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Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 Vol XIII, Edition 165
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WORLD PAGE 28
CCS GETS
UNDERWAY
SPORTS PAGE 11
TACO BELL WILL
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FOOD PAGE 19
PRO-RUSSIAN RALLY IN CRIMEA DECRIES KIEV BANDITS
City: Ban
smoking
in public
Foster City Council wants
updated ordinance, refuses
to regulate private property
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Smoking in public could soon become illegal in Foster
City after the City Council instructed staff to draft an ordi-
nance prohibiting smoking on the streets and sidewalks at
a study session Monday night.
It was the third meeting concerning the citys 17-year-old
smoking ordinance and the council decided to move forward
with prohibiting smoking on any city-owned property and
County unveils its
jail financing plan
Board president questions bonding entire project
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County is nearly set to price and sell bonds
this spring for its new jail but Board of Supervisors
President Dave Pine questioned if it might be better not to
nance the entire project and instead use extra money ear-
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
At their root, Judge Beth Labson
Freeman believes all court cases are
about people.
The dispute might be civil, it might
be criminal. The case might be a
restraining order against a bullying
teenager or a contract dispute between
two businesses. But boiled down, the
newest judge on the federal bench sees
her job as the nal decision maker for
parties who cant
reach their own con-
clusion.
The heart of what
Im doing is help-
ing people to
resolve their situa-
tions, Freeman
said.
After 13 years
doing just that in
San Mateo County Superior Court,
Freeman is taking that skill to the U.S.
District Court in San Jose where she
said the federal law may be different but
the lessons honed locally are still
applicable.
The U.S. Senate conrmed Freeman
Tuesday with a 91-7 vote and also con-
firmed San Francisco lawyer James
Donato 90-5. Donato, 53, is a partner
in the firm Shearman & Sterling.
Freeman is the rst San Mateo County
judge named to a federal judge seat.
Senate confirms judge to federal bench
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two county judge seats will have contested races in June
while other bench spots up for re-election are already set
by virtue of nobody running against the incumbents.
Judges Joseph Bergeron, Richard DuBois, Don Franchi,
Two judge races crowded
while others already set
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Its campy, its macabre and its just
plain fun. These are just some of the
ways to describe Little Shop of
Horrors, the 1982 rock musical pre-
sented by Foothill Music Theatre.
Based on the 1960 cult lm by Roger
Corman, the show is set in a run-down
oral shop on Skid Row in the early
60s. The place is owned by Mr.
Mushnik (Alex Perez), who has two
employees.
One is the nerdy but endearing
Seymour (Adam Cotugno). The other is
the sexy Audrey (Adrienne Walters),
whose self-esteem is so low that shes
willing to put up with the abuse by her
sadistic boyfriend, dentist Orin
Scrivello (Jeff Clarke).
The shops fortunes improve when
Seymour brings in a strange plant.
Named Audrey II (voiced by James
Devreaux Lewis), it comes to demand
unusual nourishment before growing
ever larger. Soon Seymour becomes
famous, but he also must confront a
moral dilemma.
Serving as a kind of Greek chorus are
three street-wise young women,
Crystal (Lyn Meheula), Chiffon
(Melissa Baxter) and Ronette (Megan
Coomans).
The two-act show is full of bouncy
tunes by Alan Menken with clever
lyrics by Howard Ashman, who also
wrote the book.
One of the more amusing songs,
especially for those who recognize the
references, is Audreys Somewhere
Thats Green. In it, she expresses her
dream of marrying Seymour and mov-
ing to a nice place like Levittown,
where their children can watch Howdy
Doody on their big-screen, 12-inch
TV.
Lots of fun in Foothills Little Shop of Horrors
Freeman first San Mateo County judge to serve on U.S. District Court
Beth Freeman
DAVID ALLEN
Crystal (Lyn Meheula) and Ronette (Megan Coomans) cheer on Seymour (Adam Cotugno) as he embraces his new plant Audrey
II in Little Shop of Horrors, playing at the Lohman Theatre at Foothill College.
See SMOKING, Page 18
See JAIL, Page 8
See RACES, Page 20
See FREEMAN, Page 20
See PLAY Page 8
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Singer Michael
Bolton is 61.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1904
The United States and Panama pro-
claimed a treaty under which the U.S.
agreed to undertake efforts to build a
ship canal across the Panama isth-
mus.
One resists the invasion of armies;
one does not resist the invasion of ideas.
Victor Hugo (1802-1885)
Singer Fats
Domino is 86.
Actress Taylor
Dooley is 21.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A series of images from NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory show the rst moments of an X-class signicant solar are in
different wavelengths of light.
Wednesday: Rain. Highs in the upper
50s. South winds 15 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Breezy. Rain in the
evening. A slight chance of thunder-
storms. Showers likely after midnight.
Rain may be heavy at times in the
evening. Lows in the lower 50s. South
winds 20 to 30 mph...Becoming 15 to 20
mph after midnight.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers and a
slight chance of thunderstorms in the morning...Then a
slight chance of showers in the afternoon. Highs in the
upper 50s. Southwest winds 10 to 20 mph. Chance of pre-
cipitation 50 percent.
Thursday night: Mostly clear in the evening then
becoming cloudy. Achance of rain.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte escaped from exile on the
Island of Elba.
In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson signed a congressional
act establishing Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona.
In 1929, President Calvin Coolidge signed a measure estab-
lishing Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.
In 1945, authorities ordered a midnight curfew at night
clubs, bars and other places of entertainment across the
nation.
In 1952, Prime Minister Winston Churchill announced that
Britain had developed its own atomic bomb.
In 1962, after becoming the rst American to orbit the Earth,
astronaut John Glenn told a joint meeting of Congress,
Exploration and the pursuit of knowledge have always paid
dividends in the long run.
In 1970, National Public Radio was incorporated.
In 1984, the last U.S. Marines deployed to Beirut as part of
an international peacekeeping force withdrew from the
Lebanese capital.
In 1987, the Tower Commission, which had probed the Iran-
Contra affair, issued its report, which rebuked President
Ronald Reagan for failing to control his national security
staff.
In 1993, a truck bomb built by terrorists exploded in the
parking garage of New Yorks World Trade Center, killing six
people and injuring more than 1,000 others.
In 1994, a jury in San Antonio acquitted eleven followers of
David Koresh of murder, rejecting claims theyd ambushed fed-
eral agents; ve were convicted of voluntary manslaughter.
In 2012, in a case that drew national attention, Trayon
Martin, 17, was shot to death in Sanford, Fla., during an alter-
cation with neighborhood watch volunteer George
Zimmerman, who said hed acted in self-defense.
T
he rst Hard Rock Cafe opened
in London in 1971.
***
On I Love Lucy (1951-1957) Ricky
Ricardo was the band leader at the
Tropicana Club. During the sixth sea-
son of the show, Ricky purchases the
Tropicana Club and renames it Club
Babalu.
***
The rst corporation in the world to
have more than 1 million stockhold-
ers was AT&T.
***
French movie director Roger Vadim
(1928-2000) was the author of the
1986 book titled My Life with the
Three Most Beautiful Women in the
World. The women were Brigitte
Bardot (born 1934), Catherine
Deneuve (born 1943) and Jane Fonda
(born 1937).
***
The winner of the annual Indianapolis
500 automobile race wins the Borg-
Warner Trophy. The 5 foot 4 inch tro-
phy is made of sterling silver.
***
From 1940 to 1975, the average
height of Americans increased by
more than three inches.
***
Clarence Birdseye (1886-1956) was a
man ahead of his time. He created the
technology of frozen food in 1924.
Freezers in the home became commer-
cially available in 1940.
***
Farrah Fawcett (born 1947) was the
most popular pin-up in the mid-1970s
when her poster sold more than 8 mil-
lion copies. Do you remember the
color of Farrahs bathing suit in the
famous poster? Do you remember what
television show launched her acting
career? See answer at end.
***
Some insurance companies are refus-
ing to give homeowners insurance to
families that have certain breeds of
dogs. The most common dogs that
raise liability and are therefore black-
listed are rottweilers, pit bulls and
chows.
***
The country with the highest divorce
rate is Belgium where 59.8 percent of
marriages end in divorce. Libya has
the lowest divorce rate with 0.24 mar-
riages per 1000 ending in divorce.
***
In the movie Revenge of the Nerds,
(1984) the nerds formed their own fra-
ternity called Lambda Lambda Lambda.
***
According to a career search website,
the biggest mistake a person can make
during a job interview is answer their
cellphone. Other blunders to avoid
during a job interview are arriving
late, dressing inappropriately and bit-
ing your nails.
***
The object of the 1981 video game
Frogger is to guide frogs safely
across the highway through trafc and
across a river full of alligators. The
game was originally going to be titled
Highway Crossing Frog.
***
Chinese philosophy says that all
things in the universe depend on the
interaction of opposing but comple-
mentary forces; yin and yang. Yin is
the passive, negative force, while
yang is the active, positive force.
***
Answer: Farrah wore a red bathing
suit in the poster. She starred as Jill
Munroe in the first season of
Charlies Angels (1976-1981). Prior
to show business, Fawcett was voted
most beautiful by her classmates at
WB Ray High School in Corpus
Christi, Texas.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
BRING BISON COLUMN LUXURY
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After the heat went out in the school, the
math class featured NUMB-BURRS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MAYFO
CHEBA
GINISD
TEBLOT
2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
Country-rock musician Paul Cotton (Poco) is 71. Actor-
director Bill Duke is 71. Singer Mitch Ryder is 69. Rock musi-
cian Jonathan Cain (Journey) is 64.The prime minister of
Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, is 60. Actor Greg Germann is
56. Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., is 56. Bandleader John McDaniel
is 53. Actress Jennifer Grant is 48. Rock musician Tim
Commerford (Audioslave) is 46. Singer Erykah Badu is 43.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Rico Wade (Society of Soul) is 42.
Olympic gold medal swimmer Jenny Thompson is 41.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Kyle Norman (Jagged Edge) is 39.
Actor Greg Rikaart is 37.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in rst place; Solid Gold No. 10, in second place;
and Gold Rush,No.1,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:40.59.
7 7 5
12 18 25 35 66 15
Mega number
Feb. 25 Mega Millions
2 3 13 14 54 4
Powerball
Feb. 22 Powerball
7 10 28 35 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 7 2 9
Daily Four
8 1 7
Daily three evening
9 22 29 32 39 23
Mega number
Feb. 22 Super Lotto Plus
3
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REDWOOD CITY
Burglary. A silver Lexus RX 400 was bro-
ken into on Redwood Shores Parkway before
8:26 p.m. Monday, Feb. 24.
Burglary. Ahouse and safe were burglarized
on Farm Hill Boulevard before 7:45 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 24.
Petty theft. Three men took two bottles of
liquor on El Camino Real before 5:18 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 24.
Identity theft. Apurse was taken and credit
cards within the purse were used to make
online purchases on Roosevelt Avenue before
9:31 a.m. Monday, Feb. 24.
Disturbance. A man was found defecating
under a bench on El Camino Real before 5:48
p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23.
Disturbance. Awoman with a baby strapped
on her back was jumping in and out of trafc
on Whipple Avenue and Veterans Boulevard
before 11:26 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 22.
Police reports
Palate cleanser
Metal pallets were taken from the rear of
a store on Broadway in Redwood City
before 12:02 a.m. Monday, Feb. 24.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The man who prosecutors accuse of
severely beating a bisexual acquaintance
with a bicycle U-lock faces up to ve years
in prison after pleading no contest Tuesday
to felony assault and inicting great bodily
injury.
Prosecutors had sought a six-year maxi-
mum for Santos Manuel Marquez-
Montiagudo, 37, but the court capped it
slightly less. He will be sentenced May 7.
Marquez-Montiagudo and another friend
met up with the 55-year-old victim July 20
at a San Mateo taqueria where the victim
shared his bisexuality. After the trio left the
business to drink else-
where, Marquez-
Montiagudo told the vic-
tim not to walk by him
because he didnt want
others to mistake him as
gay.
When the man refused
to leave, Marquez-
Montiagudo grabbed the
lock from his bike and
began beating his head
and body, according to
the District Attorneys Ofce. San Mateo
police found the badly injured man near the
700 block of Santa Inez Avenue and
Marquez-Montiagudo at home.
Prosecutors originally charged him with
committing a hate crime in the attack that
left the victim with a fractured skull, jaw,
orbital bone and rib. However, a judge
dropped the charge for lack of evidence at an
earlier hearing.
His defense also claimed previously that
while Marquez-Montiagudo did ght with
the man it was not based in hate of his sex-
uality and that he reacted to rst being
pushed. His attorney said all participants
were drunk and unclear about what exactly
did happen.
Marquez-Montiagudo remains in custody
on a $1 million bail pending sentencing.
Man facing five years for beating bisexual friend
Santos
Marquez-
Montiagudo
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The Bay Area is due to get some much-
needed rainfall Wednesday when the rst of
two coming storms is forecast to spread
across the region, a National Weather
Service forecaster said.
The rst storm, which is on track to hit
the Bay Area late Wednesday morning and
last into Thursday, could bring between a
half-inch to an inch of rain to communities
around the Bay Area, forecaster Matt Mehle
said.
Inland hills and coastal mountains could
see up to two inches of rain and a chance of
thunderstorms is predicted for the entire
region starting Wednesday afternoon.
After a brief respite of dry weather on
Thursday, a second and stronger system is
forecast to arrive on Friday morning and
last into early Saturday, Mehle said.
Strong winds are likely throughout the
day on Friday and moderate to heavy rainfall
could drop between a half-inch and two
inches of precipitation in various locations
around the Bay Area, Mehle said.
Though the weather service had not issued
any weather advisories or warnings as of
Tuesday morning, forecasters said downed
trees and areas of localized ooding are like-
ly to occur during the change in weather.
By Sunday, rainfall for most of the Bay
Area is likely to add up to two to three inch-
es, with pockets of up to ve inches in some
locations, Mehle said.
The downpour is not likely to change the
current drought conditions persisting in the
Bay Area and throughout California, accord-
ing to Mehle.
Rain, wind, chance of thunderstorms to hit Wednesday
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Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE
Thank you thank
you thank you.
This is what I hear
over and over, year
after year, from
families that we
serve. Either
verbally or in hand-written cards or letters
families say thank you: Thank for your
help; Thank you for all you have done to
make this process easier; Thank you for
making this final tribute to my mother one
which will be fondly remembered; Thank
you for your advice; Thank you for being
there for us at a time we needed you most;
Thank you for making it all easy for us;
Thank you for being a friend, etc. To hear
Thank you time and time again is a
confirmation for me that our Chapel of the
Highlands crew is doing their best to serve
families whove been through a death, in an
appropriate and professional manner, and
that we are doing the right thing in caring
for families during a difficult situation, in
turn making it more of a comfort for them.
Normally saying Youre welcome is
the correct response. Youre welcome, or
You are welcome, can be taken a number
of different ways. Generally it means you
are always a welcome guest. It can also be
taken as a blessing meaning you wish
wellness on the person who thanked you.
Wishing wellness or health to anyone is a
nice gesture. In recent years though we all
have witnessed the term Youre welcome
being substituted with Thank you back at
the person who is doing the thanking. This
is OK, but saying Youre welcome first
is taken as a hospitable and warm gesture.
Now that Thank you and Youre
welcome have been established, I would
like to say thank you back to the families we
serve: Thank you for supporting the Chapel
of the Highlands. Thank you for your
faithful patronage. Because of you we have
been able to continue with our high
standards and excellent level of service for
many years, since 1952. Thank you to those
families who weve helped so many times in
the past. Thank you to the new families
whove discovered that we offer them
respect and provide the dignified care that
their loved one deserves.
Your support, and the continued interest
from the community in our service, is what
keeps us going strong and available when
we are needed. Our costs have always been
considered fair, and the funds taken in for
our services are also very much appreciated.
Those Chapel of the Highlands funds along
with our support sifts back to the community
in different ways. Donations to local causes,
along with the donation of time through
membership in service organizations such as
Lions, I.C.F., Historical Society, Chamber
of Commerce, etc. is natural for us. Giving
back as a volunteer via these groups helps in
binding us with our neighbors, together
creating a better community for the future.
All in all there are many ways to say
Thank you. Doing so in a variety of ways
can create a circle of gratitude, in turn
making our community a better place.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Creating A Circle Of Gratitude
By Saying Thank You
Advertisement
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Awell-dressed man with an Italian accent
in a nice-looking dark SUV has approached
at least two people in San Mateo asking for
directions to the airport, if those he
approached spoke Italian and may have tried
to sell leather jackets, said San Mateo
police Sgt. Dave Norris.
Police received an email from a member of
the community who advised he was contact-
ed by a man claiming to work for a high-end
clothing designer and wanted to sell leather
jackets before departing on a ight to Italy,
Norris said. The community member said he
was approached near Third Avenue and El
Camino Real by the nicely dressed man who
offered what appeared to be a fake business
card identifying him as Mr. Giuseppe,
Norris said.
The community member didnt purchase
any clothing therefore no crime was actual-
ly committed, Norris said.
While he was off-duty and in plain clothes
about two weeks ago, Norris said he was
approached by a man matching the descrip-
tion of Mr. Giuseppe. He was near Hillsdale
Shopping Center when the man asked if he
spoke Italian and for directions to the air-
port, Norris said. However, the conversa-
tion ended when the man asked him what he
did for work and he replied he was a police
ofcer, Norris said.
