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AN

EGYPTIAN HIEROGLYPHIC
DICTIONARY.
WITH AN INDEX OF ENGLISH WORDS, KING LIST AND GEOGRAPHICAL LIST WITH INDEXES, LIST OF HIEROGLYPHIC CHARACTERS. COPTIC AND SEMITIC ALPHABETS, ETC.

ByCSir)

E^r

AV

WALLIS BUDGE,

Knt., F.S.A.,

M.A. AND LiTT.D., Cambridge; M.A. and D.Litt., Oxford; D.Lit., Durham; SOMETIME SCHOLAR OF CHRIST'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, AND TYRWHITT HEBREW SCHOl.AU KEEPER OF THE EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES, BRITISH MUSEUM.
;

{IN

TWO VOLUMES)
VOL.
I.

LONDON
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET,
1920.

iPI|iiPHii^l^lR^PMl

PRINTERS
ST.

HARRISON AND SONS, IN ORDINARY TO HIS MAJESTY.


martin's I.ANE
W.C.
2.

LONDON,

CONTENTS.
PAGE

Dedication
Introduction
List of Authorities quoted or referred to List of Hieroglyphic Characters
Coptic, Semitic,

'

facing

ii

V
Ixxv
xcvii
cxiviii

....

and Persian Cuneiform Alphabets

Egyptian Dictionary
List of Kings'

Names ^

917
947
1067

List of Countries, Cities, Towns, etc.

Index of English

Words
.

Index of Kings' Names

1257
1271

Index of Geographical Names

Geographical Names
Arabic, etc
List of Coptic

in Coptic,

Greek, Hebrew, Assyrian, Syriac


1279

Words quoted

in

the Dictionary
in

1287

List of non-Egyptian

Words quoted

the Dictionary
etc.

Hebrew, Assyrian, Syriac, Arabic,


List of

....

Greek
1305

Egyptian

Hieroglyphic Characters in the

Fount of
1315

Messrs. Harrison and Sons; with Appendix.

INTRODUCTION.
It

be taken for granted that, from the time when Akerblad, Young and Champollion le Jeune laid the foundation of the
first

may

science of Egyptology in the

quarter of the nineteenth century

down to the present day, every serious student of Egyptian texts, whether hieroglyphic, hieratic or demotic, has found it necessary to compile in one form or another his own Egyptian Dictionary.
In these days the

when we have

at our disposal the


last

knowledge which

has been acquired during the


toil

hundred years by the unceasing and their immediate Labours of Birch, Lepsius, Brugsch, Chabas, Goodwin, E. de p^"^!^ followers Rouge and others we are apt to underrate the difficulties which lexicothey met and overcame, as well as to forget how great is the debt S^'^P^^^^. which we owe to them. I therefore propose, before passing on to describe the circumstances under which the present Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary has been produced, to recall briefly the labours of the " famous men " who have preceded me in the field of Egyptian lexicography, and " who were honoured in their generations, and were the glory of their times." The Abbe J. J. Barthelemy (1716-1795) as far back as 1761 Akerblad and inscriptions Zoega's showed satisfactorily that the ovals in Egyptian uy i discoveries, which we call " cartouches " contamed royal names. Zoega
of

above-mentioned

pioneers

jT

(1756-1809) accepted this view, and, developing

it,
^

stated that the

hieroglyphs

them were alphabetic letters. Had Akerblad (1760-1819) and S. de Sacy (1758-1838) accepted these facts, and wofked to develop them, the progress of Egyptological They failed, howscience would have been materially hastened. ever, to pay much attention to the hieroglyphic inscriptions of which copies were available, and devoted all their time and labour
in

to the elucidation of the enchorial, or demotic, text on the Rosetta

Silvestre de

Stone, the discovery of which had roused such profound interest

^^^^

among
with

the learned
text

men

of the day.

Their labours in connection


considerable
first

this

were crowned with

success.

To

Akerblad belongs the credit of being the


Coptic letters, but neither he nor
S.

European
its

to formulate

a " Demotic Alphabet," and to give the values of

characters in

de Sacy seems to have sus-

pected the existence of a hieroglyphic alphabet. Both these eminent scholars produced lists, or small vocabularies, of demotic
'

See

my

Rosetta Stone, vol.

I,

p. 40.

a 3

VI

Introduction.

Demotic
vocabularies

words, and added translations of them which are surprisingly


correct considering the period

Akerblad and de Sacy.


of

when they were compiled.

And
Their

both were able


failure to

to read correctly the


e.g.,

demotic equivalents of several

Greek royal names,


to

Alexander, Ptolemy and Berenice.


inexplicable.

apply the method by which they achieved such success


inscriptions
is

the

hieroglyphic

It

has been

suggested that their scholarly minds revolted at the absurd views,


theories
Kircher, Jablonski,

and statements about the Egyptian hieroglyphs made


J.

by Athanasius Kircher (1601-1680), Jablonski (1673-1757),

de

de Guignes

and Tychsen.

Guignes (1721-1800), Tychsen (1734-1815) and others, and the suggestion is probably correct. After the publication of his

famous " Letter " to


about them.

S.

de Sacy,^ Akerblad seems to have dropped

his Egyptological studies.

At

all

events, he published nothing

De

Sacy, though he did not consider that he had

wasted the time that he had spent on the demotic text on the Rosetta Stone, refrained from further research in Egyptology, and nothing of importance was effected in the decipherment of the

Egyptian hieroglyphs until Dr. Thomas Young (June 13th, 1773May loth, 1830) turned his attention to them.

Young's Hieroglyphic Alphabet and Vocabulary.


Thomas Young and
the Rosetta Stone.

In

1 814

Stone, and, according to his

months
texts.

in

on the Rosetta own statement, succeeded in a few translating both the demotic and the hieroglyphic

Young began

to study the inscriptions

His translations, together with notes and some remarks

on Akerblad's Demotic Alphabet, were printed in Archceologia for 1815, under the title " Remarks on Egyptian Papyri and on the Inscription of Rosetta." With respect to the Egj^ptian Alphabet " he says, I had hoped to find an alphabet which would enable me to read the enchorial inscription. But I gradually compelled had been to abandon this expectation, and to admit the conviction that no such alphabet would ever be
.

...

discovered, because

it

had never been

in existence."

During the

next three or four years he

made

striking progress in the decipher-

both demotic and hieroglyphic characters. The results of his studies at this period were published in his article Egypt,
of

ment

which appeared
pcBcLia

in Part
in

of the
It

fourth volume of the Encyclofive plates,

Britannica

i8ig.

was accompanied by

containing inter alia a hieroglyphic vocabulary of 218 words, a


'

Lettre sur

V Inscription Egyptienne de
plate containing the

Rosette, adressee

au citoyen

Silvestre

de Sacy, Paris (Imprimerie de la Republique Fran^aise) and Strasbourg, an


(1802), 8vo.

With a

Demotic Alphabet.

Introduction.
" supposed enchorial,

vii

i.e.,

demotic alphabet," and " specimens of

phrases." The Vllth Section of the letterpress contained the Young's " Rudiments of a Hieroglyphic Vocabulary," and thus Young Hieroglyphic

Egyptian Vocabularies. In this article, which formed a most important and epochmaking contribution to Egyptology, Young gave a list containing a number of alphabetic Egyptian characters, to which, in most cases, he assigned correct phonetic values, i.e., values which are accepted by Egyptologists at the present day. In fact, he showed

became the "father"

of English compilers of

that he

had

rightly grasped the idea of a phonetic principle in

the reading of Egyptian hieroglyphs, the existence of which had

been assumed and practically proved by Barthelemy and Zoega, and applied it for the first time in the decipherment of
. . .

His
application of the Phonetic

Egyptian hieroglyphs. This seems to me to be an mdisputable principle. fact, which can easily be verified by any one who will take the " trouble to read Young's article, Egypt, in the " Supplement to the EncyclopcBdia Britannica and study his correspondence and papers which John Leitch reprinted in the third volume of Young's the Miscellaneous Works of the late Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S., gnceTith'^'

Those whom such evidence will not satisfy may consult the five volumes of his papers that are preserved in the In the first British Museum (Additional MSS. 27,281-27,285). volume (Add. 27,281) are all the principal documents dealing with his work on the Rosetta Stone, and in the second (Add. 27,282) will be found his copies of a series of short vocabularies of Egyptian
London, 1855.

Chan-pollion

others.

Without wishing in any way to reopen the dispute as to the merits and value of Young's work in comparison with that of ChampoUion, it may be pointed out that scholars who were contemporaries of both and who had competent knowledge of Egyptology couple together the names of Young and ChampoUion, and place Young's name first. Thus Kosegarten groups Young,
words.

Birch speaks of the " discoveries of ChampoUion and Peyron^ and Tattam says that the Dr. Young and M. ChampoUion "^ sculptured monuments and papyri of Egypt have long " engaged
; ;

contemporary
opinions on

the attention of the Learned,

endeavoured to Young's decipher them, tUl our indefatigable and erudite countryman, discovery. Dr. Young, and, after him, M. ChampoUion, undertook the task."''
in vain
Debitas vero gratias refero Youngio, ChampoUiono, Peyronio, viris praeclarissimis, quo quoties aliquid ad hoc studiorum genus pertinens abiis sciscitarem,
'

who have

toties benevolo

semper et promte quae desiderarem mecum communicaverunt. De Prisca Aegyptiorum Litteratura Commentatio prima. Weimar, 1828, p. iv. - Sketch London, 1838, p. 3. of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary.
'

Coptic

Grammar.

London, 1830,

p. ix.

a 4

Vlll

Introduction.

The

great value and importance of Young's application of the

phonetic principle to Egyptian hieroglyphs has been


the distinguished Egyptologist,
la realite, le fiat

summed up

with characteristic French terseness and accuracy by Chabas,

who

wrote, " Cette id6e fut, dans

lux de la science."' Curiously enough Young did not

follow

up

his discovery

by

a continued application of his phonetic principle to Egyptian


inscriptions other than those on the Rosetta Stone, but seems to

have been content to leave


to

its

further application and development

ChampoUion le Jeune.^ And for some reason he made no attempt to add to the Egyptian Vocabulary containing 218 words wliich he published in his article Egypt in the Encyclopaedia Britannica,
or
Young's

he did, his additions were never printed. On the other hand, he devoted himself to the preparation of a Demotic Dictionary and
if

Demotic
Dictionary.

work occupied the last ten years of his life. The " Advertisement " is of considerable interest, for it shows that it was only his inability to decide upon the system of arrangement that ought to be employed in an Egyptian Dictionary, that prevented him from publishing the work during his lifetime. His difficulty is described
this

by him thus " From


cult

the mixed nature of the characters employed in the


it

written language or rather languages of the Egyptians,


to determine

is diffi-

what would be the best arrangement

for

dictionary, even

Alphabetic arrangement
of the Dictionary.

if they were all perfectly clear in their forms, and perfectly well understood at present, however, so many of them remain unknown, and those which are better known assume so diversified an appearance, that the original difficulty is greatly increased. Every methodical arrangement, however arbitrary, has the advantage of bringing together such words as nearly resemble each other and it appears most likely to be subservient to the purposes of future investigation, to employ an imitation of an alphabetical order, or an artificial alphabet, founded upon the resemblance of the characters to those of which the phonetic value was clearly and correctly determined by the late Mr. Akerblad; and to arrange the words that are to be interpreted
:

according to their places in this


in each instance, not

artificial
first

order

choosing, however,

always the

character that enters into

the composition of the word, but


the most radical, or the most
'

that

which appears to be
in
its signification,

essential

or

Inscription de Rosette, p.

5.

See Advertisement

to

Dr. Young's Egyptian Dictionary printed in Rudiments

of an Egyptian Dictionary, which formed an Appendix to Tattam's Coptic Grammar. London, 1830, 8vo, and was reprinted by Leitch. op. cit., p. 472 ff.

Introduction.

ix

ii

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Introduction.

sometimes that which


distinguished.
"1

is

merely the most readily ascertained or


first

Now

although Young was the

to apply the phonetic, or


it is

alphabetic, principle to Egyptian hieroglyphs,

quite clear

Champollion's

from the above that he failed to see its value in arranging Egyptian words in a dictionary. Speaking of Champollion's alphabet, which was in reality his own with modifications and considerable
additions,

AlphabS'^'^

he says

"His system

of phonetic characters

may

memory, but it can only be applied with confidence to particular cases when supported in each case by the same kind of evidence that had been employed before its invention. His communications have furnished many valuable additions to this work, all of which have been acknowledged in
their

often be of use in assisting the

proper places."
i.e.
it,

So then rejecting

his

own system

of

phonetic,

ment
to

of

tionary in

alphabetic, characters, and Champollion's develophe drew up his " Rudiments of the Egyptian Dicthe ancient Enchorial Character," intending the work

appear as an Appendix to the " Coptic Grammar," which Henry Tattam was then writing. Whilst the printing of the
"
fell ill,

Rudiments " was in progress he work was so great that in spite


Kosegarten's
es imony.

but his interest in the

of his illness he continued to

prepare

its

pages for the lithographer and to correct the proofs.

he had passed for press six sheets, i.e. 96 pages, death overtook him, and Tattam corrected the last 14 pages (pp. 97-110) of proof, saw them through the press, and compiled an Index to
the work, which appeared with Tattam's " Coptic
'

When

Grammar

" in

Writing to M. Arago on July 4th, 1828, Young says, " Now of the nine letters which I insist that I had discovered, M. ChampoUion himself allows me five, and I maintain that a single one would have been sufficient for all that I
wished to prove
;

the method by which that one was obtained being allowed to

be correct, and to be capable of further application.


analysis of the Egyptian system,
I insist, is

The
I

true foundation of the

the great fact of the original identity


discovered and printed in

of the enchorial with the sacred characters, which

Criiicum No. VI, pp. 155-204], and which M. ChampoUion probably rediscovered, and certainly republished in 182 1 besides the reading of

1816

[in

the

Museum

had completely ascertained and published in 1814, and the name of Cleopatra, which Mr. Bankes had afterwards discovered by means of the information that I had sent him out to Egypt, and which he asserts that he communicated indirectly to M. ChampoUion [see H. Salt, Essay on Dr. Young's and M. Champollion's Phonetic System of Hieroglyphics, London, 1825, and whatever deficiencies there might have been in my original alphabet, p. 7] supposing it to have contained but one letter correctly determined, they would and must have been gradually supplied by a continued application of the same method to other monuments which have been progressively discovered and made
the
of Ptolemy,

name

which

public since the date of

my

first

paper."
p.

Leitch, Miscellaneous

Works

of the late

Thomas Young, M.D.,

F.R.S., Vol. Ill,

464

ff.

Introduction.

XI

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43

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{j...c5

Chatnpollion's Table of Hieroglyphic


relative
b,

and Demotic phonetic

signs.

From

his Letire

a M.

Dader

r Alphabet

des Hieroglyphes Phonetiqties.

Paris, 1822.

Plate IV.

xu
1830.^

Introduction.

The

" Rudiments,"

to

paraphrase Kosegarten's words,


all

contains a valuable and well-arranged collection of

the most

important groups of enchorial characters hitherto deciphered. These Young selected from enchorial texts which had been published
letters

by

himself, and by Champollion and Kosegarten, and from which he had received from Champollion describing the

contents of unpublished papyri at Paris.

The
Progress of

progress of Egyptology suffered a severe set-back

Egyptology
retarded by the death of

Young and
Champollion.

May loth, 1830, and by the death of March 4th, pollion on 1832, and there was no scholar sufficiently advanced in the science to continue their work. With the exception of books and papers of a polemical character, some authors championing Young's system of phonetics, and others loudly proclaiming the superior merits of that of Champollion, and others advocating the extraordinary views of Spohn and Seyffarth (1796-1885), no important work on Egyptological decipherment appeared for several years. Soon after the death of Champollion a rumour circulated freely among the learned of Europe to the effect that the great Frenchman had left in manuscript, almost complete, many works which he was preparing for press when death overtook him, and that these were to appear shortly under
death of Young on
the editorship of his brother,
It

by the Cham-

Champolhon-Figeac (i 778-1 867). was widely known that Champollion had been engaged for
'

Grammar,

In his Observations on the Hieroglyphic and Enchorial Alphabets (Coptic p. ix ff.) Tattam describes briefly and accurately the various steps in

He shows that Young was the first Ptolemy and Berenice, that Bankes, with the help of Young, discovered the name of Cleopatra, and says that the system of letters thus discovered was " taken up, and extended, by M. Champollion, and afterwards He then gives the Hieroglyphic by Mr. Salt, our late Consul-General in Egypt." Alphabet as constructed from the researches of Young, Bankes, Champollion and
the early history of Egyptian decipherment.
to read correctly the

names

of

Salt.
' Das Werk (Nro. 2), mit welchem der treffliche Young Laufbahn und zugleich sein Leben beschlossen hat, tnthalt

seine literarische

eine schatzbare,

wohlgeordnete Sammlung
gruppen.

allcr

wichtigsten bisher erklarten enchorischen Schrift-

Er hat diese Sammlung aus den von ihm selbst, von Champollion, und von mir bekannt gemachten enchorischen Texten ausgewahlt, aber auch
aus noch nicht herausgegebenen Pariser PapyrusroUen benutzt. Er leitete den Druck und die Corrcktur dieser Schrift, welchc ihm sehr am Herzen lag, und die gleichsam sein Vermachtniss iiber die Aegyptischen Untersuchungen liefert, noch auf seinem letzten Krankenbette, Als er bis zur g6sten so schwer ihm auch zuletzt das Schreiben schon ward.
briefliche Mittheilungen Champollion's

Scite

mit der Correktur gelangt war,

ereilte ihn der

Tod

die Correktur der

letzten Seiten,

und

die Indices besorgte daher


Kri'.ik,

Hy. Tattam.
II,

See Jahrbiicher
4to,

fur wissenschaftUche
Col. 771.

Jahrgang 1831, Bd.

Stuttgart

und Tubingen,

n
Introduction.
xiii

PHONETiCK Alphabet
'"
i

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The
" Phonetick Alphabet."

t
T

.BTl

From Tattam's Compendious Grammar of the Egyptian Language,


and Snhidic
Dialects.

as contained in the Coptic

London, 1830.

xiv
Champollion's

Introduction.

many
^^^^

years in compiling a Hieroglyphic Dictionary


assisted

that he
;

manuscnpts.

by his friend, Salvador Cherubini (1760-1842) that Charles Lenormant (1802-1859) had helped him in transcribing the slips and that Ippolito Rosellini (1800-1843 ?) had made a copy of this Dictionary before Champollion set out on his last journey to Egypt. But when year after year passed and ChampoUion-Figeac failed to issue any of his brother's works, many scholars came to the conclusion that the manuscripts did
j^^gg^^
;

not

exist.

Richard Lepsius and Samuel Birch.


Meanwhile two young men, C. R. Lepsius (1810-1884) and Samuel Birch (1813-1885), had turned their attention to the study of Egyptian hieroglyphs, and succeeded in completing Champollion's system of decipherment and establishing it. Lepsius first studied in Berlin under Bopp (1791-1867), and
having
received
his

doctor's

degree

in

philosophy

in

1833,

Lepsius completes ^_ _, went to Rome, Champollion's reputation as a comparative philologist. system of where he became an intimate friend of Ippolito Rosellini, the decipherment. . . ... , , . , ^, Egyptologist and friend and travelling companion of Champollion.
.

departed to Paris, where he won the Volney prize in 1834. In jgoe he published the two Dissertations^ which established his

.,.,,.
in

He
.

Here he wrote and published


Archeologico di

the " Annali

dell'

Roma

" (Vol. IX, 1837) his


1'

famous

Instituto " Lettre k

M.

le

Professeur Rosellini sur

Alphabet Hieroglyphique."
interest,

In

this letter,

which created widespread

he succeeded in

The Phonetic

Lepsius*^

removing many of the defects of Champollion's development of Young's system of phonetics, and treated the whole question of Egyptian decipherment in such a masterly manner that all adverse criticism of a serious character was silenced once and It is unnecessary to refer here to the great works to for all. ^^^ publication of which he devoted the remaining forty-eight years of his life, for they do not concern the question under
discussion.

Whilst Lepsius was perfecting Champollion's system. Birch

was studying the whole question of Egyptian decipherment from an entirely different point of view, namely, that of a Chinese It will be remembered that so far back as 1764 Joseph scholar.
/. Ueber die Anordnung ZwEi Sprachvergleichende Abhandlungen. und Verwandtscha/l des Semitischen, Indisclien, Aethiopischen, All-Persischen und AU-Aegyptischen Alphabets. II. Ueber den Ursprung iind die Verwandlschaft der ZahlwOrter in der Indo-Germanischen, Semitischen, und der Koptischen Sprache.
'

Berlin, 1835-6.

8vc.

Introduction.

XV

XVI

Introduction.

de Guignes (1721-1800), an eminent Sinologist, tried to prove that the epistolographic and symbolic characters of the Egyptians
Theories of de Guignes the
Sinologist and Palin.

were to be found
le

in the Chinese characters,

and that the Chinese


Following in his

nation was nothing but an Egyptian colony.


steps, M. and Egyptian characters were

Comte de Palin
if

(or Pahlin)

held that the Chinese

identical in origin

and meaning

;^

he believed that

either the ancient forms of Chinese characters,

or those which their values indicate, were given to them, true

hieroglyphs similar to those that exist on the Rosetta Stone would very often be found. And he thought that if the Psalms of David were translated into Chinese, and they were then written
in the ancient characters of that language, the inscriptions in

Egyptian papyri would be reproduced.^

Now

whatever

may have

been the opinions held by Young and ChampoUion about the relationship of the Chinese language to the ancient Egyptian
language, or the similarity of the principles on which Chinese

and Egyptian writing had been developed, these scholars could neither affirm nor deny effectively the statements of de Guignes and de Palin, for both of them were ignorant of the Chinese language. With Birch the case was very different, for he studied Chinese under a competent master when still at the Merchant Taylors' School, with the direct object of obtaining an appt)intment The friend of the family who in the Consular Service in China. had promised to obtain this appointment for him died unexpectedly

Birch's

Chinese
studies.

remained in to read began England. He and the works of Young and ChampoUion, thinking that his knowledge of Chinese would enable him to read the Egyptian texts easily. In 1834 he became an assistant in the Public Record Office, and worked in the Tower until January, 1836, when he entered the There he was service of the Trustees of the British Museum.
in
1 83 1,

with

the

result

that

Birch

continued his Chinese studies,

able to

make

use of his knowledge of Chinese and Egyptian, and

his first official task


coins. ^

When this

was to arrange and describe the Chinese work was completed he was directed to describe
le

'

See his Essai sur


1770.

Hi^oglyphes Agyptiens in

moyen de parvenir a la lecture Memoires de I'Academie. torn.

et

d Vintelligence des

XXIX,

1764

torn.

XXXIV,

See

De

Palin, N. G., Lettres sur les Hieroglyphes,

Weimar, 1802

Essai sur

les

Hieroglyphes,

Weimar, 1804
Rosette,

Analyse de I'Inscription en Hieroglyphes du


;

Nouvelles Recherclies, Florence, 1830. Dresden, 1804 descriptions which he wrote at this time are still in the coin trays of the Department of Coins and Medals, and by the courtesy of my colleague, the Keeper of the Department, Mr. G. F. Hill, I have been able to examine them.

Monument trouve a * Some of the

Introduction.

xvii

monuments and papyri for the official Guide to the British Museum, and his account of them was published in the " Synopsis " for 1838. Long before he entered
the Collections of Egyptian the

Birch's idea

conceived the idea of compiling a Hieroglyphic ^ ^ Hieroglyphic ,. , T^- ^11 Dictionary, and began to write down, each on a separate slip of Dictionary,
.

Museum he

paper,

the hieroglyphic

words which

he

found

in

the

texts

published by James Burton,' Gardner Wilkinson,^ ChampoUion,^


Rosellini*

and Salvolini/

Birch's " Sketch of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary."


This work of word-collecting had been somewhat interrupted

by

Record Office in 1834-5, but soon after he entered the Museum he took it up with redoubled zeal, and he copied every hieroglyphic text and transcribed every hieratic papyrus which the Museum possessed. In 1837, the year in which Lepsius published his famous Letter to Rosellini, Birch
his duties in the Public

revised his slips carefully, and decided to attempt to publish a " Hieroglyphical Dictionary." In those days no fount of hiero-

glyphic type existed, and lithography was expensive, and publishers

were not eager to spend their money on a dictionary of a language of which scarcely a dozen people in the whole world had any
real

knowledge.

At length Messrs. William Allen

&

Co.,

of Publication'

Leadenhall Street, London, were induced to consider the publication of a hieroglyphic dictionary, but they decided
of all a
r

few specimen pages, with a short Preface by Birch, with the view of finding out how far the work would be supported by
the learned and the general public.
for the lithographer twelve small

11

-1

V,

it-.-,

" sketch of a to issue first Hieroglyphical Dictionary, ,

Thereupon Birch prepared

quarto pages containing ninety-

three words, and having written a Preface of two pages to explain


his

system of arrangement of the words, they were published in the autumn of 1838 under the title of " Sketch of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary. Part I. Hieroglyphs and English. Division I.
Phonetical Symbols.

Vowels."

In his Preface Birch says that he has drawn up his work to


help the student of hieroglyphs in his researches, and that he intends it to be used as a manual which " all who appreciate the

value of the phonetic system

may

use,

and by which,
of

at one glance. Birch's

may
' '

be seen the extent of


Excerpta Hieroglyphica.

the discoveries
fol.

Dr.

Young and

Phonetic system.

Cairo, 1825-1837,

(privately printed).

Materia Hieroglyphica.
I Monumenti
dell'

Malta, 1824-1830 (privately printed).

'
* '

Lettres ecrites d'Jigypte et de

Nubie en 1828

et

1829.

Paris, 1833.
ff.

Egitto e della Nubia.


le

Pisa, 1832

Campagne

de

Rhamses

Grand

contre les Sheta et

lews

allies.

Paris, 1835.

xviii

Introduction.

J
i^/^ 4c^ r^^fuec^ ^tJ^
( S^^e7At
^&>-y *^="~'

-CS3*- rig

a/Tiiertui.:SJ>J:)

t^*y4:t^umyre' TriyOui-r'otruX'

'

CSr SitzJ^ Case TJ^M)

page of Birch's Sketch of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary.

London, 1838.

Introduction.

xix

^/

A^a^/e^

'fna^ Une/K -

^vt^t/^/'

{Jtit.

Ctt^

6.J

^cdaJ^cJt^ </^^-t.n4/y (JIo/:M.71

CX.1II.J

J^

yo-6

^.<y'.>^l^'

4^-2/

7^ ^
A

B,

or <M9 '7i>^uM*AfuiyLe: fcTl " Mom

^-

^e

t^ T. / )rcy

page of Birch's SieicA of a Hieroglyphical cal Dictionary.

London, 1838.

&2

XX

Introduction.

M. ChampoUion, and of their application to the monuments of the Egyptians." The dictionary does not claim even comparative perfection, " but it has been judged that the publication of such
a work might be of slight service to those
possessing, in a

who

are desirous of

His
ideophonetic arrangement.

compendious form, the results of much labour, comparison and instruction." The matter contained in the work is not entirely original, but the arrangement is, and " if not scientific, [it is] perhaps the only one by which tyros could at once find the particular group or word which they seek. It may be termed ideophonetic, as it embraces both principles of ideal and phonetic classification, and its arrangement has been borrowed
from a language very cognate in its construction the Chinese." The hieroglyphical and English part of the Dictionary was Part I was to contain words " comto be divided into two parts. mencing with symbols, representatives of sounds, or phonetic," and Part II words " whose initial character is the equivalent of an idea, or ideographic." Part I was to be " subdivided into symbols, having the power of vowels or consonants, the vowels forming (on account of one symbol frequently having the force

Arrangement
of the

proposed
Dictionary.

Polyphonous
symbols.

Natural
classification

and the consonants, according to their That is to say. Division I of Part I was to contain symbols or characters some of which Birch held to be polyphonous, and Division II symbols to which he had given consonantal values, and these were to be arranged in the order The internal classification of the letters of the Coptic Alphabet. of the characters or symbols was to be strictly ideographical,
of

many) one

large class,

position in the Coptic alphabet."

of symbols.

" taking

the

symbols

in

their

arrangement,

according to the

limbs,

The tabulated

rank they hold in natural and other sciences, as the human form, animals, inanimate objects, etc." At the end of the Dictionary Birch intended to give "all the symbols in a similar

symbols to classification, form the key.

and this section was to form the key to the whole work. With the view of illustrating the way in which he intended his Dictionary to be used, he says, " Suppose, for example, it were required to find the meaning as the eye is a of a group beginning with a human eye [-s>-] component part of the human body, it will be found in that division in the table, and there will be affixed to the depicted eye, v[ide Nos] 13-43." In this group of words will be found all those words in which an eye [-=2^] is the first character and the eye These remarks will be clear to the generally represents a vowel. reader after examining the two pages from Birch's " Sketch of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary," which are reproduced on pp. xviii and
in a tabular view,"

Introduction.

xxi

and

The twelve-paged specimen which he published only illustrates the plan and arrangement of what he called the " Phonetic Division" of his Dictionary, and it is much to be
xix.

regretted that he did not issue specimens of the other Divisions.

The above extracts from Birch's Preface and the specimen pages which are here given prove beyond all doubt that^ he had grasped
the importance of the " phonetic principle " for lexicographical
purposes, and that he
of the

First

application of
principle to

was the

first

to apply

it

to the arrangement ^. Egyptian

words of the Egyptian language. He says that he borrowed [the idea of] his " ideophonetic arrangement " from the Chinese, a statement which should be noted. My colleague, Mr. L. Giles, the Sinologist, informs me that though the Chinese had no alphabet
they developed a phonetic principle.
the characters
part serving as

Some eighty per cent, of of the language are made up of two parts, one a phonetic and giving a clue to the sound of the
classifier,"

word, and the other as a "


;i

which gives a clue as to its MEANING number about 214, and the phonetic symbols between 1,600 and 1,700. In the case of Egyptian the signs which are now called " determinatives " are the equivalents of the " classifiers," and the alphabetic characters are the equivalents of the phonetic symbols in Chinese texts. Sad to relate. Birch's " Sketch " did not meet with sufficient
the " classifiers "^ are in
. .

Classifiers
tives.

and

determina-

encouragement to induce the publisher to continue the publication of the " Hieroglyphical Dictionary," and no more parts appeared.

ChAMPOLLION'S " DiCTIONNAIRE ^GYPTIEN EN liCRITURE HiEROGLYPHIQUE."


Nothing more was done in the
until 1841, when glyphique " of Champollion appeared at Paris
field of Egyptian lexicography champoUion's " Dictionnaire Iigyptien en ecriture hiero- " Dictionnaire the

editorship of ChampoUion-Figeac.

under the careful In a lengthy " Preface " the

and the plan on which it is arranged, and the untoward events which delayed its publication and from it the following summary has been made. Even before 1822, the year in which Champollion published his
editor describes the history of the Dictionary
;

See his article on the Chinese Language in the Encyclopedia Britannica,

last edition.

Marshman's Elements of Chinese Grammar. Serampore, 1814. 4to, pp. 9-14. The " phonetic stage " in Chinese writing is described and discussed in W. Hillier, The Chinese Language and how to learn it, 2nd edit., London, 1910, p. 3 ff. and in Dr. H. Allen Giles' China and the Chinese, New York, 1902, p. 29 ff., and 35.

list

of

them

is

given in Dr.

J.

&3

xxii
Lettre d

Introduction.

M.

Dacier^ relative d
les

I'

Alphabet des Hieroglyphes Phonetiques


les

employes par
litres,

^gyptiens pour inscrire sur leurs Monuments

les

noms

et les

surnoms des souverains Grecs

el

Romains, he

had made one list containing all the hieroglyphic characters he had found, and another list containing all the characters the meaning of which appeared to be manifest. He wrote each character on a separate card, and afterwards tabulated them systematically. Already in 1818-19 he had made a manuscript
classification

Champollion's j^gt of hieroglvphic o r


j

words

entitled,

Premier essai d'un Dictionnaire

of hieroglyphic characters.

des Hieroglyphes Egyptiens, adding the legend,

Davus sum, non

(Edipus.
-^

When

later

three classes of he learned to distinguish

characters, figurative, symbolic

and phonetic, and was able to

prove that they were employed simultaneously in the texts of

Rosellini's

copy of
Champollion's Egyptian
Dictionary.

began to compile an Egyptian Dictionary. He first wrote each word on a separate slip of paper, or card, and then copied each on to a separate sheet of small folio paper, ruled in five columns. Col. i gave the character in outline and its hieratic form. Col. 2 its name, Col. 3 its graphic character (symbolic, figurative or phonetic). Col. 4 its actual meaning or value, and Col. 5 a reference to the text in which it had that value. Thus the Dictionary existed in duplicate, in slips and ^^ sheets, and it had assumed very large proportions before Champollion went to Egypt in i8s8. At this time Rosellini, ^ , . ,. , ^, who was a great friend of Champollion long before he became his fellow traveller, was allowed to make a copy of the Dictionary, presumably for his own use. It must be this copy which he bequeathed to the Biblioteca dell' Imperiale e Reale Universita of Pisa, and which is thus described in the Inventory of the bequest by Dr. Giuseppe Dei :^ " No. 4 casette, divise in caselle contenenti 11 non ultimato ma molto avanzato Dizionario dei Geroglifici,
all

periods, he

eseguito in parecchie migliaia di cartelle fatte per ordine alfabetico


pei caratteri fonetici,
simbolici."
e

metodico per

figurativi

ideografici

When

Champollion went to Egypt he took with him both

copies of his Dictionary,


;

and while

in that

country he added to

both very considerably MM. Salvador Cherubini and Lenormant wrote many slips for him, and their contributions formed part of
the original manuscript.

tinued his

from Egypt he conlabours on the Dictionary and added largely to it.


his

On

return

' Bom 1742, died 1833. He was the Permanent Secretary to the Academic des Inscriptions et Belles Lettrcs, and was well known as a classic and historian.

Biographia del Cav. Prof. IppoUto Rosellini.

IHorence, 1843, p. 15.

Introduction.

xxiii

ChampoUion died on March 4th, 1832, and when his brother wished to take steps to pubhsh the Dictionary he found that as

Disapearance
of portions of

a result of " funestes conseils des plus funestes passions," one mss. half of each copy of the Dictionnaire had been carried off, but

by whom Champollion-Figeac does not say


Dictionnaire.
All that he says

in his edition of the

on the subject there is that in spite of all opposition he succeeded in 1840 in regaining possession of 329 folios of the copy of the Dictionnaire, which was written out fairly on sheets of paper, and a large number of the slips belonging to the copy, which was kept purposely in slip form. And that having these in his hands he felt justified in
thinking that he was in possession of both manuscript copies
of the Dictionnaire in a nearly complete state.

-j-j^eji-

recovery

by

pige'ac^in"'^

1840.

In a footnote

which he tell us how he regained possession of the parts of the two manuscript copies of the Dictionnaire which had disappeared, and as the pamphlet is now very rare, and his story is not generally known, I summarise
he refers to a pamphlet
in
it

here.

ChampoUion-Figeac's pamphlet
1832,
retrouves en

is

entitled.
le

Notice

sur

les

Manuscrits Autographes de ChampoUion


et

Jeune perdus en I'Annce

1840.

Paris,

March, 1842.

He

says that
literary-

when

in April, 1832,

he set to work to arrange his brother's

with the view of offering the MSS. to the Government, portions of he found at once that several of the most important of them were Champollion's
effects
. .

missmg.
for

TT

He devoted

them among

manuscnpts enquiries hissing. his brother's friends, but they could give him
1
1

himself to the task of

ir

If

makmg

no information about them, and the only result of his labour was to make widely known the fact that they were lost. The savants of the day, remembering how freely ChampoUion lent his writings to his intimate friends, hoped that they were not lost but only mislaid by some friend who had forgotten all about them. A year passed, and nothing was heard of the lost manuscripts. Meanwhile Champollion-Figeac began to suspect that one of his brother's friends, a man who was peculiarly indebted to him, had

champollionFigcac's
g^n^g

them

in his possession.

This friend was a young ItaUan called

EgypChampoUion and tology in 1 83 1, and who became a close friend of ChampoUion-Figeac's suspicions were aroused by the his family.
Salvolini,

a native of Faenza,

who came

to Paris to study

suspicion

falls

fact that a

few months after the death of

his brother, Salvolini on Salvolini.

him a prospectus of a work on the inscriptions on the Rosetta Stone, the Book of the Dead, etc., which he intended to publish That a young man, 22 years of age, in three volumes quarto.
sent

xxiv

Introduction.

who had only


elaborate

studied Egyptian for a year could produce an

Effrontery of
Salvolini.

Salvolini's

pubhcations

Verardi the
artist offers

MSS. to
Lenormant.

work on difficult Egyptian texts in three volumes quarto was absurd on the face of it, and as Champollion-Figeac knew that his brother had written monographs on the very texts that were mentioned in the prospectus, he came to the conclusion that Salvolini had stolen the missing manuscripts. This was quite possible, for Salvolini had had free access to the study of ChampoUion, and was constantly in his house during his last illness. In August, 1833, at a public meeting of the Academic des Inscriptions Silvestre de Sacy solemnly called upon the man or men who had the missing manuscripts in their possession to restore them to their author's family, and Salvolini had the audacity to join him in mourning the loss of them, and with tears in his eyes he implored the man who had them to give them up. And at that moment he was announcing the publication of them under his own name Still nothing was heard of the missing manuscripts. In February, 1838, Salvolini died, aged 28. ChampoUion-Figeac tried to find out what papers he had left behind, and was told that they had been claimed by a foreign messenger, and that they had been sent beyond the Alps. As a matter of fact, they had never left Paris, where they remained forgotten When Salvolini died his relatives commissioned in some rooms. an artist, Luigi Verardi, to wind up his affairs, and when this gentleman examined the effects the manuscripts on which was inscribed the name of Francois Salvolini seemed to be the most valuable parts of them. Verardi really believed that the manuscripts were the work of Salvolini, and wishing to do the best he could for his friend's family, tried to sell them, but no one would buy them. Finally, not knowing what else to do with the manuscripts, he wished to show them to Charles Lenormant, the friend and fellow traveller of ChampoUion, and to take his advice on the subject. At first Lenormant refused to look at them, but
!

after a time,

to oblige his friend Verardi, he agreed to

do

so.

Lenormant

As soon
^^ once

as

Lenormant began
of the

to turn over the leaves of the bundles

recognises the of

manuscripts which bore on them Salvolini's name, he recognised

MSS. stolen by Salvolini.

ChampoUion, the loss of which had been publicly deplored by Silvestre de Sacy at the meeting of the Academic mentioned above. There was no longer any doubt about the matter. Salvolini had stolen the manuscripts of his friend and master, and as he made no response to de Sacy's appeal for their restoration, it was quite clear that he had intended to keep them. With the manuscripts of ChampoUion were several

two

works

of

Introduction.

xxv

papers that were the work of Salvolini, but when Lenormant

showed Verardi a whole volume which ChampoUion had written in French with his own hand, and pointed out to him the title, " Storia d'Egitto par F. Salvolini," which Salvolini had written on the title sheet, Verardi was convinced that he had been deceived by his dead friend. He realised quickly that ChampoUion's manuscripts must be given up to his heirs, and showed Lenormant Lenormant himself amenable to Lenormant's representations. purchases the aerreed to eive him 600 francs for the documents, and with this MSS. from T sum Salvolmi s family had to be content. Lenormant took Verardi. possession of all Champollion's stolen manuscripts, and handed them over to the Government, who, by a special resolution passed on the 24th of April, 1833, had ordered their acqusition in the Salvolini published the first volume of the interests of science. " Analyse Grammaticale " in 1836 the second and third volumes

Mill

did not appear.

His papers

fill

five

volumes.

See Catalogue

des Papyrus ligyptiens de la Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, No.


331,

MS.

4to.

See also the two letters to M. C. Gazzera in Des


les

principales expressions qui servant a la Notation des Dates sur

Monuments
alteration

de I'Ancienne gypte.

Paris, 1832-3.

8vo.

Champollion's manuscripts, however, needed a great deal of

and arrangement before they could be printed. And their editor describes in detail how he was himself obliged to make a copy of the Dictionary in which he incorporated the contents of both the slips and the folios, as well as very many important Having Champollionparticulars from his brother's Grammaire ^gyptienne. written out all his material, he had to decide how to arrange h/f brother^s the words. This was no easy matter, and finally he adopted MSS. the system which was foreshadowed in his brother's " Memoire At that sur r^criture Hieratique," and was printed in 1821. time ChampoUion was endeavouring to classify and arrange the Egyptian hieroglyphs, and found great difficulty in doing so. He believed that the ancient Egyptians must have had some system of arrangement for them, though he had no support for this view, and no evidence on the subject was forthcoming from native sources, and none from the works of classical writers.
Finally he adopted a " methodical, or so to say, natural classi- Champollion's

he grouped into sections the figures of men, human members, animals, birds, fish, reptiles, plants, etc. This method was a modification of the system of arrangement of
fication," that
is,

cial^[fi atio

of hieroglyphs

*^^
c^p^^f^,""

words
that
if

in their Vocabularies

by the Copts,

for

ChampoUion argued

"Scala."

the Copts,

who

are racially the descendants of the ancient

XXVI

Introduction.

^^

:>

(1=^

o o ouheHhh^JTy-wxio o |c^D at] ! ^U-^-v 1\XS5: = ^^


-

"^

JO

U(S

ti:

if

t|

IJ

'^-^

\^

I!

6\

SI

<0

s<

PM

,e^

>5

F<

-^

1 o

^g
d"^

f-

|-<^

"

g.

g 2

E*^ flt
K

'^^

"^

1^
15

;fri

>S^s<^ o^^^

^'^

^'S

Introduction.

xxvii

Egyptians, and whose language

is

substantially the

same

as that

of the ancient Egyptians, arranged their Vocabularies in this

way,

they must be reproducing a system that had been in use


their

among

remote ancestors thousands of years earlier. ChampoUionFigeac accepted his brother's arguments, and arranged the words
of the Dictionary according to the order of the Sign-list

composed

by

him, and printed in his earlier work.

The
for

following paragraph will explain the general system of The Coptic

arranging words in a Coptic Vocabulary, the common native names

which are xxotKi or juloki, and (fkocT or (5'Xoo(re i.e. Scala, " steps " or " stair." typical example of such a Scala is given
,

in the bilingual Coptic


fol.

and Arabic MS.

in Brit.

Mus. Orient 1325,


"f nioj-f XjC juloki,

90

ff,^

where we find the Scala Magna (Copt,


of
^

Arab.

^^\ ^)
'
'

Ibn Kabr.^

It is

divided into ten Gates or The Ten Gates


.

Doors

(90=*^), and
.

each gate

contams several Chapters


90A) contains four Chapters.

of the " scala."

(Kec^A-Xeon)

The

First

Gate

(fol.

The

Chapter gives the names of the Creator, nipi.rt itxe npeqcaortx, the names of the Son from the Holy Scriptures, and
First

the names of the Holy Spirit.

The Second Chapter


rteju.

gives the

names of the world which


of its orders

is

above, nKocJUioc eTc^.


iteqTA-Xic

nojtwi,

and

and ranks,

iteju.

neqxi-VJULA..

The

Third Chapter gives the names of the Firmament, and its towers, and its stars, n\cxepi.tJOJU.i, rteJUL neqmrproc neju ixeqeoo^cy,

and towers

of the second station


itiJutortH

and the

stations of the

rtmirproc JuuuLi-g^i S

Hxe

"f Axexiog,.

moon, The Fourth

Chapter deals with the world as it exists and its physical constitution and its Elements, niKocjU-oc ex cyon itext iteq4)-Kcic The Second Gate (fol. 97 a) contains seven Summary of nexjL rteqcxoixJort..
Chapters,

and deals with men,


grades,
clothing,

their
etc.

worship,

their

qualities,
series

their contents,

occupations,

Then

follows

of

Chapters giving the names of beasts and animals


birds
trees

(fol. (fol.

ii8a),

(fol. 119A), the monsters and fish of the sea and fruits (fol. 121A), scents and unguents (fol. 122A), seeds and grain (fol. 125A), precious metals, stones, etc. (fol. 127A), colours, names of countries (fol. 128A), rivers (130A), churches (Gate Vn, fol. 130B), persons mentioned in Holy Scripture (fol. 132 a), foreign words in Holy Scripture (Gate IX, fol. 135B), miscellaneous series of words (Gate X, fol. 138B).

120A),

For a full description of the MS. see Rieu, Catalogue of Arabic MSS., Supplement, No. 47, and Cram, Catalogue of the Coptic Manuscripts in the British Museum, No. 920.
' "

See also Kircher, Lingua Mgyptiaca

restituta, p. 41.

xxviii

Introduction.

oQ)

27. tXJ

^
P^

>

(foi^uxxJSAJL^ Iwuvu'-AJ;^ a*^xtAuU6l\A/C


/"w^v^i^

Li/

W(^

Ajv^/.aa^s.x^'U

'

'

Aire

,'XJi>)^'^(!>fci/^

^ayivcT

iy

h*

Ir'W

I*

"^

>-.^_/

ii/J

lAvX' luxlvw,*/)

/5vwf -Jt^/ tiAi^.

C35Mc/v.ytciw'J'CU-

-'^tx^'iStej.

To' i*4w*v'

AS^L

.^ 4:aH'

v'vO

page of ChampoUion's Dictionnaire Agyptien.

Paris, 1842.

Introduction.

xxix

i.

^. -^

^
I

/VVVW\

g'^n

JUvyv^ VOL, Vtvt^Avv

Oe^

-SviV.

G.

I'i^S

vO

ITATTe /"oOTIT-j

W/ AVulWvUJr ;

<? i-ii*

^ Q/Vv^w ^

III

oJ=^v^n-<iTTfc

fi

gAnu.i.TOI

J1Avx)tx><-

</'

J-jcP

D^

/VVVVC-'

C/VjeVi-lAVU-^ CtM/vux--'.

page of Champollion's Diciionnaire itgyptien.

Paris, 1842.

XXX

Introduction.

ChampoUionFigeac accepts the

arrangement
of the " Scala."

He

rejects

the Chinese

arrangement
of characters.

Such was the arrangement of words in the model which ChampoUion-Figeac took as a guide for the arrangement of words in his brother's Egyptian Dictionary, and he asks the question " L'experience ou le raisonnement indiquaient ils une autre ra6thode ? " Experience, he says, suggests a single example only, namely the Chinese, but having described at some length the differences that exist between the Chinese and Egyptian languages, he decides that even if analogies and a similitude between these two languages did exist originally they do so no longer. The Chinese Dictionary must not be employed as the model for a Hieroglyphic Dictionary, only the Coptic Scala is any use for this purpose. Champollion-Figeac then goes on to mention that another system has been proposed and even tried, namely that advocated by Samuel Birch in his " Sketch of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary." Having examined the Preface to this work he says, " Though the specimen, which I owe to the courtesy of Mr. Birch, is brief, it seems to me to be sufficient to make clear the defect in the general plan adopted by this scholar. The phonetic characters are divided into vowel characters and consonantal
characters
;

the symbolic or ideographic characters are separated

He

discusses Birch's plan


rejects it

and form a section by themselves. He who would search for the value of one of the eight hundred Egyptian characters would
then be obliged to second
series, to

and

know

first

of all

whether
its

it

is

a symbolic or

phonetic character, and

when

the character forms one of this

know
is

also

whether
to

value

is

that of a vowel
all

or a consonant, that

to say,

know beforehand
The general

that he

seeks to learn in the Dictionary.

table proposed

by
it

Mr. Birch will undoubtedly facilitate his searchings, but would

not be more advantageous to spare students


searching
the vowel
;

(i)

the labour of

(2)
i,

the trouble of finding the

human
A,

eye belonging to

the arms belonging to the vowel

the leg belonging

to the consonant B, the two

arms raised belonging to the consonant K, the hand belonging to the consonant T, the mouth belonging to the consonant R, the head full-faced belonging to the and (3) the inextricable confusion of aspirated consonant g, forms and expressions that results from the mixing-up of the
;

members of the human body with quadrupeds, and

fish

and flowers
series,

On

the other hand, would not

all

the analogous characters which


in the

the natural or rational system

would write

same

or

the members of the

human body,
is

or animals, or vegetables, placed

together and each species grouped

a single chapter, characterise

more

clearly a

system which

truly natural and, in consequence.

"

Introduction.

xxxi

preferable to

any other
1

This
1

is

the actual system which was He pleads


1
,

adopted by the author of our Dictionnaire Hieroglyphique, and -11 / TIT T-.1 it IS necessary to hope that Mr. Birch will not deny to it his
1

for Birch's suffrage for ^jg brother's

suffrage .1
[of

...

In

the

general

order

of

the

divisions system,

the Dictionnaire] the characters are placed according to the


;

order of merit of the object which they represent

the stars which appear therein


creatures
of
;

man

before

all

heaven before other animated

the products of the divine creation before the products

human

invention

plants before objects of art and fantastic

and these even in champoUiona certain order of relative pre-eminence, which is regulated by Figeac describes his Each hiero- natural and the customs or opinions of the world. glyphic character is followed by the groups of which it is the rational primitive character, the key-character, and in the arrangement
emblems.
Finally, the

whole before

its parts,

of these groups, the order of priority


classification of the characters

adopted

for the general


.
. .

has been followed.


is

More-

over, this order for the second character

followed equally for


for the second, third

the third, the fourth,

etc., just as is

done

and fourth letter of the words of our dictionaries arranged in the


order of the alphabet."^ However " natural " and " rational " this system

may have

been from Champollion's point of view, there is no doubt that the beginner and student with only a limited knowledge of The "natural " ^"^ hieroglyphs would find it very difficult ^o get from his Dictionary
s^s'jjj^

much

help in reading even an ordinary historical inscription, or arrangement

This will be apparent to eec5S^{fP^^ of the Dead. from it which is printed contemporary examine extract the the reader Egyptologists, on pp. xxviii, xxix, even after making due allowance for the imperfect knowledge of the interpretation of hieroglyphs which EgypAt all events Champollion's system was tologists possessed in 1832. Egyptologists of the day, though all admitted not adopted by the his Dictionnaire to be a fine monument of research and learning.
a formula from the
if

Book

he

will

In the Preface to his " Sketch of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary,"

Birch stated that he did not intend to proceed with the publication of his

work until the second part of Champollion's Grammaire ^gyptienne had appeared. This decision is easily understood and it is only natural that he should wait to see what further
details
of

ChampoUion's incomplete works might be contained ^\^^-^ f^^^jg which Champollion-Figeac was publishing as the " natural in '" The last fascicule of the Grammaire i^gyptienne ^"t/^ fast as possible. appeared in 1841, and Champollion's Dictionnaire gyptien in unpractical.
manuscripts
'

Preface of Champollion-Figeac, pp. xxviii and xxix.

'

Ibid., p. xxxii.

xxxu
1842,

Introduction.

contemporary Lepsius spent some Birch told me more than forty years in digesting these works. years ago that the more he studied the monuments, and the more he copied hieroglyphic and hieratic papyri, the more he became convinced that ChampoUion's " natural and rational " system

and Birch and

his great

He

finally

adopts a phonetic

words in the Egyptian Dictionary was hopelessly unpractical. He had profound respect for ChampoUion's learning and ability, but he could not give his " suffrage " to the Dictionnaire as ChampoUion-Figeac hoped he would. In the end he decided once and for all that in continuing his lexicographical labours he must adopt a purely phonetic, i.e., alphabetic arrangement, even
of arranging

though it implied the rejection of the " ideophonetic " arrangement which he himself had proposed in 1838. Moreover, his own arrangement and rejects study of the Sallier and Anastasi Papyri, which the British Museum his own acquired about that time, convinced him of the fact that the time ideophonetic system. for the publication of a really useful Egyptian Dictionary had not yet come. Material out of which a dictionary might be compiled Birch, Leemans and existed in abundance, but it was unpublished. What was most
alphabetic

Lepsius begin
to publish the

Egyptian
texts.

The Leyden
Papyri.

wanted was good copies of texts on which scholars in every country could work, and the Trustees of the British Museum rendered Egyptology great service when they published the wonderfully good copies of the Sallier and Anastasi Papyri, made by Mr. NetherDr. Leemans urged the clift under the superintendence of Birch.^ Government of the Netherlands to publish the monuments and papyri at Leyden, and they wisely did so,^ and Lepsius put an end to vague talk about the Book of the Dead when he published a facsimile of the famous Turin Codex, containing the Saite
Recension
scholar,
of
this

The Turin Book of


the Dead.

important
the

work.

Further,

the

last-named
of

having
of

persuaded
collecting

the

Prussian

Government
to

the

importance
the
The
"Denkmaler.

fast-perishing

inscriptions

m
of

Egypt, was despatched to that country in 1842


work,

carry out

and

so

was

able

to

place

at
his

the
great
etc.,

disposal

Egyptologists

throughout

the

world

Corpus

of

Egyptian texts and papyri, Nubian " Denkmaler."3

inscriptions,

called the

' in the British Museum. ( i) Papyri in Hieroglyphic and Hieratic Characters, etc. Character with prefatory Hieratic London, 1844, fol. tite Papyri in Select (2) remarks [by S. Birch]. London, 1844, fol. A mass of valuable material was published by Sharpe in his Egyptian Inscriptions from the British Museum and other sources. London, 1837-41. Monuments Agyptiens du Musee d'Antiquites des Pays-Bas <J Leide [Parts Leyden, 1841-2. I and 2 contain facsimiles of Monuments and Papyri].
, ;

Denkmaler aus Aegypten und Aethiopien, 12 Bande, large foho, 1849-59.

Introduction.

xxxiii

Birch's Dictionary of Hieroglyphics.


Birch's decision to adopt a purely alphabetic arrangement in

Egyptian Dictionary was induced largely by the results of the careful study of the alphabetic hieroglyphs which Edward Hincks
his

carried

out after the appearance of ChampoUion's Dictionnaire

Egyptien.

Whilst making this study he was in frequent com-

Hincks's
researches,

munication with Birch, who was greatly impressed with his clearness of thought and the ease with which he recognised the
difficulties of the

problem, and found their true solution.


in preparing a list of

Birch

was

at that time

engaged
of

for the first

volume

Egyptian characters^ Bunsen's "Aegyptens Stelle," and the


it,^

matter

for the last three Sections in


official

and, judging from Bunsen's


little leisure for

remark,^ Birch's

duties left

him very

the
Birch begins
to

Hincks published the results of his investigation in 1847,* and in that year Birch, as he himself XXA told me, began to write the slips tor his Egyptian Dictionary,
compilation of his Dictionary.
,

wnte

his

Dictionary of

and

to

arrange them

alphabetically

in

boxes.

The work

of Hieroglyphics,

publishing and reading

new

texts occupied

him

for several years,

but at length the large mass of material which he had collected Therejustified him in considering the publication of his work.

upon arose the two


publication
of
?

difficult
?

questions

Was

the Dictionary to be

printed or lithographed

To

print

it

would undertake the expense of was impossible, for there was no fount

Who

Egyptian type in existence. It might, of course, be lithographed, but that pre-supposed the writing out of the whole Dictionary on transfer paper by Birch himself, a work that would As no immediate require a vast amount of time and labour.
solution
of

Typographical
'

the difficulty seemed possible,

Birch continued to
his
in

^^

^^^'

write slips and revise his manuscript.

Meanwhile Bunscn had published further additions to voluminous "Historical Investigation into Egypt's Place
'

list contained about 830 characters, and was printed on eight plates 8vo). volume of Bunsen's work (Hamburg and Gotha, 1845. in the first 2 Bunsen thanks his friends for their help (Vorrede, p. xxvi, Vol. I) " und Theil der drei ein grosser (in welchem Museum Britischen am Birch Samuel wir mit Dank ist), sageu geschrieben Buches ersten Abschnitte des Ictzten

This

freudigen Wiinschen."

Ein voUstandiges Worterbuch des Hieroglyphenschatzes, mit alien Maiinigfaltigkeiten der Darstellung und mit Anfiihrung des Textes der entscheidenden StcUen, darf die gelehrte Welt von Herr Birch erwarten, sobald seine amthchen Beschaftigungen ihm die Musse dazu gewahren (Vol. I, p. 646). See his paper, An attempt to ascertain the number, names and powers of the
^

letters

of a new principle in the use of phonetic Dublin, 1847. 4to. Irish Academy.

of the Hieroglyphic ancient Egyptian Alphabet, grounded on the establishment characters in the Transactions of the Royal

XXXIV
An
English

Introduction.

Universal History," which excited general interest not only on the


Continent, but in England, and an English edition was called
for.

edition of

Bunsen's " Aegyptcns


Stelle" called
for.

Negotiations with Messrs.

Longman were a

entered into, presumably

by Bunsen himself, and the outcome of


heavy
cost,

them was

that, at a very

they undertook to cast

fount of hieroglyphic type

in order to print Birch's

Egyptian Sign-List, Grammar, Dictionary

and Chrestomathy as essential portions of the English edition Thus a firm of of the first and fifth volumes of Bunsen's work.^

fount of hieroglyphic

publishers undertook to perform, at their

own

private expense,

a task which abroad would have been heavily subsidised

by the
a speci-

type cast in London.

Government.

The designs

for the bold,

handsome type

(see

men page of the Dictionary on p. xxxvii) were drawn by Mr. Joseph Bonomi, the matrices were cut by Mr. L. Martin, and the casting was carried out by Mr. Branston, all under Birch's direction. When the printing of Birch's Egyptian Dictionary began I have been unable to find out, but I remember his saying that it took
nearly three years to pass the sheets through the press, even after the greater

number

of the types

were cast and ready


of "

for use.

The English
and the
Birch edits the fifth

Egypt's Place translation of the fifth volume " year 1867, first half of the appeared in the in Universal History
official

date stamp of the copy in the British


It

Museum

volume of
Bunsen's work.

was seen through the press by Birch after the death of Bunsen and Cottrell, the English translator, and in the Preface Birch says that " a few words are required to indicate the additional labours which have been bestowed upon it, and the introduction of certain portions which are not to be found in the German Edition." The first 122 pages were revised by Bunsen, who was enabled to use the English translation of the Turin Codex of the Book of the Dead which Birch had made and placed in his hands. The Hieroglyphic Grammar, Chrestomathy and Dictionary, which according to the original plan of the work
Postscript to the

reads " 11 Ju[ly] 67."

September 27th, 1847, Bunsen says in the I, " This English edition owes many valuable remarks and additions to my learned friend, Mr. Samuel Birch, parThat I ticularly in the grammatical, lexicographic, and mythological part. have been able to make out of the collection of Egyptian roots, printed in the German edition, a complete hieroglyphical dictionary, is owing to him. To him also belong the references to the monumental evidence for the signification of an Egyptian word, wherever the proof exhibited in Champollion's dictionary or grammar is not clear or satisfactory. Without any addition to the bulk of the volume, and without any incumbrance to the text, the work may now be said to contain the only complete Egyptian grammar and dictionary, as well as the only in short, existing collection and interpretation of all the hieroglyphical signs all that a general scholar wants to make himself master of the hieroglyphic system
'

Writing at Highwood on
first

Enghsh

edition of Vol.

by studying the monuments."

Introduction.

xxxv

were to form parts

of the fifth

volume, were not completed when

Bunsen died on November 28th, i860. The unfinished translation of the comparative vocabularies was completed by Birch and Dr. Rieu, Assistant Keeper of Oriental Manuscripts in the British The Museum, who also inserted Bunsen's adc^itions and corrections, vocabularies
'

Birch's translation of the

Book

of the

Dead, together with his completed by


j^j^^

Introduction,
fills

209 pages (pp. 125-333), the Egyptian Dictionary 250 pages (pp. 337-586), and the Hieroglyphic Grammar and
fills

Chrestomathy fill 153 pages (pp. 589-741). Thus the original matter supplied by him to the fifth volume fills 612 pages, or nearly three-quarters of the whole volume. The number of entries on a page of the Egyptian Dictionary averages eighteen, and the total number of entries is therefore about 4,500.
"

Birch's
?"/,"^fl//{^"^

volume.

The Dictionary," Birch says

in his Preface,

"

is

phonetic

words being placed under the phonetic It is important value[s] of the signs at the time of compilation. power to a give a different Egyptologists to remember this, as The ideographic and few signs, or regard others as polyphone[s].
in its arrangement, the

determinative hieroglyphics, having been already given in the


first

volume,! have not been repeated in


in their appropriate places.

this,

and the student

be borne must seek them in mind that the meaning of all Egyptian words has not yet been determined, and that the researches of Egyptologists continue to A reference to the place enrich the number of interpreted words. where it is found is given with each word, but it was not possible,
It is also to

without exceeding the limits of this work, to give in every instance


the

name
'

of the scholar

who

discovered

its

meaning
"
I

[here follows

Bunsen says

("

Egypt's

Place," Vol.

I,

p.

503),

have, together with

Mr. Birch, submitted to the test of accurate criticism


hitherto collected

all

the hieroglyphical signs


its

and explained, and have

classified

each of them in

proper

place, according to that arrangement.

[The general arrangement

is laid

the text.]

At the same time I have requested that gentleman to valuable remarks to this collection, so as to complete and correct

down in add his own


it.
. .

Through his assistance I am enabled to give, not only a more critical, but also a more complete exposition of the hieroglyphical signs, than has hitherto been embodied in previous works, all of which are very expensive, and some very rare. Where the Grammar or Dictionary of ChampoUion is not quoted, the signs and interpretations are supplied by Mr. Birch from other authorities or his The arrangement is the natural one, proposed and own researches. viz., adopted by ChampoUion, in the early stages of the study of hieroglyphics
. . . :

signs of astronomical or geographical objects

human

forms, animals

from the

quadruped down

to the

worm plants,
List

stones, instruments, etc.,


:

and signs as
characters

yet undeciphered."
B. Determinatives,
C. II, 135 characters.

The
201

contains
C.

A.

Ideogr.\phics,
C.
I,

890 characters.
153

characters.

Phonetics,

D.

Mixed Characters, 70

characters.

C 2

xxxvi
Contemporary mention of Hincks,
Egyptologists,

Introduction.

Goodwin and Le Page Renouf


in

in

England,

chabas, E. de Rouge, Deveria in France, H. Brugsch, Diimichen,

Germany, as being the men to whom the advance of the study of Egyptology is principally due]. The advantage of [Messrs. Longmans'] hieroglyphic type to the present volume cannot be too highly appreciated, as it has rendered it practicable to print the Egyptian Dictionary, the Grammar, and the Chrestomathy in a form which renders the study of the hieroglyphs accessible both to the student and general enquirer.
Lauth, Lepsius and Pleyte
opinion of his Dictionary of Hieroglyplucs.

The Dictionary is the only one hitherto printed in this country, nor has any hieroglyphical dictionary appeared elsewhere, except
that of ChampoUion, published in 1841 [read 1842I, which contained
,

only a few
it is

of.

the prmcipal words.


it

...

Its

phonetic arrangement
It

-m will,

hoped, render

particularly easy of consultation.

has

been a great labour to compile and print it, and the execution of Other Egyptologists, indeed, it has been a task of many years.

have attached vocabularies to their labours on particular inscriptions, but no dictionary on a large scale has as yet been attempted, although the absolute want of one has been long felt." This Preface is dated April 13th, 1867. The publication of the first Egyptian Dictionary arranged on phonetic, i.e., alphabetic, principles, and printed in hieroglyphic type, was a great triumph for English Egyptology and the craft of the typographer, and to Birch the compiler and Spottiswoode the prhiter, and Longmans the publishers, every Egyptologist owes a debt of gratitude.

But
Birch's

it

is

quite impossible to hide the fact that the inclusion

of Birch's

Egyptian Dictionary in the fifth volume of the English translation was a great misfortune for the Dictionary itself and
fQj-

Egyptian
falls

" flat."

whom the work was primarily There was an interval of seven years between the publication of the fourth and fifth volumes of the English transla^he beginner in Egyptology for
intended.
tion of Aegyptens

and there seems to be no doubt that public interest in Bunsen's scheme of chronology drooped when its author died in i860, the year which saw tlie appearance of the fourth volume, and was practically dead when the fifth volume was published in 1867. According to Birch, " the volume fell flat," and its editor and publishers were greatly disappointed. Whether the edition was a small one or not I have no evidence to show, but it was certainly the fact that for some reason or other copies of the volume were difficult to get in the early " seventies." It was said at the time that the publishers, being dissatisfied with the sales, had " disposed " of the sheets
in der Weltgeschichte,

S telle

Introduction.

xxxvu

DICTION \RY OF HIEROGLYPHICS.


MA
^%jr

423
S
r

MB
Open, unwind, an Br M Uvii 2. 4 6
Balance
9.

mutt.
fold.

mil

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xjiii

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iku A A _IV"X"
J

makJi

127;

L T

Bal ance 12 125. 9

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millet

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matert

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5.

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Bulance

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,

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Br

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p. 34.

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cxi. 17.

matai.
82. 4.

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L.

mAkhcM. Despoil, strangle, kidnap. Goodwin, R.A


1861, p. 133.

V
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xl

Road. L.

mdkhai. Balance

G. 75

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Pas.s

E. R. 6655.

mdkhen.
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iJtii.

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castle. 145. e

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;

mdsh. Archer

E S

866

l.x.xiv.

153 9.

fit
matai.

niAtennu. Road, path. Ch. P. H.


221.

jS

mdshd.
xiii. 1.

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D. O.

A mercenary.

L. K.

xlvi. 600. c.

m&sht. Battle, slaughter L. D. iv. 90. a.

m&tai.

A mercenary.

L. K.

maa.

Come

(?).

M.d. C

1 1 1

xlvi. 603. a.

xxi. hor. 2.

matab.t.

Hatch. E. R. 9900; L. T. xxxvi. 99. 17.


ma-tabu. Plank,
L. T. XX. ; xvi. 99. 17 ;xlv. 123.3.
liatch.

^k

mati.

Neck.

D.

UO

masfiau. (Uncertain.)
tliv. 7.

S.

V.

mliiabu. Plank, hatch. 9900. p. 9.

E. R.

mefka.

Copper.

D.

140.

ma/o.

Phallus.

L. T.

mehbi

(?).

Humble,

Ixxix. 164. 12.

ccxx. See hbi.

page of Birch's Dictionary of Hieroglyphics.

London, 1867.

C3

xxxviii
of a large

Introduction.

number

of copies.

The natural

result

was that when

people found out that the volvime contamed Birch's Dictionary

Bunsen's

fifth

tombaf
Birch's

Hieroglvphics

and Grammar and Chrestomathy the copies that found their way into the market fetched relatively very high prices, or at all events prices which effectively placed the book beyond the reach of the ordinary student. When I attended Birch's Egyptian classes in 1875-76 and needed the book urgently, I was obliged to trace each page of it on a separate sheet of tracing paper, omitting the references, and when these sheets were bound I used them for some years with great benefit. Moreover, the ^^^^ volume of the English translation of Bunsen's work formed a
veritable tomb for Birch's Dictionarj^. The title-page of it sets forth quite clearly that the " Historical Investigation " was by

was translated from the German by Charles H. Cottrell, Esq., M.A., and that it contains " Additions by Samuel Birch, LL.D." But who could possibly imagine from this last remark that Birch's contribution was 594 pages, i.e., nearly
Bunsen, and that
it

three-quarters

of

the whole

volume,

or

that
first

his

contribution

included

an

Egyptian

Dictionary,

the

ever

published

entries of

4,500 (!), and containing about Egyptian words, and names of gods and places, with references and translations, and an Egyptian Grammar and Chrestomathy ? Or, again, take the case of the student who wants

arranged on phonetic principles

to consult these

be

seen in the British

works and who, hearing that copies of them are to Museum Library, goes to the Reading Room
turns up the entry Birch, Samuel, LL.D., of the
in the

to see them. British

He

Museum,

Great Catalogue, but

fails to find

any mention

of the Dictionary of Hieroglyphics or

Grammar and Chrestomathy,


All that he will

because they are not mentioned in any one of the columns of names
of the other

books and papers which Birch wrote.

find connecting Birch with an Egyptian Dictionary is the entry, " Sketch of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary, London, 1838," and unless

he receives further instruction he


published in 1838
Birch's
is

will

" conclude that the " Sketch

useless to him,

and that Birch's Egyptian DieBirch's transla-

tionary never appeared.

The same is the case with

the the

Book of" ^^^^ ^^ t^*^ Book of the Dead, the first ever made and published, Dead and which also appeared in the fifth volume of " Egypt's Place," and his

Hiero<'lyphics.

which appeared in the first volume, first with plates of characters, and secondly with the hieroglyphic characters printed in the new type. The only mention of Birch
^^^* ^ Hieroglyphic Characters
in the Great Catalogue in connection with the
is

Book

of the

Dead

contained in the

title of

the Trustees' publication of the texts

Introduction.

xxxix

on the
lives

coffin

generations of
in

The fault Ues not with any of the the learned and devoted men who have spent their
of

Amamu.

compiling that

wonderful Great
in their

Catalogue,

with

its

millions of entries of books in every printed language of the world,

but with those

who buried
Book

own books

Birch's greatest
his

works so effectually that they have no mention under


the authors' great
In his admirable
of Life, the British

name

in

Museum

Catalogue.

Bibliography, The Literature of Egypt and the


4to, Prince

Soudan, 2

vols.,

London, 1886,

Ibrahim Hilmy rightly


of

mentioned the translation

of the

Book

the Dead, and the

Dictionary of Hieroglyphics and the Hieroglyphic


the entry Birch, Samuel, LL.D., etc.

Grammar under
so,

But even

he refers the
J.

reader for particulars of these works to the entry Bunsen, C. C.

Heinrich Brugsch and his

"

Hieroglyphisch-Demotisches
in der

worterbuch."
The publication
Heinrich Brugsch, ^
of

Bunsen's Aegyptens

Stelle

Weltcalled
studies in

geschichte in 1845 fired the imagination of a

young German

who was

at that time a pupil in the Real Brugsch's

Gymnasium

at Cologne,

study of the Egyptian

to the demotic inscriptions in the demotic character. In

and he devoted himself ardently

1849 he published the paper. Die demotische Schrift der alten Aegypter

und

ihre

Monumente,

in the Zeitschrift of the

German

Oriental

Society (Bd. Ill, pp. 262-272), and in 1850 he received his Doctorate His editions of from the University of Berlin for his Thesis De Natura et Indole demotic texts

Linguae Popularis Aegyptiorum, Berlin (Diimmler, 1850, 8vo). In the same year he published Die Inschrift von Rosette, nach ihreni
Aegyptisch-demotischen Texte sprachlich

und

sachlich erkldrt, with

an Appendix containing a series of hitherto unpublished demotic


texts.

Stone, 2

In 185 1 he published the hieroglyphic text of the Rosetta with a Hieroglyphic-Coptic-Latin vocabulary and a list of

hieroglyphic characters, and after a Mission to Egypt in 1853-54 His Grammar he published his famous Grammaire De'motique.^ Ten years later of demotic

he published his epoch-making work on the Rhind Papyri," and proved himself to be an expert in translating very difficult hieratic and demotic texts. Brugsch did not confine his studies to demotic,

and between 1855 and 1865 he was engaged


'

in

drawing up a
gtli,

Born and died

in Berlin (February i8th, 1827

vSeptember
4to.

1894).

* '

Inscriptio Rosetlana Hieroglyphica.

Berlin, 1851.

Grammaire Demotique, conlenant


Populaire des

les

Principes Generaux de la Langue


Berlin, 1855.
hieratisch

et

de

I'

I'xriture
'

Amiens

/igyptiens.

4to.
iibersetzt

Henry Rhind's Zwei Bilingue Papyri, und herausgegeben. Leipzig, 1865. 4to.

und demotisch,

C4

xl
His mission to
Persia.

Introduction.
its

History of Ancient Egypt under

native kings,' and in pub-

lishing a series of geographical texts, ^ etc.

He was

attached to

the Mission to Persia of the Baron Minutoli in 1850-51, and served


as Prussian Vice-Consul in Cairo from 1864 to 1866, but in spite
of the official duties attached to

these posts he

managed

to find

time to undertake the compilation of a Hieroglyphic Dictionary.

Race

for

priority

more than probable that he knew that Birch was engaged on a similar task, but if he had this knowledge, it did not prevent him from making arrangements for the publication of his work. That Birch knew of these arrangements is quite certain, for his name appears in the list of subscribers issued by the publisher. Each scholar naturally wished to be the first in the field with
It is

between Brugsch and


Birch.

Egyptian Dictionary, so that he might claim the credit of being the first to publish a really large collection of ancient Egyphis

words arranged alphabetically. In this race for priority Birch was the winner, for he dated his short Preface to the fifth volume of " Egypt's Place " on April 13th, 1867, and his whole Dictionary was then printed off. In the other case only the first volume of Brugsch's Hieroglyphic-Demotic Dictionary, contian

taining the letters

'^,

\\,

D,

v\ and

^,

was printed off at that

time, and the publisher's advertisement on the cover is dated " Ende April 1867," though Brugsch's Preface is dated Marz 1867.

The Hieroglyphic-Demotic Dictionary^


Brugsch's Hieroglyphic

of

Brugsch

is,

with

the

exception
first

of

the

Introduction,

lithographed

throughout.

The

Demotic
Dictionary.

volumes form the Dictionary proper and contain 1,707 pages, and the last three form the Supplement, and contain 1,418 pages. The number of words treated in the
four
is

Dictionary proper

4,637,

not counting the additions in the

Supplement, which were derived from newly published texts.


Whilst writing out his Dictionary for the lithographer, Brugsch's
object seems to have been to

make
of

the

work

as large as possible.

He

on points but unequal length, and many


states his views
1 ^

of

Egyptian Grammar at great his paragraphs are filled with


Paris, 1859.

Histoire d'/igypte sous les Rois indighies.

Geographische Inschriften Altcigyptischer Denktndler,


;

Bande

I-III, Leipzig,

1857-60
4to.
'

Die Geographic der Aegypter nach den Denkmalern.


full title

Leipzig,

i860.

The

reads

Hieroglyphisch-Demotisches Worterbuch

enthaltend in

wissenschafdicker Anordnung die Gehriiuchlichsten

W drier

und Gruppen

der fieiligen

und Schrifl der alien Aegypter nebst deren Erkldrung in Franzosischer, Deulscher und Arabischer Sprache und Angabe ihrer Verwandschafl mil den enlsprechenden Wdrtern des Koptischen und der Semitische Idiome, 7
und
der

Volks-Sprache

Baiide, Leipzig, 1867-1882, 4to, Vol.

I,

1867

Vols. II-IV, 1868

supplement.

Vol. V, 1880

VoL VI, 1881

Vol. VII, 1882.

Introduction.

xli

by translations and wordy resembles an Encyclowork comments. In some paedia of Egyptology rather than a Dictionary, and contains a great deal of information which, it seems to me, should have been given elsewhere. As no publisher could afford to defray the cost of printing the Dictionary, even on the Continent, where great scholarly works are often subsidized by the Government, it was decided to reproduce Brugsch's manuscript by lithography, which B^gsch's in those days was a tolerably inexpensive method of publication and Brugsch undertook to write the transfers for the lithographer knowledge of with his own hand. Thus he was given practically a free hand Egyptology, by his publisher, and a Dictionary containing 3,125 pages is the result. The amount of Egyptological knowledge which he displays in this truly great work is marvellous, and his familiarity with the contents of the most difficult texts, whether hieroglyphic, hieratic or demotic, is phenomenal. He was the greatest Egyptologist that Germany had produced, and his energy and zeal and devotion and power of work must ever command our warmest admiration. Brugsch, like Birch, arranged the words in his Hieroglyphic Dictionary alphabetically, and it is an interesting fact that both scholars, apparently independently, came to the conclusion that ChampoUion's " natural and rational " system of He rejects arrangement must be rejected. Birch, as we know from his J^hampoihons Preface to the fifth volume of " Egypt's Place," had no high rational-" a'Tangement. opinion of ChampoUion's Dictionnaire gyptien as a Dictionary,
extracts from Egyptian texts followed
respects his
;

for

he says that

it

" contained only a few of the principal words."

Brugsch dedicated his Dictionary to the Manes of ChampoUion, and in his Introduction says that ChampoUion's Dictionary, which

was published five and twenty years ago, after its author's death, under the name of Dictionnaire Egyptien, could and can lay claim to-day at the very least to this name. He goes on to say that it was published without the will and intention of the immortal Bragsch's P""" ! French scholar, and that it consists of little more than an epitome ^ ChampoUion of the words and groups in his Grammaire Egyptienne, and that Egyptian Dictionary, it contains mistakes of which the master, had he been alive, would never have allowed himself to be guilty.^
'

"

Das unter dem Namen

Jahren nach dem Tode

kann am

eines Dictionnaire itgyptien vor fiinf und zwanzig ChampoUion's veroffentliche Wurterbuch konnte, und allerwenigsten heut zu Tage, Anspruch auf diesen Namen machen.

Ohne Absicht und Willen des unsterblichen


Jigyptienne dazu mit Irrthiimern, deren gemacht haben wiirde." Einleitung, p.
,

franzosischen Gelehrten publicir

enthalt es beinahe nur einen Auszug der Worter

und Gruppen dor Grammaire

sich niemals der lebende Meister schuldig


III.

xlii

Introduction.
WJiilst Birch

was preparing the manuscript of his Dictionary for the printer, and seeing the sheets through tlic press, other Egyptologists, e.g., Goodwin, E. de Rouge, Chabas, Deveria, Diimichen, Lepsius and Pleyte were actively engaged in publishing Birch and translating hieroglyphic, hieratic and demotic texts. And contemplates long before he had finished printing his Dictionary, Birch had come a second edition of his to the conclusion that he must prepare a second edition in which Dictionary of he could give all the new words and forms that appeared in the Hieroglyphics. newly published texts. As he read these texts he noted every word and form that ought to be in the new edition, and he continued to write slips for many years. Those who have visited him in his room in the British Museum may remember the glass this always stood in box containing slips for this new edition More than one front of his inkstand and was added to daily. publisher was ready to publish the new edition of his Dictionary, but his multitudinous duties and advancing years prevented him from reading all the texts that were published. And he did not see that if ever he was to publish the new edition he must at some time or other cease from the writing of slips and adding to his manuscript, and so he rejected the advice both of his publisher and his friends, and continued to write ever more and more slips. Maspero's In 1882 Maspero began to publish the hieroglyphic inscriptions edition of from the Pyramids of Sakkarah in the Recueil de Travaux, and the Pyramid Texts. in them Birch found whole paragraphs of Egyptian text similar to passages in the funerary texts on the coffin of Amamu, which he was preparing for publication b}^ the Tnistees. Naturally he was anxious to include in his new edition as many as possible of the words and forms from these very ancient texts, and he set to work to read them and to extract from them additional matter for his Dictionary. He found his task more difficult than he imagined it would be, for though he doubted the accuracy of many of the readings of Maspero's text, he had no means in the shape of photographs or paper " squeezes " whereby to control them. Moreover, he was seventy years of age and his health was failing. But he struggled on gallantly and continued to write Birch dies and slips for the new edition of his Dictionary (which he was certain leaves his he would live to see) until death overtook him on December 26tli, manuscript When his books and literary effects were being sold for the second 1885. edition several boxes containing many thousands of slips were put up unfinished. to be bid for as a separate lot, and a bidder bought them for ten Thus the labour of twenty years was shillings.
;

wasted.

Introduction.

xliii

PiERRET's " VOCABULAIRE HiEROGLYPHIQUE."

The
glyphics,
terbuch

difficulty of obtaining copies of Birch's

Dictionary of Hiero-

and the expense


left

practically

both that work and Brugsch's Worthe students of the ancient Egyptian
of

language without a dictionary.

The

first

scholar

who made any

serious attempt to help the beginner

and the advanced student

out of their difficulty was Paul Pierret, Conservateur adjoint


des Antiquites Egyptiennes au Musee du Louvre, and he set to

work

to

compile

the

handy and comparatively inexpensive

Vocabulaire Hieroglyphique,^ which so


to be a useful

many

students have found

Pierret's

book of reference. It consists of 759 lithographed pages in which the words are arranged alphabetically, and an index to all the French words by which the hieroglyphic words are translated in the volume, which fills forty-eight doublecolumned pages. It contains, in a condensed form, the substance of the Dictionaries of Birch and Brugsch, and most of the 987
royal

vocabuiarv.

names which Lepsius published in his Konigsbuch der alien Aegypter, Berlin, 1858, fol., and most of the 2,000 geographical names given by Brugsch in his Dictionnaire Geographique, Leipzig,
1877,
fol.
2

In his Preface Pierret calls attention to the fact that


Inclusion of

Brugsch's Dictionary cost 600 francs, and this was without the

Supplement, which cost about 500 francs more when it was ^^^ ^ycid completed in 1882. He justifies his inclusion of geographical names,

names

in his

Vocabulaire by pointing out what every one has

found who has tried to use the Dictionnaire Geographique, how


difficult it is to find a

given

name

in that " merveille d'erudition."

He

claims no special merit for his Vocabulaire, and says, "

Mon

but est de fournir aux commen9ants un moyen d'aborder directe-

ment
There

les textes, et
is

a tons un manuel commode doubt he succeeded in his aim. that no

et

pratique."

SiMEONE Levi's " Vocabolario Geroglifico Copto-Ebraico."


For a few years after the appearance
in

of the last

volume

of

Brugsch's Worterbuch in 1882 no attempt was

made

to publish

a collected form the lexicographical material that could be

collected from the editions of hitherto unpublished texts, which

were appearing frequently

in

England, France, Germany, Russia


this

and
'

Italy.

But meanwhile

material was being diligently


les

Vocabulaire Hieroglyphique comprenant


et

mots de

la

Langue,

les

Noms

geographiques, divins, royaux

hisioriques, classes alphabetiquement.

Paris, 1875.

8vo.

His Supplement to

this

work, containing 1,420 pages, appeared in 1879-80.


xliv
collected

Introduction.

by one scholar

at least

existing Egyptian Dictionaries,

who was dissatisfied with the and was determined to publish a who
list

new
was
Levi's

one. well

This was Simeone Levi, an Italian Egyptologist,

known

for the

very useful

of hieratic characters

which

he published^ in 1880.

Under the
i-

title of

Pa

Uatch-ur en Metchut
G^^C't

EgyptianItalian

Dictionary.

^^^k T\^5 ^"^^ ^"^

it

'

'

^^' ^^^

Sea of Words,
Vocabulary
to be

he began to publish a Coptic-Hebrew Hieroglyphic


quotations of Coptic and

with translations of the hieroglyphic words in Italian and numerous

Hebrew words which he held

cognate to the ancient Egyptian words."

The Vocabolario proper consists of six parts folio, which were 1887-88 and contain 1,705 lithographed doublecolumned pages the Supplement consists of two parts, and contains 6g6 pages Part I was published in i88g, and Part II
published in
; ;

in 1894.

In a very closely written Preface, which

fills

30 pages,

Signor Levi discusses the


Levi holds

grammar and the

structure of the ancient

Egyptian to
be a Semitic language.

