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Works Cited Primary Sources: "Attorney Geoffrey Fieger speaks on passing of Jack Kevorkian." wxyz.

Scripps TV Station Group, Web. 9 Feb. 2014. Geoffrey Fieger described Kevorkian as a compassionate doctor who felt that it was right for a physician to help patients overcome their suffering. Kevorkian was the only physician that was willing to risk his life for the rights of his patients. This showed me that Dr. Kevorkian was a strong and persistent advocate for the right to die. "Dr. Jack Kevorkian." Gale Student Resources in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Student Resources in Context. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. This photograph showed Dr. Kevorkian with his suicide machine, the Thanatron. This picture confirmed that Kevorkians creation consisted of three containers each holding a different fluid but all three contributed in the process of an assisted suicide. 'Dr. Death,' Jack Kevorkian, dies unassisted. Philly.com. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. Barbara Walters and Jack Kevorkian are posing with a replica of the Mercitron in this photograph. Kevorkian created this death machine to help his patients have the least painful death possible by inhaling carbon monoxide through a mask. I learned that Kevorkian minimized any pain that a patient would go through when they ended their lives by creating suicide machines such as the Mercitron which only required inhaling carbon monoxide to end a life. Dr. Jack Kevorkian, 1928-2011. YouTube. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. Dr. Jack Kevorkian died on June 3, 2011 at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan at the age of 83 due to a blood clot. Jack Kevorkian devoted his life to fighting for the right to die. Critics named

him Dr. Death but his supporters considered him a champion. He was a retired pathologist who challenged authorities and sparked a national debate in the 1990s when he assisted more than 130 terminally ill patients end their lives. Kevorkian created his suicide machines because he believed that the terminally ill had the right to end their own suffering and die. Kevorkian was put on trial four times but was never convicted until 1999 when he had recorded himself injecting Thomas Youk with lethal drugs. He was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to 10-25 years in prison. In 2007, after Kevorkian had spent eight years of his sentence, he was released on parole due to good behavior and his promise to never assist another patient in their suicide. Kevorkian never achieved his goal of legalizing euthanasia, but he succeeded in getting an entire nation to begin thinking about the right to die. Despite Kevorkians relentless efforts in the 1990s, few states made euthanasia and physician assisted suicide legal. Laws took effect in Oregon in 1997 and Washington State in 2009, and a 2009 Montana Supreme Court ruling effectively legalized suicide assisted suicide in Montana. This video educated me about the fight for the right to die. "Fourteenth Amendment." Gale Encyclopedia of American Law. Ed. Donna Batten. 3rd ed. Vol. 4. Detroit: Gale, 2010. 509-513. Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 9 Feb. 2014. The 14th Amendment protects the right to physician-assisted suicide. Every United States citizen has the right to life, liberty, and property and no state can deny people those rights. The right to die or live should not be taken away from people, which includes whether they choose to end their own life or continue living. The Constitution protects the right to live but also does not ban the right to die.

Jack Kevorkian- The Right to Die. YouTube. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. Dr. Kevorkian believed that it was not ending life that was important, but ending suffering. Kevorkian has helped many terminally ill patients end their lives and is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to legalize euthanasia and PAS. Officials disagree with Kevorkian because they do not want to promote death; they want to preserve life. This video discussed both sides of the debate for the right to die, which is a significant part of understanding the true controversy between the two sides. Townsend, Liz. "Kevorkian's Nine-Year Euthanasia Crusade Leads to Murder Conviction." National Right to Life News 8 Apr. 1999: 10.Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. Dr. Kevorkian was convicted after nine years, 130 assisted suicides, and six trials. Kevorkian continually disobeyed the authorities and challenged them to stop him. In 1999, he was convicted for second-degree murder after he had recorded himself injecting Thomas Youk and allowing it to be broadcasted on the national TV show 60 minutes. Kevorkian was sentenced to 10-25 years in prison but only ended up serving 8 years. He was released on parole due to his good behavior and his promise to not assist in suicides anymore. This document showed me that Dr. Kevorkian was a very persistent advocate for euthanasia and PAS because he did not stop trying until he was convicted and sent to prison. Secondary Sources: "Against Euthanasia." Paper Maters. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. This image helped me understand the morals of the debate on euthanasia. If terminally ill patients who wanted to die were euthanized, what would happen when terminally ill patients who did not want to die were killed? Would there be a certain point in time when it became considered necessary to