At the time he didnt think it was suspi-
cious but, after receiving an email describ-
ing a similar situation, he now thinks it
could have been the same person, Norris
said.
It sounds similar, but he didnt try to per-
petrate any fraud on me so I wasnt certain it
was the same guy, Norris said. I think its
odd now that I know.
Similar encounters have been reported in
nearby cities but because it can be difcult
to prove a crime was committed in cases like
this, the public needs to be extra sensitive
to when they suspect fraud and contact the
police, Norris said.
If someone approaches [you] on the
street, a stranger, and offers [you] some-
thing that appears to be a really great deal,
[you] should follow that old adage, Norris
said. If it seems like its too good to be
true, it probably is.
Anyone with information regarding these
incidents should contact the San Mateo
Police Department at (650) 522-7700.
Italian jacket seller
may be scammer
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
ASan Mateo County resident who recent-
ly traveled abroad tested positive for
measles last week, according to local health
ofcials who are promoting vaccines for the
unimmunized.
While measles is highly infectious, it is
also a vaccine preventable disease, county
health ofcer Dr. Scott Morrow said in a pre-
pared statement. The recommended vaccine
schedule produces nearly 100 percent immu-
nity against measles, which is important
when there is an increase in the spread of
measles cases as we are seeing this year.
The patient is currently being treated and
the Health System issued advisories to all
health care providers suggested testing for
patients who have a fever and rash.
The county last reported a case of measles
in 2012. Statewide, 15 cases are conrmed
as of Feb. 21. The same time last year, there
were only two cases reported in California.
Nearly all recent measles cases in the
United States have been linked to interna-
tional travel and Dr. Catherine Sallenave,
the countys communicable disease con-
troller, said it will become more common as
the viral disease spreads in many countries.
Symptoms of the airborne disease begin
with a fever that lasts for a couple of days,
followed by a cough; runny nose; red,
watery eyes and rash. The rash typically
appears rst on the face, along the hairline,
and behind the ears and then affects the rest
of the body. Infected people are usually con-
tagious for four days before and four days
after their rash starts. Complications can
include diarrhea, ear infections, pneumonia
and even death. Infants, pregnant women
and people with comprised immune systems
are more susceptible to complications from
measles.
For immunization information see
www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/.
International travelers can visit
wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/contentVaccinations.
aspx for information about travel vaccines.
County reports first measles case
California lifers leaving
prison at record pace
SAN FRANCISCO Nearly 1,400 lifers in
Californias prisons have been released over
the past three years in a sharp turnaround in a
state where murderers and others sentenced to
life with the possibility of parole almost
never got out.
Since taking ofce three years ago, Gov.
Jerry Brown has afrmed 82 percent of parole
board decisions, resulting in a record number
of inmates with life sentences going free.
Browns predecessor, Arnold
Schwarzenegger, authorized the release of
557 lifers during his six-year term, sustain-
ing the board at a 27 percent clip. Before
that, Gov. Gray Davis over three years
approved the release of two.
This dramatic shift in releases under Brown
comes as the state grapples with court orders
to ease a decades-long prison crowding crisis
that has seen triple bunking, prison gyms
turned into dormitories and inmates shipped
out of state.
Crime victims and their advocates have
said the releases are an injustice to the vic-
tims and that the parolees could pose a danger
to the public. More than 80 percent of lifers
are in prison for murder, while the remaining
are mostly rapists and kidnappers.
NASA turns research
to California drought
FRESNO NASA scientists have begun
deploying satellites and other advanced tech-
nology to help California water ofcials
assess the states record drought and better
manage it, ofcials said Tuesday.
The California Department of Water
Resources has partnered with NASAto use the
space agencys satellite data and other air-
borne technology to better measure the snow-
pack, groundwater levels and predict storms.
It sounds like a cliche, but if they could put
a man on the moon, why cant we get better
seasonal forecasting? Jeanine Jones of the
states Department of Water Resources said in
an interview following the Sacramento
announcement of the partnership.
Now they will. NASA scientists said they
are also embarking on projects that use satel-
lite images to help more accurately measure
the number of elds farmers have chosen not
to plant and where land is sinking because of
excessive ground-water pumping.
Gov. Jerry Brown directed state ofcials to
form such partnerships as part of his drought
emergency declaration last month.
Couple strike $10
million gold-coin bonanza
LOS ANGELES A Northern California
couple out walking their dog on their proper-
ty stumbled across a modern-day bonanza:
$10 million in rare, mint-condition gold
coins buried in the shadow of an old tree.
Nearly all of the 1,427 coins, dating from
1847 to 1894, are in uncirculated, mint con-
dition, said David Hall, co-founder of
Professional Coin Grading Service of Santa
Ana, which recently authenticated them.
Although the face value of the gold pieces
only adds up to about $27,000, some of them
are so rare that coin experts say they could
fetch nearly $1 million apiece.
I dont like to say once-in-a-lifetime for
anything, but you dont get an opportunity
to handle this kind of material, a treasure like
this, ever, said veteran numismatist Don
Kagin, who is representing the nders. Its
like they found the pot of gold at the end of
the rainbow.
Convicted state lawmaker
takes indefinite leave
SACRAMENTO Astate senator convict-
ed of perjury and voter fraud is taking an
indenite leave of absence as he awaits sen-
tencing this spring.
Sen. Roderick Wright, a Democrat who rep-
resents a Los Angeles-area district, requested
the leave during a meeting Tuesday with
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg.
Steinberg, a fellow Democrat, said in a
statement that he accepted the request.
The senate leader had recommended letting
Wright remain in ofce until his sentencing.
That has been delayed until May.
Around the state
6
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Subway robbed in Belmont
Amasked gunman robbed a Subway sand-
wich shop in Belmont Monday and made off
with an undisclosed
amount of cash, accord-
ing to the Belmont
Police Department.
Around 8:45 p.m., a
man wearing a stocking
over his face entered the
shop on the 1600 block
of El Camino Real and
pointed a black semi-
automatic handgun at an employee. The sus-
pect stole cash then ed south on El Camino
Real, according to police.
The employee was the only person at the
shop and no one was injured, according to
police.
The suspect was caught on video wearing
a white Adidas jacket with a black stripe,
dark jeans and black gloves. He is thought
to be dark skinned, in his early 20s and
approximately 5 feet 8 inches tall with a
thin build, according to police.
Anyone with information should contact
the Belmont Police Department at (650)
595-7400 or its tip line at (650) 598-3000.
The burglary occurred less than a week
after another man was arrested for attempt-
ing to rob a Subway in Redwood City.
Thief attempts to rent luxury car
A parolee wanted on multiple criminal
charges was arrested Sunday after fraudulent-
ly attempting to rent a BMWfrom an airport
rental company, according to the San Mateo
County Sheriffs Ofce.
Corbin David McDevon, a 38-year-old
San Francisco resident, was near the San
Francisco International Airport when police
contacted him around 12:20 a.m., according
to the Sheriffs Ofce. McDevon refused to
reveal his true identity and was arrested for
burglary, identity theft and forgery, accord-
ing to the Sheriffs Ofce.
After being ngerprinted, McDevons true
identity was established and police deter-
mined he had two no-bail warrants for a
parole violation, auto theft, giving false
information to police and being in posses-
sion of stolen property, burglary tools and
drugs, according to the Sheriffs Ofce.
McDevon was also found to be in posses-
sion of personal information relating to at
least three separate crimes, one of which
was a vehicle burglary in San Francisco,
according to the Sheriffs Ofce.
McDevon was booked into county jail.
Office building fire forces evacuation
ABelmont ofce building air conditioner
caught re Monday afternoon forcing about
100 people to evacuate when the smoke
spread into the ventilation system, accord-
ing to the Belmont Fire Department.
An air conditioning system on the roof of
the four-story building at 1301 Shoreway
Road caught fire before 4:50 p.m. and
required the Belmont, San Mateo-Foster
City and Redwood City re departments to
respond, according to the Belmont Fire
Department. The fire was quickly extin-
guished but not before the air conditioner
pumped the smoke through the ventilation
ducts to a section of the building.
No one was injured but those inside the
building were evacuated and forced to wait
until reghters could extinguish the ames
and ventilate the smoke from the building,
according to the Belmont Fire Department.
Walmart scammer
targets South City woman
A South San Francisco woman was the
victim of a scam in which she received a let-
ter and a threatening phone call from a man
claiming to be a representative from
Walmart Mystery Shoppers, according to
the South San Francisco Police Department.
Around 11 a.m. Monday, Feb. 10, a letter
was delivered to the womans home contain-
ing a cashiers check and instructions for
her to cash the check and spend or keep
some of the money at a local Walmart,
according to police. The letter instructed her
to send the remainder of the money via
Western Union to another Mystery
Shopper. The woman did not respond and a
few days later was contacted over the phone
by a man with a heavy foreign accent,
according to police. The suspect demanded
she follow the instructions and threatened
the FBI would come to her home if she failed
to comply, according to police.
After researching the check, she discov-
ered it was fraudulent and contacted police
before incurring any loss. This is a common
scam in which a demanding suspect targets
elderly victims, according to police.
If anyone with information regarding the
case should call the South San Francisco
Police Department at (650) 877-8900.
Man beaten, robbed in
residential neighborhood
A man was beaten and robbed in a South
San Francisco neighborhood early Tuesday
morning, according to police.
Adelivery driver called 911 after spotting
a man down in the driveway of a home in the
300 block of South Maple Avenue at about 5
a.m., according to South San Francisco
police.
An unknown suspect or suspects assaulted
the victim, a 38-year-old South San
Francisco man, and stole his wallet and cell-
phone, police said.
His injuries were not considered life-
threatening, police said.
There was no immediate information
about the suspect, according to police.
Anyone who might have information
about the case is asked to call South San
Francisco police at (650) 877-8900 or an
anonymous tip line at (650) 952-2244.
San Mateo County and Code for
America launch SMC-Connect
San Mateo County Human Services
Agency and Code for America launched
SMC-Connect, a website that allows users
to nd social services near their location, to
obtain food, shelter, health care and other
essential services. The website is available
in various languages. It was created through
a year-long collaboration between the
agency and Code for America. This project
was funded by the county and the
Philanthropic Ventures Foundation.
The web application will supplement the
Librarys Community Information Program
directory, which is only printed once a year
in two languages.
The web address is smc-connect.org.
Asiana Airlines penalized over crash
LOS ANGELES In the rst penalty of
its kind, federal transportation ofcials on
Tuesday docked Asiana Airlines $500,000
for failing to promptly contact passengers
families and keep them informed about their
loved ones after a deadly crash last year at
San Francisco airport.
The U.S. Department of Transportation
said it took the South Korean airline ve
days to contact the families of all 291 pas-
sengers. In addition, a required crash hotline
was initially routed to an automated reserva-
tions line.
Never before has the department conclud-
ed that an airline broke U.S. laws requiring
prompt and generous assistance to the loved
ones of crash victims.
Three people died and dozens were injured
on July 6 when Asiana Flight 214 clipped a
seawall while landing.
The last thing families and passengers
should have to worry about at such a stress-
ful time is how to get information from
their carrier, U.S. Transportation Secretary
Anthony Foxx said in a prepared statement.
Many of the families live in South Korea
or China, meaning the airline was their
main source of information on the crash
half a world away.
In a statement emailed to the Associated
Press, Asiana spokeswoman Hyomin Lee
said, Asiana provided extensive support to
the passengers and their families following
the accident and will continue to do so.
Aconsent order the airline signed with the
department says Asiana will pay $400,000
in a ne and gets a $100,000 credit for
costs in sponsoring multiple industry-
wide conferences and training sessions in
2013, 2014 and 2015, to provide lessons
learned.
Local briefs
LOCAL 7
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STATE
GOVERNMENT
State Sen. Jerry
Hi l l , D- San
Mateo, was appoint-
ed to the California
C o a s t a l
Conservancy, the
state agency established to help preserve
and protect coastal resources, by Senate
President Pro Tem Darrel l Stei nberg.
Hill is now one of three senators and three
assemblymembers who provide legislative
oversight to the Conservancy and partici-
pate in its activities. The state Legislature
created the conservancy in 1976 to work as
an intermediary between local govern-
ments, citizens and the private sector to
improve, protect and enhance coastal
resources of the state, from Oregon to
Mexico.
COUNTY GOVERNMENT
The San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors appointed coastside resident
Zoe Kersteen-Tucker to the Pl anni ng
Commi s s i on representing the Third
Di st ri ct. She replaces Chri stopher
Ranken, of Pacica.
CITY GOVERNMENT
The city of South San Francisco will
vote at its Wednesday, Feb. 26 meeting
whether to approve a use permit, design
review, transportation demand management
plan, development agreement and mitigated
negative declaration to construct a mixed-
use project. The Centenni al Vi l l age
project would include 222,000 square feet of
commercial space, including a Safeway,
and 285 residential units on a 14.5-acre site
located at 180 El Camino Real.
Si l i con Valley Clean Water, former-
ly known as the South Bayside System
Authority, invites the public to learn
more about its replacement plan for an
aging wastewater pipeline that runs from
the San Carlos airport area to the treatment
facility in southeastern Redwood Shores.
Informational meetings will be held at the
administrative ofces, 1400 Radio Road,
Redwood Shores on the following dates and
with some offering tours of the wastewater
treatment plant. Wear closed-toed shoes.
Wednesday, March 5 at 3 p.m. (with option-
al tour) and 7 p.m.; Saturday, March 8 at 10
a.m. (with optional tour); and Wednesday
March 12 at 3pm (with optional tour) and 7
p.m.
The Burl i ngame Pl anni ng
Commi ssi on voted to approve an applica-
tion for construction of a new four-story,
10-unit residential condominium with
below-grade parking at 1433 Floribunda
Ave.
The commission sent another condomini-
um project, at 556 El Camino Real, to a
design review consultant. The building
would include 25 units.
Dorothy (June) Buckhout
Dorothy (June) Buckhout, 95, of San
Carlos, died Feb. 22, 2014, in Roseville.
A funeral mass will be
held at 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, Feb. 27 at St.
Charles Church in San
Carlos, with the Rev.
Lucas Chacha ofciating.
Burial will follow at
Skylawn Memorial
Memorial Park in San
Mateo. Arrangements are
by Crippen & Flynn Carlmont Chapel in
Belmont.
June was born in San Francisco to Otto
E. Stricker and Caroline D. Rittner on
June 12, 1918. She went to school at St.
Dominics elementary and St. Rose
Academy in San Francisco. She married
Vincent B. Buckhout on Sept. 18, 1943,
in Monterey. She graduated from
Dominican College in San Rafael. She
worked as a teacher at Hoover School in
Redwood City for 30 years. June i s pre-
ceded in death by husband Vi ncent .
June is survived by children, son William
J Buckhout (Linda) daughter Elizabeth A
May (Tom) and daughter Barbara C Stevens;
grandchildren Joe May, Jenna Greco, Lisa
Carr, Michael Fenyes, Bernadette Kelly,
John Fenyes, Rob Buckhout, Scott Parsons
and Matthew Sobers; 19 great-grandchil-
dren; two nieces and two nephews.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be
given to the Alzheimers Association.
Julie Ann Jaquias-Daniel
Julie Ann Jaquias-Daniel, born Aug. 31,
1967, died Feb. 22, 2014.
Julie was a loving mother, wife, daughter,
sister and friend and will be missed by all
who knew her. There will be a visitation 5
p.m. Friday, Feb. 28 at Crippen & Flynn
Woodside Chapel, 400 Woodside Road,
Redwood City and a memorial service 1 p.m.
Saturday, March 1 at Tapestry Church, 1305
Middleeld Road, Redwood City.
Obituaries
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Apediatric nurse who reportedly said she
couldnt take her job anymore and had to
have a drink before after going down an
embankment and colliding into a car of
people last summer pleaded no contest to
drunk driving.
In return for changing her plea to the
felony on Monday, Gloria Kiyoko
Pedruco, 56, faces up to 90 days in jail
when sentenced April 16 and the possibil-
ity of its reduction to a misdemeanor
halfway through successful probation.
Pedruco, of Pacifica, drove onto the
shoulder of northbound Interstate 280 near
Serramonte Boulevard and down the
embankment at approxi-
mately 6 p.m. July 5.
Her vehicle hit a car
waiting at a stop light,
leaving the five people
inside with bruises and
cuts.
Prosecutors say
Pedruco asked the vic-
tims who hit who and
added that she needed a
drink after a tough day. Pedrucos blood
alcohol level three hours after the colli-
sion was .18 and she had also ingested
Prozac and Xanex.
Pedruco is free from custody on $50,000
bail.
Nurse who blamed DUI
on job takes plea deal
Gloria Pedruco
LOCAL/STATE 8
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
marked to shrink unfunded liabilities.
During a mid-year budget update Tuesday
morning, County Manager John Maltbie
laid out a timeline for getting the bonds to
market and noted that the total size is pro-
jected at $215.4 million which includes the
roughly $17 million the county already paid
for the Redwood City land east of Highway
101, $165 million for the construction and
the rest for interest payments, the investor-
required reserve and the expense of legal,
nancing and underwriting.
The funds already spent on the land will be
repaid to the countys capital fund for later
use, Maltbie said.