Egyptian language, which he treats as though the speech that is revealed to us by the hieroglyphic, hieratic and demotic texts

was a mistake on his part to do this, for he assumed to be a fact that which has never been proved to him Egyptian, Coptic and Hebrew are substantially forms of one and the same language. He adopted an unusual arrangement of the alphabet, placing h ro and h |
belonged to the Semitic family of languages.
It
;

after tch

^^, and
at the

c>,

or

\,

and

c=^> after sh r-vn,


etc.

and kh

(x)

and t

end of the alphabet,

Thus the arrangement


:

and the values

of the letters of his alphabet are as follows

"^a-N1.

(]d
(

- ort?.
i^

Daor M.
f

Ij(]

"

\\i

M.

^u-\^n-

or

~.

o =

or

^?

^ ua - Nin.
D.

"^^ ur

His Egyptian-

Jb-l.
-wwvA, f

^0
W,
C>

P = D n =
sh
2-

^. ^,
.&.
t
r, 1

_>,
^.

]^

m-r3.
P
s

Hebrew
alphabet.

\,

-1,

-<,
T.
ffi

=
z
:).

D.

C
2.T-

oa,

lj^

ir-

= n. D,

c=^^

d =

"^
g -

rah = n- |h

n-

/I,

U q= p

"D

k-3.

'

Raccolta dei Segni leratici Egizi nelle diverse Epoche, con


i

correspondenti

Geroglifici ed
'

hro

differenti valori fonctici.

Turin, 1880.
:

4to.

Vocabolario Geroglifico Copto-Ehraico


di linguistica
conferito

opera che

vinse

il

grande premio
e

reale

nclV anno 1886 dalla R. Accademia dei Lincei,


della
giun'.a

piibblicalo dopo

incorraggiamcnlo

del

consiglio

superiore

della

islruzione pubblica.

Turin, 1887-1894.

Introduction.

xlv

This system seems to represent an attempt to show that the


ancient

Egyptians

adopted

the

Hebrew

alphabet.

By some
Hebrew

curious oversight Levi failed to find an equivalent for the


letter y.

Hagemans
The
list

"

Lexique Franc^ais-Hieroglyphique."

Egyptian Dictionaries ends with the Lexique Franfais-Hieroglyphique that was compiled by M. G. Hagemans Hagemans and was published at Brussels in 1896. It is an octavo p^!)!^t^ia.n volume of 923 lithographed, double-columned pages, which Lexicon,
of published

contain a French-Egyplian Dictionary and Supplement, a hieroglyphic, hieratic-demotic alphabet,

and a

list

of determinatives.

The Present Egyptian Dictionary.


It will

probably be admitted by

all

that the compiler of an

Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary should know at first hand every collection of Egyptian monuments and papyri in the world,
that he should have visited every great

Museum on

the Continent

and

in

Egypt, England and America, and copied, or collated with


he should know well the histories of Egypt
Qualifications

printed editions, every hieroglyphic, hieratic and demotic text


of importance, that

and the works of the Arab geographers, and Coptic in all its dialects, and that he should have had at his disposal unlimited time, in short that he should have been able to devote his whole life to the making of his Egyptian Dictionary. That he should also have one or more assistants to help him in
written
classical writers,

by

'^^^tfngTn

Egyptian
"^

''^

^*

his laborious task also goes

without saying.

am

conscious that,

unfortunately,

possess none of the qualifications necessary for

such a great work except in a very limited degree.


less
I

Neverthe-

have written

this Dictionary

and how

came

to do so the

following paragraphs will show.

Between the years 1880 and 1883 the Natural History Collections were removed from the British Museum, Bloomsbury, to the new buildings which were specially constructed to receive them at South Kensington. Thereupon several of the rooms of the First and Second Northern Galleries, and the long room thatran parallel to the fourth room of the First Northern Gallery and had contained the studies and workrooms of the Natural RearrangeHistory Staff, were allotted to the Department of Oriental Egyptian Antiquities. When Dr. Birch, Keeper of the Department, had Collections removed the Collections of Egyptian and Semitic Antiquities Museum. into them, and rearranged the Egyptian Collections, he took

in

xlvi
in

Introduction.
for

hand a task which he had contemplated

many

years, namely,

the compilation of a detailed description of the Egyptian hiero-

The Theban
Recension of
the Book of the Dead.

The English translation of the Saite Recension of the Book of the Dead according to the Turin Papyrus,^ which he published in 1867,^ had aroused universal interest, and he was urged to supplement it with a version of the older Theban Recension translated from the rich collection of XVIIIth dynasty papyri in the British Museum. The smaller papyri had been cut up into sections and mounted under sheets of glass, and were at that time arranged in drawers in the TableCases in the public rooms. The longer papyri, i.e., those which measured from 5 to 30 feet in length, had been mounted in black glazed wooden frames and hung upon the walls of the North-West Staircase. But as in this position it was well-nigh impossible to consult them, and as it was feared that they might suffer injury through damp, they were taken down and, where possible, were cut up into sections, mounted under sheets of glass and stored
glyphic and hieratic fmierary papyri.

with the shorter papyri.

During the general rearrangement

of

the papyri which followed these alterations Birch seized the


Naville's edition of the Book of the

opportunity of re-examining and describing with minute care the


papyri which Professor Naville had selected as authorities for the

Dead.

Theban Recension of the Book of the Dead, and he directed me to assist him in this work. He was chiefly anxious to collect variant readings, and unusual forms of words, and new words, and to make lists of the papyri in which The work was long and difficult, particular Chapters appeared. chiefly because we possessed no concordance of the words of the Theban Recensions, and therefore could not easily identify the
text of his edition of the

So long as we were dealing with papyri containing the Saite Recension we found Lieblein's little " Index "^ very useful, but for identifying Chapters and passages in the Theban Recension it afforded no
Chapters in which they occurred
in

mutilated papyri.

Birch's

help.

proposed concordance
to the

funerary
papyri.

Having grouped the funerary papyri chronologically, i.e., according to dynasties, Birch began to write his descriptions of the papyri, and he directed me to make a concordance to them, and intended to incorporate the slips that I wrote with those which he was heaping up as material for the new edition of his " Dictionary
'

For the Egyptian text see Lepsius, Das Todtenbuch. Leipzig, 1842. In the fifth volume of Egypt's Place in Universal History. London, 1867,

pp. 161-326.
' Lieblein, contenus dans le Litre des J., Index Alphabetique de tons les Mots Marts publie par R. Lepsius d'apres le Papyrus de Turin. Lithographed. Paris,

1875.

8vo.

Introduction.
of Hieroglyphics,"

xlvii

which he

fully

believed

he would one day

publish (see p.

xlii).

When
slips

had been engaged on

this work, officially


I

and un-

officially, for

nearly two years, Biixh died, but

continued to write
(Brit.

for the

concordance to the Theban Recension, and began

to

collect

words from the Bremner (Rhind) Papyrus

Mus.

that the

No. io,i88), and other funerary works. It was now quite certain new edition of Birch's " Dictionary of Hieroglyphics "

to go on collecting " Eg3'ptian words with the view of publishing a " Vocabulary on much the same lines as Pierret's " Vocabulaire." By that time

could never appear, and

my

friends advised

me

had written amounted to many thousands, and I soon found that the work of arranging them and of incorporating the new ones consumed a vast amount of time. It was impossible to continue the work on the scale on which I had begun, and I foresaw that the task of making a concordance to Egyptian literature could not be carried out by any man who could not
the slips which
I

abandon

^^e \dea of

concordance
^
^"^^

funerary
papyri,

devote his whole time to the work.

Between 1888 and 1892 the British Museum acquired the Papyrus of Ani, the Papyrus of Nu, the Papyrus of Nekht and other remarkable Codices of the Theban Recension of the

Book
of

of the

Dead.

The

first

edition (500 copies) of the Facsimile

Ani was sold in less than two years, and it became a part of my official work to prepare a second and more correct edition of the Facsimile and to write the volume Vocabulary to thePapyrusof I made a of English text which was published with it in 1894. Vocabulary to the Egyptian text, but want of space prevented I then began its inclusion in the volume of English translations. to make a Vocabulary to the Papyrus of Nu, and in working through it I was so much impressed with the importance of this
the Papyrus of

Codex that I decided to publish an edition of the Theban The Papyrus ^^" Recension, and to make it and the Papyrus of Nebseni the principal ^ I have described the Papyrus authorities for the Egyptian text. of Nu at length elsewhere, ^ and it is only necessary to say here that it contains 131 Chapters, i.e., more than any other copy^ The whole papyrus is of the Book of the Dead now known.
carefully written,

Nu

himself probably having been the scribe.


called

The

Amen-hetep and his mother Senseneb, and it is prx)bable that she was no other than the lady Senseneb, the wife of Nebseni the scribe, whose copy of the Book
father of
'

Nu was

See

my The Chapters of Coming

Forth by Day, Vol.

1,

p. xii.

London, 1898.

"

The Papyrus

of Nebseni contains 77 Chapters.

xlviii

Introduction.

of the

Dead

in the British

Museum

(No. 9900) has so

much

in

My
the

edition of

common with
^j -^^^ ^^

Theban

the Book of the Dead.

Taking 115 Chapters from the Papyrus from the Papyrus of Nebseni, 27 from the Papyrus of Ani, and some half-dozen hymns, etc., from the Papyri of Hunefer, Mut-hetep and Nekht, I prepared an edition of the Egyptian texts and translated them. When I ventured to suggest to Messrs. Kegan Paul, who undertook to publish the edition, that text and translation should be accompanied by a Concordance they demurred, saying that no one wpuld buy the Concordance, or
that of Nu.

no one wanted such a thing. Finally they decided to print 750 copies of the Egyptian text and Vocabulary, and 1,000 copies of the Translation, thinking there would be a larger demand for it than for the first two volumes of the work. Two
Vocabulary,
for

years later they wrote to

me

saying that the whole edition of the


sold,

Egyptian text and Vocabulary was

and that as about 230

copies of the Translation were unsold they had decided to sell them as a " remainder," and they did so. Thus it was proved

that there was a considerable

My
ofthe

Theban

demand for an Egyptian Vocabulary to the Theban Recension of the Book of the Dead, and that there '^'^^^ students who would not buy the Translation unless they
could have the Vocabulary with
I
it.

Recension.

In printing the Vocabulary

adopted a plan hitherto untried. I placed the transliteration of the Egyptian words in the first instead of in the second column
it seemed to me that it would enable the beginner word he wanted more easily and quickly. This plan has been much approved of in England, and as it has been adopted in an " Aegyptisches Glossar " published in Berlin in 1904 it has evidently seemed useful to the practical Teutonic mind. The success of the Vocabulary to the Book of the Dead and the encouragement of many friends emboldened me to write an Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, ^ and with this object

as

was

usual, for

to find the

in

view

I I

began to
first

collect

The

collection

generally.

laid

words from Egyptian literature under contribution the Dictionaries of


verified,

of material
for this

Birch,

Brugsch and Pierret and

as far as possible, all

Dictionary.

doubtful readings.

From

the Vocabularies published with editions

......
frorn
I

of special texts I obtained

much

material,

and

my own
had

reading of texts, both published and unpublished,


'

obtained a

As Brugsch died
is

in 1894, all

hope of a new edition of

his Wcrterhnch

to be abandoned.

His private copy of this work was purchased by the British


in the Library of the

Museum, and
Antiquities.

now

Department

of Egyptian

and Assyrian

It is interleaved

and

in several

volumes, and the extensive notes

and additions a new edition.

in his

own handwriting

suggest that he contemplated the issue of

Introduction.

xlix

work was that I filled many boxes and drawers with slips on each of which a word was written, with its certain or problematical meaning, and a reference to the text or monument where it was to be found. In 1908 I had written over three hundred thousand slips, and in spite of the constant help of my wife in arranging them and in making incorporations, I realised that the publication of such a mass of material was impossible. No one man could write the fair copy of it for press, and no publisher could afford to undertake its publication. I therefore set to work to revise the slips, and to destroy all that had redundant references, and references to words the meanings
great deal more.

The

result of all this

which were commonly accepted. In this revision I got rid of more than one-half of the slips, but even then the compilation was far too large, and further revision was necessary. I then cut out all the numerous quotations from texts, and nearly all comments, abbreviated the references to published works, and, at the risk of making a somewhat bald Egyptian Vocabulary, eschewed, except in very rare cases, any attempt to discuss theoretical renderings of words. This second revision was completed in 1913, and the slips which I proposed to print numbered
of

Revisions

^ ^ 'P^*

nearly 28,500.

The question
stages
of

of publication then of
this

arose.

During the early


an
understanding

the

writing

Dictionary

Manager of Messrs. Kegan, & and myself that his firm would endeavour to include it among their publications, but by the time the manuscript was ready for the printer, he had left their service, and they were not in a position to fulfil his wish. I talked the matter over with Mr. Horace Hart, Printer to the Oxford University Press, and showed him the manuscript of the
existed

between

Mr.

Blackett,
Co.,

Paul, Trench, Triibner

Diificulty of finding a

Dictionary, and, having


cost of printing
it,

made

a rough calculation of the probable

ought

to

he came to the conclusion that no publisher undertake the work without a subsidy. He thought
it

that the cost of production might be lowered by printing

printing in in Vienna

Vienna, and spoke highly of the Austrian firm of Messrs. Adolf

Holzhausen, who had already printed several books of mine,

and with whose excellent typography I was well acquainted. Further enquiry made by me among printers and publishers showed the correctness of Mr. Hart's opinion, and I accepted it as final. I decided that it was unwise to attempt to reproduce manuscript my by lithography, because works of reference printed by lithography are often very unsatisfactory and difficult

Introduction.
use,

to

and
after

lacked the

skill

of

Brugsch

in

writing

the

transfers.

friend offers

Soon

to defray the

tunity of placing

cost of printing the Dictionary.

my conversation with Mr. Hart I had the my difficulty before a friend an English
all his life

opporgentle-

man who

has been

intensely interested in the ancient

languages of the Near East, and has proved himself to be a

generous patron and supporter of English archaeological enterprise


in

Egypt and Western Asia

for

many

years past.
to remain

This gentleman,

who

persists in his determination

me

a sympathetic hearing, and a few days later


I

anonymous, gave wrote and offered

to defray the cost of printing the Dictionary in Vienna.


heartfelt gratitude

With

accepted this munificent

offer,
filled

and made
seven large

preparations to take the manuscript, which

tray-boxes, each about two feet three inches in length, to Vienna

The printing of the


Dictionary

begun

in

May, 1914. The completing of a piece of work on which I was then engaged made it necessary for me to postpone my journey from the spring till the early autumn, when I hoped to conclude my negotiations with Messrs. Holzhausen speedily, and to begin to print before the end of the year. The delay was providential for the Dictionary, for the Great War broke out early in August, and my manuscript was safe in England had it been in Vienna it would have been impossible to regain possession of it for a very considerable time, and even if I had eventually succeeded in recovering it, its publication must have As things were, I was able, been delayed for some years. with the consent of my friend and benefactor, to open negotiations with Messrs. Harrison and Sons for. the printing of the book, and very soon after their completion the printing
in
;

England.

began.

Contents
of this Dictionary.

Egyptian Hieroglyphs contains nearly twenty-three thousand forms of Egyptian words collected from texts of all periods between the time of the Hlrd Dynasty and the Roman Period. Strictly speaking, the words belonging to each of the great periods of Egyptian literature should have been printed in separate sections, but the time for making such a series of Egyptian Dictionaries has not yet arrived, it seems to me. Birch excluded from his Dictionary the names of deities and the names of places, and printed lists of them as Appendices Pierret included in his " Vocabuto his Dictionary of words. laire " the names of deities, kings and places, and made it to

The present Dictionary

of

contain practically
Dictionaries of

the essential parts of the Hieroglyphic Birch and Brugsch, ChampoUion's " Pantheon
all

Introduction.

li

^gyptien,"^ Lepsius'

"

Book

of Kings,"^

and Bragsch's " Geo-

graphical Dictionary."''
refer at first

And

Brugsch, expecting the student to

hand

to these works, devoted all the space in his

Worterbuch to registering and explaining Egyptian words.


there
I
is

Though

have

to be said in favour of following this plan strictly, Names of gods nevertheless included in the Dictionary of Egyptian words and goddesses
all

much

the names of
beings that
I

the gods and goddesses, and other mythological

have been able to collect, and thus the total number of entries in this section of the book amounts to 23,889. Pierret's instinct, which told him that a " Vocabulaire Hieroglyphique " that was intended to help beginners in the study of Egyptology, ought to contain the names of kings, was undoubtedly
correct,

but

it

seems to

me

that he

made

them throughout his work. As and the " Livre des Rois " of Brugsch and Bouriant" are out print and scarce, and the edition of my own " Book of Kings
is

the "

a mistake in scattering Konigsbuch " of Lepsius,


of Names
"^
^

i^a.

rapidly becoming exhausted,


of

have printed a

full list of

the

names

necessary, for of

Egyptian kings as Part II of this work. This was Das Handbuch der Aegyptischen Konigsnamen by Pieper and Burchardt only one part has appeared (Berlin, 1912, Svo), and few students can ever hope to possess the splendid but
expensive Le Livre des Rois de I'ilgypte, which Gauthier has

published in the Memoires of the French Archaeological Institute


of Cairo, in five parts, folio (Cairo, 1902-16).

My

List contains

439 entries, which give the names of all the known kings, from Mena, the first king of all Egypt, to the Roman Emperor Decius.
It

includes

all

their principal

names and titles North, and the Son of Ra. It illustrates at a glance the development of the use of these names and titles, which in many cases resemble the " strong names " that were adopted by the kings
'

Nebti names, and their as the Horus of Gold, the King of the South and

Ka and

Collection des personnages myihologiques de I'ancienne Egypte, d'apres les


;

Monumens

avec

un

texte explicatif

par J. F. C.

et

les

figures d'apres les dcssins


4to.

de L. J. J. Dubois. Avec 90 planches en couleur. Paris, 1823-25. * Konigsbuch der alien Aegypter. Fol. Berlin, 1858.
^

Dictionnaire

Geographique

de
Fol.

I'Ancienne

Jigypte.

Leipzig,

1877.

Fol.

Supplement.
'

Leipzig, 1879-80.
et

E.

Brugsch-Bey

Urbain Bouriant, Le Livre des Rois, contenant


et

la Liste

Chronologique des Rois, Reines, Princes, Princesses,


de V Egypte depuis

Personnages Importants

Menes jusqu'd Nectanebo IL

Cairo, 1887.

The Book of the Kings of Egypt or the Ka, Nebti, Horus, Suien Bat and Rii names of the Pharaohs with transliterations, from Menes, the first dynastic king of Egypt, to the Emperor Decius, with Chapters on the Royal Names, Chronology, etc. London, 2 Vols., 1908. Svo.

d 2

lii

Introduction.

of

Dahomey.

Some

of the

abnormally long strings of bombastic

epithets which the later Pharaohs loved to see prefixed to their

names

as Kings of the South

and North

have omitted,

for

they

only contain quite ordinary


Geographical
included

titles.

The importance to the beginner of having a list of geographical names available for handy reference is so obvious that no ^.pology is needed for devoting a section of this work to a register of the names of countries, districts, localities, cities, towns, etc., Brugsch's in Egypt, the Egyptian Sudan and Western Asia. Leipzig, Dictionnaire Geographique, 1887-80, and the three volumes
of his Geographische Inschriften Altagyptischer

Denkmdler Leipzig,
,

1857-60,

contain a vast

amount

of information,

but the facts

needed re-stating and supplementing in the light of the studies In drawing up the Geographical List, of modern Egyptologists. which forms Part III of this Dictionary, and contains nearly
3,500 entries,
Geographyof
and
Palestine.

have derived much help from


Altdgyptischen

Miiller's

Asien und
1893,

Europa

and Burchardt's Die Altkanaandischen Fremdworte und Eigennamen im


nach
Denkmdlern,
In the
Leipzig,

Aegyptischen, Leipzig, 1Q09-10.

first

of these the writer

has treated the geography of Egypt and her colonies historically and chronologically, and has grouped, in a clear and systematic

manner, all the facts that were available at the time when he wrote the book. In the second, the author collected a mass of material of the utmost importance for the student of Egyptian Geography and Philology. His work is of peculiar value because
he possessed a good working knowledge of Hebrew and other
Semitic dialects, and was able to use
it

authoritatively in dealing

with Egyptian forms of Semitic words and place-names. Every Egyptologist must lament the untimely death of this sound
scholar.

The Tall al-'Amamah


Tablets.

have also obtained much help in identifying the original names of Syrian and Palestinian places mentioned in Egyptian texts from Knudtzon's Die El-Amarna Tafeln, Leipzig, 1907, and Winckler's complete edition of the texts from the
I

Tall al-'Amarnah
Berlin, 1889).

Tablets

{Der

Thontafelfund

von El Amarna,

Wherever possible I have added the cuneiform originals in the Egyptian Geographical Lists from the Tall al'Amarnah Tablets and from the historical inscriptions of the kings of the later Assyrian Empires which flourished between 1350 and 620 B.C. The exact positions of scores of places must always remain unknown because their conquerors, whether Egyptian or Assyrian, often destroyed cities and towns utterly, and in a generation or two their sites would be forgotten.

Introduction.

liii

The
Indexes.
of
all

last

section
First

of

this

Dictionary contains

a series of The
list

English

The

Index contains a complete alphabetical

the English words, with references, which are used to

translate the Egyptian words,

and

it

forms a kind of English-

Egyptian Dictionary.

have found the French Index in Pierret's Vocabulaire Hic'roglyphique very useful in reading Egyptian texts, and I hope that mine, which is much larger and fuller, and contains over sixty thousand references, will be acceptable to
I

the beginner.

The Second Index ought royal names when they occur


of the prenomens,

to assist in the identification of


in mutilated texts.

In

it

many

which begin with Ra or some other god's


;

name, are given under two forms


of Seti
I,

thus

foea

J,

the prenomen Kings' names,

will

be found both under Ra-men-Maat and Men-Maatof

Ra.

The Hebrew and Greek forms


The Third Index contains a

Egyptian royal names,


of

the identifications of which are tolerably certain, are also given.


list

geographical

names. The
Geographical

with references, under the ordinary forms in which they are

found

in

English books.
the

These are followed by

lists

of

the

forms in which they occur in Coptic Literature, in the works


of Greek writers,
in the in

Hebrew

Bible,

in

Semitic texts, and

cuneiform inscriptions, both Assyrian and Persian.


list

The Fourth Index contains a


Index consists of
Syriac, Arabic,
lists

of all the Coptic words, Coptic. Index,

with references, that occur in the Dictionary, and the Fifth


of all the

non-Egyptian words, Hebrew,


Index of
Semiticwords.

Ethiopic,
it.

Amharic and Greek, that are quoted


words
are

or referred to in

The system on which the


Dictionary
' '

arranged

in

the
his
' '

is

alphabetical,
'

like
'

that followed

by Birch
' '

in

Dictionary of Hieroglyphics,

and by Brugsch in his

Worterbuch,

The
ofThe words

and by the makers of Vocabularies to editions of special texts, e.g., by Stern^ and Erman^ in Germany, Lieblein^ in Norway, PiehP in Sweden, Schiaparelli' in Italy, Maspero* and Moret' in
'

See the " VoUstandiges Hieroglyphisch-Lateinisches Glossar,"

by

L.

Stem
Uni-

in Vol. II of Ebers, Papyros Ebers, das hermetische


versitats-Biblioihek zu Leipzig.
2

Buch

conservirt in der

Leipzig, 1875.

Fol.

'

Die Marchen des Papyrus Westcar, 2 vols. Berhn, 1890. Index alphabetique de tons les Mots contenus dans le Livre des Moris.
8vo.

Paris,

1875.
* '

Dictionnaire du Papyrus Harris, No.


II Libra dei Funerali.

i.

Upsala, 1882.
Fol.

8vo.

Turin, 1880-83.

*
'

Les Memoires de Sinouhit. Paris, 1908. 4to. Le Rituel du Culte Divin Journalier. Paris, 1902.

d3

liv

Introduction.
their

France, by Griffith/ and by Griffith and Thompson^ in

Transliteration,

Demotic Glossaries, and by myself in England/ In the case of several words belonging to the late period here and there inconsistency will be found, but this is due chiefly to the fact that many signs which had syllabic values under the Middle and New Empires were used as mere letters in the late texts. And Egyptian scribes were themselves inconsistent in their spellings. Throughout this book the transliteration of the Egyptian word
jg

placed

first

in the entry,

according to the plan followed in

Vocabulary to the Theban Recension of the Book of the Dead. Then follows the Egyptian word in hieroglyphs, frequently with a reference to the text where it is found, and theif the

my

Now, the exact meaning of many words is unknown, and can only be guessed at by the context. In some cases the context makes the meaning of an unknown word comparatively
meaning.
certain,
is

but in others, especially where no probable Coptic equivalent


it

forthcoming,

does not, and then any meaning suggested


In

is little else

than the result of guesswork.

many

cases, then,

the English words that are set


difficult

down

as translations of rare

and

Egyptian words must only be regarded as suggestions The meanings ^^ ^o the probable meanings. This is especially the case with of many words certain words in the Pyramid Texts. The meaning of some of them is tolerably clear from the determinatives, but there are

words in these difficult documents for which no one has so far proposed meanings that may be considered correct. The spells and magical formulae which abound
a considerable
of in these

number

Texts are not only

difficult to translate

because of the

words of unknown meaning in them, but also because it is not always clear where one word ends and the next begins. Even Maspero found himself unable to translate whole sentences and passages in them, and as none of the translations of them promised by German scholars has yet appeared, it seems as though
the difficulties which they belittled in describing Maspero's edition
of the
Order of the

Pyramid Texts have vanquished them. " The order of the letters in Birch's " Dictionary of Hieroglyphics

!"-

is

as follows:-!).
,

_.,
,

^,

J,

>u=^.

|.

m,
|,

l\l\,

^,
e,

B, |^.
, C30

D,

<=>,

p,

c^^,

^,

=,

O,

|,

^,

Catalogue of the Demotic Papyri in the John Rylands Library, Vol. III. Manchester, 1909. ' The Demotic Magical Papyrus of London and Leiden, Vol. III. London,
'

1909.

Vocabulary

to the

Theban Recension of the Book of the Dead.

London, 1898.

Iv

Introduction.

In other words, he tried to


the letters of the
In E. de Rouge's
tienne,

make

their order

approximate to that of

Birch,

EngUsh Alphabet.
Egyptian Alphabet {Chrestomaihie t^gypis

E. de Roug6.

Part

I,

Paris, 1867) the order of the letters


^^'.

as follows

^'

^'
^,
.

|>

^'

Ifl'

^'
|.

^'

^'
ra-

J'

^'

'

^'^'
0,<=.,

^'
-2a<.,

LJ'

^'
,

s==>,

^='> ^^>
\'
*-*'

^^. ^=.
]'

__>,

-wv^^,

-*

|l,

IM' '

I'
(|,

In Stern's "Glossar" the order is stem.


|>
\\,(|(|,

as follows
'^^'wvA,

i"^,

D,

J,

^.=^, ra,
ci,

'^==',

ZS. -23i,

a, ^, <3>,

p,

_H-, 00,
in

=>,

|,

c^s.,

^, ^
:

>>

(2, ^>

The order followed


or w,

this Dictionary is
,

"^^j

Budge.

^or

(2,

J,

D, '^^^,

^,
|,

<=>

or .2^, ra,|. ^,

|l,c3a, A, ^^^,

S.

ci

or

s=>, c=>,

^^.

Among
are

the words given in this Dictionary are

many which
this

derived
of

from demotic
is

texts.

As
I

my
have

knowledge of

branch

Egyptology

rudimentary

relied for the cor-

rectness of their transcription into hieroglyphs chiefly

upon the
F. LI.

works of that
Griffith.

erratic genius, E. Revillout,

and Professor

These scholars have shown that Demotologists

able to transcribe demotic texts into hieroglyphs,

and

are Demotic Birch's words:

view that they were unable to do

this

is

no longer tenable.

About the correctness of the meanings of many demotic words given by them there can be no doubt, for the equivalents of a great number of them, and their counterparts in form, are to be found even in the existing Coptic " Scalae " and in the printed Coptic Vocabularies and Dictionaries of Peyron, Tattam and
Par they.

The

references

to

original

documents

and

to
of

published

editions of

unsatisfactory.

them in this Dictionary are, in respect They represent a compromise, and


all

number,
suffer

will

the fate of

compromises, that

is

to say, they
I

wUl

satisfy
first

nobody.
all

In the great collection of slips which

made

of

there were to

some words as many

as sixty references,

and

the slips that

contained only from six to twelve references were


print all these

was manifestly impossible, for the references would have occupied far more space than the EgypIt seemed at first that each tian words and their meanings. followed a reference, but even so the word ought to be by d 4
very few.

To

References to publications,

Ivi

Introduction,

references required as
I

much

space as the Egyptian words, and

decided that

many

references to the older printed literature

must be cut
and
tions

out,

tions admitted.

Further,

and only a limited number to recent publicait was clear that the names of authors
of the Society of Biblical Archaeology, the

their papers printed in the Recueil de Travaux, the Transac-

and Proceedings

Archceologia of the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Aegyptische Zeitschrift,

and other scientific journals of the kind, would have to be omitted, and the name of the journal quoted in an
abbreviated form.
followed by a

list

of the abbreviations of the titles of all

books actually quoted


list

of all

be found on pp. Ixxv-lxxxvii. This is the principal books that have been used or
will

consulted in the writing of this Dictionary, so that the beginner

Coptic forms
of Egyptian

what books to turn in the prosecution of his studies. Following the meaning of the word and at the end of the entry is often given the equivalent of an Egyptian word in the
to
latest stage of the language,
i.e.,

may know

words.

Coptic.

In selecting these Coptic

have not copied them straight out of a Coptic Dictionary, but have satisfied myself that they bear the meaning which the Egyptian words have in passages in the Coptic versions
equivalents
I

of the Bible,

and

in Coptic patristic literature generally.

the great Corpus of Coptic words upon which Mr.


Mr. Cram's Coptic Dictionary.

W.

E.

Had Crum

has been at work for so


of Coptic equivalents

many

years been available^ the

number

quoted

have been quadrupled.

would probably The Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic and other


in this Dictionary

Semitic words quoted in the entries stand in a different relationship to the Egyptian, for they merely represent borrowings of

words, usually by the Egyptians from the Semites, whilst the


true Coptic words are native Egyptian.

They seem

to

me

to

stand in quite a different category from the pronouns which were

Borrowed
Semitic words.

borrowed at a very early period by the Egyptians from the people whom, for want of a better name, we may call " Proto-Semites." And the greater number of them were certainly introduced into Egyptian texts after the Egyptians founded Colonies in Syria and Palestine by scribes who either knew no Egyptian words that were exactly suitable for their purpose, or who wished to

ornament their compositions by the use show their erudition.


'

of Semitic

words or to

broke out in 1914 Mr. Crum was in Vienna, and had He succeeded in leaving the city, but his manuscripts remained there for a considerable time afterwards, and his work has been hampered in consequence, and the publication of his Coptic Dictionary
the Great
his

When

War

enormous mass of material with him.

delayed for five years.

Introduction.

Ivii

In the transliterations of
words,

tlie

Egyptian words in

this Die-

Difficulties of
tion.

transl transhterationary, I have followed the order of the letters of the Egyptian

but

cannot think that these transliterations always

represent the true pronunciation of the words.

Thus

in the

word

Mam

plant, fl'^^s,"^' ^

it

is

impossible to think that the

Egyptians took the trouble to pronounce two long vowels having


exactly the same sound and to give
it

*^ its value, always supposing


The
in the

had a phonetic value

in this word.

analogies in Coptic

suggest that

we should read
^

the
.

word simply am, nevertheless word Nenui[t]


or

the scribe wrote '


Nui[t] r^

"^
,

Vv
the

Again

v>

0(1

':^^

primeval watery mass,

we have
;

n ~wwv 4- en f^~~. + n "~^~" -\- nu O, i.e., four n sounds that any Egyptian ever took the trouble to pronounce all of them in this word is inconceivable. It is possible that the scribe wished the reader to understand that one n had to be pronounced like the Spanish h or the Amharic "^ and wrote n four times
,

to

make

certain that he did so.


I

In

many

transliterations of
Addition of
*^ letter
e.

have added the letter e, not because I think it represents the vowel which the Egyptians used in these places, but merely to make the words pronounceable and therefore
easy to remember.
transliterated hes

Egyptian words

Thus the word

fi

d|' ^^

P d^'

^^

by me, but the Coptic equivalent &twc shows


e,

that the vowel sound between the two consonants was not an

but something like an

o.

On

the other

hand

in

"to

submerge," the Coptic equivalent ^^.cIe suggests that in this word at least the vowel sound was that of some kind of a.

And
1

in

netchem

^^^'
11 and the
of

or

|^v

|.

"sweet," "pleasant," the


first

Coptic equivalent notTlx. suggests the

vowel sound in the Evidence


1

of

word was m or o Without vowels


(|"^~^

11 second that
^

of

some kmd

Coptic texts,
e

of

or a.

some kind how can the name


('^^"'^^'"^

of

the god

(l^'Or
?

5^'

^'^

"^"^I"^!'

be pronounced

In

transliterating -www I

and there is good authority for doing so, Coptic papyrus Codex of the Book of Deuteronomy and the Acts of the Apostles.* Thus in & nnei 'ivTeKAJLnrT^iJL^^J>\ (Deut. 13, 10) the line over the Hs and the Ji. proves that the reader had to
Brit. Mus. MS. Oriental No. 7594. middle of the fourth century of our Era.
'

have written en or ne, namely the most ancient

It

was written not

later

than the

See

my

Coptic Biblical Texts in the

Dialect of

Upper Egypt.

London, 1912.

8vo.

Iviii

Introduction.

supply some vowel when pronouncing these letters, either an a or an e, probably the latter. And this was the case with
several other letters besides n

and

jul,

for

we have

^^xeTrtonrcjocgfi
A.nftw

(Deut.

I,

41),

iinp
4,

{ibid.

42),

xeTRonfCOcyq

{ibid.),

rtv

x5jS.oq

{ibid.

15),

rtrteKpJULKxpe {ibid.
26), K^-x^.

20), JU-H

nexH

g^xXo

{ibid. 23), TiitoTT-e

ex oitg; {ibid.
{ibid.

xeg^iH XHpc

{ibid. 5, 33),

xooxK

{ibid.),

aj-^-rtxqqoxonr e fi.oX

i.-ras

rtenrpptuoT {ibid. 8, 24),

rtr
ri

XJuC p ntoS.^

zncixe (Acts
X,

10, 3),

25, 19), g,n oTcupx (Acts 5, 23), nni.-r etc. From these examples we see that lines

were written over the

letters

B.,

X, jul, n, n, p,

c,

x,

k, v, q, cy, g,

and
Separate vowels in words.

and that

in certain positions in

words a helping vowel was


vowels which
difficulty,

necessary for their pronunciation.

The whole question

of the use of the separate


is

we
it

find in

Egyptian words

one of considerable

and
in

seems to

me

quite clear from the statements that are

made

on the subject by Egyptologists that no one has yet succeeded


solving the problem.
It is quite

obvious that the scribes syste-

matically wrote certain words without vowels and expected the

reader to supply them,

e.g.,

the

name

of the

god

| J| Pth.

Now,
Egyptian
abbreviations
of words

it is

impossible to pronounce this


least,

name without adding one


In the case of

vowel at

but there

is

nothing in Egyptian to show what


it

that vowel must be or where


and

is

to be placed.

Pth, the Greeks,

who

spelt the

name

^6d, or

(t>0a,

supply the

names.

vowel, and suggest that the Egyptians pronounced it something like " Ptah." Or, take the name of the god Horus, which the

Egyptians wrote

Her

fX ^'

^1'

^'

<^5

^"^ '=^

without adding any vowel.

Hebrew

("nn),

Coptic (&u)p)
is o,

The transcriptions of the name in and Greek Cflpo?) prove that the

missing vowel

but the Egyptian forms of the


In the Pyramid Texts

name

give no

indication of this fact.


'^

we

find the

form
to

V-^

(M-

454) which

was held by one Egyptologist


terminated in u
is
;

prove that the god's name


Vowels placed to
at the ends
of words.

but, according
%:> is really

M. Naville's view, which


is

probably correct, the

the vowel that


"

wanting in the name, which we ought to read


in

Hur," or " Hor," as

Hebrew, Coptic and Greek.

This same

scholar thinks that another example of the use of the v^ in this

way
,

is

found in "^^ tk
D
,

Jj
^

_zr u'

or "'

Q a

(23

variants
of

of

and "-"^

I-

As the Coptic form

the word

is

,u3xn, the ancient Egyptian form of the word clearly included

lix

Introduction.

the vowel

o,

and

this

is

proved by the
It

^ or e
find in

in the

first

two

forms of

quoted above.

has seemed to

me

for several

years past that the vowel signs which

we

many Egyptian

words were intended not to be read necessarily as parts of the words, but only to indicate or limit their signification. But the subject is too large to discuss in an Introduction to a Dictionary, and demands a book to itself. Meanwhile, I understand that M. Naville is preparing a volume on the whole question, and as
there
is

Vowels as indications of
the meanings of words or verbal forms.

every reason to believe that he will present in a new light


facts

many

important
is

bearing

upon Egyptian phonetics,


which
I

its

appearance
Dictionary

eagerly awaited.
of

The system
is

transliteration

have used

in

a modification of that which was employed

by Birch

this The Egj'ptian Alphabet in


1867.

and some

of the older Egyptologists,


life.

and by Brugsch
is

until the

last years of his

The following
:

the transliteration of the


in the

letters of the
first

Egyptian Alphabet which Brugsch printed

volume of his Wdrterbuch (1867)

ra

ffi

m
AA/wv\

[land

or

'

^^

-I

m
f]
u,

ua (w)

.&

In 1880, the following modification of this Alphabet appeared The Egyptian


in the fifth

volume

of his Wdrterbuch (Folge


:

und Umschreibung

jggo^

der alphabetischen Zeichen)


a.

Vowels and
1.
(]

half- vowels

a (n).

(j?).

1.

(^)-

u. 0.

f]

u,

(,).


IX
.1

Introduction.

Consonants
b,

v(l)
(2)

p.

l^'W'
P
>u_
f

ro-i

s,

(sx)

ijia

i (tr)

^
ffi

k,

(^)

k
^v^A^^

m
n
r

k,

(a

and

I)

^
Cii

k(3)
t(:o)

<r>
.^ai

.^,]
:

6 (n- d)

ra

=
^
i

(T,

t)

The Egyptian
Alphabet in
1891.

Mc)
X
(n.

t^(^V)
t(a) (y)

t)

In 1891

{Die Aegyptologie,

p.

94)

he published a further
:-

jnodification of the

Egyptian Alphabet which reads as follows


f

I.

(j

'

(a)

9-

17.

IM
ffl

2.

(a)

10.

18.

19.
3.
IIH

g
k

" 0)
20.
12.

4.

^^

" (0

<=>
[.2^

r,

(r)

21.
5.

k(q)
t

^
J
D

^'

(a)

13.

rw](l)
22.

6.

w(u)
b

14-

rn

h
23-

7-

.5.

24.

d d

(t)

8.

16.

(x)

25.

(f)

contains a

list of

double vowels and half-vowels.


Introduciion.

Ixi

In 1894

Dr.

Erman proposed some

modifications of

system of transliterating the Egyptian Alphabet, and following {Egyptian Grammar, London, 1894, p. 6)
:

this The Egyptian printed the Alphabet in

}^
1

ffi

g
t

c^

P/'
w
r-w-i

cz=^

ra

k k

^
W

d
y

In 191 1 he
tische

made

the following changes and addition {Aegyp- The Egyptian


Alphabet
:

Grammatik, Berlin, 1911, p. 20) ' ^ ^


i

in

1911.

i|

or

y.

fl'=;y.

<=>
=
s-

= 1 and
'

S-

n]h = n-

\^ " Z
A k =
=
p.

b = C::

"^^^ h> ~*~"


c>

^-

"I s

ttj.

^z^ k =
w = y

= n-

t.

^
Erman

d =

t:-

"^^d.

y-

(little

yodh).

From
two

these

we

see that Dr.

introduces the sign

as

a letter of the Egyptian Alphabet, and distinguishes between the


sibilants
(|,
'

and

fl;

that

he gives y as an alternative yodh," and that he retains


,

value to
I,
I

and regards w as a

"little

and

as the transliterations of

^\

(1

and

respectively.
\\,

It is also to

be noted that his system includes the letters


I

h,

s,

t,

and

d,

making with

and

seven new characters which must

be specially cut for the compositor's use. There are many objections that might be urged against this system of transliteration, but
the innovations in
it

are not worth discussion.

It is sufficient to

say that when the actual mistakes in the older system that was used by Birch, Lepsius, Brugsch and others are eliminated it remains,
in

my

opinion, the best that has yet been proposed.

fications

which

have made

in

it

for

The modithe purposes of this book


y,

are not in
rections
;

to be improvements or even cormade were solely they with the view of simplifying

any way intended

the transliteration for the use of the beginner, and of reducing simpUfied I have tried to get rid of as many transhterthe labour of the compositor.
.
.

ation used

letters

with diacritical marks as possible, because

they

often

in this

book

Ixii

Introdtiction.

break
for
(1 ,

off

in

a for

the
o,

process of printing
for
;

but

have retained a

are familiar
rejected
I

| and t for g^> three of these, a, h and t, to every student of Oriental languages. I have

and

and
t,

'

them,

i.e., h,

h,

d,

and and

letters
s

with

lines or a semi-circle
(s),

with an accent
pains
collected

under have eschewed


Introduction

entirely for the reasons given in the following paragraphs.

Maspero with
d
Maspero on Egyptian
phonetics.
I'

infinite

in

his

Etude de

examples

Phonetique Bgyptienne, Paris, 1917, a number of illustrating the various vowel sounds which the
la
\\

Egyptians themselves gave to the signs "^j

and

And

from

his conclusions

it is

clear that

even though we transliterate


the various modified sounds
letter
;i

*^ by

A, the

A will not
q

represent

all

which the human mouth can give to that


the case with

and
\\

in

and

this

is

also

0.

According to him the primitive phonetic

value of the sign


the French

Pyramid times was " un

A moyen

" like

in patte, cage, that is to say,


fi

an A, or an open

which borders on
for

as in the popular pronunciation

MontpEnasse

MontpArnasse

"^^

A
is

is

grave bordering on O, as in the

k.

and

popular Parisian pronunciations g()r for gAre, or in the English


All,

wOs
Q,

for

wAs-

guttural which recalls the sound of


it

y =

but does not correspond to

exactly and turns sometimes

to the

that in

and sometimes to the A grave. In fact, we see archaic Egyptian " les phonemes varies de la langue
aigu,

posterieure ne s'etaient pas produits encore, et qu'il n'y avait

sous chacun d'eux, ainsi que sous chacun des signes reconnus

pour consonnes par tons

les
si

savants

J,

a, >^^=^, ^^=^,

rD.

etc.,

qu'un phoneme unique, ou,


unique."

Ton

veut, les groupes de nuances

vocaliques que nous avons I'habitude de designer par un signe

Accepting these conclusions heartily

it

has seemed to

me
and

quite unnecessary to use

any other
signe

signs to represent "vi, h

fl

than

a, a

and a

respectively.
le
(],

" Si done nous disons que


les signes

anglais figure

une

voyelle,

il

n'y a

pas de raison pour que entendu,


je n'ai

^^,

ne figurent pas des voyelles.


si

Bien
il

pas

la

pretention d'affirmer que,

^_^ par exemple sonnait A,

n'y avait sous ce signe qu'un seul des

chaque modification de forme dans la bouche humaine produit une voyelle ou une nuance de voyelle differente, le nombre des voyelles et de leurs nuances est tres considerable aussi les signes que nous appelons signes-voyelles communement A, E, I, etc., representent en r&.litd des groupes de nuances vocaliques differant trhs legerement I'une de I'autre et Ton considdrera les signes qui rcpresentent chacun d'eux,
possibles.
;

Comme

1>

m-

'

'^^

I^gyptien

comme

couvrant chacun de ces groupes "

(p.

119).

'

Introduction.

Ixiii

The

sign

%
.

is

transliterated
i

u throughout
I

it

is

no doubt The

sign

equivalent both to
literate
it

and

>i,

and

think

it is

a mistake to trans-

always by w.
or

The
"

correct transliteration of -^^. or The sign 4s?.

A^,

or

^
d

^^

is

a matter of difficulty.

That

was sounded

in

some way

different

from ^\
It

is

clear,

otherwise

it

would appear
the sign A

in
-

words more frequently.


o

seems possible that


to

or

added to the v\

was intended

show that
in

the ^^ was to be pronounced in one of the

many ways

which
is

is

sounded

in

African languages, but what that

way was

not evident.
cription of

When -%^
name

occurs at the end of an Egyptian transPalestine or Syria


it

the

of a locality in
I

may
m'.
\\as
^^^A^and

represent ma.

In this book
'~>~^,

have often transcribed

-^
the

by

?V^.
vy

And

as regards

when

the Egyptian wrote

f^

(SAAA/VA

n
gn.

probably pronounced

like the

Spanish

tI

or the

Amharic ^

The

signs

and

kha respectively.
in Coptic by

are transcribed throughout by kh and According to some authorities is represented


*-=

and &.

&

and

by

i),

but the Copts did not observe


find in Coptic texts g^Hi^i

this distinction carefully, for

we

and
is^-=

and ^ojxS, etc. can become in Coptic The absoluteness of the statement that cy, but never but that can become & or cy, or or cy, 2, and has been disproved by Maspero,^ and nothing more need be said about it here. In this Dictionary the words beginning with and those beginning with ^ are separated into two distinct groups for the convenience of the beginner, but it has been thought unnecessary to use any specially distinctive signs for and <*-=. As he will always have the Egj'ptian text before him, he can make no mistake. The x is, of course, dropped.
^HiB^i, pjexsLc

and ^ejULc, g,pe and ^pe,

g^oj-rS

-=

and

^.

In 1892, Professor
Aegyptische

Hommel
s.

pointed out in the Zeitschrift fur


9
ff)

Sprache (Bd. 30,

that the Egyptians used


>>

two

sibilants

which were represented bv the signs


is

and

U,

The
"

sibilants

But the texts prove conclusively that they ceased to distinguish between them in writing, except in the case of a few words at an early period, and the
fact

beyond dispute,

as all will admit.

'

and that they used


to express the letter

<*
s.

and
There

'

indiscriminately

when they wished

is

no doubt that - must sometimes


sound
froin
[I

have had a somewhat


'

different
la

for

we
ff.

find the

Introduction a

I'

Etude de

Phonetique Egyptienne, p. 46

Ixiv

Introduction.
for "jackal " written

word

^-"^
0,

J "W
is

or

J i^

sa6 or

s6,

and the Hebrew word


find a

for the

animal
thus
,

ze^bh
|

l^tt.

But we

also

form beginning with the

J "^i

and, as several

variants of this form begin also with


rarely

the form that begins with

"^
z

is

not a very sure ground for the statement that


in

- =
;

T.

The

-T-

sound must have been very rare

Egypt, for most of the words

under ^ in the Coptic Dictionaries are of Greek origin ^uJitx for cojnx {see Parthey's Vocabulanum) seems to have been the
result of careless pronunciation.

When

the Egyptians merged the

sound of

<

in that of

is

not known, but the merging

must

have happened long before the Christian Era began, for the Copts represent both signs by c. And the Egyptian transcriptions of

-
=D

and and

(1

Canaanite geographical names prove that both


sent D

ttj.

and

uj.

In their transliterations of the


distinguish

and R represigns and


y

the

German Egyptologists

- by

and

by

/,

but in

have followed the example of Birch and Brugsch and Maspero, and regarded them as having practically one and the same sound. Nevertheless, remembering the large number of words that begin with the signs * and P and with the view of
this Dictionary I
,

simplifying the task of the searcher


I

who may

use this Dictionary,

have printed
all

all

the words beginning with


I

^ in

one section,

and
^=q.

those beginning with


transliterating

in the section following.


di

By

Ahy

q,

letter

with a diacritical point


ZS

(k)

S = g.
o
S

has been got rid of and, though the transliterating of


does not seem quite satisfactory,
I

by g
and Greek

have followed the example

and
r

==t.

of the older Egyptologists in this particular.^

The

signs

c^

th.

\ are both transliterated by

t,

and by
it

using th for s==s the


(/)

d and a letter with a line under

are eliminated.
/

In the

case of c^a I have retained the transliteration

and have not adopted d by which it is now sometimes transliterated. Maspero has shown that in Semitic geographical names in the XVIIIth
dynasty
<==> often represents the h <^^> C--*=~J ^AAA^NA
f\

Hebrew
H"^:-'

f, e.g.,

in

oa v^,
^.
a,
e.g.,

Heb.

2?li5, is

and

(1(1

tia'

^^* other names show


|,
^,

that T

represented in F^gyptian by

e.g.,

\\\m

Heb.
*

pto^"i.

At a

later period

':=:3

is

transliterated

by

In one Gjptic word, K4Lcy, "reed," the


is
ffi

represents

ffi,

for the hiero-

glyphic form

r-rr-i

"^il

see

Erman, Aegyptisches

Glossar, p.

139,

and Maspero,

Introduction, p. 39.

Introduction.

Ixv
transcription of which

in the
'"T'D"':OD,

name
and

fl

jl)

Sf

'

*^^

Aramean
jc^ra
C3ilt^-

is c^=^

= d (i)

in

the

name
is

v^, Abydos,
In
the

the

Aramean
period cs:^

transcription

of

which
Greek
Aio?

Greek

represents

the
as
in

T,

as
\\\\

in

KXeoTraroa

__

(]

-Jlf)

= ^^
use,

and

A,

c=3

"^
were

^
no

"qI'

In

the
in

Coptic
the

period,

when

the
all

hieroglyphs
the

longer

in the old language had Maspero admits^ that the sound a of <=> was not exactly that of the Greek A or the Arabic j, I have thought it best to retain / as the transliteration of <=^>. It is possible that the sound of the Greek A did exist at one time

scribes wrote

names which

or a c=> with

9.

Finally, as

in Egyptian, but

when

the Copts formulated their alphabet


folk.-

it

had

disappeared from the mouths of ordinary

There remains to mention now only the transliteration of -^ =ts and which in some recent works appears as i or d with a line tch.
it,

under

d.

In the transcription of Semitic geographical names


:i

represents both
"^^^"
'

and

T,

e.g.,

~^

'V rwi'

'

^^^

^"^^

^^^ there

is

abundant proof that


ts

it

may

be

correctly transliterated

by both

and

tch,

and

have adopted

the latter, which in " cicerone."

is

pronounced

like the ch in " child," or the c

Egyptian an African Language Fundamentally.


During the years which
for this
I

spent in collecting the materials The

alleged

looked eagerly in the texts for any evidence Egvptkn to that would throw light on the relationship of the ancient Egyp- the Semitic
Dictionary
I

tian language to the Semitic languages

and to the languages


is

of

^^^*^^-

North Eastern

Africa.

Though the
it

subject

one of considerable
in

importance philologically, about

has- never

been,

my

opinion,

properly discussed, because the Semitic scholars


it

who have written have lacked the Egyptological knowledge necessary for arriving at a decision, and the Egyptologists, with the exception of the lamented Burchardt, have had no adequate knowledge of Semitic languages and literature. Benfey came to the conclusion the ancient Egyptian that language had close affinity with the
belonged to a great group of peoples which not only included the
'

Benfey's

Semitic family of languages, but then he also said that the Semites 0?".

et

il

Introduction, p. 30, Notre c^^is est done, je pense, I'intradentale faible A, est k '^% ce qui s=i a ete un moment a <=>

Ixvi

Introduction.

Egyptians, but
absurd.

all

the peoples of Africa/ which


his

is

obviously

results so far as his reputation

Brugsch on
the Semitic origin of the Egj^jtian language.

into Coptic had disastrous was concerned, his view that there was a close affinity between the Egyptian and Semitic languages found acceptance with many scholars, among them being E. de Rouge, Ebers and Brugsch, all of whom were Egyptologists. Birch's view was that the " greater portion of the words [in the ancient Egyptian language] are an old form of the Coptic others, no longer found in that tongue, appear (to be) of Semitic origin, and have been gradually introduced into the language from the Aramaic and other sources. A few words are IndoGermanic."^ Brugsch stated categorically that the oldest form of the ancient Egyptian language is rooted in Semitic, and he prophesied that one day philological science would be astonished at the closeness of the relationship which existed between EgypHe was convinced that they had tian and the Semitic languages. a mother in common, and that their original home was to be sought for on the banks of the Tigris and Euphrates.^ Brugsch held these views practically to the end of his life, for in his Die

Although

excursions

Aegyptologie, Leipzig, 1891, p. 91, he quotes from his Worterbuch


Stern's opinion.

the words which he wrote in the preface in 1867.

Stern, the

eminent Coptic scholar, also declared that the Egyptian had an affinity with the Semitic languages, which shows itself in the

pronominal formations and


all,

in the roots
itself

which are

common

to

but thought that

it

separated

from

its

Asiatic sisters

at a very early period

and developed along lines of its own.^ These views, which the older Egyptologists expressed in general terms, were crystallized by Erman in a paper which he
contributed
to

the

Zeitschrift

der

Deutschen

Morgenldndischen
zum
Semitischen

Benfey, Uber das Verhaltniss der Aegyptischen Sprache

Sprachstamme.
* '

Leipzig, 1844.
p. 618.

Bunsen, Egypt's Place, Vol. V,

Es steht mir namlich fest, dass die altagyptische Sprache, d. h. die Gestaltung derselben, im Semitischen wurzelt. Im voraus kann

alteste

...

ich es

weissagen, dass die

enge Band

Sprachforschung eines Tages erstaunt sein wird uber das der Verwandtschaft, welches die agyptische Sprache mit ihren
alle eine

semitischen Schwestem zusammenkniipft,

de Thatsache, dass

und iiber die mir jetzt schon feststehongemeinsame Mutter haben, deren Ursitze an den
Worterbuch, Bd.
I,

Ufem

des Euphrat und Tigris zu suchen ist."

p. ix.

Es bestcht eine alte verwandtschaft zwischen der iigyptischen, welche dem hamitischen stamme angehort, und den semitischen sprachen, wie sich unverkennbar noch in der pronominalbildung und in manchen gemein?amen wurzeln zeigt doch scheint sich das agyptische von den asiatischen schwestem friih getrennt zu haben und seinen eigenen weg gegangen zu sein., Koptische
;

Grammatik,

p. 4.

Introduction.
1892.^

Ixvii

Gesellschaft in

In this he pointed out in a systematic

Egyptian Grammar that have their counterparts in the Semitic languages, and printed a List of the words that were common to the Egyptian and Semitic languages. Most of Recent views these words had been remarked upon by Brugsch in his Worterbuch, based on Bragsch s but Erman's List heightens their cumulative effect, and at the opinion.

manner the

details of

first

sight

of

it

many

investigators

would be inclined to say


is

without any hesitation, " Egyptian


very
able

a Semitic language."
the

comparative philologist
this List,

of

Semitic
of

Languages,

Carl Brockelmann, impressed

by the remarks

Brugsch quoted

above and by
included
oldest form of

says that Egyptian must certainly be

among

the Semitic Languages, and that the more the


it,

such as that

made known by

the Pyramid

Texts,

is

investigated, the

more convincingly apparent becomes


Like Brugsch, he thinks
its sister

its similarity to

the Semitic Languages.


itself

that
ago,

it

separated

from

tongues thousands of years


the

and went

its

own way.

According to him the Egyptian


languages of the

language developed more quickly than

other Semites, which was due partly to the mixing of the people

caused by the invasion of the Nile Valley by Semites, and the


rapidity with which the Egyptian civilization reached
its

zenith,

same way as English has gone far away from the other Germanic languages. Wright thought that the connection between the Semitic and the Egyptian languages was closer than that which can be said to exist between the Semitic and the Indo-European. But he called attention to the fact that the majority of Egyptian roots are monosyllabic in form, and that they do not exhibit Semitic triliterality. He was prepared to

much

in the

'^

Monosyllabic
Egv^p^^Em''*
roots.

admit that the " not a few structural


be thought
sufficient

affinities "

might perhaps

to justify those linguists

who hold
i.e.,

that

Egyptian

is

a relic of the earliest age of Semitism,

of Semitic

Das
ff.

Verhdltniss des Aegyptischen zu den semitischen Sprachen (Bd.

XLVI),

p.

93
*

Aegypter eigentlich in Forschung den altesten Formenbau des Aegyptischen, wie er in den Pyramidentexten vorliegt, erschliesst, desto iiberraschender tritt Aehnlichkeit mit dem Semitischen zu Tage. Durch die Vermischung der einwandemden Semiten mit den alteren, anderssprachigen Bewohnem des Niltals und durch die friihe Bliite ihrer Kultur
vieles dafiir zu sprechen, dass die sind.

Es scheint sehr
Kreis

diesen

hineinzubeziehen

Je

mehr

die

sei

das Aegyptische viel schneller und durchgreifender fortentwickelt, als die Sprachen der anderen Semiten, ahnlich wie das Englische sich unter denselben Umstanden so wait von den anderen germanischen Sprachen entfemt hat.
Grundriss der vergleichenden Grammatik der semitischen Sprachen.
P- 3-

Berhn, 1908,

Ixviii

Introduction.

speech as

it

was before
said to

it

passed into the pecuUar form in which

we may be

know it historically.^ Now no one who has worked at Egyptian can possibly doubt that there are many Semitic words in the language, or that many
of the pronouns,

some
all

of the

numbers, and some of

its

gram-

matical forms resemble those found in the Semitic languages.

But even admitting


it is still

the similarities that

Erman
much

has claimed,
is

impossible to

me

to believe that Egyptian

a Semitic

language fundamentally.
Egyptian

There

is,

it

is

true,

in the

Pyra-

mid Texts that

recalls points

and

details of Semitic
still

Grammar,
remains a

an\frican^
language.

^ ^^^ after deducting all the triliteral roots, there

very large number of words that are not Semitic, and were never
invented by a Semitic people.
that

These words are monosyllabic,


(or

and were invented by one of the oldest African

Hamitic,

if

whose written language we have any remains. These are words used to express fundamental relationships and feelings, and beliefs which are peculiarly African and are foreign in every particular to

word be

preferred) peoples in the Valley of the Nile of

Semitic peoples.

The primitive home

of the people
all

these words lay far to the south of Egypt, and


of the Predynastic Egyptians suggests that
it

who invented that we know


in the neigh-

was

Perpetual immigration
into the Nile Valley.

Borrowings
proto-Semitic

bourhood of the Great Lakes, probably to the east of them. The whole length of the Valley of the Nile lay then, as now, open to peoples who dwelt to the west and east of it, and there must always have been a mingling of immigrants with its aboriginal inhabitants. These last borrowed many words from the newcomers, especially from the " proto-Semitic " peoples from the country now called Arabia, and from the dwellers in the lands between the Nile and the Red Sea and Indian Ocean, but they continued to use their native words to express their own primitive i^*^^^, especially in respect of religious beliefs and ceremonies.

Words
/(]

like

tef

"father," sa

c- "flesh,"

qes ^|l

"bone,"
self,"

"^ "son," sen l "brother," iep ^ "head," db <& "heart,"

d" hand," tches '^\\ "

ka

" double," ba

" soul,"

dakh 'y^ "spirit," and scores of others that are used from the

Addition of conventional
signs.

and have nothing to do with the Semitic languages. When they had invented or borrowed the art of writing, they were quick to perceive the advantage of adding to their pictures signs that would help the eye of the
earliest to the latest

times, are African

'

Lectures on the Comparative

Grammar

of the Semitic Languages. Cambridge,

1890, pp. 33-34.

Introduction.
reader,

Ixix

and convey

writer intended to

mind an exact conception of what the express. The names of the cardinal numbers
to his
Borrowing

show that the people who invented the words quoted above
counted by
fives,

for

they have words for " one

"
,

" two

"

three" f=^, "four" I next number is "ten" n.

^^, and
When
"',
Mil

"five"

^^ ^.

and

their

they came in contact with the


1

Semites they borrowed from them the numbers " six "

Heb.

irtlj,

"seven"
" d

\\^
I

(i3

bttJ,

'

and " nine


/

'^""'
'
I

nil

borrowed

c^

as a sign of the
later period

the pronouns and the sign they Heb. V^r\. In a similar manner 'of the feminine, and several of the pronouns, feminine,

'^^||||, Heb. Borrowing Heb. VI, "eight" " AwAA


nil

of

and

at a

much

many

of the Semitic

current at the time in Syria and Palestine.

words that were And it has always

seemed to me that some of the aboriginal words of the primitive Egyptians found their way into neighbouring countries, where they
still

live.

Thus

the
its

common

Egyptian

word

khefti

^^-z:^,

" enemy," which has


is

equivalent in the Coptic

shaft cy^qT,

The Survivals found in Amharic under the form sJiaftd hQ.:^: R Amharic. r^=^ " pygmy," seems to be preserved Egyptian word teng ZS ^ 4|l,
also
in the

in

Amharic denk K'^^

The Egyptian word


Amharic fuwat
" "^^n," " person,"
i

iuat
;

i<

^^q.

" morning," seems to survive in the

(W,^

and with
be com-

the Egyptian 5a

(?)

pared the Amharic saw


side

woman," " person." As none of the literature of the peoples who lived on each of the Valley of the Nile has been preserved, we have no means
rt([r:

^^ "^ "

may

man

or

from the Egyptians or the Egyptians from them, but I believe the Egyptians were as much indebted to them as to the Semites. I do not for one moment suggest that such literature as the modern inhabitants
of finding out
linguistically

how much they borrowed

Value of
sfldan"
dialects for
'^'^

of the Valley of the Nile

and the neighbouring countries possess, whether it be those on the east or those on the west of the Nile, can be utilized for explaining ancient Egyptian texts, but the comparatively small amount of attention which I have been able to devote to the grammars and vocabularies of some of the languages now spoken in the Eastern Sudan has convinced me
that they contain

pi'J!]^^es

much

that

is

useful for the study of the lan-

The ancient Egyptians were Africans, and they spoke an African language, and the modern peoples of the Eastern Sudan are Africans, and they speak African languages, and there is in consequence much in modern native
guage
of the hieroglyphs.
e

Ixx

Introduction.

Sudani literature which will help the student of ancient Egyptian


in his work.

From

the books of Tutschek.^ Krapf,^ Mitterutzner/

and from the recently published works of Captain Owen' and Westermann/ a student with the necessary leisure can collect a
large

number

of facts of

importance for the comparative study

of Nilotic languages both ancient

and modern.
etc.
list

The Introduction, Indexes, Semitic Alphabets,


The
Introduction.

In the introductory section of this book


of the

have given a

commonest Egyptian

signs,

with their values as phonetics

and determinatives, arranged practically according to the Lists of Egyptian Hieroglyphic Signs published by the eminent printing firms of Theinhardt in Berlin,^ Holzhausen in Vienna,' and Harrison & Sons in London.^ Certainly none of these lists is
absolutely correct since the classification of several of the signs
is

the result of guesswork, for the simple reason that Egyptolo-

Lists of

Hieroglyphic

by ChampoUion,
signs
Birch, E. de

do not know what objects certain signs are intended to represent. The only native Egyptian List of Hieroglyphs known was published by Griffith, Two Hieroglyphic Papyri from Tunis, London, 1889, 4to, but this does not help us much in the identigists

Roug6 and
Brugsch.

fication of the hieroglyphs. The first printed List of Hieroglyphs was published by ChampoUion in his Grammairc gyptienne, Paris, 1836, and contains 260 hieroglyphs. In 1848 Birch published a fuller List with detailed descriptions (see above p. xxxiii) in the first volume of the German and English editions of Bunsen's " Aegyptens Stelle." This he revised and enlarged, and republished in 1867, in the second edition of the first volume

of

the English edition,

pp.

505-559.

It

contained 890 hieroIn 1851

glyphs and 201 determinatives were grouped separately.


hieroglyphiques
de

E. de'Kouge issued a List of hieroglyphs in his Catalogue des signes

I'lmprimerie Nationale,

Paris,

1851,

and he

reprinted
*

it

with explanations and descriptions


of the Galla- Language.

in the first part


his Lexicon.

Grammar

Munich, 1845

and

Munich,

1841.
* '
*

Vocabulary of the Galla-Language.

London, 1842.
Brixen, 1866.

Die Dinka-Sprache in Central Afrika (with Worterbuch). Bari Grammar and Vocabulary. London, 1908.

The Shilluk People


Liste
list

their
;

Sudansprachen.
'

Hamburg, 1911

Berlin, 1912 Language and Folklore. Tfie Nuer Language. Berlin, 1912.

Die

der Hieroglyphischen

Typ&n aus

der Schriftgiesserei.

Berlin, 1875.

This
'

was arranged by

Lepsius.

Hieroglyphen. Vienna (no date). This List contains all the unusual types which were specially cut to print Maspero's edition of the Pjoumid Texts. ' List of Egyptian Hieroglyphics. London, 1892.

Introduction.
of
his

Ixxi

Chrestomathie

iJgyptienne,

Paris,

1867.

This

contained

about 340 hieroglyphs. A much fuller and more accurate List was published by Brugsch, Index des Hieroglyphes Phonetiques y
compris des valeurs de I'Ecriture Secrete, Leipzig, 1872, and
references to pages" of his
it

contained 600 signs and their phonetic values, accompanied by


Worterbuch, and 147 determinatives.
in his Coptic Hieroglyphic

After the Lists given

by Rossi

Gramselected

mar^ and by von

Lemm^ in his Egyptian Reading Book, no further attempt was made to discuss hieroglyphs generally until Griffith ^^^
described 104 Egyptian characters in Beni
1896.

Two

years later he published

III, London, von Lemm, Collection of Hieroglyphs, Griffith and

Hasan

London, 1898, which contained descriptions and identifications of 192 hieroglyphs illustrated by really good coloured pictures of the objects which they represented, copied chiefly from coffins and

tombs

of the

Xllth dynasty.
is

of Hieroglyphs his Aegyptische

The most recently published List that given by Erman in the third edition of
It

Grammatik, Berlin, 191 1.

contains about 660

hieroglyphs, not reckoning variants, selected from Theinhardt's


List.

In the List of Hieroglyphs given in the present work

have

followed their order in the List of Messrs. Harrison

&

Sons, but

have been obliged to alter the numbers of the characters. I have given all the ordinary phonetic values which the signs have when forming parts of words generally, but have made no attempt The to give the word-values when they are used as ideographs. values which many of the signs had when used in the so-called " enigmatic writing," and in the inscriptions of the Ptolemaic
Period are not given.

Want

of
list
is

space

made

it

impossible to
hieratic signs.

include in this Introduction a

of the hieratic forms of hiero- Lists of

glyphs

for these the beginner

referred to Pleyte's Catalogue


la

Raisonne de Types ^gyptiens Hidratiques de


Tetterode,

Fonderie de N.

Leyden, 1865 (which contains 388

signs),

and the works

of

Simeone Levi^ and G. Moller.*


I

have also given in the Introduction reproductions by photography of the Egyptian Alphabet as formulated by Young,
'

e del loro significato.

Grammatica Copto-Geroglifica con un' appendice dei principali segni sillabici Rome-Turin-Florence, 1877. It contains 386 phonetic signs
Aegyptische LesestUcke.
Raccolta dei Segni leralici Egizi nelle diverse epoche con
i i

and 124 determinatives.


' '

corrispondenti

Geroglifici ed

loro differenti valori fonetici,

Hieratische

Palaographie.

Die
II,

Turin, 1880 (contains 675 signs). Aegyptische Buchschrift in ihrer

Ent-

wickelung von der Fiinften Dynastie bis zur Romischen Kaiserzeit.

Part

I,
;

Leipzig,

1909 (contains 719 signs)

Part

Leipzig, 1909 (contains 713 signs)

Part III,

Leipzig, 1912 (contains 713 signs).

e 4

Ixxii

Introduction.

Champollion

Lepsius,

and Tattam, and reproductions


the ancient

of pages of

Reproductions Birch's Sketch of a Hieroglyphical Dictionary,

Young's Rudiments of

some

early

^^ Egyptian Dictionary in

Enchorial Character, Cham-

Egyptological works.

polUon's Dictionnaire gyptien, and Birch's Dictionary of Hieroglyphics. These works are not to be found in every pubhc, still

Semitic alphabets.

and I believe that many a reader will examine and study them, if only from the point of view of the bibliographer. The indexes to the Coptic and to the non-Egyptian words and geographical names which are at the end of the book will show that a considerable number of Coptic, Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic, Ethiopic, Amharic, Assyrian and Persian words and names are quoted in this Dictionary. The beginner who wishes to examine these words will need to learn the alphabets of the principal Semitic languages, and as I know of no Egyptological work in which they are to be found, I have included them in this Introduction, and they follow the List of Egyptian Hieroglyphs.
less private, library,

Apologia and Thanks.


In the preparation of the manuscript of this Dictionary

have not spared labour, or trouble, or time or attention, and I have made every effort during the proof reading to reduce misprints to a minimum. I have copied too many
for the printer I

texts in the course of

my

life

not to

know how easy

it is

for the

attention to be distracted, and the eye to be deceived, and the


of this kind. The professional copyists of the Book of The mistakes the Dead, and the monastic scribes who laboriously transcribed of scribes and Coptic, Syriac, Arabic and Ethiopic texts in Egypt, Ethiopia transcribers,
their errors

hand work

to write something

which

it

ought not to write when doing

and omissions.

and

Syria,

made many

mistakes, mis-spelt the words of the archelines,

and made nonsense of many passages by omitting parts of words and mixing together the remaining parts. It seems to me obvious from these facts that every one who undertakes a long and very tedious work like the making of an Egyptian Dictionary, must be guilty of
types in their copies, omitted whole
the perpetration of mistakes, blunders, and errors in his copying,

however careful he may


sistencies,

be.

In

my work there will be found incon-

misunderstandings, and misprints, and probably down-

right misstatements,

Pyramid une infirmity de


parti,
I

and as Maspero said in his edition of the " Texts, je le regrette sans m'en etonner. C'est
.

la

nature humaine dont on

finit

par prendre son

de bien d'autres." hope and believe that this Dictionary

comme

Notwithstanding such defects


will

be useful to the

Introduction.

Ixxiii

beginner, and will save

him time and trouble and give him


be realized, the purpose of

help,

and

if

my

hope and

belief

my

friend

who made the printing of the book possible will be effected, and my own time and labour will not have been wasted. Many, many years must pass before the perfect Egyptian Hieroglyphic
Dictionary can, or
will,

be written, and meanwhile the present

work may serve as a stop-gap. It is now my pleasant duty to put on record my thanks and gratitude to those who have enabled me to produce this book. Thanks to First and foremost they are due to the gentleman, who having }^^^ ^^ have made the discussed with me my plan for the proposed Dictionary and pubHcation suggested certain modifications of it and additions to it, decided ^^^."-^'^
to

defray the entire cost of

its

...
production.

In spite of

my

Dictionary
possible,

entreaties he persists in remaining

anonymous, and wishes to be known only as an English gentleman who is interested in everything that concerns the history, religion, language and literature of ancient Egypt, and in the language and literature of the Copts, that is to say, of the Egyptians who embraced Christianity. He is also deeply interested in the exploration of Western Asia, and has liberally supported all the endeavours made by the English to excavate the sites of the ancient cities mentioned in Owing to the great advance in the price of materials, the Bible. and the various rises in wages in the printing trades that have taken place during the War, twice or thrice I was on the verge
of being obliged to stop the printing of this book,

but

my

friend

decided that the work should go on, and that the original plan
as

approved by him should be neither altered nor curtailed, and

he furnished the means for continuing the work.

What

Great rise in this wages and


cost of

be evident from the fact that since we began to print production in July, 1916, the cost per sheet has increased by not less than o^.this In addition to this generous act I am indebted 125 per cent.

means

will

to

my anonymous
I

friend for ready help

and sympathy during

the last forty years.

owe

my

wife

many thanks
of slips,

for constant help in the sorting

and for assistance in the reading of proofs. She has also read for and with me the proofs and revises of every sheet of the book, and its completion is due largely to. her help and encouragement. To Mr. Edgar Harrison, partner in the firm of Harrison & and incorporation
Sons,
I

am

indebted in
the

another way.
interest
in

From
the

start

to

Mr. Edgar finish Harrison.

he

has

taken

deepest

printing of

the

Dictionary, and has done everything

he could, both

officially

Ixxiv

Introduction.

and privately, to forward my work. During the War, when the resources of the Firm were strained to their utmost to carry out the urgent work which was thrust upon them by the Government, and when every available hand was pressed into this service,
he somehow managed to keep going the composition of this book,

and found means of machining each sheet when ready for press. Besides this, he had many hundreds of new characters cut, and
Messrs. Harrisons' fount of

spared no

trouble

in

reproducing

my

manuscript, and when-

ever necessary he cast great quantities of

new type

to enable

Egyptian
type-

the composing to continue,

and
is

so

avoided delay during the

distribution of the type of worked-off sheets.

time his fount of Egyptian type


hensive and complete

the largest

At the present and most compre-

pared a

list

of his

At my request he has preEgyptian Hieroglyphic types which will be


in the world.

found at the end of the volume.


firms like Harrison

On

the Continent great printing

&

Sons,

who

enlarge and complete their founts

of Oriental types, receive subsidies

Academies, but
given to printers,

in

from Governments, or from England no subsidies or contributions are and the satisfaction which they feel when they

have done a public-spirited act of this kind is their sole reward. That Messrs. Longman cast at their own expense the fount of solid Egyptian type that was used for printing Birch's " List of Hieroglyphics," and his " Dictionary of Hieroglyphics," and that Messrs. Harrisons have cut, at their own expense, the very extensive and complete fount of linear hieroglyphic types used
in the printing of the present

work,

will ever

of the great

company
I

of English publishers

redound to the credit and master-printers.


I

Dedication
Messrs. Harrisons' Oriental

the coloured border was

drawn by Mr. Alfred Caton.


have
has

Finally,

mention with gratitude the help which

received from Mr. A. E. Fish, the able compositor in the employ


of Messrs. Harrisons

compositor.

who

set the

type of this Dictionary.

He

and interest in the work, and his skill and great experience have triumphed over many difficulties, and made He is a worthy successor of Mr. Mabey, the proof reading easier.

shown great

zeal

Messrs. Harrisons' great Oriental Compositor,


for

who

set

the type

George Smith's monumental work

The History of Assur-

and of Mr. Fisher who set the type for my text volume of the Book of the Dead, London, 1894, published by the Trustees of the British Museum.
banipal, London, 1871,

ERNEST WALLIS BUDGE.


British Museum,
February
2$th, 1920.

LIST
ABBREVIATIONS

OF THE PRINCIPAL WORKS USED IN THE PREPARATION OF THIS DICTIONARY, AND OF THE OF THEIR TITLES BY WHICH THEY ARE INDICATED.

.. .

A
indicated
I
:

LIST

Of the principal works used in the preparation of this Dictionary, and of the abbreviations of their titles by which they are
Urkunden
des Alien Reichs bearbeitet Large 8vo. Leipzig, 1903.

von K. Sethe.

II

III

Hieroglyphische Urkunden der Griechisch-Romischen Zeit Leipzig, 1904. Large 8vo. bearbeitet von K. Sethe. Urkunden der alter en Aethiopenkonige bearbeitet von K. Large 8vo. Sethe. Leipzig, 1908.

IV

Abbott Pap.

Urkunden der 18 Dynastic, Bdnde III und IV bearbeitet von K. Sethe. Leipzig, 1906-09. Large 8vo. (In the Series Urkunden des Aegyptischen Altertums. Edited by G. Steindorff.) Brit. Mus. Pap. No. 10183. The hieratic text was published by Birch in Select Papyri. London, i860.
Vol.
ii,

pis.

9-19.

A.

Wilkinson, J. G., The Manners and Customs of the Ancient Egyptians. Ed. Birch. 3 vols. 1878. 8vo.
Mariette, A.,

Alex. Stele

Monuments

Divers,

pi. 14.

Alt-K.

..

Burchardt, M., Die Altkanaandischen Fremdworte und Eigennamen im Aegyptischen. Leipzig, 1909-10. 4to.
Birch,
S.,

Amamu
Amen.

Egyptian Texts of the

earliest

period from

the Coffin of 1886. Folio.


.

Amamu

in the British

Museum. London,

The Book

of Precepts of Amen-em-apt, the son of Ka-nekht, according to the Papyrus in the British

Museum
Amherst Pap.
Anastasi I-IX.

(No. 10474).
P.
E.,

Newberry,
1899.

The

Amherst

Papyri.

London,

4to.

The Anastasi Papyri in the British Museum. Published by S. Birch. Select Papyri in the Hieratic Character from the Collections of the British Museum. London,

MDCCCXLIII.
Annales
Vol.
i.

Folio.

PI.

35

ff.

Annales du Service des Antiquites de


1900.
A.,

I'ligypte.

Cairo,

4to.

In progress.

Aram. Pap.

Ungnad,

Aramdische Papyrus aus Elephantine.


4
of
Hilfsbiicher

Leipzig, 191 1. 8vo. (No. Kunde des alten Orients.)

zur

Asien
A.

Miiller,

W. Max, Asien und Europa nach altdgyptischen Denkmdlen. Leipzig, 1893. 8vo.

Zeitschrift fur Agyptische Sprache und Alterthumskunde. Leipzig. 4to. Vol. i, 1863. In progress.

Banishment Stele Barshah

The

text

is

found
Part
ii

in

Newberry,
Fraser
:

P., El-Bersheh.

Brugsch, Reise, pi. 22. Part i by Newberry and


Griffith

by Newberry,
4to.

and Eraser.

London

(undated).

. .. .

Ixxviii

Principal Works used in Preparation of Dictionary.

B. D.

The hieroglyphic text of the Theban Recension of the Book of the Dead. See E. A. Wallis Budge, The Chapters of Coming Forth by Day. Edited with
a translation, 3 vols. 8vo.

vocabulary,

etc.

London,

1898.

B. D. (Ani)

B. D. (Nebseni) B. D. (Nu)

Papyrus of Ani, edited by London, i8go. Folio. Birch, S., Photographs of the Papyrus of Nebseni in the British Museum. London, 1876. Folio. The Book of the Dead Facsimiles of the Papyri of Hunefer, Anhai, Kerasher, and Netchemet, with supplementary text from the Papyrus of Nu. London,
:

The Book of the Dead


E. A. Wallis Budge.

1^99.

Folio.

B. D. (Saite).

The hieroglyphic
It

text of the
of

Book

of the
(1

Dead

accord-

ing to the Papyrus

Auf-ankh

VN'^.:::^

T ^

^'

was published by R. Lepsius, Das Todtenbuch der Aegypter nach dem hieroglyphischen Papyrus in Turin.
Leipzig, 1842.

B. D. G.

Beh.

Brugsch, H., Dictionnaire Geographique de I'ancienne gypte. Leipzig, 1877-1880. 2 vols. Folio. Rawlinson, H. C, The Persian Cuneiform Inscription at Behistun decyphered and translated. London, 8vo. (Forming vol. x. of the Journal of the 1846. Royal Asiatic Society.) See also The Sculptures and Inscriptions of Darius the Great on the Rock of Behisticn in Persia. Edited and translated by the late Prof. L. W. King, assisted by Mr. R. C. Thompson. London, 1907. 4to. Newberry, P. E., and G. W. Eraser, Beni Hasan. London, 1893. 4to. 2 vols. Bergmann, von Ernst Ritter, Der Sarcophag des Panchemisis in the Jahrbuch der Kunsthistorischen-

Beni Hasan
Berg.
I,

Berg.

IT.

Sammlungen
Bibl. figypt.
.

des allerhochsten Kaiserhauses.


4to.

2 vols.

Vienna, 1883-4.

Bibliotheque Izgyptologique publiee sous la Direction de Paris, 1893 (vol. i). G. Maspero. 8vo. [At least forty volumes have appeared.]

Book

of Breathings

Book

of

Gates

Brugsch, Rec.

Mus. Pap. No. 9995, Budge, E. A. W., Book of Facsimiles of the Papyri of Hunefer, etc. London, 1899. Folio. Bonomi, J., and Sharpe, S., The Alabaster Sarcophagus of Oimenepthah I, now in Sir J. Soane's Museum. London, 1864. 4to Budge, E. A. W., The Egyptian Heaven and Hell. London, 1906, vol. ii. Brugsch, H., Recueil Monuments Isgyptiens. de
Brit.

the Dead

Briinnow

Parts Briinnow, R. E.,


Leipzig.

and

ii.

1862-3.

4to.

Classified List of all simple

and
i-iii.

Compound Cuneiform
Leyden.
1887-89.
lished in 1897.

ideographs, etc.

Parts

4to.

The Indices were pub-

..

. . .

Principal Works used in Preparation of Dictionary.

Ixxix

Bubastis

Naville, E., Bubastis (1887-1889), being the Eighth Memoir of the Egypt Exploration Fund. London, 1891. 4to.

Buch.

Bergmann, E. Ritter von, Das Buch vom Durchwandeln


der Ewigkeit (in Sitzungsberichte der Philosophischhistorischen Classe. Bd. Ixxxvi). Vienna, 1877,

Cairo Pap.

p. 369 ff. Photographs of

Egyptian Papyri

in

the

Egyptian

Museum,
Canopus Stele

Cairo.

Chabas Mel.

See Lepsius, Das bilingue Dekret von Kanopus, Berlin, folio 1866, and the facsimiles of the Hieroglyphic, Greek and Demotic texts published by Budge, E. A. W., The Decree of Canopus. London, 8vo, pp. 35-1141904. Chabas, F., Melanges Iigyptologiques ; ler Serie, Paris, 1862, 8vo 2me Serie, Chalon, 1864, 8vo 3me Serie, Paris and Chalon, vol. i, 1870, vol. ii, 1873.
;
;

Champ. Mon.
.

ChampoUion,
Nubie, vols.
Petrie,

J. F., Monuments i-iv. Paris, 1822.

de I'Izgypte
Folio.

et

de la

Coptos Coronation Stele

W. M.

F.,

Koptos.

London, 1896.
;

4to.

The text of this stele was published by Mariette, Monuments Divers, pi. g Schaefer, Urkunden III, and Budge, E. A. Wallis, Annals of Nubian p. 81
;

Kings,
Culte Divin

p.

89

ff.

Decrets

Weill,

Moret, A., Rituel du Culte Divin. Paris, 1902. 8vo. R., Les Decrets Royaux de I'ancien Empire gyptien. Paris, 1912. 4to.

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Breasted, J. H., De Hymnis in Solem Sub Rege phide IV conceptis (lithographed).


Griffith, F. LI., Catalogue of the

Ameno-

John Rylands Library.


Denderah

Demotic Papyri in the Manchester, 1909. Folio.

Mariette, A., Description Generate du Grand Temple. Texte, Paris, 1880. 4to. PI. Vols, i-iv and a

supplementary volume.

Paris, 1870-74.

Folio.

Der

al-B.

Mariette, A., Deir el Bahari : documents topographiques, historiques et ethnographiques recueillis dans ce temple. Leipzig, 1877. Folio.

Der al-Gabrawi

Dream

Stele

Dublin Pap.
Diim. H.
I.

4.