kill not just terminally ill individuals but people who did not contribute enough to the society? These arguments have to be considered before making a significant decision such as legalizing euthanasia. "Aid in Dying." The Wall Street Journal. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. Assisting in someones death is legal in only a handful of places. Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands allow euthanasia. France is considering euthanasia, and places that allow assisted suicide are Switzerland, Montana, Washington state, Oregon, and Vermont. I learned that euthanasia and PAS are illegal everywhere except for a couple of countries and states. "Assisted Suicide Laws Worldwide." MCT Graphics Service. 2008. Professional Collection. Web. 9 Feb. 2014. The map displayed the few countries and states that allow euthanasia and PAS. This image showed me that assisted suicide is legal in Switzerland and Oregon (U.S.) and that euthanasia is only allowed in the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxemburg. "Death With Dignity Act Supporter." Gale Student Resources in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Student Resources in Context. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. In this photograph a protester, Stacy Richter, is one of several people supporting the legalization of the Death with Dignity Act outside Portland, Oregons federal courthouse. Seeing the supporters perseverance greatly contributed to my understanding of the morals behind the fight for legalization of assisted suicide. "Dr. Kevorkians Suicide Machines." MCT Graphics Service. 2011. Professional Collection. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. This graphic described how the two methods that Dr. Kevorkian used in assisted suicides functioned. The image labeled the specific parts and functions that took place when either method was used. It helped me understand what exactly happened during the processes of assisted suicides.

"Hastening Death." The Wall Street Journal. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. These three graphs represent the increases in the declaration of euthanasia and assisted suicides in Belgium, Oregon (U.S.), and Washington State (U.S.). It can be gathered that over time euthanasia and PAS have increased in theses places due to laws that allowed these actions. "Jack Kevorkian." American Decades: 1990-1999. Ed. Tandy McConnell. Detroit: Gale Group, 2001. Student Resources in Context. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. Dr. Jack Kevorkian was born on May 26, 1928 in Pontiac, Michigan. He earned the nickname Dr. Death when he performed research on the eyes of dying patients. Kevorkian claimed to have assisted in 130 deaths in the 1990s. His actions led to intense debates about the right to die. In 1999, Kevorkian was convicted of second-degree murder after he had injected Thomas Youk with lethal drugs. He was sentenced to 10-25 years in prison but got out after 8 years for good behavior and his promise not to assist in suicides. This biography of Jack Kevorkian helped me learn that Kevorkian was willing to sacrifice a lot to achieve the right to die. "Kevorkian, Jack." UXL Biographies. Detroit: U*X*L, 2011. Student Resources in Context. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. Jack Kevorkian, an advocate for legalizing euthanasia, defied the law by helping terminally ill patients end their lives. In 1991, Kevorkians Michigan medical license was revoked, but his assisted-suicide mission never slowed. On June 4, 1990 using the Thanatron Kevorkian helped her commit suicide. Kevorkians actions resulted in harsh criticism from the medical society. Even after his release from prison Kevorkian remained in the spotlight of assisted suicide. He gave several lectures at many universities stating that his aim was not to cause death but to end suffering. This

biography helped me learn about everything Kevorkian did during his life to earn people the right to die. Not Dead Yet. Trinity University. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. There are countless numbers of individuals with terminal illnesses who do not wish to die. The benefits of legalizing euthanasia and PAS apply only to individuals with terminal illnesses who are constantly in severe pain. Organizations like Not Dead Yet worry that if euthanasia and PAS are legalized that mentally/physically handicapped individuals may face medical limitations. I learned that there are risks in legalizing euthanasia and PAS because if some terminally ill people were euthanized against their will that would be murder. "Preface to 'Should Doctor-Assisted Suicide Be Allowed?'" Suicide. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2008. Opposing Viewpoints. Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 9 Feb. 2014. Dr. Jack Kevorkian was the representative for the assisted suicide movement in the 1990s. His suicide machines enabled him to assist in about 130 suicides, the first was Janet Adkins and the last was Thomas Youk. Many people believed that Kevorkian was a hero for assisting in the suicides of 130 people because those individuals died a peaceful and dignified death. Many others thought that Kevorkian was not good for the right-to-die movement because he never seemed troubled in euthanizing someone only hours after they had met. In this article I learned that whether Kevorkian was considered a hero or not he will be remembered as the one who brought euthanasia and assisted suicide to the U.S.s attention. The Right To Die. Panos Pictures. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. These images represent the two opposing sides of the debate for euthanasia and PAS. The photograph for euthanasia and PAS is arguing that everyone should have the right to a dignified death because it is a human

right. The picture against euthanasia and PAS features a man who suffers from a neurodegenerative condition spinal muscular atrophy but he does not want to be euthanized. I gathered from the images that individuals with terminal illnesses are divided into both sides of the debate. Some want to be euthanized so they do not suffer, but others prefer to live their life. Right-to-die Debate. BBC News. Web. 11 Feb. 2014. (Image) Schneider, Keith. "Dr. Jack Kevorkian Dies at 83; A Doctor Who Helped End Lives." The New York Times [New York] 3 June 2011: n. pag. Print. Jack Kevorkian argued for the right of the terminally ill to be able to choose how they died. His strong advocacy for euthanasia and PAS helped increase hospice care in the U.S. and made doctors more sympathetic to patients in severe pain which also resulted in doctors to be more willing to prescribe medication to relieve the pain. Kevorkians goal was to make euthanasia a positive experience and also make other doctors realize their responsibilities, one that included assisting their patients with their death. From this article I learned that Kevorkians actions were meant to have a positive effect on the nation because he only wanted to make sure that people did not have suffer until they died.