But Pine questioned if the county should
borrow the entire amount for the jail,
including money already spent on the land,
through the bond process when there is
extra revenue coming into the county
through various tax streams. Instead, he
raised the possibility of using the countys
money to decrease the bond amount rather
than spending it to rein in retirement obli-
gations.
Maltbie said the choice ultimately falls in
supervisors hands but that in his opinion
pensions are the better choice to target.
We have this bucket of liabilities and
were either borrowing money for a new
facility or we have the unfunded liabilities
and the pensions, Maltbie said. So it real-
ly becomes which liability do you want to
shrink?
Last August, the Board of Supervisors
unanimously agreed to accelerate its paying
down of a near-billion dollar unfunded pen-
sion liability with a $50 million kickoff
payment followed by $90 million over the
following nine years. The payment plan,
using a combination of department reserves
and excess property taxes known as
Educational Revenue Augmentation Funds,
will drop the countys annual required con-
tribution by $13 million by 2023-24 and
approximately $16 million by scal year
2041-42.
Pine and Supervisor Adrienne Tissier
agreed to meet with Maltbie ahead of the
boards March meeting to approve the jail
nancing structure. Currently, the tentative
date for pricing the bonds is April 2 with
them going on sale April 23.
The new jail is scheduled to open in 2015
with 576 beds for both men and women on
three stories and 40 feet of unnished space
known as a warm shell which can be devel-
oped in the future if the need arises. Future
buildout can be up to 832 beds.
The jail nancing was just one piece of
Maltbies midyear budget update in which
he painted a pretty rosy picture of the coun-
tys nances.
Im pleased to report this morning that
the countys nancial condition continues
to improve as the economy continues to
recover, Maltbie said.
Maltbie pointed to the number of proper-
ties restored or in the process of being
restored to full value, a drop in the number
of assessment appeals and seven- to eight-
year maintenance of reserves at 20 percent
or around $200 million.
Its an exceedingly strong position for a
county to be in, Maltbie said.
Revenue projections for the next five
years have moved from conservative to the
conservative-moderate range, with overall
growth through 2019 estimated at 2.7 per-
cent to 3.1 percent. Property tax is project-
ed to grow about 3.5 percent annually and
the Measure Asales tax initially estimat-
ed at $68 million annually but now updated
to $71 million will see 3 percent to 4
percent increases over the next ve years,
he said.
By Tom Verdin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO More than three
months after it opened for business,
Californias online health insurance mar-
ketplace had what federal ofcials described
as a potential security aw in its computer
system and one that had already been dis-
closed publicly.
The concern is noted in a Jan. 10 email
between ofcials with the federal Centers
for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the
agency that oversaw development of the
online exchanges.
CMS is now aware of a vulnerability
with the CA exchange that has not been
xed and a reference to the weakness is
posted in the public domain, said the mes-
sage sent last month from Tom
Schankweiler, the agencys marketplace
information security ofcer.
The agency said it contacted Covered
California, as the state marketplace is
called, and learned that the state was already
aware of the issue and was addressing it.
There is no indication that any consumer
information has been compromised.
That simply has not happened, said
Dana Howard, a spokesman for Covered
California.
The exchanges computer system is mon-
itored around the clock, and any security
concerns are addressed as soon as they are
spotted, Howard said. He described any
problems encountered to date as computer
processing errors that have been xed.
We certainly dont have a security vul-
nerability, and we dont have anything
thats publicly posted, Howard said
Tuesday.
The email from the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services ofcial was contained
in a batch of documents provided to
Washington, D.C., bureau of the Associated
Press. They show that more than two-thirds
of the states tapping into federal computers
to verify personal information were consid-
ered high risk for security problems
immediately before or shortly after the Oct.
1 launch of the health insurance market-
places.
Continued from page 1
JAIL
Director Milissa Carey has chosen an
excellent cast of community members and
students. Led by Cotugno as Seymour,
Walters as Audrey and Perez as Mr. Mushnik,
every member of the large cast does well in
this energetic production.
Musical values are strong, thanks to
musical director Dolores Duran-Cefalu, who
leads four other musicians from the key-
board.
Well executed choreography is by Amanda
Folena. The serviceable set is by Yusuke Soi
with lighting by Michael Rooney and cos-
tumes by Margaret Toomey.
Little Shop of Horrors has been done on
the Peninsula before. For example,
TheatreWorks staged it in 1986, and
Broadway By the Bay and (the now defunct)
American Musical Theatre of San Jose both
offered it in 2008.
Still, it never gets old because its so
much fun, especially when done as well as
this production by FMT.
It will continue in the Lohman Theatre on
the Foothill College campus, 12345 El
Monte Road, Los Altos Hills, through
March 9. For tickets and information call
(650) 949-7360 or visit www.foothillmusi-
cals.com.
Continued from page 1
PLAY
California insurance exchange had vulnerability
OPINION 9
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The reason for
the water shortage
Editor,
There is only one answer to this
water shortage and it is not desalina-
tion. If you havent noticed lately, I
suggest you get out and check out
your highways and streets. You will
nd them overcrowded and overbuilt.
We caused, not Mother Nature, this
drought. The Bay Area can only sup-
port so many people and we passed
that amount a long time ago.
Our city fathers dont seem to know
when to stop building. It seems that
they are more interested in making
money by developing than taking
care of the people that live here.
Heres what cities do: they build big-
ger highways to support the people
who are here, then they add more
developments because they say the
highways are bigger. Its like adding
a bedroom to your two-bedroom
house then having six more kids.
If we start taking water from the
ocean, well simply say we have more
water, so lets build so more. Do the
math. Same with the water, except
now they are saying we all must cut
back on our water usage because we
are short of that valued commodity. In
the same breath that they say that,
they also are approving more devel-
opment. Have we all lost our common
sense?
If you live in the Bay Area and love
it here, its time to let your cities
know that enough is enough. Keep
this up and we will be just like Los
Angeles without the water.
Bob Nice
Redwood City
The water shortage blame game
Editor,
Numerous letters and Op-Ed pieces
have been written concerning this
longstanding problem. The city folks
think the farmers are using too much
water, which should be for them. The
ecology-minded are against dams. The
anti-nuclear folks are against desalin-
ization. The delta smelt lovers are
against using existing water for agri-
culture.
Our government bureaucrats believe
low-ow toilets and shorter showers
are the answer. The federal govern-
ment is promising money. I am not
sure what for, money cant buy water.
The only solution is developing water
sources. There are three sources: build-
ing new dams, using Sacramento
River water or desalinization. The
population of California grows at a
rate of 4.4 million per decade. The
problem is not going away.
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Water and energy
Editor,
California agriculture consumes
much more water than does the popu-
lation. Israel puries 80 percent of its
waste water, and uses it for agriculture.
Israel invented drip irrigation, which
it has advanced to wetness sensors on
the emitters. Israel has developed new
technology for desalination, and has
ve desalination plants in operation,
with a total population of only about
8 million. Israel has an extensive sys-
tem of reservoirs for water storage.
Israel has developed varieties of veg-
etables and fruit that need less water,
and grow them in hot-houses in the
desert. With little rainfall, Israel is
developing an excess of water, for
itself, and to sell to Gaza, Jordan and
other neighboring countries.
Israel has new innovations in bat-
teries for electric automobiles. It
quickly brought its natural gas discov-
eries into production. It has innova-
tive advances in wind and solar ener-
gy.
Israel is a leader in water and energy
programs. California, and the whole
world, needs to learn from Israel.
Norman G. Licht
San Carlos
Missing the point
Editor,
Letter writer Matt Grocott complete-
ly misses the point, as most believ-
ers do, whether or not the ood
occurred isnt the issue (Evidence
supports scriptures in the Feb. 24
edition of the Daily Journal).
The Bible claims it was an event
caused by, and predicted by, God as a
form of punishment that is the
point of contention. Those of us who
are not believers dont discount the
reality of natural disasters, we just do
not accept that they are purposely
used by some magic being. It is simi-
lar to the school bus driver in
Oklahoma asking why God let the tor-
nado strike her bus and injure the chil-
dren. The simple, and obvious reality
is God had nothing to do with it.
Mike Slavens
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
S
an Mateo County ofcials are
exploring the idea of creating
a mental health center that
would be an alternative to jail or the
hospital when it comes to individuals
in the midst of a signicant mental
health crisis.
Too often, an individual dealing
with such a crisis is in the hands of
friends or families that do not want to
call the police or send their loved one
to a hospital for treatment. Even
worse, at times there are instances
when the person is in such a state that
police are contending with a poten-
tially violent situation. Sometimes
that potential manifests itself into
reality and the worst-case scenario
occurs an injury or even death.
So how do we as a community con-
tend with such situations? Police have
ongoing training in mental health
crisis management but there can be an
alternative that could prevent the situ-
ation ever evolving to the point when
police are called.
And thats why such a center is an
idea whose time has come. Mental
illness is a very real situation that
can become a crisis if not properly
managed. As evidenced by our crim-
inal justice system, many of those
arrested for a variety of crimes have
issues with mental health. The
capability of a respite center for
those contending with a crisis and
who are not currently considered a
harm to themselves or others is a
tremendous idea that has not had the
needed funding. Until now.
With the assistance of a countywide
half-cent sales tax increase passed by
voters in November 2012, there is up
to $2 million to purchase a property
and $400,000 to renovate as needed.
Now, the question becomes where
such a facility will be. Afacility like
this is always great in theory, but not
so much when it is being proposed in
a neighborhood. However, proper out-
reach and due diligence in nding a
location may make it more palatable
to those who are nearby. That is
always a challenge, but such a facility
is denitely needed. After all, provid-
ing a real option for those contending
with a mental health crisis before it
reaches a dangerous level is some-
thing for which our community
should always strive.
Mental health center an idea whose time has come Our nanny state?
I
f soft drinks were occasional treats, no nutri-
tionist would be the slightest bit concerned
about them. But they are produced and con-
sumed in vast quantities. Soft drinks have replaced milk in
the diets of many children as well as adults. Marian
Nestle, Food Politics.
Orange County is where I
grew up a conservative
bastion if there ever was
one. And it seems it still is
if we judge by the Other
Voices item in the Feb. 22
Daily Journal from the
Orange County Register
titled: Does state need to
warn you about soda? Its
about Senate Bill 1000 pro-
posed by state Sen.
William Monning, D-
Carmel, that would require
labels on soft drinks that
warn of their health consequences. But, according to the
piece, we must keep big government out of our lives no
matter how the food industry (specically the soft drink
industry) may be having its way with us.
Concerned people have been trying to do something
about the overconsumption of those anti-nutritious drinks
that ply so many bodies with sweeteners (usually high
fructose corn syrup), caffeine and who knows what other
additives detrimental to health (Dont forget the secret
ingredients). These products not only play havoc with the
health of those who consume them (especially children
and teens), they are a perfect example of how much certain
facets of our food industry manipulate the Food and Drug
Administration. After all, as Michael Pollan wrote in
Food Rules: The more processed a food, the more prof-
itable it becomes. The health care industry makes more
money treating chronic diseases ... than preventing
them.
The Register piece is a typical conservative posture.
Those who try to help improve the health of the populace
are berated for proffering a simple label that warns of the
products potential for harm. They believe we must not
interfere with anyones free choice even if theyre igno-
rant of what allowing their children to drink the stuff can
do to their health. No, we must sacrice the future health
of our populace to enrich corporate interests. Its the
American Way!
We need to remember what Ms. Nestle also wrote: For
the most part, food company strategies are standard eco-
nomic practices and are legal. Whether they are ethical or
promote the health of the public is quite another matter.
The ways in which food industry practices distort what
Americans are told about nutrition and compromise
food choices raises serious issues that are worth con-
sideration by anyone concerned about nutrition and
health.
Obviously, the writers of the piece believe its OK for
the industry to produce products that contribute to (if not
cause) various chronic illnesses. Apparently they dont
believe in education, either, because if someone were to
take the labels seriously, it might interfere with free enter-
prise one of the gods they worship. So how do con-
sumers evaluate their food choices? Since those who are
most in need of learning about nutrition are not likely to
read anything educational, how is the information sup-
posed to get to them? Oh, I forgot, the piece tells us: the
risks associated with ingesting too much sugar are well
known without political prodding.
We are also informed that studies show that only 6 per-
cent of the average Americans diet comes from soda.
Deliberately contrived to deceive! What does average
American mean? There are those (especially teens) who
drink large amounts of empty-calorie soft drinks regular-
l y. Some of us dont drink them at all. The statistics
reported in Michael Moss very interesting book, Salt,
sugar and fat tell it like it is. He informs us that in 2011,
we in the United States consumed 32 gallons per person.
Is it a coincidence that we in this country consume by far
the most soft drinks and also have the greatest problem
with obesity compared to other countries?
So should we all stand by while our food industry has its
way with us in spite of the increasing ill health and med-
ical bills that may result? Should we put up with a food
industry that will get away with whatever it can to maxi-
mize prots? Shouldnt we try to educate the naive,
gullible and uninformed who are at particular risk of
resulting health problems? If the labeling process con-
vinces even a few people to cut back on soda consumption
and to refrain from giving soft drinks to their children,
isnt it worth it?
As Michael Pollan wrote about diabetes in In Defense
of Food: Apparently it is easier, or at least a lot more
protable, to change a disease of civilization into a
lifestyle than it is to change the way that civilization
eats.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,179.66 -27.48 10-Yr Bond 2.70 -0.05
Nasdaq 4,287.59 -5.38 Oil (per barrel) 102.02
S&P 500 1,845.12 -2.49 Gold 1,340.60
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK Stocks were unable to
nd any momentum on Tuesday.
The market drifted between gains
and losses throughout the day, then
headed steadily lower in the last hour
of trading. Investors found some sol-
ace in strong results from Home
Depot and Macys. The enthusiasm
was not enough, however, to offset an
unexpectedly steep decline in con-
sumer confidence this month, due
largely to bitter cold weather and win-
ter storms that affected much of the
country.
The weather is having an impact on
everything, from homes, vehicles to
retail sales, but fortunately we expect
that pent-up demand to return later this
year, said Joseph Tanious, a global
market strategist at J.P. Morgan Funds.
The Dow Jones industrial average
lost 27.48 points, or 0.2 percent, to
16,179.66. The Standard & Poors 500
index fell 2.49 points, or 0.1 percent,
to 1,845.12 and the Nasdaq composite
fell 5.38 points, or 0.1 percent, to
4,287.59.
Even the retailers, who have a ten-
dency to blame the weather for poor
results, had a valid point this time
around.
Macys reported an 11 percent rise in
fourth-quarter income that handedly
beat analysts expectations, but sales
came up short due to the weather. The
company said that at one time in
January, 30 percent of its stores were
closed because of inclement weather.
Home Depot had a similar story. The
nations largest home improvement
retailer said prots fell 1 percent from a
year ago, hampered by bad winter con-
ditions.
We dont like to use weather as an
excuse but we think we probably lost
$100 million in the month of January,
Home Depots chief nancial ofcer,
Carol Tome, said in a conference call
with investors. Atlanta was frozen,
for example. It was tough here.
Investors were able to forgive
Macys and Home Depot for missing
analysts sales expectations. Macys
rose $3.19, or 6 percent, to $56.25 and
Home Depot closed up $3.11, or 4 per-
cent, to $80.98.
Investors were less forgiving about a
weak consumer condence report.
The Conference Boards index of
consumer condence fell to 78.1 in
February from 80.7 the month before.
That was below the 80.1 level econo-
mists polled by FactSet were expect-
ing. The report is a closely watched
indicator of how likely consumers are
to spend money and keep the economy
moving forward.
The condence slump was the latest
sign in the last several weeks that the
recent bout of cold weather has slowed
the economy. The regions that had the
biggest declines in condence were in
the middle of the storm earlier in this
month that brought snow from Atlanta
to Boston.
Stocks end lower after an up-and-down day
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Vitamin Shoppe Inc., up $3.36 to $45.33
The retailer topped Wall Street expectations for prot and revenue during the
fourth quarter and its sales at stores open at least a year grew.
Ofce Depot Inc., down 47 cents to $4.88
Losses widened as the ofce supply retailer continues to integrate OfceMax, an
acquisition it completed in November.
Macys Inc., up $3.19 to $56.25
Fourth-quarter prot rose11percent asthedepartment storewrestledwithterrible
winter weather in much of the country.
Tenet Healthcare Corp., down $4.40 to $43.93
The hospital operator posted a loss in the fourth quarter as it took on more debt
because of an acquisition and a stock repurchase.
LinkedIn Corp., up $10.25 to $209.84
The professional networking service is launching a Chinese-language website for
the worlds most populous Internet market.
Nasdaq
Zulily Inc., up $15.57 to $58.41
Revenue doubled over the past three months at the newly public e-commerce
clothing company that markets to mothers and children.
Tesla Motors Inc., up $30.35 to $248
The electric car companys Model S sedan is Consumer Reports top pick in this
yearsautomotiverankings.MorganStanleyjacksitspricetarget onthestockto$320
from $153.
InterMune Inc., up $23.84 to $37.80
A drug to treat a fatal lung disease met the pharmaceutical companys goals in a
study, which may lead to market approval from regulators.
Big movers
Exchange disappearance
spells trouble for bitcoin
By Raphael Satter and Yuriko Nagano
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO The sudden disappearance of one of the largest
bitcoin exchanges only adds to the mystery and mistrust
surrounding the virtual currency, which was just beginning
to gain legitimacy beyond the technology enthusiasts and
adventurous investors who created it.