Davies, N. de G., The Rock Tombs of Deir el Gebrdwi. Vols, i-iii. London, 1902. 4to. Text originally published by Mariette, Monuments Divers, pll. 7, 8 see also Sethe, Urkunden III, p. 57, ff and Budge, E. A. Wallis, Annals of Nubian Kings. London, 1911, p. 71 ff. Naville, E., Das Aegyptische Todtenbuch (Einleitung), Berlin, 1886. 4to, p. 80.
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Diim. Temp. Ins.

Diimichen, J., Historische Inschriften altdgyptischer Denkmdler. Leipzig, 1867 4to, and 1869 Folio. Diimichen, J., Altdgyptische Tempel-Inschriften in den Jahren 1863-1865 an Ort und Stelle gesammelt.
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Ebers, G., Papyros Ebers : das hermetische Buck Uber die Arzeneimittel der alten Aegypter in hieratischer Mit hieroglyphisch-lateinischem Glossar Schrift. von L. Stern. 2 vols. Leipzig, 1875. Folio. Stern, L., Glossarium Hieroglyphicum quo papyri Medicinalis hieratici Lipsiae asservati et a clarissimo Ebers editi. (Printed in the second volume of the preceding work.)

Ebers Pap

Ebers Pap. Voc.

Edfu
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Diimichen,
Petrie,

J., Altdgyptische Tempel-Inschriften, vol. Leipzig, 1867. Folio.

I.

W. M.
N.

El

Amarna

Davis,
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Eg. Res.

W. M., Egyptological Researches, Results of a journey in 1904. Washington. Publication of the Carnegie Institution. No. 53. 1902. 4to.
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E T
Excom.
Stele

Hieroglyphic Texts from Egyptian Stelae,


British
Folio.
.

in the
(pt.
i).

Museum.

Pts.

i-v.

London, 191 1

Stele of the

Excommunication now in the Egyptian Cairo. Published by Mariette, Monuments Divers, Paris, 1872-89, folio, pi. 10 Schafer, Klio, Bd. vi, p. 287 ff. and in Urkunden der dlteren Aethiopenkonige. Leipzig, 1908. Large 8vo.

Museum,

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Brugsch, }i.,Die biblischen sieben Jahre der Hungersnoth.


Leipzig, 1891.

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Golenischeff, W., Epigraphical Results of an excursion to Wddi Hammatruft. St. Petersburg, 1887, pp. 65-79, 1-18. plates Golenischeff, W., Les Papyrus hieratiques 1115, 1116A et iii6b de I'Ermitage Imperial a St. P/tersbourg. St. Petersbourg, 1913. Folio.
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Harris 500

Brit.

Mus. Pap. No. 10060. Facsimiles of several pages papyrus have been published by Maspero, Romans et Poesies du Papyrus Harris No. 500, Paris, 1879, 3-^d Chants d' Amour, etc., Paris, 1883.
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Harris 501

Brit.

Mus. Pap. No. 10042. See Chabas, F., Le Papyrus Magique Harris, Chalon-sur-Saone, i860. 4to Budge, E. A. Wallis, Facsimiles of Egyptian Hieratic Papyri in the British Museum. London,
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1910.

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Hearst Pap.

Wreszinski, W., Der Londoner Medizinische Papyrus und der Papyrus Hearst. Leipzig, 1912. 4to.

Hh

Text of Her-hetep.

by Maspero, Trois Annees

transcript of this text is given de Fouilles, in Memoires de la Mission Archeologique Franfaise au Caire, 1881-84. Paris, 1884. Folio, p. 137 ff.
edidit,

HorapoUo

Leemans, C, Horapollinis Niloi Hieroglyphica


adjecit.

item hieroglyphicorum imagines Amsterdam, 1835. 8vo.

et

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Hymn

Nile

Maspero, G., Hymne au Nil public et traduit apres les deux textes du Musee Britannique. Paris, 1868. 4to (lithographed) and Hymne au Nil. Cairo, 1912.
;

Hymn Hymn
I.

of Darius

The

text was published grossen Oase Khargah.


(in

by Brugsch, Reise nach


Leipzig, 1878,
pi.

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25-27.

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Erman,
191 1.

A., Hymnen an das Diadem der Pharaonen Abh. K. P. Akad. der Wissenschaften. Berlin,
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Ikhernefert

Inscription of Darius.
Inscrip. of
Israel Stele

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Hymn

of Darius.
,

Henu

Lepsius, C. R., Denkmdler Abth. ii, Bl. Golenischeff, Hammdmdt, pi. 15-17.

150a
is

and

The

inscription of Mer-en-Ptah,

which

found on

the back of a stele of Amen-hetep III (now in Cairo) published by Spiegelberg, Aeg. Zeit., Bd. xxxiv,
p. I
ff.

Itinerary

Jour. As.
Jnl. E. A.

Kahun

Kubban

Stele

Parthey and Pindar, Itinerarium Antonini et Hierosolymitanum. Berlin, 1848. 8vo. Journal Asiatique. Paris. In progress. The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology vols. i-iv. London, In progress. 1914 f. 4to. Griffith, F. LI., Hieratic Papyri from Kahun and Gurob. 2 vols. London, 1898. 4to. Prisse d' Avenues, Monuments Iigyptiens. Paris, 1847.
,

Folio, pi. 21.

. .

Ixxxii

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.

Lacau

Lacau,

Sarcophages anterieures au Nouvel Empire. (A volume of the great Cairo 1903-4. Museum Catalogue edited by Maspero.)
Cairo,

Lagus Stele

Mariette, A.,

Monuments

Divers, pi. 14.

Lanzone Lanzone Domicilio

Lanzone,
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R. V., Dizionario di Turin, 1881 f. 8vo.


Paris, 1879.

Mitologia

Egizia,

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E sprits ;
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Papyrus du

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Leemans Pap. Eg.


Lib. Fun.

Leemans, C, and Pleyte, Leyden, 1839-1905.


Schiaparelli,
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W.,

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dei Funerali ricavato da pubblicato. Tavole. TurinSchiaparelli, E., // Rome-Florence, 1881, folio Libro dei Funerali degli antichi Egiziani tradotto e

Libra
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Monumenti

inediti

Rome-Turin-Florence, 1882, commentato, vol. i, folio. See also Atti delta R. Accademia dei Lincei, anno CCLXXXVII. 1890. Serie Quarta. Classe di Scienze morale, storiche e filologiche, vol. vii.

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Lieblein, Diet.

Lieblein,
i

Dictionnaire de noms hieroglyphiques, vols, Christiania, 1871, 8vo vols, iii and iv, Leipzig, 1892, 8vo.

and

ii,

Litanie

La

Litanie du tombeaux des

Soleil
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d Thebes.

inscriptions recueillics dans les Leipzig, 1875. 4to.

Louvre C.14

This stele was published by Lepsius, Auswahl der


wichtigsten Urkunden des agyptischen Alterthums, Berlin, 1842, pi. 9 Prisse d' Avenues, Monuments J^gyptiens. Paris, 1847, pi. 7 and see Maspero, Trans. Soc. Bibl. Arch., vol. v, p. 555 ff.
;
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Love Songs
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The funerary
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I,

texts of
of

King Meri-Ra (o
I

"==31

\\

i.e.,

and

King Mer-en-Ra

(o^^^^,

pub-

by Maspero, Les Inscriptions des Pyramides de Saqqarah, Paris, 1894, 4to and by K. Sethe, Die Altdgyptischen Pyramidentexte nach den Papierabdriicken und Photographien des Berliner Museums. 2 vols, 1908-1910, Leipzig. 4to.
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Ixxxiii

Mar. Cat.

Mariette,

A.,

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Monuments
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cette ville.

d'Abydos decouverts pendant


Paris, 1880.

les fouilles

Mar. Kar.

Mariette, A., Karnak : itude topographique et archeologique. Leipzig, 1875. Text 4to. With a volume of plates, folio.
Mariette, A.,

Mar. M.D.

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et

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Paris, 1872-89.

[With text by

Mar. Pap.

Mariette, A., Les Papyrus Iigyptiens Boulaq, 3 vols., Paris, 1871-6. Folio.

du Musee de

Mastabah

Mariette, A., Les Mastabas de I'Ancien Empire. Paris, 1882-85. Folio. [The work was edited by

Maspero.]

Meir

Blackman, A. M., The Rock Tombs of Meir.


1914.
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Naville, E.,
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The

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Pithom and the Route of Another tran4to. be found in Aeg. Zeitschrift,


1885.

Merenptah

Diiniichen, ]., Historische Inschriften, Bd. I, Bl. 2ff; Mariette, A., Karnak, pU. 52-55 and de Rouge, Inscriptions Hieroglyphiques, p. 179 ff.
;

Methen

Lepsius, Denkmdler, Abth. II, BU. 3-7 Schafer, Aegypt. Inschriften aus den Konigl. Museen zu Berlin, Bd. I, BU. 68, 73-87 Sethe, Urkunden, i, p. i ff.
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Metternich Stele
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I,

Golenischeff, W.,DiV Metternichstele in der Originalgrosse zum ersten Mai herausgegeben. Leipzig, 1877. 4to.

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Moeller G.

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1896.
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Museums

zu

Moeris

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Mythe

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J

King Nefer-ka-Ra Pepi

II

r D D

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In-

Pyr amides de Saqqarah, Paris, 1894, 4to, and by K. Sethe, Die altdgyptischen Pyramidentexte nach den Papier abdrUcken und Photographien des Berliner Museums. 2 vols. 1908-1910. Leipzig. 4to.
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Nastasen

Schafer, Die Lepsius, Denkmdler, Abth. V, pi. 16 Berliner Museums dthiopische Konigsinschrift des des Gegners Nastesen Regierungsbericht des Konigs des Kambyses, Leipzig, 1901, 4to and Budge, E. A. Wallis, Annals of Nubian Kings, London, 1911, p. 140.
;

. . .

Ixxxiv
Nesi

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Amsu

Budge, E. A. WaUis, On the Hieratic Papyrus of NesiAmsu, a scribe in the Temple of Amen-Ra at Thebes, about 305 B.C. London, i8gi, 4to. (From The ARCHiEOLOGiA, vol. lii) and Budge, E. A. Wallis, Facsimiles of Egyptian Hieratic Papyri in the British Museum. London, 1910. Folio.
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I

King Pepi

Paheri

Tylor and

Griffith,

Ahnas

el

Tomb
Palermo Stele
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of Paheri at El Kab.

Medineh London, 1894.


altdgyptischer

....
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The

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Budge,

E.

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Pap, Ani

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Pap. Hunefer

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Pap. Mag.
Pap. Mut-hetep

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;

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Day,
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Piankhi Stele

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Precepts of

Amenemhat The

Sallier

text will be found in Sallier Pap. No. II, pp. 1-3, Pap. No. I, p. 8, etc. see the article on the Millingen Papyrus by Griffith, F. LI., in Ae. Z., Bd.
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Qenna Pap.

Facsimile of the
^^^^

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^^'

published
des

by

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(T. 2)

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d' Antiquites

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Folio.

Quelques Pap.

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R. E.
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..

Revue ligyptologique,
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ed. Revillout

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Maspero, Recueil de Travaux


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relatifs
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. .. .

Ixxxvi

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Rechnungen
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Brugsch, Reise nach der grossen Oase Khargah in der Libyschen Wilste. Leipzig, 1878. 4to.
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Rhind Math. Pap.

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Rhind Pap.

Birch,

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Rosetta

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Sallier II

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texts published

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Sallier III

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texts published

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Sallier

Ixxxvii

IV

Brit.

Mus. Papyrus No. 10184. facsimile of the hieratic texts was published by Birch, Select Papyri in the hieratic character from the Collections in the British Museum. London, 1843, pi. 144 ff. See also

San

Stele

Chabas, Le Calendrier de Jours Pastes et Nefastes del'Anneeligyptienne. Paris and Chalon, 1863. 8vo. Lepsius, C, Das Bilingue Dekret von Kanopus, pt. i.
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Bare. Seti I

Scarabs of Amenhetep
III

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4.

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5.

Making
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of

an Ornamental Lake (Birch, Catalogue


p. 137).

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Shipwreck

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Stele of

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; ;

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Ixxxviii
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Paris, 1874, 1878. Paris, 1875.

Vocabulaire Hieroglyphique.

8vo.
i-iii.

Pleyte, Pleyte, Pleyte,

W.

Chapitres Suppiementaires du Livre des Morts, vols, Leyden, 1881. 4to.


L' Iipistolographie Egyptienne.

W. W. W.
W. W.
.

Leyden, 1869.

4to.

iJtude sur un rouleau magique {Pap. 348 Revers) Musee de Leide. Leyden, 1869-70. 4to.

du

Pleyte,
Pleyte, Pleyte,

tudes

Archeologiques, dedi^es d C. Leemans.

linguistiques

et

historiques

Leyden, 1885.
4to.

4to.

Les Papyrus Rollin.

Leyden, 1868.

Quibell, J. E. Riel, C.

Papyrus de Turin. Leyden, 1869-76. 4to. Naqada and Ballas. London, 1896. 4to. Der Thierkreis und das Feste-Jahr von Dendera.
zig,

Leip8vo.

1878.

4to.
Stele JSgyptienne.

Rouge, E. de

tltude sur

une

Paris, 1858.

Rouge, E. de

Recherches sur les Monuments qu'on petit attribuer aux six premieres dynasties de Manethon. Paris, 1866.
4to.

Rouge, E. de Rouge,
J.

Rituel Funeraire.

Paris, 1861-76.

Folio.
Paris, 1891.

de

Geographie Ancienne de la Basse-Egypte.


8vo.

Sachau, E.
Schack, H., Graf von

Drei Aramdische PaPyrusiirkunden aus Elephantine.


Berlin, 1908.
4to.
I.

Die Unterweisung des Konigs Amenemhat


1883.
4to.
4to.
i

Paris,

Schackenburg
Schack, H., Graf von

Aegyptologische Studien, vols,

and

ii.

Leipzig, 1902.

Schackenburg
Schack, H., Graf von

Das Buch von den Zwei Wegen


Leipzig.

der Seligen Toten, pt.

i.

Schackenburg

1903.

4to.

. .

XCVl

Works

also used in Preparation of Dictionary.

Sharpe, S.

Egyptian Inscriptions from the British other sources. London, pt. i, 1837 ptSeries) Second Series, 1855. Folio.
'<

Museum and
!>

1841 (First
Testament.
Paris,

Spiegelberg, Spiegelberg, Spiegelberg,

W. W. W.
.
.

Aegyptologische Randglossen Strassburg, 1904. 8vo.

zum
des

Alten

Correspondances
1895.
4to.

du

temps

Rois-Pretres.

Demotische Studien.

Leipzig, 1901-10.
4to.

4to.

Steindorff, G.
Steindorff, G.

Das Grab

des Ti.

Leipzig, 1913.

Stern, L.

Tylor, J. J.

Weigall, A. E. P.
Weill, R.

Der Sarg des Sebk-o. Berlin, 1896. 4to. The Hieroglyphic-Latin Vocabulary in vol. ii of the Papyros Ebers. Leipzig, 1875. Folio. Wall-Drawings and Monuments of El-Kab, 2 vols. London, 1896-98. Folio. A Report on the Antiquities of Lower Nubia. Oxford,
1907.
4to.

Recueil des Inscriptions Egyptiennes du Sinai. 4to. 1904.

Paris,

Wiedemann, A.

Sammlung Altdgyptischer
Autoren
umschrieben
8vo.
Leipzig, 1883.

Wdrier welche von Klassischen


oder
Ubersetzt

worden

sind.

Wilkinson,

J.

G.

Facsimile of an inscription on a sarcophagus or mummy case. [Brit. Mus. No. 10,553.] Published by Budge, E. A. Wallis, Facsimiles of Egyptian Hieratic Papyri.

Wilkinson, J. G.

London, 1910. Folio. Materia Hieroglyphica. Malta, 1828.

4to.

LIST
when employed

Of the most frequently used Hieroglyphic Characters with their


Phonetic Values, together with their Significations
as Determinatives and Ideographs.

1.

MEN
Number.

(Standing, Sitting, Kneeling, Bowing, Lying Down).

Hieroglyph.

Phonetic Value.

signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

inactivity,

inertness,

inanition,

exhaustion.

1
A'

address, cry out, invoke.


interjection, ^z'
(11

As an
/'[Ill]l].

^IJf],

3.4
5.6
7

deprecate, propitiate.
pray,

A
hen

worship,

adore,

entreat,

praise.

J^
haa

praise, exult, chant.

qa

a\,
an

rj

high, lofty

exult,

make merry.

9
lO, II

go back, turn back, turn round.


call,

%t
K ^

beckon.

12

see No.

7.

13

H
15. 16,

an

run.

ab
17,

18

dance, perform gymnastics.

XCVlll

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.


*

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

19,

20

h-^
-V.

kes ^=:^p

bow, pay homage.


run away or run after something.

21
22, 23

I'4
ft^

pour

out, micturate,

penq

~-.

24

make

league with "^ be on brotherly terms with, sensen ||.


friends,
in

be

someone,

heter

25

hide, to conceal,

amen

^.
.

26

dwarf,

pygmy, teng '^.


figure,

27,28

H
1
ft

image,

statue,

tut

mummy,
body, sahu a custom.

^ \,
dead

transformed
nl

^5

^o stablish

29

eternity.

30
31

ur

^5,

ser P<r-^

great, great one, a chief official,

prince.
old,

aged,

dau

\'%^\,

senior

semsu
32

P 1;^ P

strong, strength, nekht

0^.

?yi

i
'f

beat

(?)

strike (?)

34
35

shepherd

(?)

hunter

(?)

to repulse, to drive away, seher

36
37

m
f

to

perform a ceremony

(?)

shepherd.
the a>J?-priest \\\\.

38

^
'i'^
"^

39.40
41

strong, strength.

42

harper,

play

a musical

instru-

ment.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

xcix

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

43

break up ground, plough.


present,

44.45
46
,47

4^
^
H
if

make an

offering.

mm

^\

\\

pour out water.


purificatory priest.

48

sow grain
skipping.

to use a throw-net

in hunting.

49
50
51

i
^0

khus

build.

work a boring
qet

tool

(?), drill.

52

[M

|c^

build.

53

V
l4
fa

suspend,

stretch
.

out

the

sky,

aM ^

54.55
56

^
B

carry, bear

on shoulders.
n ^

^ = khesteb J
qes __
restrain, bind.

lapis lazuli.

57.58
59
60, 61

W.M
(SJ
M'tl

= heg'

1 A, governo^r.

statue of king.

62, 63

king of Upper Egypt.


king of Lower Egypt.

64.65
66,67,68
69,

!&
/I-.I'H
fcl'/l
fl

king of Upper and Lower Egypt.


foreign potentate.

70

71

dti

l)]|[jl]

king, prince.

72

child, infancy.

73,

r4

^^

sit.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

75> 76

royal child.

17

78, 79.

enemy, death, the dead, slaughter,


80
81

= khefti-'S^
haa
m'sha
|;

"enemy."

82

soldier of every kind.

83
84, 85,

soldier

of every kind

menfit

!>'

^'

prisoner, captive, foreigner,

86
87 88 89
criminal.

execution, death.

man, sa

,vA,

ist

person sing.

90
91.92,93

invoke, address, cry out to, interHail etc. or Oh jection

eat, drink,

speak, and of everything which is done with the

mouth.

94
95

inactivity, inertness, rest.

praise,

hen

^.
adore,
entreat

96
97. 98,

pray,

worship,

praise.

hide,

amen l]S,

conceal,

pro-

99
100
lOI

tect (?)

play an instrument harper,


drinking, offering (?)
offering.

of

music,

102

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

ci

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

103

hide, conceal,

amen

|S.

104
105, 106,

uab

\ ^l

priest.

pour out water, make a


107

libation.

108 109
1

carry a load, atep support, fa -w

^ ^.

g,

bear,

t
hehlil

var. of

^(?)

10,

III

great but indefinite number.


write.

112

116

1
1
i

the blessed or holy dead.


i

117, 118

a god or divine person.


the king holding the sceptre f the king holding the sceptre
\.

119

120
121

the king holding the whip /\.


the king holding the whip and
sceptre.

122

123

the

king

wearing

Crown and holding


124

the White the whip

and the sceptre f the king wearing the Red Crown and holding the whip and the sceptre ^.
king wearing the Red Crown and holding the whip " life." f and the ankh ^ the king wearing the White and Red Crowns ^ and holding
the the sceptre
1.

125

126

Cll

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

127

the

king wearing the Red Crown and holding the object f.

128

the king wearing the


sceptre

White and
the

Red Crowns and holding


]

129
130, 131

shepherd, nomad, sentry, guard.

132, 133

sit

as a king or noble, seat oneself.

134. 135

sheps

noble, honourable, revered, the

sainted dead.

136,137.
1*38,

^,

k.

swim.

139
lie,

140
141

recline.

r^

kher

fall,

defeat, slaughter.

142 143

sickness, vomit.

reap.

II.

WOMEN.
woman,
sing.
2, 3.

sa-t,

ist

and 2nd

pers.

4.
6-

5-

queen, lady of high rank, venerable

7.

woman.

9. 10.

woman
1

beating

tambourine

and playing a harp.


ari

12

\\

present at, in charge ing to.

of,

belong-

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cm

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

13. 14.

bend, bow, ^^^


15

ffl

J-

16

pregnant woman, beq J


parturient
rues %\\
,

<d.

woman, give papa 2^ ^.


-www,

birth to,

18,

19

nurse,
child,

mena
renn

dandle, rear a

III.

GODS AND GODDESSES.


Asar
(Osiris)
;

usually

written

2.

It

Pth (Ptah).
Ptah-Tanen.
Ptah-Seker-Asar.

4,5
6

Menu

(Min,

Khem Amsu

).

Amen (Ammon).
Amen
.

9 10

holding the sceptre

|.

Amen
Amen

holding Maat

?^

<=>

holding khepesh 3.

the

scimitar

12

Amen

holding the sceptre

"j.

13. 1415- 16,

Horus the Elder, Horus-Ra, Ra,


17, 18,

the Sun-god.

19

CIV

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

20

Amen-Ra,

or

Ra-Amen.
or

21

Heru-aakhuti (Harraakhis),

Horus of the

Two

Horizons.

22,23,24
26

Aah

or

Khensu

1,

the

Moon-god.
25,

Tchehuti (Thoth).
Set
P

27

mnn

(var.
p

),

or Setesh

^,

or Sutekh

28 29-30.31 32

Anpu

(Anubis).

i,f.

Khnemu (Khnoubis), Khnoumis,


Khnum, Khneph,
etc.

Hep, or Hapi, the Nile-god.

33.34
35
36,

I'i

Shu, god of light and dryness.


Bes, a Sudani god.

n,

"^'t'

Set as a warrior-god.

38
39.

40

the

Bennu

bird (phoenix).

41

Mesta, son of Horus.

42

Hapi, son of Horus.

43

Qebhsenuf, son of Horus.

44

Tuamutef, son of Horus.

45-46
47. 48, 49. 50.
51. 52

tf.|
I

the Hare-god.

NT

Ast or Set

(I sis).

53.

54

Neb-t he-t (Nephthys).

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cv

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

55
k

the sunrise.

56

Isis,

Hathor or any cow-goddess.


(Neith).

57.58
59' 60,

i'l

Net

the goddess Maat.


61, 62

63

the goddess Nut.

64

the goddess Serqet.

65,66
67

I-

the goddess Sekhmet.


the goddess Anqet.

68
69,70,71
72,

the goddess Sesheta.


of

many

goddesses.

1Z

a guardian of one of the Seven


Pylons.

74
75

goddess of Upper Egypt,


goddess of Lower Egypt.

IV.

MEMBERS OF THE BODY.


I

tep,

tchatcha

first,

foremost, top of anything, nod.

^
if. '^.

her-i^,

|->
hair of
lack,

3. 4. 5.

animals, bald. lacuna in manuscripts, colour, complexion.

men and

want,

6
7

lock of hair, side tress.


beard, khabes J J
ar
\
1.

s
<2>-

right eye, see,

an

^.
g
4

CVl

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

9
lO
1

see,

an

::;^.

eye-paint (kohl\
grief, tear,

weep, rem => |^.

12 13

-<2>

left

eye, see.

beautiful,

an

M
15

see, behold,

peter ^_^.

divine eye, right eye of Ra, utchat

16

divine eye, the


the

left

eye of Ra.
utchatti,
2>.,

17

two divine eyes,

^iulli.
18, 19

the eyes of Ra,

Sun and Moon.


is

need, what

required, tebh c=>J

\.

20
21
ar

tear-drop of divine eye.


pupil of the eye, death, destruction.

22
23-

see,

maa

\ Wj|

24

eyebrow.
ear,

25

mestcher

<^
;

26
27
r,

breathe, nose, nostril

the front

of anything.
ra

mouth.
lip.

28

29

the two

lips.

30.32
eject
spittle,

vomit, efflux, exu-

32

..&

dation, moisture.

33
^

jaw-bone,
the two jaws,
staff,

34

35.36

to speak.

'

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cvn

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

n^

38,

*''*^
1 1
II

1 1 ,

'11

39

backbone,

hew

in

pieces,

dis-

member.
chine,

40

sacrum,

hew

in

pieces,

dismember.
breast, nurse.

42,43.44

embrace,
event.

surround,

happening,

45

u
AA
,

ka

the double, person (?) a. strength


;

of the ka, .L beauty of the ka.

46

ka-priest,

hem

\,

ka\

\.

47,48
49,

A.

lack,

want, need,

nothing,

no,

50

not.

51, 52

w^
khan
aha

magnificent, splendid, tcheser

-^

53

^
Q^
O-J.
,i_^

paddle, row a boat.


fight,

54

wage

war, contend against.

55,56
57

present an
write.

onermg

^^;::^:55.

58
59, 60,

/v-^

khu^

rule, direct,

govern.

'61
(?)

splendour, strength

(?)

62

u_j]

mak

1^

63

a, tet

give, erta

^ ^
or

or
bear,

Acarry,

64,65

arm (remen), ^^,


set in position,

anything done

with the arm.

66
67, 68

give, ertaf='.

m,
C3lJl

give.

69
70, 71

aai

wash, cleanse.
AAAWV

Strong, strength, nekhi^^r^.

CVlll

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

^2

t-n
f,

Strength, rule, direct.

7Z 74

khu

rule, direct,

govern.

^^^3

shep

hand, take, receive.


press -down
(.'').

75,76
s

^>

kep^
t

77,78

hand, palm of the hand, tcha-t


take in the hand, receive.

79,80
81
rfe.

shep

(?)

dew, data

W.'^\.

82,83
84
85

t^,^
^
V

grasp, lay hold on, amni


finger, tchebd

\_W.

^~~\\

ten thousand, tcheba '^~\\


true

86

VV

right,

mean, middle,
witness,

aqa

-^
87, 88, 89,
t

\^,

testimony,

meter

\^^.

take, take away.

90

91

^
\

nails, claws, talons.

92

men;;;;;;^

present, offer.

93

fiH

met|^

phallus,

front,

male,

masculine,

procreate.

94
95
96,.97

\]=^

procreate.

heni^

procreate.

lead, guide, scsheni P

ool^.

f.
98
99
100
fOI
1^

1
testicles.

^
^

l?em|^

female pudenda, female, woman.


go, walk, enter.
run, walk quickly.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cix

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

I02 103

A-

come out, go
gehes

out,

go back,

return.

I P

uar

^^

run, flee, foot.

104
105

^
f-

transgress, invade, attack.

stablish, falsehood,

gerg

a.

106
107
108, 109

q
eat,

devour.

IL
9
J

b
tcheb
"Jl
.

Compounds
^

are

J^.

^-

ieb

^,

khab *A -=.
I

10, II

I,

limb, flesh.

112

V.

ANIMALS.
I,

M'^
^'

horse.

3.4
5

bull,

ka ^=:^\^,

ox,

dh \\.

fel

Apis
cow.

Bull, sacred bull.

6
7

^
^

^
fe5

cow charging.
cow
lying

down

or

bound

for

9
10

^
t^

sacrifice.

cow

calving.
calf.

cow suckling her


calf.

12

13

H ^
1^

young ram,
au \\\

thirst.

14

baj\

kudu, ram, soul, the god

Khnum.

ex

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

15

1^

sacred ram of
goat.

Amen,

16

17

nobleman, elder

var.

^ij^

(?)

18

khan

interior, skin, hide.

9, 20,

ape, 21

monkey.

22

^
I'l'

rage, fury,

23

dancing, merriment.
sacred ape, praise.
fight, quarrel.

24,25,26
27

28

ape bearing solar

face.

29

ape wearing Red Crown. ape of Thoth bearing the solar

30
31

Eye

(tit chat).

si

hippopotamus-goddess
Thoueris).

(Ta-urt,

32

hippopotamus,

33

5a^
re,

lion.

34
35,36.

ni

i^&e,^^

37

}
neb
image, sphinx,

38 39

Jgas

sphinx

(?)

40
41

bolt of a door.

2^

the lion-gods of last evening and


this

morning.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

CXI

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

42
43. 44.

leopard, cheeta.

cat, give, gift.

45.46
47

^
I

dog.
wolf, wolf-god
(.'')

48
49. 50.

"W
la^.

Up-uat.

^'|

51.52

^. ^J

jackal-god, Anpu, judge.

53.

54

^' "^

set

underworld.
fabulous animal, khekh J.

55 56 57

un

hare.

wild animal.

58.59

elephant.

60
61

bear,

rhinoceros.

62

K
^i5?
-^f^o

giraffe.

63, 64,

Set, or Setesh, or Sutekh, evil

65

personified.
pig-

66
I I

67

mouse,

rat.

68

Amem-mit, a composite monster,


one-third
horse,

hippopotamus, one-

third crocodile,

which

and one-third devoured the

hearts of the wicked.

cxu

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

VI.

PARTS OP ANIMALS.
Number.
Hieroglyph.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

ass's

head.

fore part of bull.


bull.

4
5

nose,

breath, the front of any-

thing.

the nose, breath, front,


throat

and neck, head and wind-

pipe, swallow.
7

cow-goddess.
31
respect, reverence, shefit
''^

8 9

^^

1]

I)

o.

lO
II, 12

the Eight Gods (A7z^w^M of Hermopolis Magna.

PIq^)

wisdom,

knowledge, shesa

13
14,

strength, power.
fore part, front.

15,16

the lion-gods of yesterday evening and this morning.


18, 19,

4.*

set

underworld.

20
21, 22

company, group.

23. 24.

usr
25,

strength.

26

27

moment, mmute.
horns of kudu.

28,29

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxm

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

30,31
32

V.

V.

up

crown of the head, apex.

33-34,35 \i/.a>i^x,x[/
36

New

Year's Day, up renpit.

^
Y'T'T

the god

Khnum.

37-38,39

rank, dignity, high position.

40 41,42
43

\
^, ^=

ab-.J
beh Ji,

horn.
tusk, tooth.

hui^

hear, ear.

44
45

^
CJV
GY9

peh d|

end, hinder part, attain, reach.


incantation,

enchantment, heka

46
47

thigh, shoulder (?) strength.

pudenda of a cow,
constellation

female.

48
49-

fc^

Meskhet

(Great

Bear).

50

\-\

repeat, bone.

51-52,
53-

1/
|.!

kap^'
skin, hide.

54

55,56,57

f^.^.f

58.59 60
61

striped or variegated hide.

T
X
iSi
nes

shoot,
tail,

aim

at, target.

rump, thorn, prickle, goad.


tlesh, flesh, joint, heir,

62

bone and
,

posterity.

63

tongue, leader.

64
65

^"^^-^

^^

the lung or lungs, together. the


bull's

unite, join

skin

in

which

the

deceased

was placed, mesqat

CXIV

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

VII.

BIRDS.
Number.
Hieroglyph.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

kite(?)

2.3
4.5.

ma

ti^. -

eagle.

neh
I

<

9
lO

Heru, Horus

hawk, bdk J

^=^.

Horus with whip.


Horus-Ra.

2,

13

Hawk

of gold, a royal

title.

H
15

king of the South and North.


king-god.

16

Ra-Harmakhis.
right, right-hand side, the

17

West,

Anient.
18

4=^
1

Under World, Kher-neter.


Horus, uniterof the
a royal
title.

19
20, 2

Two

Lands,

the god Sep.

22, 23,

forms of Horus-Ra.

24
25

Horus or Ra

in his disk.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

Uist of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxv

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

26, 27

the goddess Hathor.

28

khu

^
sacred bird and image of a god.

29

30
31

Horus-Sept.
ner

,;__>,

m[ujt

vulture, the

goddess Mut, mother,

year.

32

goddess Mut.
the goddess Nekhebit.

34

the goddesses Nekhebit and Uatchit, the tutelary goddesses of Upper and Lower Egypt
respectively, neb-ti

k^ ^.

35

mak
'

1^

S^

38
39. 40.

mm

.\

41.42,

ma, ma(?) m', mi(?)

43

44 45

mer
before,

em

bah.

46
47

mer <4^, met


tekh

^
light, radiance, brilliance, shine,

48 49
50

aakh

gem

ffl

find, discover.

catch

fish.
-

CXVl

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

51.52.
53. 54

^,
ibis,

^\\

the

^jod

Thoth,

tchehuti

55

ba

J\,bakJ

soul, dig.

56
57. 58

souls, divine souls.


nest.

59

lake with wild fowl, nest.

60
61

ba(?)

^
phoenix, benu

62

J o %,

63 64
Hood, inundate,

65, 66,

food, fatten.

67

68
69, 70,

red.

sa
71

goose and duck, birds


insects,

in general,

son,

the

Earth-god

Geb.
72. 11

washermen,
shake, tremble,
destroy,
enter.

74
75. 76

77

78.79
80.81

pa D

duck, waterfowl, flying,


flying, flutter, hover, alight.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxvu

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

82

^Z 84
85

E \
'fc.

qema, then
tcheb

flutter,

hover, alight.

"1 j

brick, seal.

ur

swallow, great.
small,
little.

'&'

86

%T,^%
89

v
^
u

% ^
^

menkh "^^
,

people, mankind.

chicken, quail (?)

90
91

au

mau
tu

92

^;^

93

tha
fear, terror.

94

95.96

1^''

^^

ba

the beatified soul.

VIII.

PARTS OF BIR DS.


I

-^

goose, duck.
bird of prey, masculine.

3.4.5
6
7

I'l'^

peq3

aakh(l\

bright, shining, etc., like

^.

8
10

amakh
[Uij^iSj'
f

\\

Eye

of Horus.

9,

^^^3Im

flying,

wings.

cxvin

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

11,12

shu t=!a^

feather,
tegrity,

truth,

uprightness,
-J'' c^

in-

maat

PP
14
15, 16
,i-~^

Maati, the Truth.

two

goddesses of

arm, cubit, carry,

JL- JL

sha(.=>)imi^

claw of

bird, talon

'7

cutting tool,

nail,

claw

(?)

18

women, goddesses,

cities

son

IX.

AMPHIBIA (REPTILES).
I,

^.

mtr

river turtle.

^^

multitude.

^
-=.,
(SSi^

5.6
7

crocodile, wrath, rage.

4*.

sacred crocodile, the Sun-god

(.')

S^

Sebek
1

^=?i

a Crocodile-god.

9 10
1

king, Ati!\c.\\l\.

jr

k[a]m

1^
frog,

Si
^3^

the

Frog-goddess,
the

Heqit

12

tadpole,

number

100,000,

13.14.15
16

l.-1'k
il

serpent, goddess, priestess.


fire-spitting serpent or goddess.

17. 18

(g.
I

the goddess Mehnit.

19

goddess.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of

ieroo^lyphic Characiers.

cxix

Signification as

Phonetic Value.

Determinative or Ideograph.

20
21

goddess,

sis.

shrine of goddess, dier

22, 23

ISSL' 'M!'

worm.
the loathly
tch serpent.

24
25

Worm Aapep

gf^.

26

'

27

compound
and

of n
tck.

= metch

" ten,"

28

eternity, tchet.

29

1\

compound

of

"^

tck

and

\ h.

30
31

snail (?), slug (?)

a sign formed by adding < to H on a sarcophagus in the British Museum (No. 32).

32

= +^or.?+/
P

Z2,

to

come

out,

per

= <=>.

34
35

go m, aq
serpent.

= ^ or

36.37
38
i^T)

spitting serpent,

serpent's head,

39

goddess.
collect, gather together, saq

40

cxx

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

X.
PISH.
Signification as

Number.

Hieroglyph,

Phonetic Value.

Determinative or Ideograph.

I,

^So, <e^

an

fish.

3.4
5

fish, rise,

mount

up, foul, fihhy.

fighting

fish.

6,7

rise,

mount

up.
".

8,9
10
II, 12,
<, f<

swim, shining, an

a deadly

fish (?)

13

8^^

14
15

kha\

dead body.
cuttle fish (?) itar
".

^
!.:?

16
17

fish,

/atus fish (?)

18

<e<

antch mer, an old title of the governor of a district.

XI.

INSECTS.
1,

bee,

honey; hornet (?); king of


North,

the North.
3

king of the South and

Nesu
the

Bat.
beetle

flying

kheprcr <=>,
;

scarabaeus

sacer

become,

kheper

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characiers.

cxxi

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

flying, the

winged

solar disk of

Her-Behutet.

6,7
8

4^

alighting.

insect found in

mummies.

9
ff

fly,

aff^.

lO

grasshopper.
scorpion, breathe

11,12
13

the goddess

SerqitP^qq-.
scorpion with thesign for eternity, shen Q.

14

XII.

TREES, PLANTS, FLOWERS, ETC.


I.

2,

tree,

sweet, pleasant.

4. 5.

tree.

palm

tree.

LI
khet

plot of

ground with a palm and an acacia tree.


wood.

9
10,

tree,

cutting wood.

12

growing grain
flourish,

plant.

13- 14

general, last
reign.
15, 16

blooming, year, time in year of a king's

time.

17

flomMsh, renp'^^^^.

18

long time.
h 4

CXXll

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

'\

19,

20

spring plant.
thorn, goad.

21, 22

i-i
--

23

the goddess Nekhebit and her town Nekheb (Gr. Eileithyiaspolis,

Arab. Al-Kab).

24
25

*.-.

nenr:r

written wrongly in later times

W-

suP^
res =>
p

plant of the South, king of the

South.

26,27,28
29.30.31
32

the South.

shema

!==)|^

the South.

=1"

qema a\-j^

play music, musician.


see

Zl

Q
a
(a, e, 1)

m.

34
35

36
il

ai

go, advance.

n
38
39. 40,

Ml

sekh-t

field,

garden.

i Mil. Mo
;n,
,1

offering, oblation.

sha ==5"^

field,

41

garden, flood, inundation, cith JiliJ field in the, t^T^T Noi/ the field in

42.43
44

^.

w f

hen |~-"

plant, vegetable,

he^'

'

up.

ha|\

cluster of

papyrus

45.46
47.48
49. 50

t'4

papyrus swamp, the swamps the Delta, the North.


the South,

in

%%
f^.
I-I

Upper Egypt.

uatchfl'^.utch^'^ papyrus

stalk.

51.52

a plant of the South.


A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

CXXllI

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

53

n
Y
^P'T'
("'

Upper and Lower

Eg^ypt, the
y-^^.

Two

Lands, Taut

54
55.56,57.

lotus in bloom.

plants.

58,59,60
61
62,

^'

%
-=>>

tj

bud of a

flower, neheni

~^ ^.
sacri-

63

variants of

uten

\ '=.

fice, offering.

64. 65, 66, 67,

^'*-f
4>
1
un

flower.

68
/

69

\
untu

^
part of a papyrus plant, leaf(?), the number one thousand.

70,71
72

kha

\,
"^

73.74
75

shen

76,77.78

hetch
utch

"^
"^

mace, club
knot-grass.

white, shining.

79.80
81,82.

].{

\
O

83

4
*

khesef
J

spindle

repulse.

84

mes l^p

fly-flapper

made
(i*)

of the

tails

of

foxes.

85.86
87

!!
f

spelt,

dhurra

ear of corn.

88

^
'S
,

growing

grain.

89,90
1

tl&Ci

grain, corn.

CXXIV

A
Hieroglyph.

List of

Hieroglyphic

Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

91,92
93. 94.

granary.

date, sweetness, pleasure, grow.

95.96,97

98,99
100, lOI

sweet, pleasant,

flower.

102

fig-

103, 104
105, 106,

ft;

tcher

bundle of plants or vegetables boundary.

107
108, 109,

vineyard, pergola.

10

union of Egypt.

Upper

and

Lower

XIII.

HEAVEN, EARTH, WATER.


heaven, sky, above.
2.3.
ceiling,

what

is

'ir-

T^

the night sky with a star hanging like a lamp from it, darkness, night. rain or

dew

falling

from the sky.

trtt'

the sky slipping down over its four supports, storm, hurricane.
sparkle, shine,

coruscate, light-

ning, blue-glazed faience.


7

one half of the sky.

8,9
10, II, 12

o.

o
'ft

sun, the

Sun-god Ra

^,

day,

period, time in general.

'

50

the Sun-god Ra.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxxv

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

circle.

H
15

shine, rise (of a luminary), beings

of light,
shine, lighten.

16
17, 18,

prepared,

ready

the

Dog-star

SeptitP^q^.
19, 20,

winged

solar disk.

21, 22

walking disk.
24, 25

kha

rise (of the sun),

coronation of a

king.

26
27 28
29.

nearly

full

moon,

crescent moon,
span, shesp

oa

30

moon, month,
month.
c:^

31
32,

II 34
35
,

^^
^
sba
tua-

the half-month.
star,

morning

star,

hour, time for

prayer, pray.

36
I

*
)

the
ta ^'

\-

Under World, Tuat =>

4?)

37.38
39

^tiiST^

land.

the

Two

Lands, Taui,

i.e..

Upper

and Lower Egypt.

40
41

"lands," Taiu, the world,


foreign country, the desert,
foreign land

42

f^-^'^

+\

43

East.

44
45
tchu

West,

^ ^,

tu

mountain.

CXXVl

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroo^lyphic Clia7'acters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

46

C]

horizon.

47.48
49
50
51

#fr.
\>

^K
*

nome,
land.

district.

the eastern and western banks of the Nile, i.e., Egypt.

52

3S

boundary,

limit.

53

S?2
X

uafl\,

her l-^-

way, road, remote.


travel, traveller,

54
55. 56,
rn

journey

afar.

57

k' ^m

l||^

side.

58,59
60, 61

DIP

stone. grain, powder.

00

62
/WVVNA

n
water, watery

63

mass of the sky.

64,65

m
1

canal,

any collection of water written wrongly sometimes for " island love, loving. du
(

66, 67,

^\

,"1

sh

lake,

sea,

ornamental

water,

68,69
70,71.

khent
horizon.
r
)

^^.

72 73

\\C\V\7C\W

74
75

S
^=^
f
1

the two horizons of the East and

West.
i

au^^

island,
v\T(^^i\

du

\\

76
11> 78,

*i3Prinpial fMlcp

sen

go, pass, like, similar.


:;:::;:::

79
80,81,82,

pool, lake, sheet of water.

83.84

85,86

D'

kha

shellfish, cockle.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxxvii

XIV.

BUILDINGS AND PARTS OF BUILDINGS.


Number.
1

Hieroglyph.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

1,

,
CrT3
.

ITT],'
_i

city,

town.

3.4.
5

l;

,JL^, late

p or pa

house,
forth.

any building,

to

come

^V

offerings to the dead,

i.e.,

offer-

7
c

ings which appear at the command of the dead person, per kheru [pert er kheru).

+
rO'
ill.

treasure-house per hetch.


ra

h
f"er 1^*=*

9
lO, II,

m
U'
U'

nem

Mer, a name of Egypt.

mansion.

12, 13

14

mansion with many rooms.


llll

15

house of the god, temple.


1.

16

f
E.

"Great House,"
"

castle.

17

Lady

of the house,"

i.e.,

the

goddess Nephthys.
18
shrine, tomb.

19

s-

s
-

"

House of Horus,"
dess Hathor.

i.^.,

the god-

20

"

House of Nut,"
heaven.

i.e..

the sky,

21

house of the king.


libation

22

chamber.

cxxvni

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

23 24

palace.

palace of the god.


door,

gateway protected by
official.

uraei.

26
27, 28,
29.

title

of a legal

iL/ll'

court, usekht, of palace or mansion.

30
wall.

31

32, zz

overthrow, throw down.


"

34
35.36,37

White Wall," Aneb-hetch. Memphis.

i.e.,

fortress.

38

shrine

of a

god with the two

doors open.

39,40
41
angle, corner, qenbt.
title

of an

official,

42

hap

ji

;^ D

hide, conceal

var.

A.

43.44

funerary

coffer.

45.46
47

A. A
i

pyramid.
obelisk.

48

Q
a

memorial slab, boundary stone, landmark.


pillar.

49
50,51.52,
53,

11

III

pillars

with lotus and papyruscapitals.

54

shaped

55

capital of pillar.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxxix

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

56
57

decorate, adorn.

object

(flint

.'')

used

in birth cere-

58

m
s^

monies.
hall,

council chamber.

59
60, 61

bend, twist.
festival
life,

of renewing the king's hed set, " festival of the

tail"(.^)

62

festival.

63,64
65

ZN,,

A
aa

stairway, stepped throne, ascend.

open, door.
door-bolt.
travel, go, bring, carry.

66
67

68,69
70. 71

S=9SS

eax>-3

tches

thes

knot together.
the god

Menu.

72,

12>

qet :,

74-75.76
77

funerary coffers.
shrine of Ptah.

78,79
80
81

p
V,

door, gateway.

chapel of the Ka.

82,83
84. 85,

door(?)

great house, castle.

86
87

angle block

(?)

cxxx

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Signification as

Phonetic Value.

Determinative or Ideograph.

88 89
.90,9192, 93. 94. 95. 96, 97

0*0
Bffl'

funerary offerings of bread and


beer.

^-ii. 1' Sn. n.

door, gateway.

n.

n
a Sudani kubbah.

98

n
XV.

SHIPS, BOATS, SACRED BOATS, ETC.


I, 2,

3,4.
5

boat, ship, to

sail, travel.

capsize, overturn.

7.8
9
10

<i=9.

uha^i

a loaded boat.
boat of Ra.

A
^^'f
iha

boat of the goddess Maat.


sailing, to sail

11,12
13. '4

upstream.

wind,

air,

breeze, breath.

15, 16

stand up.
steering pole or oar, helm.

17

18
19

rudder, voice, speech,

shesp

-^, seshp
D

i=g=i,

receive, take.

shep
20, 2
1

sacred boats for use


22

in

shrines

and

in religious processions.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxxxi

XVI.

FURNITURE
Number.
Hieroglyph.

(SEATS, TABLES, CHESTS, STANDS)


Phonetic Value.
Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

s P,

hetem \^\,

seat,

throne;

the goddess

Isis,

Ast-\i^.
instrument for measuring.
chair, stool.

3
i^

4,5.

us^P

litter.

6,7
8

lie

down,

recline, sleep.

9
lO

^ ^
^.
[1

dead body,

bier.

couch of Horus or Osiris.


pillow,

11,12
13

^
s

head

rest, raise up.

14

(ipor pr
...Mm

eight.

15

weaving
ser
-=P

tool or instrument.

16

< >

17, 18

r.^
<#

fractional

number (f
1

).

19

= s-pekhar
sefp^
.

**-=>

20
->

f-

iCM</^.
'"I

^5^ seshem

^^ |^
offering, oblation, sacrifice set (of the sun).
;

22

rest,

23.24,25
26

ffl,

m,

stand for a vessel, down, under.


daily.

cxxxu

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

27, 28,

sarcophagus, funerary chest or


29. 30.
'.

Ts

zr

coffer.

31

32

t:^:^!

region, place.

33

tcheba

^ J ^, teba
,

substitute, substitution, supply.

34
35

an

aun

f\V

pillar,

light-tower,

van of preceding (?)


hen
\ ""^

38,

39

as

= =^= =
ing."
ci=t=

40
41

"book,"orc= "offer-

Shesmu '-^ |^
of Osiris.
oil press,

the

headsman

42

wine press,

43. 44.

metcher ^.^,m'tchet squeeze, press.

45

46
47

l5l

clothing, apparel.

lamp-stand.

48

?
T

ceremonial umbrella.
shade, dead.

49
50
51

shadow of the
weigh,

living or

scales, balance,

measurer of the hour, unnu


utcha

^^%.

52, 53

\l

"

or

right, correct, just, equable.

54.55.56,
raise up, exalt.

57.58

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

CXXXlll

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or !^eograph.

59

'

maa

^^

true, right, truth, integrity.

60
61

-^ ?

stand for sacred images,


mirror.

etc.

62

^
XVII.

weigh, balance.

'

SACRED VESSELS AND FURNITURE.


I

T
/i?^

altar with

bread and beer on

it.

stand with libation jars upon


altar.

it.

T
t

altar.

5.6
7

god, God.
divine mother.
Soter, Saviour-god.

n=]n

tl

10

^ y
^
tchet;::^,

Under World.
mistake for \ \.

II

tet^

sacred object worshipped in the the Delta, confounded with

12
1

sma

^\
p

sacrum of
unite, join.

Osiris.

13. 14.

sen
15. 16

two, friend, brother, associate.

17. 18

t-t
r

left

J, left side, J^J^,


is in.

19

4m

(11^

what

is in,

who

CXXXIV

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

20
21, 22

var. of

nr

tm-tu.

r=o

t^r::!
! !

the goddess of

Wisdom, Seshat

23.24-25, 26,27,28,
29, 30-

i-l

censer stands.

s.h)

31

t
XVIII.

Khnemu.

CLOTHING, CROWNS, ORNAMENTS, ETC.


I

^
'^^^^^

crown.

crown.

3
4. 5

'D

^==n

(late)

covering for head and neck.


the

same with

uraeus, symbol of
<

royal

war helmet, khepersh

>.

crown of the South or Upper


Egypt.

= /^ +

Upper Egypt.

9
10

net

"T

(late)

crown of the North or Lower


Egypt.

=V+

Lower Egypt.

^
e

crowns of the South and North


united, sekhemli
cord.
P

|^

\\.

12

13

u^

cord measure, the hundred.

number one

14

pair of plumes, shuti P ^^

15

helmet with plumes.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxxxv

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

i6

helmet with disk and plumes.


helmet with horns, plumes, and
uraei.

17 18

decoration of crown.

19

ffi

decoration of crown.
decoration of crown.

20
21

plumed
triple

standard, founded with if.

often

con-

22, 23

Ate/ crowns with horns


uraei.

and
24. 25,

<?.^.

the Ate/'

crown.

26 27 28

crown.
pectoral.
pectoral,

29

deep

collar.

30
31

plough

l\\,

acre.

ahU

ploughman, ploughman's
strap.
tunic, loincloth.

belt or

32

33.34

the uterus,

etc.,

symbol of

Isis.

35.36
Zl

the goddess Sati.


clothing.

38

hep|a

39.40
41,42
43

mer

nes

tongue, overseer, guide.


sandal,

44

ring, circle.

CXXXVl

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Signification as

Phonetic Value.

Determinative or Ideograph.

45

kheb

J
unite,

46
47

sum

up, a total.

live, life.

48 49
50

seal-cylinder, seal, valuables.

seal-cylinder with cord, seal,


is

what
the

put under

seal.
"

"

counterpoise
^l

of

collar,

mendt Si '=^, symbol of pleasure and gladness,


51
0^=^

kap

^^\,D

incense, cense,

52.53
54
55.56,57.

provide, supply.

il-tl

1
f.

sistrum.

58.59.60
61, 62

I ^. ?.?!

mighty,

powerful, direct, rule, emblem of authority, sceptre.

!-=

present, offer.

63.64,65

Ih4
h\

right side, the

West.

66,67
68

fan, fly-flapper, air.

^
I't
i

box that held the head of


district of the

Osiris.

69,70
71

head box of

Osiris,

Abydos.
rule, reign,

govern,

72
/

sheep and goats,


uas

11

-f) P

tcham Jl^

sceptre, fine gold, serenity.

74
75
7(>,77<7^

!
.1

Thebes, Uast\'^.
strength, strong,

IM

term of Horus.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxxxvii

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

79.80
81, 82

symbol of Upper Egypt. symbol of Lower Egypt,

83,84
85

A.

whip.

86
87

4
trtrtTtTl

the firstborn son of Osiris,

Baba

88 89

White Crown with


pectoral
(?)

cord.

90

fringe of the

"banner" of the Horus-names of kings, as in

91

.-CK

a(?)

ass's load in a caravan.

XIX.

WEAPONS AND ARMS.


I,

boomerang,

throw,

foreign

3.4
5

M
1-

nations.

keep watch, be awake.


pillar

support of heaven.

TT[

the four pillars

calamity, disaster.

7.8
9 10

carpenter's axe,

work

in

wood.

\
tepg

battle-axe.

first,

foremost, at the head.

scimitar, short,

curved sword.

12, 13
t

cxxxvin

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters,

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

14 16

mooring

post, arrive in port, to

15.

\,

land, die,

end a journey.
a name, designate.

cut, inscribe

17

knife

and block, slaughter.

18

a gory knife, slaughter.

19,

20

hone
razor

(.''),

slaughter, massacre,

21

(?),

shave.

22, 23

slaughter.

24 25
26, 27,

bow.

28, 29

Nubian bow, symbol of Nubia and the Egyptian Siidan.


extend, spread out, stretch out.
arrow, shoot.

30
31. 32

00 34
35
36,
2>1,

symbol of the goddess Neith as


huntress.

arrow

in hide of a beast, hunt,

arrows and target.

spear, pike, stab, transfix.

38
39.40,41

^'S'foP
or

sa

back, at the back

of,

hinder part.

42

great.

43

kha

44
45

tebh

_J

a collection of weapons.

chariot.

46
47
target
(.'')

memorial

stele.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxxxix

XX.

TOOLS AND AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.


Number.
Hieroglyph.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

shut

in,

confine, restrain.

m ^

or

ma
tear drop from the part, portion,

Eye

of Ra,

adze and block, choose,

select.

6,7
8

nu

blade of an adze, cut, hack, chop,


claws, nails, talons.

^
=V.
I

9
lO,
I,

= *^
m^.k^o''
or

beat, slay.

sickle, reap.

12

J^
maa

13

14,15,16
17

mer

love, plough,

digging

tool.

ward
heb raj
tern

off,

keep away, storehouse.


seed.

18 19

plough,
finish,

fruit,

complete, bring to an end.

20, 2

1,

22, 23,

pYnr

ore,
I'

wonder, marvel, astonish,

24
grain measure.
ta

25

26

t <^,

cxl

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

27
28,

1
tcha

metal, mineral,

heavy substance,
soda.

weighty,

salt,

29

"^

fire stick

or

drill.

30

utcha

^\
work
in

wood, excellent,
pyramid,

fine,

splendid.

34
35

mer

sick, diseased,

f T

handicraft,

workmanship.

36
37

open,

make

way

or passage.

38,39
40,41,42
43. 44.

M
ua

ward
'i'

off,

keep away,
powder, grind.

rub

down

to a

45

pike, harpoon, the

number

one.

46,47
48
49. 50

the goddess Neith.


razor, shave.

follow as a friend or servant.

51

qes/3 l,qers

hollow reed, bone, to bury.

52

worker

stone or metal, metal founder, sculptor, artisan of


in

Horus.

53-54
55

1^.14
bap|\D, hep|D
("ssn
,

claw, talon.

=^
gold of every degree of purity
silver,

56,57
58

ry

59

4n

gold, tchdtii 2la[ %^-

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxli

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

60

/
1

maa

k\-^

truth, right.

61,62
63

A' c^
*
XXI.

weave, net (snare).

=f-

WOVENWORK, PLAITEI ARTICLES.


)

^ S

cord.

u\
"*"
.set '"-'
Ci

measuring cord
hundred.

the

number one

4
5

claw, talon.

A
^
5
shes

au\^
qes
z]

wide, broad, spacious.


dignity, high rank, worth.
tie,

bind, cordage.

8 9 10
1

55
5
15

constrained, suffering.

shen^^
geb
fflj

packet, small bundle, sachet.

germinate, grow.

12, 13,
roll

of papyrus,

tie

up, bind to-

14- 15

gether,

come

to an end.

16, 17,
fill,

complete.

18

19
20, 21, 22, 23

ii c^
~^
,

shet

take, accept, receive.

x=x

=
antch

>=x,

the goddess Neith.

XIX,

"^

sound, healthy.
the

24

god

A tern

i).^^.

cxlii

A
Hieroglyph.

List of hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

25

8
fl
5f

foundation.

26
27

ua^\
magical protection, amulet
snent
(wva^
i

{^sa).

28 29
^0
31
-OOOfl-

knotted cord, magical knot

(ia).

her|-

32

+
+$.+
1
1

hai-.
sek

33-34,35

^
set, place, put, stablish.
is

36
Zl
38, 39,

often written for

or \.

^'
^^<?

40
41

offering, oblation, sacrifice.

a sign composed of s=i and ^=71. It occurs on sarcophagus No. 32


in the British

cut

on

of

Museum, and was when the sarcophagus Queen Ankhnesneferabra


it

was usurped by a man.


revolve,

42
-

>

the

return, circle round, bowels, the weight teben

=>]-
%
t

43

th
seize, grasp, capture,

44 45

^^

conquer.

swathe a

mummy, embalm a body

with unguents, spices, etc., the dead, to count up, reckon.

46
47

rt3

incense.

skin of an animal (?)

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxiiii

XXII.

VASES AND VESSELS, BASKETS, MEASURES, ETC.


Number.
Hieroglyph.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as Determinative or Ideograph.

1,2

vases for unguents.

unguent,
fi

naphtha

ointment, bitumen, the goddess Bastt

^ \>
tis.

S,

and her

city

Bubas-

4
5

libation jar, praise,


!

commend.

S
!

coolness, refreshing.

the king's majesty, servant, kind of priest.

servant of the god,

Aem

neter.

8,9,

ffi- :,:.
(iiti

jar stand

be

in front.
>

lO
II

5
^'

consort with, be joined to, unite the god Khnemu |^ ^.

12, 13, 14. 15

^"
-^

milk.

h
5,

'

16 17,18
19,

0.1
t

20

0Vi

vase, vessel, pot, what is fluid, viscous, etc. waiter, attendant,


;

beer.

21

milk pot

(?)

22

#
nu

wine

skin, wine.
pot,

23

vase, vessel,

what

is

fluid

or viscous, internal organ.

24
25

i
&

bring, bear, import.

heart.

cxliv

A
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

Number.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

26, 27,

libation priest, clean, pure, holy.

28

29
30, 31
32, zi
\:7

clean, ceremonially pure, holy.

ma

|^(),

mer
J

as, like, similar.

ab
0. ^^

vase, vessel, pot, goddess, queen,

mistress broad, spacious, wide.


;

34.35.36
ZJ
38,

0.

bread, cake, loaf, bread-offering.

pottery lamp(?)
flame,
ba,
fire,

39 b
(in late

heat.

40
41, 42

times)

vase of burning incense


limit,

(?)

tcher
zs

<^

boundary.

43

g
neb
k
variant of ^^^

44
45

basket, receptacle for offerings.

46
47

vulva of cow.

48

pour out

(?)

49
50
51

^37

festival.

52

^-'

^^3:7

title

who hath charge


val."

of a priest kheri heb, of the

"he
festi-

53.54
55. 56.
57. 58.

an offering.

grain of

all

kinds.

59

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxlv

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

60
61, 6
2.

cattle.

63

^
A^

vessels in stone, the city of


1

Abu
with

or Elephantine.

64,65,66

^f'&

pottery jars, covers, etc.

stone

jars

67

a kind of priest.

68,69
70

^-^
D '^

ta-\

heat,

fire,

furnace.

metal,

especially

copper

or

bronze.
71

the goddess Neheb-ka.

XXIII.

OFFERINGS, CAKE S, ETC.


I, 2,

QS^,
r

D,
J

bread, cake.

wvj
W

4 5.6

the

town Nekhen (Eileithyiasfather.

polis).

8.

bread, cake

7.8
10

bread,

cake,

shewbread

pri-

meval time.
9,

0,

ennead.
circle, disk.

'
kh

12, 13

time.
sieve.

14 15
16

river bank, land.

give, present.

cxlvi

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

XXIV. WRITING AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, GAMES.


Number.
Hieroglyph.

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

%
r-"^

scribe's

write, outfit, writing writing rub down to powder, polish variegated, stupid.
; ;

roll

of papyrus tied round the middle, book, deed, document, register of the abstract group together.
; ;

3.4
5

c=^l6=j

t=S=]

bag, sack.
harp, zither.

J
?.|.|
I

6,7.8
9
lO
1

sistrum, castanets.

goodness, happiness.
the

^
^ m
fl

god Nefer-Tem

J:^^^.

saapq\
men
1^

recognize, know, understand.

12

draughtboard.

13

draughtsman.

XXV. SI'ROKES AND DOUBTF UL OBJECTS.


I
1

a sign

added for purposes of symmetry, e.g., Y'. ?. 4:.. etc.

2.3.4
5,6

III.

'

".
1

sign of the plural.


sign of the dual.

II.

ill

7.8

X'

U
n

a pair of

tallies O, count, tally, reckon, pass by, depart, etc.

the

number

ten.

A
Number.
Hieroglyph.

List of Hieroglyphic Characters.

cxlvii

Phonetic Value.

Signification as

Determinative or Ideograph.

lO,

I,

12

objects of

wood

or wickerwork

terrify, terrible.

13

"

divide, cut.

14
15
t1

territory,

estate

to

complete

head, chief
16

Ti

the oval round cartouche.


beat,
kill.

royal

name,

17

18

a
nem|^

women's apartments.
step, walk.

19,

20

cxlviii

THE COPTIC ALPHABET.


COPTIC LETTERS. COPTIC NAMES OF THE SAME.

PHONETIC VALUE.

NUMERICAL VALUE.

ax

Alpha
Bida

DiXX4.<i.

Z
S V
2.

H
\^

Hl2ii.

Gamma
Dalda
Ei
Zita

\7^JuuuL^
"X^-Xiii.

g
d
e

"X

4
5

e ? H e
I

ei

F*
^IT-A.
z

6
7

ta
Thita
lauta

Ht-l
GlT-iI^,T^-L

e
th
i

f K

8 9

e
I

lO

'\
U H

Kappa
Laula

Ri-nni.
<Xi.TrXi.

k
1

20

X
JtX

30

Mi
Ni Xi
Pi

Ui

m
n
x(ks)
o

40
50 60 70

Hi

^
O

^i
ni Po
ClJULA.

I
n
p
c

n
p c

P
r s
t

80
100

Ro
Sima

200 300

T
Y

Tau Ue
Phi

T^T
Ye
^i

T
y

u,

400
500 600

^
X.

ph

Chi
Psi

X
Ufi

kh
ps 6 sh
f

X
^
u3

*
UI

700

Au(6)
Shei
Fei

DEXt
cgei

800

m
4
Jb

4ei
jbel

qt

Chei (Xei)

ch

90

a
2C
6"

Hori
Djandjia

ftopi

h
dj

Xi-nxiA.
6'lJU.A.

Tchima
Ti

tch
ti

^
The
TtTtl
,

Ti

(di)

last

seven letters are derived from Egyptian hieroglyphs (through Demotic)

thus

aj from

from n.=w

/n, (^

from T,

from 8,

from

(J^ from ^c:^,


i.e.,

'f"

from ^

* This bign represents the Greek sign

BnS,

and has the value COOIf,


numerical value

"six";

it is

only

used as a numeral.
t

When
1000,
fi

letter

has a double line over


etc.

it,

its

is

increased a thousandfold,

e^'.,

2000,

cxlix

THE HEBREW ALPHABET.


HEBREW
LETTERS.

HEBREW NAMES OF THI SAME.


r
.
1

PHONETIC VALUE.

NUMERICAL
VALUE.

^*

Aleph
Beth

n^'
n"'3
':Q"'a

>
I

2
:i

Gimel
Daleth

-T

^W
!:7
T

n
T
T

He

W4w
Zayin

BH G, GH D, DH H W, U
B,

4
5

6
7

n
nin
n-na
-rt""

n
tD
1

Kheth
Teth
I6dh

KH

(CH)

9
lO

Y
K,

D,X
h

Kiph
Lamedh

ni
V T

KH
L

20

30

Q.D*
:,]*

Mem
Nan
Samekh
'Ayin

DP

M
N
S
<

40
50

^D
r:^

60
70

V
2, ^*
X,

Pe

B
"T

P,

PH
S

80

^*

Sadhe

90
100

P
")
ttr

Koph
Resh
Sin

nip
tL^i-\.

R
s
1

200

pto
1"^

l^

Shin

300
'

Taw
*

in T

T,

TH

400

Form

at the

end of a word.

^
cl

THE SYRIAC ALPHABET.


SYRIAC LETTERS.
SYRIAC NAMES OF
'

HE SAME.

PHONETIC
VALUE.

NUMERICAL
VALUE.

(<
.3

Alaf

^t^

Beth

^13

b,

(/3)

^
1 en

Gamal
Dalath, D^ladh

1:K
iA.-i, .li.i

g.
d,

gh
dh
h

4
5

He

pCco

o
\

Wdw
Zai, Zen,
'or

OpCO

w, u
z

6
7

Zayn

.t^V

t*

Kh^th
Teth

huM
Av\

kh

(or)
t

\
>

Y6dh
Kif

ICU
.^&
.isoi
yixjso
k,

lO

1'
>
.^^^J
00
.:^

kh
1

20

Limadh

30

Mim
N<in

m
n
s
'

40
50

^^jMso
relj^
p*:^

Semkath
't

60
70 80

(guttural)
p, for

^
_?

Pe

ph

3adh6

rCsK^
ACLS
Ti, Jt-i

90
100

Kof
R^sh (Rish)
Sh!n

q
r

1
JL.

200

^
Of^Al

sh
t,

300

Tiw

th

400

cli

THE ARABIC ALPHABET.


1 i

ARABIC NAMES OF THE LETTERS.

PHONETIC
VALUE.

UNCONNECTED.

CONNECTED WITH
PRECEDING
LETTER.

CONNECTED WITH FOLLOWING


LETTER.

CONNECTED WITH WlJrl PRP(KCiCEDING AND FOLLOWING


LETTER.

NUMERICAL
VALUE.

^
S

Si
Alif

K
i\J
ili-

Ba

b
t

^
t-j
A^

-^
.11.

X
A

Ta
Tha
Jim

400
500
3
1

th
g.

C^

^
t

^
^
.=*

'^
.^S
2V.

SU
9U.

Ha
Kha
Dil

kh
d

z
^

t
0^

600
4

%
J<3
L'

Dhal

dh
r

<x

700
200
7
MW
i

R4
Z^y
Sin

J
j

^b

(j*^

z
s

>
LT
AM

u~
LT

60
300 90

Shtn

sh
s

lF
(ja

Al^

sad

u
o^
lo

to

Ad

Dad

d
t

U^

>b

ta.

800
9

nL
i\ib

la
Za
'Ain

k
li

k
.

z
c

]i

t
c
i

la

900
70
I, OCX)

CO-

CJ^
*o.

X.

w^
id
s
-

Chain

gh
f

Fi Kaf
Kif

C_5

X
ii

80
100 20

t_5
iJ,

Ji

S
3-,

q
1

^
i

ill,

d5C

S,
J

5:,^
i
-T

*
s

Lam
r^. J

'

3-

30

M!m
NCin

m
n h

r
CJ

^
J

40
50
5

e>^
fU>

Ha

it)

W4w
~
*L,

w
y

i
i?

i
iS

6
10

Ya

'

clii

THE ETHIOPIC SYLLABARY.


BTHIOPIC

NAME
OF THE

PHONETIC VALUE.

LETTER.

Hoy
Law!
<^:

H
L

ha
la

If

hf>

y
A,

ht
ir

ha
la

tJ

he
le

1/

h6
16

A
(],
=>

Artv

la

^
't^

A.
rh. cK^

16

A
rh

Ha wet May
Sawet
Rg's

A"
<t>

ha

ha

rtv. hi

ha

h6

he

M
S(SH)

h6

ma '^ ma c^ m!
sa ra

'^

ma
sa
ra

md
s4
re

^
Mi
C
f\

me
se
re

^
MJ

mo
s6
r6

UJ

U>
4,
tu

sft

l>t
<i

si
ri

m
<J.

Ut

R
S(C)

ra

sat

sa

sQ

il

si

sa

se

sd

Kaf
Bet

Q
B
T
n

qa ba
ta

*
fV
'\:

qO
hd
tfl

qi

?
n
:^

qa
ba
ta

TAwi

t
-^

Kharem

KH
N
'(N)

a t
-^

bt
ti

* a
ir
-h

qe
bs
t6

-fl

q5 be
te

q6 b6

^
'^

T
7
A ^

to

kha V khCl
na
'a

kht
ni
'i

kha
na

kh6

khe ^ khd
ne
'g

WM:

Nahas

nfl 'a

^
A.

\
A.
'6

n6
'6

Alef

^
TV
(D,

'a

Kaf

K
Z

ka
0)

ft:
HJ2:

Wawi
'Ayen

ka

n.

k!

ka

n
g

kg

k6

wa
'a

wa
'a

O
H-

t ^

wi
'i

T
H

wa

w6
ze

(D'

we
'

P
p
H
P-

w6
'6

a
za

Zay

H
p
J?

za

K
R.

z!

Yaman
Dant

T
D G
T P
S

a
(%

H
.f?

ze

z6

y5
da

P
J?,

ya
da
g<^

P
J?

ya da
ga
ta

y^ d^ g^

yg de
ge
te

y6 d6
go
t6

Gamel
Tayt
I'ayt

T
ta

^ 1
(li

d! gi
tt

^
a

jr

^
)

3
Tl
ft ft

m
/^

nv

ta

^
ft.

C\^
ft ft

pa
sa
ft.

K
fi
ft.

PJ
?t

pa
sa
ft.

p^
?^

h
ft

Pe
se

p6
sd

Saday

8 e

e^:
A4::

D'd[)k

da
fa

e-

da
fa
P<^

^
d

dt
{]

q
4:

da
fa

Af
Pa

P
P

a <

d6
fe

6
4:

de
fe

J^
tf^

d6
fo

T:

pa

pi

pi

pe

pe

p6

Ethiopic Diphthongs.
rr

kua

n^ kui
7^ <^
"Y.

Yi^

kue gue

]\
3.

kua

p>

kue
gue

T* gua

gui

T"
c|>>.

g"i qua

"^

^
\

qua

qui

que

$
r^

que

khua

khui

^ khuS

khua

khu6

Numerals.
e
B
I

4
5

2
S

S X
H

10

9
a

40
50

20

70 80

E IE
E-E

100
1,000

30

60

1 90

10,000

cliii

THE AMHARIC SYLLABARY.


I Gl'Z

2 kA'Ib

salIs

4 rAbI'

5 hamIs

6 SADIS

SABi'

II

ha
la

Ih

hu
lu

^
A.
'h.

hi
li

ha
la

*i

he
li

fl

h, hi,
1,

he

If

ho
lo

A
rh

A-

A
*h
atf

A.
<h.

A
;h
IJU

h, le

A"
(K

ha

ih- hu

hi

ha

he

h, hi,

he

ho

uo
UJ

ma
sa
ra

oo-mu

un
"1.
<^

mi
si
ri

ma
sa ra sa

"A

me
s6
re

m, ml,
s, si,
r, rl,

me

qn mo
H
so
ro so

Uh
<.

su
ru

ui
6.
1*1

ut
*^
l\

A"

se
re

4
n

sa

i> fb

su

IX

si

s^

n
!

sha

shu

a
a
X
=n

shi

fl

sha

n
*
11,

c n
fi

C
r>

s, si,

se

su
qe
be
te

sh, shI,
q, qi, b, bl.
t, tl,

she

sho

qa
ba
ta

*
nfs

qu
bu
tu

t V
bi
ti

3>

qa
ba
ta

*
n
I>i^

qe
be
te

*
p

qo

n
J-

bo
to

T
1*

t
1?

tcha

*P

tchu

tchi

^
:i

tcha

tche

tch, tchi, tche

+ ^
r

tcho

t
*

kha
na

1.

khu
nu nu
'au

T.
i.

khi
ni
ni
'ai

kha
na

-^

kh^
ne

'*

kh, khi,
n, nl, h, nl,
',

khe

kho
no no
'o

V
"j:

%
"E

T na (gna)
^
In
'a

t
^.

V
>

aa
a

ne
e

T i
>
Vi

ne ne

r
V

h,

h.
Yl.

'I,

'e

ka
kha

^
(D

wa
'a

tb ku T> khu (D. wu


O'
H"If
'u

n
Yi.

^
ke
khe
Y^

ki

vi
"Tfl

ka
kha

ke
khe

k, kl,

ko
kho

khi

Tl.

^
H

kh, khi,

V
<P

T ^

wi
'i

<p
vk
ii

wa
a za

w^
e

(D- w, wl,
',

we

wo
o

t\

'I,

'e

f
H
dz6

H
IT
P

za

zu

K
h:
p(.

zi

H.

ze

z, zl,

ze

z6

dza

dzu

dzi
y" di

"H"

dza

'h: dj6

K
^

dz, dzl,
y. yi.
d, dl,

K
P-

dzo

ya
da

yu du
dgi'

R
$.

^
5^
^
111-

dga
ga
ta

K
1
m.
CM.

^ X
g,
:i

ya

R
K.
il
I

y^
cle

ye de

yo do
dgo
go
to

da

^
$:

^
dge

dgi
gi
ti

dga
ga
ta

dge
ge
t^

dg, dgl,
g. gi>
t,

M
1
in
I.M.

1
rn

gu
tu

ge

"\
tR,

m.
fL

T
tp.

tl,

te

m.

tcha

Ul; tchu

tchi
pi

tcha

H*- tche
pe
.

tch, tchi, tche


p, pi,

tcho

A X
'S.

pa

A.

pu

A.

*
**

pa
I
A

fr
fr

pe
se

>*

po

H
fa

X.1
<^

H
* T
fu

Is, si,

6
4.
fa
fe

G.
fo

<L

fi

pa

pu

pi

pa

^
T

f,ft.fe
p. Pl,

p6

pS

po

Ami lARic

Dn>] ITHONGS.

^
1.
Yi-

qua

khua
k''ua

l^

qui

$;
:!.

qua

<t

que

!-

qui,

que
khue

%
Yl-

khui
kui

khua
kua

:i

khue

u
Yl-

khui,
kul,

irx

XL kue
3.

kue

>
1

gua

>

gui

3.

gua

gua

gul,

gue

cliv

THE PERSIAN CUNEIFORM ALPHABET.


A
I

fn
"T

TH DA
DI

T<r
TT

U KA

<
T=

^TT
<t]
^<

RA RU V
VI
s

^I

n^
ti

DU
NA(I)

Ku (QU) <y KH n GA (GI <Tr GU <B


C (TCH)
J
TT^

u
^
T-r
<^<

NU
P

SH
Z

^
^r

H
F

M
MI

7tT
r<^

T
iir
TT

-T<

DJ

-<^
^TTf

MU
Y

HT<-

TR
<sign

for division

between words.

[1]

^^v

in

some

respects

= Heb.
;

i^

aau lau
o

(|

>..^^

stick, staff, pole.

a ^v

an emphatic particle

aa aar

y"^
Peasant

"^j Peasant
i8o;

i8i;_n_^
125;
(j

Peasant B.I.
It

v\
to

f, Peasant 224.
times to

seems to be used some


like
f\

bind, to restrain, to keep

in

restraint,

to

mark a quotation
Brit.

in

Ethiopic
678,

oppress.

(r^<J^^(^:
Fol. Ilia,
i).

Mus.

Orient.

No.

aas

"^
(]

P
t^
'

/^.

bile, gall; var.


|j

a ^^7^, a K^
a-t

Rev.

12, 17,

=
(|

^7\

aasb
,

to

come.

^^
;

seat, throne, someJ -:'-^i


3,tt?"'.

thing fixed

compare
f=G>

Berlin 2296, estate, farm.

aa
OicLci

to beget.

I ^,
^/p^ Westcar
9,

field.

/\

grave,

tomb;

varr.

16;

12,

A'=;aaau
v\, U. 564, the hands;

p. 85, to

bring forth.

aa

a-t

^ ^
;

~ =
I

*^
\\

"^

field,
d'H'df

ground,

7\

Rev.

II, 131, to

come.

territory, region

var.

aXf

aax

aaau
,

Lit.

17, journey-

staff,

stick, stave.

ings, those

who

travel.

aat

>fe

back.
'P.

aaa
sleep, slumber.

1-^3-,

J-^&-,

to

U. 321. 535.

294

aaa
u
,

L=v],
to punish, to

l^,
do harm
.

to sleep,

slumber

var.

to some-

1-^.
ciaici

one.
fl

t^t

^^^-*^^C'fi^^^'Copt.I^.&,

J>
to bespatter, to

fl

to plaster, to build,

make
^

a charge against.
%:, f6\
I,

lis,

2,

agodof slaughter; var._

fl

^
be
strong,
hostile.

aaau
S (^

"^

Z),

wJ,

Anastasi

28, 6 ...

aati
aati
a-[t]
L_Z1'

aaa-x aaa~x
vessel,

/Aj\Qf, Israel Stele 22.

enemy.
uraeus
of

\^ Hj

N.
'

920,

the

O
;

vase,
11

Horus.

measure

plur.

=fli,

fl^
t:
'::^

Mil'

^=0=1

III"

[2]
uctct

ai

Rcc.

14, 41, foreigner, interpreter (?).

stag;

Heb.

^,

Copt. eieo-ffX, Arab. J^'}

Assyr. ai/u.

Rec
(3

14,

42,

foreigner,

aish

'^(j(]liM'^^.
R^^'^'

Rev.

12,

44,

barbarian.

truce; Copt, eioje.


LIU ^^^^-

aaia

^S\

^-=^

Thes. 1203,

aiq "^^(j^^^'
rush; van

45> reed, bul-

to extinguish, to put out a

fire.

aau
case for a

^
book

_^
lool-

ai-[t]

H"^^^-^. "^ ^,
]

Rec.
As.

case;

5
000

case

for

arms

(Lacau).

aab-t

J
8;
A.Z.
1908,

"^ "^

(]

(]

^
c.)

(](]

36,

203,

;^.
%-.

Jour.

1908,

310,

l)(j

"^

calamity,

trouble,

prejudice

=
li

?^
IV,

ait *C^ OU
510;

a kind of bread, or cake.

JExcom.
I

Stele

70;
ca-

au

A
=

^'^^ 39' "^/^^'P-

336,

opposition, resistance, vexations,


lamity, ruin.

entreaty,

be

large, to

be wide, to be spacious
the height of a
spirit,

Copt. (WOT.

JK
vase, pail, measure.

^)
Jl

B.D.

09, 8.

au,am/z,;^|j, /^
jr2

aaabu "^^
incense which
censer.
is

the

little

vase for

^ ^ Jr
_ZI

,
j

A
all,

'

,^ ''o

'^
,

"^^

^^"g'h,
'

totality,

throughout.
'^"S^*^-

attached to the handle of the

au-t

A^^' A^^'
^^
V^
'

aafi

^^ aaan %. nJ
ft^
\\ \\

"^

-S3=v

^'"'

^'

'5> IS. 9.

largeness;
earth

c^

'"
,

length

of the

repulsive man.

ii,

"^

'

-^

^.

<rfl|

^ ^^^
years
;

''^"^'^ o*"
'

plur.

"^ HJflW 5
n

advanced
;

in

Copt. ert.

/^ ^ ^

l]i]

t^

^'l"

vanced
B.D.
(Saite),
5, 5,

in iniquity.

Aani

1\\

the Ape-god.

Aaanu
god 'Ihoth.

"^^

'^

^^

'

t'le

Ape-

T. 339,

days;
stride;

\?

Of)

interpreter, foreigner.

A 1^ ^ ^ A^( /\ ^^ !
O
'j'.>^7.

o'
27,

^-

'^'^'

^""

*'

Rec.

219, long of

P- 187,

M.

349, N.

902, long of foot;

(f^

^g,

P. 215,

abundant
^^''^^ *"

a&s

a weapon.
in offerings;

Ai

"^ ^^S'

"''^^

^' *"

ass- headed

god

f^\> ^
Isis)
;

\
'

!'
>

<^-'

tail (a
1

name of

/^

C30

^,
J^-

N. 802,

155, long-haired.

[3

A
aut if^
au'='

'O

a kind of ochre.

Ill

Jl

o o

a'

unguent.

5
^jM.

au-t
swelling of heart, pleasure, joy.

AOo 0.

u. S08,

A^Q-

tion of heart,

gladness;

/^ ^5,
;

A.Z.

1906,

127;

\\ '^^^,

" his heart

was glad to do," Stele

of the Dream, ^^

if^

'O
"^

/^'^
'0'
I

'O'^.agod.
medicine for

IV, 173, food, offering, sepulchral meals, supplies of all kinds.

au-t aby-^,%^.
the heart

au (f^
aui

j^^
14, 21
.

Rec. 20, 42, splendour.

au

^
j

(?).

Rev.

II,

166

.<S.
;

"^"J^

fl,

to

make an

offering.
1,

Rev.

1K<2

au-a,

au-t-a^^ c^^,
D
,

^'^
;

I
splendour, words of praise
;

.
I

g'ory.

Copt,

eooif
to rejoice.

ff^

gift,

present, offering, alms,


jjlur,

auau
auj.-j

oblation,

i.e.,

" that of the open hand "

-M t^ ^ S

rays of light, something lething


bright.

III

Au-a
99. 29;

the god of gifts,

B.D
of
Q.

au

^(ai

fl

%> ^, Tuat

IV, a

^^,

sorrow, pain, care,

misery, ruin,

title

Horus and Thoth.

sadness, the opposite of

J^ 'O

\\-

Au-t-a

f^\>

1=^

e^, the name of

aU-t

^^^'
^
{
I

Rec. 35, 32, slaughters,

a serpent on the royal crown.

animals slaughtered for food.

Au-au-Uthes
au-h.er

(?)

^
;

"^'

a^

Tuat IV, a name of Thoth

see
1,

Uthesu.
Peasant 271, a

A^l
{i.e.,

au

A ^ ^\
(?)

'

ground, region.
IV, 967, administration.

man

auu
Auit

v\ v\, swamp, marsh.


,

of broad face

sight).

Au-t-maatiu-kheru-maat

Wort. 32, 478, a

goddess of nurses and children.

au
a group of gods

I,

B.D.

130,

13,

who gave alms when on

earth.
ill,
,

Au-matu(?)

/^--^%,

Tuat

children.

a god in the Herer Boat.

au

"^
;

V:>

f^

to

be old.

^(Jfl

^,

to stretch out, extend, IV, 498, 612.

Supp. 383

A.Z. 1874, 90, a measure of land

(?)

au/5Z^^^,Rec.3o,i87
1'
1

^^-Sfl^T'"'TvitV:it'
aui

Rec. 26, 65
^
'

to
/l

be

strong,
violent.

^g" ^_^'
,

^f].(]qU^,'o

rebel, be^^vio-

auit

Rouge

I.

H.,

pi.

256,

something promulgated, a decree.

