thy

desire
.
. .

and

the lovely countenance. honey-paleness overspreads


WHARTON

99,

iOO

Happy

bridegroom,now
thou

has

come

thy wedding
of

as

thou

wished, and
sweet

hast the maiden

thy desire
cox

and
. . .

over spreads expression

her fair face.

96,

97

Thou That
When

happy bridegroom!Now day of dayssupreme,


in thine
arms

has dawned

thou'lt hold

at

last
edwin m.
cox

The

maiden

of thv dream.
y

Joy born of marriage thou provest.

Bridegroom thrice blest. Holding


the maiden thou lovest
H.
de verb

Claspedto thy breast.


ii2

stackpoole

Bidding thee
Before thee

rise,with

outstretched

hands,

Aphrodite stands.
H. DE
VERE

STACKPOOLE

CXIX.

TO

THE

BRIDEGROOM

To

what, dear bridegroom,may


do sapling

I well

liken thee?
Edmonds

To
i6i

slender

I best liken thee.

Whereunto

may may

I well

liken

thee, dear bridegroom.'*


wharton

To

soft shoot

I best liken thee.

i04

To
Best

what
to
a

may

I liken

thee, dear bridegroom?


may
I liken thee.
cox

tender

shoot

iOi

Bridegroom

dear, to what
green

shall I

compare

thee?
anon.

To

slim

rod best do I

compare

thee.

CXX.

TO

THE

BRIDEGROOM

For this.

never,

bridegroom,was

there another

maiden
EDMONDS

such

as

i63

For

there

was

no

other

O bridegroom,like girl,
WHARTON

her.
106

For,

like her, O

bridegroom,there

was

no

other maiden.
cox

i03

ii4

CXXI.

TO

HER

VIRGINITY

Maidenhood,
me?
. . .

maidenhood,

whither
I
come

art

thou
never

gone

from

Never

again will

to

thee,

again.
i09

WHARTON

Maidenhood,
me?
. .
.

maidenhood,
O
never

whither
I

art

thou
to

gone
thee.
cox

from

Never,

again shall

return

i04

Maidenhead,
Where
I
must

maidenhead,

whither
I
must

away?
stay.
EDMONDS

where stay, bride,

i64

Maidenhood! hast thou

Maidenhood!
gone

where

from

me,

Whither,
I shall
return

Slain?
to

thee, I who thee, never

have

gone

from

again.
h.
de

vere

stackpoole

CXXII.

THOU

HAST

CHOSEN

Mica Thou house the

wishes hast

to

bring thee

here but I shall the one!


.

not

allow

thee. the

chosen

with friendship mischievous


a

daughters of
For
. .

of Penthilus, O

us

sings

soft-voiced

poet
and
.

sweet

song leaves

and

the

clear-voiced
i94

nightingales
.

the

dewy

robinson
. . .

ii5

CXXIII.

OLD

AGE

Brings
. . .

advance

to

the

features of the face


. . .

ful beauti-

children gifts, all flesh old vi^hite from age black


.

O
. .
.

friend, the singerof shrill lyres


and
. .

already
.

the hairs have do


not

become

and
. .

the knees

carry
ROBINSON

203

CXXIV.

DREAM

DREAM

v^ith black

wings, mayest
Sweet
.
.

thou

come

when

sleep

brings forgetfulness
.

is the

thou god. Terribly


robinson

dost afflictme
. . .

i98

ii6

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