Prominent bitcoin supporters said the apparent collapse
of the Tokyo-based Mt. Gox exchange was an isolated case
of mismanagement that will weed out bad actors. But the
setback raised serious questions about bitcoins tenuous sta-
tus and even more tenuous future. At least one supporter said
the blow could be fatal to bitcoins quest for acceptance by
the public.
A coalition of virtual currency companies said Mt. Gox
went under after secretly racking up catastrophic losses. The
exchange had imposed a ban on withdrawals earlier this
month.
By Tuesday, its website returned only a blank page. The
collapse followed the resignation Sunday of CEO Mark
Karpeles from the board of the Bitcoin Foundation, a group
seeking wider use of the exotic currency.
Mt. Goxs origins are rooted in fantasy instead of nance.
The service originally specialized in trading colorful cards
featuring mythical wizards and derives its name from a
game. The initials stand for, Magic: The Gathering Online
Exchange.
Consumer Reports names Tesla Model S its top pick
DETROIT The Tesla Model S electric sedan is Consumer
Reports top pick in this years automotive rankings.
The magazine cited the Model Ss sporty performance and
technological innovations, including its 225-mile range.
But it acknowledged that the car is expensive. Consumer
Reports paid $89,650 for the Model S it tested.
For less than a third of that price, the Toyota Prius hybrid
got the nod as Consumer Reports top green car. The maga-
zine also cited strong fuel economy in naming the Honda
Accord as the top midsize car and the BMW328i as the best
sports sedan.
The rankings, now in their 18th year, pick Consumer
Reports favorites among the 260 vehicles its team has
recently tested.
California gas tax drops but pump price may not
CULVER CITY The state Board of Equalization voted
Tuesday to reduce a gasoline tax by 3.5 cents per gallon
but that doesnt mean consumers will see a dip at the pump.
The board approved lowering the excise tax rate on non-
diesel fuel from 39.5 cents to 36 cents for the scal year that
begins on July 1, just as the summer driving season kicks in.
Gasoline suppliers pay the tax and arent required to pass
on the reduction to consumers.
Business briefs
<<< Page 16, Giants name Madison
Bumgarner its Opening Day starter
BACK IN THE SQUAT: AS CATCHER JOHN JASO WILL BE BACK BEHIND THE PLATE FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE HIS CONCUSSION > PAGE 12
Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
If it was a boxing match, the referee would
have stopped it.
But since the Pacic Collegiate-Sacred
Heart Prep girls soccer game was a Central
Coast Section Division III rst-round game,
the entire 80 minutes had to be played.
It was evident after only a few minutes
that the Gators were the dominant side. SHP
scored twice in the opening 10 minutes and
ve times in the opening 14 minutes on its
way to a lopsided 7-0 win.
Thats what CCS is all about, said SHP
coach Ramiro Arrendondo. You face teams
you dont know much about.
The sixth-seeded Gators will face a much
stiffer test when they take on No. 3 seed
Burlingame in a quarternal match at a site
and time to be determined Saturday.
It was evident Tuesday Pacic Collegiate
(8-5-4 overall), a team from the Santa Cruz
area, was overmatched. It took less than two
minutes for Sacred Heart Prep (17-2-2) to
strike as Olivia Athens threaded a perfect
pass between a pair of Puma defenders to a
streaking Alex Boudillon, who carried the
ball inside the 6-yard goal box before ham-
mering home the Gators rst shot of the
afternoon.
It was the rst of 15 rst-half shots for
SHP, with 11 being on frame. The Gators
nished the game by outshooting the Pumas
26-1.
After misring on another few good scor-
ing chances, the Gators made it 2-0 at the
10-minute mark. This time, it was Athens
on the receiving end of a Tierna Davis pass,
burying her shot from 10 yards away.
Athens picked up her second goal a
minute later for a 3-0 SHP lead.
The rst ve, 10 minutes, the girls came
out with a lot of intensity, Arrendondo
said.
And the Gators still werent done. In the
Gators cruise in CCS soccer opener
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
At 6-5, Sequoia boys basketball player
Chris Bene has the size to be a center. But
on the Cherokees roster, he is listed as a
guard/forward.
Bene used all his skills Tuesday night to
help lead the 11th-seed Cherokees to a 67-
52 win over unseeded Monta Vista-
Cupertino in a first-round game of the
Central Coast Section Division I tourna-
ment Tuesday night in Redwood City.
Hopefully we make a run like last year,
Bene said, referring to the Cherokees
advancing to the Division I quarternals
last season.
As it stands, Sequoia will travel to No. 6
Palo Alto in a second-round Thursday night
at 7.
Bene lled up the stat sheet for Sequoia
(12-7), scoring a game-high 20 points,
pulling down 13 boards and blocking four
Matador shots. He also threw down two
massive dunks including one in the
fourth quarter when he took an inbounds
pass, raced up the right sideline, cut into the
lane and off of one foot, rammed it home.
Bene was far from a one-man show, how-
ever. DJ Houston scored 10 points, all in
the second half, while Jarrett Crowell added
nine and Brady Stubbleeld chipped in with
seven.
The Cherokees came out ying to start the
game, scoring 22 points in the rst quarter.
All the momentum on the offensive end,
however, was tempered by the fact they
committed six fouls in the opening eight
minutes and Monta Vista (11-14) was shoot-
ing 1-and-1 nine seconds into the second
quarter.
The Matadors managed to hit only 11
shots from the oor all game long, but their
free-throw shooting kept them in the game.
Monta Vista attempted 33 foul shots, mak-
ing 27 of them.
The ow (of the game) was up and down,
said Sequoia coach Fine Lauese. Wed do
something good on the offense end and then
commit a foul on the other end.
Monta Vista center Ramana Keerthi was
the main beneciary of all the Sequoia fouls
as he was 13 for 17 from the stripe
Sequoia tops Matadors
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It appears the Hillsdale girls basketball
team is saving its most complete brand of
basketball for when it matters most play-
off time.
The Knights cleared their bench Tuesday
in what was a complete drubbing of Soledad
High School 66-27 during the opening
round of the Central Coast Section Division
III tournament.
An emphasis on pressure defense coupled
with arguably its cleanest execution on
offense this season translated to 12 different
Knights finding the scoresheet. In all,
Hillsdale shot close to 45 percent on the
night while overwhelming Soledad to the
tune of 24 turnovers.
We just brought energy, said Hillsdale
head coach Megan Hankins. If we dont
bring energy, the games are close. But no
one can match our intensity when were
ready to play. Im really proud of the girls.
We had a tough one against South City (dur-
ing the PAL tournament) and I think they
really turned it around and showed them-
selves what theyre really made of. They
wanted to make the most of the CCS oppor-
tunity. And here we are, going to the second
round.
We played together, said Hillsdale soph-
omore guard Emily Nepomuceno. And we
had the same energy that we started with all
the way until the end. Thats what motivates
us. We just came out wanting it and we
played our hearts out today. We really want-
ed to make to the next level.
For that, Hillsdale stepped on the acceler-
ator from the opening tip and pretty much
blitzed Soledad out of the gym. A19-point
rst quarter, highlighted by Kara Ronbergs
six points, was the quick start Hillsdale
needed. From there, the result was never
really in question. The Knights held Soledad
to just ve points in the second quarter
while Nepomuceno and Marissa Otonari
paced Hillsdale with ve points a piece in
that second frame. The Knights led 33-16 at
recess.
I think we were getting what we wanted
out of our offense, Hankins said. I think
we look great going forward.
Knights energy
leads to easy win
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Sequoias Chris Bene goes up for a dunk during the Cherokees67-52 win over Monta Vista in
the rst round of the CCS Division I tournament Tuesday night in Redwood City.
By Pete Iacobelli
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBIA, S.C. Marcus Lattimore
feels close to 100 percent and is counting
down the days until he can run free and easy
for the San Francisco 49ers.
The former South Carolina tailback is
back in his home state speaking to church
groups and running youth clinics and
camps. And through it all, hes got April
21st circled in red
thats when the 49ers
open workouts and
Lattimore has the green
light to run as he did in
2012 before the second of
two devastating knee
injuries during college.
The left knee, it feels
like nothing ever hap-
pened, Lattimore told
The Associated Press by phone. The right
knee, it feels great. Both feel balanced. Ive
got my speed and I rarely get any soreness
after workouts.
For Lattimore, thats major progress after
facing questions following his injuries
while at South Carolina. He was one of the
Southeastern Conferences rushing leaders
in 2011 when he tore ligaments in his right
knee in a game at Mississippi State and
missed the Gamecocks nal six games.
After surgery and a furious rehab regimen
and saw him return to the practice eld a
month ahead of schedule, Lattimore was
ready for his junior season. That ended in
October against Tennessee when he got hit
on his left knee, again needing surgery to
repair ligament damage.
Lattimore again worked to rehab, not
only to get back on the eld but to prove to
Niners RB Marcus Lattimore ready to run
Marcus
Lattimore See 49ERS, Page 14
See GATORS, Page 16
See KNIGHTS, Page 14 See SEQUOIA, Page 13
SPORTS 12
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXAMINATIONS
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BURLINGAME
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX Oakland Athletics catcher
John Jaso will take his place behind home
plate in a game for the rst time since suf-
fering a concussion when he was struck by a
foul tip on July 24.
Jaso was given the starting nod for the
spring training opener in Scottsdale on
Wednesday, a move As manager Bob
Melvin hopes will put Jaso at ease quickly.
Melvin said Jaso will play four or ve
innings.
Well see what he does right off the bat,
Melvin said Tuesday.
Jaso, who said hes treating it like any
other game, feels condent hell be ne.
Im just excited to get back there, get in
a game and call some pitches, Jaso said.
The only thing hes changed is his mask,
returning to the heavier steel frame designed
to withstand more force than the titanium
mask he wore the past few years.
When I nally get involved, I wont be
thinking about what happens if I get hit by
another foul tip, Jaso said. I have to go
out and do it and Im going to go there with-
out thinking about what happened; like it
never happened.
Jaso, the As opening day catcher last sea-
son, hit a home run in the same game in
which he was injured. He batted .271 with
21 RBIs before the concussion and was part
of a successful platoon with Derek Norris.
The concussion affected his vision,
including his depth perception. He said his
head nally cleared up in October, during
the postseason.
Jaso restarted baseball activity in
Arizona, serving as a designated hitter and
catching bullpen sessions for Fernando
Rodriguez, who missed last year after under-
going Tommy John surgery.
Its been a prolonged process, Jaso
said. It was good to rest and now its good
to get into a game.
NOTES: Melvin said he was dizzy after
attending a meeting to discuss the latest
replay regulations and the updated home
plate collision rule. Replays were exten-
sively discussed. There are reviewable
plays and non-reviewable plays and a lot of
both, Melvin said. They did a good job of
explaining things and the reasons for it. It
was a long meeting and rightly so. There
were things I certainly havent thought of
before. Replays will be available at As tel-
evised games this spring. ... Melvin on INF
Nick Punto, who will start at SS in the As
spring opener Wednesday: He ts in the
clubhouse like hes been around for a while.
Hes fundamentally sound and very focused.
Hes an easy guy to manage.
As Jaso to catch for first time since concussion
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VANCOUVER, British Columbia David
Backes went to Sochi hoping to bring home
a gold medal with the U.S. hockey team.
Instead, the St. Louis Blues captain brought
back a couple of stray puppies.
Backes and his wife, Kelly, rescued the
dogs from the streets of the Olympic city
with members of the Canadian teams
entourage. Now in quarantine in St. Louis,
the dogs will eventually be given to good
homes.
Were just trying to widen our scope to
help animals across the (U.S.) and across the
world, and doing what we can, Backes said
Tuesday, a day before the Blues faced the
Vancouver Canucks in the teams rst game
after the Olympic break.
Backes said he and his wife did not origi-
nally intend to bring any animals back. They
were hoping to create awareness about shel-
ters that have been set up in Sochi to help
hundreds of stray dogs that received interna-
tional media attention.
She doesnt take no very lightly, he
said. So when she saw those two pups and a
few more, she said weve gotta do something
to get these out of here and tell their story
and broaden the awareness of some of the
mistreatment of animals and just the dif-
ference in (how) they treat their companion
animals and we treat ours.
Backes and his wife, who have four rescue
dogs and two rescue cats in their home and set
up their own foundation, Athletes for
Animals, last November, received helped
from Canadian winger Jeff Carters girl-
friend, Megan Keffer, and defenseman Drew
Doughtys girlfriend, Nicole Arruda, and oth-
ers. The 3- to- 4-month-old pups, named
Sochi Junior and Sochi Jake, were brought
back to the U.S. on an Air Atlas charter to
Newark and another ight to St. Louis.
They fought for their lives every day on
the street and now theyre laying on our laps
in ights across the Atlantic, Backes said.
Approval for their U.S. trip was only
granted Saturday when there were tears of
joy in Backes group. The pups slept in carri-
ers on the Sochi-Newark leg and then were
taken out on the Newark-St. Louis leg.
Blues Backes brings back stray dogs from Sochi
SPORTS 13
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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We found a home-like
a[ oroa(c ,ovIol
including 12 of 15 in the rst half as he n-
ished with 18 rst-half points.
In the rst quarter, Keerthi scored 12 of
the Matadors 14 points, with eight of those
coming from the free-throw line.
In the second half, however, Keerthi was
held to just 1 of 2 from the line as he n-
ished the game with 19 points.
I think we did a good job being phys-
ical with him (in the second half),Lauese
said. We dropped to our (2-3) zone and were
able to control the tempo.
The tempo was breakneck in the rst quar-
ter as the Cherokees raced out to a 22-14
lead, connecting on 9 of 15 shots from the
oor.
They came back to earth in the second
quarter, however. After starting the second
period with a 10-2 run to take a 32-16 lead
their biggest of the game they then
went through a three-minute drought.
Monta Vista outscored Sequoia 9-3 during
that stretch and when Aditya Raju drained a
3-pointer, the Matadors trailed by 10 going
into halftime, 37-27.
In the third quarter, Bene who was vir-
tually unstoppable when he had the ball in
the rst two quarters all but disappeared.
He stopped getting touches and the
Cherokees struggled to put the ball in the
bucket. Sequoia was outscored 15-9 with the
Matadors going the nal 4:50 of the quarter
on a 13-2 run to cut its decit to 46-42
going into the fourth quarter.
Some quarters I take breaks, Bene said,
admitting he is still getting used to the fact
of being on the oor almost the entire
game.
Even though he wasnt getting touches,
he was directing teammates on where to be
and where to run the offense.
One of the things Im not very good at is
leadership. Ive been working on it, Bene
said.
In the fourth quarter, however, both Bene
and the Sequoia offense ramped back up and
the Cherokees nished on a roll, scoring 21
points and pulling away from Monta Vista.
Sequoia opened the nal period with a 13-
2 run. Houston knocked down a jumper to
push the Cherokees lead back to six, 48-42,
and Crowell followed with a fall away
jumper. Houston then converted a three-
point play before Bene took over.
He missed his rst shot of the quarter but
grabbed the rebound and put it back in to
push the Sequoia lead to 55-42 with 5:13
left. He then came back with a reverse layup
for a 57-42 advantage and following a pair
of Monta Vista free throws, Bene brought
the house down with his coast-to-coast ush
to put the Cherokees up 15 with 3:15 to
play.
Its a good team win for us, Lauese said.
In Division III action, No. 11 Terra Nova,
No. 10 South City, No. 12 San Mateo and
No. 9 El Camino all advanced to the second
round Thursday. Oceana saw its season come
to an end with a 76-52 loss to No. 12
Gonzales in the Division IV tournament.
Continued from page 11
SEQUOIA
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK New York Knicks point guard
Raymond Felton was arraigned on two felony
weapons possession charges in Manhattan
Criminal Court on Tuesday, following his early
morning arrest after a lawyer for his wife turned
in a loaded semi-automatic handgun allegedly
belonging to the basketball star to a police
precinct, claiming she no longer wanted it in
their home, authorities said.
Wearing a black sweatshirt with a peace sign
and other symbols on it, Felton was seemingly
upbeat as he appeared before Judge Diana Boyar,
nodding afrmatively after he was ordered to
stay away from his wife, Ariane Raymondo-
Felton. He did not enter a plea, which is com-
mon for this stage in the case.
Mr. Felton has no interest in having con-
tact with her, one of his lawyers, James
Walden, told the judge. Court records show she
led for divorce from Felton last week.
Felton was released on $25,000 bail and was
ushered into a black SUVfollowing his arraign-
ment. Under the terms of his bond, Felton can
travel to games, bail bondsman Ira Judelson
said.
Prosecutors said they were told Felton stored
the Belgian-made FN Herstal model handgun in
the home from August through February. A
lawyer for Feltons wife, a student at Fordham
University School of Law, dropped off the
weapon at a stationhouse on Manhattans upper
West Side on Monday evening, shortly before
tipoff of the Knicks game against the Dallas
Mavericks at Madison Square Garden, police
said.
The gun had 18 rounds of live ammunition in
its magazine, which can hold about 20 rounds,
prosecutors said.
He was charged with criminal possession of a
weapon in the third degree and criminal posses-
sion of a rearm. The rearm charge is punish-
able by up to four years in prison. The weapons
charge is punishable by up to seven years in
prison. The section under which he was charged
concerns having a large-capacity ammunition
magazine.