N. 916.

[4]
auau

g^ e

i]

e I^,

dog, jackal

Pap. Roller

4, 2,

j]

j [

[j

"^v^^

leopard

leopard

pare ojlj^j^^-

of the South,
terror(?),

?
^f]

OQ

^ i.

leopard of the

aur
aurf(?)
i.Xoo-re.

restraint,

^
^^
,

North,
long,

violence.

^ ^;
I
I

^ leopard six cubits


jj^Xx^
''^'^^

net

Copt.

and four cubits

in girth,

mill

'*>\.

M _M^ X
B-D.

_fl *^-=^

Abit
scales, balance.

J
;

1)(|^'^.

76, 2

104,

4,

ausek (ask)
stick, staff, rod.

\y^^'], sceptre,

the mantis which

guided the deceased into the

Hall of Osiris

see U

J ^^^

^^ "^^j

(3 w Wort. 144; Suppl. 514; Rev. 11, 138; balsam, incense, unguent of a light yellow colour.

ausha/K,TiM o

ab T ab
I

J^
;

'

'^e

thirsty

see

7]<

g?i

Ss, J .

J
,

\
Uream

Dream

Stele 4

*^.

gift, offering, sacrifice.

B.l). 19, 15

^
1

Vi'^

.Stele 14,

the

left

abu

J^^, y^^>

elephant;

side

see

TTv

,._J1.

Plur.fj^^j.f J^|;Copt.e&(in
eKpoc).

Hymn

of Darius 17, the left eye of Ra.

abH
(or

fJ

^,

suppi. 514;

ab
^-^

Qf^,

to wish for, to desire, to long

for;seeyg,^y(2g,|^yjg.
Pap. Koller
pare
3,
2,

Jy

elephant grass, or balsam.

in order to, wishing to

com-

niNto love, to wish for, to desire, to long for.

abeb,abebufJJ,OJ^,y
1

\\

f,l,|fJ^|,Pap.Koller38;fJ^77;,
f
T

abeb-tyj.,yjo^,lv,
975, 1092, wish, desire.

J^^^ var.y^|:,IV,
1

1x49;
IV,

abu-t

1'

P"'''^'

'^'

^'^'^

rotten,

ivory,

V '^

'

''"'"^'y

disposition.

329;

ivory

tusks

and

tooth,

\\

\>

Abt
ab
Y

J
, (j

\> J)

"^^^
'

'^" ^ Abydos

J^^

\^5
;

^'^^^^^^'^'
i'

S'^'"^-

parents,

ancestors, kinsfolk

personified as a goddess.
variegated,

M^ V

'

\l

Hymn
marked with
(fl),

of Darius 19

compare nillt^.

different

colours, streaked, striped;

having feathers

of different colours, a

title

of Heru-Behutet.

abu

1
,

q' f

J V'

*^^s^^''";

-^^

ceaselessly.

abu

J^

^'
f

Rec. 30, 188, leopard.

ab,

abu

ab, abi, abit

JI^,

fj*^^.

J fj,

Edici rf,

J ^ IJ

fJ^,,ob,.d;.eefJ|J*^,L.U
III, 184, 36.

[5]
ab

^^i^. Rev

II, i8o, father;

Heb.lM.
Ani,
I,

15,-a mythological fish.

Aparius
20, light
;

"^

"^

-2!s5>

compare

/K

AireWnioi, a Macedonian

name

of a month, the

aban ^\ ^^^ 0,
Copt. a)S.en.

Rev. 12, 69, alum;

Roman December.

Apuranites

^
)'

f] -^^

ab - Ian - athan - alba

^ 17
13

U
Gnostic

J], Rev. II, i8o, a god.

ABAA0ANAABA.
Rev.
^
I-

abahi
21,

'^ I Leyden Pap. apsu "^ ^ "^ P


aph
f,
'

8,

'^''^^

tooth;

Copt.

O^gjG.

apt
Ill,

D
7^'

D
35,
to
flutter,

7\, L.D.
alight

abakh "^"i^
to forget
;

65^,

Rec.

4,

to

as

a bird.

Copt. (JoE.^.

apt

abash
Jour. As.
forget;

1908, 267,

^^PI^^P "^"i^
P ^^

^^,

goose,

duck; plur
570,

11^,
^

n
,

U.

N.

940,

!^'

Copt.

toE^g.
,

Tombos

8,

49, Rec. 36, 86,

Sphinx

i,

89; Alt. K.

3,

name of a
1

^^53-l'^|.k=L^%.^.
IV, 877,
i'

Libyandogof Antefaa, theSlughi,

jJJi~:

li-

abatu

.L

"Tk

^S A :^'^^^.
'2_

o{3

Rev. service,

y^.

m
OJ^X.

@"

water-fowl in general;
^^^^'^ Soose, P.

abitf

JHq-^,
pyramid tomb.

^^^''^-"53. 35.

=a %*= ti
Copt.

11'

699

apt
I

IV, 1047, staff

(?).

h^"^^

'

af

abekhy,0^,fJO yt,^,

<5< Ml'
af-t

B.D. 172, 36, offerings of


birds

and

fish (?)

^^
;fzzi'

P.S.B. 14, 232,

gift,

offering,

^J^X,^J^, IV, 365,to


enter battle
;

present.

mix

with,

to unite with, to penetrate, to enter in

among,

af
afa

\M

Hymn of Darius 38,


'

see

%
j

Q^
to

^^^^
^^

nj

might, strength (?)

glutton, greedy

man.
greed, gluttony.

abkhekh^jV'-'^tp'Jh.rjd":
abs

afa-[t]

Jy
,

Annales
I

9,

Vll

1'

156, a kind of plant.

afau
af,

(?) (?)

o'

a kind of balsam, or medicine.

afau
78,
6,

Hymn

of Darius 11, a kind

B.D.

(2
1,

of

fish

see

@.
1
',

W
abt T

to trouble, to be troubled

'<".

to shut, to bolt in.

'^(g

li'

those who are troubled, or those who give trouble.

A 3

'

[6]
afaf
aflt

?1k?
'

to praise, to rejoice, to exult.

ama
araa,

--^

"^

-^

to see
(2

ijl

flame,
to

fire.

ami

afu

to injure,

inflict

an

injury.

Afu
afer
afri

'

Tuat

VII,

W-'

"Worm"

the Kheti.

^:si'
-

to burn, to

be hot.

"^L-J,"^! Ijfl'^^=3.
to

to

mix together,

(1 '^'^'4
[j

Verbum Voc, smoke,


hot vapour.'
13, 38, foot soldier (?)

compound a

medicine, to rub

down

drugs.

^""^^ A

aft
aft

I,
;?

Rev.
to

bend the

leg, to

march,

^'

part of the leg.


not.

^ ^^ m
+

"^

something rubbed "^ fl down, or crushed. 4 L=J'


A

"^

^ TombofSetil, oneof ^^ the 75 forms of Ra.


!]

Ama-ami-ta
Tomb
of Seti
I,

am
am,
L_=/],

^^[| ^^ f 7^|.
Ra
''''^"^

one of the 75 forms of

amu
3,

tiv.^'U.

177.

(No. 63).

Rec.

46

amau
,_>Ci,
^\

'^k^^'^'"^'^'^'

ama-t (am-t)

^
<^

t^

ti

to seize, to grasp.

o
am.i-t

O
III
,,.

meal, pottage.
Rev., the interior,
I

amm
^^

ti
Rec. 31,
17,

M.

742,

nature; "^^
a,

%"

'^
1

a
'

good

disposition.

ci

I,

A.Z.

1905, 36,

Amu
fist.

"^k^'
\{^,
11

"'^'

"' ^

^'^'^""S^-

to seize, to grasp.

amm-t
am.

ames, amsu
^
."Qgrasp,

N. 803,
|

p.

^- 169,

^X know.

^'jl,

p.

614,

M.

781,

N.

138,

IV, 158, to understand, to

amam.

_-^ .^^

Merenptah

2,

to

know, to understand.

am "^ ^^ f Amen. 19, to swallow. am (read hemp) Y ^\ ^> Jour- As.


,

9,

1908, 305, artisan.

am am

^c\

tk

n Sl
Jf
mourners.
I I

to grieve, lament, to

mourn.

|^^,rodofauthority,sceptre,stafr;^^p

amiu

\M-\^VcoZL':.

^rr-l-'4.twosceptres;plur.^[l|l.

the amulet of the sceptre.

Rec. 16, 109, to burn, to consume.

am, amut '^J^ls^lj."*"". ":

ames-ab
ams-t

^ ^
I
P

0,

0-,

J-

Wort.

,4.

liver.

amait

"V -^ M v'

''''''"^(^)' '*""^-

Amtit

fl fl

"1

"^tiai' i'

foreign tribes and peoples.

7]

A
179

am
^'-'^

^v

w>wv MM j^, Rev. 12, 19

'>A''^,

to remove, to put aside.

= AXxm.

^^ jwA^v

It

_A, Rev., removal.


.3, t4,

ark-t
froth,

\\

^:=^ ^^^^
;

f
II,

Rev.

5,

94,

anpa^^^^s.Rev.
an interrogative particle

foam, aphronitnmi

Copt ^AI2I.
169, a

arg
1

"^ "^
;

(^

Rev.

member

<^

^^^

of the body

Copt. ^2i.<LX.

Artakhshassha
tured, be put in restraint, to strangle, to shut up,
JjT

Vi^lMil
A.Z. 49, 80, Artaxerxes.

be netted.

arut
ar
ar-t

"^

<^-r>'^

o ^ ^,
disgrace.

Rec. 31, II.

Artakhshshs
Artaxerxes; varr.'^

^
Yh,
j\
;

hair, tress,

lock of hair.

Jl^
t=

liM'Pers.
T

^^
J
^f

-as>

JM^ "^
^|yy

^
^

yy

ar
schoenus

"^1 A,
(I

Babyl. ffy,

si !=> \^ ^n-

Rev.

13,

4.,

Artikastika^-^](](]^^f
]
-^3=^
()[j

var.

<3>

\ J\

"^ ^

B.U. (Saite) .65,

3,

a form

ara

"^.^^"^

a,

Rev.

u,

157,

,2,

of

Amen.

41,^^

y^, Rev. II, 161,

"^.2^1

^c^^H'

security

artcha

^^
^,

Copt,

ojpx

1^. ""'copl^'aJpi:

"^.aas
embark

1|(|

^,

Rev.

12,

40, to

go up,
;

to

in a boat, to bring,

to be high

Copt.
.ra:

arar

^.^^.a^g, ^-2^
A,
Rev.
12,

Rev.

13,

29,

^N, 4ii
Rev.

^,
II,

^
123,
;

ra

^^ -2
Copt. uoX.

23, 41,

high, exalted;

ra

pain,

grief.

trouble, loss, sorrow, poverty, misery, debility,

^''"'^'^^SMO'
Copt.

^^'''' "3-

vine;

destitution, sadness, ruin,

woe

ahi

eXooXe.

ahu
,

^ ^

ra
ra

Ijlj

^ ^, - r^:
Peasant
249, a
,

Copt. ig,e.

^"^ ^,
^"^v,

arb

"^ 1^ ^

disturber,

one who causes trouble.

Rev.

3,

63, to besiege

Copt. lopS.

ah, aha
ra

^ra ^u-^

Hymn of Darius

23,

arf
death
:

Rev.,

rest,

repose,

any cow-goddess. ^^ ^y^' Ahait(]ra'^^^,^ra^^

Copt. (jopq.

Arsatnikus

^g^

S^^
-2^

^S'^ra^^^.L.D.4,
B.D. 162-4,
(i) a
;

82B.

form of Hathor

(2) wife of

Osiris the Bull-god

and

(3)

mother of a Horus.

33, 6, Aristonikos.

interjection

ahai,ahi^ra^(j(l,^ral)()|^, O
!

Arsinfau^^^[j(]T;^^
II, 57,

ahai

^ra

(j(j

^,
;

\mM^
Heb. 7nb<
(?)

Arsinoe.

Mar. Karn.

55, 62,

camp

A 4

[8]
ahi

"^ ra

(] (|

^
-^

to

go

(?),

to

march

(?)

Ahit

ra
ra

O o'
j\
Rec.

B.D.
5,

(Saite) 142,

to lighten (?)

22, a goddess.

Aha,Ahu\|^^,P.^o4,M.
33i>

ahem

16,

109, to ad-

ahem-t^-^raf^.^^o,!)^;
If.

^\,
Menu.

N.850,

y
M.

Hh.
699,

566,

^:^,N. 1330=1^^,
IV, 263, B.D. 40,
6,

rG

^vN _o?tr

'

incensCj unguent.

000

Rec.

16, 108, to groan,

^^,^.
157, a form of

Rec. 29,

to grieve.

Rec. 32, 216, weak,


powerless, grief.

aha

IT'-I-I
Rec.
12,

ploughed or cultivated land;

plur.

o
111'

9j

\i

~vwvv^ canal.

^>
7,

III'

J^X s

^1,%. ^^l. ci
1'

.mX

Amen.
lo^i,
(A s T^ -^"^
'

Rec.

13,

42, to har-

14; Copt, eioi^e, eioog^e,

i^.^^,

vest, to reap.

Ahs
ah-t

Stat^l^,

^c:^,Thes.
a
Sfldani
'

"^ I P ^,
god;
varr.
|1

P.

668,

the

name

of

| M

1288, arura.

M. 779,

Ahut-en-Amentit %.
Tuat V, the

'

'

estates of the blessed in

Ament.
III,

ah-t
I

^
'
I
I

L.D.

229c,

Akh-t JiU ^=^^^ ^ W

the

fi'St

season of
see

ll.t

year

Aakh-t.
^^'

flax fields.

akh <^0
akhi
akh-t

aha-t'^|(]^/h^^'^""g
ah-t-nu-arr^f
Rec.
6, 7,

of a
field.

Y'

^^-

^^^' ^'"'-

'^'

'

bloom, to blossom, become green, green.


reed, water-plant
;

5 O

^pW
to

Heb.
xli,

iriKi Gen.

2.

vineyard; Copt. i^.gji.XoAI.

ah-het
the
pit,

zrzi or shaft, of a tomb.

^If^Q
C=D,

'^ Mil

^, IlM >

N. 996,

Akten. p. 340,

watered, or irrigated, land.

akhakh^^,^^_f:
become
green, to put forth shoots, to blossom.
^^'^- 3'. -.
(?),

N. 281,
a plant

^
ahu

IV, 171, 754, a herb


(?),

akhakhu "^^'^^fiH'

(?),

a vegetable

pot-herb

(?),

a kind of

bread, or cake.

ah,
pottage

,
1

meal,

Amen.
16
1
J

6,

9,

5
e^iii

K.ec.

15,

,
I
I

food.

blossoms, flowers.

c^

ah-t

a kind of medicine.
12, 33, 50,

akhakh
M. 641
^C
III'

o'
.,

01'
Rev.
II, 139,

)i<i<i<,

P.

340,

flowers (of heaven),


i.e.,

ah
evil, grief, disaster,

stars.

prejudice

var.

.ra

akhakh
akh-t
ness, matter of the
,

5=^
*
'

night, darkness.

ah-t
ah-ti

"^ I ^ ^

'

entreaty, petition, prayer.


c.
,

thing, affair, busi-

^ w

see

day;

plur. ^^.

' .

^.ec.

**^-*i^IU?'^^'^'"''^'^'''=flI"^^-

[9]
akhakh
N
III
,

bone;

plur.

^^
[^

"^t
,

4^'

^'''-

'''

^^'

XZ3
as.

to be light, speedy.

Coptic A.CI4LI (?)


,

Peasant 97; A.Z. 1866, 100, 7^ to withdraw an arrow from a quiver.


,

akh

asu

^
1

Peasant 277,

J:

akhakh
the tackle of a boat
;

X
var.

I,

Hh. 483,
Rec.
8,

akhut

^'
-e-

13s,

"^

~^,

R.E.

6,

28,

Hh. 481.

7\, to

make
run, to

haste, to hurry to,

to

akha

^^
,

J\

to enter, to go.

flow quickly, to

attack

Copt. ItOC

j\ '^, Rec. 13, 21, to

judge hurriedly

\\

'''^3^

\\

olT.

/I ,

to carve, to engrave,

^P
as-t

w
p

hasting with
swift feet.

to scrape, to shave

akha-t "^^

^^"^

^_,,

scar.

-<0! ,

P
(&

- i

v.,

-e

Jour. As. 1908, 268, haste, hurry,


ci
"-

ast

"-^
III

yea

7\
;

^
,

hasters

away, ^

Akhabi
(SaVte)

^--J^qy.
^=^Jflfl^5^i'

B.D.

fugitives

runnmg

water.

J\
I

III

153,5,

^^
as "^^
I

153A. II-

Akhabit ^"^"-^

a god with an ankh-shaped phallus.

f]^

5^

>

T"^' "'

IT

I,

N. 296, 300, an

offering.

as as

Akhabit-ankh-em-tesheri ^^^"^^

J
30,
.

^fl

T^
II, 2, p. 134,

^ "^

^^,

Mar. Karn. 53, 35


Papyrus, VIII,
14,

\^

--I
>

'

^^^^^^^^ ^
Rec. 30, 183,

Hearst
,

Ombos

a goddess of the dead.


'^

"^ n O
O,
old
(?)

Tombos

Stele 8, gall,

akhah-t
;

"^ll
^.X'

^ec

gall-duct or gall-bladder
13, 124, reed,

(?), filth.

papyrus

Copt.

as
splendour, light, bright-

"^ n

Copt. i.c (?)

akhu "^^
ness
;

ym

as-ti

1^,

testicles.

see
(]

^0 ^ |
S70,

asi

^^ ^ HS ^'
;

^'^'^-

'''

^9'

payment,

akhu^^%.'^^,U.
M. 823,
light,

punishment

Copt. oce.

beings of light

see
(j

^) ^^.
u. 59,

asaka (ask)

[q]^^' Jo"'--^^sI

akhu
di^ne

^0 ^ '^ %> %-'


;

1908, 302, to delay; Copt. UJCK.

spirits

see

aakhu.
B.D. 153, 8(SaVte),
to

asu

Hh. 230

AkhkhU

^J^ ^,

a god of vegetation.

consume by

fire.

asbi[t]
Rec. 30, 193,
A.Z. Bd. 46, 108, Isis
;

"^ P J

flame, fire
(j(|

plur.

[J,

11.

3,

4,

^PJ^fl^li^^' -""^PJ^ ^^
to

see

Ast

reduce to powder, to crush.

iO

[10]
Asbit

Denderah IV,

^' M.

237,

N. 615,

ashash-t

00^^^^,

IV, 482,

81, a fire-goddess.

asha
the goddess of the fourth hour of the day.
o
lllJ

"^ l^ "^ ^,,


1)

to scatter [sand

^ _
B.D.
(Saite) 147,

ashahu
d Q
a fire-god.
A
,

^^a |^ >
cyCTg^e

!> (Saite)

B.l).

17,

41,

42, 21, paralytic; Copt.

(?)

Ashu^C30^|,B.D.95,3,awat.7,

asem
a sceptre.

P.

375 =

(meat

oaj^j.

asen
H

w"!
,

^^^'
'

'^'

"''^

B.D. 144, a fire-god

in the 5th Arit.

breathe easily or freely.

ashep
drum.
day, light.

"^
Q
,

A.Z. 1900,128

= ^^^^,

aseh.

"^^

[U r~~]

asekh

^~J" ^>

M.

224,

N. 129,

fl^hpr ^^^^

"^ '^^^Q m<=>'4'

' burn,. to melt, to roast, to try by fire.

asher.t^S^,N.r348,^
;_=vi'

11,
I

U. 124,
to reap, sickle

*^
-n

<=>0020^, U.
r"wn

29s,

^ <^

r-^rn
;

Copt. tOg^C COC.^.

roast

meat

offering; plur.

asekh
slaughter

^^
A

c~n
I

%'cr-zi, Ddcrets

r-n-1

34,

chamber (?)
Rev.
14, T9,

Ml'
asher
.2^

O
o.

III

roasted joints or birds.

asq
ast
I

delay;

Copt. COCK.
clay,

^
^^^
,

[I

~
I

i,

earth,

chalk

^
rrr-i

r-^rn
)i\
,

evening

see

(?);

^^
;

Ci

Dnm

potter's clay.

round,
Jou''-

ast

'^-*-]
Copt.

O'

As.

1908, 300,

estates.

ground, earth

CHX.
-2a>,

aq,
Annales
star
;

aqa
,

Peasant

259,

295,

Asther
asta

III, 178,

to

fail,

to

be weak, to be weary.
to
,,

Gr. 'Atniip. to

be

tired,

diminish,

come

an end,

be
;

(?)

to tremble; see

exhausted, perish, die

to run aground

asteb

"^n ^^^^ to eat; see

=J

^^^,
destruction
;

tired,

weary;

A^^
J^ ^
^Ko
,
,
,

ruin.

Copt. A.K(X), and

in

xLKO.
46,

ash '^pa'^^, evening; see


ash, ash-t *^i=2a5_j.

aqu

'^

%> -^,
i

Peasant

iii6b,

Peasant

ii6n, 23,

^^'
;

destruction, ruin

dog, jackal

var.

1=1 JM, "^ "^


I

fire.

Copt. i.KO.

Aq-t-er-pet

A ^

<^
,-

P. 645,

ash ^^^

\j\,

an offering made by

name

of the Celestial Ladder.

[11]
aqa
place
;

'^ ^^

see

^ ^ "^ ^

steps,

height,

a high

aqS ^,
aqs, aqs

13 7^

to

move, to walk, to go.


<$.

aqa

Q,

filth,

vomit

= A

to

tie,

to bind;

aqSU *^
\

bonds,
III,

fetters.

Aqetqet
a

house-boat

Arab.

aqau

_^,Hh.
of seven spirits

,01,

^\ ^^S^S
Osiris.

^,one

Aqan
the

"^

who guarded

'^^~''^

>

^^- 99>

int. 4,

name

ak
"'^^
(
I

of a god.

^^

to

become weak,
;

to feel pain

or sorrow, destruction

Copt. ^KCO.

aqb-t

^^

arm, shoulder

see

|^

aku-t
pustules,

^^ rr^

^,
Oi
III

boils,

blains,

sores,

any inflamed swelling.


,

Stele 4, a foreign people.

aki-t

chamber, abode.
I,

akuiu
of Gates III, a serpent-god.

Rec. 33,

aqem

.^N

%^,
Rev.
14,

A.Z.
10,

1898,
to

49.

,L.D.

Ill, 194, 33,


(2

\\J2^\

^1
&i
-5\

be sad;

aliens, foreigners, enemies,

Copt. oKeju..
;

Aker

il

aqen
aqers-t

/I A

see

/I A

-2

u. 498,
_-,
J

rvvvvv\

AAA/^

291,

S^::^

1^^, tomb; see

U. 461, N. 850,
V, 669,
,1^::^

aqr etchna
a weapon, axe
;

^4> ^ 1^ m j^
I

^
65,

1
,

-2^

\\ I

Heb.

'j^'^S (?)

Rec.

26,

^tsism

aqhu ^".1

L=/),

Rechnungen
,

70,

'^^'^y
who had a
it
;

5^, Rec. 31,

29,

an Earthat

Rec. 29,
22,

god,

lion's

body with a head

each

end of
165,

^^

Copt. <LKU3pi.

%.

L=fl,

Mar. Karn. 42,


to

Akeru
to
isism
-

-2^
,
!

T.
31,

319,
17,

'^J^,'^|^L=/1,
Rec.

work

m
;

wood,
5

Rec.

30,

196,

be a carpenter, to hollow out a boat


21,

@
I

"^^"^^^ S^xSbiSbi, N. 1386,

91,

dressed timber;

cans.

L_=fl,

\A

Earth-gods

who

are said to be

tlie

ancestors of

aqhu '^,

'^ I % L=^, carpenter.


A.Z.
1905,
142,

Ra and

of the Akhabiu-gods, B.U. 153A, 11, 23.

aqhu
X
t

13,

a group of Earth-goddesses

(?)

(J
fi

carpenter's adze, axe, battleaxe.

/]'

Akeru-tepu-a-Akhabiu ^^

^~^

aqhau
)

y^
,

'W

'

'

''^^^"""^"j soldiers.

aqh

B.D. 153A,
clay, earth.

II,

the ancestor-gods

who worked

the net for catching souls.

[12]
Akeru-tepu-a-Ra
_y
I I

ageb
^'^'
^"'^'
''^'

^^

oV
;

^,

Metternich Stele 179,


1

__fl^'

^^^

to weep, to cry out

caus.

Of

ancestor-gods of Ra.

akraut

'^ "^^

(|

wagons

compare ni73i?.

Agebsen(?)
a goose-headed god.

"^sj^.^'

Tuat

ill,

Akerta

U. 614, the name of a


god.
to lack, to want.

at, atu, at

\q, ^q', f^.


some
act or
: ;

^
^st\ ,\\

|.

ag
see

"^ S h "^ <jj;

,
I

U. 639,

plant,

shrub

a small portion of time, moment, minute, hour,


the lime of culmination of

emotion

Copt, ^,Ke, oeiK.

^Z-J, at this O'

moment
to

/ i

^, from hour

hour

^--^ T <:p>

^g^b ^ffl^J^'^^^^Nile,
flood, deluge
;

water-

^'

J4

a happy time with the women.

see

^S

'^^^

at

^
V\

, B.D. 177,

= -JW,

not.

agap "fe.

ffi

"V^ ^-=^' "^ S "^^S'


1

to destroy, to flood.
8, injury,

harm.
''=>->

agb'^ffij=, U. 193, T. 73, N. 587,605, ^fflJ(]^,M. 2.7, ^ffi

at-t

loss,

diminution.

at "^g^ at "l^^
the
celestial

^ '^
f\
,

loss, prejudice.

prisoner. J]|. rebel,

waters,

flood,

stream,

any large

at

^^
,

u. 456,
li

P.

182,

M.

285,

mass of water; ^^^


216; Copt. cocT^.

jM

wa^a, T. 56,

M.

T.

249,
..

^, U.
<ff\

370, N. S94, violence, wrath.


(?)

Agb^fflj:^,
'vw^ Jl, B.D. 189^
II, the

at
N. 706,

crocodile

^fflj
enemy
,

primeval Water-god.
P.

1.

806,

plur.

V\

^
^
;

\^

'^

enemies, fiends.

^O J ^,

u. 608,

^H J = ^111,

"^ p,

to be angry, to

behave

in a beastly

manner.

att

o o

"'

%^'

destitute,

poor.

possessing nothing

Copt. <LT".

^ffij^, ihe Great Agb.


ag^^

^
-71

Z5

J
fl
>

I)

^ ^,
"^ii_
tV

ati
u. 395.
P.

Rev. 14,

15,

he who

is

without,

who

has not,
in-

^/vw^A

384;see<^fflJ::^^^.
agb ^^ffi
ageb
]

mjury

^ (^
;

without

failure,

w
a milch cow,

fallible.

^n astronomical term.

at-t

cow

suck-

fej
p ^
Rec.
*

ling a calf.
12, 19, vulva,

^S J?,

knee; see

(|

^J

^.

-t^^

uterus;

Copt.

0x1.

'

'

[13]
ati-t

"^s^ ^^

V' ^^^^-

''^' ^'

^"^^^' "'^''"^

atep-t

:.

\^Zh' m-^'
couch, bier; van ^^^
[I

^-Z- 49. 32>


load,

mo
;
j

=
V\

Jour.

'J^^^^'
*^""'^'^'

As.

1908,

282,
;

burden

^D
I

atit,
cushion;

ataut

"^

Peasant 259

Copt.

exntO.
bearers of
(2

1 ^^'H'

plur.^]()(j^|,'^][]
1

atepu

loads.

atit^
;

atep
see

chest for clothes.

nurse, nurse

at-t

" ^
X.

?.

X ?

i2^
I I I

Rec. 27, 222, 31, 170,


nra

^Z

'

'

^^

'

^ crown of Osiris.

1
"^"^
(j

X
JjJ

Thes. i2o6, high-backed,

atf
sweet unguents.

,^v

incense, spices,

stiff-necked, varr.

^^,B.D.
^I(X).

154,15,

atf atf

"^

..~

Copt. OJT- (in

i, a

tree.

at

a cutting tool or instru-

standard, perch, resting place of a god or divine statue.


].,,
1

ment.
A/WS/\A
I
I I

Ata-ra
23, 4, a

^, Cairo Pap.
mummy.
'^'-

a-ten
1889, 71.

or

/V^A^^A

A.Z.

III
;

god

in the

form of a
^fli'

aten

Rev. 12, 10, ground, earth

ata ata

^]|

(]

'' P- ^79. boat.


l^ev., a

Copt eixn.

I]

t^^^'
,

kind of

fish;

atr Vn _&^ j2

river plants, papyrus.

111'

Cr)

17, to

draw a bow =

(I

ci Q

/i"

Ati
atita

Tomb Rameses

IV', 28,

a god.

-^Sr> ministrant(?)
Shipwreck
1 1 2,

26, 233, to nurse, to nourish.

atu

to trouble

oneself.
B.I).

a*^-*

^T H ^ S
.

^'"^^ ^"'^'^'

stool, chair,
,

canopy.

145, 4,

16, a

kind of wood.

ateb

"^^

,
I

land, region.

ateb "^^

J^' sceptre

(?)

athp

"^

atep'^^^U=y]

^,,

to load, be laden

see

^^llWl^CoptOJI-a.

"^

"^V

V^

fl'

'

'"''^'^'

'^

'^"^ '''^'^^"

master
'

^%
Copt.

;]

burden, load

var.

^^^ ^ ^

of a load, ^^37

"^

^ )'

exn(JO
,

^^'

'"^''^

Copt. U3Xtl.

Athpi

Tuat XI, a dawn-god.

[14]
at
at-t

a small portion of time,

moment.

atah^c^(]fe|;see^^f|;.
atit

X,
,

"'^^j

w
(?)

back, rump.

O
j\

disease of the eyes.

at
ati

heart disease

j'^\-^\i['"%'kz:-s::;.
atu
,

=^^
TflfiJUl'

X to be wounded, be afflicted. W '^'


inflammation
'

to run, to flee, to

make

one's escape.

at-t

of the eyes.

at
loaded
calamity.

D
;

1 r
.-..Si

"i, Amen.
Ji

12,

8,

to

load,

be

see *K\

!^ L-J

ata
at
,

Rec.

lo,

136,

to

suffer injury or loss.

^^^p^^n^'r^'
geese.

Rec. 26, 12, 27, 10,

31,

14,

atf atf
o o
,

a kind of balsam tree.

Rec. 27, 61,


angry,
to
at.

w
,

mcense.

to Ije

rage
',

atm
ath
swamp
;

"

^SV,'

N. 982

Rec. 29, 157,


wrath.

atu

"^^^^

^
'Ox

-sss^

^,
'0'.
,

a
a

man man

of wrath. of wrath-

see

(I

at-ha-t (?'il\ axnai^i'^


4.

^^^
.

]^ ,^^

ful nature.

atsu
Ates-heri-she

'
,

a kind of plant.

Ik

Peasant 181, croco-

^^f
act,

at-t

"^
(?),

^^^^

to prepare

' I Leyden Pap. 9,

the iierald of the 6th Arit.


'

'"^''^
i,

'^^''^^^

^^'^'

atch
i4> 2-

"^ ^, calamity. atcha "^ %^ '^. a bad


I
;

wicked-

fire,

flames.

ness, guile, fraud

Copt. 02I.
'*"''

atau

"^^^^^T'

^""' "^^'

'''

^*^^^

^ ^ ^'
i
;

''spJmter

garment, apparel.

atchait^i^(](]^,R.E.4,76.
fraud, injustice, wickedness

Copt. 02CI.

[15]

A
^,
I,

A
^, ^,

l\

^ a

represents a short sound of a, e and i in English.

H pronominal

^,
(]

Rec. 31,
suffix,

16,

I),

I,

^,

aa-t (|'^c=^(?) bounds (?),

limits (?)

ist

person,

me, my,

etc.

(j,

I,

U. ,73, T. 333,
'^

(11^,^,(1'^,
aa-t n
heart
,

P. 825, O, hail '."%

^' O my

she

who embraces,

nurse.

aa-t

(1

g?i,

he who, that which.

(j^'^'^,
,

girdle (?)

aa-t h

pain of body or mind.

aa-t
grave,

h
sepulchre,

t::^:il

J
heap
;

tomb.
I

dust

plur.
III

a
a a a

l\j\
O y^

=au
n
,

(l7\V^,to come.
lciJl^^:Jt-2-J,U. 208,

(j"^
65,
(]

P. 643,

M. 680, N.

242, to wash.

P.

i74,'f^,A.Z. 1883,
\>
III

(?) U

"^^1 A-Z.
,

1908, 16, an amulet.

"

Ci

5"'

'^
(J
I

"k

I"]

ti^ m

"''' "''" """'''

a kind of plant.

the tombs of

Horus and Set

^^^

^^,

P.668,M. 778, h
Asien
u. E. p. 313, Lieblein Diet.

^^-v^

^^^>

the

No. 553.

two tombs of Osiris


the

[I

aa |]'^ = rD^'Re^-3^84,34,i82.

14 Aats,

B.D.
;

149 and
''''^

150,

Book
N. 669, Rec. 31, 171, glory
!

of Gates, 66

ff"

'-',

B.D. 85, 17

praise^

the Western Aat


;

U
I

aaaa
I]

n "^

l\

'^,

U. 609, acclamation
14, 14, flattery.

"^

^, IV, 882

^^^

(\

^^
I

"^
aa

(]

'^'*| ^> Amen.


()

aaaau
(|

^ "^
j-|

a sacred grove
the

in Busiris

t-^'^

()

'^^,
I

cries of joy.

tomb of Osiris

in Busiris

"^"^

'

'o cry out (?)

"

Aat of

Life," the necropolis of the 8th


;

Nome
tomb
Holy

of

Lower Egypt
in

u-~si ^A^AAA

\^
,

the the

of Osiris

Mendes
in

U-~si

u^

Aat, a locality

the

nome

of Gynaecopolites

&a-t

(1

^^

rank,

dignity

see

RH
Aa-t
in

Metternich Stele 07.

(J

^^ ^^^_^
Kingdom

the

name given

to the

sections of the

of Osiris as described

B.D. 149.


'^ _ S J2
'

'

> ; ;

[16]
Aat Aakhu
aa tH
Cl
,
I
1

l\

,
1

B.D. 149, the


IV, 1098, islands of the Mediterranean;
the
'-'
III
I

JLri

3rd and 5th sections of Sekhet-Aaru.

^^

M. 689,

four Aats of Horus.

.^ ^^^=^3^^
,

islands of the Eastern Medi-

Aa-t-en-uabu

I
I I

,
I

Rec.

terranean
(

]'

i^'^"'^

o^ Senefru

31, 35, a mythological town.

(^S^ /
-^^~,

u-S) the necropolis of Philae


.

^S>

Aa-t-ent-mu

U-~sl '^~^>^ AAAAAA

B.D. 149,
17,

jl

11

u-^-vi

the necropolis of Hermopolis,

ww^, B.D. (Nebseni)


g
^

AAAAAA

Aa-nsasa
see Aa-nesrnesr-t.

'^^^

'

'

11

>

N. 393.

the 13th Aat of Sekhet-Aaru.

Aa-t-en-setch-t
(Nebseni)
17, 43, a district of

-w^wv
fire in

jL B.D
the I'uat.

Aa-nsernser-t
1

S
'

v^/w\
I I

M
A/VNA/VA
ri
I

i^

/'A'^AAA

Rec.

27,

218;

varr.

*n

N ^^^
Rec. 31,

Aa-t-Heru
1\
Ci

i^-^^l^--^i^'~vi

Rec. 27, 217,

in

^AWAA

l<:=>
Rec.

1*^,
31,

the divisions of the

Kingdom

of Horus in heaven.

Aa-t-Heru-mehti
<^ ^^,
North:
P. 555, the

1)

^^^
^,
P.

PpfJ,
wM^ II
, I

173,

Rec. 30,

7 1

Avwu\

II <

domain of Horus of the


610,

fl'^

"^

'^^^

^ Q {7

Rec. 31, 173, the "Island of Flame," a


'

region in the

Kingdom

of Osiris.

the

domains

of the North.

aaa
fl

ground, earth, rubbish-

Aa-t-Heru-resu
P-

fl^^^i^'
P.

'

heap;

plur.q^^;^^,
[J
1

Tutankhamen
ground

7.

555)

the domain of Horus of the .South;


4= '^'

aa-t

,Q U---nI 1-^

610, the domains of the South.

JffS'

^\

c
I

region,

(1
1

Mar. Kara.

52, 4, rubbish-heap.
>
I

Aa-t Kher-aha

^ Q^
aa
plur.
[I

waste

lands,
(?)

s
[1

III'

islands

B.D. 149, the 14th section of Sekhet-Aaru.

V\

^^
,

Stele of Herusatef 99, ox

Aa-t Setesh-t
208,

t^s^iiii^ii

tr^n^^^ij, U.

^^ S

cattle.

^
||

^t:Silb:S::JL:::S::dn^_^,kS^li^iJl^:S:^

aa-t
P. 188,
'

j,

the

M. 351, N. 903, the divisions of kingdom of Set, or Setesh, m heaven.


i

(j"^

I^,DeHymnis36,

I]

"^I^,
^^t

an animal.

Aa-t-shara ^^^ TtTtl <^=>


35, a mythological locality.

(|

n Rec.
,

^"

A'

'

^^^'
fl

m
;

aa(|^y^=(|^^^,boat.
Aat
^^^3
A/WV/V\
1
' '

(WSAAA

'

fl

^^
t=t'

^^
U. 426,

v-^.

st'ind for figures of

the great canal of Heliopolis.

gods and sacred animals, stand, perch

plur.

aa
Rec.

u
1

P.
y
),

4n, M.

593, N. 1198.

13, 22, island

plur.

'

s^ ^^-.
two
sup[)orts,
(1

(2

l'(2vl'"^^-'''=

n flflll<^<>l

"^v

v-T^ >-^, T. 244.

'

A
()

[17]

Aa-t ent Up-uatu

^ v^ ^boat,
[1(1

Aai

^qO>
,

Tuat IX, an ass-headed

B.D. 99, 1 6 a, part of the magical

god, the opponent of


-jj
I

Aapep and

Sessi

(I

^^,

the allies of the same.


I]

P. 146, 364, 415,

M.

185, 895, N.

1077, 1200

Aaiu
of gods

"^

(](]

|.

Tuat IX, a group

who bewitched Aapep.


l<iie-

aait (|'^l)l|/^|.
mace, rod, sceptre,
stick.

^^
fl

'^^^' ^

^ ^'

P''' ''^^' '''^^

the " old gods," gods of olden time.

moment(?),

=^g(?).
Assyr. j^

"^^ "^
(|

plants, herbs, flax (?)

a horned animal;
6,

^ ]^,

W.A.I.

II,

Col. 4,

n
l|

Heb. V^N
Tuat
I,

aau
aaa

/I

1 n

Q % -^ ^
Jl
III

Aau
^^'

"^ ^,

a singing-god.

55. things with a strong smell.

a kind of stone.

^ o

(2

aaa-t

(1

Aaait

(j

^^ o "^ ^ Q I
(1
,

praise.

B-D. (Saite) 145, R-

a goddess in the 17th Pylon.

*^* 1 '^ 1
y8i

' 1

^
'^'"'^

C-

'"

""'

mation, adoration

Copt.

eoOT.

aau

^' ^ \^ ^ \A^
daa
8'3'8'

P- 437> 440,

M.

651, 65s, flourishers of sticks.

aaar(]^ij<:=>i^^(]<^|.
fl

"^

H
iJ

P^ =
1

'^

^" animal

for

sacrifice.

^^
[I

to burn, flame,

fire.

aaasn
Copt. cocg.

^^\

^^ gSi,
(]

to call, to cry out;

*-11^M'ft'ft|.ftS

aaatchtau
j*,

young man, youth.

^^

^MS^fti.q^ft^.
(j

f)

ll^SS^iS'
veteran,

"-^

'' "

aaatchta-t
maiden,
virgin.

(]^-^^(]@^^|,

aged folk ;

plur.

'

(1

*^

U.

513,

1^^.?..-'---.l)S^ftf

'

fl

[18]

portable shrine or chapel.

aaui

(?)

Ij

'^

^^,

Rec. 21, 99, 100, P.S.B.

12, 123, 13, 574, a particle.

Karn. 54, 45, companies of troops.

two goddesses.

Aaurmerra

i)^ | x

AauNu,

(|^^f^^^,B.u.

Jour. As. 1908, 312, a proper

name (?)

^g

11'

^,

57, the primitive Sky-god.

aaulia(]^^ra(]
aauhu-t cud

Rec. 30, 72

^
;

|
see

'\>

steering-pole, rudder
official

merhu-t.
(2

position,

rank,
;

dignity,
plur.
(I

position,

pro1
'

fessional

occupation

*^.

'

TTT' TTTIJ.
I
I

fl^rTTT^
253, N. 639.

(?

.4.
7|.,

.. 7,.

<2>^

.4.

<2>-

.6,

i3

left

foot;

,7[.

^,7,.

J <2>-

the
I

left

eye of heaven, the moon.


,^_j]
!

,T. 336,

P. 8ii,

M.

aab-rek k J
[get]

p.S.b. 20, 203

away

to the left

Compare
k

aabi-ty^,!])^,^-^
aaUU r
aaui
I

\y

^^ U
(1(1

<2

Rev. u, i3r, dignitaries.


to

the

left

eye of Ra,

i.e.,

the moon.

-^;

have power or rank.

T.iS8,295,l]^Jf,f^,P.203,f J

herds, cattle, sheep

and goats

[1

^^^

^ ^^^
'^

Rec.

29, 148.

'

^^^^'

^'^^'i

eastern; plur.

7|<

strife (?)

opposition

(?)

dau-t

"^^

w
/^
1

tliG sticker,

the stabber.

Ci

^,Q

.4,

n Ci

tj:
4au(|^l_3,(l^^,lj^~;^,
Amen.
4,
6,

Q^iieii

I'

aab-t

()

to

turn

aside,

to

deflect

from

"^ J4^.

'!'

80,

^, M.

234,

a course or purpose.

daua

"^ -^ L

fl,

to bear, to carry.

; ,

'

fl

[19
'tK

Aab[it]

j, Tuat

I,

a singing-goddess.

aab
aab

TK

an animal marked

for sacrifice.

w
""^

tt;^
I

Sphinx

III,

143, a

mark on
fish

\\

animals sacred to Set.


a

Aabtit

"^

"^

IJ
.6.

<s3<, tJu^^' Copt.te4>tox(?) ^aabifj3-^,ycy,y(](]Y,


,

aab

mythological

goddess of the East.


of a serpent of the royal crown. n c^ ci p '^'^'^^^A

Aabtt

i:^

^21

1^
r^-^^^

the
.6.

name

(]

"iok' leopard, panther

plur. tt

J ^ V;

iUV

Aabtt-hena-ka-f
a

see^jqjl^.
aab TJiJI,

r^./^/i

;^

B.D. 141

(Saite), 18, the

East and

its

fJI?'
,

tJ^I^'

double.

aab
aabt

(1^ H, -e^ Ji
1
I

^-

^*4'

sceptre,

cere(?)

monial mace

aab-t

tt;
I

enclosure, garden.

Jf-v^o^f^^,-^
\\

the head-box of Osiris at Abydos.

aab

-1

S
Y,
0.

kind of cloth.
^5:^^
I

'f

Aab[ut]
T

'IJ ^^Jl^l

see

u-\

JV

'^
'

T"

"

'

'^

'^''^'

'

^^'^"')

to
1

come

nS

3}

fathers, ancestors.

to an end, to cease, to finish

_n_

(1

c^

-^^"^Jfl' N. 719 + 11, ceaselessly; -^K A % ceaselessly day and night. wM^
285;
fl
I

U.

to cut, to slay, to smite, carved work.

-=il

^^=a>^

Aabtiuy^^l

fighters.

aab

mj^o:^,

Tj;

^-*^ c=>^

Rev.

II,

aabutyo^^
Rec. 31, 171, " fighting faces a company of gods.
"

slaughters.

129, 136, decree, message.

Aabauherulj^J^^^l^l,
(?),

the

name

of

to

wish

for,

to

desire,

to

love

aabi-t J
aabis-t (?)

(][]

'=^'^=> the mantis.

.4.

C2

Q^

Amen.

8,

13

f
(?).

fjl]

P^"^^^-

Nastasen

aabb

f J J^- f J

J ^^.

Rec. 32,^

Stele 61, eye-paint

181, to love, to wish, to desire.

aabu "^Jf^,

an

official,

butler (?);

Rec.

19, 19, pleasure, desire.

aab-nut-f
city,"

f J

" beloved of his

28, a singing-god.

title

of

Amen-Ra.

aabnn f
aabrek
(1

,akindofbird.

to burn, to flare up, to

burn

off,

to brand.

d^ f

""^^^^^^7, Wort. 42, a

vessel or instrument.

aabekh |J^,L.D.lii,i94,9,f JJ
III, 194, form, figure, similitude,

statue, effigy,

mark, sign.

to pierce,

to

penetrate,

to

B 2

'

; ; .

fl

[20]
or into, to be permeated with

force a

way among

T J ^21'

'"Sled.
,

^ -^
tree of
life.

I,

Rec. 29,

152,

aabbkh
kind of stone.

J J

shrine, sanctuary.

aatbekhab (?)

^ J _^M

aabs-

Tfc

eye-pamt.

aam.a

(?)

a wine, palm wine

(?)

Aamtiu
aabet
.t.

c^ia part of a crown men-

mi'^
Ammon.
j\
,

the people of

the Oasis of Jupiter

tioned with V

(I

aam ^
>

v\

to arrive happily.

Aabtu

U
,

Rec.

<c=<

35, 56,

fJ
32,

aam
(]

^
to.

to

deal

<e=i, B.D.
1.

3, I,

44, 11,211,3,

B.M. No.

kindly with, to be gracious

123,

(I

TTC

a fish that acted as pilot to

Ra;
to
;

aama(]^|,|)|^|,ij|,

(JJI,
to treat

var.

J Q:\|'^ <e<
^vL
f
1

be pleasant, to be benevolent, to be gracious.

Copt. -fei^UJ-r (?)


>

aamaam
fl

X
,

JK

cz^ii
J

'^^^

the holy aabt

fish.

''i-Jl

very kindly;

aapa
compare Heb. nDt^-

a baked cake

1^ |

<>

Ij

| |i^

lj_>$^,
___
'

.od-l,e.<.,

tJkH
to thine

a baked cake.
claws.

Y
^

f^^
0,

'

"shadow, pieasant

eyes";

aafut

h
to
tie,

N. 165, talons,

kind of hand, benevolent.

aam
aami

to bind.

fl^kvll^K L=0' w
to grasp, to seize.

Thes. 1205, graciousness.

aamaam
aam

U^<\

_ X
~^-il'

aamit
Thes.

^ ^.

|^

I,
fl

1207, to be strong, effective.

T.8s,M.239,N.6i6, fl"^ l\ (1 S -B^ '4' to set fire to, to kindle.

amiability, graciousness, pleasure, things


please.

which

p.

826,

palm

tree;

var.

^
u.

ffl,

M.

249,

atitleofRa;plur.y|^^||,S-ious
aam, aama
(1

__>

249,

_Jp

Aamit
the " gracious " goddess Hathor
c^
;

(|

%. ^v

name

of the

crown of Upper Egypt.

of

tree,

date palm

(?)

plur.

^^^

'

Aamu-t

I)

^J^ ^

u. 197, M. 229,

N. 608, P. 230, T. 76, the name ofa divine nurse.

..

'

A
Rec.
32,

[21]
aar-t
h

A
O,

milk; Copt.

epOJXI,

596, gracious god.

Mission

I,

177,

kindly

one

epcjoxe, epco-f

4am.t

aar[r]t

1)1^1

^^^^
fl

^ '^ ^ -^
(j

fish-spawn

(?).

i^;^

t[

^ ^.

T. 395,

P-34,(]^<::>(|^^^^,
house, tent, camp, station
;

M.515,

plur.
1

aamu
aamu
aam-t

t^
_ZI

'

waggon load of some


material.
^^'

U
'

f
f]

^
A A

^57. weapons.

I'

'^^

(]

^,

part a '^ P^""'

of ^^^'^ ^ the

body, bod

in-

testmes.

\^

-2^
,

the

name

of a celestial

city.

aam

aaaru(j^^^;^,
Aaru, Aarr
(]

reeds.

Aamit
u.

(][]-]^,
god
(?).

Asien
(]

E., p. 316, a

^^ ^ J^
Heb.

^ 2,

U.

598,

N. 964, the god of the Field

Aamit
Aanait
I

a goddess.

^
'
I

Rec.

2, 31, a EToddess.

lion;

^N
\>
I

aaneb

L.D.

Ill, 65A,

15;

aaraar
\>
I

Anastasi
1^1

I,

23, 9, hero

compare Heb.
2.

/N''1^5.

Rec. 36, 199, axe, battle-axe.

'^^'

kind of

bird.

aar-t
forms, transformations.

[1

d
Yj.
,

'

ditch

Copt.

eToop.

^arr-t, aarrut
|)

^^

p(~,
plur.

(]

aar
aar
misery.

tress,

lock of hair.

^^,

vine; Copt.

eXooXe;

(]

(|

T'
.

^T

"^'

'^"

(Saite), 125, 43.

aarat iXoXi, eXeooXe;


vine of the god.

(]

"^^ 2,
I)

to plant;

see

^j^V^,

p. 292,

the

Aarait
<E>beans, berries
(?).

Q
I
I

'M'^^Sx'
h

Uraeus-goddess.

aartiar
I

a kind of bird. B 3

m
l\

22

aakh-t
2, 8,

TtTtT

liM,

"

-^

1,

Amen.
t'xei,

6,

water plants; Heb. ini^, Gr.

Copt.

mourning, a cry of

grief.

aahau
aahar
(I

h
^
I

"^TD
^

"^ ,^,
made

feeble, weak.

aakhkh

(|

"^

'J,',

neck, sinews

(?)

hut, tent
tents

aakhkh

I]

"^Jo.

"ight; van

||

^.
14th

\>

rO

vhr}'Vi'.

of camels' hair;

Aakhabit|)^"^J|j(];|,B.D.
145,
(Saite)
14,

Heb.

52,

goddess of the

aahem 0'^ m
1

_M^

'

an ingredient in mcense.

Pylon.

aakhu-t "^^
aakhu[it]

Hi

L.D. HI, 140c,

fire.

ra5^(v.(|S^,q.y),B.B.
78, 25, 26, a fighting

'^

l](j

'^'

"'g^^'

god

in the Tuat.

evening; Copt. enfcgH.

aah
^^'^

(1

"^K

Y,

to set, to place.

Aakhuait
I'uat
I,

^^^1)1)^,
one of the
tv,'elve

^
to

i\\h-

IMl'

"\:s.

goddess-guides of Af.

aakhu
(]

(|

'^,
'^'-

N. 112, 124,
[|

^,

T. 292,

"^^[j^'
2,

399> Rfcc. 31, 17,

'^,
I
J

p.

be bright, be
fine,

1,
I

p.

200, N. 936, an ancient SAd^ni god,

shine, to
cellent,

splendid, glorious, ex-

"Head
I

of the

Land

of the Bow,"

([[h Ij

(1

'=^^

good, to

useful, to recite formulae.

(Nubia);

varr.

"^

| P

^.

? 668,

aakhu-t "^^
nich
Stele

A.Z. 1904, 143, Metter-

107,

'^^

Dream

Stele

7,

aakhi
()

^|l^

I),

T. 227,
[j

^IjM

ijfl'

I
thing which
is

li'

any-

beneficial, good, splendid, benefit,

485, 617,

M.

694, N. 1297, to flourish, to burst

strength, protection, advantage, credit,

renown

into flower, to bloom.

aakhi
iakh-t

i]

^
files'

Mil. {i^ jy=b'

* ^'^' ' '"'^^'1' '

"^Jl^?' 1^

IV, 890;

'0'
'
I

excellent
hearted.

mundate.

Aakhu-menu
a building of

l^, ]Mo, Hil^, Hil'^o

odd'
Thothmes HI.

TTtl,
TiTiT

^"^ BM,

A.Z. 1904, 89, 147

Mm^'

'h^

season of the Egyptian year


(July 20-Nov. 15).

Sli
I

i'

Ombos I, 90, goddess Aakhit(?) V / Mil", Qjijjjj, ji^g fj^g^ season


,
I

words

of power, protective formulae, spells

aakh

"^

MtT

"'^^^.

M.

684, pond, lake


,

Thes.

295, the magical formulae of

Thoth

largecanal;plur.
P. 123,

||'^%1^, i|'^llli2%;

N. 1040.

\tl

^
I I

D
,

magical words.

; ,

'

fl

[23]
I)

aakhu

"^(j^, U.

622, P. 237,

Aakhu-nekhekh
(]

^^

^\

^,

^|. ^^||..v,,^|,|,
,,

Denderah

II, 10,

one of the 36 Dekans.


a singing

Aakhu-ra '^^^'JuatXII

Jy

dawn-god.

A.Z.

1900,

129, glorious

light,

splendour,

Aakhu-heri-ab-He-t-ashemu

S %>

radiance,
acts,

brilliance,

deeds,

splendid
benefits

virtues,

excellences,

blessings,

and 148, the rudder of the eastern heaven.

aakhu-t

^
"
i.e.,

Aakhu-heri-ab,etc.j|^^|y_
^\!1

^ ^^^ priestess "l\'''lf,

oftheNomeProsopites.
Rec.
27,

aakhut
beings of light,

S^^Jjl,

219,

Light-god

in the

temple of the gods.

wise, instructed folk.

Aakhu-hetch-t
IV,
2,

'^

A,

Cairo Pap.

Aakhu
p. 447,

H,

Rec. 27, 59,


I]

(JS^ 8
.

god

of the dead.

N. 656, 662,

'^^ ^

Aakhu-kheper-ur
B.D. 162,
7,

Rec. 30,
the body of

(?)
in

1|

[^

>

Ra

An.
l

Aakhu-Sa-ta-f
IV, 60, a warrior-god.

m ^

^n,

Denderah

^1|, 1^,

Pap. 30.4,65,

^-g
i.e.,

aakhu
spirit;

to be or

become a
6,

^^

Hh. 561, the Light-god


Rec. 31,
13, the

(|

Great Light,

^^I
the sun.

'^ ^
;

U'^3::*
|
(I
,

^
|

B.D.

9,

"I am
having
|
|

a spirit "

'^^
;

endowed with

spirit,

aakhu-t

T- 251, 321,

become a spirit
Rec. 33, 30.

see

'^,

i^

u.440,'^
<E^,

^^, m ^
fiery

<s-, the Eye of

Ra

or

Horus,

the fiery light of the sun, a flame-goddess, the

uraeus on Pharaoh's crown, the


]

name

of

spirit-soul of a

god or man

'^^
a

t
^_^

a crown

the uraei

on the royal
Rec.
32,

182;

^^ '^J'

damned

soul.

^^^^ aakhu-ti 'fe^

Pap. 3024,4; piur.

'^

(|

%,,P.

<E>-'
the

"^^4:o'
'-'

-CS>-'

Itl

Jl' ^f^
i.e.,

V^

-^^^o,
1'

M.

268, 270,

^ ^^ ^,

712, N. 1367,

the two eyes of Horus or Ra,

the sun and

N. 888,

moon.

'^%.'^,N. 70,

Aakhu-t (^

y(,ananieofIsis-Sothis.

N.SSS,

^^l^'^j^.^JH
l',l'

Aakhuit
goddesses

'^ p.
light the

Tuat

I,

the fiery uraei-

who

way of Ra.

Aakhu
*:,

\^ *, 'l%l*.g^. e
,

Denderah

II,

i<

10,

one of the 36 Dekans; Gr. x"-

0.21
B 4

'

'

; ;

[24

A.Z. 1908,
spirits,

seven

spirits

of Sepa
II,

WMV.

fl

i'(2

III III III

IIS.
1

the

D.

149,

spirits

nine cubits high


the
ancestral

glorified spirits of the dead, the dead, the sainted


I

spirits

dead

Copt.

I^

aakhu-t
,

Q w
I,
111

(sic)

the
j I

primeval
spirits.

a female

spirit.

Aakhu VII

?|

,
I I

B.D.

17,
'

LI

aakhu aqer '^,


9i> 4
is

^
skill

87, 100-106, the seven guardian spirits of the

B.D.

body of

Osiris.

a spirit whose

mouth

Aakhu VIII S in
four sons

''^

""

iia' 11 11

Berg. "

I, 7,
'

the

able to recite spells with

and knowledge

and the

four grandsons of Horus.

<\^^\
B.D. 169,
15.

Aakhu-ami-Neta
P.

'^
,

""^
(|

41(]

'

7,M.

10,

aakhu aper '^^


Rubric, a
spirit

^ "d^

?^

||,

B.D. 91,
spells.

(J-j[-^[j
soul of Neta,
i.e.,

N. 114, the

spirit-

Osiris.

equipped with amulets and

aakhu ankh
65, 8, a living soul.

^^ T
I

Aakhu-akhmiu-seku

.B.D.
the the spirit-souls of the imperishable stars.
1

Aakhu
vX

'^^
,

B.D. 64,

21,

'spirit-souls of the

dead who numbered

4,
'

601, 200
=1
I

aakhu
"Spirit-soul,
Osiris.

%^^
Lord
37, 17, "

^'\^V
a
title

of Spirit-souls,"

of

Aakhu

^ Aakhu '^^^,
'

Berg.

I,

13,

ram-

headed god.

Denderah IV, 80;


(I

Aakhut-nebat
Q
Ijl
,

B.D. 149, the god of the sth Aat.

Nesi-Amsu

Flaming Eye,"

/.;.,

Aakhu

"^

J,

B.D.

I4SA,

the

the goddess Sekhmit.

[Aakhu]-neb-S

doorkeeper of the 17 th Pylon.

f'^^l

^~^. Den-

M Aakhui '^ AaKnui ^gl^q.

Tuat II, a god with two lotus sceptres.


(]'

derah IV, 84, the name of the loth Pylon.

Aakh-su-ash-mer-t-Uast

'^

aakhuti

'^'^
the two
c>

"jj

N. 760,
i.e.,

'^ ^
and
a

Q
M.
677,

f\

Lit.

90,

spirits,

Isis

Nephthys.

Theban god

(?)

Aakhuti'^

w,

P. 642,

^'^^^>
spirits.

Aakhu-Set-heru-kheru %. '^ '^


the spirits of Set, celestial and terrestrial.

t\

N. 1239, a pair of divine

'^'

Aakhu Aakhu

III'

Tuat VI, the spirit-souls of the gods of the Tuat.


,,

aakhu-t
U. 501,

T. 320,

'^

U.

70,

275, 527,

pQ^
^~~'
I

Rec. 31, 161,

T. 174, 289, 330, P. 120, M. 155, N. 109, 331, 719, the spirit-souls of the gods.

om' o
,

C3

C^, C^
'q
I

c.ir:D

Aakhu IV '^^ '\


3,

-^

"
, 1

the abode of the

Light-god or Sun-god, the


,

B.D. 96-97,
horizon
:

CiiO

the horizon of the sky

the

four

spirits

who
I !

follow the

Lord of
the horizon of

Things;

'^^^

'.'.'.'.

B.D.

Manu,

i.e.,

17, 87, the

III

c ca

000

the West.

fl

A
.wvn
|]

25

Aakhut-en-aten c^
II,

.^

Berg.

13, a title of

Nut.

"^^

Aas-t (Ast)

l^-~sl

Q
the goddess Isis

-H-0
'o'

C3

ww|0|,

Aasabatiu
eternal horizon, ?>., the tomb.

"V"
'o'

^ ^ "^

g>

},

Harris Pap.

I,

77, 3,

name

of a tribe or nation

" -'

fl.

^
C3

Aasakhr
Hittite goddess.

'~~^

*^

name

of a

CG r8n

the god

who

dwelleth in the horizon.

T. 340, N. 628, a region in the heaven of Ra.

aasb
(|

aakhutiu
,

. P- 357,

^
I

p
fl

the

name

of a game.

aasb
N. 1071,
i^ Ci

O"^ -M^
1

11^:,^ Jl

throne, seat;
'

com-

pare Heb.

Hyi^

Rec.

31,

171

aasr

<=p>

t^

tamarisk tree ; see

1,

c^
Aasten^^^^^^',
0"
i,

Berg,

r,

34,(1
16,
6,

^,

B.D.

18, G. I,

Nesi-Amsu

(]

c2

"^^""^
1 I I

C3 J) W r O
I

th*^

g"ds and beings of the

Jj'

"^ of 'he eight ape-gods of the com-

III'

kingdom of the Light-god.

pany of Thoth.

He

presided over the seven

Aakhu-t Khufu
__^

f^^^^] '^
^^^
i)
j

/\
n

, the name of the pyramid of Khufu. c^d anoUin'^n

aakhu-t sheta-t
r-TT-i "-^^

aash
1

"^
_ffi^

1:30

n^ "

the secret horizon, the

name

^ ^

'o
, '

"y out.
;

call, incite,

ask for

Copt. ujcy.

of a part of a temple.

aash-t

(11\^^4,cry.
(|

aakhu [^

Rec. 27, 86, a kind of fish.


I

Aasha
"the
crier,"

"^M >^, i^ iji^^ -^


i.e.,

aakhmt(?)^^^,'^^J,
^%^l]ll^,C;(](l-t,her1.,reed,

"roarer," a

name

of Set, or

-I,

Typhon,

jackal.

-Qii
"

Jj II111

plant, grass, vegetation.

Aasha ^^^T(TT%, ^V^Z^ a kind of dog

aakhu-t
"^

^
\,
,

J,

'^^,
>

Rec. .7, 86,


, ,

'^

"^
'

cs

soil,

>

ground, land, earth.


Suppi.
131, the of a cubit.

J^ ^^ aashata^^^](]^,akind_^of
aashaf
fj
,

or jackal

to

bum.

of

aakhu meh

'^
3

T^ n' _
,

name
A.Z.

aashata penu ^^^^T<T<!'^]


a plant,
rat's

(] 1

-^S- %^,

aakhu-t

^l^,
Pers.

1906, 114, sacred cow.

bane

"^

Jl

(?)

Aakhmansh
Achaemenes;
Beh.
I,

<t< yr fn

-fyr -<

f ^,
IU3C.

p.

182,

M.

256,
/)

6
(]

Gr. 'Axtufiemj^.

^^

N. 894, to enter;

see
;

aas

"^ n "^,
j\

to hasten

Copt, jhc,

y\'

aaq

h
1

"^f,
-M^
I

U- 283, N. 719-f

10, torule,

to govern.
los.s,

^^^fl^Pl.^Pig'!.""'-.;:

aaqu

(]

'^^ ^^,

want.

[26]
j\

aaq-t

''K

\^

leek,

onion

Copt. HX\,

Aaker
Aag-t

h h

%s S @
(]

a town in the Tuat.

AagU-t

iS.i\i\'
V\ "^,

^""'" " "

"
fl

"^ S
Nb^
! ,

seed of a plant.

III

aat

[1

^^,
[

to

fail,

be weak.
;

Rec. iQ, 02, seed of the same.

aat-t

aaqu ^'^^L^J,
62, to bastinade.

^'^'^^^^,

A.Z. 1874,

^ "^

V\ .mm

weaknesses, defects
^'' '^^' ^'"

var.

^^'

J""''-

Aaqetqet
(]

^
(]

\|

"^ "^ 5^
\1

>

b.d.

17, 102,

one of the seven

spirits

who guarded

S
injury, breach, stab.

the body of Osiris.

Aak 1)'^^/^.
man, senior;
plur.

A.Z. 1906, 122, old

"^ \j^\'
I,

^-^^

'

'J

Ni>^

' '

slaughter houses.

AakuH-^^^^l,

B.D.

(Saite) 28, 1,

>>Peasant 177,

a group of warrior-gods in the Tuat.

aat(?) ' '


II (I

resister.

^ ,L-^- "^' HOB,


fvA/i
,

deadly

Jf^

'

country.
i,

^,

mason, stonecutter;

plur.

(I

^^,

Aat

"^^ J|

Mar. Aby.

44, the god of

the block of the goddess Sekhemit.

Aat-urt

(j^^^^.
speech
(?)

1)'^^

T. 98, P. 813, M. 243, a sky-god.

aat
(]

^^d^,
"'

aatata
3,
1

n.
(1

I'l'^'

^^'^^'^

^^P12,

u)>,
[J (J

wailings,

mourning, mourners.

il, Anastasi IV,

2,

a kind of strong-smelling plant.

aatem
a weeping, mourning,

i^
h

^ ^ ^,
,
,

^"^^^ ^'^- "'

aateu u-^ awwv


woman;
plur.

jn; see disk of the sur

(I

||^J(j||^l|,

I)

-^

aatru
aath

stud bulls.
^^_^^^ ^=^'

III'
l\

Hh. 481,

to

lack.

A.kebi|)^j^q^,
the 75 forms of

fl^J
T"at

aathu(l^^^^^,Hh.555
places of slaughter,

Ra

aatha
(No. 29).

'

Aakebi[t]
(]

^^J ^ ^'
^''^^'

Anastasi
this?

I,

11, 2, 21, 5,
\>

what

is

compare Heb. n^t;?.

VIII, the

name

of a Circle,

aatha

^^
,
I

Amen.

15, 2,

Aaker

\^^^,

'^'

''-P'''

\>

?_fl'

tector of the dead.

18, 2, to seize.

[27]
aathamai
\>

(1

->^fl^.
\S:&\

dat-t h
aat-t, aati

^
\

Q
'

some strong-smelling
substance.
(]

Anastasi

I,

26, 8, part of a whip.

aatharaa-t
Anastasi
I,

(|^;^^,

18, 8,

neighbourhood

aathen
aat aat
(]'

.^^ u--nI '.waa

O
,

disk of the t sun.


,

J\
\\
,

T. 399, M. 409, to descend Rec. II, 71, mace(?)


to,

Mar. Karn. 53,

39; Amen.

4,

4,

21, 8, to vex, to injure, hurt, oppress,

be hostile

to be oppressed, desolate.

o
w
ent, hour.
'
1

aatU
(|

^
(|

""^^

Rec. 10, 61, A.Z.

1905, 16, foes, enemies.

aatua
6,
(j

"^^-f] ^^,

Israel Stele 17,

aat-t
Rec. 21,
field,

',

I]

v
n
plur.

Rec. 33,

to suffer, to be oppressed.

15,

ground, place, region,


(I

Aat|)^^^,T.239,(]
U. 419, the name of a sky-god.

meadow
(1

Ci

III'

aat-t

^^

^^!^

M
f]

Aat
Aata

"^ "^.

B-D.G.

78, a mythological locality,

marshy land, luxuriant meadow.

'(ji^, N.
P. 189,

908,

(j-^

aatutilV<x ^^'^
140B, Rec. 14, 97, pastures, cattle-runs. cattlf

M.

'

357, a lake in the Tuat in which the righteous bathed.

aatt-t

Ij^
I

^^.

stud
2, 8,

a goddess, a friend of Osiris.

cow

see

aatb
'](Sd|
,

^^J^'^U--vl

11

^^'=^

II

^-=^

aat' t-t(]

vine-land, vineyard.

Aaten
o aatu

the disk of the sun

see

aat
AAA/sA/\
'

(I

^^.
;

O
Copt.

some strong-smelling

iO

^JJJ^J

dew, mist, vapour, rain-storm, moisture, exudation ; Copt. eiCJOXG.

substance, dung(?)

eiTeit

^3
aat,aat-t(|^|),(]^^^,
(I

stud cattle, a yoke of beasts

Copt.

^^,

2/), child,

youth, young

man

aath

Q
1

"^^^
_S^
i^i^ig

#, swampy land, marsh,


papyrus swamp.
disk

A E

aatclin
,H
net,

'^ y o,
I

n-^ c:=s^^S
seal, a

n-n,,^

esse
;

= l\^ o

aamiu
(]

cord of a

ceremonial bandlet

plur.

aa, aai

(]

kinsfolk.

(|

a,

u. 95, N. 373,
q

/SAAA/V\
(]

III

Hh.381,

Aat-t
(j
"

^ ^3,B.D.

p;,

rr^5

/-^

AAAAAA

j53A,the

o
to wash, to bathe, to dip in water;

net of the Akeru A gods for snaring the souls of


the dead ;ad in the Tuat.

aat-t h
\

plague, disease.
I

epidemic.

Rec. 36, 162, indissoluble.


1
aai
washed
1

. .

[28]
iL^
www! (II
(or

A
aaa-t
h

Rec. 30, 218, something

*"^

<a, t. 15

Rec. 36, 162, things

washed away.

aaamesk
Aai
(]

J_^^[l]
fl

Hh.
I,

204,

aai-ha-t
Stales,
heart,
ij

aai-ab)
,

7^ '^

Israel

(](]

O. Tomb
(No. 55).

of Seti

one

j^
(J

Peasant 206, to wash the


gratify the

of the 75 forms of

Ra

i.e.,

to cool, to

mind, to be

aab |)__flJ|,U.507,ij-^J,T.32i,

appeased;

aww ^/

eiCA)

gjKX
fl
fl

aai-ab en aten
Rec.
15, 46, joy of

(]
,

AAAAAA AAAAAA

0"

o
^'^.
gold-

Ji

^^
JT^
1

approach, to come T. 366, ' towards, to meet.

Aten.

aaiu-nub
(]

^^
V\

U=/l
j

(1

^,

M.

127, to present a
(I

gift,

to

make

washer;

plur. H ^AAAAA
1

AAAA'VN _//

U^

nsn. L.D.
o o

III,

140C.

an

offering,

an offering;

awva, liba-

aai

(1

A t A jvwvAA '-^, AAA^W\


I

/I .

to remove, transport.

aa

[I
1

Amherst Pap.
AAAAAA AAA/W*

30, bowl, pot,

vessel ; plur.

(|

O
' I I

aab-t
^I

fl

fl

(3
J

TT,

offering;

plur.

aai

Rec.
/VAAAAA

14, 122,

tosport with,

to hold or treat lightly.

aa
aa-t

Asbi

11

lt7|](l=;,-'M.';~i<a
fl^
^^A^^^sAA

5^-55[

ubations.

i^^'

Lq.j>

U. 462, path, road,

direction.

aab

fl

to

comb.
73,

Mi

d/\,, U.
(]

562, p. 764,

M.

765,

aab fl^-f>,^^^-

'3,

measure

1-

'

rise, to

P. 65 8, to approach, go up to, to ascend, to reach up, to exalt ; Copt. iJXe


g

aa

h H

'-

T. 268, M. 427, grave, tomb,


sepulchre,

aab

fl

-"

monument.

aabb
aa

(|

j\, table of offerings. ^ J J ^, . Rhind


D

[]

^%,
M.
,

P. 65, 655,

u. 120,

(]

Pap. 32, scarab, beetle.

fl

aaper f|^|]|
aaf
out
oil

|' ^'^-462,

(j^^ol^

|j,

S^^^,
(1

760,
(j

|.

1)

^.

to equip, be equipped.

e^-)

l\ 11

flesh

and bone.

(1

(1

V=^
;

>

to squeeze, press
a

or wine, to wring

var.

L=3.

T. 343,

h
1

D%(],P.222,
_ZI
1

|]X^ 'WWVA
1

JT

^
I I

aam
aan

(|

d^,
;

U. 512, 633, T. 324, to


fl

swallow, to eat

see
to

^\

g5i, etc.

Berlin 2296, food, offerings, morning meal.

Aaau
ia-td

h
1

"^
l

^-DI I

"^^"^

S. 2.

the ape-gods who praised Ra.

so back, return

-wvw

Rec. 30, 187.

J_^](]^,

f^^=^^
(]

Mn

fl

U. 527, (\ZZ^,
ape;
plur.
fl

l\Z^^>

I]

T^'n,,

%W

Aa-t-nt-khert i\^
99, a part of the magical boat.

^,

b.d.

R66i,fl

fl ,P.

776,M.772,fln^^,

Rec. 31, 19; Copt. en.

1 1

fl

[29]
(]
1

aaan
aaani
Amen.

fl

ftA/S/W\

S^'
n

^'^^^ 3. 195. ape.

aarut VII
great Uraei.

^^h
'
,

c^
1 1

the seven

n r

w
a box of anti (myrrh).

17, 9, 22, ape.

Aarut

Hh. 376, the


^

Uraeus-god.
the serpent amulet,

aan

j]

aan
'I
a
I

7X^ %\

^,
r-

Peasant R. 186, h
;

AAAAAA
"
1

^^'

a..

a
",

A.Z. 1908, 16.


h

to utter cries of loy or sorrow o\v

/www var. '^

D
ci

Aar-t ankh-t
living Serpent-god.

:^ ?-, Tuat VIII, the

'

Jr

L.D.

Ill, 140, cries, outcries.

Aarut ankhut

!\:^mfZ\Setesh
h

aanu
aana |l"-^l],ape;see()^,
1

Tuat IV, the uraei who burnt up the souls and shadows of the dead.
(]1

AAAA/\A

A^A/W\

..^

\^-

Aar-t per-t

em

Aana
(I

q ~wwv, Juat II, the Ape-god; plur.


'

^n
Si
'^ J

N. 955, a serpent-goddess.
h

/www

'^ r^
"

"

They praised Ra daily at dawn,


and supported the Great

Aara-t heri ab he-t neter


v\'

^^ ^ D

and acted

as his guides,

Hand

(Tuat XI).
(1

B-D- 136, a uraeus-goddess.

Aanait

'w^ c^

W,
(J

aar
of the tk

(]^^|,
;

Hh.472,

Rec. 30, 195, ape-goddess.

(]^
;

spiked reeds

Copt. ^,pO,

i.pOOTe
cypress trees

Aana Tuati
forms of

"~^^

w^, one

aar

Copt.

(]

Ra

(No. 69).
(]-?; see h -^
?-.

i-pO.

aankh

aah
N. 551, the
living.

P. 279,

I]

J,

aankhu
^ar
[j

%^
(]

^
(]

^ ^ ^,

T. 365,

l\

,N. 1103,

(]Ji|(-,
o|

/\,
;

52, Hh.
5:$ ; Copt.

395, to

N. 944,
N.
1

(|

P. 203,
1)

approach, to ascend

see

^Xe.

104, h

aar-t
773,

^^770,

u. 470, 630,

p. 195, 660,

M. 369,

(j^iroi,

P- 260,

(|^^,
[I

<:::r>

snake, snake-goddess; plur.

<rr>

the moon, Moon-god; Copt. log^,

lOO^j lOIg,;

Heb.
U. 394,
T.
305. 320,
(|

n-(\
^

^^
J

fl^^
o

Aah meh Utchat

'(3

Quelques Pap. 41, the

full

moon.
Q^ei-

Aah her res-t


)

^
at

ques Pap. 47, the

moon

f" noon.

^^|

.
|

^^^-^M^S^Sl'^- 543.(1:
the two Uraei-goddesses, Isis

Aah Tehuti (Tchehuti) h


(?)

J"^

and Nephth) s
I

^^5,

Thoth the Moon-god.


(1
fl

aararut
01
/.
I

Do ^ o

aah

^:^ U.
,

2 14, to

break ground,

uraei, serpent-s.

to plough, to dig

up

earth.

'

[30]

aah.U ^?^

field labourer, peasant.

ai-t
crz2

house, palace.

aah-t

^^
(]

field.

Ait
fl^
,

Berg. II, 13, a

name of Nut.
a physician of

Aah-ur
225, the

_. I
I
n

name
l\

^^^
,

Rec. 26,

Ai-em-hetep
Memphis who was
of medicine

f|

^\

of a god.
D

kah

^=^ '^
| ^=^

to hold

back (?),

to

restrain (?);(]

<=>

^^
,

ing

he

is

deified and became the god and surgery and the art of embalmcalled the son of Ptah and was the

-==-,

third

member

of the triad of

Memphis;

Gr.

N. 764,

restrain thy tears.

Aah-rem-t
aah.

(^
X
(^ (^ (^

^^
>

"--"fi=f^?r"'t:tr
"tfiiq^.fifl^^Jfl^:^evil hap,
ill

Rec. 37, 63,

the " Drier of tears,"


(1

title

of a god.
limbs,

luck,

unlucky event, wrong,

injustice.

members,

flesh,

ai

<s<

Peasant 228, a kind offish.

aia

aash

flifl^

Rouge I.H.

pi.

159,
!

Rec.

4,

135,

{]

alas

2
Berlin 6910, to
cry out; see
C3S=]
,

Copt.

hail!

aui(?)
,

aash en ha-t

(1

/wwA '=^

.^

[]

Ijljs, certainly

(?)

pilot.

OCD,

aih (]^(](]U,IV,

772, aplant.

aaq
k

M.

728, T. 259, to enter; see

aikha(l(](l|^|e^
Rev. demon,
spirit
;

-k

aq
Copt.

I^.
-f]-,

ai
(l(l(]

= (j^, tobe
Berg. II, 409, change, transformation.
3,

aitenn

[1

(][]

a/^ ^

ground, earth.

aiu(?)(l(iq^{,
ai
(]

mud, dung; Copt,

eixen
pers. pron. ist

(](|

-<2>-,

Rec.

204, the evil eye(?).

au

ai ^|)(],P.i84, M.293, N.897,

^,^^,
come;

au

(]

v\, to be
,

the Pyramid Text variant

is

P. 164

= N.

859, and see U.

y\

^\

Qwl)^. ^fl^^'

to go, to

215, P. 652, 653, 654,

M.

438, 560, 755, 756,

758, 759, N. 941, 1048, 1167, 1376.

Coptei;5q,P.i37,
1
to

fi^H^. fi^
o, acommg;

au-t

(|

%>'^, P. 693

{l>is),

act of being.

au|)e,(l^,()^
all;

= er<
(]

>i()eA^'
,

come

|](5_^p=q,above;
()e

Nx^,

come, come!

^Ij^^f,,
1^

Rec.
^i,

^
^"''

Up

to,

until;

30, 187, comers, comings,

^,

^- '^'

-^ '^ ^
;

backwards, behind;
^^^ ^'^^^
^''

^;
Copt, e^^.2^o^f
shall

those

who

come,
Copt,

"-fill
Mu-her-sa

i.e.,
I

posterity.

e T-fie

(]

round, to circumvent.

Rev., aussi bien qu'i.

^ ^ "^ ^-'
through the serpent
re-born daily.

f-

(](]

,^,

"d",

Thes

Au

(]%>, Tuat XII, one of the 12 gods


the Boat of

who come
posterity.

who towed

Ra

Ankh-neteru, and

who were

'

[31]
Au-ankhiu-f l\\
one of the 12 gods
re-born daily.

'

'

'

Tuat xii,

au

who towed

the Boat of

Ra
g?l
I

^Wf,
,

N. 760,

^^,

through the serpent Ankh-neteru, and

who were
to cry out, cry, outcry, wail.

Au

|]

%>

^%,

Mar. Aby.

I,

44, a god.

auau

Au(]|>=]|,Berg.I,

^^ ^^
(?)

cry, outcry, wail.

..,_.^80d^wi,h

311, a group
I

of divine beings.

praise.

Au-qau (?)
the

S^

I'

name

of a god.

^^

M.

374,

auau
au au
(J
1

0=0

Rev., bread, cake.

(|

%
^

y^

U. 220,

1]

^ ^.

P- 212. 6i9>

^ ^ 4dog, jackal
;

^^
''^^plur.

-^,
'''

Mar. Karn. 53,

23,

^'''^\^'
,
|

N. 759, 1303, N. 1286,

(]

^,

T. 189, P. 676

()

(|(]^,

7^^, Ti^A,

-^y^,(]7^,|)]^,
Stele of Herusatef,

aU-t ....

^ ^^ ^^
||||
j

[1

U. 605

|)7\%>
73,

,|]7^^7\^,
(je'j^,

au 1^,
:

100, 106,

1]^

j\,

Rev. 12, Rev.


(]

S^^^, 2:^(2^, ^

25>

fl^|;J^'
come,

Rev. 12, 17,

(]s|^.
;

AAAAAA AAftAAA

14, 21, to

to go; Copt. 61

(j

^ ^,
au
(|

sticker;

^
r?)

those
()(] |^|,

who

cut;

^^^^^^ aaaa/v\

,^,_,-T.233;
=
Q
it

y^
r\

AAAAAA

A^^^

hath gone out in peace; explicit


liber.

river, strearHj

aui aui
j\
,

^^

Rec. 32, 177, comer, leader.

'^-^^^JrX'www'

to wet.

auiu
7\ 7\

au7^
AAAAAA
|,
I

Rec. 35, 138,

7\^",

7\^
filthy one.

S;S\

/wvsAA (VySAAA
,

Jour. As,

passengers, passers, comers, goers.

1908, 261, foul or Stinking water; ^rj^

_n

Jl
7^
AAA/w\
[I

errand, embassy.

au, au-t

^ ^, ^
sin,

Jg,

^
c^
I

au-t en athen
of the solar disk.

AAAAw

tlic

course

goose pens,
I'ght,

aviaries.

^^q3; y^^^,
harm,

wrong, calamity, crime,

disaster, deceit, evil, disgrace, ofTence, ill-luck,

auu

(for

aur?) (]%>

|j(>

brilliance,

injury, wickedness.

radiance; compare Heb. Ili^-

aui-tl^Y'flfl^'^
Peasant 264,

Rec. 32, 78,

1^ |g=^,
o ^^,
:

R-^^- ^4. ^9, chijd,

aU-t "^^^

Rev.
,

II, 60, posterity. 13, 14, growth.

au-tu

^W\\
autiu

1:^^^ .^
I

,
|

sin, sinful

ones.

%^

IJfj

^^I

Rev.

5^

j.

Rev.

6,

156,

foul ones, a group of gods in the Tuat.

11

[32]
(|

1
old
ancestors.

au
M.

l^^s^, M. 556, ^^^g*s,


1]

57,

()(]

^^,

P,

390, 400,

1^ ^
644,

(jljs^, N.

1177,

(]^C=d|](],P.

M.
-

girl,

maiden.
2s;s,

auaa
>t2k;

M^

\\

!,

^, ;=, ^^ ^, 'LtTht-iL %. e
"^

I, R.E. ,L_=ilSi |39, farmers, husbandmen; Copt, oifoei.

3,

.1;a :=^,

^^v8\ shipwrecked
sailor.

auaa
Jour.

^fll\<^r^, ^(^l\^,
1908,
285,

au |)^c=3,
679, nest, home.

M.

201,

()^^.

N.

As.

Rev.

14,

52,

pledge,

guarantee.

tail i(5(jl|

^, &^, &>
%^
v\

auai

i)

-f]

"^ ^^
(jl)

f^^'

oof{?)

abode, house, court, temple, shrine, quarter of a


town, camp, cattle-pen; plur.
(1(^

Auai
(j

^'^

Tomb of Seti

I,

one of the 75 forms of

Ra

(No. 60).

au arpi %s\ cr^


14, 67,

(|

^
''^"'^' '^'Snity.

),

Rev.

1lS,.1f]1^11=,-^>---

wine shop, tavern.

aUU-t
(|

^ "^ Y

^ lifll^k-^S-ofpS
A.-if(JO.

'

auag
(|

^ rH

1^'

^ "^
I

^
(3 (1

N. 997,

to flow(?)

animals, cattle, sheep

and

goats,

III'

herds.

auata, auat S^s^-f]] (j^


between; Copt.