Police had arrested Felton on charges that
included a mid-level weapons-possession
charge that can entail having a loaded gun out-
side ones home or business or having a loaded
gun with the intention to use it against some-
one. The DAs ofce didnt comment on why
prosecutors chose the charges they did; its not
uncommon for charges to change between arrest
and arraignment.
Investigators reached Felton by contacting
the director of security at Madison Square
Garden after his wife made a statement to detec-
tives Monday night, police said. Felton turned
himself in at 12:50 a.m. Tuesday, not long after
the Knicks buzzer-beater loss to Dallas, police
said.
The former University of North Carolina star
made no statement after he arrived at the
precinct with a lawyer, police said.
AKnicks spokesman has said the team had no
immediate comment. An attorney for
Raymondo-Felton didnt comment. The Knicks
had no game scheduled Tuesday.
Felton had eight points and seven assists
Monday in the Knicks110-108 loss to Dallas.
The Knicks brought the point guard back for a
second stint in New York in July 2012, opting
to let Jeremy Lin leave, and Felton helped the
Knicks win the Atlantic Division last year.
But he has had a disappointing season, aver-
aging 10.4 points and shooting 40 percent
while missing 16 games with a series of
injuries. He has been frequently criticized by
fans as the Knicks have fallen to 21-36.
NBA spokesman Tim Frank said the league
was monitoring the case. It could ne or sus-
pend Felton, but usually waits until after the
legal case has been resolved.
The league did break from that policy to sus-
pend Gilbert Arenas for the remainder of the sea-
son after he brought guns to the Washington
Wizards locker room during the 2009-10 sea-
son. He was eventually sentenced to 30 days in
a halfway house.
NY Knicks Raymond Felton arraigned on gun charges
SPORTS 14
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NFL teams he was worth drafting. The 49ers agreed and
selected Lattimore in the fourth round last spring and told
him not worry about rushing back to play last season.
It wasnt easy, but Lattimore understood the patient
approach would prove fruitful down the road.
I was just so grateful they believed in what I could do,
Lattimore said.
Lattimore held a youth football clinic in Charleston this
past Saturday and has similar sessions planned for
Greenville and Columbia the next few months. Lattimores
kept a high prole in South Carolina since heading to the
West Coast as a spokesman for several organizations,
including a commercial for the South Carolina Education
Lottery about playing responsibly.
These days, hes promoting South Carolinas First
Choice Fit Adolescent Well Visit campaign, which stresses
the importance of proper nutrition, exercise and building a
relationship with a primary care physician among adoles-
cent rst choice Medicaid plan members statewide.
Lattimore said he learned through his injuries about not
cutting corners with your health and believes young people
who follow that advice will see the benets throughout
their lives.
Dr. Marion Burton, medical director for the South
Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, says
the group couldnt have a more well-respected representa-
tive than Lattimore. Many health professionals and admin-
istrators dont have a way to communicate with adoles-
cents, but Marcus sure does, Dr. Burton said.
Lattimore said it wasnt easy watching from the sidelines
while his San Francisco teammates were playing. He bond-
ed the strongest, he says, with other injured players in sim-
ilar rehab situations. Lattimore says he poured himself into
learning coach Jim Harbaughs playbook so hed be as pre-
pared as possible for workouts. Man, its thick, he joked.
Hes spent time with 49ers running back Frank Gore, who
returned from college injury to become a ve-time Pro Bowl
selection in San Francisco. Lattimore says Gore has pro-
vided a strong example of how to handle oneself as a pro.
Lattimore was nervous about moving so far away from
home and small-town life, but his family came out frequent-
ly and he learned that San Francisco had its positives, too.
This is a very healthy place, Lattimore says. People like
to eat right and do lots of things to keep t.
Lattimore believes for him thats going full speed so he
can contribute to the 49ers quest of getting back to the
Super Bowl, where they lost to the Baltimore Ravens after
the 2012 season. He says he tells himself all the time to
remain patient when hes back in action. I cant go out
there and be Superman the rst day, he says. Once I get
back in the groove and take a few hits, Ill be OK.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
Its easy to see how Hillsdales offensive performance on
Tuesday could be a great condence boost for them going
forward. Always a tough and feisty team, against Soledad
the Knights tapped into a bit of nesse. In the third quarter,
they shot a cool 50 percent from the oor while taking
leads of up to 21 on a couple of occasions. Soledad pulled to
within 17, but Ronbergs back-to-back baskets pushed it
over 20 again and Hillsdale led by 23 going into the fourth
quarter.
It was really great, Hankins said. Trying to explain
that to kids, theyre like, Coach, my shot isnt going in
but they know if we play hard defense, the buckets will
come. I think we made it a lot easier on ourselves going for-
ward and I think if we keep up this energy, we can go pretty
far.
In total, 12 different Knights scored. Ronberg scored 12
while Nepomuceno added 11. Caelynn Hwang was also in
double digits with 11.
I think the message tomorrow is to pick up where we left
off today, with the energy, Hankins said. We have to exe-
cute better in the half court. And we have to cut down on our
turnovers.
In other CCS action, a strong defensive effort fueled
Mills 42-23 win over James Lick High School in Division
III action. The Vikings held James Lick to just nine rst-
half points.
Mills shot 28 percent from the oor and were led by the
efforts of Aubrie Businger, who scored 10 points and pulled
down 12 rebound. Madison Sui led all Mills scorers with
12. Julia Gibbs added nine.
Defense was the name of the game at Burlingame where
the defending CCS champion Panthers took down Gilroy,
37-24.
The Mustangs of Capuchino recorded an opening round
win as well by taking down Live Oak 70-61 in Division III
action.
And nally, after the teams were tied at 18 going into
halftime, Half Moon Bay pushed past Santa Catalina 44-36
in Division IV action.
Continued from page 11
KNIGHTS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUSTIN, Texas Dale Earnhardt Jr. is all over the place.
No time at all to process the signicance of his second
Daytona 500 victory.
Earnhardt has been traveling almost non-stop since he
won NASCARs premier race Sunday night. He made a cou-
ple of national TVappearances before arriving in Austin for
a stop on behalf of Texas Motor Speedway on Tuesday after-
noon.
NASCARs most popular driver snapped a 55-race losing
streak dating to 2012. He also won the Daytona 500 a
decade ago.
When I won it early, it was a huge shock, Earnhardt said
at a restaurant in downtown Austin. The feeling that I had
wasnt really joy. It was more relief that I got it out of the
way. Then, after another couple years, you wonder if youll
ever win another one. As those years have turned into 10
years, youve really got to wonder if youll ever feel that
again.
Earnhardt got his answer last weekend, when he led six
times for a race-high 54 laps after a rain delay of 6 hours, 22
minutes. He was the runner-up three of the last four years at
Daytona International Speedway, where his father was
killed in an accident on the last lap of the 2001 race.
I want to think I have an idea of what the value of that
win is, but its hard to measure, Earnhardt said. I did a
poor job of measuring when I won it the rst time. I was
younger and I thought, Man, this is a big deal. And before
I knew it, we were at another track trying to win another
race and forgetting about Daytona. I just missed it.
Earnhardts slump-busting victory also was a big one for
NASCAR.
Thats our Michael Jordan, our Tiger Woods, Texas
Motor Speedway president Eddie Gossage said. He realizes
hes in his late 30s. Hes gotta do it now. I dont mean to put
any more pressure him but, he doesnt have to do it this
year, but hes got to do it soon. The window isnt very
large.
Earnhardt on whirlwind tour
SPORTS 15
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 32 25 .561
Brooklyn 26 28 .481 4 1/2
New York 21 36 .368 11
Boston 19 39 .328 13 1/2
Philadelphia 15 42 .263 17
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 40 14 .741
Washington 29 28 .509 12 1/2
Charlotte 27 30 .474 14 1/2
Atlanta 26 30 .464 15
Orlando 17 42 .288 25 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 43 13 .768
Chicago 30 26 .536 13
Detroit 23 34 .404 20 1/2
Cleveland 22 36 .379 22
Milwaukee 11 45 .196 32
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 40 16 .714
Houston 39 18 .684 1 1/2
Dallas 35 23 .603 6
Memphis 31 24 .564 8 1/2
New Orleans 23 33 .411 17
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 43 14 .754
Portland 39 18 .684 4
Minnesota 28 29 .491 15
Denver 25 31 .446 17 1/2
Utah 20 36 .357 22 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 20 .661
Golden State 35 22 .614 3
Phoenix 33 23 .589 4 1/2
Sacramento 20 37 .351 18
L.A. Lakers 19 38 .333 19
TuesdaysGames
Indiana 118, L.A. Lakers 98
Washington 115, Orlando 106
Toronto 99, Cleveland 93
Chicago 107, Atlanta 103
Minnesota 110, Phoenix 101
Portland 100, Denver 95
Houston 129, Sacramento 103
WednesdaysGames
Orlando at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Golden State at Chicago, 5 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 5 p.m.
Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Detroit at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 6 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
Boys soccer
Wednesday
DivisionI
No. 11 Sequoia (8-8-2) at No. 6 Homestead (14-5-
1), 3 p.m.
No. 10 Santa Clara (9-4-7) at No. 7 Menlo-Atherton
(11-5-2), 6 p.m.
No. 9 San Benito (13-5-2) at No. 8 Carlmont (8-7-4),
6 p.m.
DivisionII
No. 11 South City (12-5-3) at No. 6 Willow Glen (10-
6-3), 6 p.m.
No. 12 Woodside (8-7-5) at No. 5 Gilroy (13-4-3), 6
p.m.
No. 8 Overfelt (8-4-8) at No. 9 El Camino (11-5-4), 3
p.m.
DivisionIII
No. 7 Scotts Valley (11-3-4) at No. 10 Sacred Heart
Prep (14-5-1), 3 p.m.
Saturday
Boys soccer
DivisionII
No. 11 South City/No. 6 Willow Glen winner vs. No.
3 Serra (14-2-4),TBA
DivisionIII
No. 11 Harbor/No. 6 Monterey winner vs. No. 3
Burlingame (13-4-3),TBA
No. 8 Greeneld/No. 9 James Lick winner vs. No. 1
Half Moon Bay (14-5-1),TBA
Girls soccer
Tuesday
DivisionIII
No.11PacicCollegiate(8-4-4) at No.6SacredHeart
Prep (16-2-2), 3 p.m.
Wednesday
DivisionI
No. 13 Salinas (12-5-1) at No. 4 Carlmont (12-5-3), 3
p.m.
DivisionII
No. 13 Overfelt (14-6) at No. 4 Woodside (15-2-3), 6
p.m.
DivisionIII
No. 8 Santa Cruz (11-8) at No. 9 Terra Nova (17-1), 6
p.m.
Saturday
DivisionIII
No. 8 Santa Cruz-No. 9 Terra Nova winner vs. No. 1
Menlo School (15-3-2),TBA
No. 11 Pacic Collegiate/No. 6 Sacred Heart Prep
winner vs. No. 3 Burlingame (12-3-5),TBA
CCS SOCCER PAIRINGS
Boys basketball
Wednesday
DivisionV
No. 9 Summit Prep (11-9) at No. 8 Crystal Springs
(6-17), 7 p.m.
Thursday
Division II
No.11 Westmoor (10-14) at No.6 Santa Clara (18-6),
7 p.m.
DivisionIII
El Camino (9-15) at No. 8 Hillsdale (12-12), 7 p.m.
No.12 SanMateo (8-15) at No.5 Valley Christian (6-
19), 7 p.m.
No. 10 SouthCity (12-11) at No. 7 Gunderson (16-
11), 7:30 p.m.
No.11 Terra Nova (12-12) at No.6 Monterey (14-10),
7 p.m.
DivisionIV
No. 12 Gonzales (13-12) at No. 5 Menlo School (11-
13), 7 p.m.
Friday
OpenDivision
No. 6 Leigh (23-2) vs. No. 3 Serra (19-7), 7:30 p.m. at
Santa Clara High
No.7Riordan(16-9) vs.No.2Burlingame(23-3),5:30
p.m. at Santa Clara High
No. 5 Sacred Heart Cathedral (17-10) vs. No. 4 Half
Moon Bay (23-3), 5:30 p.m. at Piedmont High
Saturday
DivisionI
TBD vs. No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (16-8), at Piedmont
Hills High,TBA
DivisionIII
TBD vs.No.3 Aragon (17-9),at Foothill College,TBA
TBD vs. No. 1 Mills (21-6), at Foothill College,TBA
DivisionIV
Pacic Grove/Kings Academy winner vs. No. 1 Sa-
cred Heart Prep (17-7), at Kaiser Arena, Santa Cruz,
TBA
DivisionV
TBD at No. 4 Alma Heights (20-6),TBA
Girls basketball
Tuesday
DivisionII
Lincoln (12-11) at No. 10 Aragon (9-15), 7 p.m.
DivisionIII
Live Oak (15-9) at No. 11 Capuchino (16-8), 7 p.m.
Soledad (16-8) at No. 10 Hillsdale (16-8), 7 p.m.
Gilroy (16-8) at No. 12 Burlingame (9-15), 7 p.m.
James Lick (9-11) at No. 9 Mills (16-9), 7 p.m.
DivisionIV
Santa Catalina (11-8) at No. 10 Half Moon Bay (11-
14), 7 p.m.
Thursday
DivisionI
No. 10 Silver Creek (20-6) at No. 7 Menlo-Atherton
(16-9), 7 p.m.
No.12Independence(12-12) at No.5Carlmont (23-
3), 7 p.m.
DivisionII
No. 10 Aragon (10-15) at No. 7 Pioneer (10-12), 7
p.m.
DivisionIII
No. 11 Capuchino (17-8) at No. 6 Santa Cruz (14-
12), 7 p.m.
No. 10 Hillsdale (17-8) at No. 7 Gunderson (13-11),
5:30 p.m.
No. 12 Burlingame (10-15) at No. 5 Notre Dame-SJ
(12-13), 7 p.m.
No. Mills (18-9) at No. 8 Terra Nova (10-16), 7 p.m.
DivisionIV
No. 10 Half MoonBay (12-14) at No. 7 Monte Vista
Christian (17-6), 7 p.m.
Harker (11-14) vs. No. 8 Mercy-Burlingame (9-13),
7 p.m. at College of San Mateo
Saturday
DivisionII
TBD vs.No.3 Westmoor (21-6),at Christopher High,
TBA
DivisionIII
TBD vs. No. 4 South City (17-9), at Mills,TBA
DivisionIV
TBD vs. No. 3 Sacred Heart Prep (13-12), at Notre
Dame-Belmont,TBA
TBD vs.No.2 Menlo School (15-11),at Notre Dame-
Belmont,TBA
TBD at No. 1 Notre Dame-Belmont (9-16),TBA
DivisionV
No. 5 Summit Prep (12-5) vs. No. 4 Alma Heights
Christian (14-10), at Santa Teresa High,TBA
CCS BASKETBALL PAIRINGS
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 57 37 16 4 78 176 125
Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145
Montreal 59 32 21 6 70 148 142
Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182
Detroit 58 26 20 12 64 151 163
Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191
Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183
Buffalo 58 16 34 8 40 113 174
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138
N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146
Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167
Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161
Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175
Carolina 58 26 23 9 61 146 161
New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146
N.Y. Islanders 60 22 30 8 52 164 200
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 57 39 12 6 84 196 135
Chicago 60 35 11 14 84 207 163
Colorado 58 37 16 5 79 174 153
Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 145 147
Dallas 58 27 21 10 64 164 164
Winnipeg 60 28 26 6 62 168 175
Nashville 59 25 24 10 60 146 180
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 196 147
San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 175 142
Los Angeles 59 31 22 6 68 139 128
Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 163 169
Vancouver 60 27 24 9 63 146 160
Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 137 179
Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47 153 199
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
MondaysGames
No games scheduled
TuesdaysGames
Buffalo 3, Carolina 2
WednesdaysGames
Boston at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 7:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
16
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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13th minute, Riley Shanahan converted a
Carey Bradley assist into their fourth goal of
the game. Another minute later it was 5-0
when Davidson won a ball near mideld, car-
ried it to the top of the Pacic Collegiate
penalty box before unleashing a wicked,
bending shot that curled just inside the far
left post.
After that, Arrendondo all but called off the
attack.
I told them they had [take the] ball wide
and connect 10 passes before going on the
attack, Arrendondo said.
Even with that stipulation, the Gators still
had plenty of opportunities to literally dou-
ble the score. But some less-than-stellar n-
ishing kept the score from being even worse.
And credit the Pumas defense and their off-
side trap for keeping the Gators at bay. SHP
was whistled 11 times for offsides in the rst
half alone and 17 for the game.
Pacic Collegiate did a good job stepping
up (its defensive line), Arrendondo said.
The rest of the game was also an opportu-
nity for Arrendondo to use his reserves liber-
ally, as all 22 members of the SHP roster saw
game action no small feat with a roster
that size.
Its a challenge, Arrendondo said. We
tried to get them in early on. Weve had a cou-
ple games like that in league.
The rules for attack were the same in the
second half 10 passes and attack from the
anks and despite six more offside calls,
the Gators managed to nd the back of the
net two more times. In the 57th minute,
Athens picked up her second assist of the
game, sending a perfect pass through the
Pumas defensive line. Cameron Gordon ran
past the defense, latched onto the ball and
buried her shot in the far right corner for a 6-
0 lead.
Then, just before the end, the Gators put
the icing on the cake off a corner kick. Blair
Hamilton, who spent the rst half in goal for
SHP, swung a cross into the middle of the
box. Following a scramble, the ball found
the foot of senior co-captain Maddy Jones,
who poked it home for the nal tally.
Up next is Burlingame, which nished sec-
ond in the Peninsula Athletic Leagues Bay
Division. While Tuesdays game did not do a
whole to prepare the Gators for the Panthers,
Arrendondo believes some good can come
from Tuesdays rout.
I think the condence we showed in the
rst 11 minutes is a good sign, Arrendondo
said.
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Sacred Heart Prep defender Maddie Morgan clears the ball away during the Gators 7-0 win
over Pacic Collegiate in the rst round of the CCS Division III tournament Tuesday.
Continued from page 11
GATORS
Bumgarner named
Giants opening day starter
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Left-hander
Madison Bumgarner has been selected the
San Francisco Giants opening day starter.
Manager Bruce Bochy made the announce-
ment Tuesday at spring
training that Bumgarner
would pitch March 31 at
Arizona. This marks
Bumgarners first open-
ing day start. He was the
only member of the San
Francisco rotation with a
winning record last sea-
son at 13-9 with a 2.77
ERA in 31 starts and 201
1-3 innings. He made his
rst NLAll-Star team.
Righty Matt Cain went Game 1 last sea-
son, when the Giants wound up missing the
playoffs a year after winning their second
World Series title in three years.
Sharks reassign Kearns to AHL
SAN JOSE The San Jose Sharks have
reassigned forward Bracken Kearns to
Worcester of the AHL.
The team made the move Tuesday to create
room for the expected return from the injured
list later this week of forwards Logan
Couture and Raf Torres.
Kearns has three goals, one assist and six
penalty minutes in 22 games this season
with San Jose.
The Sharks open the post-Olympic break
stretch of their schedule on Thursday night
in Philadelphia.
Sports briefs
Madison
Bumgarner
FOOD 17
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
1390 El Camino Real, Millbrae 94030
Reservations (650) 742-1003
(located in La Quinta Hotel. Free Parking)
Serving Lunch & Dinner
Featuring Wagyu Beef imported from Japan
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
EXPIRES: February 28, 2014
JACKS RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
Lunch Specials
Available 11AM 3PM, 7 days a week
Starting at $5.98
Dine In Special 10% off
Monday Thursday
From 5PM Closing
* Beverages excluded
650.595.2031 650.593.7286
FAX: 650.591.4588
1653-1655 Laurel Street, San Carlos
(near St. Francis Way)
Sun Thur: 11 AM 9:30 PM ;
Fri Sat: 11 AM 10 PM
www.sancarlosamazingwok.com
Same great food,
same great prices! Yelp!
Chinese Cuisine
Government: Cut out junk food ads in schools
By Mary Clare Jalonick and Darlene Superville
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Its not just about what Americas kids
are getting in the lunch line.
The Obama administration is moving to phase out junk
food advertising on football scoreboards and elsewhere on
school grounds part of a broad effort to combat child obe-
sity and create what Michelle Obama calls a new norm for
todays schoolchildren and future generations.
This new approach to eating and activity is not just a
fad, Mrs. Obama said Tuesday as she described the proposed
rules at the White House.
Promotion of sugary drinks and junk foods around cam-
puses during the school day would be phased out under the
Agriculture Department rules, which are intended to ensure
that marketing is brought in line with health standards that
already apply to food served by public schools.
That means a scoreboard at a high school football or bas-
ketball game eventually wouldnt be allowed to advertise
Coca-Cola, for example, though it could advertise Diet
Coke or Dasani water, also owned by Coca-Cola Co. Same
with the front of a vending machine. Cups, posters and
menu boards that promote foods that dont meet federal
standards would also be phased out.
Ninety-three percent of such marketing in schools is
related to beverages. And many soda companies already
have started to transition their sales and advertising in
schools from sugary sodas and sports drinks to other prod-
ucts they produce. Companies are spending $149 million a
year on marketing to kids in schools, according to the
Agriculture Department.
The announcement at the White House was part of a week
of events marking the fourth anniversary of the rst ladys
Lets Move program. Mrs. Obama also traveled to Miami
Tuesday to announce that the Boys & Girls Clubs of America
and the National Recreation and Park Association will serve
more fruits and vegetables at after-school programs and
ensure kids get 30-60 minutes of physical activity a day.
NBCs Parks and Recreation star Amy Poehler introduced
the rst lady.
The proposed school marketing rules come on the heels
of federal regulations that now require food in school lunch
lines to be more healthful than in the past.
Separate rules, which are to go into effect in September,
will cover other food around school as well, including in
vending machines and a la carte lines in the lunch room.
Calorie, fat, sugar and sodium limits now will have to be
met on almost every food and beverage sold during the
school day, as mandated by a 2010 child nutrition law.
Even though diet sodas would be allowed in high schools
under the proposed rules announced Tuesday, the rules dont
address the question raised by some as to whether those
drinks are actually healthful alternatives to sugary soda.
Some healthful-food rules have come under re from con-
servatives who say the government shouldnt dictate what
kids eat and from some students who dont like the new
alternatives.
Mrs. Obama defended herself against critics, saying that
I didnt create this issue. She said kids will eventually get
used to the changes.
New rules, which are to go into effect in September, will cover food around school, including in vending machines and a la
cartelines in the lunch room.Calorie,fat,sugar and sodium limits now will have to be met on almost every food and beverage
sold during the school day, as mandated by a 2010 child nutrition law.
See RULES, Page 18
18
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD/LOCAL
Paid Advertisment
Thats our job as parents, to hold steady
through the whining, she said.
Aware of the backlash, the Agriculture
Department is allowing schools to make
some of their own decisions on what consti-
tutes marketing and is asking for comments
on some options. For example, the proposal
asks for comments on initiatives like Pizza
Huts Book It program, which coordinates
with schools to reward kids with pizza for
reading.
Rules for other school fundraisers, like
bake sales and marketing for those events,
would be left up to schools or states.
Off-campus fundraisers, like an event at a
local fast-food outlet that benets a school,
still would be permitted. But posters advertis-
ing the fast food may not be allowed in
school hallways. An email to parents with
or without the advertising would have to
sufce. The idea is to market to the parents,
not the kids.
The rules also make allowances for major
infrastructure costs that scoreboard adver-
tising Coca-Cola, for example, wouldnt
have to be immediately torn down. But the
school would have to get one with a different
message or product the next time it was
replaced.
Schools that dont want to comply could
leave the National School Lunch Program,
which allows schools to collect government
reimbursements for free and low-cost lunches
for needy students in exchange for following
certain standards. Very few schools choose to
give up those government dollars, though.
Continued from page 17
RULES
may expand the 25-foot buffer zone around
main entrances of private businesses. It did,
however, refuse to regulate smoking on pri-
vate property, including apartment buildings
and will continue to allow restaurants to pro-
vide up to 50 percent of outdoor seating areas
designated as smoking.
Questions about personal liberties, prop-
erty lines and business models were dis-
cussed, but city ofcials maintained its ulti-
mately about health and safety concerns and
preventing the publics exposure to second-
hand smoke.
[Smoking] is not a personal liberty, this
is not a right, I dont even think its a privi-
lege, Councilman Herb Perez said. I dont
think anybody has a right or a privilege to
affect the health of somebody else.
Members of the public, many who lived in
apartments, spoke in favor of banning
smoking in multi-family residences at the
study session. The vast majority of renters
prefer to live in smoke-free residences and
most apartments already have no-smoking
policies in place, said Rhovy Lyn Antonio,
spokeswoman for the California Apartment
Association.
Eighty percent of renters actually prefer
moving into a community that has a smoke-
free policy smoking provisions have
been driven by market demands, Antonio
said. Due to the fact that most multi-family
building communities are voluntarily
smoke-free, we ask the council to evaluate
the necessity of [including it in] a smoking
ordinance.
The council ultimately decided not to regu-
late private property and suggested people
form homeowners associations instead.
We control the public spaces, so to me,
no smoking in public. If the public owns it,
no smoking, said Mayor Charles
Bronitsky. All we ask is you act responsi-
bly. I think some level of prohibition is
appropriate because of health concerns but,
for me, [regulating] some level of personal
property is overreaching.
Although the interior of peoples homes
may be off-limits, the sidewalks directly in
front of their homes arent. The council
instructed staff to move forward with the ban
but councilmembers Art Kiesel and Gary
Pollard were unsure about approving an ordi-
nance prohibiting people from smoking
directly in front of their property.
The council agreed electronic cigarettes
and hookah will be identied as tobacco
products. But Perez was concerned a new ordi-
nance would be a detriment to Waterfront
Pizza, a Mediterranean restaurant that serves
hookah within 50 percent of its outdoor
patio area.
Patrons of Waterfront spoke at the meeting
to express support of the restaurant and point
out people can choose not to frequent the
establishment.
The public and city ofcials agreed second-
hand smoke is harmful and those who wish to
refrain from exposure should be afforded pro-
tection. Sam Hindi, a Foster City resident
and business owner, believes Waterfront
offers those who wish to smoke a venue to do
so.
Its providing a space and time for those
who want to smoke to be away from those
who dont want to smoke, Hindi said.
Blanche Aram, a resident who doesnt
smoke, said people can choose whether to go
to Waterfront.
Indoors, I understand it where people are
living in residences that dont want to be
exposed; and in parks, I understand that. But
when it comes to a business, I think it gets a
little tricky, Aram said. If I dont like it, I
simply go somewhere else, just like if theres
a restaurant that serves food I dont like, I
dont force them to change their menu.
As a city nestled against the Bay with
lagoons and waterways, the council should
consider regulations that will help deter the
litter associated with smoking, said Alison
Chan, spokeswoman for the environmental
activist group Save The Bay.
This is an environmental issue as well as
a public health one. What many people dont
realize is cigarettes are toxic plastic litter,
Chan said.
The council instructed staff to research how
it could pragmatically enforce the ordinance;
whether it will be a civil matter handled by
the City Managers Ofce or a criminal one
police would have to oversee will be dis-
cussed at a later date.
After city staff readies a draft of the new
ordinance, it will return to the council for a
hearing and public comment, Assistant City
Manager Steve Toler said.
Continued from page 1
SMOKING
FOOD 19
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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11AM to 9PM
By Candice Choi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK Egg McMufn, meet
the Wafe Taco.
Taco Bell is readying for the launch
of its national breakfast menu on
March 27, with items such as the A.M.
Crunchwrap designed to appeal to its
fan base of younger men. And the
chain says breakfast will be available
until 11 a.m. a half-hour later than
McDonalds offers its Egg McMufns.
We can turn the breakfast conversa-
tion into a two-horse race, Taco Bell
President Brian Niccol said in an inter-
view, noting that Taco Bell intends to
be a strong No. 2 after McDonalds .
McDonalds has long been the fast-
food leader in the mornings, with its
popular Sausage Biscuits, Hotcakes
and other items pulling in roughly 20
percent of the companys U.S. sales.
But the chain has been facing stiffer
competition over the years, with
places such as Starbucks and Subway
looking for a piece of the growing
breakfast business.
On March 4, for instance, Starbucks
also plans to roll out new and
revamped breakfast sandwiches,
including a croissant sandwich with
ham, cheese and egg.
Its not clear how Taco Bells entry
into breakfast will alter the fast-food
landscape. Last year, an executive with
Taco Bells parent company Yum
Brands said that breakfast accounted
for about 4 percent of sales in loca-
tions where it was tested. But that was
before the chain put its full marketing
might behind the menu, he noted.
McDonalds, which has more than
14,000 U.S. locations, has also said it
plans to step up its marketing of break-
fast this year as new players enter the
space. Separately, the president of
McDonalds USA, Jeff Stratton, also told
the Associated Press that the chain is in
the early stages of looking at whether it
can extend its breakfast hours.
Stratton noted that cutting off break-
fast on the weekends at 10:30 a.m.
doesnt go very well with people in
their 20s and 30s in particular. Still,
guring out how to serve both break-
fast and lunch poses an operational
challenge given the limited kitchen
space in restaurants.
In the meantime, Kevin Newell, U.S.
brand and strategy officer for
McDonalds, seemed unfazed in an
interview late last week by Taco Bells
breakfast plans.
I think theyre going to nd that
going into the breakfast business is
not like what theyre accustomed to, in
terms of marketing, Newell said. The
breakfast menus of the two chains
only have one main offering that
seems to go head-to-head, a sausage
and egg burrito.
Taco Bell takes aim at
McDonalds breakfast
Taco Bell is readying for the launch of its national breakfast menu on March 27.
McDonalds eyes
extending its
breakfast hours
By Candice Choi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAK BROOK, Ill. McDonalds is in the early stages of
looking at whether it can make breakfast available later in
the day.
Fans of the Egg McMufn and Sausage Biscuit have long
wanted the option to get breakfast at McDonalds after
10:30 a.m. But offering both the breakfast and lunch menu
was considered logistically impossible, given the tight
kitchen spaces of the restaurants.
Still, its an option the chain is eyeing more seriously at
a time when peoples eating habits are changing particu-
larly those coveted customers in their 20s and 30s known as
Millennials.
We know, as an example, that breakfast on the weekend
cut off at 10:30 doesnt go very well, Jeff Stratton, head of
McDonalds USA, said in an interview.
Stratton declined to provide any details on how
McDonalds would adjust kitchen operations to make break-
fast later in the day.
Well, were just beginning. ... Were just taking a look at
it, he said.
Arepresentative for McDonalds, Lisa McComb, said after
the interview that there are no tests currently in place for the
extended breakfast hours.
McDonalds has long entertained the idea of serving
breakfast throughout the day. But the chain has been inch-
ing closer to making the idea a reality as it faces heightened
competition and slumping sales. Last year, for example, the
company began offering an After Midnight menu at select
locations.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacic
Blvd., San Mateo.To make an appoint-
ment or for more information call
523-0804.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 percent
your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
Author Steve Palumbi presents:
The Extreme Life of of the Sea. 7
p.m. Eagle Theater at Los Altos High
School, 201 Almond Ave., Los Altos.
Sponsored by the Commonwealth
Club. General admission is $10 for
members and $15 for non-members.
For tickets call (800) 847-7730 or reg-
ister online at www.commonwealth-
club.org. For more information con-
tact Georgette Gehue at
ggehue@commonwealthclub.org.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: God
and Gays An Hour of Civil
Conversation. 7 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information contact Angelina
Ortiz at angelina@bethany-mp.org or
call 854-5897.
Rainwater Harvesting and
Graywater Reuse. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Learn methods for harvest-
ing rainwater and capturing house-
hold graywater for using in your gar-
den and landscape. Attend and enter
a rafe for a free rain barrel. To RSVP
call 259-2339.
Kirk Fletcher at the Club Fox Blues
Jam. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. The Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
Are We There Yet? Comedy of a
Rebel Generation. 8 p.m. Angelicas,
863 Main St., Redwood City. One-man
multi-media comedy show. For more
information call (323) 854-8543.
THURSDAY, FEB. 27
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: God
and Gays An Hour of Civil
Conversation. 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information contact Angelina
Ortiz at angelina@bethany-mp.org or
call 854-5897.
Cardio Kick-Start with Rip, the San
Mateo Fireghters and Equinox. 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. Whole Foods Market,
1010 Park Place, San Mateo. For more
information contact hsu-
lien.rivera@wholefoods.com.
Transportation: The First Mile
Indicators Launch and Lunch. Noon
to 1:30 p.m. SamTrans Auditorium,
1250 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos.
Learn about the latest trends impact-
ing the county including population,
job growth, commute patterns and
traffic congestion. Free admission
and lunch. Space is limited and par-
ticipants must RSVP at indica-
tors2014.bpt.me.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 percent
your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
Movies for school-age children:
Monsters University. 3:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Rated G. 95 minutes. Free.
For more information call 522-7838.
Presentation by Dr. Dana Girard:
Understanding the Behavior of
Hoarding. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Belmont Hills Memory Care
Community, 1301 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Please RSVP by Feb. 26 to
belmonthills@silveradocare.com or
call 654-9700. Appetizers will be
served from 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. and
the presentation will begin at 6 p.m.
North Star Academy presents
Fiddler on the Roof Jr. 7 p.m.
McKinley Auditorium, 400 Duane St.,
Redwood City. $8 to $14. For tickets
go to www.northstartix.com.
War Horse. 7 p.m. Cinemark, 1901
Junipero Serra Blvd., Daly City; 825
Middlefield Road, Redwood City;
1188 El Camino Real, San Bruno; 320
Second Ave., San Mateo. Pre-recorded
live from Londons famed West End.
For more information call (303) 792-
8763.
FRIDAY, FEB. 28
Spirituality and Veterans. 7:30 a.m.
Crystal Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Speaker:
Rev. Chaplain Virginia Jackson, D.
Min., BCC. $15 includes breakfast. For
more information and to RSVP call
Jake at 515-5891.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacic
Blvd., San Mateo.To make an appoint-
ment or for more information call
523-0804.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 percent
your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage
Lane, Twin Pines Park, Belmont.
Proceeds benefit the Belmont
Library. For more information call
593-5650.