-f]' 7\

OTXe.
,

aua

^^

to

be conceived

= S^A

aur.

aua S?^e
285,

tv]^^
.,
,

^'

^^^'

''^^'

'^^'

^:^
;

"2

1]

r.

to take in pledge, to
to

commit

violence

with s^p*

be wearied or annoyed

^^

I,

Rec. 29, 148.

Aua-en-Geb
()

f]

Copt,

^.o'f (A3,

(Tii-onrco.
,

"^ J 5^

auau-t^^e(|% ^

chamber, abode (?)

E.D. 125,

III, 30,

name

of the threshold of the

Hall of Maati.

au.An(?)1^^7f,^-^^'^'te:

aua(]^^^,
Auai]f]^ss*V
,

P. 366,

(j^^,

roads. ''"r-^

p. 581, 604, 621,

N. 429,

T. 372,
(]

(l^^^^"^'

^, P- 366,

^\t,^\
joint, carcase.

a kind of

fish.

1'
I

P o '^^Jr'^' the body,

fl

[33]
auaa

&^

gazelle, a

horned animal.
ring, bracelet (?)

'^' '^'
'|3
,

auau

flesh

and bone,

joint.

auauit

^^ ^
(?)

a^ O
a

^ OO ^ ^
L-D.
joint,

'

Rec.

2,

auau
(j

^^^^>

III, dogs, jackals

N. 429, 1079,

divine flesh, the god's body.

auaft(?) ^ '
auar-t
h

S:^^^,
ac=^

Ill,

229c,

Suppl. 514

%\

^^ ^Si,
Rev.
II,

haunch.

aui (]%(](],

140,01; Copt. eie.

aui

I]

(](]

^s, p. 400
(|(|

=
(]

S^ ^^s^,
sailor.

^ -S.
inheritor;

S3:,
plur

[^ ^, ^

'^\
S^
o

^^
^^
heir.

heir,

M.

57,

S^ ^

a^,
'

N. 1177,

auiu
!'

aui
(]

% ^

()

f%

>

Israel Stele 10, old

men.
(?)

c=:3

M
(j(]

P. 644, to repulse

geny, posterity

]^

male

aui-ha-t
1=

^
(3
(j (j

-C, Rev. 13,


2,

7,

S^c^

(]l|

auaau S^S^^li^
spring (of animals).

j,

Rec

27, 85, off-

^^
aui

Rev.

13,

to

be

patient,

long-

auaau

aSs

]
I

Rec. 21, 15,


heirs.

g^
[I

"^

Miss.

1 3, 1 2 7,

a plant

(?)

aua-t %:^

^^\

'

Rs'^-

30,

196,

aui-t

(1(1

.^, grain measure.

Auirna-t
(]

^ ^'^o ^, Rec
i](|

6, 6,

the

name
e

Irene.

auisu '&^
(3

pouch

Copt.

W
,

<LcioTri.

aub-t
tance.

(|

s J
(]

cake, bread.

Auuba

Aua-ua 2:^
the

Rec. 31, 24,


(?)

^^ ^^
^~^

B.D. 168, a god'


|],

who bestowed peace on

the dead.

"One

Heir," the

name

of a god
1
1

auai

t^^.
(]

aub-t (j(2j^,,,.net.

Stat. Taf.

aubku

10.^

^i^'I^e*---

'3,

i6r,^
l,S^
I'

(1^1

^,

to

weep; see

\,^
I

'I'

^up

\\

H,,Rec. 27, 204,

S^"^
I

^ ^^
(]

to

open

see

up \/

Aup-ur

^^^

>

'-i

god.

auputi (]J/y^,lj

V^TS^.IjV
plur.

S^^ii-^llll^^i^i.acompany
of serfs or slaves, a body of soldiers, any group of men, civil or military, bodyguard, troop.

to recompense.

^^^\-^,&^\ L^
aua-t S-a-^, "^^^Q n'
^^''

(1

\J

V^

A W^, envoy, messenger;

to reward.

'^' chamber, abode, house.

'

'

A
^

[34]
aun-ra
mony
of

Aupasut
J\

\
j I

^^^ \i\--\
P
2,

(]

Hr

to perform the cere-

of opening the

mouth

(1

t"

t^ ^
t:i> El

B.D. 112,

a group of gods

Anep.
,P.S.B. 13, 112

aupen(|'^
auf

(]

aun her
.

(]

^, N.
i.e.,

482,

-=f I

^.

N. 145, to open the

face,

show oneself; Copt.

^iflM^i^ftm e
1^

ofcong,.

aun gra
inner chamber.

^. Rev.

12,

117,

S^ 2^
AA/NAAA

fl^r-fl
S
1 "uz:^

flesh,
III

meat, body, carcase

^
/]

devouring, consuming,

consumed

Copt. i.q, i.qo'if I.

aunn-t S;s^^, a.z.

1872, 37,

Auf Auf
Aufa

H
(1

"^ Jr

1
I

-^
'

^^'"g-

34, a dogheaded ape-god.


I'

Ml,

Denderah

2,

49, a frog-

faced ape-god,

ojg^^Q 1

S^ V !^^' shrine, sanctuary, part courts. of a temple g^ V\ ~^


&^
) ;

/WWW

plur.

halls,

%^_ Jl

'^,
I

U- 533, the nanie


of a serpenl-god.

aun

I]

-^^^ >ta, with


,

A.Z. 51, 72,

aufta-t
\
I)

^'^lljo^^,^^
leaves, plants, a

cabin of a ship or boat.

!\

foliage,

kind of grain

aunll^a, ll^^e.
I

(]^^:^.
,

III'

compare Heb.

Q'^NSDJ^, Syr.

AiSQi.
1

auma, aumat S=^3, ^3a


I

AAAyWN III

AAT^AA

fl

Dion

Rec.

15, 19,

^^ -^^ e _M Q
aiLiaan

"=t^ "tCl'
;

1'^ality, characteristic,

manner,

part of a waggon. ^ ^^

colour, pigment

Copt. ^OTT^rt.
,

III

(amn)

s
I I I 1

aun
'^^
A/VSAAA

(1

-^^
'

disposition,

nature;

III

I <

SOO'^

"''

kindly disposition.

>

juuuLon.
S
(3
'

Copt. i.o-)fem,

i.Tem.

aumi

(I

V:>

n n

SZ,

fear,

awe, reverence,

aumer

aunnu|1^^7^^,P.8,^
34

ll^^l)(J3S,W5rt.

^, T.
nest,

171,

M.
S=;s;
AA/WV\

151,

^ ^,
,

N. 106, abode,
376.

home;

^^ "^=f, T.
R.E.

(]

if)

^,

(]

^ I -

/WWV\
,

A.Z. 1879, 51. 1904,

auna

Rec. 21,88,2:3^
6, 39,

^48, 1905, 86, IV, 65, loi, 157, 348, 693, 808,
973, 1079, Thes. 1281, 1282, 1483
j5i,

S^
;

(1

'^ +
f,

Anastasi

1,

13,

i,

to decree, proclaim (?),

self-evident, obvious, not to

be gainsaid.
.

cry,

assuredly, certainly, in truth

aunn (ann) ~vwva,


|l

[l

-wwv.^ y^^

Q^p^

JSi compare i-

fl

^, ^'

Copt. A.tt ; A.Z. 1905, loi, Bd. 41,


i3ofif,

Suppl., 509.

i.non.

_ _

fV ""^

Tuat XI, a form

^un(l-f,P.2i4,(l^U.6oi,(] -f
I

^^^^^fi)l^Ii:^'^''ofthegodAf.
i,

A/SAAAA

AA/A^A

AV\/WA
;

'1'.

201, to open, to

make

to

be open

aunit
,?

see

^^

^^ TT ^
Hi]

qi]

,'J--i^-

ni,65A,

14,

Rec.

27,

225,

CT]'

inner chaniljer, sanctuary.

[35]
aur
1]

~vwv,(]

v\
(1

stream, canal,

Aimut
31, 173, a

group of divine beings

&> ^ ^ ^ ^^ '^,

^I
(?)

"I.

R-

river,

arm

of the Nile; see

\\

Copt, eiepo, eioop, Heb.

"iN"!.

aur-aa
fl

(0

^^/^A^^

A
,

AAAA^

" great nver

var.

aunk
cinal plant.

var.

ff

AAA^

vS[,

a medi-

AA/SA/SA

the Canopic

arm of the Nile.

aur-t aur-

aur
(j

57S> 691,

(]

^, S^ ^, NP. 98,

(j,

u. 198,

I)

^,

1]

P.

AAAAAA A/WVAA AAAAAA

AAAAAA AAAAAA ^^^AAA

(]

^<=>,

^> S^ 2, N.
700,

M. 68, N. 49,
750, to con-

Aurauaaqrsanq Rabati

S:;^^

p -Sas

ceive,
P. 221

be pregnant,
;

;a

,,

(|^

,,

>

T- 342,

B.P. 162, a

name

of Par, a form of Ra.

compare Heb. 1^17


:

L^t^r forms are

aureh

S9s^<::2s.|c

open space, area

the following

'^^^'^^'
aurekhu
(]

Copt. o-ifpe&.

^^^ ^
;

j-

iv, 481,

men who know,

the learned

a/

#
riJ!

aurtchaau
,

h
1

2i

i'-'\^
^f-Sl

Koller Pap. 4,

4, staves.

ra

2^

-^
I

to

conceive, be pregnant;

ra

j^L/l'
be loaded, bear,
,

to load,

carry.

tions (?) Copt.

(JUIO.

ra

auh-t
(j

^^
h
(2

ra

speech

(?)

auhamu
Ost. No. 6

e X
,

Theban

ra
*^^ j7
!'

d-i^

333> N. 703, the child conceived, pregnant goddess or woman.


(;^

auht-t

ra

'^i
I

a medicinal

wood

or

bark.

auru
aurit

%a ^='

Vir J)

'

>

human beings.

Auhet
(]

S^

e
AAAAAA AAAAAA AAAAAA

ra

^rSi

Si

a god of the Tuat.

KeC. 30,217,:;5;

A^^NAAA

AV\AAA

AWAAA

AAAAAA AAAAAA AAAAAA


AAAAAA AAAAAA r /VWAAA *^

^
s:

beans, Syrian

O
/I

000
;

-*?

beans

Copt. A.p(JO.

^
to separate
(?)

A/V\AAA

^-

AAAAAA

_^

^(*

aur
see
(j

^
(j

^7^, (|^<c=.^y^, schoenus;


to inundate, to flood, to steep or soak in water,

"^^, aur-t (ater-t?) ^ ' D^ T<=>^ n

tomb, place
of
rest.

to moisten, to sprinkle, to shower, to

pour out

a libation.
c
2

11

[36

auh-t

^
7\

^^ I ^
j"
, ,

lotion, liquid, flood.

Ausars (Asares)
Amsu
28, 21, Osiris; see

(1

"^^^ eH
J], Asar.

Nes

auhu &?^

to lament. t c"' ^"'^y; '


set free.

r(

^ \. ;a ^, auh So. '^"^ ^ w


'(>
.
.

Ausasit

A %. n *-=> "^

y\

Auhu

divine

name

of

magical power.

Auhu-t (Auhit)
a goddess of Philae
;

^" J,
J)
,

E.D.G. 292,
Metternich

Nesi-Amsu
HarrisT,

25, 22,
"

Hymn of Darius, 3i,7\


I

t-,
<^_

pi.

i,

a consort

of

Temu

of

Anu

2i;5\ /vwwv

Stele 189, the female counterpart of

Un-Nefer

and mother of Horus.

auhu

^^

(2

fi

(2

,akindofgrainorseed.

aUSU

S:^^

auhal^;^f>
auhnu(?)2^|
Au-her-aptes
god with a
lasso

X
L=fl'

Suppl. 513.
16, B.

^ ^
],

s..-^,

Peasant

148,

^
H
'

P.

1 1

20
a small pair of scales held in the hand.

(]

^, Tuat

v, a

who destroyed

the dead.

ausem
ausekh

S^s;

^\ ^|

Rev., to prevent, to obstruct.


,

iukhekh
"^^^
'

H^J^.Ij^J^^.
"'S*^^'

(1

darkness. V aukhemu(|^^^;^,iv,48o;
'

%> "J~ \.

to

reap;

see

seekhemu0^^;^.
Aukhemu urtu
Ma,. Aby.
I,
(1

pottage, aushesh&?\m.grs,%^, (T=r) ^^^ 000


(g

_R

plaster,

cake

Copt. OOTCy.

%
(|

_n111'

auqet

fl

'^

'^
I
I

'^^'^^ "^e*^
,
I

'"

""

'^^"

8,

,o,

^^
"^

-JU.
^ ^
^

Ci

ratory.

Auqau
a

S^ ^ ^

M.

374, N. 943,

name

of the divine ferryman.


I'-i^-iii, 219K.

the stars that

do not

rest.

Aukhemu-seku

(|

^
(]

aukiu
'^ "^
17,

(l^'==^(](j^]'
(.')

quarrymen

Auker
Mar. Aby.
I, 8, 90,

\\ ^^,

'I'omb of

Rameses IV,

the stars that never perish.

30,

the god

who

bears on his back the solar


in the

Aukhemu-pen-hesb (?)
tk -A-_2r
I

%i

O
www
.'<-

a
iU
(]
'

disk,

which is held in position by ropes hands of Nari, Khessi, Atti and Rekhsi.

'

B.D. 189, 15, etc., a group of divine beings.


!\

aukherru (?)
aus

^^.2^^ ^ ^.
14,

Auger-t Augertt (0 fl Q '^ ZS H JT <=> err:


(]

%v.
^
'

Z5

r^r\^
,

<=.

fl

name

of the

'

Other World.

Augeru

^Aus-t ^P^
(]
1]

P.S.B.

237, 3rd pers.


;

O^ ^
(]

r||

l.thegodsofAugert.

sing. fern.

Copt. ec.
II, 16, Isis

Augerit

fj.

Mar. Aby.

\^ ^

^,
h

R-i^- 64,

u,

goddess of the Tuat of Anu.

Augerit-khenti-asts
AA/WVA
I

<~> m.

^^

aUS(as) (jsP'^
I

Rev.

14, 18, a

perfume.

B.D. 141, 18, 48, one of the seven Divine Cows.

fl

[37]
^^^-

t\

aut /l^vll H Jr 0'

"'

'43.

who, which; Copt. ex.

autcheb
1]

'^^^,

river

banks; see

utcheb,
I

=3.
= ^,
T. 394,
-O"0-

ab
(]

J 0-, M. 407
no,

J,
M.
172,

U.

16, 451, P.

369, 653, 654, 833,


;

who, or what,

754, 757, 759, N. 690, 1145


is

plur.

not, without, lacking; Copt.

aut

^
;

^JT.

||J

^ O O"
'^ '^

e]

ys. Rev.

.i, i86,

g^ ^,
^-

T.i8r,P,2O4,y^'^,Rec.3i,28;"0-_^^
heartofthesoul, Rec. 32, 79;c^^'^c:

Rev.

4, 74,

between

Copt,

onrxe.

N. 27, the dictates of the heart


desire,

au-ti
ing,

^ ^,
plur.
1]

^^
:

'^, heart's

Rec. 29, 157, 158, swath-

U. 629.

Later forms are

bandage

S^A
(jfj

Auti

^\

^^^
?
2i;^
i,

^, Tomb
AAAAAA

of Seti

I,

one of the 75 forms of Ra.


axiX611"'t ^rji
I,
'wv^AA
^

middle, interior, sense, wisdom, understanding,


intelligence,

attention,

intention,

Mar Aby
^v^m
(g

disposition
lust,

manner,
. '

will,

wish, desire, mind, courage,

6,

31, Anastasi Pap.


15,

26,

i,

^:^

D Q

Rec. 21,

ground, dust, earth, dung; Copt.

self;plur.'^^,'0'oV^|,-&|,>0>'&>&,^^| III' ^ err I' r I' OO''

eixrt.

authth
a^t

S^ ^^^ ^
.

fl

III'

Rev.

13, 3,

between

O
I

Stunden 109;

"O-O
gladness;

Heb. 3,7

'O

m'

Copt.

oTxe.
;

.=i:= joy,

S:^:^

Rec. 21, 98, between

Copt.

to eat the heart,

i.e.,

be sorry;
'

%> ^^

ll

"^
I

"^^

'

in

charge

dense of heart
of.

'

^
'

y ^,

everybody.

Rec. 33, 7;

^V
O"

'?' thoughts, inten

Thes.^96,%.^,S^^^,|^A,
^=^
_^
.

tions

y -=^

^
"^
%:^

heart of

my heart,

N. 350,

S^ ^ c^3 1 A
^^,

to separate, to re-

ab en Ra
nameof Thoth,
'0'

^ J, "heart
14, 18, a god.

of Ra," a
'^'

move, to divide,
to lead astray.

to travel through

^^j^ v\

J -wwv,^ J, ^^^-

auten-t S;a

^^ %. ^^ %
-wv-aa

"*,

Ab ^
4b Y
'^
,

Amen.

the amulet of the heart

plur.

dust, ground, earth


9,

g-j,

Amen.

'& O"
I

'"^
ra
'0'
I

'0'
I

III

20,

dung.

autenb

a %> ^"^^

| , incense

ab-ab
(?)

^
ill
,

O
I

O ^ Rec ^'
I

heart of carnelian.
27, 182.

image,

statue (?)
I'hes.
1

autchamana(?)^|^|^
^.A't.
K. 206

ab-t

w
<Acj^

tr-D

||J

i^T]

296, h

cr^, middle room

of a house, cabinet.

autchu
N. 1276,
(1

I]

%,

i*-

146,

672, M. 661,

ab-t
(]

bread, cake; plur. '0 %>(?)

V:^n-Q-,, p. 672, to

make an order
IV,
1

or decree, to give a

command.

131, calf.

c 3

[38]
fl

Anastasi

I,

24,

8,

Feasant B.

2,

117,

to think,

^^:,.->,.a.b.*i',*ory,*ri'. var. aab, tK


;

to suppose, to imagine, to let the fancy run free.


tt;

^>

to dance.

4bau,4bay/J,^^,y^

y MOV - y 1.QM'
^-

Copt. eiE.e Arab. ^-^J

(]

j S, Rec.

N.
26, 78,
1]

1 1

80,

dance [of the god].


[1

J
*'

O
-

abau
man;
var.

*b.tyg,u..,..y^.y^

AAAArtA

J /^ ^ ^, ^. f f J
f^

dancer,

dancing
^''"''

Ahti
||
,

H
thirst.

H^

t mT
(]

Tuat
'

I,

who sang

a -'dancer "-god before Ra.

ab-t

rbyj,T.33^jji.yjt,
N. 622,

(]

J|,
J
Ci
,

J^|(?)sistrum(?)
sceptre; var.
1]

ab-t

(1

J J

^^ ^^ ^.
man.

to be thirsty.

ab
(j

(?)

"^,

a spice offering

Peasant B.

2,

118, thirsty

byt^,y^,t.y^?,.

Ab
()

J
{]

"^, U.

539, T. 296, vases.

y^^^i-^'y^:'y
V\
,

ab
ab-t

^^S^, to mix.
','

a kind of seed, or plant, used in medicine,

lettuce; Copt. I'easant 130,

1UJ&
'III'

(?)

i)

J <^ ^ ^

(jj

,^,

^ T"

179
f\ \1

y^".y^=-u^
(]

Ol'iMl^iir
nrirlrl

tk

\Tt

tk

<"'"'

of the South and North.

abu(?)y^.oo.,U.336,e>:credons,
ab-t
see
/
1

Rec.3.s..yqqOJJQ'T^
J^t^n,
'

(1

something pure or holy

Rec. 26,

8,

(]J%^c^
cave,

w^^^

"-"

C^
or M

a walled enclosure, place of pro


restraint,

ab
tion
;

\\

'

>

to cease, to stop, cessa-

tection

of

abode,

strong
var.

building, asylum, re.st-house.

"^J

.A

'^J
!'

"I^ ^^.
579, path, road(?)

ab

(fc^
if

pegs or stakes of a net

ab-t
(]

J ^ 5^.
^

or snare

var.

{\^
j

ab.ty:=(j==j=.
Rec.

Abb
ab

yj^:,?-i.;
J

Ab-ti

y ^^

'

a goddess.

30, 68, ropes of the magical boat.

fl

A,

draughtsman.

Aba(]^, |j^,(]^^.T.35o,
p. 74, 109, N. 109, 973, to

tb.4bay^fl^, N.,,y

endow with

soul, to

make

strong or courageous, to be filled with

^fl.y^Ty'-'W'yi:'

soul or strength.

[39]
abu

fl

aba

HJ ^'
fl
11

^
()

P- 1*^5,

M.
T-

317, N. 821, to

open.
18-'.

yvf'O^if
B.D. 42,
3,

a tree sacred
to Horus.

aba, abaa
N. 653,
(]

J^"^. J c*^, M. 164


Ij

^'^>
0, P. 527,
f\

J c^
[(] (]]

to marvel.

Abait

^ "^

^ '^'

iu\'

a god or goddess of the Block in the Tuat.

si
ness or disease.

y(](]o^,fJI)(lI^,B.D.76,.,i4o
(Saite), the

^O
"^5,

a sick-

Mantis that guided the deceased.

abem
1]

J^^(|

^e*^-

abm[er]-t
Hh.
744, P.S.B. 14, 400, part of a rudder.

|;^
(3|||.

|^,

grave, tomb.

abain
(j

^
h
,

Iji)

^^.

Rev.

13,

8,

wretched man, poor; Copt. eJS.IHIt.

15, J-^j3 A n ^ yo^,>Rec.x5,r99,y%,^^.


[]
f\

abn

Harris

I,

63c,

n AAA/W. O

AA/SAAA

alum

Copt. ujfi.ert.

tk _^

J?^r
\

Rec. 29, 148, small animals, sheep,


goats.

abns
(]

J TT

Copt, i^ctjurt.

% f ^'

^^'^"t(?);

abar

^'^^- "' ^^^^


-=p-,
(|

^^"'^'^

[]

<:r>

4bar i]^

= ]^ ^^
"l^3,X.
^
(

'=^.

i.'^

comi)any with.

4bry_^,y_^,;.y-

U-.fl^i4Ty-qS'
y-i;,'y-^^.y-"^,
salve,

Sr

jl

^^ *^^^ ^ H
\

^*^''^^' stallion,
'

horses,

unguent, ointment.

bulls;

compare Heb. "T^^^i and

abash-t
Pap. IV,
Gol.
6,

^ ^^^
^

abrau maa

->

Anastasi

(]

-==>
(|

J,

^ |,

genuine abr.

14,

I,

<^ XiM

Ijtj

cr=D(^vV),

II.
1]

^ ^^t 1=50^ V\ CI3, Kahun


ffi

y%ra^^;,
tooth
;

"""'ysrjj^^'ys:'
stone of Abhcti,,
(?)

40, 23, a kind of cake or bread.

Nubia, a precious stone, emerald


(?;,

N. 984, weak J "^ "i^ helpless see J 4bat..aq^J^^5^._A^.

abagi

Ijlj.

(j

(?);

ffi

plur.

<=, U. 41, 68, h J |^^, N. 660,

^^y-i.yi-y^5
yi^7r:'<>fts^''i>'-sae.
"'-iiJi^.yi:ii.'''>;
J I ibh

tasi I, 23,

i;,

"thou

hast destroyed";

^y^^^^.
servant,

abata
(|

! I

Mt)

slave;

Heb. 12.y.

^,
honey; Copt. efilO).

Rev.

^
1

Hymn

"^
111

Nile 24, teeth, "biters."

ibay^q^, yijo
ri,akind of unguent

Rec.34,
"'

=0'^'0''^^^^

abeh
AAATsAA

^^

Ji^*) X

114^

^^^"^ P^P- ''


,

9'

13.

af.

"^tf
23,

moist, wet.

.0

A.Z.

1899, 89, Rec.

102,

title

of a

*-y^^(iq.^-=

AAAAAA

priest.

c 4

[40]
AAAAA'V

'LJ
sprinkle, to moisten

IV, 386, to

ibthersu
an animal.

%^l^.^^]f.
o'

^-^ N. 524, a wooden object, goad (?)

'

abt

abhn
abekh

Ij

J
\\

^^. J I
I)

T-

282,

,^?.
,

'

N. 132, to drive away.

month

Copt. efi.OX

plur-

^,

()
.

to proclaim.

^-^,T.,P.65,,,6.,M.,64,;;^^;J,
;
.

abkha
^O X
.

OJ

var.

aabkh-t,
J-

J
140
^)*(
11

ointment contammg many mgredients. U. 538, T. 295, P. 229

= Pashons:
,

<r^='^ 1,

abekh (?)

^^,

monthly

festival:

(jj*

the 12 monthly festivals;


Vc

^ ^ '^

';3>', the

abes (]J-^,u.4o5,
Rec. 31, 162,
rise,
(]

(]J^,
to

P. 215,

2nd day of the month

^
1

J^
,

J^,

make

to

month by month.

to

make

to advance.

Abt
Month.

The gods of the


:

months,

abes
var.

y^

a kind of cap, headdress


5,

each containing 30 days, were

Gor>.

|]Jpi^,Rec.

92.

Tekhi
Ptah
1^.
feasant
25,

w
D
or

Abesyp^.agod.
absa(?) 1)J^'d'
medicinal plants, or seeds
;

Mknkhet
[I

or

Apt

jA-w^

WIp

a kind of

Het-her
'=^^^0
I

medicated

oil.

absit
plur.
(]

\\

(|(|

part of a boat;

Sekhmet

'*',

or

Kahkkka

II

J^^.Rec.
{]

30, 67.

U^ u
c>

absi

J I4I
||

[1

(|(|

H
,

wolf, or jackal.
I

Menu ^^^,

or

Shefbeti

absha

J ^^^ Kl
(I

gazelle.

^J W
I

Q o

Rekh-ur

^^,

or

wailing, weeping; see

Qr-

o a
IT.

in
I I I

Q O
I

Rekh Netches
RevnUTET
'wwv<

net, snare, trap;

Copt.

<LfiiU3.

Abtka
a

y^^U|,
Aapep.
[]
11

III

0'

^:

B.D. 65,

8,

god who

fettered

^AA/W^0.

KHENSU
HERU-KHKNTI-KH.Vnil-K
<y

Abta
dbeth

=^^
'

^
<====
'

T"^^

J)

^' '^"'^ ^ 'h^* nine ape-porters.

in

Aw^O.

(]

Js=^,

p.

616,

M. 784,
o n u
CO

fly
c

(I

]|

N. 1144, to snare, to hunt with nets.

G.

Apt

1 Q)

G
III

Heru-aakhuti

[41]
G
I

abt

a temple of Shu.

Rec. 14, 56, a measure of corn


P.S.B.
14, 432, A.Z.

= 40

liJ

'
1

1904,

143; Heb.

rrp"'t;,

ap|]o,u...6,P.33s,ll|,(j4.,

Copt, oine, Gr.

(LXX)

oi^it, o(0e/.

ap-t
count, to reckon up, to number, to enumerate,
to assess, to to

(1

.."^

the quadruple heqet, and


for beasts,

was the measure of a ration


26, Rec. 17, 159.

R.E.

6,

adjudge the value


Copt,

of, to

appreciate,

measure

ton
i.e.,

*"^^
;

(1

^^
(1

^"
,

ap-t ap-t
plur. n

(1

fl

a vase or vessel.

the great counting,

last

judgment

(1(1

(1

rSmn, Rev. n, 169, metal pot;


.

Rec. 26, 231.


a-P-t
(1
;

(1

^'^

numbering, census,

111

number, measure
countless;
(I

Copt. Hire
;

D
;

ao-t ^'

fl

Hq

\-'

Ko"^'' P^P- 3^' refined (of


gold).

D^

taxes.

55, house, dwelling, palace.


I,

ap-t
reckoning, account.

neSU l'^ cr^ 1 "^


,

'-^
111

TQ
,

royal harim.

a D
,

to count, etc.

-M^memis

ap-t ur-t

<=.

"^^ <=>

^
cr-n

the great temple


:

ofKarnak; among its gates were

i.

ap-t
bones

(|

tita

bers of the body to see that none

1^1^'
<^
,
I

P-

557, a counting of

ti^

%^
[^^^

r^""^^

\;

counting up the

ci

wanting.

(1^;3.(]
1

^,;

AAAAAA

k
month of
enici>i

Api-abu
p. 697,

\\

COO, P. 541,(1

1]

^,

6.(1^
1

AAAA/

"counter of hearts," a name of Anubis.

Apap

(1

(1

the

Api-ab-neter
heart of the god," a

OT,

"reckoner of the

name

of Thoth,

%
ff[|]

ap(heb-e..^)q^ = y^.
(1

--5,

a festival in the

month

of n^,tjune,

Api-khenti-seh-neter
Rec. 20, 79, the god

I]

d
a

fTl
cinson
to live
2
1

who makes

man

3,

no

years.

3,

the tutelary goddess of Ta-apt,

^^\

(]

j^,

Api-tchet-f
body," a
title

\\

2T|1, "counter of

his

Thebes.

of Osiris.

ap-t (l^^ll,
plant,

(1^^,

a kind of

papyrus

(?)

Mon.
list,

36,

ChampoUion, Mon.
in the

i,

27,

No.

4,

one

register of lands, rolls

(]

D V\

/
1

of the mother-gods of Egypt, nursing mother of

o
ap-t

Thebes, who appears

forms of a

woman

estate rolls.

and a woman-headed hippopotamus; her chief


8,

]\

^, Amen.

19,

18,

21,

stick,

sceptre, measuring rod, corn measure.

'

[42]
I]
,

k
Rev.,
to think, to

Apit
month of

the goddess of the


;

nth

oT^o A A *P^ ^^'

consider;

Copt. ton.

the year

Copt. eTIHTl

varr.

Apa

p,

(]

(|

^.

a goddess.

Apit-hemt-s

I)

j ,

I)

Api[t] (]a[]|j,U.487,(ln(](j\,P-64o,
(]

!n^<y^^/
I

(](]

^,

M. 672, a god

in the

Tuat
;

Rec. 34,

192,

O ^ii Q

C)

one of the 12 Thoueris goddesses.

api-t (jaljlje^

a measure for corn

Apit-aakhut-thehen
,

Ij

J
H

Copt. oine.
Rev., judgment.

^^

Ombos

api \q\!^

^
,

I,

45, a hippopotamus-goddess.

Apit-ur-t-em-khat-Nut

<=>

apu

(1

pI

^^'hat is

assessed, tax, tribute.

apu \\u\,
Rec. 34, 190, 192, one
goddesses.
of the
12

U.190,

(l|.(lai]^i.
'^^^

Thoueris

(|d%Io ^D^fl^i'
these; fern.
(I

'^^'"- P'^^"- P'"""-

3'P

^
;

V\.
these two (masc).

stairs, staircase, steps.

apap (papa ?)
tile,

apui
[|

(1

tablet, plaque,

brick

compare Copt.
J

c{)^c{)e.

aof

fl

^
\\ (]

D V\
'

U. 487, T. 203, P. 96, 310. N. 792, dem. pron. masc. this.


d

8'PP

IJ

to journey, to traverse.

apen, apenu
these, these

I]

I]

V'

two (masc).

round cake ;

(1

V\ o
;

pills, pastilles.

apen apeh

Q>^
D

to play the tambourine.

ap

(]

V" i ^

see up.

-A

P- 163, to

make

arrive.

Ap-t, Apu-t

|^,N.946,

(]

V ^,
A,P.

T.

312,

(]

apeh
._ aps
1)

(j

nl-^.pig\\

\\U

650, 726,

!\a\J

__---'

n
t|

Q ~*T part ^^777,'

"

of a boat,

Hbs(?)

^, M.

751, the Messenger-god.


h

ap-ti (aupti)

\/

"^

^ ^, Rec. 21,

Denderah
A.4)OCO.

o,

one of the 36 Dekans

Or.

81, messenger, envoy.

Apsetch.t(j_^;^^,(]^'^,.,
A

D
II

U. 604, M. 664,
[j

^, U.

476, N. 738, 1280,


^'^''

^=^> Thes. 113, one of the seven stars g' of Orion ; its god was Horus.
H
'^'"^
,

^^

'

^' ^"' ^' ^^^'

^" "^^"^^ ^

^^ ^^'

apshen
apt

||

a medicinal seed.

"^

^ ^ "^
iS,
'

goose

plur.

(|'-'(|||'^i, Rec.
house, dwelling, /larim

182; Copt.

(W&X.

Copt. HTII.
P.

^Pt
645,a

(1

(
(I

^^^
I

P^""'

of a ship.

^Paa-f
proper

(l^D'^lj.W,
(?)

aptu

""^^
,

Westcar
I,
I I

7, i,

Rec. 34, 118,


cases for

name

apath,apatM ^^^"^2=*'^
\\ ,

A.Z. 1898, 147,

^^^
ci
I

(J
1

Q
^ri

III

M. 374, N. 934

amulets;

var.

(1

vS

43

A
af
h

~^

to turn, to twist, to revolve.

p. 40, 301,
(fern.).
,

M. 610, 636, Hh. D

312, these two

af

()

aptf

"
,

"Y M.
,

'

i]

"Y HIS(|

'

serpent, viper

Hh. 433, dem. pron.

plur. of

Heb. rrirON

Arab.

^\, Eth. l\(f:p^

Af
apten, aptenti
these two (fern.).
(]

I)

^^V^,
Rii.
(]

9~>^,

|]

"^A^

^'^,

'Y MJi.

Tuat

III,

serpent hostile to

aptul]
1

^, c^^ III

(]

%-^,
Ji
I

af, af-t
IV.

Y,

(j'Y^.abed.
I,

1 ci^rp

149,

Rea
fl

^Pt

34, 118, furniture, beds, boxes.

Afa
^21

2^,,=^ 1],

Tuat

an ape-god gatekeeper.
P.S.B.

'^'

goose; plur.
(]

^
I,

affl
194,

I)

^
||

OO =<. Tuat VIII,


shrew-mouse

7,

^^^^'fj^j'^l^'^j' Rec. apt M __ o cup, pot Copt. ^.nox.


>

3, 2.

shrew-mouse,

god;

Copt.

afen

-^a^a^

u. 545,

(1

^,

'r.

300, 310,

^Pt

(J

'

^ measure.

p. 232, to flee, to get back.

AptcheS

"^

Annales

84

afekh

'^^^
(|
,

U. 209, T. 310, to unloose,

to untie, to unroll, to unpick, to disentangle.

Af
af
flesh,

(1

^~

god of the 6th day of the month.

aft

(1

'

medicine for the eyes.

I)

'^,

U. 268, 519,

(j

'^^, U.
(J

535,

aft
aft
bed with

(1

AA,

to rest, to repose, to

sit.

meat, joint,

member;

plur.

3 3 3,

(|^^,bier;(]fe^-^^5,
fine linen bedclothes
:--_

(Love Songs,

r^ 4).

eee^l^^idden
Af,Afu
h

body;

(]^,^-ad, cake,
aft
the carcase of the
I)

,1.Si
,

couch with cushions,


_,

bedstead like the Sudani

^jij^

Sun-god of night, or the dead body of Ra; he has the form of a ram-headed god, and his shrine
is

aft

!\

^'tT. Peasant 48.


i,
(|

f|

encircled by the serpent

Mehen. Amherst Pap.

Af

'^''^
l\ ^

III'

PPP \\\'

Tuat V, a name of two man-headed sphinxes.

f=^

'^

/T-~.a
(|

AfiAsarm^^q^^^. Tuat VII,


linen garment, piece of stuff, linen cloth, rect-

the

flesh,

:.e.,

dead body, of
I?

Osiris.

angular sheet or coverlet of a bed, square shawl


or head-cloth, bed, bed-clothes.

Afu
gods who

ftU "^

J] nil, Thes. 122, the four

fought Set.
"^

Af-ermen-ari-f
associate
c)f

O
,

an ape-headed
,

a rectangular box or chest, a rectangular


(I

Thoth.

Afa-heri-khent-f
Tuat
II,

(]^<^ -^^

stone, a rectangular socket, a rectangle,

an ape-headed god with a knife-shaped

^y^,Dum.T.I.I,io,,4.

phallus.

Afu Tern
" flesh of of Osiris.

(1

^1 ^,

Tuat VII, the

MX
aft

'^'^^
(j

Iji-nJ

sarcophagus.

Tem," a god who devoured the enemies


,

a rectangular plot of ground.

'

[44

fl

aft

|)fe,(|^i,(j^|A,lc,flee,
to

some person or
something which
is in
;

leap away,

jump up from
IV, 697;

the

ground
plur.
i\

(]^ ^^==>^>
aft-t
(I

-\\-

V\,

11

-\r

Copt.

qoT.
;

c^s

^^~w^

3]

sweat of the god

Copt, qtjoxe,

qo-f qcof
,

(J

c^>,

Hc>iiii'

Copt,

40s ^ ^ ^' ^ llll' ^.qxe, qxoT, qTrcooir, qxooT.


[
,

four:

d^a

four spirits,

M.

jf

'

-if "^^^ <G=<

the waters.

aftU

ami-t
q
-^

-\[-

(^^
,

a fourfold garment.
it

^\

(I

4^

"^^^

she

who
c^
,

is in,

am am

which

is

in; plur.

amiut

[1

-|i-

[1

4U

(1

^\

adverb; Copt. AJUULi.T.

ami-at
the supreme

(]

4|^^

someone

at

moment
[j

of

some emotion.

ami-ab

-[|-

^,

^ ^ ^ |^^,
,

(]

^,

0"

one who

is

in

the

1^, U. 23, -J- o. U. 38; between q^],M.350. ^|.],"--'^ among


imi-t
-f[(]

heart, darling, trusted

one;
-6,

fern. -]^j^,t

-Vr

'^ ^

li

(J

thy darling

sister.

(?

ami(]

ami-ab a
20, 42,

41U

"^
,

^V-

'''

.'^"-

<,.=.
''"

'^^'f friend. fidential


'''^

^, ^ W o ^, Rec.
I)

^
-J-

^
;

ami-abt

4^"^,
U
V<

O
[|

'^?u^ month, a
I)

^^'-'^^ priest.

Amiu amau
a
[j

^^

_>

0'
<2>-

N. 1327, a group of gods(?)

v\

between two, IV, 362

ami-ariti-j^^,f;^^,(]|

JL ^s^

VAv ,^^j^

^^ between the two

legs.

B.D.i74,7;(j^[^f]Jl](j
Unas
is

between them

<:rr>

[I

^
-JL

\\^

^
n

(]

[i

n w,

"^

^,

he who

is

in

the

Ml'
^m;i
p.

f*^"

, between.

tomb, the name of a priest of the tomb.

ami-ast-a

.85.
(j

f^
(|

].-!]-

14^!^. among (?)


P.

'"""

'

f jj_^> f^jj.^^.
^'^'^

^'

'^'*'^

'^

priest; plur.

&mi-ta

-0-

|l(],

167,

between;

j|=_.^l,M.,3,.f^jl.^^.^,

^M K.

H K' k
1

r.

332.

^fl'

ami-ast-a
*
,

em

Herset

-{]- jl

an amulet (Lacau).

'

A
;

45

]
fl

ami

^ikT^'-tt-T^'''^'^"^

ami-ren-f

41-

^v^

^^,
JU

-||-

a priest of Heru-ur
plur. - -

(j,

p. 674,

M. 666;

Q?^ '^^i^, -1^ ^^\

wwv^,

wwvv

o^,

list

"^

fl'^, N. 1282.

of names, catalogue, register; plur.


'^^^^ Hfi

4U ^\
wwv,

^
1

ami-aha -|]-|^|^,l)

0(221111
/..,

Rec. 21, IK,


'

-\\-

^'

J^K^-STl
"^q,
Rec. 15,

V\

(^

'O'ctt:, he who
j\

registers, deeds.
is

in the palace,

the king.

ami-hru ami-uab
place,' a
title

-jL HI,

JL

HI

-0-

/^

" dweller in the pure

150, contemporary.

of a priest.

ami-ha-t

41Ci
v^\
"S^
I

ami-unnut -0- f^ ^AAA^^ '^^, horoscope. ami-unnut ami-unnut


Copt. eJULItO-CT.
-11- tx'^'^

Peasant

193,

^^ ^ ^ W,
AA/VVA^

A.Z.

he

who

f W
,

is

in front, leader.

1899, II, horoscopist.

amit-ha-t
Awwv
-^

41- &\

guard

breast, in front.

qfK .^

what

is

at the

(E

ami-unnuit
Rec.

41- In^^

-^^
O
(s

11

01 "

111'

^^
D

ancestors, predecessors, beings of a


I I

14, 13, a priest

who

served by the hour.

jH

former time.

ami-iirt

"d-^^. ^j-^.
''^^ P'^'' ^'"^^
'

^f^^
^ ^ ^"^^

4miu-Uha.

f 1^^-41^

41-<^5ry:!-Q
'

when

'' U

o
-~

sailing northwards, the west.

ami-urt-sa

41-

title

of the
king.

ami-bah
(]

f 2' H-^^'
;

Rec. 31,

18^ O ^,
I

Rec. 31, 29,

in front of or before

plur.

(1

4 h V\

%
1
I

**^',
I

f^
in front,

Q ami-khent
||(]
,

:|i
I

Thes. 1481, thoughts.


h fx ^
Oi'

ll

he who

is

Rec. 36,

,f1^^^ ||, (||.^^,


I

JS^

leader.

(=lil

ami-khent q^l^fflll

Tombos

2.

of a priest; plur.

-fj-^^^^.

ami-per-j^"^^,!
Rec.
-\]J

W
\\

amiu-khen
palace
officials.

,9, 16,

-[^^c^,
-|[,

^^

a will, conveyance of

^mi-khet
,

f ^,

-]]-

y^,
fl

property, inventory of goods for testamentary

follower,

companion, member of a body

purposes, title-deeds.
I

amit-per

A
^J^

41-

Methen

15,

4^
II

I]

will,

III

testament, schedule of household goods.


I

amiu-khet

l\

amiu-mitu

f:

'

a name of the dead.

^
I

%>

'^^,

n.

652,
after

III

.A

those

who come

A
posterity;
varr.

[46]
,

A
ami-

l|

^^ o
-

T.

180,

M.

162,

"dweller in the chamber of embalmment," a


title

of Anubis.

ami-sa

-i

yf

>

t'tle

of a priest.

Ami-ut
1)

ami-sa A

^^ $, he who

is

behind.
'7'

HTJr

JL

t^
'

Jl.

TjrO'

%\

^"^ ^ ^

Rec.

36,

215,

"^e Mo*^ of the 9th day of the month.

ami-shepa(?) (j-J-cna^G,^-

Ami-qerq-t

[]

-[}-<=> ^^ U. 530
>

Ami-utcliat-saakhu-Atemt -||- -^^ ^ o

i]^^

1,

Rec. 34, 190,


1

M^

title

of the chief priest of LetopoHs.


'=^

one of the

Thoueris goddesses
J'itA

she pre-

amiut-ta

'^^
1

-|l-

-^

herbs of the
field.

sided over the month,

sill'
""

Amiu-bahiu
Amiu-bagiu

Ami-Ta-mer (?) t\ -^^


33) 3) dweller in Ta-mer,
i.e.,

-||-

^^^=3 J

B.D.

Rec

17, 59, the gods in the presence [of Osiris].

an Egyptian.

Ami-tahenb-t(?)

-(P^j ^^ffl^(||,
lie

(|-[1-S'ij^'<i J.

Tuat VII, the gods Avho back of the serpent Nehep.

" helpless "

on the

amiu-tcher

(|

-f|-

P. 161

Om

'

^'^' ^^^^^^

25

see Ami-besek

-f]-^^

Am-t (Amit?)

^'^^'

the

name

of a serpent on the royal crown.

Ami-beq
(]

Ami-Anu
,

(JI^IJtitle

U. 354,

l)f

23, 3, a

god of the dead.


41U

^J

Cairo Pap.

N. 716, a

of

Ra

or Osiris.

Ami-Pe

1\ _K5^'

^^''^- 'f' " ^ lion-god, a protector of the dead.

Amiu-asu l\-^\
M.
174, a group of gods

l\

ftj^

-*-^'

Ami-pet-seshem-neterit

41-

whose abodes were

hidden.

Ami-Antcli-t
U. 256, h

41
title

'^

c=i,
180,

-f]-^
uaa-f

N. 717, a
41-

of Osiris.
Tu^^t xi,

one of the 12 Thoueris goddesses.


,s,

Ami

(1

s^ ^.

Ami.pui-|]-|^o^|)y,B^D.

one of the divine crew of the Boat of Ra.

Amu.upt(]|^\/,T.3.,f^V,
N. 202, a form of the Sky-goddess Nut.

arai-mu ^h

%i^

^^~^, a

t't'e

of Sebek.

Ami-Unu-meht
265,

(Jl^^^T^,

u.

Amlu-Mehnit l)f ^Qll-Sl'


B.D. 168, the gods who are with Afu-Ra.

"dweller
title.

in

Hermopolis of the North,"

a divine

Ami.Unu.resu(]^^J^.U.
264,

Ami-meuen-f & B.D. 64, 18, ^'^^ ^'

Ij

f
title

|^ 1}

^
^'

of Afu, the dead Sun-god.

"dweller in
title.

Hermopolis of the South,"

a divine

Ami-naut-f (|-{}-''"~^%^''^-.
U. 331,
(]

Ami-urt-j^l^^^,
7,

B.D. ,45,

-j]

^^^5_^'

'^-

a cow-goddess.

a serpent-god of the " bush."

[47]
Ami-Nu
aged primeval Sky-god.

DDO
,

Tuat VIll, the

Ami-hem-f(]-[j-^ra^
B.D. 108,
4, 5
;

1M!1,

see

Ami-heh-f.

Ami-nu-t-she

(?)

(]

-jj-

O,
w "^
the Tuat.
Ijfl
,

U. 266, the name of a god.

Ami Nebaui
C\ (\

B.D. loS,

h -f- ^/v^^^^v

4, 5,

the serpent of the

Mount
and

(]

of Sunrise
in

who was covered


and
h
his
-fl-

with

flints

Tuat

II,

the warder of Urnes

'4 '4'

metal; he was 30, or 50, or 70 cubits long,


3 cubits in girth,

head was 3 cubits long.

Am[it]-neb-s-Usert
-f fl
I

41-

amiu-hetut
Pylon.

.w ra
^^
t::^

r^ om'

*~^^^ ?)

B.D. 145, 146, name of the 9th

-U.

1.
I
I

B.D.roo,

5.-11-^^1

the apes that

sing to the rising sun.

N. 166, a name of the Sky-god.

Ami-He-t-ur-ka
|]
,

Ami-neht-f

|)

-[^

^^

^^"^^3 %
ra

^^
^
'^'^
,

^Q ^=^5^
)i

(]

-[|-

U. 263, a

title

of Osiris

and of Ra.
v<

N. 153, Rec.

30, 187, the

name

Ami-He-t-Serqet-Ka-hetep-t

^^Jil'
-ll-

of a god.

Amm-t Nekhen
name

|C
,

Pn ^he
-

^qU^'
ami-hat
royal uraeus

U. 257, a god.

of a serpent of the royal crown.

-[^|^^g^,
king's head.

Tombos

6,the

Ami-Net
Ami-net-f

(]

1
Ci

B.D. 746, the

on the

doorkeeper of the 7th Pylon.


"^

Ami-hent-f (|-f|-| ^^
Tuat xi,

-||-

^wA.lli^.-,
,

Q -fl

.-''^

M.

762, p. 665, a

title

of Osiris and of Ra.


,

the serpent guardian of the loth Gate.

Ami-her

-[[.

^ ^
"j

Berg. i^erg.

I, 18, a proi, tector of the dead.

Ami-neter -[[- '1

Tuat Xll, a singing-god.

Ami-Hetep

h |

Cairo Pap.

2 3,-3,

a protector of the dead.

Ami-Hetchpar
T. 346, P. 689, N.
1

^v

?
title

14, a title of Osiris.

N. 719, a
Osiris

of

and of Ra.
]]
,

Quelques Pap.

79, title of

a god

Amiu
(?)

khat Asar

JL^ "^
|

Ami-ret l)f ^^- 6^5) <? p ^-7 ^*' JL ^

2
,

^'

^- 5^'

^li'
a god
(?)

Tuat VII, the 12 gods who sleep on the serpent Nehep.

N. 1281, the name of

'

Ami-khent-aat
EdfA
I,

i
-[]-%
'

c.

o O
,

amiut-haiu^l^^^ra^Hq^,
"11-

12, 15,

a goddess of Edffl.

1^ I Ami-hafq^|^m^^^.B.D.
ra
contemporaries.
6,

^^
who

Amiu-khet-Ra
four gods

^o

Tuat IX,
his

who towed

Heru-tuati in

boat

Khepri.

115,

a god

received a harpoon (mab,


in

Am.iu-khet He-t-Anes

from Ra, which was kept

Mabit,
'7^

o' n<et

i
I

III

6)

B.D.

(Saite),

17,40, group of gods.

Amiu-khet-Hem
Ami-hepnen
name
of a god
(?)
(]

-R-

IS5,

T.

308,

the

Tuat IX, four gods who towed Heru-tuati


his boat.

i\

^m'
in

[48]
-^W]
Heru-tuati in
7,

Amiii-khet-Tehuti
Tuat IX, four gods
his boat.

Ami-kehau
[]

I ^1^^,(1 f
,

who towed

Ami-suht-f
22

[]-[]-

[1^1^, B.D.,

Ami-ta Ami-ta

-JU

Rameses IX,

10, a ser-

pent-god and associate of Tematheth.

(Nebseni),atitleofRa;-||-^-*-^|^_

Tuat n,a^god^onh.

(jit;,

Todt. Lepsius
9th Aat.

4, 83,

B.D. 149, the god of the

Ami-sepa-f
P. 759,

-H-

"^

^-t-ikJ--'"Tlion'.gS ami-ta-f (]f^^,R-^,^.,^


Amiu-ta(?)|.^|^^,
,

i^^
^'-

5^^=-,

-j]-'^^^^^'^'
of a god.

B.D. 168, a

'656,

^roup of gods

who

fed the dead.

Ami-tehenu
the

name

title

of Set.

fkl

(S.

Ami-Sept-t

[]

-{^ p

j\

^^.

"a dweller

Ami.thephet.f|)^|^4|
^=*
'''"^^

in Sothis," a title of

Horus.

Ami-Seh
(j

^
-[]-

8 ci
ji,

m^

^, U.

260, a

title

of

iyni,"UyMi'

[HI

^- 3^^' ^- 3' ^ ''"^ ^


several gods.

Osiris the

god of Orion.

Ami sehseh
31, 27, the

-^ f -^ | ^
h
-|1-

>

^^c-

name

of a god.

Amiu-teser-t-tep

Ami-seh-neter
a
title

[^ 2

U. 258,

-ff

y ^^ ^
'

of x\nubis.

Pp.

B. D.

68, a group of benevolent goddesses.

'Ami.Tetf^|o^.^-.4,38,atitle
Amsu,
10, 17, a title of

Ra.

Ami-tcMamu-J-l^^^^,
T. 305, a
title

Ami-sekhet-f (|-f]-|||^, Tuatix,


a god of his domain.

of a serpent.

Ami-Tcheba kher-ut
-f|-

(?)
title

-||-

Amit-she-t-urt

Ombos

II, 130, a

goddess.

fl"!

o^
y\

'

T. 369, a

of Osiris.

am
those

who

are in the following

of,

the body-

come

var.

(j^,
N. 719

guard of a god.

Ami-Shet-t
1360,
title

I)

-[]-

^^
^^
'J

Copt.

iJtXOt.

N. p/^^ ^m.'
-f

^"^
14, to

of Anubis.
-||-

fl^^'

^'-

^93.

-J-

(]

be attacked.

Amit-Qetem
M. 342,
(|-[[-'^

(]

"""^^K'

^- ^'*'

^"^^.N. 868, a goddess


(j

who

assisted at the resurrection of Osiris.

Ami-kap
N. 718, a
title

^ ^z^-^ ^,
-|j-

u. 258,
Rev.
II,

of a god.

138,

S)

l^ec.

14,

15,

to eat; see

Ami-kar

^
'

Tuat

I,

a sing-

(1

<^

ing ape-god.

ft,

Rec. 29, 144;

CopL

OTftWJUL.

A
X
Rev., to overeat
;

[49]
X

i
43

amemu
;

Copt.
'

CCCOAXOTf Hp.
.

see

^\ Hemnemet.
>

|R

Todt. (Lepsius),

6,

am-t
',

-O-^^
"
\j

Israel Stele

7,

-[l
6, 22,

amu AtkO
V
Jl
III'

B.D.

148 (Rubric), colour, paint; see flam. S(


.
'

Rec. 17, -\\7. 146, -j-

.^ ^^

...Q
,

R.E.

amm
am
am
Rec. 188,

r
||

to

make

firm,

to

strengthen.
strength.

food, fodder for horses

and
1

cattle,
'

provender.

am-t

il

t\

T.

20,

U- 149, name
,

amam-t

(]-[|I]

^^,

fl

ci^

of a wine.
child,

stuff, cloth,

garment.
ftA/VW\

am, am-t -^^=z^,

(j^J,
.

pupil.

Am

(IT

B.D. G. 569, a form of Horus


^~vvA/^

13, 30, 72, stream, flood,

deluge

suckled by Renent,

fL

am (amm)
a goddess

(]T^^,
(jl",

(]/=:

Amit
']'
I I

Q
I

Ombos

II, 2, 195,

%^

^3iS,

Hymn

Nile

26,
(|

Amen.
h
-f|-

20, 5, boat, ship.

Am[it]

^::^. Tuat VIII, goddess of

am (amm) (].^^
eyebrows.

the circle Hetepet-neb-per-s.

\.
skin
(?), cat.

Am
am
rSAAAAA

41-

^v

^Sas, Berg,

i,

34, a lion-god.

am (amm)

[1

^^ I^,

am (amm) (|=^^,
to be hard of hearing.

Rec3i,i47,

-Qt'

^^*^- 35> 56,

tj

jx~x^>

iJ

A/W^AA /^ww

^j

Rec. 36, 213, to cry, to wail, to weep.


14,

am (amim)
(I
I

/
|]

^^ '^, Amen.

12,

y\

.^^^

patient, submissive.

s /A
Ll

am (amm)
fl
i,

(]

r=^
filth.

(^3,

jj

'

N. 170, 960, to putrefy, to


(S.
I

rot,

to

to cry.

ferment.
i

cry out, to exclaim, to groan.

am
(1-JUq

(|-[]-^^|,A.Z.

1905, 107, woe!

am \ Oi am (amm), ammit h =^v


,

c^

Ill'

4^^mHHQ'

l\

AA"

clay, like clay;

Copt.

OJULe, OJULI.

(Lacau),

staff, stick,

standard

am(amm)(l^|^,tS,^)(?)'
(?)

am, amit (j^fJ.-U458,^'^[J,


to burn, to flame, to blaze,
fire,

am(ammu) l)^|^()^
13, 411,
fruit trees,

P.S.B.

palms.

flame; plur.

ami

(4mm)

\\ <

^^ A e ^ ^
,

grace-

fulness of form, graciousness.

amu(ammu) (1^=^^|^.

(]

am-ti(l^-|j

grace. graciousness.

^^^
(aam-t)
||

1k^'
(

Tuat X] a dawn-god.
,

^"^^ik'kl\
L

to eat

Copt. Olf UJJU..

||.

light, rays,

beams.

ama

|j^

lw|.

ast aff.

50]
Amakhu
(]

amau

^ ^^^

\\\,

P.

404,

\
amaa

' I

borders, boundaries.

_Jp

M.

750, to

make

to

\\ VS,

N.

183, the divine serfs in the Tuat.


rs
I

travel.

d,mani (]^

house, tent.

Amakhu nu Asar
.

?=^

il

B.D. 14T, the

serfs of Osiris.

Jk-, date palm

(?); plur.

(j

_Jf

"^

Amakhu
name
of a god.

(|_-i'

^%>^, N. 1200, the


Tuat XII, a god

Amakhui

(?)

^^,

ffl

kind, gracious, agreeable;

(1

^
;

who towed Af through the serpent Ankh-neteru, and was reborn daily.

Amakhit-f

4^ ^^
(|

^^''" ^'^^'

''

^i

'

"^

darling.

ama
(]
.

P. 258, T. 69,

M. 224

amakh

^
(|

(]

-^ ^' -J-

J,

= | ^^f^^

Jo"''.

As.

1908, 313, to honour, to worship, to be worthy Rec. of honour or worship ; Copt. jm.ncy^
(]

ama, amait

^^^^Q I^^.Rev. u, 178,


3,

23, 204.

|l

(] (]

Rev. 13,
"J,

cat

Copt. eJULQ-if.

amakhu

^^ J
-^
|^
,

Rec.

36,

78,

ama (?)-t
(]

Il^vj^H^, Rec
190, n.

31, 27

amar
T. 69,

(|

<=>, u.

601

(]

_>

M.

224, like.

^ ^,

(j

one who

is

bound

to

honour a master, or worship a god, vassal, one who is worthy to be honoured, revered, or worshipped;
plur.

amakheri(||^|](]^, (]g^|)|j
,

a kind of balsam tree, white

manna tree.
,

(]^^^^",

P.

403,

amma

(read

ami

?)

\\

\J>''\

^^^^^.

M. 576, \

->

^^ ^^

{\

Aa,^^

a
III'

give, let, grant, I pray,

make,

_^_a^

cause; Copt. JULHI, JOLOI.


Ij

dm (amm)
paternal serfs, IV, ^S4; 11'^

[%

aged

serfs,

wheat or

barley.

IV,

1045;^'
(I

i?

vassals of

amaa
(]

^ % ^. ^ ^
ij

grain,

3'

^^'-

^- ^5'

Osiris; fem.

proper

name (?)
II

compare Heb. Dt^.


would
that!

amakhi ^(|(]^>
JliA
serf,

Rec. 27, 53,

J^
|j

ami li

^: (]_^(](],

vassal of a god,

X UMT' t.

person of honour.

ami li-t

1]

^^^ 00

'

Re^'-' nature, disposition.

Ami
name
(?),

-jj-^OQfl'
Eye of Horus.
5^.

Nesi-Amsu

30, 21, a

of the

0(J "^i

female vassal

vassalage, fealty.

amakhkh \-^
the venerable dead.

j^. Amen, n,

Ami -[^^
4,

B.D.

(Saite)

no,

9,

'

51

A
Amen-aakhu
,

7'uat X, a

'A (\^

'

^^'

'^'*'

"*'

^ "^'"^ of Sekhmit-Bast-Ra.

destroyer of the dead.

amitiu
fl

V\
I,

W]

Amen-ren-f
,

dead person ;

plur.
1*"^^^

L.D. III, 219E, 18,

i
FD
i^

^_

' .

T. 322,

(1

he whose name

is

hidden, a

title

of several gods,

the great judge of the Tuat.

Amutiien(?)
(]

^^^.

T- 49, 5'.

Amen-ren her
(j

P. 160, a

goddess of milch cows,

V\

Rec.

27, 55, the

name

of a god.

(J

S S Ef
=

and cows

that give suck, /wwv\

Amen-hau
1

flSI?^'fl
Seti
I,

= ll
(No. 30).

ja

amn

Tomb of

B.D. 168, one of the

i
^^^
Ira
i
,

R.

II,

140

<?^ l[]

75 forms of

Ra

5jLju.on

Amen-Heru
1

Ij^

'^,
"j| ^

Tuat

X,

amen
1

destroyer of the bodies of the dead.


AAA/VA
L

Peasant 182, to hide, to

Amen-khat
the 75 forms of

h '-'^^

/WVAAA

jj

one of

_j!I

conceal, to be hidden, secret, mysterious.

Ra

(No. 39).
[1

amen
1
I

U. 508,
,

(]

Amen-khat
Aapep by a
chain.

^^"^

,
'

wj^ "j^ ^

i,

"

hidden person or
;

Tuat X, the name of the Hand that

holds

ra

_
(I

thing, concealed, secret, mysterious

^~^~^A

IT^,

Ament-seshemu-set
fl
,

AA/SAAA

f^"^^

Tuat VI, a goddess of the Utchat.

[1

AAAAA^

Ul

fl'

Amen

(1

iT^

title

of the high priest

Amen ^^ U. 558, P. 703, ^^ M. 478. ^^,Hh. 385,(1^ A (1^1, C_l


(]
,

(1

1] 1

/VWVVA

AAAAAA i_J

AAAAAA

of the Gynaecopolite

Nome.
>,

Amenlj^^o'^r
a

"hidden one,"

A/WNAA

" the hidden god "


;

who

is

in

heaven

name

of the Uevil.
r\

W
Heb.
]'\12i?,

"M

Assyr.

amen-t

[I

AAAAAA

^^
,

something hidden.

->f

]} fcj ./-,

Nahum
a hidden place.

amen

M
(I (1

8, Copt. ^.AXOTrt, Gr-'Afifito. |Um^ Amen-t (Amenit) h ^^?^, U. 558,


3,

a sanctuary; plur.

Hymn
A
,

of Darius 23, fern, of preceding.

amen amen
U
1 I
,

u.
(?)

524,

Ameni(l^(](]y,ll^|)(],Rec. AAAAAA
1

A(^AAA

AAWV\

I 1

T. 330, doubly hidden


jumij,.

/VVWV\

3.

"6,

A'
(j

Edffl

I,

9D, a form of

Amen
I,

and Ra.
A
''^^^

ameni-ab
(]

Y^,
],

to hide the

Ameni

AA

J, Tomb
52).

of Seti

heart, to dissemble.

one of the 75 forms of Ra (No.


to conceal the hand.

amen-a
fl;

Amennu
p. 266,

^^ ^,

A vwwv

Amennu-au
1

'^ _^

flf^l

Tuat VII,

N. 1246, the "hidden" god.

gods whose arms were hidden, and who lived

with the body of

Ra

in IJet-Benben.

[52
k

Amen-aab-t
()

^f J

5^-

^^^

^7,

Amen-Ra-neb-nest-Taui

"^^^^
(1

J|

119,

Amen

as

god of the East.

Amen-aabti
in the Sftdin.

i\^

l\^UT i^
^"'^"
5I
'

throne of the

Two

Lands,

i.e.,

Egypt, prince of

Herusatef Stele 154, a form of Amen worshipped

Amen-apt l\^<^ ^ cA:


of Karnak
;

Amen-Heb
=
'Afievri/it9,

'^^^

J 1

ra
A/^AAA

.^

1^, Rec.

28, 182

Amen

of Heb, the capital of the

compare Tell al-'Amama

J ]}

"tT

Oasis of Khargah.

Amen-Ra nesu-neteru
Amen
of Karnak
;

e^ o
[
/VVVVV\
I

var.

[J

/^

iiiT ^
,

'^^ A m
4
i.e.,
\\

n
Gr.

[I

J|

'AfiovpaatcvOqp,

Amen-Ra, king of the gods

also

I
O
I

Amen-Menu
Amen + Menu.

"^^^^^^
|]

f,

iv, 1031,

Amen-Ra Heru-aakbuti
,

the triad

Amen + Ra +

Heru-aakhuti.

Amen-meriiti

(I

w>wa
(?)

Amen

the beloved, or loving, god

Amen-Ra Heru-aakhuti
Kheperi Heru
(]

Ainen.naanka(?)(|^^^l||U,
B.D. 165,
Nubia.
4,

=|

Tern

^
I

a form of

Amen

worshipped

in

of
|j

Amen + Ra + Heru-aakhuti + Tem + Khepera


Heru.
FS

Amen net Nut (?)


satef Stele 34,

i^^ Heru,

AA/WAA ^

JJ

Amen

of Thebes.
r^*"^^

Amen-Ra setem (?) ua


(0 (3

(1

AA/WV\ ~

Amen-neb-khart
Amen
as lord of the

h
Qlllt'

J^

Rec. 26, 57
'^^^^
\\

Nome

of Heroonpolites. n
/WVVNA

Amen-Ra Ka-mut-f
,

9 '^

Amen-neb-nest-taui

Amen-Ra

as his mother's husband.

^
'
'

"

Amen,

3x

lord of the throne of the Two Lands," i.e.. Amen of Karnak.


~''^~"
(j
,

Am7nBruti5=^-|^y.
B.D. 165,
4,

Amen
Stele 8,

Nept

Dream

the triad

Amen + Shu
D ^^ c4
,

-i-

Tefnut.

Amen

of Napata (Gebel Barkal)

Amen-hap

'^^^^
\\
1

an ithyphallic

Amen-Ral]^ 0,11^^0^.
k

AAAAAA

man-headed hawk-god, a form of Amen-Ra.

Ament-herit-ab-apt

\\

^^ ^ '^

i]

^'

Amenit Ra
counterpart of

fl

~vwva

O, L.D. 4,
I

2,

the female

ChampoUion, Mon. IV, 332, as god of the Apt.

3,

consort of

Amen

Amen-Ra.
"^^^
(]

Amen-khnem-heh(j^^Q^
9

>

Amen-Ra-Ptah
Amen + Ra +
Ptah.

'^'^ '"^'^
)

0S, Amen
-

as

god of

eternity.

Amen-Ra-menmen-mut-f
=^
p.
1
,

'^^^^
()

Amen
J]
A

sept -hennuti(?)
1 7,

^^^^
\\

J]

^\^, Nesi-Amsu
title

14,

Amen

with the ready

Culte Divin,

horns; Sept-hennuti

is

probably the original of

24,

Amen-Ra as

his mother's

husband.

of Alexander the Great,

Dhu

'1-Karnen.

'

[53]
Amen-qa-ast
the exalted throne. h

'^^^

T J
fl

>

Amen

of

amen
N.
f\tii^
I

P. 406,
'

right

side,

western;

Amen-kau
\J \J

D^VH,P.6o.J^
'

"'

H
r\

Heb.p;.
,

"',
-www p. 610,

li^^ "^'

^'

'54'

sod

of the east gate of

amen-t

|l

heaven.
(]

Amen-ta-Mat

^ ^ ^^
in

(]

the West, the right side.

^^^,
-^
/

Rec. 21, 94, I02

amen-t
(]'^^^^>==%^

ft

Amen-Temu-em-Uas
T
,

^\
ci

the right eye. t.

Amen + Temu

amen-t <^
Thebes.

1^2, <^ 12,

81,

AmenTehnitq
Rec.
14, 74,

Amen
"^^^^
(]

= |S-;,
'^^^ Lanzone,
,

M.

234, N. 612, the west wind.

Amen-t

[]

^^^^

f^^^/^

'^
,

ft

1^ f^^^

of Tehnit.
Inscrip. of Darius 9, the west

bank of the Nile

Amen
Eight Gods
;

(]

pi. 1 7,

and the land westwards.

a frog-headed god, one of the eight elemental

gods and goddesses, and grandfather of the


see
(1

Khemenu.
,

Amen

Pierret, Et. i, a lion-god.

west wind.

Amen ^^
1]

(1
,

'^^

Ha
/w^^a

Amenti
,

^,<^^,|jS,
Will

U. 543, T. 299,
the god of

r w Tq w

Tuat

III,

Amenti or the West.


a denizen of

Tuat IV, a serpent-god.

Amen-t
preceding.

(1

w^^ JlJ,

(1

Lanzone,

amenti '^lO, '^^11],


pi. 1 7,

Amen-t, one belonging to Amen-t,


a serpent-headed goddess,

U.

578,

counterpart

of the

N. 966.

Amen

^^^^\

amentiu
B.D. 168, a bull-god
^s^

5 (^^\i

d
l^/^/^
/SAAAA/\

Amen

Tuat VIII, one of the


nine h

(?)

Shemsu-Ra.

Amen-usr-ha-t

^^^ ^

-^

C^^^Jl^
I,
I
I

!.
I

..^^,
I,
I

(l^l-^. 11^1-^^,
895, the
at

IV,4.r,

name

of the sacred barge of

Amen-Ra

TL

Ci

Thebes.

mo^^^ii'
I

!,
I'

jm
who

I, ill i-

those

Amen-Ra
Tell al-'Amarna.

ftAAA/V\

O
J

an

official

are in the West, i.e., the dead.

compare Am-mu-ni-ra

Jj^

>-^

,^

t^TT'

Amen-t

[I

^/^w^

fw/^

Tomb

of Seti

I,

one

of the 75 forms of

Ra

(No. 27).

Amen-Ra-em-usr-ha-t
S)
Rec. 20, 41,
'
I

(j'^^^^O
1

/SA/VW\

Amentt

name

IP ci

of the sacred barge of Amen.

Amen-ta-f-pa-khepesh
'-'

^^^^
(]

'^

[VXQ
'^

, '

|N^VQ

Q, [J ^
'

" -

-^

"

the west, the abode

of the dead. Dead-land

Copt. eXJLtVT.

r~;xj
'

^GV.

II,

vv

60, the name of the favourite horse of Seti I.

Amentit
SI

h
the goddess of Dead-land.

dmen

^,
right

P.

406

= ^
;

k^'
compare

O
ft

M. 580, the Heb. <t2"'.

hand, right side

Amen-t
the

Tuat

I,

a singing-goddess

name

of the ist Aat (B.D. 149).

3'

;,

[54]
p.

II

ii i

"^^^

Amen-t-urt
Tuat
I,

~^^ *==,

amen
T

IjS^^,
1338,

U. 589, M. 823,

a gate-goddess.
(]

Amen-t-Nefer-t

^^ f^^^o

3,N.

(]^<:^,P.

^^

669,N. 895,

H-HoS'
3;
division of the

tJT'T-tII,Berg.II,
daily sacrifice of a bull
;

NI^.'lL

f\

"

' I I

plur.

(1
I

(I

(i) a goddess, the personification of the ist

AA/WNA

Tuat;

(2) the

Aat (B.D. 149); (3) a deceased (Berg. II, 11).

name of goddess who


"",

the 15th

hid the

amenu
T^'it vii, a starI'

t^^

^_^^

pasture

Copt.

Amentt ermen l^

,-.-~5i

goddess.
^^

amenu

(1

^ww^ A, Rec. 36, 81, flower, plant

Amen-t-hep-neb-s ^ \/

B.D. G. 494, goddess of the necropoHs of phis and Abydos.

nMem(J

amenu

^ '^=,,

dove.
.1

p amenhu(]^V^^,|)^|
1

" !!]

(3

Amen-t sefml-t
chamber of the Tuat.

i^^

the ante-

Y '^'^>^^' sacrificial priest, butcher.

17

ameil-t

(I

aaw^a, A.Z. 1908, 16,

name

of a
I

vuhure amulet.

(Nebseni), 31,

fl

a group

amen-t

name
1^^"^^

of a

sceptre

amulet
(Lacau),

of slaughtering gods.

amer
(j

amen
to

^, ^,
|]
,

T.

264, P.

320,

U. 335, T. 396, N.

149,

M. 129; see

to love.

make

to arrive, or reach

amenmen
I I I
I I 1

amer
h
I

to set in

motion

(]

2^,1)^^.^,
%jC
it-i.
,

to be deaf.

AAAAAft ftAAA/V\

see

y\

amer
make

[I

an animal
^
*'-^'^'

for sacrifice,

amen

r^""^^

amer t
,

-^ t-

q 1

T. 340, N. 1352, to
;

'

'

sceptre

(?)

AAA/W,

firm, to stablish, to fortify

see

ameh
i
,

/]

In!^"
.fliv^

^'=<^-

32. 67, a kind of incense, perfume.


27, 13,

amenmen
Hymn

Rec.

4,

121,

dmeh

=^
I]
,

Amen.

q-I

of Darius 4, to stabhsh
h

see

V^,

I)

J^'^,P.S.B.
fill

20, 19s,

(]g,to

amenu

^^^^\,, made

absorb, to
firm, established.

oneself

full.

Amenu kherp (Kherp He


-

ameh (]^^.
-

'i'

363,

[]^^n|.

Amenu)
the pyramid of

r^
Amenemhat
II.

N- 179,

(1

I
;

L=/l, Rev.
Copt.

12, 59, to seize, to

have power over


^^^^

^XJL^^TE.

Amen-sekhem-f-au
I

1\

Amh-t.Ammh-t(] 1^1^,1)^

B.D.

72,

I,

149, the

name

name

of a gate at Thebes.
the

of the 6th Aat.

amem.t(l^lir,ll^
regular daily sacrifice or offering
7, IV,
I

(1

142,

(I

~wwi in
CTTD

Thes. 1253,
I
'

[55]

,
I

the

Kingdom

of Seker, the

god of Death, at Sakkarah. amh-t at Thebes also.

There was an

N. S92. T. 60, P. 46J,

(|

]^,

M. 551,

of these kingdoms.

amkhen
P. 676, to

(1
I

make

-11-'*^, t. 190, (1 U AAAVSA U AAA^rtA a voyage, to travel through or


41,
I

about.

(I

^^^^

'y

'
I

'^^ following forms occur

|^Jl

ames

U. 296, N. 533, to conduct.

which suggest the reading

Amges
Ij

(1

\ c=^
p

ames

P ],

445, 706,

M. 218,

^=^

o,

*ms.t(l(ljP^,il=^P,Ebe
Pap. 47, 12, 81, 10, Rec.
7,

P- 673,

i]^=^P
Osiris.

'='^,

N. 1279; Amset

108, shrub, plant,

was one of the four sons of Horus and assisted


in

embalming

Amset
anethum, Gr. av^eov, Copt. A.AJLICI, eJULICI.

(j^l"^,
i]

Ij'lpp^'j.godofthe

loth hour of the night.

Amset
Ad,.Te.38,!]|^_^,(]^(l
I

^=1^X7, (IT"*"^, the god


A

of the 4th day of the month.

'^

s5^7^

Staff of office, sceptre.

Amesta-em-abu
derah
II, 10,

^^^1

T '^,

Den-

one of the 36 Dekans.

W
title

B.D. 17, 34, Todt. (Naville)

II,

41, a
P- 535, 689, 690, to decay, to

of

Menu *~^

as the bearer of the sceptre

N. 172,
(|

^'^.

to perish,

ames,(]f|]p^.^.

become

corrupt.

ames
(][ji(]^,

(|

jtl,

to give birth to; see

mes

amgah(|^ffi|^|),(|^ffl^
JTl;

born(plur.), N. 1229.

Am.tt

Q, Rec.

32, 80, a region.

[V^\l'

amnes,

(j^ilipg.
S =
if]

cake

i^
offering.

4ms (j^iQi
usury
:

[Ir^,

Rev. 14, 73,

Amtenm
a magical name.

^H

tiv

Hh.488,

Copt. XJLHCe.

imesua

ypU^%. P U
H

Rec. 31, 165, kinsfolk; see untuit.

amtchart

-f
(1

amset
ft

h
-9

^J[\ '=^*T"

*?

^"^^*^^'
'

^''P-

^^'
;

^ ^ ^,
i
*^\

salve,

unguent, ointment,

B*

U. 297.

n
-jj-

",

3,

Ij

^3^-^,

the loins, reins, kidneys

Copt. JULeCT-

2,HT.

amtcher |j^zz|^

B
[[,'"'!^f,-on'

amset

i^]?.flT-]i.;nLs

an

Copt. ftxo.

/www

D 4

A
an
&a.
1
,

[56]
an au
ji
,

A
to shut doors,

j\

\/, a mark of emphasis, an

indication of the subject of a sentence.


']

an-uauai
|\a~w,
of reports,
i.e.,

,M.

624, 625, a particle

H -^ -^

()f|

e V

i,

bringer

(1

herald.

P. 316, 317.

an

anutcnat
,

interrogative

particle;

4
C6)

J]^^.
j\w,

the

Eye
I

of Ra.
, I

an

em

skhai

to

put into writing.

an-t ret
hat, p. 93, the

l\

j Tomb Amenem,

name

of a ceremony.

{o,

shall

then?

(|

%>

_(u.

is it

that not

4n-shet
an-t,

"-

',who?

/www

_ii*V5

^O^,
1

(J,
A o,
J\

'""^-'.ill.iS

'^

~~

AAAAW

anut

something
offerings.

brought, conduct, lead;

J\o% "^
||

'['

an
Copt,

a conditional particle,
l|

(I

S;

ene
'j

(late form,

^
IV,
,

an
||

^ www,
T.

U. 556,

^^, M.

544,

n
J\

j3%,

26, P. 44.

gift,

offermg; plur.

an an kn an
4, 220,

a post negative particle.

/ww^^
4
/VA/NWV\

=
,

-WW",

of,

3,

140.

M.2Si,(]^
(]

y^7\y^,P.82,N.788,^^^,
P.

V
W
(]

iJ

^'

in, to, for,

because, by.

-www

^,ww\

U.

212,

509,

688,

^O

'

T.

323,

i]^,
1141
;

-vwA^

said by

IV,
T. 292.

var.

M g5i awa

(I
,

gi ^
I
I

Later forms are the following

we

say.

an meru
so that.

/ww

ann
pers.

M
1

AA/WAA
I I

M
1

pers.

pron.

ist

com. we
(I

Copt.
''"^^
,
I I I

^noit.
an
interjection.

o,

jl

gift,

tribute, offerings, products,

ann

dnn ann

revenues, income,

increase,

wages, something

brought in

Copt,

eme

^3^

w
P.

AA/\AAA

11, IT

w 318 =

Peasant 120, owner of merchandise.

11, 11

M. 626.
,

ani(?)
1

jj,
Jr
(I

U.

2,

^,
jrf

^
JJ

(]

^,

things brought, offerings, etc

/www

JJ
t

JJ

'vv'wvA

www

JJ 7\
offerings of flour.

U -w^,
ft

^wwv, to brmg, to convey, to

produce;

y ^,
A

"'""^

N.

1 1

18,

bringing:

^'

Copt.

^^^^

H'^Ai ann J]o^1 r|'


A/VAA/V\

I V,

1152, tools used in

brickmaking.
ft

&VM

AAwvA ^P\,

porter, carrier, bringer;

AAAAAA

an-t
(]

^' _J2.

P^-

172. '72.

(Jj^.
(j

N. 939,

watercourse, channel, valley.

'

[
fl

57

A
Anher neb-mab
H

~^ ^:z^
^

Rec. 32, 82, the

name

of a serpent deity.

Anher, lord of the harpoon.


275,

An
the

j\

X,
"

jlX'U-^72,
III, the

An-her Bast-ntet-tha

^^^
[5

name

of a goddess.
ft

^^,
"bringer" of the Eye of Horus.
goddess
III, a

Thes.

I,

23, one of the 36 Dekans.

T^
1)

Tuat
'

Jj

An-her-Shu

_^

^^
-f-

(2^,

Antit

Tuat
'

who

JJ Ci <ri " brought " the pupils of the

l--P^|.Lanzone,pl.TgTP^?.
Mission
13, 126,

Eyes of Horus.

An-her

Shu.

An-her R

B.D. 144, the Watcher

Anithi-ff=,T""^".'J^An-ari-t-Ra
of the Utchat,

An-hetep R =
An-hetep-f
B.D. 125,
II,
|\

Tuat IV, a god in the Tuat of Seker.

A^s>J J Ci
I

W
1

Tuat

III, a

god

c J\=^ III
Osiris.

'^^

one of the 42 Assessors of

An-atf-f R
5,

w^
I

I]

a form of Horus.

^^

=^^

B.D. 92,

Antaf
A an

_^

Afe'^1 A&'
fiend.

U. 548, T. 303, a serpent


,

An-a-f

j\

Denderah
II,

III, 69, Haaaaaa

;T^WJL,

B.D.

j^ serpent-god, one of the 42 Assessors of Osiris.

125,

^^3'

il A J fV (wwA U Rec. 32, 181, to turn back, to drive awayy to

^=0^
AWV\

A *s=^ (VWW\
I

A AMAAA M
1

-^
A.

"^^

(J

A.

A.

repel.

An-a-f
26
ff.,

%^^^^^

<^''^-'^- 17 (Nebseni),

anan

(j

wwa
(J

ww

T. 31

i,

to turn back.

the executioner of Osiris.

An-urt-emkhet-uas

%<

^^

ann

,u. 297, T. 311,

H'-^, 1.338,

lj:).VT..4.,M.S.(l^,N;J3,..o.^.pel.

'^S)^^^ j^ _^
(
II

'

^-^^ 99. i5> name of the mast in the Magical Boat.

An-maat
gods who

f\

.-S-,

Tuat V, one of eight

N.

3.,(j/ljl].H
anti
n waaa
*?

..S,'ep"e'repeller.

burned the dead.

An-nef-em-hu
Q

V ^^ J\
4, 28,

a.

1]

"^^^

Berg,

i, 3,

(^

|-[]

e G^

on

""~^
+
A

Rec.

one of the eight

H^/V'
ann-t
U
1

O ^^
A

A
' ,

^ repelling, something returned.

sharp-eyed custodians of the body of Osiris.

K-^-^^f An-re-f

9 J^
|\

-^^^^

B.D. 12 c, II

see

'^'^ '"'^ U A- 1 Q A.
P. 685,

a turning back.

^^,
aaaa^v

Maa-antu-f.

ann-t (j^,
something repelled.
r\

t|^^^^,N.96i,
r\ fi

an

ha-ti

'^

a w^a,

-=^ O,

to

ftAAAAA ^/^AA'V\
,

/SA/W^A AA/VAAA
/

f\

/\A/VW\

sacrifice a heart.

anetnet

(I

II

r
Tuat VI,

An-her-t

j^^J-^.^^^,
18,

7^

delay, withdrawal.

Anen-retui
Der
'75.
al-Gab.
i,

(|

^^V^A'\

J\

<^55,

P.S.B.

7,

an

^^^*',
||
I

^"^
>=;5^
AWVNAA
,

Rec.

6, 7,

J\ Wl'

l^^^'
A

Cairo Cat. 71,

JJ

>^,Rec.,.,r43,l]^C'fl^^^
IV, 546, to cut, to destroy, to reduce, to suppress, to obliterate a name.
n

"^"-^

y? i^^^^)

the god Onouris, the

centre of whose cult was

Abydos (This)

Copt.

^.n^^onrpe, Gr.

'Oi/oy,>/.

anan

-0*1

f|

<e=<
^^*^

knife,

sword, to
destroy.

'

, ;

fl

[58]
-0*1
r CE "^

fl

an an

^ /] ~^~^ ,-^".,11 fl"^'' [|


lAAAAftA

>

'^o

fetter, to tie

anau

|]

UX, skin coverings.

-^1
I

up, to bind, to wrap round, to rope up.


(5,

(I

cord, rope; plur.

[1
(Vi/NA/Vl
II
I

an an
an

(1

Hh. 482.

ra

^,

>

'^^^

scale or rust of a metal.

anau(?)
fetters,

(1^1)^,
1

/v/^yV\A

h^ l\\,
1

(I

V! purple linen
A/vww
,

(?)

A^V^AA

III

bindings.

(1

KoUer Pap.

3, 8,

red cloth.

an

a^^^aa

anew.

an
an-t
valley,

(j^'^J^^^.akindof
^^^AAft
I 1 I

(]^,(l^ii^,(j^,(|
ravine; plur.
[J

yVVNAiV\

/?:i^(?r,

aaaa^

D
I
I

T^

Hh. 229,
KBC. 20,

An-t An-t
an-t

^^^.^Sq, B.D.
fish,

15, 43,

(I

n
1

A/^vAAA

|A/yi f^^^^

iV, 1020,

(I

AAAAAA

mythological
(1

c>

one of the two

fish pilots

of Ra.
8,

*^^ C=!^__^^
147
(1

upper valleys or ravines, valleys of the tombs.