Kingston Cafe Second Anniversary
Celebration. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Kingston
Cafe, 19 N. Kingston St., San Mateo.
Live music featuring local artists
Heather Scarlett Rose and Ronin Rock
& Blues. For more information go to
www.kingstoncafesanmateo.com or
call 477-2276.
Billy Manzik and Seconds on End at
Devils Canyon. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 935
Washington St., San Carlos.
Admission is free. Doors open at 4
p.m. For more information call 592-
BREW or go to
www.DevilsCanyon.com.
Cheer and Dance Exhibition Show.
6 p.m. Sequoia High School Gym No.
1, 1201 Brewster Ave., Redwood City.
$10 for adults and $7 for students. For
more information call 593-6269.
North Star Academy presents
Fiddler on the Roof Jr. 7 p.m.
McKinley Auditorium, 400 Duane St.,
Redwood City. $8 to $14. For tickets
go to www.northstartix.com.
Many Dances. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City. $5.
For more information call 747-0264.
Little Women. 7:30 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University Theatre,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. $25 gen-
eral, $15 students/seniors. For more
information go to www.brownpa-
pertickets.com.
Amy Obenski and Artemesia Black
with Kenny Schick. 8 p.m. Red Rock,
201 Castro St., Mountain View. This
concert will feature acoustic lyric
moody folk-rock. Free and for all ages.
For more information call 967-4473
or go to www.amyobenski.com.
SATURDAY, MARCH 1
HP CodeWars Silicon Valley 2014. 8
a.m. to noon. HP Labs, 1501 Page Mill
Road, Palo Alto. The competition is
open to all high school students, pub-
lic or private. Pizza and caffeine will
be provided. For more information on
HP CodeWars, go to www.hpcode-
wars.org. CodeWars Silicon Valley
specic information will be posted at
https://www.facebook.com/pages/H
P - C o d e w a r s - S i l i c o n -
Valley/181236968717027.
Mushroom Walk at Filoli. 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Filoli, 86 Caada Road,
Woodside. $15 for adult members,
$20 for adult non-members. $5 or
child members, $10 for non-member
children. For more information go to
www.loli.org.
Canyon wildower hike. 10 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. 44 Visitacion Ave., Suite 206,
Brisbane. Bring water and a snack or
lunch. Dress for varied weather. Hike
led at a leisurely pace with time for
discussion. For more information
contact sanbruno@mountain-
watch.org.
Asian Fusion Collection Opening
Day. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Portola Art
Gallery at Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor
Road, Menlo Park. This collection by
Linda Salter runs through March 31.
Portola Art Gallery is open 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday to Saturday. For more
information visit www.portolaart-
gallery.com.
Bountiful Blueberries Class at
Common Ground. 10:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Common Ground Garden
Supply and Education Center, 559
College Ave., Palo Alto. For more infor-
mation go to www.commonground-
inpaloalto.org.
Eth-Noh-Tec Kinetic Story Theater.
11 a.m. Menlo Park City Council
Chambers, 701 Laurel St., Menlo Park.
Stories from across Asia come alive
through music, dance and spoken
word. For more information call 330-
2512.
E2 Fitness and Breakfast: Ultimate
Workout with Stella Sandoval. 11
a.m. Whole Foods Market, 1010 Park
Place, San Mateo. For more informa-
tion contact hsu-lien.rivera@whole-
foods.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Jonathan Karesh, Steven Dylina and
Elizabeth Hill have no opposition.
On the other hand, two people are
hoping to ll the position vacated by
the U.S. Senate conrmation Tuesday
of Judge Beth Labson Freeman to a
federal judgeship. Defense attorney
Jeffrey Hayden is joined in the race by
Commissioner Susan L. Greenberg .
Deputy County Counsel Kathryn E.
Meola pulled papers but is withdraw-
ing them because of a work promo-
tion.
In a separate race, former commis-
sioner and current prosecutor
Stephanie Garratt is running along
with defense attorney and Daly City
Mayor Ray Buenaventura and
Christiana State.
For Greenberg, a move to the bench
would expand the work shes done as a
commissioner for 14 years by offer-
ing other assignments like juvenile
court and the chance to be a presiding
judge. Greenberg, 54, previously
worked in the District Attorneys
Ofce and said shed love to do more
criminal work as a judge.
However, her diverse experience
over the last 30 years is what
Greenberg hopes voters consider
when choosing their next judge.
I dont need to be trained, she
said.
Greenbergs law degree is from
Hastings College of the University of
California.
Challenging Greenberg is Hayden
who received his legal training at the
University of Southern California and
specializes in criminal law. Hayden
also points to his experience which
includes being a public defender,
working in private practice and clerk-
ing in the district court.
I have a very different background
than anyone else in the race, Hayden
said.
Hayden, 55, said serving as a judge
is a way to give back to the communi-
ty beyond his current advocacy for
individual clients.
In California, judges serve six-year
terms and are elected in nonpartisan
races. Vacancies between elections are
lled by gubernatorial appointments.
Judge positions are not part of the
county government and candidates are
not limited to what ofce they seek by
where they live and need not even
reside in San Mateo County. Each
bench hopeful must select which
ofce he or she is seeking which, in
this race, are the two open one by
Freemans ascension and the other by
the retirement of Judge Craig Parsons.
Hayden opted for Freemans seat on
the assumption she would be con-
rmed.
Its really hard to walk away from
an open seat, he said.
While Hayden said he would not run
against Freeman if she remained in the
race, not having any other candidates
ready would have left her seat empty
after the election and left to a guberna-
torial appointment.
Buenaventura, 49, said a judge is the
ultimate public servant and that
joining the bench is the ideal mar-
riage of legal work and public serv-
ice. Buenaventura is currently a Daly
City councilman along with a crimi-
nal defense attorney and said Parsons
retirement provided a good opportuni-
ty because he neednt challenge an
incumbent. If elected, Buenaventura
said he will bring the right character,
disposition and fairness along with
a good sense of humor.
I see what works in the courtroom
and what doesnt. I want to make sure
there is access to justice and make the
courtroom a place where people feel
comfortable, Buenaventura said.
Buenaventura has a law degree from
Whittier College.
Buenaventura is joined in the cam-
paign with Garratt and State. Neither
could be reached for comment. State is
a temporary judge in small claims for
Santa Clara County Superior Court
and the director of intellectual proper-
ty for a private unnamed company,
according to her online resume.
Garratt previously worked as a pri-
vate defender in San Mateo County
and served as a Superior Court com-
missioner for nearly nine years before
returning last July to the District
Attorneys Office.
Both Garratt and State have law
degrees from Santa Clara University.
Competitive elections for judges in
San Mateo County are not that com-
mon. Judge Don Franchi was in the
last contested race in 2008, beating
out civil attorney Jerry Nastari who
had the endorsement of every sitting
judge at the time. Many judges rst
join the bench through appointment,
like Hill, who was named by Gov.
Jerry Brown in January.
Continued from page 1
RACES
Freeman stepped down from the
Superior Court effective immediately
following the vote and hopes to be
installed in her new position quickly
once the president makes the appoint-
ment ofcial.
The seat has sat vacant for two years
since U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel
moved from San Jose to direct the
Federal Judicial Center in Washington,
D.C. The seats were empty so long the
Judicial Conference of United States
declared them judicial emergencies.
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who rec-
ommended both Freeman and Donato for
the lifetime appointments, said in a pre-
pared statement after the conrmation
vote that both bring strong qualica-
tions and extremely important experi-
ence to the Northern District.
Harvard Law School graduate
Freeman, 60, said she was very
pleased to be approved, particularly
the unanimous support of the judicial
committee. The appointment closes a
big, signicant chapter in her life, she
said, while opening up new opportuni-
ties. No one particular case stands out as
a favorite for Freeman but said, looking
back, what shell always appreciate is
being part of the solution for individu-
als who frankly dont want to be in
court.
Court is my life but its not my liti-
gants life, Freeman said.
Freeman has a bachelors of arts from
the University of California at Berkeley
and earned her law degree in 1979. After
four years in private practice, she joined
the San Mateo County Counsels Ofce
in 1988 where she stayed until 2001
when former governor Gray Davis
appointed her to San Mateo County
Superior Court.
She served as presiding judge in 2011
to 2012 as the court continued absorb-
ing statewide cuts through challenging
local cuts of resources and services.
Freeman proved herself not only an
excellent judge but also an exceptional
leader for the court, said Court Executive
Ofcer John Fitton.
Judge Freeman has exceptional
skills as a judge and also a unique abili-
ty to understand complex administrative
areas that go beyond the judicial
branch, Fitton said.
Freeman served statewide in 2011 on
the Trial Court Budget Working Group
and on a 2013 judicial committee devel-
oping court funding.
Presiding Judge Robert Foiles also
praised Freemans keen intellect and
quick ability to discern issues both
skills he saw rsthand as her assistant
presiding judge as they tackled the budg-
et and other administrative tasks.
On a personal level, Foiles describes
her as witty, funny and fun to work with.
Both Fitton and Foiles said Freemans
abilities will serve her well in her new
role.
Had things turned out different, the
role Freeman might be serving instead
is that of politician. Freeman, who
moved to the Bay Area at age 14 after a
childhood in Washington, D.C., and
Virginia, actually delayed going to col-
lege so that she could run for state
Assembly at age 18. She lost the elec-
tion to the Republican incumbent but
not her desire for politics.
Freeman had expected law to be a step-
ping stone into public ofce but said
she veered away pretty quickly from
that goal and ended up enjoy-
ing legal work on its own.
She thinks sometimes of
what might have been but
never with regret.
Her early legal career
included time with a
Washington, D.C., law rm
before she and her husband
returned to the Bay Area. She
worked for a San Francisco
rm before joining the
County Counsels Ofce.
Together with the time as a
Superior Court judge,
Freeman said shes spent
more than 30 years in the
county courthouse. And now,
in her new position, a slight
shift further south.
Freeman said her husband
and two grown children are
pretty excited by the appoint-
ment and pretty proud of
mom. Neither followed in
their parents legal footsteps,
though.
I guess they decided the
family had enough lawyers,
she joked.
Continued from page 1
FREEMAN
COMICS/GAMES
2-26-14
TUESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Trudges along
6 Rushed off
12 Wolfs pastime
14 Surface
15 Flour infester
16 Transmits
17 Unfold, in poetry
18 Joule fraction
19 Que. neighbor
21 Statute
23 Brownie
26 Slangy coffee
27 Molecular bio. topic
28 Tire feature
30 Magazine execs
31 PC key
32 Starry prex
33 John of Crocodile
Rock
35 Evil eye
37 Female pig
38 Furriers stock
39 Yale grad
40 Pistol
41 Movie lot locale
42 Byron work
43 Plant sci.
44 Switch positions
46 Grey Cup org.
48 Kind of energy
51 What a shame! (2 wds.)
55 Gourd-shaped rattle
56 Weird
57 Lana of old lms
58 Galaxy locale
DOWN
1 Loud noise
2 Size above med.
3 Bullring yell
4 Fairway clump
5 Save a coupon
6 Jaunty cap
7 Bradley or Sharif
8 Account books
9 Bi- plus one
10 Narcissus aw
11 Plaines
13 Gathers bit by bit
19 Lots and lots
20 Cuddle
22 Prestige
24 Frees (2 wds.)
25 Groovy (2 wds.)
26 All-terrain vehicle
27 Hideouts
28 Bus alternative
29 Elevator button
34 Footstool
36 Puts in ofce
42 Movie award
43 Pop y
45 Congenial
47 Dandies
48 Lb. or oz.
49 Upsilon preceder
50 Boston Bruin great
52 Jungle crusher
53 Canine grp.
54 Batik need
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
GET FUZZY
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2014
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Be businesslike in
your dealings. Someone may be overly interested in
your personal life. Keep them guessing about your
private matters, and be careful not to reveal too much.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Preparation and
organization will be key today. Someone may not be
forthright regarding a touchy situation. If you wait
until the last minute, you risk becoming overwhelmed
by the issues at hand.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Make plans to have
fun with friends, or arrange an outing with your lover.
Deal with your responsibilities in advance so that no
one will nd fault with your actions.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your clever ideas and
innovative solutions will lead to a moneymaking
venture. Determine exactly what you want to achieve
and then work hard in service of your goals.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Its a good day to
review paperwork and nancial records. Make
changes to improve your savings and investments.
Reward yourself by spending a romantic evening
with someone you love.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You are in a romantic
mood today. Dont get carried away and offer
untrue or frivolous declarations of your feelings.
Your relationship will only be strengthened by your
honesty and devotion.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Its time for a little
pampering. You may decide to lift your spirits by
getting together with your special someone, or
perhaps even treating yourself to a new look or outt.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It is not necessary to
seek approval from others for all of your plans. You can
gain a new perspective and improve your outlook by
exploring new locations or experiences for yourself.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Trying to please others
will only cause you frustration. Although people may
have your best interests at heart, focusing on your
own goals will keep you on the sure path to success.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) With
determination and self-discipline, one of your many
hobbies could prove protable. A close look at your
various interests may reveal the opportunity for
nancial gain that you have been seeking.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Following your
intuition will lead to inspiration. However, persistence,
determination and dedication will be the necessary
ingredients for positive results. Avoid negativity and
doubt they will only interfere with your dreams.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Changes are on the
horizon. Make the effort to expand your knowledge
and insights by joining a club, class or other activity
that is interesting to you. New circumstances will also
provide new friendships.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
EXPERIENCED
HOUSE SITTER/
DOG SITTER NEEDED
We have inside dogs that need someone to be in
our house full time when we are out of town.
Requires overnight approximately 20 days a year
and day housesitting approximately 30 days a
year. Overnight and daily fees are negotiable but
need someone that does not have significant other
obligations as the timing of need is random ....
could be day, night or overnight for multiple days.
Please leave message
with experience on
(650) 477-2404
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
107 Musical Instruction
HAVE YOU ALWAYS
WANTED TO PLAY
THE HARP?
Private lessons in your home or
at San Mateo Studio.
Rentals available.
www.ericamesser.com
(415)786-9143
110 Employment
AUTHENTIC THAI CHEFS WANTED
A new Thai restaurant in Half Moon Bay,
open May 2014, requires 2 authentic
Thai chefs.
Please send resume to
spicemehmb@outlook.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have.Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRIVER WANTED Northern Peninsula,
Your car or mine (650)868-2334
after 7pm
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed per Month. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNAS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 200
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
IN-HOME
CARE Staffng
RESTAURANTS -
Managers, Servers, Bussers, Bartend-
ers, wanted. New Downtown San Mateo
Restaurant, Call (650)340-7684
110 Employment
HOTEL -
NOW HIRING
Breakfast Attendant
Housekeeper
Apply in person:
Best Western,
2940 S. Norfolk St.,
San Mateo
Or call 650-341-3300
INTERIOR DESIGNER - Mosaics Divi-
sion (San Carlos, CA) Responsible for
artistic custom dsgn & inlay surfaces
components of mosaic tile & slab proj-
ects. Rqmts. incl. MS in Fine Arts, Deco-
rative Art, Int. Dsgn & working knowl of
Mosaic tiling, AutoCAD, technical draw-
ing, interior dsgn composition. Resume
to: Marble City Co., 611 Taylor Way, #6,
San Carlos, CA 94070, or info@marble-
cityca.com
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SOFTWARE - Sr. Software Engr in Mtn
View, CA- Design/Devlp software systm
test envrnmts to test enterprise
scale ntwking gear. Req incl BS+5yrs
exp, incl routing & dep protocols, Layer2
ntwking, Border Gateway protocol,
OSPF.Mail resume to Cumulus Net-
works, Inc. Attn: HR, 185 E. Dana St.,
Mountain View, CA 94041
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259405
The following person is doing business
as: Pastrychik, 1301 Old County Rd. #1,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Pastrychik,
CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Reena Sy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/29/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/14, 03/05/14, 03/12/14, 03/19/14).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 526443
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Maria Lourdes Victoria De Carlos
Andrada
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, filed a petition with this court
for a decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Maria Lourdes Victoria
De Carlos Andrada
Propsed Name: Victoria De Carlos-Da-
vidson
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on April 3, 2014
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400 Coun-
ty Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the fol-
lowing newspaper of general circulation:
Daily Journal
Filed: 02/06/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/04/2014
(Published, 02/12/14, 02/19/2014,
01/26/2014, 02/05/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259401
The following person is doing business
as: Five As Cafe, 1851 El Camino Real,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: New 5A
Food Corporation, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Zhi Hua Deng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
23 Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journals wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
B2B sales experience is preferred
hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
work well with others
Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259435
The following person is doing business
as: ZeroChaos, 1800 Gateway Dr., SAN
MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Workforcelogic,
LLC, FL. The business is conducted by a
Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on12/20/2004.
/s/ Michael Werblun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259436
The following person is doing business
as: ZeroChaos, 1800 Gateway Dr., SAN
MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby registered
by the following owner: APC Workforce
Solutions, LLC, FL. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on12/20/2004.
/s/ Michael Werblun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259437
The following person is doing business
as: ZeroChaos, 1800 Gateway Dr., SAN
MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby registered
by the following owner: APC Workforce
Solutions II, LLC, FL. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN
on12/20/2004.
/s/ Michael Werblun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259423
The following person is doing business
as: Autosense, 219 Old County Rd. Unit
D, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jere-
my Sklyer, 544 Fathom Dr San Mateo,
CA 94404. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Jeremy Sklyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259320
The following person is doing business
as:1) The Greenspan Company, 2) The
Greenspan Company/Adjusters Interna-
tional, 3) Adjuster International, 400 Oys-
ter Point Blvd., Ste 519, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Greenspan
Adjusters International, Inc, a CA Corp,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on De-
cember 6, 2002.
/s/ Kimberly Kirkbride Allen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/22a/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259115
The following person is doing business
as: Delight Bites Catering Co, 1029 El
Camino Real, MENLO PARK, CA 94025
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Jessica Pak, 2740 Oakmont Dr.,
San Bruno, CA 94066. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Jessica Pak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259362
The following person is doing business
as: Belmont Village Properties, 926 Ral-
ston Ave., BELMONT, CA 94002 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Yvonne Wai-Yee Chan, 36 Arroyo View
Cir., BELMONT, CA 94002. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Yvonne Wai-Yee Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/27/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259480
The following person is doing business
as: Homesmart Platinum Living, 1060 El
Camino Real, #G, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Realtorchristina, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 02/03/2014.
/s/ Christina Nguyen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259350
The following person is doing business
as: Epic Limousine, 1618 Sulivan Ave.
#319, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Blessed Through Favor, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Irwandie Tio /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259364
The following person is doing business
as: Color Jet Supplies, 704 Prospect
Row, Apt 1, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ilyas Gursul, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Ilyas Gursul /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/27/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/14, 02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259560
The following person is doing business
as: Bayworks Construction Inc., 1045
Whitwell Rd., HILLSBOROUGH, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Bayworks Construction Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on Dec.
09, 2013.
/s/ Davina Murphy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14, 03/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259191
The following person is doing business
as: Ciaoshopper.com, 809 Park Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Newmax
International, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/01/2014.
/s/ Ming-Lik Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/14, 02/19/14, 02/26/14, 03/05/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259660
The following person is doing business
as: Aristar Continuing Education, 1001
Bayhill Dr., 2nd Flr, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hazel Salvana-Chew, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 05/17/14.
/s/ Hazel Salvana-Chew /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/18/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/19/14, 02/26/14, 03/05/14, 03/12/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259591
The following person is doing business
as: Royal Prestige of the Peninsula Com-
pany, 139 Mitchell Ave. Ste 232, South
San Francisco, CA 94080 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Ana Gon-
zalez, 60 E. 40 apt F, SAN MATEO, CA
94403. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Anna Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/14, 03/05/14, 03/12/14, 03/19/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259748
The following person is doing business
as: Environmental Andes, 1911 Ivy St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Juan-Luis
Echeverria-Bustios, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Juan-Luis Echeverria-Bustios /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/14, 03/05/14, 03/12/14, 03/19/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259742
The following person is doing business
as: Meineke Car Care Center #2469,
2260 S. El Camino Real, SAN MATEO,
CA 94403 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Carquinez Holdings Cor-
poration. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Stephen Borostyan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/14, 03/05/14, 03/12/14, 03/19/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259765
The following person is doing business
as: Kittys Studio Six, 6 Civic Center Ln.,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Catherine
Barranti and Steve Barranti, 2981 Crest-
moor Dr., San Bruno, CA 94066 The
business is conducted by a Husband and
Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Catherine Barranti /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/25/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/14, 03/05/14, 03/12/14, 03/19/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259753
The following person is doing business
as: Ting Li International, 203 El Camino
Real, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ting Li
International Corporation, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Stephen L. Grant /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/14, 03/05/14, 03/12/14, 03/19/14).
203 Public Notices
SAN MATEO COUNTY
Harbor District
Boat Pump-out Services
Request for Proposal
Mandatory Meeting of
all providers
March 11, 2014 at 9am.
Oyster Point Marina
Harbor Office at
95 Harbormaster Road, #1,
South San Francisco.
(office number for directions
etc. only is 650-952 0808)
Please visit
http://www.smharbor.com/
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-242511
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Five
As Cafe, 1851 El Camino Real, BUR-
LINGAME, CA 94010. The fictitious busi-
ness name was filed on 12/27/2010 in
the county of San Mateo. The business
was conducted by: Fu-Yan Corporation,
CA.
/s/ Zhi Hua Deng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 01/28/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 02/05/2014,
02/12/2014, 02/19/2014, 02/26/2014).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-258600
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Auto-
sense. 219 Old County Rd. Unit D, SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070. The fictitious busi-
ness name was filed on 11/20/2013 in
the county of San Mateo. The business
was conducted by: Jeremy Sklyer 544
Fathom Dr., San Mateo CA 94404 and
Sean Patrick Ellis, 600 Niagra Ave., San
Francisco, CA 94112.
/s/ Jeremy Sklyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 01/30/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 02/05/2014,
02/12/2014, 02/19/2014, 02/26/2014).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14. Call 650 490-
0921 - Leave message if no answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
210 Lost & Found
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3 each (650)341-1861
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
295 Art
5 prints, nude figures, 14 x 18, signed
Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all. 650-345-
3277
6 CLASSIC landscape art pictures,
28x38 glass frame. $15 each OBO.
Must see to appreciate. (650)345-5502
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
CRAFTSMAN 9 gal 3.5 HP wet/dry vac-
uum with extra filter. $30. 650-326-2235.
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! SOLD!
HOOD, G.E. Good condition, clean,
white.. $30. (650)348-5169
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24x24x24, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
MINI-FRIG NEW used i week paid $150.
Sell $75.00 650 697 7862
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24 wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18 Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24 5 speed in
very good condition $75 SOLD!
SCHWINN 20 Boys Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
HO TRAIN parts including engines, box-
cars, tankers, tracks, transformers, etc.
$75 Call 650-571-6295
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
RUSSIAN MEDAL Pins for sale, 68 in
lot, $99 (650)873-4030
24
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE DOLLS- 2002 Collection- Never
removed from box. Holiday Celebration &
Society Girl. $40.650-654-9252
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15 boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
VINTAGE 50'S JC Higgins toboggan, 74"
long & 18" wide. $35. 650-326-2235.
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
302 Antiques
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains
Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27 SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
32 FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
ATT 2WIRE Router, working condition,
for Ethernet, wireless, DSL, Internet.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
FLUORESCENT LIGHTS, Commercial
grade, 4 tubes $9 650-595-3933
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. SOLD!
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72x 21 x39 1/2
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
304 Furniture
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65.
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
SOLD!
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
304 Furniture
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, (650)345-5502
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each SOLD!
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/ cover, washable $25.
(650)578-9208
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(2) stainless steel, tem-
perature-resistent handles, 21/2 & 4 gal.
$5 for both. (650) 574-3229.
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MASSAGING SHOWER Head NEW,
screws on, no tool, only $10
650-595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
306 Housewares
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
BLACK & Decker 17" Electric Hedge
Trimmer. Like new. $20. 650-326-2235.
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
GREEN CERAMIC flower pot w/ 15
Different succulents, $20.(650)952-4354
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $7, SOLD!
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
NALGENE WATER bottle,
$5; new aluminum btl $3 650-595-3933
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 SOLD!
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40 high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
25 Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 McCarthys
dummy friend
6 Baltic, e.g.
9 Cougar
13 Canadian dollar
coin nickname
14 I threw away my
golf shoes when
I got a hole in
one e.g.
15 Computer
operating system
16 Blackadder
network
17 Hosp. heart exam
18 Medicinal dose
19 Cutie pie
20 Impressionist
whom Mel Blanc
labeled The Man
of a Thousand
Voices
23 Baltic feeder
25 ... a __ / By any
other name ...
26 Head honcho
30 Tolkiens talking
trees
33 Equal: Pref.
34 The Mod Squad
cop
35 Show shame,
perhaps
37 Smudge
39 60s jacket style
41 UFO-tracking org.
42 Unsavory sort
44 Respectful
address
46 From, in some
European names
47 Star witnesses?
48 Driving with
abandon
50 Hispaniola, por
ejemplo
52 Poet __ St.
Vincent Millay
53 Borzois, e.g.
57 Gratify
61 Put out
62 Low numero
63 Prominent Ore.
peak
65 Wither in the sun
66 Porters __ De-
Lovely
67 B beater
68 Raised
69 Look at
70 Super Bowl XLVII
player
DOWN
1 Area below
Greenwich
Village
2 Sleigh ride song
3 As a whole
4 Kid
5 Making
pronouncements
6 A writer may
work on it
7 Trick-taking card
game
8 Prefix meaning
English
9 Portable
shelters
10 Curriculum part
11 Grain grinder
12 Rod in a hot rod
13 Letters on some
Brit. letterheads
21 Dancer Castle
22 Oracles opening
24 UPS competitor
26 Lettuce variety
27 Imams faith
28 Fondue choice
29 Knucklehead
31 Three Coins ...
fountain
32 Resolute about
35 Reserve soldier
36 Minor dent
38 Put a bad
present to good
use
40 Like daisies
43 Lillian of the silver
screen
45 Musical key abbr.
48 Smart-looking
49 Enter quickly
51 Character in
Donalds
Nephews (1938
cartoon)
53 57 Spud who
won the 1986
NBA Slam Dunk
contest
54 Rubiyt poet
55 Enjoy
56 Bouquet
58 Top-of-the-line
59 Visit with a guide
60 Money mgrs.?
64 Texters I didnt
need to know
that!
By Bryan W. Young and Jeff Chen
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
02/26/14
02/26/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM, MARINA Cool 10, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. (650)591-
1500
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WANTED SILVER Dollars
(650)492-1298
WANTED: HORSE DRAWN
EQUIPMENT
For restoration.
Condition is not critical.
Email location, photo, &
Telephone number. to:
rosekrans@pacbell.net or
call (650)851-7201
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56 square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
316 Clothes
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, $10 (650)375-8044
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
MANS DENIM Jacket, XL HD fabric,
metal buttons only $15 650-595-3933
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
RAY BAN Aviator glasses - brand new in
case. Green lens-gold frames. 63mm.
$99. 650-654-9252
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
316 Clothes
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50. (650)637-
0930
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. SOLD!
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
318 Sports Equipment
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER Solaris Electric Cord-
less 21 self propelled. Excellent work-
ing condition.$85. SOLD!
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
CIMPLER
REAL ESTATE
Cimpler Real Estate - Reinventing
Home Buying
To Buy Smarter Call Artur Urbanski,
Broker/Owner
(650)401-7278
533 Airport Blvd, 4th Flr, Burlingame
www.cimpler.com
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
RENT
1 bedroom bath & kitchen
close to everything Redwood City $1375.
650-361-1200
452 Condos for Rent
2 BEDROOM 2 Bath Condo San Mateo,
New App, W/D hook-up, Garage, Pool,
Jacuzzi, Quiet $2750, (650)387-5998
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
99 DODGE Van, 391 Posi, 200 Hp V-6,
22 Wheels, 2 24 Ladders, 2015 Tags,
$4500 OBO (650)481-5296
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
Well run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 00 Impala, 58K miles, Very
clean! $6,000. Joe, (650)589-3002
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition SOLD!
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBILE 99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. $1,500.
(650)740-6007.
VOLVO 85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO 85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUVs
FORD 98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2000 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
TOYOTA 05 TUNDRA, 4WD, Access
Cab, low mileage, $14,000. Call Joe
SOLD!
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires Service Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Claremont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
670 Auto Parts
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a 96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUNNING BOARDS Dodge Ram fac-
tory chrome running boards. $99 (650)
995-4222
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICAS HOUSE
CLEANING & JANITORIAL
SERVICES
House Cleaning Move In/Out
Cleaning Janitorial Services
Handyman Services
Spring Cleaning Special! $65
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
REMODELING,
CONCRETE &
MASONRY SERVICES
Paving Landscaping
Demolition
(650)445-844
Mobile (907)570-6555
State Lic. #B990810
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot Decks Fences
Handyman Painting
Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
MARIN CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialists
* custom decks * Framing * remodel-
ing * foundation Rep.*Dry Rot * Ter-
mite Rep * And Much More
Ask about our 20% signing and
senior discounts
(650)486-1298
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels Framing
Carpentry Stucco Siding
Dryrot Painting
Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS CLEANING
Roof and Gutter Repair
Screening & Seal
Replace & New Gutters
Free Est. Call Oscar
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
L.C PAINTING
(650)271-3955
Interior & Exterior
Sheetrock/Drywall Repair
Carpentry Repairs
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
HAMZEH PLUMBING
Faucet Repair, Sewer lines, Un-
clog Drains, Water heater repair
and Repair Sewer inspection
People love me on Yelp!
(415)690-6540
Plumbing
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Plumbing
27 Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
Attorneys
BANKRUPTCY
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650)515-7792
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
President's Day Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
$29
ONE HOUR MASSAGE
(650)354-8010
1030 Curtis St #203,
Menlo Park
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax & Massage
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
www.unionspaand salon.com
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP serving your mid-Peninsula
real estate needs since 1976.
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
BRE LIC# 1254368
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
WORLD 28
Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Yuras Karmanau
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEVASTOPOL, Ukraine
Dozens of pro-Russian protesters
rallied Tuesday in the Crimean
Peninsula against the bandits in
Kiev who are trying to form a new
government, with some even
speaking of secession, and a
Russian lawmaker stoked their
passions by promising that
Moscow will protect them.
Russia, save us! some chant-
ed.
An armored personnel carrier
and two trucks full of Russian
troops made a rare appearance on
the streets of the port city where
the Kremlins Black Sea Fleet is
based. A Russian ag uttered in
front of the city council building,
replacing the Ukrainian ag that
demonstrators had torn down a day
earlier.
The protesters pleaded with
Moscow to protect them from the
new authorities who forced
President Viktor Yanukovych to
ee the capital and go into hiding.
Bandits have come to power,
said Vyacheslav Tokarev, a 39-
year-old construction worker. Im
ready to take arms to ght the fas-
cists who have seized power in
Kiev.
Yanukovych was reportedly last
seen in the Crimea, a staunchly
pro-Russian region the size of
Massachusetts. Law enforcement
agencies have issued an arrest war-
rant for him over the killing of 82
people, mainly protesters, last
week in the bloodiest violence in
Ukraines post-Soviet history.
His former chief of staff, Andriy
Klyuyev, was wounded by gunre
Monday and hospitalized,
spokesman Artem Petrenko told
the Associated Press. It wasnt
clear where in Ukraine the shoot-
ing took place.
The protesters gathered for a
third day in front of administrative
buildings in Sevastopol and in
other Crimean cities in the pro-
Moscow region in the southern
Ukraine. Protests on Sunday num-
bered in the thousands.
Pro-Russian rally in Crimea decries Kiev bandits
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Two days
before he ed Ukraines capital,
President Viktor Yanukovych hud-
dled on the phone for more than
an hour with Vice President Joe
Biden, his primary conduit with
the U.S. government throughout
the political crisis consuming the
former Soviet republic.
The window for a resolution to
the crisis was closing quickly
and may already have closed,
Biden warned Yanukovych,
according to a senior administra-
tion ofcial familiar with the con-
versation.
Yanukovych was initially de-
ant, the ofcial said, and accused
the protesters in the streets of
Kiev of being terrorists. Though
Yanukovych became less resistant
to Bidens appeals as the call con-
tinued, the vice president hung up
the phone uncertain of the embat-
tled leaders next move.
What followed was a rapid series
of developments that left
Yanukovychs fate and the
broader political situation in
Ukraine highly uncertain. On
Friday, Yanukovych agreed to
form a new government and hold
an early election. Ukraines par-
liament slashed the presidents
powers and voted to free his rival,
former Prime Minister Yulia
Tymos he nko,
from prison.
And on
S a t u r d a y ,
Ya n u k o v y c h
fled Kiev,
reportedly hol-
ing up in
Crimea, a pro-
Russian area of
Ukraine.
The tenuous political agreement
was orchestrated by European
diplomats, with the U.S. and
Russia playing supporting roles.
Biden, who had built a working
relationship with Yanukovych
since becoming vice president,
was at the forefront of the deli-
cate diplomatic maneuvering for
the Obama administration. He
spoke to Yanukovych on the
phone nine times during the
three-month political crisis, an
unusual level of contact that
underscored the heightened U.S.
concern about stability in
Ukraine, a strategically located
nation that shares a border with
Russia.
The vice president also met
throughout the crisis with
Ukrainian religious leaders and
Ukrainian-American groups,
according to the administration
ofcial, who was not authorized to
discuss the vice presidents
involvement by name and insist-
ed on anonymity.
Biden at center of U.S.
diplomacy with Ukraine
REUTERS
Members of self defence units march to the parliament building in Kiev,
Ukraine.
Joe Biden
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON In a blunt
warning to Afghan President
Hamid Karzai, President Barack
Obama threatened on Tuesday to
withdraw all U.S. troops from
Afghanistan by the end of this
year if a crucial security pact isnt
signed and he ordered the
Pentagon to accelerate planning
for just that scenario.
At the same time, in a rare phone
call with Karzai, Obama indicated
he was willing to wait his mercuri-
al counterpart out and sign a secu-
rity agreement with a new Afghan
president after April elections.
That would allow the U.S. to keep
as many as 10,000 troops in the
country.
The effort seemed aimed at mar-
ginalizing Karzais role in the
high-stakes negotiations over the
future of the lengthy American-led
war.
Obama tells Pentagon to plan for Afghan pullout