N
AAAAAA f\./\/i
Zi
,

A,AAA

U^,
,

Qenna

Pap.

2,

mythological boat of the Sun-god.


(I

an-tt
of valleys.

h
J

AAAAAA

fv^vn

a region

Ci

AAAAAA

"^^^
ri "^

sickness.

an-t aa-t
[j

the," Great Valley."

^, ^_^ 1^
aaaaaa aaaaaa o
^

m. i88, n. 694,

an
an

*^^
fl

AAAAAA

O
111
'

the pallor of fever

Copt. A-OTfi-rt (?)

M w'^, some strong-smelling substance.

an-t anti

(J

the valley of myrrh.

an-t pa-ash
of the cedar.

aw^ mh

a^ r^ A
*^
"^

an
,

'^^
f]

W O
III'

juice, sap, drink of

some
(?)

valley

AAAAAA

kind

an
fune.r^ry
festival.

I
,

N. 535, 538

ij

T. 294, 295

an-t
.

heb ks^
A

h^^ :^y^, Q Q
1 AV^AAyV^

P. 229, pillar,

column;

plur.

| |

[H

An-t-sekhtu
on

1* ^\

Y>

Tuat xi,
standing

P.340,M.642,|||^^|,IV,8i9, 1;^.

the pit of fire containing the their heads.

damned

an an an

IP ^
?

Anastasi Pap.

I,

15, 3, the shaft

of an obelisk.
>
,

An-tt

Kek

'^,

B.D.

Rec. 27, 87, mast for a


battering ram.

sail (?)

G. 43, the " Valley of the Shadow," or " Dark Valley" through which souls entered the King-

dom

of Osiris.

Ayi.t

-^^
c:^

an
one
third

a building (with pillars?)


CTJ

Q
,

second, the " twmkhng of an eye."


167,
AWVAAAj
DaiD

of

4 AAAAAA

an
U ''^^y
1

AAAA/V\

KeV. II,

sm
(I
]

"^

an-t

Rec. 10, 136, building, abode; Rec. 30, 66.

=
EUD

(I
1

<=>,
oniD

Stone; Copt. OJIte,

IHID

corti

plur. U

Awuw.

(|^ ^
an
13,

|r.^^,
,

an
or
(1

1)^^,1) ^=. = (1^3


fi

1 nnnilii

A
I

hall

of a

tomb
i

plur.

|
1

:=^ eyebrows,

graves, cemetery

^
o o o

Rec.

8,

136, the slain.

an-ti
^^' 1
13,
i,

T. r8, the two

pillars of a palace,

portico (?)
^-^

_ir

aaaaaaCs III'

H<=>^i'iD

Rec.

(g

in'
121

4,

Amen.

Anastasi Pap. I, 25, 4, hair of any kind, covering, colour of hair, colour of face,

cm

a hall of

complexion.

columns, colonnade,

'

[59

]
fl

B.D.

15, 89,
(j

I,

a form of Osiris, the


Litanie 53,

Moon-god;
[n

OT^

rt

],

a form of the Moon-god.

I
the

A^Q^v^,
^
fll

^^,

An

of

An-sebu
Pepi
I.

stars.
''

ii p

A^.
,

T.

289,

An-a

/]

^9' ^^^ divine father of

U. 419, the name of a god.

111

Anit|(](]-^,B.D.G^8,|;Rec.x5,
162, the consort of Saaba,
I

An-smet||p|^
^s

U. 421,

I'P
of the

*^ jj

and mother

^\ ^&=,

T. 241, a

pillar

of Osiris with
title

of one of the seven forms of Harpokrates.

the eyes smeared with stibium, a Bull of Heaven.

Anit
Anit

I (j(j^^,
(II] '^^

Wilkinson A.E. 111,232,

An-k<?, |2^=|,P.<i9.,a.i.leof

a form of Hathor and a goddess of childbirth.

An-ken-mut
[|

|.

Rameses IX,

^^^\n,

pi. 10,

direc-

f|

tress of the serpent

Neha-her,
B. D.
1

^
69, 2 o, the habita11, 23, 16,

Anit

(1

j__|

^,
a god

T.S.B.A. VII, 366, Mar. Aby.


(?)
;

tion of the men-gods,

<=>! \^\^^, fj^^^,


P- 828, N. 772,

An-Kenset
An-tek(?)
An-tt

'"

An-mut-f

1^^^.

^^
'

see

Anmutf.

CO^'

^-Z'?' title of a

'^-

god

^^<J
(?)

^P. 690, the divine


'

mother of Pepi

I.

DenderahIII,3S,|^'=l,/^/..IV,84,|^

|-

-(X,,

the desert between the Nile and Red Sea.

An-tiu
Ill'

,1;

f^^,

IV, 157, Beni Hasan III, 27, a god,

whose exact functions are unknown.


ginal form of the

The

ori-

name was, perhaps,


,

the Eastern Desert, the Troglodytes, Eastern Desert tribes in general, their chief god was

Z^

see

^^~^o ^y\
1

P. 661,

'^^^.
the Eastern Desert.

776^

^. " "
o

An-mut-f

An-ti Set
Desert; plur.

'^j

man of the Nubian

(i) title of the priest at Denderah who personified the god of this name; (2) a bull-god, who presided over the 19th day of the month (3) the
;

| | |
I

god of the 9th hour of the

night,

|||6q!^
Rec. 20, 43.

I^

I'

fjl

Q
in the

An-tiu Sett

Anmut-f abesh
Ombos
I, I,

|\n^

^.

"^[Xil^'
far
',

the dwellers

Jitsmsi'

Eastern Desert as

north as Palestine
18,

252, a star-god.

an-ti
1
;

An-mut-k
^^^-

^-^
fji

"^ ^, Mar. Mast. |^


= An-kenmut,

RS.B.

37,

Nubian bow.

W
rogative.

^
the

an-na

Rev.

as an inter-

^^ana
Anranr?)

^Z:^ ^.

Sphinx

1,

258,

"^^^^
wwv^
'

111

^-^- 3. 80, a form of Hathor.

name

of the original

owner of the D'Orbiney

Papyrus.

[60]
fl

A
Anu
(]

^"^, U.

392; see
sandals.

'^^
(?)

Methen

4,

title,

or

name
(]

of an office.

ana

I]

'^ ^,
I]

anu
a kind of

I)

O Oe^,
[I
1

^^
(J

1,

anu-t
J^
1
I I

^o^.
AWTVW
I

P- 437,

M. 65 1, boat

plant, twig,

branch;

plur.

[1

\I.
I

/V.^^VAA

anun

'^ -^^ "^


AAAft/SA
I I

herbs, plants.

ana

(]

[]

=
.'^

fl

'^^^^i stone.
mini

/^AA^AA

anau, anu
(I

(|

l]

v '

^^^- ^'' ^37.

I; Copt. A.noK, Heb. ""SiM.

gai'^^.^^, Rev.

1 1,

131, see!

CoptittiT.
i)

anauau
(9
(|

J^i)^!]^^'
I]

^^
^^^'
''^'

anuki
k

O
'

Rev.

II,

157,

Heb.

anuk-hu h^
myself; Copt.

(^

Rev. 12, 87,

'^

(1

"^
(]()

a kind of plant.

^.noK

g^CXJ.

anauba
165,
(1

i]

^ ^
i]

4"^""^^'
,

anebQ^,|]^jQ,|)'^jn.

^w^M

(1

(3

^
i,

a bearing pole.

Anaushana
Ana.stasi Pap. IV,

(]'"~0<2|{I}I'^1,
13, i,

^,
^
/)

Rec. 15, no, a kind

Rec.

6,

9,

wall

plur. fl
III'

of plant.

Anaukar

(1^(]^^<-!

[^],
aneb-t
j]

(]^(j^.m.|^,(jq^^^,A.Z.Bd.
43, 97, the disease-fiend Ningal, *-*^ i*^ET !'"

anar-t

fl

:^ =
IV,

fl

0^O>

N- 955.

^,

milk.

anas(]jp^,P.6.r="q]^,N--^99.

(1

Anastasi Pap. V, 20,

2,

a walled
;

ana =

A/A/VW

enclosure, a walled town, a palace, a fortress


,

161, with.

O
<

>

ana

(I

t_

P- 567, chin.

Aneb
15, 48, to

Fill

|["', Israel Stele

3,

a walled

city.

anau
blaspheme ;

^
a

^!,B.D.
o

Nav.

anbi

[1

fl

[ji]

n, a wailed

district.

var. J-,

^
On
(Heliopolis),

am
ani-

man

of

or

anbiti)^J^, Ij^J

singing-man of Denderah.

ql

1]
1
I

J
I I I

fenced enclosures, pounds for

AAiVV/V\ -iiJ

catde, zeribas, the sides of a ship,

dancing-woman of Denderah.

dni

<e<(]|]iiniii,

(][]iiinii,(]

(jflDim,

to surround with walls, to shut in.

Jour. As. 1908, 292, stone; Copt. COIte.

anbu(l'-J^^,lj^jD^.
wall-builder,

anit

(1^(11)7^, 11'''
1

AAftAAft

(l^y^"^, 000 11
I

mason

(?)

A/vy^A^

aneb-hetchtiu
tants of

j]

W -^^

inhabi-

Memphis.

.11'*' (I^^QQ".

:,^^^, twigs, palm-leaves.a *WAAA


I

anebj^ 1%(]'^

J|-^,deRougd.

'

[
fl

61

Peasant

26.
1

AAAAW

J Hi
"^
'

Anp-heri-em-pet-ta-tuat
Ml' 1
AWAN

"W
5,

Jl-ir

1'

Rec. 31, 26, a kind of medicinal plant, herb, or


fruit.
I

^[ra

Cairo Pap.

Ill,

Anubis,

J t

to

dance, to perform acrobatic feats.

governor of heaven, earth and underworld.

Anp
M.

khenti

Ament ^^

f[|]]

^ i^,

T.387,U.7i,N.33r,^fflllT^i'
anbs(?)
46, title of

h '^(s;c)^~-^''^j^, A.Z. 1907,


official

403, Anubis, lord of Ament, the predecessor

an

of Thebes.
h ^1^7

of Osiris.

aneb-t
P- 79.
(]

(?),
1
1]

aneb-ta
,

J
M.

fl

Anp
I

khenti-seh-neter
S\
iiJ

(I

J|

"^^^^
^z::^, lord.
(1
,

N.

22,

(j^^^lj,

109,

m^^ i^TD
I

B.D. 117, Anubis, chief of the


hall of the god.
"ji

dual of

anp
anp
'

B.D. 188,
S), Sphinx text
(I

Anp khenta-ta-uab -^ ^ awaa


4,

(]

D n'

[1

a,

fl

tK M
D

Jri^'
[I

Thes. 1281, child, boy, prince, IV, 157, 898, 994-

"^"^

Anubis, chief of the holy place.

Anp Khenti Ta-tchesertt


.

anp
anep

^^5^

f[[}]o

^'^

swathe, to wrap round.

P. 707, Anubis, prince of the cemetery.

|1

p.,Rec.

29, 157, to decay, to stink.

Anp, Anpu
115.
(]
!_,

(|

m^
36, II,

Anp.a-As4rq7|^j^|.
Anubis, son of Osiris.

>

Peasant
Rec.

2,

^^. Rec.

^,

2, 27,

Anp
'^

f\

/VV/^\A

[I

^^'

Anubis of various cities:

'?

etc.,

Mar. Aby.

I,

45,

Nesi-Amsu

25, 24.

i'

^-p-^^MS^I!-.firo/?het:
the judge of hearts (U. 220); Copt. ^rtOTTIl.
fl
^

Anpu

AA/\AAA

U
I

a-up

fl

Denderah IV,
I,

(I

J|

EdfO

I,

14,

the four

III'

83, god of the 14th Aat.

forms of Anubis

(0

(j

"^^^ -^O

Anp
5^.

j\^
1

^
Cl'

Ombos

62, a

hunting-god
in the South.

worshipped

anp(j^-^^.-a.neofthe^2.t^^^^^^
j\

/*AAA/NA

AAA/VVA

anef

H
AAAAAA

anf
^^=^

[I

/^
I

[I
, I

AAAAAA \\

O
III'

^#-^

^ r-^

J^fT'

(J
I

AAAAAA

Anp-ami.ut
|j

H}-^^B.D.
Will

(3

droppings from the eye, diarrhoea, any kind of bodily exudation.

anem
fl

1^' ^'fl V
fl

Anubis

in the

embalming chamber.
(1

I,

L.D.

Ill,

140B

s,

W
A^^VAAAAAA

who?

Anp
^"^

neb-Ta-tchesertt

J
Tuat v, a
fire,

Copt. niJUL.

Anubis, lord of the cemetery.


FQ
(]

^J'U-543.fl3^

Anp

heni

(](|,

jackal-headed god

who guarded

the river of

a form of Anubis.

AAAAAA

'

11

62]
p.

(1

^YjN

(]

^"iJi.,

Rec.

J^
5, 90,
(|

/vw\/v\

aner-en-bekhenu
1
lllffll

J
CUD

V\

mm)

porphyry.

aner-en-ma
Rec.
3,

(1

irnni

48, granite.

Aner-en-Maat
Sinsin
I,

h
ffiHD

" stone of truth," a


[

title

of Osiris.
<y\,

aner-en-rut
sandstone.

<=>

/^^va

Qm]]

\\ <54v>,

skin of

human beings,

or animals, hide,

aner-en-rut-ent-tu-Tesher
rnnn

H
1

<=>
nnm

pdt;Copt.^.rto^;()^j^I^^^,
Rec. 30, 67.

^ /W,AAAQ^ o
I

Thes. 1286, red


sandstone.
(]

anemu
/.f.,

<e=<
(]

I,

"skins,"
1

aner-en-sen-t
174, a kind of stone.

IV.
nnm
:

qhttth

ill

human

beings.
11

1"^ anem-

AA^/nAA

w
.

f^

aner hetch

^^ ?

h
mrm

^\'

white calcareous stone, limestone.

^^
;

Rec. 14, 195, skin bottles.


[I

aner hetch -nefer- en- rut -t l\<=>


Y T

vessels of drink

plur.

AwA^

Thes. 1285, fine white sandstone.


r\

Rec. 16, 57.

AA/V^A

o
1

aner sept
fn
ill
I
I

(I

<=> A

prepared stone (?)

an-m'k-t

,
I

Greene

II, 17,

home, abode, dwelling.

anerkam
Rec
33,

(]^.!:=3,

^ |^ (J^

anmer
to love.

(|

^,
-~^

35

=
(|

v\

Q
[|
|

black granite.

anr
jj

'

'

anmesit

p g

^^ g

a vase

^?)

cloth, garmoit,

anr anr
fh|

"^j
III

skin head covering.

,
I

Anastasi Pap. IV,

Anenit
desses

(]:}.:(.

r:(j(i;;;.B.D. 168, godvirility.

9,

a reptile

(?),

worm

(?)

who bestowed
n
T

anr
shell of an egg.

liJ.^Pli.BirchI.H.

15,

aner

<=>, De Hymnis 44,


unm
,

a kind of cake or bread.

(^S '^,

gravel,

An-rnt-f^^'^l,!]^^
" the place where nothing grows," a mythological
locality at

stone

Copt. (JOne.
,

anrit
(|

stone, pebble,
1

worked

Hensu

var.

n^

(l

^ cm

(S/WA^ h A

/2\

stone; plur.

(I

I.

anrana (alana)
^-,
,

"ii.-^':ki'
oak trees; Heb. ]^7^<
"^^^
f|
|

~^'>~"

Aner-ti

mnD
,

H
omii

n<e<Qiii!ni H ^ <=>\\iiiiiD
,
(1

IV, 894,

-2^
III
I

the two rocks near Al-Kab j

^^

B.D. 134,

anrahama (arhama)

<~>

aner ua
fl

.-ni-,
nani

IV, 932, monolith.


/v^.^/^^

AAAAAA

aner-en-bda

h ;^^>
EUD

^prif mnn
N
11

basalt.

i'
"^IMI

AAAA/\A

aner-en-benu
o'^
.

Harris

imT^^^^-O'^
I,

i6a,

10,

h
nnm
tmiDJ,

pomegranate; Heb. ^1^', Eth.

'j'iS^

Syr. ntxsio*, Arab.

C^^

:,

Copt.

""^o^

yellow sandstone.

[63]
Anratat
*

[|

AAAAAA
AA/\AAA
T-r

anhem
anherher

^
ftl l
I

^^

^
^
I I

(?)

U. 182, to carry
;

off.

the river Orontes.

anhama
Harris
I,

"^ to rejoice see nherher. :3=><:=>' Jl


U

ra
5,

56A,

pomegranate; see m

W
|

an-khU

ill

OfflD

Turin Pap. 67, n, a kind of stone.

ankhurasmara
w
,
I

Alt.

K. No. 81, a precious stone.

III

anhemen

|]

"j^t:^ |

iv, 73, Rec.

2,

anes
rQ *5^^

|1

a^wv

p.

662,

(]

a^vw

1 1

m.

^ fruit-beanng tree and

774, U. 398,T. 242,


(IaaaaaaX,
I

(j^P^^S,
(1
1

(]

^^,
\\
1 1
1

rn

(I
1

5>

^^~^ 5'
H
1

A/^AAA

AAAAAA

),etc.
AAAAAA

Anhetut
1
I

"iT "^
<:i

I,
I

Q""^

if (

the Singing ape-gods.


4,
5,

a red bandlet, cloth, apparel; plur.

/vnawv

AAA^^^

A
1

aaaaaa

A/WVSrt

^f

AAAAArt

Aw
Copt.

eyebrows; Demotic form,


AA/VW\

Anes-Ra (15^^.^--^^"'"'^^
ans-t

eng,, rt&.

anh(]^|

H^

(j^Poie. l\^Tl
plur.
(J

(]

/SA/WV\

the sole of the foot;


<e=<i
to surround, to enclose, to

w^jv.

Yi ^,

"=^1

embrace, to

ans a.ns-t
rimmed, or banded, with gold.

(I

AAA/wv

ci

the hoof of an animal. a

ans,-t
I

^^ n ^ ^,
AAAAAA
I

kind

III

of plant Gr. UViaOV (?)

anhu Q'^g^^dj, 1 iwwvA A


Jl
I
I

those

who

sur-

round or

encircle,

ans

<e^
III'

Peasant 34, the seed of the same.


king;

anh
anh

(]^Q, (j^^'7,
(1

an

ansu
Jjtffi'

enclosed place of protection, courtyard.

h\w
fl
I

see' nisu'.

ansuti^^-'=],Rec.4,25,^iQ,
St' ^
secret, a riddle.
^^'''^

^"'h a hidden
a reed case, box
(?)

meaning, a

anseb-t

anh-t

[I
1

wv^/v\

A D
JJ
?

vase, vessel.

1]

^,

U- 160, n. 511
to flame (?)

anhasapr?)
^

R qYf H

'
1

Do

a kind of unguent or salve.

anq ^^, Rec.


/J

17,50,1]

^.(l-j^^^,,

to withdraw, to return (?)

An-hefta

"^"^ Tuat IX, a guardian


of the 8th Gate.
.

AA/ww

X ==.'

anq(]7^.
P.

U.236,

anhem
(j

^f^^
"^^
j\

skin,

colour,

667, M.

777,

(]

'^

^ Q,

(]7|;j,
P.

601,

covering; mistake for

J f\

"ttl

'

64

A
anth-t
(^

^=='^

fetter,

cord, cordage, rope,

"^^'
U.

^'
13,

"^^^'^

'^^^'

^ 0'
3,

tackle jplur.

il^^(?.
rwwvv
I

U. 422,

1]

1. 242, M /www

V^

vir,=-,

''

'

o''

/^ Amen.
_fl

3,

P^

to embrace, to gather together, gird round.

Antheti

[1

^^ ^,
fl

Tomb

Seti

I,

one of

the 75 forms of

Ra

(No. 64).

Anq-t
AnnA anqa
n
ij

-^r^.
fl

B.D. 153B,

the net

Antheth

"^^

Tuat VI, a goddess,


functions

used by the Akeru gods


""^^

in snaring souls.

unknown

--

<^
ii|,

Rec.

30,
"

67, cordage, tackle of a boat.

anqefqef-t
tasi

m ^~^^

/i

^' ^"'^^"
of,

ant

^^ "^^
(]

u ~>''^

^^
5^'

to

be

in

need

Pap.

I,

24,

7,

ank,
<e=<
^Y-=.

annk
I

n i)^^|.

n t]^^'

^, ^, ^ ^ ^^ "^
(j

a part of a chariot, or harness.

want, misery, sadness, disgust, trouble.

Antebu

(J

J^
'T',
,

^.d.

99,

7,

"^^^

t];:;:;;:::;

\^

1'

a kind of plant.

(]gJ(2^;_3|,agod.
anetch
j]

protector,

defender, advo,

ank
ank

^2'

'''^'

* ^^"^''' ^ ""estrani.
cate, avenger; see ^-=.

U ^-=!|

t. io,

(J^,fiend;plur.
(1

(JY

tj^

^^l"
netter,"

Anku
a god who
.
.

'^, Tuat VII, "the

anetch
to

\, to strike, P. 204.

fettered the foes of Osiris.

h'^S<^L^
^JS'
11

bind up or cripple [the


toes].

anetch her

I)

^^M
ant-t

^ '^ <^'

^-

^^'

'^
/wvAA

II

(>

cord,

rope,

chain;pl.ant-ut,l|2e,,l)^^V|,,,(J^^^^^,
thee
'

the opening words of

many hymns

see

Rec. 31,

17p.

-pyj^i-

Ant-t

X, the chain by which


is

t]

^
(]

f. Aapep

fettered to the earth.

antch

m' four gods who slew Aapep.

Antiu

"^

'^"^^ ^' ^

^""^

^
I
l]

^,

to suffer grief or

pain, oppressed, depressed.

antch-t

"^
g,

grief,

sorrow, pain.

ant l|--^^^,
f1

^4.

*S=4

^ Hymn
,

of Darius 13, to stifle, to choke, to close up.

antcher
T. 386,

,^.

l)

dnti-tU
4nt-t
1]

n ^5

B^

>
,

hindrance, obstruction.

M. 394,
1
,

to grasp, to seize.
if.

^
^ ^,

|,

N. 682

ar
ar

a conditional particle, when,

an emphatic particle; also used


e.g.,

intu

I]

L.D.

III,

140B

= o
,

^
Darius

with other particles,

|l,
(j

^_J_^

AntriUSh
see

jl ll

.2^
^''-'''-

[j (|

^^

XT !)<=:> (j^. J^^, ^>^,J^


Rev.
6, 12.

'^

[jlj

IM'
''~-~^

"n

m H T<- "TS
E^T? -S-KStele 73,

ar

A^ =

*=^>.

""oi^e

than;

(1

<-yy-^

Babyi. T
(]

EKT

-TW
,

Antesh

Mettemich

a mythological animal.

"

[65]
ar
J^, an
old form of the preposition <;:=>,
as, against, until.

ari

ab (?)

.<s>- '^

to

do the win of some-

at, by, to,

towards, as far

one, to carry out the intent of someone.


to-

ar ar ar

j]

21

<r>

preposition

<c:z>

to,

wards, etc.

ari ar-t <s>(j

:^,
'g

to milk an animal.

l\

^^^

Nastasen Stele ii, 22, 25, 26, 32 = preposition

ari aterti

(i?l

f^'

'^"""'"Eoye^Egypt'^
' ^^^^^ the irrigation

(]| W

preposition <:z> to, towards, from, etc.


i"to

ari a (?) '"^rl'.


ari

of a
,

district.

ar-her

l]^^?. ijg^f.
someone
;

aukh

f
c^
'

P.S.B. 10, 47, to

the presence of

Copt, eg^peit.

take an oath, to perform what one has sworn


to do.

ar, ari

(1

^s:^, U. 586, P. 16, 96, -;2>-,

ari ant

Jhy~^

worker on the

nails,

,:^,
<2>-

||-C2:^(|[|,P.

i9o,M. 392,

manicurist.
,

ari antch. <2>- 3cx:

to heal, to

make

to

recover, to restore to soundness.


I)

^ ^,

Rec.

21,

76,

(]

ari ua-t (?) <2>- ^^,

to travel, to journey.

ari uat-shu
do, to create, to form, to fashion, to beget, to

-<2>-''~*^

"^r

^> Rec 19,


to heal.

produce, to pass the time, to be made, done,


created, etc.,

92, to

work

at the trade

ofa
,

and used

as an auxiliary; Copt.

ari

utcha

^cs:^

-^ ^i;
J
A
;

eipe

^^^^ss-, do not ; Copt. XJCnp,


Nastasen
vT^'

Sinep
66

ari baka-t o:^


conceive, to

K^:
ari

Stele

=
ari-t
(]

^ ^
\_\
,

^,

to

cy^"T"eqeipe.
nj]

<s>-, to visit,

'cn^

^a^^^
man who

<2>-

pequ

become pregnant D

Copt. epfi^OKI.
to prepare

food. to

ffl

^C\

fv"^ " any other


,

visited

ari

em hetep
\\

work

Amam";

contentedly.

-s>-

the mine region."

,__ j^^, "I


army

visited

ari hetep

^s>-

%>

to

do what

ari <2>-,

ought to be done.
to serve in the
1

"a second time

served."
to,

ari
wwv\
to

em qaa
oneself like someone, to feign to be
else, to disguise oneself, to

an
^

.<s>-,to

amount

make

someone
,

pretend.

IV, 666, "amounting to 1784 teben."


to pass

ari

em tena-t
r

l^okto
AAftA/VA
I

III

an
-ff

the time

_D

register jister oneself, to enrol one's t

name.
3

III eight days in exploring."


I
I

"

J\

"\ passed

ari-t

maat
a
life

^K
of integrity.

1,

to practise

right, to lead

ari
page.

abu
to cease.

Y Jjv^ 7^

to

make

a stop-

ari m'k-t
'

to protect, to spread

the wings over young.


,

I.e.,

ari-t
,

menkh-t

todothg

ari aau-t

<2>-Y

to

occupy an

office.

very best work.

to enjoy a dignity, to exercise the functions of

Ari

metcha
I I

a certain

ofifice.

L. SS:>^

to write a book. to benefit to

ariaakh os.-'^
/Till'

someone, do good to.


'" perform

ari
<2>- ^

ari dui .o>-

f)

\\

'^ ii

'

^ P""^'^^a service of praise.

en
'

<s>- nwj^
'
'

made

by,

produced by,

produced by the lady of the house,

w/wvo

CTD'

"born of the lady of the house."

'

[66]
ari

A
ari

ennu

<=:=>

'

o,

Rec

21, 80, to

do

hem-t
J|
,

-CS>-

^
;

a thing continually.

ari nefer

<^ J ^.
.<2>T''~

'

P""^"
^^eiL
to have inter-

to live with a wife

<2>-

^ ^

Jj

to pass time in philandering.

ari nefer-t

ariher.<2>- |
ari hes-t

^
fi

S\.,
,

to terrify.

course with a virgin.

^s^

to

do the pleasure

ari

neh

["=0'
-C2>-

to protect

of someone, to
to protect.

make someone
<
,-^-',
I I

pleased.

ari nekhi ari

^^

/) ,

ari khet

to

do

things, to

be

active, to acquire wealth, to sacrifice.

nekhen
^^^^

to

renew one's

youth, to act as a youth.

ari
to deify.

kheperu

to effect

ari neter

""^^ transformations, to take different forms ; ^ss-

_'
"'"^^

they changed their forms.


h
(

arinetch^t^'"^'^%'rrt
ari

Ill

kheru

i,

Rec. 21,

ari-netchemm-t-am-henen

n -s>-

87, to thunder.

ari kher-f <->-<^,

'"^

p^'^"" ^'^

J^lf
magical passes over someone.
to repeat.

M. 529, N.

108, to masturbate.

ari rethu aqeru


h

-co>-

w^
^^7
to

ari sa <s>ari sep sen

to

make
II

^
ari

%, to appoint
Haker
hep er
<==>

"trustworthy people."

D D

ari

sem
;

1\

to greet with

-s::^ fD
festival.

celebrate the

Haker

good words

Copt. pcJU-O-r (?)


|,

ari
in

ran

c=>,

to set the law to

ari senther -s>-

C < >

s= ^,
III

<2>-

000
to play the

motion against someone.

make an
ari
ari

offering of incense, to cense.


-'^s^-

an hru
ari
day of

to pass the day.

sekhem
sekheru

Y
1

'

sistrum.

w <z=>or
<s:^<c:=>T, to make a
-<s>-

hru nefer
-<s>-

n<|>

|.

to devise

rejoicing, to celebrate a festival.

plans, to arrange

men's destinies, a
at

title

of one

of the

Khensu gods

Thebes.
,

ari hett ari

rO

^
to

to praise.

ari sesh

to act as a scribe, to

ha
;

<2>-

',

make magical passes


<s=- -<e:^
,

copy a document or book

O i'
;

over the dead

"W
n

^y
Vi^
O
III'

to

to act as a scribe, to copy


I

<s>;

make magical
ari-t

passes over the eyes.

heb

<3>- Q

to

do into writing
,

<2>-

to celebrate a
festival.

111'

IV, 1004.

ari
cloth,

hebsu

<s>-

JP
to

to

make
ari seshsh -s>-

i.e.,

to weave.

Of

^^.to
'^.
^^

arihep-t

<e:

0'

i.e.,

work the paddle, to row a boat.

play, or rattle, the sistrum.

arihemu^\^,^^|^^N^,
to

ari

seshem kh[n]s <5>->K

to praise.

work the steering oar or rudder,

to steer,

dri

hem <=>-^/

work

at

a trade or
handicraft.

^ri seka ^2>- p


plough.

U "^ ^

to

^-fl

'

[67]
ari-t setep

l\

sa(?) ^^^

"'"",

to

make

Ariti

<:3>Jl|, Rec. 15, 178, a goddess.

magical passes, to perform magical ceremonies with a view of securing protection from evil, to
visit

Arit-aakhu
a star-goddess.

"'^^'^^ ii.
h

Tuat vii,

the Court.

ari
<zr>

Shen
,

<2>-

"^j^

hairdresser

Ari- Amen o^-

^^^^

^
] I

a god.

chief hairdresser at

Yj.

Court
"doer of

Arit-aru(?)

arikat ^;^,^=, '^"c^.,


the Splendid

^M
<2>-

Tuat
'

VII,

star-goddess.

Ari-maat

!,

Ui

Works of

the

Lord of the

Two

Lands,"

t.e.,

the royal Clerk of the Works.

"doer of the right," a name of Osiris and of other deities.

ari gestep D ari ta-t tep-f n

^
W
I

^SS,
'^-^
c^

to protect.

Ari-em-ab-f <2>-^j^ ^,6.0.125,


II,

'^^

one of the 42 Assessors of

Osiris.

<=>

IS

he who has laid


earth,

his

head upon the i.e., the dead man.

Ari-em-aua
<s>XJ
.<s>^

"^^^^

TT"

[1

1, Rec.

4, 28,

ari tchet

^^^ <=>

'-=*j

to

make

a speech, to
say.

e=.('

ariu"^/]/)^ .21
-<2>- A A fV

working men,
.<2>-

slaves,

servants.
,

n
night

L=J1, Berg.
;

I,

(i)

one of the four grand-

arit
ing

!,

work-

sons of Horus
;

women.

(3)

(2) god of the 6th hour of the god of the 15th day of the month.

*-^ *'" f;.


v\

Tr,-^^!\\
who make,
etc.

Ari-en-ab-f "^^^"^
AAftA/V\

^.-^

J
i
I

b.d. ho, 42,

a blue-eyed god in Sekhet-Aaru.

Ari - entuten - em-meska - en Nem3


I

workers, doers, those


Ci

urA^;^^A/:;;;:vAi\

ari-t <ss(of

(1(1

IV, 901, made,

^^i^MPu^^^fe,,
fflPLj'
19, the leathers of the

artificial

B.D. 99,

magical

boa*t.

lapis-lazuli).

Ari-ren-f-tchesef ^^-2r| i.
7,

Berg,

i,

ari-t ^2:^(j() o,T.342,(j<s^']|,P. 191,

Rec.

4, 28,

^
(4)

^_ .2n
month

,^'^J^:
;

(]^,P.r7o,^,<^(j(]o,<^(](]^|,
A X2
l\

(i)

one of the four grandsons of Horus


;

(2)

god

^ <=>,
iir

<2>-

of the loth day of the

(3) a part of the

somethmg done, work,


act,

the act of
;

magical boat

god of the 8th hour of the day.

working, deed,

a thing to be done

plur.

Ari-hetch-f
ari-khet <2>a
title

<^ -^
?^
I 1 I

fl

=^,

"creator of his light," a god.

^ o
ari-t

'

c.

Ill

^
*,

work of

all

kinds.

" maker of things,"

of several gods and kings.

creature ; plur
.

creatures.

Ill'

human

beings, mankind.

Rec. 32, 176,


" worker,"
i.e.,

Tuat VI, the 12 gardeners of

Osiris.

the creative god, as opposed to


is still, i.e.,

Ari-ta

''^^^,

Rec

27, 189, a title of Ptah.

the god whose heart


Osiris.

<=>

'

fl

Arit-ta-theth
Ari-tchet-f
-<2>-

(?)

Tuat X, a lioness-goddess.
I,

Ari -o^-^, Ombos


the 14

i,i86-i88,oneof

Kau

of Ra.

the god and festival of the 9th day of the month.

A
&T
Copt,
,

[68

A
Ar-ti-m-tches
.<s=^
15, 17,

to see

compare Heb. Hb^'l and

eiojp^

(?)
;

Rec.
Copt. lOpgj.

one of the 42 Assessors of

Osiris.

ar

'

the pupil of the eye

Ar-t
,

Ra
eye of Ra, the mid-day sun.
,

ir-ui
-C2>eyes.

This reading
is,

is

very doubtful

the correct

Ar-t-Ra-neb-taui
?ex

Om-

reading

perhaps, something hke the Coptic

bos
,

I, I,

47, a serpent-goddess.

ar-t
p

-<2>- -<S>- -<2>, ,

<^>p,

-CS>-

o,
Copt.

-^ ]
eiiX,
U.

Ar-t-Heru
I

-<2>-

^,

N.

421,

the eye; compare

fj.
91, 112, 117, the

a seeing, a looking, look, glance, the faculty or act of seeing, sight, vision
evil eye.
;

Eye

of Horus,

?.^.,

the sun;
,

and 61 in eiepfi-OOItt",
E3^

fern.

.^B-

^^^

Denderah IV, 81

ss^^^.

ar-t

em ar-t

-<2>-

U. 37, the two eyes of Horus, one black, one


-<S>,

eye to eye.

white;
the southern

vS, 1, T. 196,

P.

678, N.

1292,

ar-ti .<s=-.<2>-, U.
<2>-,

63,

>U. 551,
-cs>-

Eye of Horus

<2>-

p. 167,

<=
o

w
;

OO o '^

U. 37, the two Eyes of Horus


'

= <2>- '^ and


i
'

O, the two eyes

-o^-, eyes.

<2>-7r;, P. 264, 265

'CBs^

^^

^- 5^^' 'he

ar-ti

en nesu

<2>AAWVAA

a
I

title

of an

green Eye of Horus; .<2>- *^.


white

i, N. 519, the

T T

/V*AA/V\
1

official.

Eye of Horus
of Horus.

ar-t nebt
-<s>- V

,
I

the

red

Eye

-<s>-,
.
,

-<2>-,

I,

xS

" every

Ar-tHeru^J^^^,U.
the

83,

eye,"

i.e.,

all

persons, everybody.
,

Ar-t (?)

B.D. loi,

4,

the

Eye of Eye
of Horus, a name given to offerings.

seven cubits with a pupil of three cubits.

Ar-t-aabt
the
left

%,

% -o^i.e.,

j|

Thes. 104,

Ar-t
Ar-t

Heru hetch-t o:^'^ i d


[1
,

'Tp,

eye of Horus or Ra,


,

the moon.
i.

a ceremonial garment.
^^'e of Khnemu 1 "^ k "l fj "^ khnemu. ci Khnemu "^^^ fi s^, p. 444,
^-i

Ar-t-ua
"one
eye," a
title

B.D. (Saite) 1x5,

of the Sun-god.

Ar-t

Ar-t-unem-t^|^^,B.D.r7,
71, the right eye of Ra,
i.e.,

the sun.

N.
'*' Ar-t-unemi .^^\ li "^^^l;. ^"""l of Sinus and Ra.

130,

"Eye

of

Khnem,"

the

name

of the

boat of Her-f-ha-f.

Ar-t-utt (?)

Ar-t
a goddess.

Shu

P^^^EyeofShu,/..,
the day-sun.

Ar-ti-f-em-khet

^^ ^^ 01

one of

Ar.t(?)Teb
.
,

^^ ^

J ^,
,

T.

245,

the 42 Judges in the Hall of Osiris.

Ar-ti-f-em-tes ^^^ w
B.D.
125,
II,

^^^
,

J (]^, 428, a god.


Pap. Mut;

Ar-t (?) Tern


hetep
5,

"Flint-eyes," or

"Fiery-eyes,"
;

a god of Sekhem, one of the 42 Assessors

varr.

Eye of Tem, the

setting sun

fern.

Denderah IV,

81.

. '

69

A
ar-ti ar-ti
(
III
,

Ar-ti-tchet-fr?)

^^^"^^
,

the

a kind of seed or grain

(?)

god of the 9th day of the month.


ar,
U. 4^1,

l\

some

strong-smelling

aru

(|

<2>,

|, N. 119,

(]^^

^^
rite

Rec. 27, 217,

^, ^^^
(]

substance, or disagreeable sensation.

ar
Rec.

(1

-^^^, to be oppressed ;
109, greatly oppressed.

-wvw

[I

H
2,

!>

J*f

,l)oj,l]c|,(]o^j|,form,f,sure,
;

oppressed one, a

man

in trouble.

image, ceremony,

plur.

[I

o:^

vS N.
,

213,

Ari-t

h -<s>- llh

Tuat V, the gate

of the 5 th division of the Tuat.

ar-ut
ar-tit h

part of the magical boat^

5, blue garment.

ar-ti U
which

<=>

^ ^1
N. 391,
Ij

coloured cloth of

flags are

made.

Arti(?)
T. 245, 330, the divine forms in the Tuat.

-<s:

'TT, Tuat IX,

god

who swathed
ari
Ij

Osiris.

ar
.

(1

<:^> wwNA,
ft

river; Copt.
/^

eiOOp.

[|

<::^

(j(],

(]

.^>
(|,

(],

N. 1164,

<:;;;;>

-wwvv
AA(WNA
1

<^
I

Ci

moisture, flow of water.


1 7,

"^,

[]

'^,

r. 663,

<^^

P. 204, 961,

ar-aa ^^"^
the Nile; Copt,

-ww^

Herusatef Stele

eiepo.

YJH

he who belongs
is

to something, or

someone,

one who
P.

in charge, keeper; dual,

(I

<z:>^-(|(l,

391,

M. 557, N.

164;

plur.

||

<=>

^,

P- 433,

1)

<=>
fl

'

- ^'

^i-

619,

(]

-^^

I)

Rec. 32, 183,


||

^
see

||[|

Rec. 13,

4, 21,

^"/^\'^'
ari U '^~^

"24;Copt. epHTf.

milk

CoiJi.

epoJXe;
(|

fl

s=* ^.
68,
[j

Wi^>

'''^ ''"^"

whose duty

it

was to attend to something;

fern.

(I

V^

J)

artu (arut)

-<e>-q%^, u.

<o>.

ari
(1

i)^5[]A^,Rev.
Y^
,

II, 139, 12, 25,

<2>-

friend, associate,

companion.

who

give suck, nurses

(?)

ami
(1

^^^^

%
(](]

^f^,

stalled

ox;

plur.

^^'
arit
(1

'

cattle for sacrifice.

<s>-

c ^3,

V^J ci

that

which appertains to someone or


office,

milch cow.
something, the duty of someone,
appoint-

ment.

beans

Copt. ^pCA), Arab.

iri aui

Jj.

j]

''^ W

^>
1

""''

"'tt^

^''T Egypt. Upper


E 3

'

, -

[70]
(j

ariu aakhut

'^ '^
^^
.

^ - Ipylon-keeper
;

dwellers in the horizon.

plur.
(|

an aru "^
priest of the loth

'^

'

^ Jp Nome
,

^^ ^ ^

t'tie

of the high

of

Upper Egypt.

Ari-ar-t-tchesef
Rec.
4,

^
jj

"^^^
(^

^:^,
tei pet

28, a god.
iJj n

4ll^.l\^4^.
i.e.,

ari as-t

throne attendant.
'^
^

belonging to the heavens,

divine being, or

Ari-as-t-neter

!> T"^'

^^>

bird; plur.

guardian of the divine throne

(j*^^,

U. 430,
(j

^^

ari aui

^,T.246,(]<^^()|)^,P.39i,M.5S7,

'A
i.e.,

belonging to the arms,

brace-

lets,

armlets.

4ri a-t

(]

<=>

1^

steward,

housekeeper.

;^ o CTD'
1074.
[]
[

ariaa fj'^.^.N.

q
IIMIIlll

.P.6sr.

Ari-peMi<^3,DenderahIV,^7^9,^a

imiiiii

ari4pehui(]^_af,<-''fj-ies
ari petch-t
h
y

inmnr
|

^^^ bow-master,

iipi|)i

Wi,

y^|l

porter, ..^, iirninT


'

doorkeeper;
'

plur.

'

bow-bearer.

H^M
III
iiiiiiiii
I

iiimni

^
of Horus. h

an m'

^:zM-^iii-i
IIIMIIII

Ari aui
th6

vj)
miimr

B.D. G. 608, keeper of


;

^1^1^ 11^
arimenkh-t
Ari mehiu
arinitC?)
(]

'

master of the scales. a title of Anubis.

Two

Gates (Egypt)

title

^ M-

^-p^^.^^UI^
>

Ari-aa-em-as-t-maat

l-J}

h
T

^^ <=> ^3! WVAA

M\> '^^'^
T 1 _ZI
I I I

Cairo Pap. VII,

4,

a lioness-goddess,

Tuat V, the keeper of the drowned

in

the Tuat.

"O

keeper of the throne in the Hall of Judgment.


"^^^^

^
^

>3
,

11

?5^ N.' '

--

Ari-aa-en-Asar
1
IIIIIIIII

^^^ %. "
"^

]]

ari

Nekhen w]
;

title

of high rank or

.<2>-

N. 1074, the doorkeeper of

Osiris.

learning

see

Nekhen.

Art-aa-nt-pet
P. 651,

(I

^q_

Ari-nebaui l^<=>
,

J
T T

f^
1)

fj

^^

M.

752, the doorkeeper of heaven.


1

Tuat

I,

keeper of the fire, stoker, a firegod.


h

dri

aau V^ ^"^
()

Ari-nefert
,

<=>

ass-herd.

^^f

Tuat iv,

Ari-anb-f

keeper of the boat's tackle, a sailor of Af's boat.


J

-^ '^'=^, Tuat

viii,

Ari-ti-nefert
of the virgins.

"^^^
h

^^ J|

keeper

a dog-god in the Circle Aakebi.

dri anti (|''^^^^^vf)^;^LJl^, Quelques


Pap. 67,
title

ari neter
i

<=> 1
I

,
1

belonging to the god, sacred property.


"]

of an

official

of the "

House of

Ari-t-neter-s
Tuat
I,

Life,"ir-D -^ era.

p. "X* 1 P' attendant on her god, a singing-goddess.


(]

"^

'

^
[71]
ari sebkh-t n)
3

ariretui(j^>^fl2ii'^T
^^
,

H
h

"^

>

gatekeeper.

belonging to the
1

feet, i.e.,

anklets.

Ariu sem-t (?)


672,

<=> %>

Ari-ret-ur

| ^=f

c^td, p.

B.D. 141, 61, the divine keepers of cemeteries.

ariseshem i]<=>Y^P"^^' ^'


N. 1276, " keeper of the Great Leg," a god.
Rec. 26,
7,

keeper of the slaughter-house

(?)

ariretui

vf)

ft ^J
Ji
(j

^^^- 33-

6, associate,

companion.
ra

Ar-Stau
1
I

~^

C^O^a, a portion of

Ariu-hut

^^

^^,

B.D. 168,

the

kingdom of Seker the Death-god.


(]<==> %>Y^

gods who directed the food supply.

Ariu-stau-amenhiu

(1

^
ari

-=S?

^c^^

captain,

title

of a priest.

31 (Nebseni), the overseers of the slaughtering


gods.

ari heb

O
M

director of the festival.


'

ari qeb-en-she-en-shet -S

|zij^^
in the

hemu

^ ^^\^,
(]

steersman.

=2^

X r\

(!

keeper of the bend

Lake

of Fire. h

Ari-hems-nefer

"^ J ^

"V"

Ari kenem
ari-t ta h
earth,
i.e.,

.^^^^-k, Ombos
vfl
U
I

i,

i,

252, the keeper of the Dekans.

^^^^

belonging to

a man, or animal.

whose wife was Tefnut

(I

KD

Ariu-ta (]<3>^=-=,
o

|]<=>^^
earth. ^"^
,

AA

Arensnuphis.

0=?^^, U. 431, T. 246, the denizens of


U

Ariu-ta (?)

(]

<=>

'

B.D. 168,

overseer of the cultivators.

the four water-gods in the Tuat.

ari thetthet

(1

w
(E

Ari-khabu

Ij^-^l^J^T^.
i.e.,

Amen.

22,

20
h
(3

Tuat VI, master of the scythes, Seven Reapers of Osiris.

of the

ariu tha-t

ili

fill

s^
'

Amherst Pap.

28,

companions

in

theft,

S:

71

fellow robbers.
'1

^khekh^J|,qf^|VJe.
[1

Ari-tes l\<=>'^

5^, Berg.

I,

<i^, Ijelonging to the neck,


;[|

i.e.,

collar.

34

necklet

='flTJk"=-^""''^ ci
o
I

"

Edffi I, I. 1 3D, keeper of EdfCl the slaughtering knife.

'^.

i'>ni<\

irisipu!l-^pi)o^|j,
B.D.
17,

aru

^l:
,

bandages,

mummy

swathings.

123, keeper of the divine register of

to remove, to transport

ar(j^i^,(j<c=>^c=.,---

n-\M
ariu sura
jj

^r-t U
see

(1

<i=t^, a skin roll, a

book;

vvvftAA

^Hs

butlers,

men

in charge of drinks.
-mmnr

ar-ti
see

I]

^_>_>,

the two jawbones,

arisba

(j*^^ ^^J

i i

ii iiii

'

doorkeeper.

o w
E 4

I\

[72]
Wort. I02, deaf(?)
i
,

1
IV, 670, honey wine;

arr (j''^^^,

I]
j-j

=^

-Tl-,

Rec. 13, 7-5, wine by "'*' ^ measure

'

oCa Hd
1,

III'

grape seeds

Copt.

eXooXe.
I

wine shop;

(1

^^

wine cellar;
'"

^
jar.

'^ I? ^ I ^ "f"'
I

''""'

'^^ "'""'

'

17,
I

Alt K. io6, a wine

drr-na

(]^^^T;-<>,b.m.
H

21
||

^
I,

'
I

5633, a pot (?)

wine of the Southern Oasis.

Ari

(]

<c=>

\,

Tuat

^rp
a singing-god.
districts;
*'''

(I

Arar-ti
desses, Isis

(|

^^ ^ ^ ^'
(?)
(1 fl

uraei-god-

(j

^ wine of various ^ Ms ^ ^'


,

kinds and
'^' ^'"^

(^

'

and Nephthys

of Pelusium T. 119;

(j

=0=

i~^^ -A&.
^'-

ari

||

-cs^-

knife,

weapon.
A.Z. Bd. 38, 17,

l]

Q
;

O
(1

'^'^'^^

^^ ^,
*^.
'

148,

Ari
a proper

(]

^""^ Od ) \^,
'^'^.

cedar wuie
T. 121,
;^

(I

a^ww

/vww X]

name =

wine;

:0=

T. 122,

wine of Syene.
Rec. 35, 57,

name
<s>-

of a fiend, hostile being.

arp

(j

"^
(1

wine plant, vine.

ari-t

(1

(jfl

/Ci^,

fruit,

produce,

arpi[t]

(]|]

*^,
I I

product, food.
,

to rot, to

to ferment.
,

land, estate.

arutana

(1

16

arpi
(]

'^
,

^i)

i^'

J"''-

-'^*-

^908, 300,

Voc. the name of a disease


temple

arut(?) (]<^^L=il,||<=>;^^,
to
tie,

; Copt. pne.

to fetter, to rob

||

<:=>

%\ '^

LJ)

"^

arpi-t

^
,

>

^^''"^ '^"P

(*) ^''''^^

TTT
arb

M5i , poor man, one robbed of his goods.


I

aref

(1

B.D. 52,

3,

an emphatic par-

.2^

*J^'

to be shut in, driven


in
;

Copt

Ojpfi..

*-"'"
Annales
4,

129

^TJl^B.
p. 724, "(S^i,

arm
arm
(Syrian,

(I

^^^

L.D.

ii,

49B, a word used

in connection with a blowpipe.

arp
]5^

(]

'^,
,

U. 43A, \
^-

"^
^*^'

(]

<=>

^ ^ ^.

man

of

Aram

p.

243,
(]

^ H ^'
I D

Mesopotamian).
i

Armu(?)^^^]
Pap.
4, 3,

Roller

a tribe in the Sudan. Thes. 926, a god.

'I

III'

^111'

III'

#'

Armau|]<=.|^^

M.

719, N.'i327, winej Copt.

Hpn

\\
;

|]

'

[73]
Arkanatchpan
1^
Alt.

k-"fli^&iM
Treaty
Copt.
lo,

H g?i

LJ

with,

along with; see

nix.
[1

K. n6, a god whose functions are unknown.


/I /I

armen
Aranth
I I I

see

remen.
k

ark-ta :a|].^^'^ll
1

.^^- Rechnungen

59,

S
/

'a

kind of wood.

h
1
I

ft/VVWA /Wvv\

lV^*J^A

Art (|^|J|a_^,Rec.i4,ii,(]^^,
the

'^'^'^^^

AAAAAA

Mett. Stele,
the Tuat.

p.

19,

note 15, a serpent-fiend in

/WWiA

r
5??^

River Orontes.

Ar-hes

JJ

'

^
;

P. 231. the Tuat.


>

^ lion-god.

4rt4tchar
Rec.27,
a kind of bird.

arekh (]"^, u..i4,(l"^^,


57, to

l)^l,](li\
,
I

know, make

to

know

see

arth-t
(]

^ ^^
J,
(]

U.

20, T. 338,

arkhekh(?)
(|

^^
I

Theban
III

368, P. 247, milk.

Ost.

No.

4,

a mineral.
(j*"^^^^

Artheth-aa-sti (?)
414,

(|

s=i *^, Tomb

ArkMm Khertt-neter
^
ffl

of

Rameses IX,
S'^t
(1

pi.

10,

god of the serpent


,

"

", B.D.

(Saite), pi.

72; Denderah

I) (1

ns' www
a measure

moisture, liquid.

83, a lioness-headed

goddess in Aat XI.

artb
Gr.

Copt.

epTofi,

tifndpi],

Arab, ardeb.
cries of

T. 286, 370, P. 69, 670, M. 174, N. 687, 760,


1272, to

wake

up.

oVi/ln^ n^r-i^to utter


ahu
(]

Arsi

^^ W
h

%
ill

^'-

''

42.

B.D. 181,

14,

a god.
'o'
,

^
ra

nn

cries of joy.

arr-sa

""^^

after.

aha
Obel. Hatshepset,

(]

'^,

P. 42,

M.

62, N. 29,

Arsu
Kubbin

^E>- 1

^
4=

r^

Stele 4, " his maker," the king's

god

(?)

shouts of joy.

Arsu
who
ruled
dynasty.

(1

g?^
at

^
1

>

^ Syrian general

ahai

\\

m
!

Mira
O
!

Egypt

the

end of the XlXth

hail

hurrah

cries

of acclamation.

ahahai
,

\\

ra

ra
I

Rev.

6, 6, ^^, 3, .\rsinoe.

arq

^7

to roll up.

aha(hi?)
"^^e of a serpent amulet.
JIIII'

(]

ra
!

(],

T.

185, 287, P. 371

ara fl*~~^? 4' H A

^^'

'9^>

'*^i

M.

820, N. 42,

O
I]

moan,
ra
,

cry, hail

abah
I

(j

ra

U. 295, a shout of joy.


ra

arqabas
Roller Pap.

(j^^.^^^f
J*g:^
;
I

4, 3,

a kind of stone

compare Heb.
\\

ahi(]ra
ra Q Q

\\\,

I]

()(],

(JrallC
!

tr-'nj-^N, Arab.

irk

0^^, ^
1
^;=::^

^^^\, crystal (?) A ^.i"- 266,


H '=:=^

^
\\

a cry of joy,

hail

hurrah

N. 1244,
a god.

ahit

rn

a cry of joy.

'

[74]
fl

f|

ahh, ahha, ahi

I]

j|.

I)

[^

I)

ahi

[j

raljljc^, [jra^crz], camp,


(1

Kec.3.6s.qmqqg,

qmqqii

courtyard; plur.

ra ra

(](]

>

Israel Stele

7.

()ra|](j|,Rec.6..37,l)g@lllj|,cryof
joy,rejoicing;plur.(jra(]l]gj,(|^ra(j(jg|.

ahi
house

n aua

(|

(jfl

"^ -^^^

(|

-f] ^y^^'

for cattle, cattle-shed.

ahhi

(]

^
I I

ahi
ra HI
(jfl

(]

ra ra

'V27, a

festival.

()[]

^, grain.

ahb
sadness,
misery, trouble, calamity, affliction.

[1

J
ra

4^, to

rejoice,

be

glad.

n
'

rn

S "^^

ahbut
pare

[j

^^

j'

^^'^^

''
;

'5,

dancing- women, love-women, concubines

com-

ahai ()^ra
death sentence.

5V

death cry.

VnnN(jra

ahbu
i,

J'^l^lltl,
workmen.
|,
(]

IV, 504, a

ahi(]^ra(j(jx'^
woe, death wail.

a cry of

class of officials or

ahm
to

(|

ra
r-i

ahi

[1

rn

^\
^R\
,

^
ra

ra

^,

Rec. 30,

make
go

to go.

,,
to

^, Q, n 72, 33, Si,

f\ 7^, A to Ijra^

drive ashore (of a

bW

aha
see ra

q rO

to

in,

to

make

embark

ahm

(]^,(]
7,
(]

"^ J\

M. 691, 696.

Rec. 30, ji

^g^. (]^^^. ^^. ^^|>


Thes.
1

199,

(j

ahai-t

Thes. 1206, groaning, grief; Copt.

i^^OXX.

l)(]^,(] ra^(|(]:r-=i,Mar.Karn.S2,r5,
I

A.Z. 83, 65,


1)

ra

^ ^ ^
ij()

^t
ahn

^*'^' ^'^'
i

'^^'
fl

'

^
Mar.

^^'^^^'

c?o'

.
j

cow-byre.

smelling gum, incense, unguent.

stable,

any outhouse on a farm, chambers, dock.


(1

ra
iniMiii

' v:^,*-'

B.D. 145,

3, 12,

a wooden

instrument.

ahir (?)

(]

^
;

J^ ^

^ ^,
f . Oh
(]

Kam.

52, 7,

'

'"^'

^^^^"^^''' ^'^"cing.

camels'-hair tents

Heb. ^i^'^-

ah

I]-

and; Copt. OTfO^,.


,

ah
sistrum player.

(1

^=

Mett. Stele 39, to

crj'.

ah, ahi(?)
(j

ahab
d,ham
A
|
I

(lra^jA,(||>ra^>,
fly

1^^.

i^f^ei

Stele 2 2, cry of grief.

to send a messenger, to let

(an arrow).

(j

ra

'^^^^.
^^
(of
,

ah
Ahem,
10, 7,

P.S.B. 24, 46, interjection,

"Jk

"-'

.M

^--^^^

(1

^^'

Israel Stele 25,

mourning,

ah ah

(]

lament; Copt.

A-^OXX.
(]

I
I

to go.

dham

ra

to run aground (of

5^,
(|

I)

I
,

f=Si, Rec. 21, 92,


plur.

a boat), to drive ashore

a ship).

5f^, ^,

'-^

i^

ox; Copt, eg^e

*hil]ra(|i,ljral]^/"-S:

^i-

fll^i' (l|e5^.-^en.

cattle;'

'

, ;

A
-w^ V^
I
I

75]
ah
I]

'fcjj

of the

foreign

cattle

&;,
{

a girdle,

collar,

necklet,

^i

iZ\'

^i

^1,

cattle of

something worn round the neck or body.

certain weight.

ah ah

(||
(]

rope, cord

plur.
()

|^-

'^i

papyrus, marsh flower; plur.

Bubastis A. 34, cow.

Ah-pet
heaven," the

I]

"^

yc,

M. 704, " ox of
and

name

of a

star.

ah-tesher

h^H '^
,

a kind of plant
,

its

seed

[I

P. 706, " red bull."

ah

^
,
1

white ah.
"^I

pasture

(?)

ah

(]

II
\

I)

1)111

a kind

of' tree

plur.

Hh

cr^

stall,

stable,

workshop

^
ah.

h |

a-3

^
,

ji

Rec. 24, 161, the moon see Copt. log,, Heb.


;

aah nil

stable of horses

"^^
;
|]

'M O
Tuat.

Ah
ah

(|

the Moon-god.

royal stable.

ah-t

8
[J

chamber
'

in the

m)
i

^-.7,

lunar festival on the i8th day of the month.


(?)

ah
ahut O^X
^:Z
,

(S.

',

Rec.

2,

116, prisons.

A
[I

9 '"***^
o o o

white metal, silver

ahu
to be green (of land)
;

X 1

limbs,

members,

flesh,

body.

see aah.

^
^

'

O ^'
;

ah (j|o.
^"^' ^^'^'
tillage, pasture,

Wort. 107

parcel of land

Copt.

eiOU^e

plur.

.jb?

steering pole, rudder, paddle

plur.

[I

see aah.

ahah l)|(l|'^m^>to
I

^^'O'"'^

^ P^^dle

*i
(2

^^'*5^C'*5
\\

%^

/wwvA

(1

the sound of paddling.

O^
labourer,

^
plur.

to smite, to fight.

^,

ploughman,

field

/.//#;

^ \^. ^\
= I
(]

^h ah ^^^

(j

I
fi

Q^i"(]fQ-l^^.

packets

of arrows (Lacau).
[1

spears, arrows.

Ij

^^
(]

fl

1^0^'

to fight; see

. I

U. 150, N. 458

T. 121, IV, 60, 767, 1078, Annales III, 109, to spread out a net, to lay a snare, to catch animals
or birds, to surround with a wall, to enclose.

ahai^f-q(]I^,^f (jl^(j
=
(J
ft [1

"Sssw

some

filthy

animal.
^istrum bearer.

ah

-ft,

(]

^.fishing

net.

ahai-t
||

'^

^f)

*f

>

[76]
Ahibit [j|l)y(](j^|,
goddess of the 17th Pylon.
B.D. X46,a

flesh, limbs.

ahU(?)
(|

j^^,
I
e

IJIJ^,
8, a

weak-

aha
(]

'

P-

I'

75,

to rejoice,
(]

ness, helplessness (?)

-_i:|j,U..66,(]J^|(j(l,P.x94.

Ahu (?)

(]

J
,

B.D. 124,

form of

^^^
M.

^ I 461, 678, N. 1239, to ^


'

i~~^

y
D

^% p- 45, 642,
rejoice,

to acclaim,

Ahu
(]

^^

Rec. 30, 198

[j

__j]
HI,

(]|i=i'^,N.

69,649.

AMp
ahi

(]

-|-^

K
,

I
the Nile-god.

^ ^,

a form of Thoth;
(j

^^

';:L^

Rec. 26, 228.


|)|(](], p.

364=|(j(], N.

1077, to

ahun(j|^^^,(]|^^^^,
,omh,,.,iplig;plun

smite, to strike.

(j|^^|, (||&

Ahi

I]

[1[]

Tuat VI, an attendant on the


I)

^ j^

Rec. 32, 176, young god.

ahi,ahit|)|(ll|'J,y(l(||,Rec.3o,

ahbenut(?)(jy

f
(?);

t^'cSe.
(j

.,3.,.7o,.,4!sl|.llII)!-lS.
a priest or priestess
Ojli'

ahem

who

personified the god Ahi.

J;^, HOT, to decree N. |,


(|

<t::?

? 492, 493, 494,

^
J,

(JC^^
nor.

P. 276,

M. 520,
(]

(]^^g'J(],N.
,
>

B.D. 125,

II,

one of the 42 Assessors of


(]

Osiris.

ahemu
ahems
N.
1

^^
t^
p

^- (^ebseni)

92, .3

Ahi, Ahui, Ahai


B.D. 102,
(2) the
2,

(jl)

*J, *J.
the god of

(]

^,
^,

M. 677,

(|

^^

[]],

149: (i) a form of Harpokrates


ist

240, to

sit,

god of the

Aat;

(3)

the i8th day of the month.

ahems

[1

^
Q

to seat oneself.

p.S.b. 14, 207, a child

Ahi-sa-He-t-her
348, a form of Harpokrates.

who was allowed


B.D. G.

to enter the royal nursery.

ahu

(1

\\

a pair of clappers or qfistanets.

ahenn

(1

:^,

Mar.

Kam.

54,

42

Ahui (j|\\^@,B.D. I24,i5='^|\\

\^^
ahi
i

(?), i.e.,

Horus and

Set.

ahennu
field-labourers
;

fi

(J

awa^^^, U.

167,

workmen,

(jf

(]l)"tQ.,hair.
''

see P

^^^ L

=/)

^<^^^ Ah /ion* ^^ HXHH '^=''

29, 7. a crocodile-fiend.

ahes

(]

Wort. 550, to strike I n.

(?)

^hi-t

(]

(](]^,
(]

fish-pond.

Ahes
].

(|

n^,

M.

779, a Sildani

god;

ahiut(?)
human

(j(]

^
(?)

^^
J
(J

a class of

beings, peasants

n|

'

>

ahesmen[j|^^^^^4^,p.292,
packets of natron.

class of divine beings.

'

A
Ahkai (]|[J
who composed
aht-t
(1
fi

[77]
j]^,
Hh.43i,thegod

A
akhkhut
Q
1

<1

(](]

magical spells for the gods.

akhakh
akhakh

[1

^vT^, Pl^"'^ ^"^ herbs, vegetables, verdure. ^^^^''^ ^ '^^ ^'^y. *

II

n
,

rent of a field or estate.

1
(]

Hi

/..,

the

stars.

(|

t^,

darkness, night.

aht

(1

liquor.

athekh(jJ^,q:.(lJ,,|J|^,
aht
(I

^Si,

the lung, or lungs.

il

OO ^
Ahti

i<

darkness, night.

II?, neck, throat, windpipe, lung.

Akhkhi
in the

l|

(](]

"^^
^-D'

(O

a doorkeeper

(I

fi

T?
"^

N|' ^"3-eofOsirisasthe

Tuat

(2) the night personified.

throat

and lungs of the dead.


h

Akhekh
4,

l\
1

% ^

(Sai'e)

98, 3. an associate of Shu.


,

Ahti

^.

L.D.

82B, consort of

akhaar
Street,

Rerit^^(?)

^ J ^ quarter of a town.

^
(]-=.
%>.

Rec. 33, 120,

aheth (]|^^|],u.539,t.2 96
aht
(1
fi

akhab, akhb-t
;

J]^,

chamber,

stall,

stable

see

||;^XSi;.

pure water.
*-=>
|]

akhabU

j"^, grain.

ahetchta

"^ \"^^^' ^- 43^. M. 6i8,


h

akhkha

I)

I)

J.

to be'green, to flourish.

N. 1222, to dawn.

akh, akhi (?)

akhai(]Q(|(],R6i4,(j^(](],M.78o,
h
,

an interjection. N. 1137,(1''^
1

^
fl'

to

make
to

akh

Copt,

^.^o, why ? what

21

on a throne, crown a man king.


to rise
jo.y.

where ?

akhi akhi

Ij


(j

(j(j

^,
j^

gladness,

akh fl.U.424,lj^,
(J
.

|)j|, ()||,

11

(1(1

i^=R, upper region, sky.


spirits; Copt.

(J

iJiJ,

an interrogative particle;

Why?

akhiu

l|(|

what?

in

what manner? wherefore? how? Copt.

|,

I;^.

Akhkhu qji^^.M.
IV, 649;

409,

(]J^,
the Light-

f)

for

why?
Rev. 30, 99, what

T. 399,

^ ^.

B.D. (Saite) 98,

3,

akh-rek
is

god;
(I

var.

(]^^.
(]

the matter with thee

Copt.

i^^poK.

akhu

akh.t(];,|j;|,(]^J|],||, things,
property, goods, possessions
;

Akhuti
desses, Isis

(|

%^ ^%

^^'"'^' ^ "''' 'P'""^


1

'^,

the two

snake-god-

see
I

and Nephthys

(?)

akhit

r
^

akhb ^J,tofeed(?)

product, revenue, food.

akh

Rec. 30, 189,

fertile land,

grassland.

Seti

I,

one of the 75 forms of Ra.

'

'

I\

78]
.J

akhem
IV, 201,
inert,

(1

to

be ignorant, to do
[1
( I I

Akhemu-betesh[iu]

(1

^v

nothing, to have nothing ; see ^= ;

^^
I

Z*"^, P- 241, a

group of gods
\\

in the Tuat.

weak, feeble.
n

Akhmui-remthu
^
^

|\

'^

^=

akhem, akhem-t
,

without, lacking.

gy^''^

N. 710, the two gods (Horus

akhm-taua

_zr'

and
(]

Set)

who weep

not.

Akhem-hep-f
P. 142, without sourness (of wine)
;

var.

1^ ^ ^. Tuat IX,
Tuat with water.
\\

(I

-^

a god

who

sui)plied souls in the

^, N.

885.

Akhem-khems-f
u

t\

^a",
Tuat

akhm-t ama

^^~'^~^

.{*

Tuat IX, a god who supplied


with water.

souls in the

Akhemu-seshau
-JU.
.,

()

Of

N. 885, without mouldiness,


or staleness (of bread).
\\

^ -^ ^ ^
in the Tuat.

/^
[]

^,

P. 241, a

group of gods

akhem khestch

^
',

_(u.

"^
288,

Akhem.-sek
lasting

[j

1\

y ^^z^

an ever-

oro,.N.885,|)^-^P'^,T.
M.
65,
\\

^-^
[j|
1

*^.

N. 126, without

god who, under the forms of other gods, members of the deceased. Each of the Cardinal Points possessed an Akhem-sek.
protected the

going mouldy (of bread).

Akhem-sek
U. 645, a goddess,
near the pole,
i.e.,

(1

t;^ P'^'

^'-

^'^'

Akhemit
consort of '^37

a star that does not disappear

till

dawn

a never-failing, or imperishable, star


"h
8^

Akhem

aut

\\

_ju.
(|

_^ ^___n_, ^

^35

.^,

title

of Ra,

the

"never-failing."

U.477,ll^--^(l-f^>N.74^.

Akhem-upt-amkhau

\\

^T^ X/

U,1l.'ll.lli-='I^^.^-s-.(lk
T. 323, a hunting-god
slaughter.

P^==:^

(]

^^^,

U. 211, 214, 482, T. 289,

353. 366, 397. P- 158. 159. 181, 203, 308, 381, 412, 544, 70T, M. 186, 285, 715, 749, N. 118,

who bound

the gods for

Akhmiuurtu
B.D.
2,

893. 944, 957. 99. 1196, 1219, 1329, (i) the "imperish1342, Rec. 26, 234, 31, 21 able " stars, i.e., the stars which never set below 839.
:

(l^7^:5^>^
2,

the

horizon;

(2)

a group of

12

gods with

paddles (Tuat X)
14, (Saite)
15,

who were
h

reborn daily.

32,

2,

78,

28,

98, 3,

Akhem-sek-f
a god

^ ^5,
"

Tuat ix,

102,

the stars that never set(?)


[]

who

supplied souls in the Tuat with water.

Akhem-urt-f
a god

^^^.
\\

Tuatix,
']'.

ftkhkhm-t
[j

J.^^. U. 141.

(j

who

supplied souls in the Tuat with water.

112, N. 449,

fire.

4khmiu urtchu

_jv,

%>

akhem-t

Ij^S^^.M)^
s
A.Z.
19.10,
III'

^-^.P.
''-^
(

382, N.
]

1,57,(1^---^
stars.

Ti, dam ; see bank of a stream,

^
jO

Rec. 26, 234, the never-resting

akhm-t

(]^^.

125, pool, tank.

A
akhemti
jDOnA.
,

[79]
fl

o f\/VO
[VAT)'

T.

2 38,

>

" that

is,"

" behold " (Copt, eic),


(1

etc.

1]

_a,
Ci
,

(1

U. 418, the two regions

(?)

but not

ask

^^:z^,

and ast

(1

or

asth

Akhmu.t|]^^^^^,P.3,
^'

=5, have a somewhat

similar meaning.

f^,
akhem (]^^,

M. 626, a

district (?)

as

f]

^'

Q P

'^.

to call to, to hail; see

u. 509,
,

nas
(j(

ti

qp
28, 176,1]
.

T. 267, 323,
smite, to grasp violently.

N. 39, to seize, to

as Ijpg, UpO.Rec.
to reckon a price, accountant.

Jpo,
beam,

akhkhm-t
fl

fsT,
M. 607, N.
1

U. 91,
212, a smiting
(?)

as-t
timber
;

\\

p s.^^,
{.'')

(j

P^,
^
,

plank,

J if

P. 624,

Copt. COI
(or St)

akhen
1

.1
\5^

^'

fl

"T
;

^
w ork
a
boat.

aS-t

j,

U. 222,

jj

-p^

^
'

women's apartments

Gr. ^(waiKeloi',

Awww c^

akhen
Akher
[1
,

(]

^,
^,
[1

seraglio, harim.

^^9''jlS'jPT'7'il-5S.'
,

Hymn

of Darius

P- 603, to

8, seat,

throne, place,
n
n

CT]

abode, tomb, room, chamber;

plur.

[j

(j

T.

246,

311, 346,

U. 400, P. 608, M. 174,

P jjjj

ci, N. 687,

U. 430, Peasant 150, a conjunction, but,


;

because, then

var.

^^
furniture;]]

akher

\\

ffl

but, because, then.

|
r|

||||

U. 222.
>0'
'
I

akher akher

(I

possession, property.

as-t

ab

'^

the dearest wish of the


heart, heart's desire.

\\

C^

p. 228,
|]

^r*7. ^- 7^.
(1

as-t

amakh
is

rl

M.
to

69,

(]

<^ ^, Hh. 426,


to
fall,

make

to cast

down,

to

bow

^ ^,
oneself to

J1

-^ ^' S
'^

^ place

fl

where honour

paid to one.
.

as-t

ado

fl,

U. 507,

jj

fl;

plur.

the ground.

akheriu
sacrifices.

an
\\

assistant priest

plur.

Hh

J
j]

-^

,e,e,(2
n?> n?^

W^

akheriu

^\^i-*=
4,

as-t

[j

c
J,

,
^ ^

an

office,

chancery.

fallen in death, enemies, fiends.

as.t aui as-t aha


L.D.

Akhsesf
(j

the place of the hands, i.e., a possession^


'^
jl

|)^^,(]PP^^,
a god.
Ci

en neb

^5^,6.0.75,
akhet
1

^A
temple set
'^^'^
,

Ill, 65A,

15, the place in the

U. 163, T 134, N. 471, plant, wood, tree; Copt. cye.

apart for the king's use.

as-t uab-t
purity, bath
(?),

^ /]
.^cttd,
ri

place of

as
draw
is

(I

I,

T. 271, M. 33, an enclitic conjunc-

sanctuary.

tion, often

used as a mark of emphasis, or to


it

special attention to the phrase to which


;

as-tur-t
I

<^

attached

it

also serves to

mark an explanation,
wit,"

"^v

and may be

translated

"namely," "to

j CD <=^>

^^ Era ^'

^ ^

Rec. 14, 17, great place, i-e., heaven.

'

[80]
fl

as-t utcha-t
jj

the position of

As-t Heqit

'^
rl

|z]^ J] cd,

the temple

73

the

Eye

of

Ra

in heaven.

of the Frog-goddess.
scene,

as-t

maa

jl

" ^

as-t

hetep
J
11

spectacle.

tomb:

plur.

\C3a Q S i_ _i -vww " c~zi ^ Q;


rest.

rj

abode of peace, the


J
fl
I

as-t

maat

Ci

"

V,

-,

place of the heart's

as-t
law,
I.e.,

khet

c^

place of duty (?)

the

Kingdom

of Osiris

aja^ as.tmenajj^_^,^
landing, landing stage, quay.

asut sutsut
,

place of

jjn P^^'P^^^^o
(3
I 1

Anastasi
for

J
I,

21, 8,

places

J\

promenade.

as-t

na shau
neferu
'

ri

^k
'^"'^

As-t sutenit
of

"^
rl

(1 (1

library, record-office.

a temple

Ra

in

Gynaecopolis.

as-t

'^
r|

VH^
i.e.,

i-

as-t

smeter
judgment

^
rj

Ill
cemetery.

'

'^^

^^^'

*^^ ''^^

happy,

heaven,
tribunal,
seat.

IH
Ci
rj

as-t nefer-t

jl

'^"^

^
U3

~^' '^^

"

As-t-sen-ari-tcher

CZl

III

B
r

1, Rec.

4, 28,

agod(?)

as-t

nemm-t

7\

place for

as-t sesh
j)

walking, path, promenade.


office, clerk's

j^
jj

fi{]

'

j|

^
[1

'^

]^

l^u^eau,

room.
'^
fl

As-t en-Net
Neith
in the

c^ ^^
Nome
rj

a temple of

as-t

segera

ffl

^, Thes. 1480,

Gynaecopolite

place of silence, council

hall.

as-t

ent senetchem
place.

PI

as-tqebhj.J|,P>-of^reJres^^^^^^
as-tqen-t
H

^^ p, resting
as-t

.^,

"bad

place,"

z".^.,

heh (neheh)
,

jj^ |f'
i.e.,

jj

evil plight, critical state.

T\

Q 9

"eternal home,"

the tomb.
in

As-t-qerh-t
the Heroopolite

jj^
Nome

a sanctuary

iCa

asut neteru (He-t-asut-neteru)


l] ll ll

111

'

P'^l^''"^^ ^'^'^'

^ sacred building.
of

as-t taa
fire

rj

Infi

|j[,

the place

as-t

ra

rj

occasion for speech.


P'ace of the feet,

in the

Other World

as-t retui

^
rj

H
;

as-t tcheb-t j c^
.

Rev., place of retribution, hall of punishment.

one's accustomed place.

as-t tchef-t 4s-t

her
jj

(^ "f.

i" the phrase,

cU
ffl

^:^, Q
I
rj

''"'^
'

for provisions.

i^"^^'

Ao"^'^

jj

fj_,
as-t tchesert

^
rj

'^'^

" under his supervision "

i"
J|

^,

"holy

Sf

under

my

place," sanctuary.

authority.

As.thert as-t neri


as-t as-l

rl"^
j]

aeru

J]

^ ^ ;=^' ^ <^ ^O ^ ^ ;^.


>

the high place, >., heaven.

Asut tcheseru
name
of a building.

jj jj

^^^

place of sacrifice.

as-ti
-,

^,
jj

rj

Ci

[1,

one

in the place of

another deputy

successor.
;jj I

the royal throne.

[81]
ast-a

^,
^

jj

i
^^,
II

III

Ast-Rait-set(?)

j;^-^]^.
'^,

disease, fever; H

Ombos

I,

I,

163, a lioness-headed form of Isis.

(2

disease caused by a

Ast-Septit

rj^

Isis

Sothis.

goddess.

Ast

Ci
jj

^,

N. 62s, 903,

139,

jj

Astta-Uhjj^ o'^^|3|^,Rec.24,
,

160, Isis, the Scorpion-goddess.

Act ^^*
of Osiris and mother of Horus.

rl

Tuat
-

II,

a uraeus in the Boat

I\^'

ofAf.

Ast jjo
Asti
rl" Jj
,

Tomb

of Seti I, one of the 75 forms of Ra (No. 17).


(?)

Ast Ament-t

rl

il

V, Isis in the ^ ^ Tuat kingdom of Seker.


I'

IV, 1085, wife of Thoth

AstAnpUjj^^l^f
Aby.
I,

^,Mar.
^^='

Asti-pest-t ^

JJ

fj" err:

^^Juat IX, a minister

of Osins.

45, Isis-Anubis in Tept.

as-t
rj

Ast urt
i^--j

em Aa-t-sM
n,

palace, any large building..

^
as, ast
(]

Mar. Aby.

I,

44.

^__^, u. 296,

N. 534,

^st

ur-t-mut-neter fjlo^l^C)],
I,

Mar. M.D.

33, Isis the Great,

mother the of the

tomb, chapel of a tomb

[f

(I

[f

god [Horus].

Ast Ast
1^ t^^

em Ast-aa-t
I,

]|

c> J)

(j

Mar. Aby.

J
[1-3

JP<=
(|

^,
lift

tomb;plur.

45.
rj

N. 707,

Jj~
.,4,
I)

;^,

M.

em Per-mau
,

nil'
ill,

Mar. Aby.

I,

45.

Ast

em
em
I,

^ ^^ ^^, nebt ankh 0' iJ0^37


rj 1

the

goddess of the ninth hour of the day.

Ast Ast

Semt-t(?)

c,
jj

^^^o,
a
r|

as-t tchet h

k -

^
'

"^Zl Rec. 29, 78,


,

tomb held
as-t n

in perpetuity.

Mar. Aby.

44, a form of Isis.

em

Shenas-t
,

(?)
I,

^ [J
"T"

granary,

silo.

&C-D
Ast
Mar. Aby.
I,

Mar. Aby.

44.

as-t
fl

QQQ

^- ^^^' 453' st'^lae,

em Ta-tcheser
45, Isis in the

rj

c^

f\ ,^^

frontier stones,

memorial

tablets.

rv/vn ,

Holy Land.

Ast-Mehit

^
'

Ifll-i
'^

u
I

f\

00

"^' ^^'

"o"hern form of
Rec. 28, 182

y^

I,

workshop, factory

plur.
(J

[f

lOiJ

I 1

As-t nekheb

'
ri

f]

asui(?)

^,T^,(|P^^.Rec. ,8,
IV,
175, 1058, laboratory.

Ast - netrit - em. - renus - nebu


I

^^^ rj^l^

B.D. 119,
c^ "t"

Isis in all

names.
11, isis

Thes. 1290,

III

(|^P\\%
[]

Ast-netchit

jJ

|],

Tuat

as-en-sesh
copyists'

ft

"

"^

-w^^^v

Wi g

the Avenger, with knife-shaped phallus.

room, chancery.

;;

82.]

as neteru
(j

c-^

Tuat viii,
^j^,

the workshop of the gods, a circle in the Tuat.

as-t

workmen, gang of labourers


I

\^^\ on
I

male and female

servants.

breeze, puff of wind.

as
(] [1

^.

Rec. 15, 141,


(]

[1

\N

as

[1

ft

1^3

\> (?)

ground, place.
,

i n ^y,

reed, papyrus, herb, shrub, myrtle

as, asi -n-,Tr-(](]

-nr- J(](),who?_

as, asi
I)

[]

-n-, u.

2,

(]

-rr

(],

U. 208,

(1

Ijl)

^,

Rec ,

,46,

I)

[)l

[1 .5

;^,

(1tt-()[],U.

223,qT^-*-[l(l,P-93,

W
jy-

%>

7\

to

make
ItOC
;

haste, to

make

to pass

quickly;

Copt.
7.

V^, IV, 809,

old writings

(^

),
1

old registers or written


;

',

U.

regulations, old orders or rules

plur. ""^

"^ "^

ashak
UJl t.A
\

ra

A
I

_^

"i5
,

old laws.

-rr

IT A

A
1

IV, 659, 691,

(j

asu
,

Thes. 1297, quick

spoil, spoil easily taken.

asiasi (?)
old, ruined:
(]

/v

= -nr

/v(?)

^
[|

(^"^
|
(|[|

j.

Rec. 31, 146, old


old

to stop, to hinder, to oppose.

age, infirmity;

i R

J,

woman.

asi rr"

ill]

"^^,
,

tt)

pass away in decay;

^
"^
[1
,

\^

TT"

(]

"^^

incorruptible.

rags, old pieces

of cloth

^^

5^

asu TT"
as
ass ass

p ^*, decay,

destruction.

old rags used for

lamp
t"'^''^'

wicks.

(]piT3.(]prtjj>
(|

bile, gall.

asut

ft

^ -^
,

^1'
2,

^"''*^^' '^P'^-

U. 534,T. 293, P. 539, to run, to move.

a a nCl>~P ^^ Stf "^'

Peasant B.

103,

159, light
in weight.

II

~^ =

(]-*-

I]

to punish; see

as-ao q-*-U\lI

^-minded,

unstable.

ass |)pp^,tofetter,totie;|]pp;^
(2

asu
as
lie,

(]

ft

n -x^, a light-minded man, unreliable,

'%\ L-dQ

;iww^ @
1'
I

those whose heads are tied up.


rope, cord.
'=^

Jr

ass ass-t
sin, deceit.
,

a disease of the belly.

Ass-t

Tuat VII, a town


in the

'
I]

Tuat.
;

Ases
[j^n^I3j,
air,

n n , B.D. 149, the 7th Aat

van

wind, breath;
(j

(Saite)

o D ?
!\

'

[83]
T. 88, N. 6i8

Asartiu -^^ -^

Asa
M. 14

mJ ^
One

BD.
| I

89, 3, beings

'

like

unto

Osiris.

P.

X.,

-*
(]

Asar-Aau-ami-Anu
-H-IX

jii /%
Osiris, the

|^

--

N.

1 1

6,

to watch, to

guard, to pasture flocks

fll^^
111

B.D. 142, 85,


'

Aged

J3t5^

tU

in

An

(Heliopolis).

asa
U. 12 0)

-
, ,

P- 73,

N.

15,
(]

^,

Asar-Aah
ji "^

HS

J|, Lanzone 42,

M. 701,

P. 60,

N. 1322,

,^

Osiris the

Moon.

T. 2 79, to

come (?)

Asar-ami-ab-neteru
to travel (?)

^i?l|.
Gods.
35,

Tuat VI,
H

Osiris, Darling of the

2S^ ^

Copt.

CRT.

Asar-An
Osiris, the solar

asa

^
\\

Denderah HI,

(lP^^.I)P^^g.(JPt^i.
fill

god An.
-^-^

T. 58, M. 217, N. 589, to

full,

to satisfy.

Asar-Anpu
Osiris

asa

...

Q (A 1

fl
I

-^
K<^Z

'^ cr-D

P'^^^ f '="-'^''iy or restraint.


22, 10

%>, B.D.

168,

Anubis, a jackal-headed god.

asa (?) Ul^U -^j. Amen.

AsarAhti
98, Osiris, the

J^ (j|^Je
J)

5^,

B.D. 142,

asa
(]

p||,Rec. 34, 121

= (]^(j>,

Lung god and

giver of breath to

baton,

the dead.

club, mace.

Asar-as-ti
O

rj

j]

", Tuat

ill, a

form of

asaa h^h

/I\,T.

268, to introduce;

Osiris, functions

unknown.

Asar-AtiX5^lli](l(l||.B.D.r42,

asau

h n

g^ %i, M. 62, to lead.


U-,

106, Osiris, the King.

Asar

X.

Asar- Ati

jj^,

j]^,

J1

S
,

H "^
(?)

B.D. 142, 43,

variant of preceding

Asar-Ati-heri-ab-Abtu
jj

Rec. 30, II,

^^,

Rec. 33, 30, 36

"^ WW
ji"^!]!!

ill f ^ J ^ Asar- Ati -heri-ab-Shetat

B.D. 142, 93, Osiris of Abydos.

|i}^^.Buch.5r,(]P^O^,R.E.
141,
^
^

J|,

Rec.

26,

224, 27, 56, 33,

flails S5'^-of the Tuat of

'^''^4' ^^'"^''''"g

Memphis and
[1

Heliopolis.

A.Z. Bd. 46,

92flF.,

rj'^

Wo\v6(p0u\no'', the

Asar-athi-heh
Osiris,

s^ o

|,

Tuat

III,

great Ancestor-god of the dynastic Egyptians.

conqueror of

eternity.

god and the exact pronunciation of his name are not known. He was said to be the son of Shu and Tefnut and the grandson of Geb and Nut. He and his wife Isis and his brother and sister Set and Nephthys, and his son Horus, were brought forth by Nut at the same time. He was drowned in the Nile by Set and suffered mutilation, but he rose from the dead, and having been declared by the gods innocent of the charges brought against him by Set, became King of the Dead and giver of
origin of the

The

^sar-ankhtiXf A^'Jlf
[1(1

^,

B.D. 142,

2,

Osiris, the

Living One.

jH a form of Osiris worshipped

As4r-iru jo

^^
in
'^

j^,

B.D.

o.

1064,

Lower Egypt.

Asar-up-taui
B.D. 142,
5,

ri

\J

X)

=
F 3

s s

immortality to

all

who

believed in him.

a form of Osiris.

"Iroj^Y of

JEjyj

'

'

[84]

A
Asar-em-asut-f-ara-Ta-meh
*

Asar-Un.neferj|^y,X^
Mar. M.D.
word.
i, 6,

J]

<2>-

Osiris, the

Good

Being, true of

95, Osiris in all his shrines in the North.

Asar-em-ast-f-em-Ta-shema
rj
I

ji"^
'^4,

Asar ur-pa-asht
f|
I

''^

Nesi-Amsu

17,

15, Osiris, cliief of

...

Asar-Utti
B.D. 142, 53,

Xi
B.D.

Osiris, the begetter.

W
19,

^= j 1^

^^

^'

2-^-

'-^^

the acacias.

Osiris in every shrine of his in the South.

r=^,

Asar - em - ast - neb-meri - Ka-f-am


Ka

Asar-Bati-erpit
ffi

X*^ uT"
j-]=1

"
fl^

B.D. 142, 146, Osiris


loves.

in

every shrine his

'"^ '^

B.D. 142,
'

76, Osiris, the dual soul in Erpit.

Asar-em-Atef-ur jii

JH
,

^O
fl

Asar-Ba-sheps-em-Tet
8<;^^
(s

(^
the

B.D. 142, 50, Osiris in Atef-ur.

142,

Osiris,

'

holy soul in

Busiris.,

Asar-em-ater
B.D. 142, 104, Osiris

Asar-baiu-tef-f
B.D. 142,

J^ ^'

X^ ^
<2:^ JiJ^
Aper.
j]

<^'
c^
lU
.

^.

in the river (?)

72, Osiris, the souls of his fathers.


ll

Asar-em-Aper
B.D. 142, 35, Osiris
in

^ "d^ U
?\

<::z>

Asar-Bati(?)
a form of
Osiris.

\M]M,Tuaim,

<S>- usSa !lw^

Asar-em-ankh-em-Het-ka-Ptah

Asar -pa -meres

(
d

j^^^"J
Osiris.
=]

Annales VI, 131, a form of

95, Osiris in the

Ka-house of Ptah (Memphis).

XJ Denderah III, 10, Osiris, the divine

Asar - p - akhem

Asar-em-Antch
Akhem,
J
B.D. 142, 20, Osiris
in

Anlch.

X ^ I '^
,

I'
r]

Asar -Ptah- neb -ankh


B.D. 142,

O
life.

Asar-em-aha-t-f-em Ta-meht

"^

15, Osiris-Ptah, lord

of

n^^
B.D. 142, 87, Osiris

Hi

B.D. 142, 145, Osiris

in his station in the North.

Asar-Pa-Heru
B.D. 142, 68,

j-j'^i

Asar-em-Akesh(?)
Horus.
in
ri'=^

jj'^

Osiris, carrier of

Akesh.

Asar-em- Asher
ill

^
in

Asar-em-Uu-Peg "^^zz:'^'^
Asher (part of
Thebes).

B.D. 142, 80, Osiris

S-r
Jl^

B.D. 142, 69, Osiris in the great sanctuary of Abydos.

Asar-em-Aat-ur-t

ji'^

^
I

B.D. 142, 62, Osiris in the Great Aat.

Asar-em-Uhet (?)-melit "j^ [^1 "^ O JL ~^ ^ B.D. 142, 61, Osiris in the

Asar-em-Anu
B.D. 142,
84, Osiris in Heliopolis.

il
l]
I

^o
-1

\. SLl'

Northern Oasis ( Bah riyah).

Asar-em-Uhet (?)-rest
tk

J^ [^1

Asar-em-asut-f-^mu-Re-stau
III

_P

O t^a
^

"^
'
I

B.D. 142, 60, 0.siris in the Southern Oasis (Khargah).

MiFiK\^:r.\^i
B.D.
142,
97,

Osiris

in

all

his

shrines

in

Sakkirah.

B.D. 142, 32, Osiris

in the

Hawk-city.

85]
Asar-em-Netbit

./a2>-

(-1

Asar-em-Benben-t
J
J

CD

ilk
ll

B.D. 142, 83, Osiris in the

i^
var,
'-=^

D. 142, 113, Osiris in Netbit.

sanctuary of the stone (obelisk) of the Sun-god.

Asar-em-Netch-t
^pt,

3'
Netch.

Asar-em-Bener
B.D. 142,

3^^J^|,
J^ i %^JZ\
in

74, Osiris in Benr.

Asar-em-renuf-nebu
,

B.D.

142, 24, Osiris in

-^Ori'^

Asar-em-Betshu
^,

B.D. 142, 115, Osiris


l]
\^

Betsh.

a
B.D.
142,

B.D. 142, 149, Osiris

in his

every name.

III

Asar-em-Pe
26, Osiris in Bute.

Asar - em - Rert - nefu

(? )
55,

H "S

/=z

^ t^^V5il'
ffi

y^-jlll

B.D.

142,

Osiris in

Rer(?)

Asar-em-Pe-Nu
~vww

jj^
in

Buto of Nu.
]]

Asar-em-Rehnen

J^^<=>^:).:|.
142,34,

^,

B.D. 142, 88, Osiris

Asar-em-Per-ent-meh

^^^

^^

(var.
I

^^^Jt), B.D.
ll

Osiris in

Rehnen.

^
'

B.D. 142,

12,

Osiris in the sanc-

Asar
B.D. 142,

em resu (?)
25, Osiris in the

tuary of the North.


ll

South Land.

Asar-em-pet
47, Osiris in heaven.

t\

'^

Jj.B.D. 142,

Asar - em, - Rastau


B.D. 142, 39, Osiris
in the

d'^

<=

kingdom of Seker

Asar-em-Per-ent-res
B.D. 142,
II, Osiris

j]

the Death-god.
the sanctuary

in

Asar-em-Hena
B.D. 142, 124, Osiris
in

of the South.

-<2>-

f\
JiH\:s-

rD
/wwv>

(],
I

Hena.

Asar-em-Pesg-ra
^

Asar-em-Hetaa
B.D. 142, 89, Osiris

3^_^^^.
House.
jl'^

^,

B.D. 142,44;

var.

in the Great-

Osiris in Pesg-ra (?)

Asar- em-het-f -ami -Ta-meh


d"^

Asar-em-Petet
Osiris in Pet.

46, Osiris in his

temple

in the

North

I^and.

Asar-em-Maati
B.D. 142, 70, Osiris

ri=^pp:i.
Truth.

Asar-em-het-f-ami-Ta-shema

in the city of

Asar-em-MenaJ^lx^^q
B.D. 142,
71, Osiris in

=Q' ^i^
Asar-em-Hemag
B.D. 142, 86, Osiris

^ ^.
ri

J1

B.D. 142,

45, Osiris in his temple in the

South Land.

Mena.
H'^

'^^

Asar-em-Nefur (Tau-ur ?)
Xtn'^^' %,
B.D. 142, 40, Osiris
ri

in the

Laboratory City.
ll

in Nefur(?)

Asar-em-Heser
B,D.

t\

'

Asar-em-Nerutf
B.D. 142, 31, Osiris
(Herakleopolis).

^ tm

J^

.,,,.,; v.

in the

necropoHs of Hensu

PI VS^. IP:.
Thoth.
rl'S
/ fi

:f^^i^
B.D. 142, 65, Osiris
ri'S

Osiris in the City sacred to

Asar-em-Netru J f\ i
B.D. 142,
28, Osiris in Netr.

Asar-em-Heken
in

'^'^^

Heken.

Asar-em-Netit

Asar-em-khakeru-f-nebu
I
I

B.D. 142, 41, Osiris in Netit, a place near Abydos where Osiris was slain by Set.

Jlk
F 3

B.D. 142, 152, Osiris in all his ornaments.

86

-A
Asar-em-gerg-f-neb
ji'^

Asar-em-khauf-nebu
e
III

01

ill'
all

\
in his

tt
every

B.D. 142, 151, Osiris in

his

mani-

festations.

"^-^^

ffi

B.D. 142, 150, Osiris

settlement.

Asar-em-Sau
B.D. 142,

jj'^/:

s^ !m.
e

Asar-em-ta

^ J]1^ 7^
|^,

'^

^^^- '^''

23, Osiris in Sa.

48, Osiris in the Earth.

Asar-em-Sau-heri
B.D. 142,

j]i
Upper
Sa.

Asar-em-taiu-nebu

.7? lllJlJ
,

jH"^

/=

29, Osiris in

B.D. 142, 81, Osiris

in all lands.

Asar-em-Sau-kheri

Asar-em-Tep ji'^'=
30,

\'

A.

B.D.

142,

Osiris

in
Sa.

B.D. 142,

27, Osiris in Buto.

Lower

Asar-em-Sa
B.D. 142, 78, Osiris

"^
in Sa.

"''*"

Asar-em-Tesher
B.D. 142,

^=z

jj'^ 1^

(1

nnm

58, Osiris in the

Red

City.

Asar-em-Sati
B.D. 142,

J^ =
in

[1
()

^
I

Asar - em - Tcbatcliau
1

79, Osiiis in Sati.

B.D. 142, 25, Osiris in the Chiefs.

Asar-em-Sunnu
B.D. 142, 33, Osiris

@ iS^P-rl
AAA^J^A

Asar- nub -heh

111

^1

Sunu (Syene).

B.D. 142,

75, Osiris,

gold of millions of years.


]]

Asar-em-seh-f-nebu
lira'

J1
in all his

Asar-Neb-Ament
Osiris,

<

,TuatlII,

B.D. 142, 147, Osiris


III

Lord of Anient.
[]

council chambers.

Asar-em-Sesh
B.D. 142,
birthplace.
59,

jj^

|^

^
i.e.,

Asar-Neb-ankh
B.D. 142,
3, Osiris,

f
Life.
Osiris,

^.
his

Lord of

Osiris in the Nest-city,

Asar-Neb-ankh-em-Abtu
D
r]C=0
ffi

Asar-em-sek-f
B.D. 142,

]]

f
J1
96, Osiris,

B.D. 142, 90,

^'LordofLifeinAbydos.
-

54, Osiris in his feathered headdress

Asar - Neb - pehti petpet - Sebau


Lord of Might, crusher of the

Asar-era-Seker
B.D. 142, 66, Osiris
in

Seker (Death-god).

rebels.

Asar-em-Sekri
B.D. 142, 37, Osiris
in the city of Seker.

Asar-Neb-er-tcher
tdl
Osiris
in

^^
j]

Bs
Lord

Asar-em-Sekti
> nv<
S)

^^

to limit of the Earth,

^ ^3

'

B.D. 141,

4, Osiris,

i.e.,

Osiris Almighty.

B.D.

142,

^=^^

54,

511'

the Sekti Boat.

Asar-Neb-heh
57, Osiris,

j]

0X, B.D.

142,

Lord of Eternity.

B.D. 142,

67, Osiris in Sha.


rj'^

Asar-em-Shenu
B.D. 142, 64, Osiris
in

^
yj

'^

Asar-Neb-ta-Ankh ri'^ ^ B.D. 142, 22, Osiris, Lord of the


'

Land of
Life.

f\/\yi

Shenu.
AA/VNAA

Asar-em-Qeftenu

Asar-Neb-taiu-Nesu-neteru
S3I S T ww

ri"^

ll

^^^1 -

111,
I I

j|, B.D. 142,

36, Osiris in Qeftenu.

B.D. .4^, 73,

Osiris.

Lord of Lands, King of the gods.

Asar-em-qemauf-nebu j]^

As4r.Neb-Tet
in all

B.D. 142, 148, Osiris

2l^8^
Busiris.

his creative works.

B.D. 142, 91,

Osiris,

Lord of

'

A
Asar-Neb-tchet
56, Osiris,

[87]
rl'S-=^

"^,3.0.

142,

Asar-Khenti-Un
B.D. 142,
6, Osiris,

rfTK

n,

Lord of Eternity.
ri

Chief of Un.

Asar-Nemur
Stele 87, 88, Osiris
thie

jll-

^ in
r\

Metternich
crl

Asar-Khenti-peru
CD!
I

(?)

^J^

^^

LTI

B.D.

142,

72,

Osiris,

Chief of the
temples.
JJ

+ Mnevis;

^'

tomb of

Osiris Mnevis.

Asar Nesu bat


Pap. 19,
Lit.

m [J^E
t;;iS

Asar-Khenti-men-t-f
Ani
\\\

^
,

K^

p. 706, Osiris,

Chief of his
ti

^\^

rjhl--<2>-l B.M. No. 236,

Asar-Khenti-nut-f
B.D.

^
Chief of his town.

Osiris, king of the

South and North.


iJ

142, 42, Osiris,

Asar-nesti
49;
var.

Jj,
'

b.d.

142,

J^

ing to the throne.

^ ^^ ^
'

0i"s, belong-

Asar-khenti-iiep[r]
'^^^

rji

fllh

..-O

^
JlJ

B.D. 142,

7,

"!)Q<5

Osiris, Chief of corn (all kinds of grain).


AA^^/^A
l]

Asar-heri-ab
fl

Asher

'f%

"^ '^

^a J^
-aa

Nesi-Amsu 17, 16, Osiris in Asher (part of 1 hebes).

W
I

Asar - Khenti - Nefer


J], B.D. 142, 69,
Osiris,

f[||]

Chief of Nefer.

Asar-heri-ab-se[m]-t
B.D. 143,
polis).
18, Osiris

j^t,'^ ^'
{i.e..

Asar-Khenti-Rastau

d h

in the desert

Necro-

<='-^t^j^^^
I I

B.D. 142,

16, Osiris,

Chief

_fl

Asar-Heri-sha-f
III
,

[1

his sand.

'~^^

of Rastau of Seker (D.iath-god).

Asar-Khenti-seh-kaut-f
B.D. 142,
76, Osiris

on

_^ 3
I

Asar-Heru

V
rj

"^

J]

Jj,

Osiris

4-

Horus.

_ wiXB

II

ci

il

Icn^

Asar-Heru-aakhuti
B.D. 142, 100, Osiris
-I-

jV^

B.D. 142, 77, Cows.

Osiris,

Chief of the house of his

Harmakhis.

Asar- Khenti -shet-aa


">-=

jl'S

Asar-Heru-aakhuti-Tem
],

J1

UIi

ca

S\
'

B.D. 142, 82,

Osiris,

I>ake

Chief of the (?), Pharaoh.

Osiris

-I-

Harmakhis

-f

Te mu.

~fa=a

Asar-Khenti-geti-ast (?) jj^^i?


''^rl'^
[($.

Asar-heq-taiuj^l^lll
B.D. 142,
18, Osiris,

J,

B.D. 142, 92,

Osiris,

Chief of

Governor

in Busiris.

Asar- Khenti -Tenn-t


J|
j

rj'^fllh^

Asar-Heq-tchet-em-Anu

^^

[]

Osiris,

Chief of Tenen.
11

nor of Eternity

in

An

(Heliopolis).

Asar - Kherp - neteru


Tuat

^ 1

''

Asar-Khas "^^
277, a form of Osiris.

"^i .\nnales xill,

III, Osiris, Director of the gods.

Asar-Sa
AJ]{[\\\

Asar-Khenti Amentt

"^

X ^ "^"k "k
71, Osiris the

L=J) J], B.D. 142,

Shepherd.

Asar-sa-erpit

J^ "^^ "^ ^ ^
son of the two Erpti

of Amentt, Osiris, Chief of those

who

are in
,

Amentt.

B.D. 142,

14, Osiris,

F 4

A
B.D. 142, 5^'
8, Osiris

[88]

asu^, S3^|, (]p^|,


3^ p 1 14*
Asar-Sep
n>te ^^
,

(IJp

Orion.

J'^^.
J^

Rec.

3,

46,

j|o

^uyjP^v.^.q&P^ii. qPf^,qPK,fl

Rec. 14, i3> Osiris

Sep.

^ '^,
w
r43,9,
of the
'
'

^ ^-,
C

Asar-Sepa
j]
1
1

^-^fl
retribution,

i ,

reward, recompense,

^^im

jn
Osiris,

|^|,B.D.
the

return, substitution, price,


tion,

payment, remunera;

Osiris Sepa,

holy

worm

equivalent

Copt.
;

A.COT

(?)

Souls of An.

It

^^,

those

who

are rewarded

^\

(I

Asar-seh

ca
rl"^
,

B.D. 142, 99,


A

in return for;

<:r>^3i, asareward;

Osiris of the Council Hall.

Asar-Sekri
51, Osiris
,

JJ

D
(J

ft

n\

B.D. 142,
Seker.
_^n>ri

>

Rec- 20, 40, to endow.

the god of the coffin,

i.e.,

Asar - Sekri - em - Sheta - 1


a^

S ^^^

testicles.

^n

asu.t(?)

Jb^q n SiJ

^
'

B.D. 142, 51, Osiris

Seker in Sheta, the modern Sakkarah.

1)1^".

U"!^'

^-

'^'

M. 494, an explanatory

particle.

Asar-Ka-Ament
Osiris, Bull of

Ament.

^
*

[J

I, Tuat

iii,

Asar-Ka-heri-ab-Kam
P.S.B. 19, 261,

Rechnungen
;

59,
'

board, plank,

B.D. 142, 97,

Osiris, Bull in

Egypt.

beam,

seat,

throne

plur.
(J

-Jf )

^v

>

Heb. !T^U?, Arab. lyj\


B.D. 142,
75, Osiris, the

Syr.

,<kjo^.

swathed one.
^"^
_

Asar Tu-Amentt
Osiris of the

'^^
I

5
I'

-^^

J]

nnm

c^o^'

^.l)[lj;^. I1PJ^,P.S.B,.4,,
L.D.
Ill,

Mountain of Amentt.
l]

194,

47,

seat,

throne;

compare

Asar-Tem-ur
,

>!:~^

^^ 3

j]

Heb.

v/^?^

^f\ ^=:5.^'^=f % n <=> tlJ .J^


t^

'

B.D. 142, SO, Osiris, the great Executioner (?)

Asdr-Tet-Sheps^|^,j|^gj^^,
Osiris, the holy Tet.

Aseb ()PjTmm,Berg.I,34,(|PJ^|,
Rec.
4, 28,

a benevolent serpent-god.

Asar Asar
who

cz>~
A J\

J]

Tuat

II,

the

name

of a term.

Asbit

I)

J^ ^
EdfCl

a goddess.

Tuat VI, one of the nine

spirits

Asbu-peri-em-khetkhet
5C^=iv ::'-^ ^3-^
/

[I

J %i 1

destroy the wicked, soul and body.


j!

^./V|

'

I, lOG, one of the eight sharp-eyed servants of Osiris.

Asar-merit
the Athribite

""^^
01]

P'^ce in

Aseb

[j-rr JJ,Hh.328;.see-nr-j7\.
ij

Nome.
(]

asa
(]

U. 296 = p ^,

~^,
12

asbar, asbur
N. 533,

^
I,

'T^

'^.

to introduce, to

make approach.
(]

4si..,.-n-|)()^Y,Rec.3i,

PJ^i

-SiRl'^, Anastasi

24,

2,
(]

pj

'
l\

A
growth
;

89

A
asf-t
[]

W
Ij

c=3, U. 394,

thicket, undergrowth, scrub, thorn

comRec. 31, 22,


J;

pare Heb. nViatr.


sin,

^^,
;

I]

^, =^ ^^, J p ^,
(]

fault,

wrong, crime, iniquity


(1

plur.

&ri asf-t <e>h n


^

sinner.

Js<=>s;-,^,
I,

Aiiastasi

I,

26,

8,

KoUer

Pap.

""^
5,
(I
I

(2

whip, beating stick;

asp
(]

p D, U. 137, T. 108, N. 445,


-

to

be

men, criminals, fiends, sinners;


offered: see
t

var.
(J

Q '

aSD

fl

n
I

'^
.

'
,

keep count of something, to reckon up.

W
asfa
h

Will ~^
j I

Rec. 31,
'

II,

a
(?)

group of gods

asfekh
asfekk
N. 310, to
sledge, bearing pole,

h
'

P. 643, M. 679, N. 1241, to do away, to cast aside.


^
^^'^y^,

p
split,

^,
[\

(]

U. 58,

to sacrifice (?)

wood

packing, timbers.

asfekk-t

^^ c,
I

slaughter

(?)

asp-t

(II

Israel Stele 12, throne; see

asmar

j\

^ <r^
I

Turin Pap. ^ 67,

11,

III

a kind of stone, emerald

(?)

asp-t

(|

^ n cr^

P.S.B. 13, 424,

HeruemN.

asmen
1

(|

^^^^, u. 26, p. 409, M. 586, P


^^*^- ''' 9> to stablish,
il

heb (Masp. )

18, seat of royalty, palanquin.

191
'

[1

21 /www

/^^5

U'

make fkm.

rTfir/)t<i,

emery powder
p
1

(?),

or

Heb.

'^''P^\

asmes
(] [1
1

|, M. 466 = p |,
1,

p.

243,

(1)

ot), Rec.

90, to give birth to.

quiver; plur.
(]

^=^''-

fl

i^'

^^''"- 53>

P four sons of Horus

Asmet

^r ^,
;
f\

M. 663, one of
n

the

see Mesta. K n /WWNA


^^

.4.

i\

/w/w^v\

asen,asenn
A.Z.
17,

l\^\]

57,

quiver

filled

with arrows;
jr<yy
-if:
f];

Heb.

4^()

|^.
^^,

^5^?^|l; Assyr.

ishpatu, plur.

^f,

T. 289,

M.
I]

66, N. 969, Rec. 13, iii,


<?
,

(||

Sennach. VI, 56.

asepsep(?)
3,

^ ~^
see

N. 128,
,

to sniff, to smell, to kiss,

Anastasi

I,

14,

to

make

friends with, to fraternize.


r\
r^j

ri

/wv/.^s /vaaaaa

15, 4, slope of side of

an inclined plane

.k

(?)

asenn, asensen

l\W\\

7Z3-,
air,

aspr
(]

pD^whip;

(]

|]

J^^var.
,

i^
asen l-ta
(j

i^
^^,
I

wind, breeze.

aspt
asf
N. 429.
11

P
,

-^^,

Rec.

8,

171, sledge.

P >/
;
II

to smell or kiss the

U. 120, to cut

off;

earth in

homage n

N. 114.

; ,

[
fl

90]
ashetch
f]

i\

asm li
(j

^^
llfl,

p. 608^

Ij

""*~
()

M.

498,

(]

^ ^^
(

|j(],

p. 631,

Sir
^^>^

T. 281, N. 130, to shine ; see hetch.

(](),

N. 1080,

askh

L_vi,

to

make

to open.

mn
to reap;

^'^,

asenut|l^^,P-36o,N^:o,4,^
asensh (?)
H

^P^^' U^J^.
U3C&;
see

Copt

~^

U. 375, T.

19,

(|

^^^

^q
P

-^.

-mmr, T. 356, P. 32^, 668,

askha
call to

Ij

(|||,

P. 196,

^,

T. 199, N. 1295, to

mind, to remember.

M. 628, N. 928, 1080,


to open.

to

push back doors,

asnet (11

a ceremonial bandlet

asshau
asesh
h

!\

flczio'^ %\.^'-

'^+' ^-

433

plur.lj.p^^
aser
aser
(|

, u.

140, t.

i i i,

n. 448

N. 294,

staff,

mace.
'88,

^SShem
asq
(]

h p "2?^, N. 762; see


z],

seshem.

(]^ ^

n. 755,
I]

T. 66,M. 22i,N.S98,

^^^f U<^r> | p^,


>

^L=J

^'^^j to cut, hack in

pieces, to decapitate.

(j

[1

(]

P<=z=.^,

(j

[1<:=>^-^,

P.S.B.

8,

X58,

as<i(]p^|,|)p^,(]P^,()P^|.,,

qP

to linger, hesitate, delay

Copt. UJCK.
,;5-

asqer(?)
1]

^,

^^^,--

foliage, branches, etc.

Heb.

/ttJ^, Copt.

OCI,

ask ask
Ij

=^,(JP^^,--P>-rtL7 particle.
p^::^|,
U. 481, P. 188, M. 354,

oce.

Aser-t

()^^, (]^0,
(I

u. 188,

N. 144, 906, to draw, to strengthen.

T. 66, M. 221, N. 598, a sacred tree whence

aska(?)

came Up-uatu,

l<:=>--=f^^, B.D. 42, 4.


-^

jjpU-^.^'^^^'^'^^^o'ih'
h

Aser
(]

B.D. 178,

14,

town

in
(?)

Asken
n

^^,

p.

79,

M.

109,

N. 23,
p.

p
\\

'

the Other World

^=^ C=3,

M. 708, h

^z^ i=c,
...

379,

^\^
1

T^
asru(?)
asrut (in

Rec. 17, 155, aforeigner(?) 21' prisoner (-|ib) (?)

I]

^=^^,
ast
(]

N. 1324, M. 333

^7r~ ^^ t^K

^-ft-,^
'^. N.
.

/\

R-c.

8, 171, article

of furniture.

^,
(]

p^,

Rec.

19,

187

ff.

(many
;

738, to

make

to

examples given), an e.xplanatory particle

var.

grow; .see^__^^3

fl

aseh

l\

|-j-]

B.D. (Saite)

no

4sti

MP w

Mar. Karn.
I

54,

i,

report,

document.

asha

(]

n HI
jj

"^ 6
ra

linen bandlet (?)

asha(?)

"^g),

^^^'^''

'^'

'9

to tremble, shake (of the limbs).

asta

(]p-^=^p-J',tohasten.
'

ashabuqpm^J^I5,'^';i|^^
ashabu
41
2,
i]

n:

whips made from the skin of the same.

astit

"^
''^

unguent, incense
a deceitful man,

(?)

Je]^,
to

P-S.B. 13,

asti
to travel.

ft

^^

>

liar (?)

ash

P I

''^

>

U. 388,

make

astb

= (lP-J[g ljpJ

"
'

"'^''

throne

(?)

,1

[91]
ash-t
N. 708,
ij'

h
1

,
Ci
,

u.

5-,
W''

P.

693,

(1
1

^,
o o o

Q
,

(1

thing, possession;

ash-t
fl

legal possession.

nation of

Thoth

the 'Oo-Taci/? of Democritus of

Abdera.

asten
|)

1q

,1
III

'=^

li

-'-^

I,
l

Rec. 31, 165, wealth,

L_Ji,
(j

p~f-^^,

goods

^^,

U. 185, T. 324, and

to tie up, to lace up, to tie round, to envelop, to


fetter.

ash-tt
to beat

""^

T. 344, meat and

down.
h
1

drink offering (the five offerings).

asth
N. 96
;

g=>, U.
1

224, P.

102,

M.

89,

asll-ta(]](],
^
ci
,

N-

972, to make a possession of.

see

an explanatory

particle.

Asth Thaath
Tuat VI,
Isis,

^^^
P. 125,
,

ash-t

I]

food, meal, ration.

(]

^,
647,

ash-t-fkhu
(]

the clother [of Osiris].

^ im^^'
'"^ c=^a

evening meal.

Asthen (]^il;see(]n
ast

^ ^.

ash-t-f tuat
ing meal.

-^

Pc^
1
I

Y'

corn-

A
'</

M. 136 N.

spittle, saliva.

Ast

D n <==i. >J_J U. 388, a

name of

Set

ash (|^^|,
(?)

an

offering.

w
Thes.
1

202,

(1

"""^^

Rec.

9, 6 1

(|

,.,0, M. 93, H spit out, to evacuate, to pour out.

N. 663, 69s,

to
(]

ashu h i=s=i% ''"<i:>, U. 333, outpourirfgs,


emissions, sweatings.

U.

15, emission, saliva, efflux.

ashsh

h
1
I

Asten

IJP^5^.f|P^^.
I)

.
I

A^^-'^
Rec.
32,

(JP

bear, to carry.

P.S.B. 20, 140; see

astes
(]

p^^^^.
u. 40.,^k.fe,

ashsh (]o, o
i "w-|

67,

perfumes unguent (?)

^,

ashaf
i^

1.=^

k
;

Aste8()p^^|,(]P^^,(]p
Alt.

^^'

to break, contrition

Copt.

olfcwcgq.

ashakhar
,

l)|^IiM^l^
-=:=^,

"^^
I

KX

K. 152, a disease.
h

one of the Company of Thoth.

asha
P. 425,

^3

U. 552,
(|

^^IJ".

dstch

(1

^^, U.

455, 601, 609, to cast

M. 608,
[1

to cut.
o"'^^:^! piece,

out, to shoot, to hurl, to break.

Astchet

"^ ^
P

asha-t
fiery

something cut

off.

B.D. 149, a

region in the 12th Aat.

ashu

j\

r-rr-i

to dry

up see
;

Shu ^ %i O

92

].

ashui|JP^(]|),P.447,p(l^,M.54.,
(I

ashespit
(] (1

^^ ^
,

[]

Ij

v\, N.

1 1

22, to raise up, to elevate.

;;vy

a booth in a garden, a

summer

ashep
ashf
(1

h 1

^^
D

\Tt,

cucumber;

Copt.

house, a niche in a temple, a chapel,

hall.

ecgoon.
(?)

ashesn
asht
[

|1

O
|]

^, to
B..

utter a cry of joy.

a liquid, unguent

ashem
M.

c^,

M.

ir4,
\\

^ ^,
114,
I,

Sf^i to

compel

see

"^^
^
.

Ahtit(|^;,

..

u.^ajg.-

20I, 559, N. ii6o, ii66,


to go.
i'-

(]^5^^.
(]

U. 488, T. 193, to make

ashem-t
(j
,

^^,
; (1

96,

^, M.

^|j^, a kind of tree, persea(?) sycamore

fig; plur.

"5^, N. 4 1 a going

t=?P t^", Anastasi

24, 4, journey, travel.

ashem sek
fl

csn
van

~wn -Ju.

II /I

PI
;

in Heliopolis

D_X
Q
var.

*"""'"''"" k^'^^
M

title

of Ra.

""^^P*,

the imperishable stars;

"^^5^

^^

Ashteth
Sekhet-Aaru;

'"^ ,

U. 360, a

city

in

Ashemiu seku
The.s.

[|^^ ^^r^illl,
1,
j
I I

N. 1074.

59

=
(^

^=-^^-i
who towed
r^;r-|
(1

a group of

asht

"^^^^
(|

u. 154,

(|

^, h=^
q

four jackal-gods

the Boat of Ra.

ashems
ashen
asher
d.Sher
h

a, to

make

to follow.

Rec.
I

15,
\

107,

P.S.B.
11

13,
ffl,

499, sycamore figs;


fruit

'~^^,

w^A/>

U. 267,

to furnish, to

of the sycamore.

ornament, to encompass with.

Asht
tree in

""^^
(

(1

fire,

flame.

I' Anu by which


[j

i]

(1

<z>,

roast meat.

Ashtt

2 ^ f^
A
z]

^^*-

'

7-

2i> a mythological

sat the

Great Cat (Ra).

5^

Hh. 438, a god.

ashes-t(|5c=sanQ,M.2 7i,([
N. 756,
n

g_

pQ,
(]

^ c ^,
(]
I]

o
n

N. 888, Hh. 429,


,

^
[1

Zl

to lose, to be injured;

^^

'^

O'

^^'

Copt. ^.Ko, ^.Kto.

5_

'^

Rec. 26, 225, 29, 151,


.id

'^^^'

1SS' '"i""")'' ""'"' destruction.

interrogative particle,

who

?
^1

what ? where ? why

?
3'Ql''fc

O.
(jf;^,

^ l''"d of drink.

wherefore?

5
\\

'

Qf
,

^,

Peasant 129.

aq-t
to

A.Z. 35- 17,

ashesep

^^

i)^^^.
^^e,
some

make

to shine.

Ashesp

(]

^
jl
(j

Rev.

12, 48,

reed; Copt.

^K.
;

Ashespi-kha
dshesep

^
,

^,

light-god.

aqi l\^l\^ ["^j.


3i.

reed

Copt,

jj^

^ q-

"r*^^^-

aqi-t

(]

/d (](]

Nasta-sen Stele 48,


var.

the goddess of the 4th hour of the day. h

kind of gold ornaments or figures;


(1-

A
[I

^ 5

bandage, garment.

SO).

'

A
3'Q.
1}

[93]
fl
;

form, ceremony

see

/]

Aqrit Khenti - he - 1 - set


come.

|]

<=> [\vq

fl'Q.a'

(I

-^^^^
zi

A.,

Amen.

26, 16, to

f|Jll^Q^P-^g^,B.D.x48,oneof
the seven divine cows.

aqa

(^

"v^v^

^, to dance

(?)

perhaps =

Aqertt
|]

^^, ^ '^(i^,
^

Berg. II,

12,

the "

perfect land," the

Other World.

T. 65, M. 220, N. 597, 847.

aqer

aqai

(]

^^^(j,

exalted; see

^^|.
(]

(]

^,

a plant.

aqau

1]

^^ ^>

Rec. 27, 218,

|]

aqra(qeri?)
exalted
(?)

'^
||
(]

s::^,

bolt.

Aqauasha (]^^(](j
\K
eLl

^ "^lilil

Aoeh ^
Aqhit

'^

H ra
||

-^

B.D. 168, a protector of


the dead.

zl

"^j U. 556, a goddess, the

f^^^-

Mar. Karn. 52,

i,

a Mediterranean people.
fishing tackle.
(|

aqh
z]|

aqarljg^^^ aqeb ^ J ^ ^=
-^

(]

^
,

>^

Rec. 18, 181,

\^J\,
.
.

7^

Rec. 10, 136,

1]

-^1

to enter,

to double.

to invade, to rush in (of water).

aqep

(1

lHlf)

Hymn of Darius 12, storm.


()

**

l]^||.l)^0,ligl>i(?)

aqem
buckler.

()

^^1^,
^

|^

i),

shield,

726, a metal,
(|

some mineral substance; Copt.

aqmu
Aqen ^
aqer

^ ^.
-wwvv
-?] <^'
, ,

N. 766

Ke&Ke (?).
aqes

>
''5>^,

^
[]

Q
'--

B.D. 168, a protector


of the dead.

\ay
I)

to cut.

to be excellent, perfect,

precious, valuable;

A
,

p ^, the name of a god (?)

Aqes

(j

ft-

^,

Rec. 32, 81,

excellently;

A
(I

aqes
J
,

(|

\\

,^

to

be

vile.

most excellently

Heb. 15^.

aqes-t
something excellent or
(]

y p^^>
A

^'^^' ^'''^''='^^'^'

^ ^''^

aqer-t

aqet

(1

c^s, U.

560, to work like a sailor,


\[\
I,

precious.

aqeru(j^^|l,(]^^|,|)
I

to row, to pilot, to punt, to tow;


A

(1(1

J|

fem.

the perfect ones, a title of the beatified

(1

\\\\\,\\\

Sf

sailors,

boatmen, crew.

Aqeru
^

jj

j^

^^
Ij

^^
,

'

P-

92,

M.

aqettiu(]i|^^|, (j^^(jl]j.(j\
121,

N. 699, the " perfect " gods.


3S..

^ %1MM,'^AqruQ ^ ^,__^Jj>ouM' Aqrit


\L
,

a mythodivine sailors in the Boat of Ra.

logical serpent.

c.

trjinn,

T. 35,

I)

aqettiu qeras

a goddess.

^7^

<^

fl

P^'

Rec. 36, 78, funerary bearers.

'

fl

[94]
akamu
akana
mes
III,
p.

aqet(|^c:^g|,p.833,{]^^^[^,

h ^rz]
;

'^ %. ^^,

wretched,

(|g^^^y(j^!
aqetU
labourer,

^,to

build.

miserable, patient
h

Copt. tOKeJUL.

0^^^'%^^^.
plur.
[1

mason,
yr

artificer,

U
vessel,

"^ W,
pot,
;

Birch,

Thoth17,

13,

IV, 665,

717, Rec.
bottle;

76,

workman;

\\

1 E

SI

71

basin,
Syr.

bowl,

Heb.

'iSN,

rtyo^rc, Gr. "X""';

see

(I

^.
T. SI

aqet-t

\|

'^

^
D
j\

(1,

Rec. 36, 78 see


;

\|

"^ IM.

aka

d >P.i73,
,

aqet

(1

,
^^^^

n^n
60, to cry out.

T. ry,

builder's con-

P.

struction; plur.

'

'

^' ^^^'

'

akka akau

^~^
(]

<^=f=^,

night, darkness.
P;

M. 426.

aqet

....

^=^
[|

IH^f. ^H^-^'
^_,
^~

builder's

S^
7n"

Hffl ],
^
I).

_^^-5

plan, design, draft.

Akanhi
name

(]

^:3^

U. 327, the

Alt A

'^::356'

U. 537, T. 295, M. 466, thou = k^crP6.


suffer
injury,

of a serpent-god or fiend.

aV

^^'
(j'^z:^

to

be

lost or destroyed.

aki
T. 295

(]

^^^(j,
T>t)\

u. 537,

()

^3^S^(1I),

akin
destroyed
;

\>

^^

lost ones, things

A Vn ^

fl

Tuat
"

III, a

god or animal
in the

^^^Jf^'
(1

Tuat.
^^'

[1

kz::^ t^O

V '^

'

'

'^^

damned.
lost.

aku-ta

'^^ "V

'"'^'

^"

ak-t
Slkk

[I

^^\

pain, injury,

something

(]^y=^,M.ii2,(|-^;|.'^o=^,
N.
25,

Sp
(]

cry, song.

(]^=^^=^^,

P. 1S7,

(]^.z^^^=^^,
(?)

ak,

aku
198,

-=^ f^X

^^^^
fl

Rec.

30,

stonemason,

quarry

^ ft' man
;

M.

348, N. 901, bowings to the earth

plur.

akeb
akeb

(|^:r:::

J,

to

bow; see^:::*

J ^^.

q^J^, ^i^J^'
iiii^

ak-t(?)

(l"^ft^.Hh.45i
f^^^
,

akU
ak-t
;

^ '^l^ V\ f%
plur.

stone quarry.

q^,U.536,[|^c{}:,
^^3^
(]
(]

T. 294

^,

U. 537,

(]

^z=^
'

to weep, to lament, to cry, to


wail, to tear out the hair in grief.
]

^|*.T.295.
aka-t
Akfl
fl

akebu

h ^^^ips

Amen.

i8, 5,

weepers, mourners.

[1

^^

111'
I

estates, lands.

^ LI 21
I, I,

4kbit(|^J|)(|l,

^^-

()

'^74,
(?);

64,

sesame

seed

Copt. OKe.

waihng women.
Diim. H.
19,

(]

^=1^

Akbiu
[[[?|.
()

^!=1
n
fl

(j-^^^^jllljl.

Tuat XI,
8,

Ij

tk %\ JjriH^iJl'
fl

B.D. (Saite) 80,

a group of four weeping gods.

.hMd;plu,.(lc3|^;?,(]^|^J3.

l\

A
(1

95

Akeb
Edfft
I,

^:z^

8o,

q^i^q ^,
^,

-wvAA/^
,

(1

'CTP*

T=T,

Akenti
keeper of the

H
!\

aaaa^a

j]
;

B.D. 146, the door(1

(]^^,

7 th

Pylon

varr.

__ 3,

(1

(]

'cr^

the Nile

and

its flood.

Aker
for fumigating purposes.

^~^
(]

2^:^

an Earth-god ;

see

akep

ViM

rain-flood, storm, torrent.

Akeru
gods who guarded the great tunnel through the
earth.
,

akem
(Lacau).

fl

^^z^

^^ M,

buckler;

plur.

(1
1

B.D. 149,

aken
Heb.
y;^

aww
^[7

(I
, 1

'-'

bowl,

basin
Assyr.

the 9th Aat

var. (Saite)

^^/^^A^

|2b?

see

[1

^\

T',

compare

akeshti (]^^ ti^ J^^, Nubian (adjective). 1 i-^r-i o ^.T-'^'X^"'!"''!'

tyyyi-

^y yTVf.
I,

"bowls,"

Rawllnson,

Akesh
Nubian;

C.I.W.A.

I)

23, 122.
'^^^'^
lEQl
,

^
||

tL ^( ^' tL
52
;

Rev.

14,

13, a

aken.

11

a kind of stone

(?)

plur.

aken-t

(1

-wwvs

U. 6ri, resting place

(?)

I)

^^
Akshit
3'S
11
1
I

^^

'
|

^^^'-

'3,

3,

^'^''
j

'^'

Copt. e6locy.
o. 134,

'^~~^

aken-t

[1

'-f^^^

domain,
'

estate,

abode (?)

p. ", B.D.

a cow-

aken
aken

(1

^
~wwv
-x^^.,

goddess of Oxyrhynchus, mother of Apis.


>

make,
,

to fashion.

(1

^^
,

to salute, to address.

agU
(j

I]

^ S
I I

'^w^AA
A/\/w\^

Stream, flood.
plant or herb; var. h

'^, a

aken
|1

(1

^^^^

Rec. 1,48,

aww

'^^-cx.,

Z5

ga
;

^Aww^ Vp\ vjr,a-

a digging tool, hoe, plough,

aga,
pick
plur.
(I

wwv

\S

aga(]ffi^_., (|ffi^^,A.z.
1869, 86, a kind of wood.

a class of gods like Osiris.

aga
Amen.
13, 6,
24,
3,

akenu (|g~^^^,
some
evil quality, lying (?)

(|

a "^ ^, to quiet, to subdue.

AgaqB^^|,B..>.,S,35(Sa,,e,,
''"'"'
,

Aken-ab
(]

^
""

"^

^'

'^'-'^e'^pe'-

Akenh
Akenha
name
U. 327.

U. 544, the

ra
h

name of a serpent.

Rec. 29, 157, 159, a god, a form of Anubis(?)

Agau
title

(]

rn U
;

'ittSm,

of a monster serpent

T. 299, the n^^^^fl "^^^


U
[7]

S
(?)

of Anubis

^^

^,
>

B.D. 64,

19, a

var.

(I

A S'

agap

(j

S "^

Iflf

flood, rainstorm.

Aken-tau-keha-kheru
D
I
I

h
AA^^AA

^0
I

Tuat VIII and X, the souls of the drowned

in

the Tuat.

agit, aggit
(]

ffl

(](]

"y",

Ij

B.D. 144, the doorkeeper


of the 6th Arit.
1 1

a kind of garment (?)

[96]
fl

Aggit-hebsit-bag, etc.

Agertt

ffi

"^
,

ffl

"

", B.D. 137,


.

^
the

(var.
(|

ffl

^ !!

Sa,te),

B. 13, 17,
in the

(]

S*

O _2_ _2_
'^3^'
ll

the abode

Tuat of the souls from An.


(|

ages
name
of the 7th Pylon.

ffl[l==^,^(1

^-

^53.

^ide.

agb|)fflJ-^,-b2l^eTubrued

Agest
at
il

see

Amset.

4gbii|^,llfflJ::^,(]ffiJ
flood; Copt. (JJ(fK.

o, N. 1126, father
(j'^^lj^I]^,
P-

P.

441,

M. 545;
ffi

442

=^^^
[|

agbu

I)

ffl

Rec. 27, 84,

(|

ffi

J ^ 43, J e ^O
i

(j

J 4=,
air.

',

^
\
I

M. 545.
(j

wind,

at

o, T. 368, M. 207, N. 668,


plur. I 1 1
,

'^,

P. 441,

agep (]Sf=^,T.3I9,1]S|||,P.44i,
710, U. 609,

M. 545,N. ii25,father;
"^
,

||

q o (Iq,
(1

M.

545,

N. 160, 193, 1125, 1352,

U.

213,

P.

85,

442,

N.

43.

1365.

o o o
fl

Thes. 1287; see


rain storm, tempest, flood
;

and

M?^; Copt.

Copt.

^THni
27,

eiCOX
t7

Q ^1 T=T =
I

Philopatores
i.e.,

(1

o,

agep
(]

ge|f ^i'!) ^'Rec.


^'^^^

A ^

=!
f)

father of the god,

a kind of
priest.

H'^l'
at (]^

210 h ffi f^^S^ '^' S D

^7,

84, cloud, fog, mist, the darkness of a storm.

^,
11

child, suckling; plur.

<

(j
I I

agem
ager
(j

\\

/^^i
ffi

to discover.

Rev.

14, 14,

^^7^,

e^

Rev.

13, 10.

III

,m.i93i,U.86=^,n.
www
r,

363,
j^
'

at-t (j"^S &, nurse.

O Rec. 29, 78, but, now, however; Q


I,

n^

at,ata|).^,^,^g,,^^,^,
womb;

36, yea, even.

ager ager
20, to

ffi
(|

= |

'^

^,IV,

236, hunger.

Copt.

OOTe, OXI
1

r.j4

concu-

(|^>

^^^'

^''^- ^^^

bines

W
p.
,

cows or mares

in foal.

make

silent, to quiet.

at (|q,

287
house.

Agerlu(lJ^||(j^fj,(|J^^5D!,
at
(j

( u u-. . of A mhab.tants

Ager
(]

^ ^
7A
(]

'^

the

Tuat of

An
19,

at Q

'^, stone (for

(]^)(?)

j^^,

(Heliopolis).

^
^* ^
&t
A4. ai[I
f.

no
"^
'i

part,

portion;

^.

B.D. (Saite) 64,

ffi
(|

J,

Rec. 30, 192, 31, 20, a god.

Kj' ~^, Rec.


"^
^
'

K-s'

Copt.

XOI.

20, 91, fluid, liquid.

Tgrit[j^7|,B-D-(Sa.te)64,^,^9.^a
A ri1- \\'^^Tl '^^ goddess of the 5th ^ hour of the day. '^ jp O UA'

to smite,

l|

_/!

to pierce, to beat, to constrain.

ati

(1"^,

beater, scourger.

Ageru
(j

^^

5^ !

B-D
s

no.

hX (jo|^^, N. 747
5.

in

^^^yi''^''''"^^^'^

SekhetAaru.

4t ai-

fll T. 182, p. 529,


L|

M.

0'

165, N. 653, twig, branch (of a palm).

'

'

[97]
fl

A
atu
(]

^
507 (with

it-t
cords.

(]

O^acordnet;plur. (1^.^^(3(2(2,

^,
o

P. 55-

^^ o^)
IM^^,

it,ata
M.

(j-^^;^, ^Ijo.p.
.

94,

Atum
wife of

(j

u-Li

[v^v]
,

(]

I
(1

118, N. 57, a kind of red cloth.

^ ^j
Dil^i*.

-4sien, p. 316, a Syrian

god;

fern.

At
(j

^^

^^ ^^Q'

Rec. 29, 149, a god.

Reshpu; compare Heb.

at

(]]j|,

king, prince; see


|)

(]
|)

||

atur ()o%<c=> -^ i J\,


1

JT

^ ^'"e "'' ' flow, to march.

N.824,
grist
;

/^, '^, (1^,-a,

atur
|)--,corn,
AAAAAA

h-'^ZZ,
flood,

^,

(o

Copt. eiUJX-

V,

river,

arm

of the river, lake> basin ; see ater, atm.

Ati-t-khau||]=^^;^,.,i.leof,h.
crown of Upper Egypt.

Atur aa
<\

name

of the

Canopic arm of the


,

Nile.

ata

(1

^^^ cur^

boomerang.

""
(-21

(Q '^'vw^A

I^^ST1?

1-^
league.
I'hes.

-^
I

a measure of land, stade,

!\

^ n

Atar l\mh^
9,

'^'^^' ^^- '^4


'^^"''

Atur-meh
Lower Egypt.

(|

"%^^^.
,

1251,

a Nubian

(?)

dwarf-god, son of Ra.

dta

d
1

o Q /^ UQ.^'
1 A
fl

moisture

Copt

eiujxe.

Atur-res l\^\^ "^^^ ^


Upper Egypt.

Thes.

1251,

Ata

^,

N. 766, an associate of Shu,

the two chief temples of Upper and the

Lower Egypt,

two halves of Egypt, the northern and

southern halves of the Egyptian sky;


sovereign, suzerain.

"^

U. 418,
Rec.
3,

P. 453-

ati

"^^
,

J,

116,

king.

Ati

Tuat VI, a crocodile-god.


I

Atiu
i.e.,

f\,

the bandaged gods,

the divine

mummies
fiends,

Attiu iu(l^]](j(|^4!,
1

the

ateb

"^^

'

damned.

JV

tongue.

Ati-baiu

QHT]^^.
r-rr-i

ateb
i.

hS,

the

O^Jl^.
'^
[1

Rev.

13,

62,

to

be

name of a pyramid.

removed; Copt. oifCUXefi.

Atu (]]^,U.632,|)]^^,T.3o6,
an associate of the Serpent-god

atep

'^

' '^^' ^

'^e

laden

Copt.

Ug

^tpa

H^l)^.

bark, boat

' .

[98]
fl

Atemit -^
counterpart of

",
[j

^, U. 2i8,the female
PI. 2,

Tem.
'^

(|

" ^\

(|

^||,

Atem
two fathers;

Goshen,

a dog-headed

fl

!>=='
(|

bow-god.
c^

Atem
I,

^ 1 Khepera, the union of the evening and morning Sun-gods.


-I-

Atem Khepra

^
,

i
tef.
i,

see also under at

and

atemu-t
q

knives.

plur.

^;
,

(]^ ^
;

atemti

V^
title

L.D.
I

Ill, 140D., father


all

'

\:::z^

mankind

and mother of Copt. eiU)X.

1]-^^ W Atemti ^^
(1

one who
destroys.

Tuat

III,

Atf-meri

h^
h
,

goose-headed god.

Philopator.

atem atem

^^^ ^"^

J\

a verb of motion.

Atf neter 1

" father of the god,"

of a priest, or father-in-law of the king

000
13,

iy-i

air,

wind.

atma-t
(1

(]

c.

^5,

(]

o g(][j 5.
"^

(j

^j.

IV, 349.

(s

a kind of red cloth.


h

Atf, Atfa-t

()^^,
the

Rev.

Aten

f G%J
^
(]

^l
Rec. 4, 128,

serpent

on the royal
crown.

Rec. 27, 55, 31, 174,

8'

Atfa-ur

h
,

^
(]
(]

Rev.
sCX,

14,

7,

(D1]

Hymn

of

P. 26,

M.

37,

N. 67, a god.

Darius

7,

'^
of

atem

fl^k--'M
75,
(|
.^

U. 491, M. 129, N.

^
_(U.

0511
,

^. ^^5' ^I^V^'
(]

j^j

Rec.30,

the

disk

the

sun,
(|

the

disk

stands

still,

Metternich Stele, 207;


190, not, without; plur.
[I

~^>X,

disk with

N. 938

see

tem.

two horns

(]

-^ =#
name

:\!\

-^
those

k ^' "
who
are not.

""

" ""

^ -^

A.Z. 1 901, 63, the hetep III.

of the barge of

^^
',','''

^ X'^
^-

Amen32-

Aten VII
1.

H'^
h

^^^-

the Sun-god. 253, the seven disks of

Aten-ur-nub
aten
(j

^^ ^^ r^,
^^
as

Ra. serpent-headed supporter of the throne of


see
^jTT-ir

^,

mirror.
to

=
(j

Plsee

atem

r
J,
(|
'

to shut, to close, to

make an end

of.

aten

l\'^^,

act

a deputy;

Ateinl]^,u.3aa,(l^,(1^5^.
Rec
30, 66, 3,, .4,

(l-^^sfl.lj^k

atenu (j^^L-ii, [jg^

a i\^
,

\1^' \^i^'
^
fl
Jf{i

i^'^^-'^'^-i.

1)^
''''"'

J)a

the
'

god of the evening and morning


sun
;

^^^
deputy,

y^^.

Rev.
,^, waM;

II,

127,

n
L|
^^

(j^/^ 5^' o O A\ Rev. 12,


eali'

18,
(?)

see

Tem, Temu.

directors


[99
aten-t
(I

staff

of

office,

mace.
Rec. 26, 234, 27, 218, 219; see aturti.

Ij

gAA^

^, ^>

to

push

Aterti
aside,

to

repulse;

van

gg

Denderah IV,

67, the

name
92,

of a funerary coffer;
to resist authority, to revolt.

^^, Rec.

II

5,

the shrine of Osiris.


(1

atenu atenu

~^ %,
O Jr

Mar. Aby.

II,

30, 37, revolt.

Ater-t
fl

meh-t
1

(]

g%

;|^

I,

(]

^|^^
1295,
()

|,

#*
^

rebels, fiends.

aten (l^^^ir,
e

Thes.

^
of

=B> cr^

O ^ T'f'
ci

'

P- ^^^>

Lower Egypt;
of

the J Q'

goddess

Lower
Egypt.

i,

Anastasi
12,
II,

I,

5,

n
1

Hymn
(]

Ater-t shema-t (?)

\\

vii

EZ

H]

"kUpper
of
the

Darius,

(Iawaa,

Rev.

12,
air

10,

^#13^-'
place of

^-^-'iig.

Rev.

14,

an opening,
prison
(?)
;

hole

(?),

Egypt;

(|<=>[r^-^J,
(|

goddess

restraint (?)

(J

wvw /W ^

Upper Egypt;
sides of the southern heaven.

the two

atenut
circle,

1).^^"'

'J-^"^^,
(^^/^, Rev.

horizon.

ater (?)... ^
*-

aten U':^,
13, 67,
l\

Rec. 15,43,
,

H ^^^ "" U
!] c1

>A'

'^^ belt of
'

III

Orion
out.

(?)

atru

"^
(|

%>/'^,

to

pour

^^
"^y

j]

-vAAA/w

'^k,

ground, dust,

earth, land, estate, farm; Copt.

eiXIt.
f]

atr,
<S=>

atru
f\

aten

to bind, to

tie.

(j^^^^i. '^ ^
fl

Rea
~^^^~^

31, 168,

^
AAAAA/S

aten-petch-t

|j

-^ ^^,
III

l.D. hi, 55B;

IV, 194, stringer of bows, bow-bearer.

atennu
points in a

(J
I

jwaa

knots,

difficult
'^^^'^
I

III'

(2

book or argument
i.e.,

'^^^
;

[I

qHd e

~^

i'

untier of knots,

solver of difficulties.
P'"t of a book, or of its binding.
~vj~vj I,

atennu
aten
ater-t
ij

h'^^s^T C^
1

Jr

'

^ ^,

a kind of plant.

P. 42s,

M.

92, 607,

Rec. 26, 65, 80,

i)<>S
,

^,
,

Rec

29, 146, river, stream, canal, Nile; Copt,

eioop,

31,

162,

Heb.

1N\
l\ fl

<^

c=~=3

l|

<^ Q
r\

a hall, a large or small


e.g.,

atru atru
l|

rzr

Nile

festivals.

building, a cell or shrine of a god, A^i^A'v^ ^,

''

of

Amen

at Elephantine.

(j^^s,
,
,
I

I]

^^^,

<=>
I

Hh. 373, watered

land, a watering

place;

IJ

^ '^

Rec. 20, 41.

Atru-neser-em-khet

^ '^^^'^
G

^'^^'Imo'l'

"^- '49, the 13th Aat.


a

100

q J\
[j

ater,

atru

^^,

(|

rwv^>A^

fl]li'US'^^^^'^"^=^and.

athu().|.|^,--PP'--;-t
ath
a distance of between 1,500

^^ Q

U. 89, N. 366, a cake-offering.

and 1,600 metres,

or 3,000 cubits, the schoenus of 30, 32, 40 or 60


stadia,

4th-t

Ij. I

^^,
to

"-,!'*,)

Rec.

15,

164

ff.

The

square

fl^g.
4-2 miles

= =

18,200 aruras
ater of Edffl

The

= =

182,000,000 square cubits.


14,000 cubits

itkh[j'^^,
brewer (?)
;

brew

beer;
(]

40

stadia, P.S.B. 14, 409.

^.

ater
l\

^ "^,
limit;

Jour. As.

1908, 302

see

Bi

^,
(|

Copt. i.pHX.

atsef
time, season,

fl

-^ O,

cake; van

[j

atru

"^

{.

%> f

dth.

(J

Till

Thes. 926
Mett. Stele, 120, to hurt
(?),

iii. ^.
ater
Rec.
3,

"';

k^{'S- *Rec.
4,

'
"^

A+-h A atJl q

^=^

^^.
(|

hurtful (?)

morning and evening.


Q

^ Oi,
^ ^ra

28,

(1

^,

athth-t

^""^^

bloody pus.

roll. 49, papyrus, the cord of a papyrus

athth
(]

ater

(]

W
.

^,
.
'

N.

953.

1)

^%-'
up
to

yoke

of

animals

AS=>'1/^
q

yvk -^

to twitter, to pipe like a bird, to quack like a duck.


,

athi en S^=^ '^"^


cattle
;

since, from,

now,

Copt.

^j^Tpe

Athabu(l;ra^J^^.B.D.
163,
I,

hitherto;

S^a^a^o,

from

this

day;
12,

S^
38;

a town in Egypt or the Tuat.


[]

with

numbers

^^1,^111111 loiiio'
U. 537,
564,
P(]

Rev.

ath

o 1^,

U. 89, i

o
Rec.

P. 366,

Copt. x\n-

(]o|^,

ath s^,
27,

s=,
340,

T. 26, N. 209,
1221, 1231,

(]ci|(^L-J,
P.S.B.
10,

230,

(|s^,

U.

I,

N.

(]^|^Lfl,

49,

[j^|U-fl,

qg,
o
9*
P. 318,

T.3-,

[j^qq,

P. 340,

IjY'

n'i^

U. 442, to drag, to haul, to


pull, to

^^^H'
2i

Rec. 31, 10,

^^^_^.

draw, to harness, to yoke, to


constrain, to restrain
;

tow a boat,
,

to

(Ci

Ci

(1

Q .

to string

^X^, T^^' ^^^.


seize,

to

to steal, to snatch away, to conquer, to


off,

capture, to plunder, to carry

to transfer, to

iH.(|^|^, lj-5^,
restraint, prison, fort.

place of

remove

Copt, xi-

athu

^^ I ^ ^'
P-

-'^^"-

'9.

^^

Att

(]c.

fields.
I'J;,

c^\>^^, Ijs^q^.

robber, seizer, conqueror ; plur.

204,

N.

1232,

ljs=^^.

'

[101
N.
1231,
S^, fl^

dthau
IV, 667, foragers;
.

ffi.

Peasant, 192,
21,
79,
thief,

^^

^^

^
rl]
'

fl^,

Rec.

conqueror of Egypt; '^yr'r


of

>

ravisher

robber;

plur.

/,

(j^^^lgj,

(]

women

o ^ Athtiu-abu
I,

-'^

i.

n <-=^

^
o

^
(]([

stealer of hearts.

will

^^
'^

mini'
athap
(]

HQ?m l^l^D,T.
23,

',.

B.D. 27,

the robbers of hearts.


'"^''^

atharlj^^^-^^^,
^^'^^*^'

Ait.K.

athit

s=5p[l[l

^'^S^>

IT

plunder.
,

193, prisoner;

Heb. "l^pN(?).
Tuat
I,

athi au-t

S^ S:?^ L=Z1 rvl c^

Jour. As.

Athep

a singing-god.

1908, 294, to torment; Copt, (fi i.0Ta3.

athi mit

S^

^
;

Athemti
I'

j|\
^~^A/^A,

'=^

Tuatlll, agoosein the Tuat.

(j(j

a
"J

_^\\' god
(1

Jour. As.,

1908, 293, to set out

Copt.

XI JULoeiX.
(I

4then
/wvw\

(1

^1
,

athi en qes

Rev. 14,
plur.
(I

(I

Ajw^ v\
.

the disk of the sun

A
67,

^A/'AAA

v\

Rev. 13,

30,

A
Rev.
II, 146,

S^='

^^AAAA

'^,

Rev. 14, 67,

ip

||1

^^

Kec. 27, 55, 29, 152, the

name

of

to wrong, to

do violence; Copt, xi HfT^ItC.

athen

(1

^>
^A~w,
fc/f
J

P"sh aside,

to repel.

athi her

f^ <i=i]<r:>
^^

b.d.

g.

281,

s^

athnu

(1

deputy, chief.

D
\

0/1
1

''^^^'

"'

'3^' ^ ^^^"' favour,

to accept

the person of

someone

Copt. (J^ o o.
Jour. As. 1908,

athnu(j^^^^j/-,*s,
time, season;

athi hetr ^^^

1^^.

252, to have power over; Copt.

XS P^Top.
varr.
]

Athit-em-aua
t

^^ L=Z1 1^
peg
in the

O,

[I

].

fi
tiJ

B.D. 99,

athes
23, a bolt

l=Ti),

to

beget, to raise

up

magical
boat.

children.

athtcha
prison
;

s^

Athi-hru-em-gerh

p^ l-J] ^= <=>

Rev.

12, II, restraint,

Copt.
(]

^iTT^O.
rfe.(|{|, U. 416,
libation.
[j

^^^, Tuat

III, a god.

at, ati

r?s.,

Athi-heh

s^
h

Tuat

III,

title

of

to cense, to

pour out a
,

Osiris.

atha, athai

^L=fl,

3't-t

w=Vj,
(|

(1

incense.

at-t(j^^,
fl

q^^
M.
(1

an

mcense
offering.

MIS
Israel Stele, 53, 24,

X
h

at (j.^^,
p. 416,

[j"^,

693,
ci
,

|jrfe.(],

..,

ibid. 6,

M. 596, N. 1201,

Rec. 31, 169,

(I

^^

IV, 222, 615, dew; plur.


[1(1

j]

w=fl, to

seize,

to snatch away, to steal.

to

^,

U. 565;

carry

off,

to lay violent

hands on,

S^^

LI LI

AAAAA/\

Copt,

eicoxe.
G 3

/VWA'X

'

'

fl

102

A
Ata-t
'^
(].

&t

(1

c:^> -^ , Mett.

SteJe, 53,

swampy land.

^
(]

M.
'

703,

mytho-

logical locality.

&t-t

l\^0, (]^,
rich,

U. 115, N. 424,

Atau(?)
Rec. 31,
19, the

a cake-offering.

g-=^^^-^
name
of a god.
141,

5^,

abundant, multitudinous.

ata
M. 366,
26, 2, to

U. 332, 479, T. 300, P. 655,


759.

at-ui(?)

^^^^,
(1

the pupils of the eyes.

N.

1)^^,
,

Anas.

I,

at (jc^:^^,
ati-t
(j

child; plur.
ci

(]^=^^^|'
maiden.

make,
(|

to cause, to grant, to give.

c^:-

111]

^
i/
,

Atti

""^^
(| (j

girl,

<G=<

Tomb Rameses

IV,

29> 30) Kec. 6, 152, a supporter of the Disk.

at
=:=>

U. Ij^.U.
,

608, Rec. 26, 67,


^^^^^

(]^j,

AtU
atua

p^
^
''

(j

^=^i'%
(1

B.D. 149, the


T.
289,

ith Aat.

(1

to be deaf, deafness.

c=5.
,

att-tir^'")

/1^^

H^^^'

^"^"^

Papyrus, 99, 14, 15, deaf ears (?).


^.^.,

\i^,

M.

66,

(I

<=^>

Rec. 30, 185, to praise.

at(?) ^,

part of a plant,

at-en-aam

^^(jl^l^;
8

at-en-ah
'^

^^(]
^^^^
;

ateb|)^J=., []^J^,(j^J
(2
,

vl

at-en-aru

^ /^^^

Rec. 25, 191, land which the waters of


c^^x^
\> V ^ \\> E H H

%\ A

at-en-rega

^
4)

4::^.

S "^

'^,

"^

the Nile can reach; plur.

(j

^^^^i' ^~^
at
(j

Rec. 15, 119, 120.

"^

^IS'
,

"^-

334' P- 376, N.

157,

\^=^\

a kind of bird. \

^
IV, 159, uterus; Copt. OOT"e,

73

l]-ww

Jl ~wwv

Rec. 31, 174, flooded Nile banks.

itebui
OXI, O'TTe.
at
1

5^J=, \^\\^,
^'^'

c^:s (^
/J

Rec.

26,

235, to seize, to grasp, to smite.

^^^j^-='

^3'

7'^'

N-

698,

atiu,

attiu

(]c^(](]Z^|,
|]

two banks of the Nile,

i.e.,

all

Egypt
1879,
54,

Vi.'^-^^,

smiters, slaughterers.

ateb atb

A.Z.
(1

plum
tree (?)

&t-t

[1

p^
=

slaughter, a smiting.

at(j2

Wort. Supp. 170, the cord of a ^' papyrus roll.

X
t>^'

Herusatef

Stele,

93,

Nastasen

Stele, 61, to reward, to punish.

atbana
at &t
(1

Harris

W
'

I
I

cr^ii

g^
"^^6

p. 70s, to

be

fat,

strong.

Pap. 501

(j

to

be oppressed,

atep
afflicted.

"
,

(]

U.

15, to taste

atep
destruction, death.

^^^^^
\\

load

Copt.

U5Tn

atep-t
IV, 480

(]^___.
^;
see

place for loading up, station, khan.

&tU
ata-t

(j-^^^'JT^.
||

atep

fl

c=>

"^

tep g
Alt.

^ "^i

oppression,

misery, miserable state.

Atem'

()g^^] ry\^

K. ic6, Edomite.

[103]
(1

A
aten-t
[1
1

Atem
see

|,

god of the

setting sun;

Q s
,

wv^a^

L
I

part, division.

ater

(1

P.

186,

344, 609,

M. 301, do

atma

(I

<c:s:3

N. 972, to make
P.

like.

N. 899;

(|^^, (|^^^fin

to destroy, to

atmait (|c^=.Q^,

away, to remove, to chastise


692,

(!<==>

\^'

M- 592, N. 1197,

I)

e=^

ateriu
g,

^
11'
I, Jl

A.z.

111

1869, 134, destroyers (?)

aterit (j"^
calamities, destruction.

B.D. 125,111, 16,

Aterasfet
(1

""^^
(|

ci^ra

V\ ^

the

name

of a garment or article

^^ ^

n. 980,

" Destroyer of sin," the

name

of a god.

of apparel

made
(1

of dark red cloth.

ater (j^-^iT^,

aten
aten.

v_>;

see at

and
12,

at.

1)2^^7,^,
PI.

stud
i8,

cow
(|wAAA^,

or bull;

plur.

H'^'^^'^, Coptos,

Amen.

10,

(1

"~v^

Amen.

25, 19,

god of the

solar disk.

aten

"^^

ear;

Heb.

H^

ateru
ater
(l

d^S'^l xf^b" -^^


1
I

'

for

^^' 745, geese kept breeding purposes.


(^,

^"^^

'0>,

""^^ '^

an internal

organ of the body.


as deputy, to rule for wakil.

someone
'

else, to

serve as

atrut
1)

()^^^^ c ^,
,

P.

661,

aten 0'^^,
iD
J\

fl^,
^

enter as deputy

'^^^^^^'^
ateru
atre
(]

P- 778,

M.

772, garments,

y\

on some
i6,

service.

atenu

bandages, swathings, bandlets.


h

^L=Z1, Edict

(l^S f ^,
L=J1,

^ 0^^=^,
v(a

^S

Ebers Pap. 109, 9 ...


^^

^^=^
(]

]\,

"^'"^

^""P-

5'

U
(1

deputy, agent, vicar, wakil

var.

atre-gaha

^ ^ 2,

ffl

atnu tent
]

hetru

l^^i^W'
^
'^

O ^L=/l R--7, MS.

^v

Harris Pap. 501

deputy-master of the horse.

atnu pa-menfit atnu


,

ei

deputy-general of the army.

fl==|^=,(|
marsh,
the Delta;
plur.

= 5^f't.
common name

swamp,

fen-district, a

for land in

per-uatch-ur

8^0
atnu banti

AA/VAAA

(]c^ff^|,

l\^l\

IS
^

deputy-sealer of the maritime department.

III

^
^

^^ J

-^

(1

athi[t]
'9

W
Stele

'J'

1)1]

1^, marsh plants, reeds, etc.

L_=/i, deputy-confectioner.

atenut

AAAA/V\

III'
111

Herusatef 91

f^
I

vSi

the swamp-dweller, fen man. Delta

SI'

man.
obstruct.

atenu

(]

D go

G 4

[104]
atchbu
j\

"^ J V

'

ground,

land

Ml

Amen.

23, 20, to pull, to draw, to haul, etc.

see
fingers,

seeath h

c^

|rnatehba(j^J
^=^>

U. 552;

Heb.ni^^rjN.
nf'

X
t
'

to
r\

atsh

make to make

to

fall,

atcher
boundary
;

(1

B
^pHX
.

2_^,

hmit.

tremble.

^^ Z-^, h
i

Copt.

Hymn

of Darius 25, to
spit (?)

osn

atchera
atcher
|j

fl

flo

Rhind Pap.

34, as long as.

atga
cloth,

O^'^'kf S. f 5>
h

head-

garment.

atch her

^
(1

[[

;=ji

'

-^i^^

^^fy (?
1

.,

U. 357, P. 204

=
atcher-t
B

IV,

175, fortress.

atchanr
In. Hier.

tj

|f ^

^ _
, , , ;

|f

Birch,

Ch.

29, 3, to rejoice

compare Heb.

I^IJN (Alt. K. 209).

B.D. G. 769, Osiris


in the Fayyflm.

Mchet 1)^,
a reply, to speak.

(]^^,

(If

^,
make

U. 270, p. 652, 655, M.

76, 193, 754. to

Atchai
atcharta
K. 210, a
h

W
i
,

(]

Alt.

pot, vessel.

words, utterances, speech, divine

talk.

'

105

X
a
^
a
a J-^
vi.
,
fl

= Heb. ^
piece,

of the nose;
I

_c[i^^
,

II
'

r^-^

inm.Rec. 21
I

li

AAft/NAA

one, a, an, pair; see the following eleven examples


:

21, hill top; Copt.

i.IfTtOOir

aww
(]

ar-t

J"^i ^

'A-

a uraeus amulet.

fkK^

ft

^
,

'

'

^^^fidle

of a quiver.

plant or flower;

used with verbs of motion (Copt.


^

an unbu plant.
1*^"^^

^m, Xm):-~^Q^'^L=3, a fighting;


AAAVW

Ill

a menh-t
I

a flight;
I

Ci

an amulet.

/vAwvv ^^AA^A

a en-meri-t
'Aw\

^
I

y^
NN
I

a journeying, or

Rec.

2 1, 21,

a port, harbour

Copt. .LlteJUtpO).
.,

a going, a passage
journeying

/vaaaaa

a em-khet-em-ash
r~Tr-i

\;:^

ci

"^
I

^
0,

A J\

'

^^

^
;
I

Q^

a censer.

r3

a mighty battle;

a en-hetrau
a body of cavalry.

n
I

ft>wA^A

.flf^S

L_=/l,

an eating.
P-

aui
R256,-

643, 666,
.^^\

a en-saga
Anastasi
I,

\\!\-

25, 6, a piece of sackcloth.

dW
\\

a en-thebut
a pair of sandals, white

a~wva

g=i

I]

%>,
vN
hands;
'
I

or black
a^^wv

the two forearms, the two

a en-senther a shem-reth
I

|\ J^

^^
I

^^'
,

""^ 'u'' i^^ actually. hands

T
of

aut 1-^ -^J


g==> an amulet.
,
I I
I

"

^,1), family.

airi

''vS^

"hands,"
I

/.?.,

workmen,
labourers.

a tchet
I

an amulet.

^1
prepositions, etc.
:

D
,

a-n-Heru
I

compound
I,

O ^Slj^.-^rm
^, "a
of

Horus,"
Rec. 21, 21, truly;
before

^U^ A-sah
i.e.,
I

censer.

0""'7he
of a Dekan.

^*-^

name
""T""

Copt. ^^-XJLe

S\
I

a second time.."f;
I

^.
I I

.w
I

Aui-f-em-kha-nef

'^'^

'^^^,

Tuat XI, a double serpent-headed god.

V'

^' "ce,

immediately

"^
;

V\
at once.

Aui-en-neter-aa ~~^ \\%>


etc.,

^"^j
"1
1

before, in the presence of ;

B*
l^

B.D. 153A,

12, the

"hands" of the

net for

snaring souls.

hand, authority ;
of.

under

aui
lets
;

'11,

armlets, bangles, brace-

the authority

a *^,

: ,

the forearm, the hand,


A^^'^^

var

(?)

the prominent part of a thing

tip

auau

arm
'

ring, bangle,

bracelet.

'

; ; ,

'

[106]
a
a a
I

Anastasi

I,

26, 6, pole of a chariot. in

a-t

nemm-t
men and

?V

^,

chamber

fl

^ J\
-w^v^-,

which

Anastasi

bodies were dismembered or

I,

20, 6

dissected.
(?)

GoL

12, 104,

handle

a-t nett

Q
.CD

^AAAAA, cistern.

a
van
(?),

Sphinx

II, 174, Decrets, 100, cara-

a-t en retui
Rev.

lie.
(?)

or

some

article

used

in carrying
(?)

goods

II, 169, foot-cases,

sandals

in the desert

on asses or camels

^ ^\
Some
i ,

a-t

ent-khet

^CD

Ci

D:H1, a caravan ot

Metcha,

think

Thes. 1254, summer-house.

^
beer shop.

that

^i=K

dragoman,

a-t

heq-t
till

::i
1

LJ

/>

^
;:zi

^0=,

interpreter, P.S.B.A. 37,

17-125, 224.
state,

a-t
condi-

seba

CD

a
tion,

Mar.

Karn. 54, 42,


r\

r\

AftAAAA

3
,

means

w^A/>
I

L.D. III,
Rec.
2

J,
18, 63,

J^

Rec.

school, college; cCopt. i.It^Hfi.e.

140B,

means of keeping alive


|

a-t

tau
-J]

'

-^t?

21; Copt.

^It^^i.
,

.CD (E3)i

baker's shop.

Di,

I ,

a-t
0,

region,

place,

e.g.,

V
piece
;

ci
(f

'5

limb,

member,

plur.

\ 1
Shasu;
Di

W>

the region of the

U. 219, _
Jfl 4;

the

southern region;
D
I

^
-

Dl,_
(^
I

fl^,

o^

AA/WVA

O
I

his

place

of

yesterday

I'

liin
I

J|

I,

estate of the gods;

a-ti
att;

^Y
,
I

e Will

(^(^

I?

ci

III

C^^
"'*' '"'^

" W,

Hh. 433,^"^^,
,
(?

'"^"'
hers.

(1

east side, etc.


^

a-t

neter 1'
Oi

the god's body.


r,

aui-sem-t
aui-tu

o
,

IV, 574,
'

hilly

country.

a-t ua-t

em aner
5.

AA/^A^'\

n f^/^^

lEED

Q]
!^:^,
, DI

IV, 388, hilly country.


A^AAA^

a single piece of stone, monolith

X7

Mar. Karn. 42,


a, ai ^

i6.

a
r,

Rec.

18,

181,

AAftAAA

A Rec. 10, 136, ^

r^~^^1 ^w^
L'^'^^^'-J

Kahun
,

a^,
;

l\l\

i,

to cry out, to

Pap. ^ 100, J dyke. dam,


,
,

'

speak loud, to recite

see

S,-t

domain,

estate,

plot

of ground

a
ci

Rec. II, 174, bank of

river,

^,
.

Oh! Alas!
,=

a
charter,
II, 125,

U. 575,

P.
list,

695,

Methen

8,

wriiing,

register,
roll,

document,

will,

R.E.

chamber, house, palace, temple;

original

document,

deed, order, edict; plur.

Copt. HI.

a-t
a-t
fi-t

Arp

oc:: 1 a

"^
fl

^^i"e-shop. wineI

III
a-ti
'
,

bener-t

em

cellar.

'K''^'

IV, ii'4i,date shop


or
t:

Rec. 21, 14,


register,
;

.C3/^\'

.store.

L.D.
(

Ill,
,
I I

229c,

list,

catalogue; plur.
d

nem
room
(?)

-w-w

Rec. 12, 32,


c.

Amherst Pap. 29

vs Jr

III

sleeping

P.S.B. 19, 261.


A
a
,

'

[107
moon).

to

grow

(of the

the two

"'Mill

\\

iMinnr

Y7

'

^^irrr

Tininr

ir--^

darkness, night.

leaves of a door, door

aau, aaiu

ttttttttt

T. 288,

TTTTTTTTT

a-t

J
,

goat.
fl

391,

xj,

o,
'^
,

^o.
8111'
-^

,
I I

Rec. 27, 231,30, 67,

XJ

^^
^-^^

TEnmr _zi

Amherst Pap.

30, a vessel,
invx,
IIIIIIIII

III'
V
. '

a pot, a measure,

^^^^ pot of w^w^ '^

cense. a

>

mnniT

J
|

o a

'^

n
,

a measure

^
,

>

doors.

111

iniiim

-0-

half

II' rneasure.
Rev. 14,
9,

aau

r^ Timmr
^
/)

J|
ill

" '^, doorkeeper,


V
/]
I

7rciaT/06f>o<!.
title

a-t

^ o

^ ^-^ Ui^ ,u
great
lady,

^,

aaur

'"
''^f^

"great door,"

of a high
official.

mistress,

queen

Aam-en-sbaiu-Tuatiu
cr^
I

^"^

P.S.B. 20, 191.


^AAAAA

/wwv^

[^T]

^Tf ill

I,
I

B.D. 141, 58, the door-

keepers of the doors of the Tuat,

aa a lues

j|

god twice great (Thoth).

Aaiu-shetaiu

"^^
1
1

(2

^ip^
55,
,

first

born,

eldest

i^D

i#

born.

B.D. 141, 56, the gods of the secret doors.

a,

aa
_F^
10, Pap.

ijFi'
125, III,
14,

5^'
650,

aa, aai
JiJi

B.D.

IV,

"j3
w

"^^
,

L=J],
S)
to

J]

Wazir

3024, 151, here, hereabouts.


).

^
*"^
^1^1
1^

be great, to

l)e large.

aa^ aai

X A'

V\,

to

be mighty, to be spacious or abundant, to be


|
']'

to journey, to travel (?)

powerful;

S""*^^''
is

Copt. <kILI.

aa __
aa-t

C-D

The
''"''-''
,

ordinary use of
:

aa

illustrated

by the

-=I

^-= "^ s
<=,irT:

following

/^^'''

estate,

domam.

aaab'"'^'^
arrogant.

il"^
i.e.,

aa-t-shetat
ber,"
/.<?.,

=??;=,

"hidden chamN. 651, B.M. 138, great of heart,


proud,

the sanctuary of a temple.

Aa, Aai ^
see Aati.

aru,

n,

B.D. 125;

aa aru
of forms,
i.e.,

of very

U--\! many
forms.
I

I,

great

aa
_
-

iiKiiiii
)

u. 324,
TTinnrr
iiiinnr
'
I

iiiiiiiii

-flv inumi

aa baiu aa pehti

great of souls,
'
I

i.e.,

"

niinnr

<

of mighty

will.

mn, leaf of a door, door.


vj-7^
IIMIIIII

cover of a sarcophagus. Dual

aaui | i U. 269,
,

m'
most brave.

great of valour,

aa maa-kheru
P- 276, .,^,
fjAX
lllllllll

I^

great

of

,^

^,
UllJJlU

Rec. 29, 153,

truth-speaking, most truthful.


-Os\\ Timnir

<=
S
^.^-r^

aa-mu
aa mertu

a~wwvj great of water, the

Aamu.

Jf
UUO
nnmir

-mniiir'

(0

<_>
'
1

iiiiiiiii

e
\\

LJ _j
1 1
1

\\

mm Will

nmmr

V'

S^eatly beloved.

'

[108]
aa nerut
"%
L
'

^^most
terrible,

AAAA/V\

great god as opposed to a


vic-

little

god

"'-'^

.1;^^

1
plur.

great of terror,
/i

most

T.325.
_D PJ?

torious.

aa nekhtut

^I'-^LJl, niost strong.


great of mouth,
'

aara'"^ J aa rennu
names, a
title

i.e.,

boast-

^1
Illl

S.'

^^^^
I

ful,
I

insolent.

very great gods.


I

great

of

aa-t
Ml", great of terror,

J]

a great

goddess

fl

of Thoth.

aaherit '^n ^
most
terrifying

two great goddesses.

aa ahenut-hen-f
,

aa kliau
risings,

e
I

director of the royal corvee.

great

one of

title

of Ra.

aa
a
I

a-t

marshal of the court.


c,

aa kheperu
transformations,

Z
of

great of

Aa-t-em-Aneb-hetch
B.D.G.
57, a gate at Philae.

U
i.e.,

many changes.
of large interior (of a barge).

01

aa khenu aa sent
"^

;
P

aa

em aha
^^

man advanced
wwvs
chief

>\-i''"'fJ:
IJ

aa en uab
libationer.

a^ sheps ZZ
aa en shefit
most
terrible, or
a

most

holy,

most

august.
!,

aa en ntcha
director of storeh(juse (Bet al-Mal).

M
steward, major-

w
d,

most awe-inspiring.
to

aa en per
great,

aa-aa

be doubly
ra u
j

zi=>\r3\

domo.

aa-aaau

'"^^

*"^
0.=."^
J?'

very great

Aa-m'k
alDJ,

Jdn
name
of the sacred boat of Edfil.

men.
ingly.

aau
aa

^'^

VJl
.S'lJ'

very.exceed-

s ^ en aa

mu
^rr.,-.

^"^
c^^=, ^^~w^
,.,^^j.^

^^^^
^wvvA
I

head of the
Stream.
chief of

\>

aa en
,

mer
a

great, grand, mighty, important,

the port, harbour master.

noble, lofty, weighty, chief; fem.


dual, masc.
D

aa en sa
VN

i,

phylarch.
I

aaenqetut _
of marines.

I,

director

J-

fem.

,N.

1385,^;

^j{

Thoth, the twice great;

aa kha
plur.

Hi
I
I

Aa

rp T
^"|\,
,

chief of the diwan.

U. 513,

"^o
6,

T. 325, a fire-god.

u
aa 23,
*=>,

Aai
\E1
I

Rec.

137, a

god of the dead.

^"^(j,

p. 696,
^

Aait

Ombos

II, 132.

Aa-t-aakhu
29, a great person, chief, officer, governor, noble, a

I^o

^1

Tuat IX.

a singing-goddess.

'

109

Aa-t-Aat-t
I

Aa-t-Setkau
<\

'.

J
Circle.

Tuat IX, a singing-goddess.


-

Tuat VIII, the name of a

Aa - ami khekh
Aa-aru
><=>
(|

->=

-||-

'^>

Aa-shefit
of several solar gods.

title

Thes. 31, the god of the 12th hour

01 the day.

Aa-t-shefit
104, Osiris of Athribis.
,

r^
III,

o
,

Thes. 28,
a

B.D.G.

r~n~i

(1(1

Denderah

241,

4p

c^

Aa-t-aru
a
fiery,

c^ <s>-

Tuat IX,

Berg. II,
night.

8,

the goddess of the 4th hour of the

blood-drinking serpent.

Aa-ater

*"^
h

'VAAAAA

'Yunt

I,

a singing-god.

Aa-shefit *=.
the

J^ ^

Denderah IV, 84,

name

of the 4th Pylon.


n

Aa-perti^^^,^^| LJ LJ iU
1 4,

Rec. 21,

i-l

Aat-Shefshefit
Tuat.

Pharaoh

see Per-aa.

Tuat VIII, the gate of the 9th division of the

Aa-pehti
a bull-god

^^L_J

^,

Denderah IV, 63,

;^,^^.Rec.2r,x4,atitle.

Aa-t-qar-uaba
^

c^

^^55,^,

Nesi-Amsu
"

Aa - pehti - petpet - khaskhet


DDXE
1,

32, 49, a serpent-fiend.


"

aa
Lanzone 106, a composite hawk!


iD
'

to beget, to generate.

u)

crocodile-cat-buU-lion-goose-ape-ram-god.

Aa-pest-rehen-pet

f=ijS'^
IT
I

fwv^^A

)k

Aa-pehti-reh
of a Dekan.

_S)

la

ra

^ gd

Denderah

II, 10,

one of the 36 Dekans.

aa

Aa-pehti-rehen-pet-ta
Denderah
II, 10,

^^"^^

(=a'
-0_

'f.
Ebers Pap. 99,
12, hair of the pubes.

disease of the genital organs.

one of the 36 Dekans.

Aa-nest

''"^

S,

Tuat VI, a god(?)

aa^ aa-x

aa-hemhem
Amen.

motic form), " Great of roarings," a name of


,

~Kk5i<terror.
1,

r=Ui
I

W,

Rec. 25,

192,1^ I^,
Bubastis 34A,

Aa-herit
."^m'

Tuat VI, a god of

KoUer Pap.
(=t3)

i,

3,

^
plur.
III

Aa-kheru
the Watcher of the
7

B.D.

144,

'^,
I

ass,

she-ass;

th Arit.

Aa-kherpu-raes-aru
jl iJ

II

Q V
I

fii III*
13, 35.

A ^-n-^ t)\

Jl iJ

JT

'

Tuat X, the name of the door of Tuat X.


fl I,

;^,Rec.25,i95,;^(](2a|,Rev.
I
I

III

r^^al

Aa-saah
Aa-t sapu
2
1

tI

^ Tomb of Seti one ^%^' of the 36 Dekans.


p

O
^111

B.D. 125,

III, 12, the Ass-god, a

form

Ija^j,

of Ra.

P.S.B. 25,

aaut
-C2 y.^-r^

Rec. 30, \J A
,

8,

title

of Sekhmit.

Aa-sekhemu
Aa-sti

B.D. 149, the god of the


^r

H tk^^ nth
Aat
IX,
pi. lo, a serpent-god.

67,.

ffl,

pillars,

colonnade.

Aaut-ent-Khert-neter '^^
_^ -www
c3

%\

Tomb Rameses

g^^

j^^

oar-rests

VA'

of the magical boat.

[110
aa-t

I-

aau
,

flax,

linen

Copt.

Rev. 12, 63, 70, a


;

aaua^fj^,
steal, to rob, to

^^(](](2^,

to

bandlet, a garment,

woven work

plur.

y.

plunder.

Copt, e\^^^.t{?)

aauait
,

aa-t
,

nniD,

Rec. 20, 40,

nO

J^HS?^

fl'

a reaping.

stone of great price or value, gem,


plur.
fl

aauau f]^(j^^,bo^y,Jr..
aab

ni

amulet,
r-TV-|

tumour:
,

III'

mm

23"^ J (

I. to be acceptable

X
II

In

rare stones;

*^ W Q 'O

N. 743, pots

to anyone, to please

;^Jifl^H

of precious stones.

Pet4.._^^J(|(|^fg|j,Amhe
Pap.
1,

aaut,aut
aa
'"^ "^
13

I^^^S'T'!^'
D

things or feelings which produce pleasure.

glands of the throat and neck.


to beat (?)

aab-t^.-^ Jfg(),U.579, ^[gf


T. 383,

[g

Op
372,.

U. 193,
P. 161
fl

H'O'U

--J, M.
,

136, -^-,

fl

j>j^

]-,

T. 73."

N. 185, 647, well, fountain; plur.

J
'

glD,P.
N.
1

411,

M. 588,

"^
,

ID

o
X3,
N.
1

>{:n.,p.

J^

148,

194,

fl

Rec. 26, 224.

aaaui

a'^'^^D

III

^
0' ^-

Q o ^^,

M. 203, N. 68s,

[g

^,

N. 703,

"^' ^-

9^5.

the two sides of the ladder.

J!

f4

(i

1'

Aai"*^

f=Si jj, the Phallus-god.


(=Ti) J],

;^j-rf^'4'^--^'^3s,3x.
164, offering, sacrifice, sepulchral meals.

Aai

"^

Tombof Setil,
34).

Later

forms are

one of the 75 forms of Ra (No.

[^

"^
3
1

j^,
I

1^,

aai-t

<^
_fl

house.

abode, chamber

aai-t 0-=.

roof(?) ceiling

(?)

"^
Aait-ar-t
the place of sunset

J'
Q
,
I

B.D.G. 147,

aai

aab-t [^
[|(]

^ ^,

vessel

for

ceremonial
purification.

lA.

fl'inie, fire,

heat.

aaiaai

aabb,abb
to rejoice, to exult.

jJJt,^^.^P-'^_
78.^38

aau
Rec.

^ ^,
speak with violence, to curse,
;

Aabi_J(iy,B-D-(^--)
aabu "^"^"^
aaber-t
fiabes
x=>
Copt. OTi..

18, 183, to

to abuse, to blaspheme

J
1

^^,
,

a kind of herb?

^"^

Tuat IV, a jackal-headed


porter.

balsam, unguent.

^^

qIII

aau

,^^'t. to flourish.

IJ P fl.

fii's.

flame.

[Ill]
aabag

A
aamit
)

J
:J' ^^,

S
slave,

^^,

funifiT

'

J^ S ^,
aabt

^^^- 3^. 86, to be weak, or help-

IV, 743, ]

an Asiatic

woman

worker
,

Heb.

inN
to fly;

or iT\:}.

aap

Heb. n?|^.
"Wmn

Aamu
D a
'

)
I

f\ ^ ^^ Jr

Tuat V, the souls of


I I

'

the

Aaum
,

in the

Tuat.

Aapep
T /
f

^Mk, P g

|-j

aam

t\

H.

%^

animal, beast

D D -mm' D D
^iihh}),

D dHH

Rec.

6,

158, a monster mytholight-

animals of Egypt,

e.g.,

Apis, Mnevis, the

ram of

Mendes,
which produced thunder,
cloud, fog, storm, hurricanes, mist,

etc.
a
|

logical serpent

ning,

and

aam

t\

^,

to bring

down

birds

darkness,

He

and was the personification of evil. was called by 7 7 " accursed names " ; Copt.

and animals with a boomerang.

aamu ]^^^==^, iv, 335, throw-stick,


boomerang; plur r

aapi

3t^<J'^^ boomerangs

(?)

D W

11

Of, '^'

1^,

ds>
the

iJT

1'
I I

nets(?)

the winged disk,

summer

solstice.

^^^

"^^
^

o
'

crystal,

some kind

of sparkling stone.
(Saite), 62,
2,

Aapit
aapint

^^^
000
D

a goddess.

Aam
(?)

B.D.
'

a god.
to
eat,

unguent, incense

aam'^
aamut

?.

to

under-

Aapef
W D
aafa
'n

D
TKmui,

X' stand, to perceive.

*<=.=^^=_
D'WyMi'

B.D. 39,
'

2,

serpent-fiend.

^'^ "^ Hymn


Juci
III'

to

Uraei 25, a kind of


plant.

_
N

\ <5^ '^'

^
^_B'^^

^^ greedy,
glutton.

aamm. ha-t
sweet, pleasant

|\

0'.R.E.4,'75,

aam _

"Ci

to clasp, to grasp,

M'

to seize.

aam
iiiiMiir

^
imiiiii

aamaa

^"^^
\^

part of a bed.

inmiM

,
I

^^ V^
;

aamaq
,

>

A
,

an Asiatic,

A
plur.
]

nomad of the

Eastern Desert

VX

V\

valley;

Heb.

pOJ.*.

1,

^ aamati
,

part of waggon.

aameh '"^

^^
Nw^r^

imni

B-^- (S^"^) 3.

4,

a kind of stone.

aanniu cz^i=,
^.,

\\

"(^gf
-ft-

ape; Copt. eit.


-, to sing;

(^y^r)^

aann

/vu^w^ AA/NA'V\

=,111

\\

aamu-||^^,-l^

Heb. n:y, Arab.

U
"^
,

1^^^^ ^. Rec.
herd,

^2, 118,

1^^^.
;

shep-

aanata

singing-woman (?)

nomad, herdsman, farmer


fellahin.

plur.
I

*|\

aano-t KZi^^'V, axe, hatchet; plur. Tmnnr-::::^,

'

'

[112]
_
^^^
/^/>A/VA

^-^1
cinii III

^s^ ^^^^^^ ^^^>


[=^;f=,
1 I I

z=t=,i

jSasI
'^
I

Aah

*<=

the Moon-god = I ^,

(]

d^

r-^-^
bles,

III
round

nr

.-^-^

III

Aahpi
Aasit
1

III'

JAW
n
\\\

Annales

III, 179, a god.

stones.
I

aanratat
Gol.
5,

W\'

^'^'

^'

'^^' ^^""

-^^ III

zone 140, Rec.


the chase.

13, 78, a

goddess of war and of

14,

15

W
or

=-1
;

upper chamber, balcony

Heb.

Aasiti-Khar
Rec.
7, 196, the

2^3

^^

fl^ -^ B\

name

of a goddess of Syria.

aanh

^^w^

U^
-

a winding serpent.

Aaserttu

aankh
^__

(Demotic form), to

Aasek
AAAAAA
^AAA'W^

live, life;

Copt. (JOHg,,

UJH^.
Rec. 33, 137,

p^^, ^P
143, N. 648, a god.

g] ^ ^; see^ -] (]^.

VWVWV

M.

aankh
to swear

^,

^ ^ ^^,
;

an oath
o

Copt.
,

aashasha-t >-='.TtM \^
throat, gullet.

<Lrt.i.cy.

aant
;;-.. aar

spice,

perfume
(?

=
to

"^

aasharana
a kind of seed or

^"^^
tjTtT
fruit.

/SAA.A/VV

O
111

_ (aal)^^|y.,
/=!>

<''='

ascend;

^^p^^^^;

aar-t
>

a kind of stone, a

EUD

^ X
L=/l'^

natural block of stone

(?)

M'

/i
r.

"^^

/,!

to oppress, oppres-

aarara
Anastasi
I,

.2^
;

sion, to usurp, violence;

Heb.
2,

p^V
68, 8
.

23, 3, pebbles

Copt.
part

A.'X.

aaqer
building;

aara
,

of

aag
ZS

S
ffi

Peasant 185,
to beat, to bastinado.

Rec.

3, 55,

tenons of a

coffin.

.2as.o

III

aaref

^"^^
,

Rev.

1 1,

184

:dn'

aag-t
ffl

Copt, (jopq,

tope^.
^^

Aar-n-aaref "^^ ^
Rev.
II,

"^
Copt.

J/,

nail,

claw, toenail, hoof; plur.

B
Rec.
30',

184,

Horus

of

bandages;

'^3^-_.^5n'

72.

opnoTfuopq.

aarsh

"^"^ .Sas TjljT,


cult, service.

aag-t
the agit plant,

SWO
Ci

the

oil

made from

^
'

(1 (1

ci
f]

vl
"^

.-"^

III

t^

III'

Rec. 21, 91,

lentils,

beans; Copt.

aagit"**^

TT A

an

offering of

some
kind.

-i-Pffl^n,

i-pam.

^HHo'

aarata
E

"^^

"^"^ <==>
i

aag
<:p.
;

Q crzi

11

Rec. 21, 82, an upper chamber


I

Heb.

aagarta^ffl^*^]!]
chariot; Copt.
I

Aartabuhait
'

w
b. 9,

]1>ra^
llll

.LCToXTe,
n"?:!:^.

V,

Harris 501,

a female demon.

ffi

Heb.

[113]
aagasu
^

<^

Aau-taui
III, 38,

"^^^
of Thoth.
I

^,

^.D. 125,

title

Aabt __Dm
Sallier Pap. II, 4,
2, 5, 8,

1^'^^ the name of amy thoJ!<!G=i'


logical fish.

cord, belt, girdle (?);

aa
7^

n
fl,

to bring, to carry.

Heb.

D3^(?)

Aagm'
aatkh
aat

"^ '^

aa
1
I

fl,

Rec.

C7^
10,

61,
(K

_cm

^, JM
stuff.

''^

"^'"'^

?
61, to doze, to

-^3~,

fiend.

a woven

be drowsy, to

sleep,

a piece of fertile ground.

pyramid.

Aat-en-sekhet

B.D.G. 136, the second station on the old caravan road between the Nile and the Red Sea.

Aatt

_j/\

j^^^>

the pyramid region,

the necropolis, the Other World.

dess, the personification of the

aat-t

c^ III Rec. 35, 161, gate sockets (?) slabs of stone.

Sail. II, 3,

I,

2,

aa, aai

^ ^
"

pyramid

district.

"

|] (]

^
to
(?)

Aati

^^
B.D. 125, one of the 42 assessors of
Osiris.
1

fl^^
I

^M-

^^'

to cry out,

shout, to speak loudly.

aa __J
I

^.

Rec. 14, 42, foreigner


(?)

speaker of a foreign tongue

Tomb
aat

Seti

I,

one of the 75 forms of

aa

.Q. >

. ,

joy.

Ra e
pale (of the face), yellow
;
,

(No. 23).

of a livid colour,

Aa
'

"A^
.I\'

Denderah IV,

79,

an ape-god

who

slew Aapep.

Copt.

OTfOXOTf GX.
Heb. ttJljr.
I

aa

O
fltj
I

filth (?)

aat^na
=!:=.

W
3
(2

.lentils;
III

aa

\j\j "a

'^"^'o*^
;

',

flesh

and

aattau
who
conspire.

men

bone, heir, inlieritance, posterity


heir 1;?=^
\Ji|j}l>!

an accursed

aatch
the face)
;

*"
,

pallor,

paleness (of

aau
(S

0,
III

seed.

^
,

Copt.

OTfOXO'Vex.

aa
grease.

to tie, to bind, to

compress

aatcn-t

^^
o'lll
*'

fat,

(?)

Copt. ujqe.
Aelt.

aatchamm
lUi

f\^^ l\^^

^
III'

aaa aaa

Tex.

28,

a kind of
tunic.

kind of

oil.

aatchar
to help, to

Nav.

Lit.

26

<>-=

aaam
as.sist
;

var.

l^'^.

aatchr-t

a kind of balsam
1

tree.

aau, aaua
196, heir.

^^, ^^,

Rec. 30,

aaam

the seed of the

-iimS^iii'
H

same.

114
aab
Annales
vessel,

A
1,

_::j.:^j^'z:j copper
III,

]>i,-^i^-few,
M
,

no, a

vessel,

a bowl, a

spoon.

aab
comb;

1]

J\^.
,
,

to card

wool,

to

and

goats, animals, flocks

animal kept

L.D. Ill, 65A, 15

aabt^^Jc^^, incense vase.


aaf
strain

L=Z1,

to to

"TV,

desert game.

squeeze out, to wring out, to press out


;

oil,

au-t-neb- etc
all

Copt. Ojqe.

y\^^^'^l\^^,

kinds of four-fooled beasts.

aam
_i]_a
f^MAAA ^A/^AAA AAAVSA
J

^m
^"~^
Edffl
I,

au
I

^^^,
1

wretched, miserable.
^ beast of a

canal.

au-t
'^ fx
81, a

AQ-m ^^"^ ^S^:r:'

name

of

^ Q Qft
V ^^
^
f
'

'

man

plur.

the Nile.

?-^
au
I

^,.

aam
ii_a>^
III

f\

an earthen-

sins, evil

deeds

(?)

ware vessel

(?)

au-t au-t

stick

with a curved end (Lacau).


766,
St.lff,

d|^, U.

283,__ii|^, M.
"
,

'^^^^i^Cop,.
aana
AAAAAA

^.P.659,--|'^^,P.659
eit.

crook, sceptre

(?)

_fl

au

__i]

^
^
'

5=2, M. 253, to travel.


a call house
(?)

au-t(?)
Koller Pap.
4, 3.

Aan

IZ
o
;

BergT

I,

19,

a minister of the dead.


1908, 313,

au

\j

77^

^
fl

'

^ '''"^ ^ '^^-

auau
Rec.
8,

Aanu
the ape-god

]I^

^,

Jour. As.

136, to smash, to crush.

Copt, ert

aua, auai
S\, B.D. 126,
2,

Aanau
ape-gods

TZji \,
AA/\^/v\

the four
j,

JET

jNj)

Peasant 292

who Judged

the dead.

^ "^L-^,

aan
aan aah

\\H,Jour. E.A. III, 105

camp, place,

tent, station.

'1 =

^T
Kev.
1

to rejoice.

aah
Aah-ti

TO Ml'
"
(1(1

1,

151, cattle

Co|)t.

e&e.
-''
'

I ^r^ J4

pair of goddesses.

ama
^^^

""^ cmD, a kind of stone.

]i^' V\[

-^m ^\

steal, to rob, to injure, to

do

violence, to break,

to plunder, to waste, to reap grain.

'

[115]
auau

aun
.^a

^_

/I

C*

/I

----

jj

IVVVVVI

1 ^^ L^' ^^ L^l ^-^' ^^^ ""g^


'

to rob, to steal, to plunder, to


n
(VAAA/V\
,-

com-

t_=/l'

mit deeds of violence.

aun-t
brigand; plur
a|

.^

robbery, violence.

-O ^^=^,

Rec. 16, 57
,

robber.

ravager, oppressor.

Thes.

1480;

fern.

a^ "^ ^^ ^
c
injury,
'

'^

aun-ab

^^
)

"[^

v', The.s.

1207,

Y
one who
is

greedy, covetous, avaricious.

robbed.
_J]-?t

aunnti
10, robber.

^^J
god.
i_i

;\men. lo.

aua-t
ff

^H

" L^'
~f]M

harm, violence,
robbery,
theft'.

^^^

^^'^
/WWW

Aun-ab
aun-t

Auai

L=Z1, Tuat III, a winged

^^^
_^,
,

liUL. Mett. stele 189,


,

the scorpion that stung

serpent-headed god.

Auait^__.f]^^^, _^fl ^ Soddess who ^^ ^^L_=fl^' ^'^'


''' ^^'

^
Q^ ^
,
I I

Horus and
Roller Pap.

killed him.
i, 5,

Rec.

i,

48,

^^^^

a kind of wood, cypress

(?)

stick, cudgel,

kept the register of the punishments inflicted on


the foes of Osiris.
I
I

a pole of a chariot ; plur.

^^ Q

\^

Staves from the Oasis Ta-ah-t.

aua^^f]^^,_.^^_,..,
^0,P.i43,-_^f]^O,Rec.3o,i9r,
to ferment, to

aun
j^i).^?-

to sleep, to slumber.

aunra __
plur.
<2

v\
.

(miD

pebble, stpne

become

III

ffiHD

III

sour.

auait

_^ f]

^
,

(jlj

^O

auratchaut (artebatu)

-B

_,

^
auq
TV

of fermented drink.

^ '^^
a

stream, canal.
to heat, to

auab

^{]j^~

aug
courtyard;
.see

uba

ffi

f^

cook

(?)

autcharu

w
(2

L-^

aua

(^

auxiliaries, a class of soldiers.


'

to give a gift,

to

t]

Auaha (Aha)
126, a goddess.

present.

autcharu (atcharu)
Ill
,

Mission

3,

part, or parts, of a chariot.

autchata (atchata)

aubbu
a kind of
fish.

^J J^ff^.

I^casant229,

Alt.

K. 306

^" \\\
i

(1

L_=Z]'

ab_i,J\|,_^J\||,,obe
^'',

re-

aun
8, t,

^. i' ^.o e^^'


,

nowned, famous, strength


3^'

(?)

^^^ ^.

Mett. Stele 181, 219,

J^^^' to cry

ab_.J\,
"X, JlV'
^'-

\, _.J^,u.
H
2

270,

out in pain, to wail (lik? a jackal).

V'9' born, tusk of an elephant;

A
plur.

[116]
^

A
ab

^ J^, ^. ^ r^
Y^
1

J ^ \ J ^.
^
|.

U.

270,

^J

|,

J^ ^, Roug^,l.H.

II, .25,
tiie

N. 719; dual,fl

J^' >^,
II,

to sink into [the


feet).

ground] through fear (of

11'

Rouge, I.H.

1.4;

=
'

^'^"'^

^''^"^'

^
/\

abab
push a way

^a, fljiij\j],
into, to

to

open up.

V ^V^

^^

^^'"^^

horns ready 10 gore

<=^>

ab, aba

nj \ ^,
Thes. 1483,

J a^,
a

^'^^^<

U. 577, the four horns of the bull of

aj"^^,

Ra, the four horns of the world.

J^^^>

abati(?)

J^^^,'J'hes.
3
,

.,98. the

ab

tusk of ivory

see

ab T 13,

J^^,

A.Z. 79, 51, IV, loi, 368, 751, to con-

tradict, to gainsay, to

oppose in speech

Abui

^
D

X
(](),

^^

Rec. 10, 61, to contradict his state-

Tuat V,

>Q^ ^,

B.D.

(Saite) 64, 14, a

god who burnt the dead.


D

ment

JA^
J
I,

Mar. Karn. 44, 35, contradiction.

gX'
Rec.
8,

Abu-tt

J%\
(^

'^

^' 'he name of


4,

abab
-J

-|j^^,
|, Rec.
23,

124,
D

dJ
D

a serpent on the royal crown.

203,

ab

\,^.

B.D. Saite) 134,

star.

to contradict, to gainsay.

Ab-peq(?)^-r^'^";/ila"
Abet-neteru-s
lioness-goddess.

\
J

'^

"1
'

'

'

Tuat x, a

abab-t_.J_.J^gj,_.J contradiction. \ ci, R.E.


a
)

7,

24,

ab seshu

\
,

ab

J VJ "^J
,

-J-O

to face

some;

one or something, to meet,

to join, to unite with

and of a kind of

priest.'

Ab-sha
'i'uat

\
I

-J\
kJ^. k\Jlc"J-^
^^'
""

VII, a crocodile-god which guarded the

"symbols."

Ab-ta X'^^HJL.'^""''' ^ sx

'fP^"'"

gatekeeper.

ab

^JlJ

'^'"'^ of incense. o' ^

ab, aba
.

\
a
11
fl

L_J1,

Jf^>

'

''esist,

^\

\,
;

t^, together with, face to face

to revolt against, to oppose by force.

with, opposite

er ab <cii>
H

abb
S.but

11

J! *i
J

L_J] * ^^^^' * ^"'' ^ ^P^'^'' or any weapon.


'
,

abu

Ji

\ ^

^
-^yT
,

\,,
^^''-

I'.

815.

,
! [

3.

-..

cattle ' 16, for sacrifice.

V\

opposition, resistance.
resistance,

a^

\ O. \ 0|, ^p&O^,
is

a bird with a loud harsh voice.

opposition, what

opposed

to existing things.

ab

\.

to weave.

abab
enemy,
rebel, fiend.

ab \ ^

r^ stis. ^~rar

to s'"k) to

drop back,

Abuti
to
Isis

J 5
;^^

to weave.

the two weavers.

diminish (of the Nile).

and Nephthys.

'

;
,

[117]
Sb Jpl ^*^
,

to purify, to

make
p.

clean.

ab[a]u
912,

abu

-^ Ji^-, -S^,the gods

^,

449,

N.

^ &^,

who
,

slay.

f'^

'

'

'a

?V 1'

P'^rifications, cleansings,

ab-t

J Jgl
Iffeioi'.

Palermo

Stele,

^
<?-

libations,

washings with water.


offering.

sanctuary, shrine, any holy place

..

fl

irS

abit__/]J(j|jo^^,
ab, ab-t
\

JU /www
Jl

=
fl

^ J,__iiJ ^ ,__j]J^,
,

abu
making of

%v ^3:7,

a festival at which the


plur.

Y7, a vessel, vase of purification.


offerings

was obligatory

fl

ab
aba

M7 U

to

embalm.

^^E7
175,

L.D.

III,

^
fl

^.

''

J J ^

G
|,

Jeo aba_.J(J'^
111

111

III'
,
I

194, 35-

T. 227,

P. 708, Rec. 31, 166, to penetrate, force a


n

way

t^

to

make an

offering, to present a

into.

J! Jl U'

propitiatory

gift.

aba
M. 641,
fl

abu,abut jj*}'

'?

I'-

339.

|,

g^

Jq
q

J "^ "^ ^ ^-=3, Rt;c. 27, 231,


a

to act as captain, to direct.

"^(JH
ODD

Y
,

g'ft> ^'^

offering; plur

I'
P.

ab,
^

aba
'

1^ ^,
^^3' ^-

u. 274, n. 798,

552,

J "^ ^'
N. 673,

^'
D

3"'

^'3'

J ^,
,

U- 206,

sceptre,^staff,

o
I

fl

ci

staff, stick.

Ab
Hh. 456

Tuat

II, a grain-god.

abut __i)J^ o|,


M.
301, p. 666,
staff.

p. 186,

Jo
fl

|,

Aba-taui

abb-t

fl

J
fl

staff,

sceptre, stick.

aba __

DOD
a
jl

^ QS
t?,
N. 1072,

ab-t

In,

kidney,

testicle.

abu
altar,

flJ^r=a),A.z.49,s9

a table tor offerings.


fl

ab
,

^, Rec. ,1,92,
^

aba

"(^^

Effl]

"il^

Y I

-^
show

I'

^M' J ? S'

dJk7|^,^0,
'" ' ^^'"^'

different colours, " shot " as in " shot " silk.

a slab of stone on which offerings were


placed.
variegated, spotted:

ab

??? ^^ ^
I.

kmd

or speckled lilfi, ^Po^^d or striped plumage. v. r

of stone

plur.

ab Shuti

"

^,,

Thes. 414, he of

-J

ITMl

the variegated wings, a


a

title

of Horus of EdfQ.

ab-t

N. 503, a kind of grain.

abu i^ n?^^ MS, people, men and women.


H 3

A
abi

[118]
animal, reptile, or in.sect(?)

A
Abesh Abesh Abesh
abesh.
r.
1
1

H^X' abab -^-^ ^ Rec.


,

Jflfl EkI

CSZl,Tuat X, aformofPtah
.

20, 4

J C30,

Thes. 112, one of the seven .stars of Orion.


a

ababu
abb
fl

benevolent
serpent-god.

J
J

J ^,
see.

Rec. 15,178,10

rejoice, to dance.

9,318, N. 1344, a kind of wine.

-^3-, to

/\
^^''

R.E.

3,

III, a pyramid tomb,

abb_.JJg,_.JJ^|^..o
desire, to love, to

'-"'

be desired.

Aim:- "i^
D
J'

b of
s(?)

abb
scarab
;

dJ
var.
a

^
]

^^
(J

to

fly,

the

flying

ap
D

^ V^,P.703,^^,
y^
,

a D

^,

>

the

flier.

all

nJi
go

y\

a verb of motion, to

travel, to go, to

in,

to

go out, to escape, to
1

abb

beetle,

bb

-A

scarab.

walk, to march, to journey,

tramplings
foot.

Q Dill' under
D

Abb ^ ^ M,
aba __

B.D.G. 1394, a form of Osiris.

ap
D

%-^''JV w
..^B-, to see.

a
I

^T

disk, the

D summer
I

.,

^S
',

to

fly,

the winged

solstice.

abaaui -ubxj

"
ji'

to

open the hands


in greeting.

Api
D

Rec. 35, 56,

abut_.J^-,.,__.J^-^,,ropes,
bonds,
fetters.
D

Rec.

14, 7, the "flier," a

name

of the Sun-god;

Abbut
nets
(?)

.^

JJ o

%'^,

I,

Tuat IX, the

^,the
apu

rismtr sun.

used

in

snaring Aapep.

^
515
"C7 "-"

Hymn
'

of Darius 37, scarab, beetle.


798, Osiris

Abbuitiu
three gods

J J ^^
(|

^
M.

'
j

Tuat IX,

Ap-ur
in the

^^^', B.D.G.
beetle.
st--e|-j
|-,

who

fettered

"^X

form of a

Apep
a mass of
plants or flowers, bouquet.

a a
_fl

W^-

Apap
D

WJ!}).B-M. No. 383; see

^^'-^1

Itl, frog
(?)

Dj^

,^,.

and

^i'iiii

D D
,

apap

ground, earth, estate.


brick or
tile kiln.

toad

(?)

apap
a

Abraskktiaks
n
S\

D
D

\m~

_'Aft/>aaa^, Leemans, Papyrus

III,

W^ 210213-

api

O
AAAAAA

Rev. 12,91, account

= ^.
serpent,

abeh-t

^J| ^^.
637,
I)

''

334,
552,

cioUin

A'WAA'V

iCl

'

worm.
...

a^

aper

'^^
'78.

i'-

663, 783, m. 775.[j|

JciC^=T3),M.
9

J|o,P.

flj

Hh.
'

Sh

227, 247, to pour out water or seed, to create, to make, to fashion.


o

Q^'
j^

^'-

'I"-

32', U. 57,

Q^> M.

268,

2g,N.88S,^|,^2j], Y--.
*^,
fl,

abesh
S.besh
U. 539, T. 296,

cso,

vase, pot, vessel.

1^

be pro|. to be equipped, to
house)
;

Djc3a,U.62 2,
P.

dJoo%,

vided with,

furnished (of a

Q
kill

^>

III'

230

Hymn

of Darius 38.

'

6
1

119
apesaustaas
Rev.
II,

-D

J^Cifc;

"^

(]

(2 (2

i^

<^ ^ ^

Q
sary

a boat equipped with everything neces;

185

=
D

u^evaTw.; unfeigned.
,

and a crew

V^

Q^
il,

^\^

Thes.

296.

apesh

Rec.

C3in
,

s,

97

aperu

D
I
I I

apesh ~Q
ST]

tortoise, or turtle.

im
ship;

m5^
III

crew of a boat or
P.

Apesh
Apshait

,^^,B.D.

1,

the Turtle-god.

11

^
O

396,

M.

564,

"~~

'

N. 1171.

aperu "^^
?^
,

?^
mil
I

"
"^
I

ornaments,

fittings,

chains

'''"

'"^^ct

which devoured the dead.


.

m<.

Ql

II

111

attached to jewellery, accoutrements, furnishings c D T a^*S, the equipment of the royal D 1

apshut ~af V A\- ^111


fl

(?

7
,

a kind of beetle

pli:

<

>

AAAAAft

'(?)

bargejQ'^f^w^^JI, " ci
U 2

^^^^- ^arn S3 36 a woman's outfit.

D
af, aff

(M

g^

Rec. 30, 201,


I

aper Q 5

mantle, garment. a

,fly;plur.^^'^
Eye of Horus.

'
I

Rec. 31, 15; Copt. ^.q. Rev.


13, 20,

Aperit A q

name

of the

af aba-t
honey
fly, i.e.,

"

""^
(|

anpr

IS
LJ

*^~^ ^^^ name of the 21st day of the month. ^^3:7'


the god of

aR o.

bee.
_fl

Aper

^2|, 2^^,

af
aff

(2
;

Copt. ujqe.

the town of Aper.

fl '

f^\^
^'^

Aper-peh Q_^'] ^,
protector of the dead.

Berg,

i,

.8,

\\

crown, helmet, hat, diadem, cap.

afaf
(2

_fl.

fl

'SSI., crocodile,

Aper-pehui A ^>j

\-Thes.
:

818,

af-t

II

'^ o

Rev., gluttony.

Diim. Temp. Insch. 25, Rec. 16, 106 (i) a hawk-god, patron of learning and letters, who

was one of the seven sons of Mehurit


watcher of Osiris.

(2) a

Aper-t-ra

T
I,

'^

'^
'

Tuat

I, a singing-goddess. ng-godd(

Aper-her Nebtehet ~d^


Tuat XI, a form of the
rising Sun.

^ "^
s

^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ -^,
,
1 1 1

,
,

c^

^^^^

t[
1 1

plants, vegetables.
,

afa
>iii

the seed of the same.

Aper-ta
Tomb
of Seti

Q""!, Q^
a kindofgoose;

afa
afa

food, bread.

one of the 75 forms of Ra

(No. 45).

O
"

filth, dirt.

aper Q<:z=>^L,

A'^O,

Afat

'''^>f'

Tuat VI, a god

in

mummy

the egg of the aper goose.

Apriu "d"
w
I I

Afau
I,

Tuat

II,

a god of one

2 Wi
.

r D

C2

of the seasons of the year.

I,

Harris
var.

I,

31, 8, a class of foreign

Afa

T-

339.

stonemasons
' ' '

Vi <^^>

(j (J

^
H 4

,,j^^

L.D.

Ill, 219K, 17.

'i'hey

[y\|'

identified with the

were once Hebrews.

a class of divine beings in the Other World.

[120]
afait
i
,

c-3.
camp, chamber.
Rev., to be

am
P. 655,

',

U. 169,
511. 761, N. 1094,

tent,

__i]

v<

^^>M-

afa
XJ

greedy, a glut-

tonous man.

afa

^
I

evil, 4 'sasi.j

calamity,
crocodile.
,

_fl

afen
to
tie,

_flD

fl
- IJ

to bind,

L=/l
to tie

something on.
,

to eat, to swallow, to devour.

afen-t

^^'^^,
-y,

T.

359,

P.

712,

am-ha-t
0'
'
I

fx

/^
to

"^
feel

J
remorse, to
repent.
to de'

N. 1365, 1387,

Rec. 31, 20,

^^ U
AAV/NA

ID X'

to eat

the heart,

DO
U
i

'V\AAAA

amaama-t --^ 'Z^'\ ^


am-t
..

Sf'

rour.
is

head-cloth, headdress, wig

plur.

^.-^

/^"y

V\

7 Q7, something that


,?

'^Tiaftiut

eaten, food
ftA/Vi/\A
\5i

Rec. 30, 195,

flesh

^^%^ o
,

"If

Hh. 459,

3iK'

for eating.

bandlet.
-

am:
t
(^

-iir=n

III'
,

JlT^

III"

-fl^

afen-t ^ ^

"

'='

"^
Z]

haunt, retreat,

hiding
place.

^^^

food.

AAAAAA

iz

Afnuit
afs

^^^/l/l^
1

I^eHSofl'
,

D Ombos

2,

133, a

amami
am'it

'

'
'

food.

^^

'^

goddess.
III

a disease of the eye.


flesh-food.

Afkiu
aftit
Rec.
8, 171,
,

^^

WJ

'

'

^ S''"P
29,

"'^

sods.

Am

_
title

a%
Tx
1

Nesi-Amsu

32,

36,

Rec.

4,

devourer, a
-flCTl

of Aapep.

1(](]^Rec.i4,8,
c.
I

Am ^^
P. 445,

0 W
Rec.
56,

M.

552, N.

132, a

god who fed on the

hearts of the dead.

3,

Amam
.C2

5-^^|,
J.

'

fl

'I^,

B.D. 145, V, Rev.


J]
!jj

A. X,

9, p.

497,

Rec. 30, 198, box, coffer, chest, coffin,

sarcophagus

Rec. 30, 187, 195, 31,


163, 32. 79-

^, the eater of the dead. eaters (of the dead), Amiu a class of fiends.
j
^

aftch-t
box, chest, sarcophagus.

Am-autiu (?)
AAi&A
'

-^ -^
'
I

'fuat III,

a keeper of the Third Gate.

am am am
:,

^
fl

T o^
v\ ti

fore-arm, thigh

Am-asfetiu
(?)
j

(j

B.

1).

40,

2, 5,

Osiris as the "eater

^
10,

to grasp,

fist.

of sinners."

"fd^'"^ (]e^. Jour. As. 1908,


;

am-a
,

290, to know, to understand

"3^

^ yf "^'^
eiJtxe.
with Osiris.

Rec. 31,

Jour. As. 1908, 313, book-learned; Copt.

"eater of the arm," a mythological pig associated

A
Am-a
Am-a-f
B.I). II, 2, a god.
'j'uat \'I,

[121]
the

A
Am-khu

name of

tlie

pig in the boat.

'k^^
who devoured
Ra.

Tuat VI,

a serpent-god

the shadows and

spirit-souls of the foes of

Amainti kheftiu
Tuat
in the II,

I,

"eater of foes," an avenging goddess

Tuat.

Am-t-teheru
^
ass," the

^^^ n. ^,

"eater of the
I

^\'^^

Tuat

II,

a goddess.

name

of a serpent which attacked the

Sun-god.

amu

^
-a
"^

seed of a certain herb


or plant.

III'
C!f
I
I

*"^^
c

amam
Ifi
,

U)

B.I). 40,

I,

name

of Aapep.

plant or herb.

Amu-aau
Ama-asht

,TuatII,

amm

the roe of a

fish,

eggs, intestines.

an ass-headed god with a knife-shaped phallus.

~^ | ^^ '^^'^^^
fiend.

amu, amaui (?)

^1^)

]]

.^
loom
(?)

pillars.
|,
I

5 j^ many, the name of a

weaving instrument or machine,


'

shuttle of a

Am-baiu
the

'eater of souls,"

amam (amm)
to throw the

name

of a fiend.

boomerang, to catch

in a net ?

Am-mit

Q
\

Tuat

II,

amam_.^^Q,
amam-t
,

a garment, or-

nament.
I
I .

J^
PI.
3,

O
h:
I

estate, parcel of land.

3S

monster, part crocodile, part

lion,

and

part hippopotamus,

^i

^s^

"^^^

amam
ama

(am)

-MID

_^

T>

3D,

places with water in them, wells, pools.

-^

N. 885,

-^ '^,
^
:^^'

T. 288,

devoured the dead.

Am-emit

goddess wiio strengthened the dead.

^ ^ ^,
/|,

M.
B.D. ,68, a

65, *33'

"m./^'
i

^' ^^^' ' ^ sour(of wine).

ama-t
amia

Rec. 29, 148,


Staff.

W
^
,

a kind of stone.
,

an

invisible dog-faced god,

who devoured human


and voided
filth.

ama

__

(2

p:

9^S ^

to

wmnow

gram.

hearts in the River of Fire,

Ama-kha-t
one of the 42 assessors of

Rec. 15, 17,

amam

-^

Osiris.
-

.,Rec.2.,79,

Am

khaibitu,

Amam
!,

khaibitu

t^^l^J^.
know
eiJULe.
i,

understand, to comprehend, to see, to

^f IX

Px

to show, to instruct
Coi)t.

.^'

T,
111

B.D. I2S, ^
;

II,

^\

one of the 42 assessors of

^
Q

amami
fix

-^ t\
,

l_=fi.

Amen.

10,

-^^

Osiris

van

Amen.

14, 17,

"~^

'^

III

A
-3
Amam
a
21,"^!^
\\

[122]

A
amth.

-y
Si, Nesi-AiTisu32,

k^lf'^T^
'"''''''1)

':^kk^!^'"^^''"'^Teiz:;:
A?
''igV,

^^IMTi

storm.
to be languid,- to collapse.

amt

^
Jl (3

>K\

Rec. 14,

_ i2,a nameof Aapep.

Amam-ar.t(?)
,

"3 ^'

^#
ail

^,
to repeat
tract,

Rev. to turn, to turn oneself, to return,

Sinsin 11, a god of the Qerti.

an
;

act, to take back, to retract, to sub-

amam
mS^iii
aman
Rhind Pap.
32, a kind of plant,

agam
;

D Q
*^v

/I

r
1

[I

.^^
,

fl

aaawv, to

be seen
;

again
the seed of the same.

V^ T

/vi^/vw

to seek again

wj^^
to

Amamu ^

f^^^
>e
111

Asiatic

^^

to repeat

^^w^
;

>^\

v\
,

ga

people.

return an answer

^ -^^
i.e.,
'

r-t-ttj^

A. his face

was turned round,


garden
(?)

behind.
Ill, 140B,

Amanh
amar

-^ ^, *
^A^wv

aUU

^^AAAA
ft/VAA/V\

Peasant 299, L.D.

'^e god of the nth hour of the day.


travellers (?) '
^

to return, to turn back.

% ^
.

annu
from f he grave
(Jt

A-, one

who

returns

-^^
1

^
111

'

'

''^"^'^

"'^'^ return.
title

ama, ama
122, clay; Copt.

oQ (][i:i,'^=
OJULG, OAJLI.
,

-^i

R.E.

n,

"the turner back," a

of

Horus.

ama __ ama
ama, amam
("=Tj),

Rec. 30,
T.
I

anan
1

^
/\_

fi^

96, to nurse. a plant


J]

^'
I

to turn

back.
_D
,

anan
(?)
ftAVNAA

ji

g.p

i,

7,

a
a

fl

f=a
suffering

tV

AAAAV\

/WSAAA

Vi

to

hf.l\f^\/\

]y*''^

man

from some defect of

gainsay, to contradict, rejoinder.


_a
_fl

n
;

the sexual organs

plur.

J
-n
;;^

A.
("=0)

A.

o
Copt,

^<.
on

again again, on the contrary

fern.

(=Tfi'

ann

^/ws^^
/^^\AAA

P.

509
_fl

Ann abui (?)

zz:::
;

^^,
is

the god of the

ama_
ama-t

-fl\^

Amen.

24, 13, a disease

Qui'
.i!);^
III

of the sexual organs.


,

24th day of the month

he

gazelle-headed.
C

a liquid.
to

an
make
;

e
,

to paint,

ama_
a herb;
"

designs, to practise the craft of the

artist

Tjii|

ci v\, painted, coloured.


'^

^v^

v^,. the seed of the


g^jj
|,

^Q,

a letter

^f

invitation from a

amaa-t
boomerang, net (?)
;

woman.
Rec. 29, 148,

an mess an rut
j{^

var.

= 11,a kindofland.
221, to be sour (of beer and wine).

a kind painted cloth.


,

cJ^

amati-t __

^e ^,

Rec.

i,

48, a

,,

kind of painted cloth.

Hh.

an nesu
I

jO.,

b.m.

145,

Amu

^, Tuat V, a

fire-god.

v^ww

[i

artist directly

under royal patronage.

'

'

123

A
a kind of dry incense.

O
t>

(wvAAA

JT

-wAAA

Treaty

4, vvawv

an
,

-wA/w

A,AAAA
'

a writing tablet, a
plur.

flat

thin writing board,

t==t

^^

wcll, foutttain

var.
a

plaque ;

^;Heb.r.:;.
O
\J
'VW\/V\

HiU 611

3>I1

VWWA
'

the tablet of the


artist's palette.

an, anti
/VAAAAft

wvw\
A/WAAA ^^yyWN

mud(Lacau).
Copt. eit.

aniu

(?)
I I

plaques,

wooden
tablets.

an

mA, ape;
~"AA/
,

anu
fine
51.

An

Tuat XII, a mythological serpent.

\N :^&:

~vww Vp\

limestone from Ti>rah.

Anit "^^ Q O
1

J G
^
^

Denderah
fl

III, 12, a female counterpart of Osiris.

Tin

/WVNA^

O
D mnD
,

v\
I I I

Peasant

7,

a^aj^s

III

=: 4. a,n"l/ AAAAAA /V

fl

A/\AAAA

fl

a sharp-edged

(3

Cl

^~wv\

em'
g

blocks of hmestone,
"
--5,

,.

or pointed tool, adze, axe, auger, bradawl;

Thes.
J]

08, to turn a glance

an-t
an-tJ

/ww \\
AAAAAA

a knife.

(p

towards something.
_D
,

U. 537,~wv

'

T. 295,

D
A^W^An

.^^_

.^&V7
fj
^^AAAA
,

/v^^AA^^^-^

to
/VWAAA

be pretty or beautiful, beauty, beautiful, pleasant,


delightful, gracious
;

/Ijv^

AAAAA^

Tl

/wAAA

claw of a bird or
;

*w^

f,

[I

splendid.

animal, talon, nail of the hand or foot


yra,
.

plur.

an
man,
a

WAA^ -^&-

VQi, Thes. 1481,

U cii

'-'

!^

^\ "
/)
.

'^^^<~^,

P. 425,

M. 737, N. 1233, I2I3, ^


a\pAA/wv ^Tv ^A^^'v

v^
1^

y^i

Thes. 1482, a

man
;

of noble qualities, a cultured


plur.
jt

^
V^-

>ci, P. 608,

N. 798,

> ^

^
,
I

<::zs><:zs>,

good man
'>~w
\\

M^

P. 612,
'

AAAAAA

Ci

ReC. -^ ^1, 171,


I

/WVA^n

'

'

'

anu
/VWi/VA
J

v\,^^,
1

a beautiful object; dual

JorziD
.vW\AA
I I

fl^i
/\AA/NAA

'

-O e
'
I
I I

(3

;^,
,
I

ftAAAAA
.

(2

1'

I)

X^ O
J

NN

wv^

fl

^?=' to cut
,

_n

the nails;
I,

AAAAAA

-u

to rub

down
q,

the

nails.

anu-na
[o, 9, 10,

-wwv, Vp\

Ik

.^3_, Mar. Aby.

An-t-ent-Ptah
6, " Ptalj's

ww^a ;Xww

b.d. 153H,

wl what

is

pleasing.
AAAAAA

claw," a part of the magical net.


,j7=='

an-t

AAAA/VA

a beautiful

An-t-tep-t-ant-Het-Heru "^^^

goddess, or

woman.
wwv\

j^3~ '^,
.-Xnastasi I, 23,

K^
M-l
AAAAAA

B.D. 153.^

an-ha-t
8,

a
3,11

ci

cl

19, a part of the magical net.

a fine or beautiful disposition, a noble heart.

X^f^j-akind of cattle.
/VNAA/W /\AAAAA AA/NAAA

anu nekhti
B.D.G.
1 1

f\

n
I

A^w^A
1

-w

-^^^"^

y,

o.

.jl-

Jf

anan
'W^A'V\

16,

the beauties of the warrior.


,

An

Z;;;;^

;=^

Berg.

1,

16,

an antelope-

AWV\^

fi

lia

^^

'

^^^ nape of the neck.


1

A/WvAA

headed god who beautified the faces of the dead,

anan, anan-th
I I I

03=3
ring,

^,
I

and removed blemishes from the

skin.

wigs, headdresses.

An-t-mer-mut-s '^^
,

:^ '"^^

"^v^

an-t an-x

^AAAA^

n ^
[0]
)

/-N

seal,

c^

c>

signet.

T.S.B.A.

3,

424, a goddess.

v^AAA

a vase, vessel.

An-em-her ^;^|\ - ^ /r.s.B.A. 3, -^_a>^ W424, agod.


1

annu

vS

Rec. 31,

r8, cords, ropes.

'

[124]
an
-vww
)]
,

A
tft/VWV\
,

/wwv\

Mj

Rec.

8,

I -58,

to cry

U.

igi, T.

71,

M. 225,
"
,

out, to entreat, to

beseech as a captive.
TO, cry, appeal.

"T", '>A~w -, wvjsA

2J),

anani

'^^^

R*

an

AAAAn^'

^^^^, a mythological

fish

see Snt.

^ ^ ankh
U
'

T
;

'

thing, life
,

Copt. tong,.

"T n | " life,

stability, prosperity

am
anu,
Rec.

U. 633, nape of the neck


wwv

(?)

(or,

content)

"

-r c>

^:Z7

T?

-^^z^y

annu
o

^=y

Q
beam
;

III'

(f^ ," life, all

prosperity,

all stability, all

health,

13, 15, a kind of tree.

[and] joy of heart," a formula of good wishes

anu-t

ray of light,

Copt.

which follows each mention of the king's name


in official

onrem.
ulcers, boils, sores.

documents.-

See the following exam-

anut

^ em

/wwAA

30

ples.

ankh
1 VJ^
1

"^
^:z:7

l'-

(152, life

and con-

anutiu(?) "~o^ " '^


""O^'lci

>

^^^c.

14, 42,

tent for ever!

I,

L.D. III, 219E, 17,


(?)

^^^

^^

P.

18,

M.

20,

I.

N. 119,

all life

and content

for ever

a class of foreign workmen

Ana
anart

fl

d'
'w>AA/v

Tuat IX, a god, son of Heruami-uaa, a hawk-headed lion.


ci
ISSlSl

T. 338, N. 626,

life,

strength, health

a kind of worm.

ankh.

cr^

V
'

c-3

-+-

i^^

the

name

of a college of priests.

Anutat=;^](l=^,,.e:::|ij;g^.

ankh

T
I

" repeating

life,"

a formula

used sometimes

in the place
^'^'^,

of maa-kheru.
'9. 184,

f]

O J'
anb

to surround, to bind, to tie, to grip, to clutch, to seize prey.


^

ankh - A

M^

"to
IS

whom
given.

11'*:^

f^,

a bundle.

T|,
living," a title of

r^,

"ever-

anbthema-t

\|s=>^,iv,

gods and kings.


Edict 17, man, citizen.

1124,

ankhu
anb
vine
:

J'^'

^ ^,

J Ip

grape.

,Rec.
iii
!

^\

m
J).
iJi
iii
t

16, 70, citizen;

fem.
1

Heb. 12^.
Peasant
1

^
I

'^
3>

vra

iu
I

basket, crate.

anep anep
anep
moon
;

^^^^v

-1

C>

A~WVA

Ci

U. 192, T. 71,

M. 225, N. 603, Rec.

31. 32,

^CX?

the festival of

'
,

T^
"T

the 2oth day of the month.

a living person (fem.) or thing;


"living
fire."

Ijl

^>

O
of
the

the third quarter of the

ankhi,
one
seven
stars

ankhu
SS
'

'^'^

-^

(]

^^^

-^

of

Orion

(Thes. 112).

T
fv 1^
1

''^

'

'^

''^'"^ l^eing, a living thing;

anem
anem-t
anheb-t

a kind of precious
stone.

falsehood,

lies,

no,
(?)

not so
a kind of bird.

lirSMMi' T

^fl'

'

[125

"living one," a

name

of the

Eye

of

Horus and

of Tefnut.

ankh-ti -^

<b>^,

^^,

the two Eyes

OOO f^ ml' III'


I

living

beings,

men

and women.
S7,

of

Horus

or Ra,

i.e..

Sun and Moon.


(1

ankhu

Ankhi
,

-^

ff
^o,

M.

723,

f ^. N.

-^
life

Tuat X, the god of

time and of the

of Ra.

Ankhit
^
p. 94,

X^
-^

'

T"^* ^^' *'^^ name of a monstrous scorpion

M. 118,

^^J
"^'

Ankhit (?) Ankhit


y,

, Tuat IX, a

fiery,

^^^,N.

1327,

Ti^al'-^^'',

blood-drinking serpent-god.

236, "the living,"

i.e.,

the beatified in heaven.

f
o
-^
1

ll(]^>

house, living place.

f 7^|, f
name
c^,

7~^

i=i

" living one," the

of a goddess.

ankhu nu menflt
military folk.

?^

'

^ t^

'

>

Ankhit

?1

P [U\

^ec n,

178, a uraeus-goddess.

Ankhit
II
1

'^^^'^

Ombos

S^ilir

sons.

O'
'

I, i, 46, a hip])opotamus-goddess.

ankh.

Ankhit
,

-?-

Tuat VII, a womanheaded-serpent.


of Seker.

an amulet.

Ankh-ab
N. 649, "living," the

Tuat V, a guardian of
the river of
fire

name

of a beetle.

Ankh-aru-tchefa
of the

?
III

ankh

-^
\

'

Berl. 2312, a

name

III

u-~sl

tomb.
'he

["2

Jl

Tuat VII, a serpent-guardian of


Afu-Asar.

Ankh-t

$-

"land of

life," i.e.,

Ankhit-unem-unt
Rec
19,89, "life

^^^^U
^V^AAA
1

O'

Ankh

Uas-t

^f'^,

of Thebes," a palace of

Rameses

f
ga
/wvw
,

^.
Rec. 34,
190,

AAAAAA

s.

z3

II.

ankh merr

<=>

^^
,

one of the 12

an amulet.

Thoueris goddesses ; she presided over the month


AAAA/W

ankh neter T
life,"

?-, A.Z. 1908, 16, "god's


I I I

name

of a serpent amulet.
'^17

ankh neter T

Rec.

1 2,

79, a

Ankh-f-em-fentu mm
,

\
Arit.

parcel of sacred ground.

III
personified, the

B.D. 144, the doorkeeper of the 5th

Ankh

-^

%
5lJ'

'"^^

name of
a god.

Ankh-f-em-khaibitu ?-'^'^?'^,
two

ankh ^>.,

star;plur.

^l^, f
Thes.

I,

Tuat XI, a serpent-god with a pair of wings and pairs of human legs and feet from his body
;

sprang Tem, the man-god.

Ankhiu
"living ones,"

-^ *,
1

?
1

^ *,

Ankh - em - fenth
133,

-V-

yw^

-^jfyy,

III

P.

III

Berg.

I,

1 5,

a form of Bes.
1'

>.,

the 36 IJekans.

Ankh ^
P. 672,

^,

Ankh-em-maat ?-'^,

12 a
ruth.

,74,

1
,

^^"i^god of

y ^,

M. 661, N. 1276, the son of


>*;

Ankh-em-neser-t
Berg. II,
9,

f ^^^fj,

the goddess of the 8th hour of the

Sothis,flO^^rp|\,

night.

; ;

126

A
ankhit
-^(jlj,"^
I

Ankhit ent Sebek


n

-f

^^
name
of

^^

'

'

goose-food.

^~^

B.D. 125,

III, 30, the

ankh

I
I

^^, ^"7^,
I

the socket of a bolt in the Hall of Maaii.

^q(]^,,

Ankh-neteru

-^

1
'

vl, 1

'

'

Tuat xii, the

^S, o<^
I I

flower, flowers;

monster serpent through the body of which the Boat of Af was drawn by 1 2 gods daily at dawn.

ankh A

W
M.

.,Y

T''^' plant or wood

"^^-fof
life,

'^,
corn.

i.e.,

Ankhit-ermen (?)
a wind-goddess of dawn.

Tuat XII,
^T-~Si

grain, food.

ankh-t
,

f!H,
ear; dual

A^AA^V\

AAAA/V\

!;

Ankh-her
protector of souls

-^ <

Tuat VI, a guide and

P. 93,
stalk.

117, Rec. 31, 113,

161,

staff,

stick,

and

spirits.

Ankh-hetch
who
touches her
finger.

ankh
,

-V-^,

Tuat X, a goddess

^^4,ff
'S

lips

with the tip of her fore-

Ankh-Septit
a serpent-god

-^

P^\". Tuat VIII,


?

in the Circle Aa-t-setekau.

Ankh-s-meri
derah
II, 11,

^^^~^

i(,

Den-

'^=T the ears of a god; -^^^ - 5L

god's ^^^ /
I

one of the 36 Dekans.

Ankh-ta

?1

""^
I

Tuat X, a serpent-god
'

ankh-ti

n
\\

of the dawn. " the living one," a title of Osiris.

^ Ci I f f^I p ^
p
>

'

the two ears, i.e., leaves of a door.

Ankhti

ankh-ti -^ -^-^S,
O o
,

Rec.

u,

''ft

ankh

^, hT

/VA/V>

/O

/~\

/~\

A/VyV\A

T" "

the two eyes.

(J

^ 111^
oath;

ankh
,

-^

a kind of metal.

to swear

an

^ r\ f
1

, 1

to take an oath

ankhf
;
ft

j!j,

^(^,^^^,^^,
CDl
,

f| ^

to swear a tenfold oath;

life

a mirror;

mirror in

its

case

b the to swear ar by

life

of the god;
I

A.Z. 1908, 20, the

of Pharaoh
;

J|

he swore by the

mirror amulet

^fi

A^G
e.g:,

mirror for

Copt. i.ni.aj.

daily use; of various metals,

V\

ft

ankhshau
ankh-t
goat,

^l^lj^'^.aseal Q(Lacau).
n:7
,

^wva

-r

a vase, vessel

any small domestic animal ;

plur.

X
1

Mar.Karn.54,6o,f^^^|,f o,^.
ankh
f^^/^/w
/"^

W,

unguent.

^^, ^^,

^,
1

Ankh-taui

-^

-^j

"

life

of the

Two

5j^ii

titi'i

if^-if.^, luvia
1
1

Lands," or " Memphis plant."

grain, corn, wheat.

aj^ham ^.j^^,
I

^|^^,
used
in funeral

* Q

victuals, food, viver.s.

^y)< ''^U'

'

a flower

'

[127]

A
antiu - perit-en-antiu
\
III

AAA/^A

seed of the myrrh shrub.

(/

\\

1^ C
S^cl, EuSn

'

T
--

T |\ m
n
"
ftAAAAA

\\
1

'

the seed of the same.

antiu
^A^AA^
III

khet - en - antiu
of the myrrh shrub.
the Myrrh-god.

wood

ankhus

^1^, ^^^as|,milk. "H ^O www Rec. 152, to


r.

Anti
anti

'AAAA^

W
wAAA^

^,

3,

''^

(/

an image made of myrrh,

used

in

funerary ceremonies.

Ansh-senetehemnetchem '^^
^^

?
'

^^^^^-^

S J

^^w^

,<=Ti)i
I

Denderah IV,

59, a bull-god, giiardiati of a coffer,

anq wa^

-L'
,

Rec.

12, 30,

beam of a plough.
/i

Chabas, Pap. Mag. 207, waaa


of Asiatic
origin,

IjO

a war-goddess
the

Anq
or

who was adopted by


them
to

AwvvA
II

a god in the Tuat; see

Egyptians, and stated by


ter

be the daugh-

of Set

Heb. ni^-

Antit

Anqit

^~^AAA

a Nubian water-goddess,
with

O
"

see
AA/WV\

of Sudani origin,

who

Khnemu and

Sati

Antu, Anth

']\'

^AfsAAA

'

see

formed the great


with

triad of

Elephantine and Philae.


p.

Champollion (Pantheon,
'Rrr-in.

20) compared her

Anthet
f.^O>-^

wwva
J)

Diim. H.I.

I,

19; see

Auqiiaaxiiu

^^aa^a v>aaaa AAA/^AA^ Alt. 0-= AANIWV

K. 273

Heb. aj^ip jy, DVip;:.

Anthrta ^^'^^^ ll
j]
ftAA(VV\

(|

Treaty, 28, a

ant, antiu

^^^ ^,

^~
ci

Hittite goddess.

Win

ant

fl

(2

^^.

'

III

o mfnin'
m,
WA~<
v\
ri
\J

^wv^miii' Q W

^
II

AAAAAA

Ci

'

^ \\m'
D
o'

wvA^A
O

2r- to have or possess nothmg,

J^ ^=5^0
A/AA/^

to lack, to want, to be destitute, destitution, to

J]
")

111 O

'

Ulll'

^AAAAA

"

diminish.
)

'^'^BZ:nBz:l\l% -^ 00 Q
...-J
1
1

ant
AAAAAA
^
-t-^

"^^^

W,

the destitute

man

plur.

1,

/wvAA^ o^

o^

myrrh.

AAAAAA
_fl

antiu - antiu uatchiu

ant

AAAA/Vi

Sj

calamity, trouble.

ant-t

the minority, as opposed

antiu
/-AAAA^

antiu en hemut
III
I

to =?=^
ci
III

the majority.

ant

^^^
,

deeds of violence.
xzx:
ci,

^-^ ^U

women's myrrh.
n
V^SAAA
/V^VAAA AAAAArt

3C3C

lU

antiu

antiu nu tekhu

ant
L_=/],

-.

3CX

p^, ^
I
I

x,;.^

X3C >oc
,

<:r^>
"

DCZ5C

>!5^

to cut, to slay

see at

^'>-.

:^'

moist myrrh as opposed to dry myrrh.

J
ant
I

antiu
myrrh

per antiu

AAA/W\

^i

store.

part of a fowling net.

A
ant
5CX
,

[128]
antch
N.
,

A
""

to

know, to perceive.
yzx.

"^

""^,

p.

615,

M.

783,

ant

X3C X
7\
'

X3C
U'

<e=<
to

o
I

be

143, the tip of a wing.

Ci

XJ\

sound, in good condition, to be well, to get


better;
r
/)

antch
antch-t

"t',<.=

P-

643. claw, talon.


nail.

V ^^'
_
,

'""*' ^^''''^'^y' '''^"

) -AA^^^

Rec.

5, 90,

a drug

from which a tincture was prepared.

antch
<--pi, he wlio
is

/VSAAA^

"'^

m
I I

Rec.

2 7,

60,

"
AA/\A/W

^^
\

anti

well.

\ I

sound, firm, healthy, prosperous.

V n\
16,

'

''8^'> radiance,

splendour.

ant-t

Ji<=^> A.Z. 1908,

name

of an amulet.

Antch
the sun

^^

;r-Q-j,

M.

253, a

name

of

ant ant

xr-c

when

in the sky.

bank,

side.

xzx: f 30C

antch
',

^ "^, -wPlI,
AAA/W\
\
B

king.

IjJ

ground,
XJN
III

field,

soil,

antch n_^
cultivated lands
:

:xzx

to

know.

plur.

c:S>
Cl

JT

\\

Antit C XDC ^^
Boat
in

^s^, $^^ss^ Jt'' ^ '^^^' M in^ M, ^U^,


111
,

antch
to

^'~~^*^^'

P-

'^'''

-^'-

9'

be strong, sound, healthy.

^^^'-

165. the

antch

n:^^,^xz>c,^^j,
io: ^^(J(|^^>
strong

which
^Av^

Ra
o
,

sailed from dawn to midday.


''^'^^
,

ant
'

~wAA

^^ o

sound, firm, strong;


,

~^^^

men

see ant.

e^a
.

flV Dra
^0=
III

'

0:0

li\'

C^

Jf

III

antch-ur

"^

>cx

^*

J|,

"^

'^^~^

light.

xrx: 3C3C
nnm
,

>=<
\\

^
111

>::^
e:

O
III
,

>=^ =0=
<=^3iir

^^ jj, B.D. 41,


antch X3C

5,

a guide of the dead.

w
grease,

c^>
Cl
III

fat,

manure;

e^> Jj
000

unguent
il ,

fat,

grease.

^^^^
e

O ^4^

fresh grease; Copt. tJUX.

nil

11

anta

.^
S

Antchet x=x:y^,
ra
III

=
I

^J^,
Ra

^^
N.

n\g,,

AAAA/vv

myrrh.

c>

111
fish.

^ n^

the Boat in which

sailed from
etc.

ant c^> \^

a kind of

sunrise until

noon

see

Mantchet, Matet,
,

Ant-mer pet
A.nti
^^'^^

xr<''==X.D
t
-/I

title

p==i'
II,

of the Nile-god.

antch-t
_fl

^
U.
298, ^

p. 406,
'

M.
', ,

5 80,

1 1

85,

B.D. 125,
;

one of the

M. 709, ,, '
.

42 assessors of Osiris

see Aati.

'^' ",

field,

pasture, lake, pool

antu
f^.^ _2r

=0=
I

Hearst Pap. 11,6, Leyden


I'ap. 4, II, vase, vessel.

Antch-mer
antch-mer
^
^

^,
'^,
,

B.D.G.

130,

antit

form of Osiris worshipped


"JJX^
(J

at Hebit.
p.

vase, vessel, pot.

80,

m. ho.
I,

antiU ^ww^ V^'^^y^

B.

I). 1

30, 30, darkness.

Antu

-wvA^^

^ ,

N. 23,
a locality in the Tuat.

Royal Tombs,

43,

antCh"~ /3, destitute

see

ant

"!^.
a very ancient
the
title

meaning

chief, governor, etc.

antchut
-

"^ V ^^, t^e poor


o
I

wvwv^

ai

destitute.

^^ 111111111, N. 851, the chief of the


gods;

antch

'^a.

XDC
]

a vessel.

'l^n

O ^

IV, 952, the chief of {he nomes.

[129
Antcn-mer
a lake in Sekhet Aaru.

'www B. D.
,

(Nebseni),

5^ ar

-Ssa
,
ii

door ; <ci>

D-ramnr

n irrii

\\

""" "
i

the two leaves r 01 a QOOr.


>

Antch-mer-uatch-ur
B.D.
(Saite),

^<

Y^, w?aa,
n

ar
"

<=>,
1

Rec.

5,

93, a writing tablet;

n n, p.

86,

no, a

lake in Sekhet Aaru.

M. 300, 899, a

writing tablet

with two leaves, or two tally sticks

made

of palm

ar ==>,
-A,

^^.
^'

^3'
j\

wood.

^1^'^^
some one

""", N.
669,

^5*
.^"
,

wooden
<==.,
tiiim
;

objects, poles
Dnm, a

(?).

ar
to

kind of Nubian stone.

come

or go up to

or some-

jl mrm

thing, to ascend; Copt.

^Xe, udX, Heb. H^V.


he

pebble

plur.

000

<-_^>

000
stone of the

<

-2ai

o o

C:^^
ftAJVW\

moun-

an
goes up; plur.
,

who

o
O
-n
>,

'
I

tain, rock.

i!

nn tk
D
,

^
III

ar
a

pill,

grain, pellet.

arar
to

J]

\J

\J

^.

Ar
ar
5j,j,

KJ
,

lOC^
P. 45,
,

N. 31.
finish.

go up, to

rise up, to ascend.

^r

^A.
name

.-On
^j

Henu
^
/]
'

4, to

complete, to

^^AfTt'^'^P^'

j]

Thes. 1205, to be

efficient,

stairs, staircase.

<:zz>

capable.
rhes.

Ar-neb-s
IV, 84, the

_/\^

Denderah

arar
X
Anastasi
I,

1319,

of the and Pylon.

267,

L_J,
make

ar-t ^^^,
26,225,
1296,

"xTt, Peasant

I,

305, Rec.

to bring to

an end,
;

to finish, to repair, to

^^'^S'^j^'Thes.
reed,
sialk

good, to complete
n

Copt.
jO

XooXe, Xa.Xuj.
Rec. 21, 90, 52, to
fall in

rush,

of a

plant,

reed

for

arar
fulfil,

J]

^ ^,

writing; plur.

<=>
'f>

\I.

to agree to a proposition, to

with.

ar-t

Amen.

ar
15,

20,

19,

5,

-Sas
kind of
tree,

oc=>^
a book, a
-^=Ji
roll,

\j
writing, a

terebinth

plur. fj

(3

Heb.

rhvK.
register,
roll,

document, a

leather scroll or
I

^ o^
I I

parchment, deed; plur.

ar

~"

jn^

a kind of shrub.
Anastasi V, 13, 4 ...

^==J c^

X
I I
I

III

arar
ar-t
:

O,
>,

..

^ hA

great rolls of skin.

aru hau
85,

^^^S^^"^

rn

m'^ O M.ral^Y.Rskin,
skin-roll
;

jaw-bone, the lower jaw; dual.


_fl

ax,

day books, daily account books.

-^^^.U-26.
compare Heb.liir.
plur.

.>

Rec. 5,91,30,68,

<=>^^;

^..^

ar-t
ar-t"
Ci

X'
l^
,

.^ ^^

_J?.

The

early Eg)'ptians

thought that the lower jaw was formed of two


parts.

goat,

gazelle,

ibex,

ram, any
7^1;*,

ar-t

:_^,

.,

p.

604: Rec.

29,

horned animal
Eth.

Copt.

eo^fX,

Heb.

156, 3> 67, 3i> 18, haunch,

tail.

UP^:,

Arab.
lion;

S^\, Syr.

^V

arar
ar-t
\7

(^,

rump (?)

tail (?).

ar

^^,

Heb.

''"(M.

a kind of bird.

>

'

, ,

; ;

[130]
ar-t
ar-t
Ci
'v:::^

A
arit, arrit
a nri

'fj,

fire,

flame.

Rec.

II, 178,

^^
,

Thes.

1480;

ci

_2^
W ^
Ci U
,

<:3>_g^iiJV
,

uraeus.

arti
Isis

<::=>

p. P;

the two uraei-goddesses


door.
<===>

and Nephthys <r:> V\ D- |X

TTn

gate, hall of a palace,

judgment
ci
^ I ]

hall,

cabin of a

two great uraei-goddesses.


boat
;

plur.
II, 173.

nn
[J (J

arutankhut
B.D. 125,

<=.Jri

v^i
1

III

Rec.

III, 44, the

Hving uraei.
tstsm
"
,

Arit

arar-t

:^^

^^

'""t

a division of the Tuat.

'Si-

The
c^

Arits were seven in


nil
,

number

<:rr>

(1(1

||

uraeus, uraeus-goddess, uraeus-diadem.

and each was

in

charge of a doorkeeper,

arar-ti

'S\S\
-k -k

^uB\S\I,

III

a watcher, and a herald; see B.D. 144.

the two uraei-goddesses Renenti.

Art
Tomb

^^
of

Tomb

of Seti

^^^
I,

ari ""|)(j[|,

light, fiery

one.

Ari, Arit
Rameses IV,
;

'~~
fl r\

<c::r>,

Annales

87,
1

Q
,

one of the 36 Dekans

Gr. 'Epic.

.i(,

(I

the

name of a Dekan
,

Arit
of
ft
/

tjO

'

Denderah
varr.

II,

10,

one

Gr. A/IOV

^A^A^^

the star of Ari

the
<

36
;

Dekans
,, .

Copt, i-po-if, epo-r,

__fl ickk

or. A/iov.

arit
-Sas

II LI

V"

Ag,

an

internal

organ

of the

body (?)

an
Ari

"

l]ll^,
,

akindoffi.sh.

B.D. 125; see Aati.


breeze, wind.

n
I

storehouse, treasury, magazine.

ari(arri)
shrine,

^|
^ w
T=T
,

ar-t
^B'
chamber.

^^B' s
...

Ariti

arau
Aratsia
185

-"

fl

'^
vi

>S

Rev., outcries of pleasure or pain.

EdfCl

I,

w
of the Nile-god and of his Flood.

79, a

name

U "
\\

(J

^
^~^
,

J,

Rev. II,

arut, arrut

'

^Pu'

^-

^43.

Gr. 'WijOcia.

arM

.2^

c^> /\

c=^> _/]
door, gate, gateway, hall; plur. <::z=>ci

steps, stairs, staircase.

V^n],

^ci,
^
I I
,

Rec.

13,

24,

uraeus;

^^^^^'
=0=11
=51.

two uraei

compare Copt. Olf p^C (?).


iCT]
T)^
,

'-".^[ji'^^"
Q.
,

W
uraeus-goddess. a

arra-t
arait
<

aru
Copt. i-XoY.
plur.

Rev. II, 179, 184, child;

hall,

chamber

aru
<LpHT.

(2

n?^, Rev. 13, 15, perhaps; Copt.

'

A
arb
Copt.

[131]
arq

A 1
,

"^^^IJl, fume, flame, a burning;

the end of anything, the last. the earth.

cX^oSl, eXg^tjo^.

arqta
arp-t
a
,

Rec. 31, 23

A.

1^^ end of
,

arqit
arp-t <:=> D '^

decree, decision, the

vase, pot, vessel.

conclusion of a matter.

arf:

ti,

GO g O,

'^,
OJpq
;

>g,

to
;

grasp,

...,
5.

Rec.

-5,

to enclose, to collect, to twine, to

weave

Copt,

^^5 Y ^^'
;

holder of [many]

<=

Rec.

2,

III,

the
;

end of a

dignities

a pluralist.

period, the last day of the

month

var.

arf^-^,^^,
bag, bundle, packet; plur. '

y o
I

^^|,p,se,
;

(Nastasen Stele)

Copt.

^.XKe
-I

<r=> ^
t^=^lll

^?

ill

sulphate of copper, one of stibium.

1^

^^ vs ^^Jr

T
D

arq renpet

the festival

of the last day of the year.

^111'

'^ P""^"''' "" ^

arqab
finished in heart.

o Thes. 148 1,
,

-0-

Arf ^imsi, ^-^G'^^^_


arn-t(?)

653,

a serpent water-god.

arq

'^^,
I

a beer-pot.

^ ^^ '^
A

a book, roll, writing.

arq
arsh ^^^"^ S
I

' suffer pain, to be in restraint.


,

Rec.

3,

49,

^^

<=>

N\

to tie up, to

wrap up, to cover over, to put

arsh
^^^

^ l^ L-=J,
;

y\ Rev.
12,

86

on a garment,
serpent).

to bind round, to wriggle (of a

Copt. poo-Jfcy.

arsh
305, to be

^ JM^'^'
Df

arq
Jo"""- As., 1908,
;

^
A
,'

'^

girdle, tie,

band^

crx^' Thes.

let,

amazed or stupefied

Copt. OOncy.

arq heh

^^^rri,

1253,

arq

rfi'^^rn'P-4".<i-.
813,

M. 603, N.

1208,

A
L

'=^^^__j,
(2

Rec. 15, 173, necropolis.

Arq-hehtt
Z

^J

World.

^^ ^
A.Z.
,

Ci

Ci
,

the Other

DsC^
vase(?) a

A
,

L.D.ni,i94,:
\J
i.

J
A

arq
measure.

-^,
e

1874,

64,

Zl

Anastasi

IV,

12,

arq
complete,
of, to

<:z>

'jM

part of a chariot.

1^
tWpK.

(i)

to

to con-

J^

arq ur
il

X
II

(2

clude, to finish, to

make an end

abstain
;

(2) to swear an oath, to take an affidavit

Copt.

Sphinx,2,8;[J)^^^,
("^fea],

Q
Jour.

Will

X
^,

\.XA,

silver;

Gr. upyvpoo.

arq

en.

neter

1|.
A
(S

to

swear by God.

artch

gii.
I

As.

1908,

276,

arqu

Rev. 14, 43, pledge,

money

deposit,

money.

fl

^Q?)
sellor,

an educated man, a wise man, coun

ah
= V^

d|^=^,U.
^""^
D g
,

i62,T.i33,
I I I

an expert, an adept.

carobs.
I

; '

"

[132]
ah
-~*^
^'=:^, ^ts--,

A
ahati

moon;

see

(1

fl.

ahj]|^,
ah-t

d|sc^LJ,

Q^^, Q^ o
Anher

^,

"slayer," the
;

title

of a priest of
'

in

Sebennytus

var.

to

till

the ground, to dry tears /f^-

DA
P. 592, net(?)

n-

a IC^ <3, N. 512,

aha Qy^ ^^,


Set animal
(?)

a fighting animal, the

ahu_.fy, ^1^^,.^,
6r5,

p.

aha Q^, QA'^*e=<,


fish,

the "fighting

M.

782,

785, N.

141,

cordage, tackle,

latus Niloticus (?)

ropework.

ah-t
111

|H'
3
'

U. 214, Thes. 1253,

H,

aha-t,
war;

Q^
^>-=^,

a fighting ship, ship of


of the sacred boat of

a large house or building, palace,


chapel.
title

DA

name

Sebennytus.
(3

ah-a
of the

of the high priest

aha

Nome
XJ

Q^
L_=fl
,

Koller Pap.
arrow, spear,

I,

4,

Prosopites.

aha

*^

Rev.,

oxen

DA
war
;

weapon of

plur.

l\^\y^^^'
oxen
;

^''-

'3. 73, sacred

Copt.

^-

aha Q^, U. 5 38, Q^

L=/l

Q^ '^,

DA DA
day of
North.

Q^ "^ L_Jli DA ^
'
I

Mar. ^Karn. 53, 36,


packets of

'
j

weapons of bronze.
Rec. 22, 107,

III

aha-t taui
stele,

DA

Ql^(lll^.
*=^
,

Q^^^.
to

^ the fight between

the South and the

n^

to fight, to

do

battle,

wage war

Ahaui
aha-a
T. 170,

on ^ J% J%
,

N. 755.

DA
31,

q-<^

,
,

U. 560,
"
'

A
^79,

-M:^

1>

DA

Pellegrini II,
i.e.,

B.D.

Ql'^7'
I

^^-

CKi
Ql

75, 5, the

two Warriors,

Horus and

Set.

N. 689,
L_=Z)

Qi
,

L=^I

Dxx^-^
c^!^

DA
to fight, to

B.D.

28, 3, the "Fighters," a

group of gods

in

animal form.

do

Aha-aui
a warrior-god.

q^^'^ rzS

battle, to

wage war.

B.D. 64, 48,

ahati, ahauti,

DA ^^_^>

"=>

Ro"ge

Aha-nebt-benu fv\
Denderah IV,
63, a warrior-god of

^.
^'

Denderah.
^^-

Ahau-heru
'

QA

^ T|.

DA
rior,

'''^tBj

Da ^v
fighter,

^'

warlike man, warbull


;

Qy^ %>

'^,

B.D. 168, the "fighting faces"

soldier,

fighting

Copt.
1

in the Tuat.

^OO-CT

DA ^ ^ OA-^}|i.DA^^. DA
;

plur.

(Kl

Aha-Heru Q:i^.
(

Denderah

III,

36, a

god of Denderah.

Aha-sati-neterui
Denderah
III, 36, a

q^ ^, ^^^

god of Denderah.

[133]
alia Qj^, unlucky, unfavourable, bad,
opposed

to

as

Ahait

Tuat X,
6, 116,

good.
/ <?

Used

in calendars.

-^^,
A/-AA/V\

-|j

(](]

Q,

Rec.

1^,

Rec.

1ana QV^

>=',,

Peasant 278,
AAAAAft
,

Q^ *^ ^wv

to

27, 189, a lioness-goddess.

Ahau
fV^
oneself.

I '^, Tuat

III, a goddess.

Peasant 258,
water, to

IV, 1077, to

make

empty

Aha-ab
U.
277,

O,

Tuat XII, a supporter of

aha

a,

N.

the disk.
719,

Aha-nurt-nef
Tuat VIII, a gate
a
Karn. 52,
fl

Q^^^

in the Tuat.

H
,

^
n

Rec. 13, 30,


still,

|
;

_^,
Copt.

Rec.

6, 8,

Aha-neteru

the door

to stand, to stand

to halt

tW^e.

of the 5 til hour of the night.

aha
-www
,

with

Aha-rer
neteru
;

1*^^^^,

Tuat XII, one of 12

used as an auxiliary verb, e^.,

gods who towed the boat of Af through Ankhas a

dawn-god who was reborn


a

daily.

Aha-sekhet

Mfl' T"^'

^^>

\\
ahaiu

a god

functions unknown.
'

-fftV

p.

408,
1189,

aha, ahait (?) I

Anastasi

I,

243,
'^7,

M. 584, N. 1189,
M?i
I,

o|^^'
who

N.

ID'
I
a

f 'tf'
(^

f |
a

Tf -Q"
nnm
,

^""-

'3.

Rec. 17, 147, those

stand in their

11

nnm

(1 [I

stele, tablet, hill.

appointed places.

ahau neb f

^
,

ahau I
Thes. 1282,

%>

Rec.

20,

40,

station, stele (?) tablet (?)

the royal stand in a temple.

ahau^f_.^QQ2,P.65i,
M.
728,

-A

[1(1

support, prop of the sky,

pillar.

"^ ^T/T ^'

^-

"'

^"""'

daries,

landmarks, delimitation posts.

aha

Rec.

i,

48,

wooden

staff,

prop, stick.
"

ahau

%A

'

'

P'^'^e,

post,

station,

position,

I,

^
stable.

III

condition, state.

supports, things that

make

ahau
of the
festi-

aha

ari I w)

^^5:7,

the

name

of

^.

'I'-

329,

%>o.

U.

val of the 29th

day of the month.

Aha -^ "Mra'

f
68,

-^.
1
'

iisim.

ill'

-!of Set.

12, 118, time,

period of time, litetime, a man's

n,

B.D.

Denderah

III,

age;
6,

if ^o''

1'*"'^''*^

upon

life-

'^'fw^-s-^

a serpent-god, an ally

time; Copt, ^i-g^e.

ahau Rev.
6,

Aha-aha _SJ _fj,

116, a god.

who measure

^^

5^

the lives of

f 5o' men in Anient.


I

"^^

8^'

[134]
aha
o

&
aha
I

IH-^-^^^II

(^,

Q (^,

|(3Q,"|'

'^^W,

advanced

in

life,

aged, very old (of a man).

Am' '^^"fT'Ai'
period of
fll

?l^'
heaps
fl

aha-t

lifetime,

time;

O
a period of ten days.

,^n.
aha en heh I
of millions of years.
W7VWA
'iT
I

11(1,

food,

provisions,

stores,

of

grain, wealth, riches,


a
life

abundance; 9 Pj

""'^

heap offering containing provisions of

all

kinds.

ahai
interval.

00 > ^ standing

still,

pause,

men

provided with
,

stores, well-to-do folk.


jar, vase.

ahait
noon, a

o'loo'f^^^^o'
of the goddess of the 5th hour

name

aha I ^
aha-t
nape

IV, 755,

of the day.

a, I
limbs,

stiff,

hard,

the

of the neck.

Thes. 31, the goddess of the 6th hour of the


day.

aha aha

?,

members

see

ha

ooo

Ahait.-.,
derah

HH

-^

tH|

^, DenI

|;vn\<;, f""~T^,

^a^'
j

^^^'